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Sample records for femoral tunnel orientation

  1. Femoral tunnel malposition in ACL revision reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Joseph A; Dahm, Diane; Levy, Bruce; Stuart, Michael J

    2012-11-01

    The Multicenter Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Revision Study (MARS) group was formed to study a large cohort of revision ACL reconstruction patients. The purpose of this subset analysis study of the MARS database is to describe specific details of femoral tunnel malposition and subsequent management strategies that surgeons chose in the revision setting. The design of this study is a case series. The multicenter MARS database is compiled from a questionnaire regarding 460 ACL reconstruction revision cases returned by 87 surgeons. This subset analysis described technical aspects and operative findings in specifically those cases in which femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the cause of primary ACL reconstruction failure. Of the 460 revisions included for study, 276 (60%) cases cited a specific "technical cause of failure." Femoral tunnel malposition was cited in 219 (47.6%) of 460 cases. Femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the only cause of failure in 117 cases (25.4%). Surgeons judged the femoral tunnel too vertical in 42 cases (35.9%), too anterior in 35 cases (29.9%), and too vertical and anterior in 31 cases (26.5%). Revision reconstruction involved the drilling of an entirely new femoral tunnel in 91 cases (82.1%). For primary reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 82 cases (70.1%). For revision reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 61 cases (52.1%) and allograft tissue in 56 cases (47.9%). Femoral tunnel malposition in primary ACL reconstruction was the most commonly cited reason for graft failure in this cohort. Graft selection is widely variable among surgeons.

  2. Femoral Tunnel Malposition in ACL Revision Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Joseph A.; Dahm, Diane; Levy, Bruce; Stuart, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The Multicenter Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Revision Study (MARS) group was formed to study a large cohort of revision ACL reconstruction patients. The purpose of this subset analysis study of the MARS database is to describe specific details of femoral tunnel malposition and subsequent management strategies that surgeons chose in the revision setting. The design of this study is a case series. The multicenter MARS database is compiled from a questionnaire regarding 460 ACL reconstruction revision cases returned by 87 surgeons. This subset analysis described technical aspects and operative findings in specifically those cases in which femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the cause of primary ACL reconstruction failure. Of the 460 revisions included for study, 276 (60%) cases cited a specific “technical cause of failure.” Femoral tunnel malposition was cited in 219 (47.6%) of 460 cases. Femoral tunnel malposition was cited as the only cause of failure in 117 cases (25.4%). Surgeons judged the femoral tunnel too vertical in 42 cases (35.9%), too anterior in 35 cases (29.9%), and too vertical and anterior in 31 cases (26.5%). Revision reconstruction involved the drilling of an entirely new femoral tunnel in 91 cases (82.1%). For primary reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 82 cases (70.1%). For revision reconstruction, autograft tissue was used in 61 cases (52.1%) and allograft tissue in 56 cases (47.9%). Femoral tunnel malposition in primary ACL reconstruction was the most commonly cited reason for graft failure in this cohort. Graft selection is widely variable among surgeons. PMID:23150344

  3. Editorial Commentary: Anatomic Femoral Tunnel Drilling: Does It Really Matter?

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Erik

    2016-01-01

    An anatomic anteromedial portal and outside-in technique for creating the anterior cruciate ligament femoral tunnel may improve rotational stability but shows no published differences in clinical outcomes. PMID:26743417

  4. The Correlation of Tunnel Position, Orientation and Tunnel Enlargement in Outside-in Single-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young Won; Rhee, Seung Jun; Kim, In Woo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Tunnel widening after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a frequently described phenomenon. The possible etiology is multi-factorial with some mechanical and biological factors. Among those, we intended to determine the relation between the location and orientation of the femoral tunnel and the femoral tunnel enlargement after outside-in single-bundle ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods A retrospective study including 42 patients who received single-bundle ACL reconstruction with the outside-in technique was conducted. Femoral and tibial tunnel locations were evaluated with the quadrant method and bird's-eye view using volume-rendering computed tomography. The angle and diameter of bone tunnel and the degree of tunnel enlargement were evaluated using standard radiographs. Results The degree of femoral tunnel enlargements were 42% and 36% on the anteroposterior (AP) and lateral radiographs, respectively, and the degree of tibial tunnel enlargements were 22% and 23%, respectively. Shallower location of the femoral tunnel was significantly correlated with greater femoral tunnel enlargement on the AP radiograph (r=0.998, p=0.004) and the lateral radiograph (r=0.72, p=0.005) as was the higher location of the femoral tunnel on the AP radiograph (r=-0.47, p=0.01) and the lateral radiograph (r=-0.36, p=0.009) at 12 months after surgery. Conclusions This study revealed that more anterior and higher location and more horizontal orientation of the femoral tunnel in coronal plane could result in widening of the femoral tunnel in outside-in single-bundle ACL reconstruction. PMID:26672479

  5. Effects of femoral tunnel placement on knee laxity and forces in an anterior cruciate ligament graft.

    PubMed

    Markolf, Keith L; Hame, Sharon; Hunter, D Monte; Oakes, Daniel A; Zoric, Bojan; Gause, Paul; Finerman, Gerald A M

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of variation in placement of the femoral tunnel upon knee laxity, graft pretension required to restore normal anterior-posterior (AP) laxity and graft forces following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Two variants in tunnel position were studied: (1) AP position along the medial border of the lateral femoral condyle (at a standard 11 o'clock notch orientation) and (2) orientation along the arc of the femoral notch (o'clock position) at a fixed distance of 6-7 mm anterior to the posterior wall. AP laxity and forces in the native ACL were measured in fresh frozen cadaveric knee specimens during passive knee flexion-extension under the following modes of tibial loading: no external tibial force, anterior tibial force, varus-valgus moment, and internal-external tibial torque. One group (15 specimens) was used to determine effects of AP tunnel placement, while a second group (14 specimens) was used to study variations in o'clock position of the femoral tunnel within the femoral notch. A bone-patellar tendon-bone graft was placed into a femoral tunnel centered at a point 6-7 mm anterior to the posterior wall at the 11 o'clock position in the femoral notch. A graft pretension was determined such that AP laxity of the knee at 30 deg of flexion was restored to within 1 mm of normal; this was termed the laxity match pretension. All tests were repeated with a graft in the standard 11 o'clock tunnel, and then with a graft in tunnels placed at other selected positions. Varying placement of the femoral tunnel 1 h clockwise or counterclockwise from the 11 o'clock position did not significantly affect any biomechanical parameter measured in this study, nor did placing the graft 2.5 mm posteriorly within the standard 11 o'clock femoral tunnel. Placing the graft in a tunnel 5.0 mm anterior to the standard 11 o'clock tunnel increased the mean laxity match pretension by 16.8 N (62%) and produced a knee which was on

  6. Direct Visualization of Existing Footprint and Outside-In Drilling of the Femoral Tunnel in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, E. Grant; Anderson, John A.; Garrett, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Improper femoral tunnel placement in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a significant problem and may be a cause of ACL graft failure and abnormal kinematics, which may lead to late degenerative changes after reconstruction. Recently, there has been concern that the transtibial approach may contribute to nonanatomic placement of the femoral tunnel, resulting in abnormal knee kinematics. Tibial-independent techniques can provide more anatomic placement of the ACL graft, but these can be technically demanding. This technical note describes the senior author's technique to directly identify the femoral ACL remnant and use the center of the femoral ACL footprint and retrograde drilling to create an anatomic femoral socket for single-bundle reconstruction. This technique provides femoral tunnel placement based on identification of a patient-specific ACL footprint instead of averaged anatomic measurements from large groups. This technique has been shown to produce anatomic ACL graft position and orientation and restore more normal knee kinematics. PMID:26052485

  7. Femoral interference screw placement through the tibial tunnel: a novel method without graft damage.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Ching-Jen

    2006-11-01

    A frequently encountered problem in endoscopic 1-incision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is the difficulty involved in accurately inserting the femoral interference screw without significant and undesirable divergence between the screw and the graft when a femoral interference screw is fixed through the anteromedial portal. To minimize divergence, the authors demonstrated a modified, easy, and reproducible procedure that can be performed without causing graft injury or requiring special instrumentation. A ligament reconstruction route is created with the use of an ACL guide system. Lead graft sutures are pulled through the anteromedial portal by way of the femoral tunnel and out the anterolateral thigh first. The tendon graft is then inserted through the anteromedial portal and up into the femoral tunnel. A guidewire is introduced through the tibial tunnel into the femoral tunnel. An appropriately sized BioScrew (Linvatec, Largo, FL) is inserted, with the use of a guidewire inside the screw, through the tibial tunnel into the femoral tunnel. The graft is then retrieved through the anteromedial portal and is inserted through the tibial tunnel. Finally, the tendon graft in the tibial tunnel is similarly fixed with a BioScrew of the same size. Moreover, this novel approach is feasible for all tendon grafts (bone-patellar tendon-bone grafts, quadriceps tendon-patellar bone grafts, and hamstring tendon grafts). PMID:17084309

  8. THA Retrievals: The Need to Mark the Anatomic Orientation of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Heiner, Anneliese D.; Kruger, Karen M.; Tikekar, Nishant M.; Callaghan, John J.; Lannutti, John J.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that the rotational orientation of femoral head damage would greatly affect the volumetric wear rate of the opposing polyethylene (PE) liner. Damage on twenty retrieved cobalt-chromium femoral heads was simulated in a validated damage-feature-based finite element model. For each individual retrieval, the anatomic orientation of the femoral head about the femoral neck axis was systematically varied, in 30° increments. The PE wear rate differential between the maximum-versus minimum-wear orientations was often sizable, as high as 7-fold. Knowing the correct femoral head anatomic orientation is therefore important when analyzing the effects of femoral head damage on PE liner wear. Surgeons retrieving modular femoral heads should routinely mark the anatomic orientation of those components. PMID:25682206

  9. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Guo, Lancia L. Q.; Tan, Kong T.; Simons, Martin E.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Kachura, John R.; Beecroft, John R.; Rajan, Dheeraj K.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  10. A three-dimensional axis for the study of femoral neck orientation

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Noémie; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Simonis, Caroline; Puymerail, Laurent; Baylac, Michel; Tardieu, Christine; Gagey, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    A common problem in the quantification of the orientation of the femoral neck is the difficulty to determine its true axis; however, this axis is typically estimated visually only. Moreover, the orientation of the femoral neck is commonly analysed using angles that are dependent on anatomical planes of reference and only quantify the orientation in two dimensions. The purpose of this study is to establish a method to determine the three-dimensional orientation of the femoral neck using a three-dimensional model. An accurate determination of the femoral neck axis requires a reconsideration of the complex architecture of the proximal femur. The morphology of the femoral neck results from both the medial and arcuate trabecular systems, and the asymmetry of the cortical bone. Given these considerations, two alternative models, in addition to the cylindrical one frequently assumed, were tested. The surface geometry of the femoral neck was subsequently used to fit one cylinder, two cylinders and successive cross-sectional ellipses. The model based on successive ellipses provided a significantly smaller average deviation than the two other models (P < 0.001) and reduced the observer-induced measurement error. Comparisons with traditional measurements and analyses on a sample of 91 femora were also performed to assess the validity of the model based on successive ellipses. This study provides a semi-automatic and accurate method for the determination of the functional three-dimensional femoral neck orientation avoiding the use of a reference plane. This innovative method has important implications for future studies that aim to document and understand the change in the orientation of the femoral neck associated with the acquisition of a bipedal gait in humans. Moreover, the precise determination of the three-dimensional orientation has implications in current research involved in developing clinical applications in diagnosis, hip surgery and rehabilitation. PMID:22967192

  11. RISKS AND CONSEQUENCES OF USING THE TRANSPORTAL TECHNIQUE IN RECONSTRUCTING THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE FEMORAL TUNNEL, LATERAL SUPERIOR GENICULAR ARTERY AND LATERAL EPICONDYLE OF THE FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Astur, Diego Costa; Aleluia, Vinicius; Santos, Ciro Veronese; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Badra, Ricardo; Oliveira, Saulo Gomes; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Define a security zone to avoid possibles vascular and ligamentar complications during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Methods: Arthroscopic reconstruction using the transtibial and transportal technique in cadaver knees was performed followed by dissection and measurement of the distance between the femoral tunnel and the proximal attachment of the lateral collateral ligament and the femoral tunnel and the lateral superior genicular artery. Results: The measure of the analysed distances show us an aproximation between the major branch of the lateral superior genicular artery and the femoral insertion of the colateral lateral ligament and the femoral tunnel during the transportal technique. Conclusion: We realize that the use of technical ship it to arthroscopic ACL reconstruction has a higher probability of injury to the lateral geniculate artery and insertion of the lateral collateral ligament, promoting post-surgical complications such as instability of the knee, osteonecrosis of the femoral condyle and ligamentização graft. PMID:27047873

  12. Orientation and depth estimation for femoral components using image sensor, magnetometer and inertial sensors in THR surgeries.

    PubMed

    Jiyang Gao; Shaojie Su; Hong Chen; Zhihua Wang

    2015-08-01

    Malposition of the acetabular and femoral component has long been recognized as an important cause of dislocation after total hip replacement (THR) surgeries. In order to help surgeons improve the positioning accuracy of the components, a visual-aided system for THR surgeries that could estimate orientation and depth of femoral component is proposed. The sensors are fixed inside the femoral prosthesis trial and checkerboard patterns are printed on the internal surface of the acetabular prosthesis trial. An extended Kalman filter is designed to fuse the data from inertial sensors and the magnetometer orientation estimation. A novel image processing algorithm for depth estimation is developed. The algorithms have been evaluated under the simulation with rotation quaternion and translation vector and the experimental results shows that the root mean square error (RMSE) of the orientation estimation is less then 0.05 degree and the RMSE for depth estimation is 1mm. Finally, the femoral head is displayed in 3D graphics in real time to help surgeons with the component positioning. PMID:26736858

  13. Orientation and depth estimation for femoral components using image sensor, magnetometer and inertial sensors in THR surgeries.

    PubMed

    Jiyang Gao; Shaojie Su; Hong Chen; Zhihua Wang

    2015-08-01

    Malposition of the acetabular and femoral component has long been recognized as an important cause of dislocation after total hip replacement (THR) surgeries. In order to help surgeons improve the positioning accuracy of the components, a visual-aided system for THR surgeries that could estimate orientation and depth of femoral component is proposed. The sensors are fixed inside the femoral prosthesis trial and checkerboard patterns are printed on the internal surface of the acetabular prosthesis trial. An extended Kalman filter is designed to fuse the data from inertial sensors and the magnetometer orientation estimation. A novel image processing algorithm for depth estimation is developed. The algorithms have been evaluated under the simulation with rotation quaternion and translation vector and the experimental results shows that the root mean square error (RMSE) of the orientation estimation is less then 0.05 degree and the RMSE for depth estimation is 1mm. Finally, the femoral head is displayed in 3D graphics in real time to help surgeons with the component positioning.

  14. Functional integrative analysis of the human hip joint: the three-dimensional orientation of the acetabulum and its relation with the orientation of the femoral neck.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, Noémie; Baylac, Michel; Gagey, Olivier; Tardieu, Christine

    2014-04-01

    In humans, the hip joint occupies a central place in the locomotor system, as it plays an important role in body support and the transmission of the forces between the trunk and lower limbs. The study of the three-dimensional biomechanics of this joint has important implications for documenting the morphological changes associated with the acquisition of a habitual bipedal gait in humans. Functional integration at any joint has important implications in joint stability and performance. The aim of the study was to evaluate the functional integration at the human hip joint. Both the level of concordance between the three-dimensional axes of the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture, and patterns of covariation between these two axes were analysed. First, inter-individual variations were quantified and significant differences in the three-dimensional orientations of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck were detected. On a sample of 57 individuals, significant patterns of covariation were identified, however, the level of concordance between the axes of both the acetabulum and the femoral neck in a bipedal posture was lower than could be expected for a key joint such as the hip. Patterns of covariation were explored regarding the complex three-dimensional biomechanics of the full pelvic-femoral complex. Finally, we suggest that the lower degree of concordance observed at the human hip joint in a bipedal posture might be partly due to the phylogenetic history of the human species.

  15. The Potentially Positive Role of PRPs in Preventing Femoral Tunnel Widening in ACL Reconstruction Surgery Using Hamstrings: A Clinical Study in 51 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Starantzis, Konstantinos A.; Mastrokalos, Dimitrios; Koulalis, Dimitrios; Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Soucacos, Panayiotis N.; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, the early and midterm clinical and radiological results of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery with or without the use of platelet rich plasma (PRP) focusing on the tunnel-widening phenomenon are evaluated. Methods. This is a double blind, prospective randomized study. 51 patients have completed the assigned protocol. Recruited individuals were divided into two groups: a group with and a group without the use of PRPs. Patients were assessed on the basis of MRI scans, which were performed early postoperatively and repeated at least one-year postoperatively. The diameter was measured at the entrance, at the bottom, and at the mid distance of the femoral tunnel. Results. Our study confirmed the existence of tunnel widening as a phenomenon. The morphology of the dilated tunnels was conical in both groups. There was a statistical significant difference in the mid distance of the tunnels between the two groups. This finding may support the role of a biologic response secondary to mechanical triggers. Conclusions. The use of RPRs in ACL reconstruction surgery remains a safe option that could potentially eliminate the biologic triggers of tunnel enlargement. The role of mechanical factors, however, remains important. PMID:26464895

  16. Evaluating the distance between the femoral tunnel centers in anatomic double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a computer simulation

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yasutaka; Okazaki, Ken; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to clarify the distance between the anteromedial (AM) bundle and posterolateral (PL) bundle tunnel-aperture centers by simulating the anatomical femoral tunnel placement during double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using 3-D computer-aided design models of the knee, in order to discuss the risk of tunnel overlap. Relationships between the AM to PL center distance, body height, and sex difference were also analyzed. Patients and methods The positions of the AM and PL tunnel centers were defined based on previous studies using the quadrant method, and were superimposed anatomically onto the 3-D computer-aided design knee models from 68 intact femurs. The distance between the tunnel centers was measured using the 3-D DICOM software package. The correlation between the AM–PL distance and the subject’s body height was assessed, and a cutoff height value for a higher risk of overlap of the AM and PL tunnel apertures was identified. Results The distance between the AM and PL centers was 10.2±0.6 mm in males and 9.4±0.5 mm in females (P<0.01). The AM–PL center distance demonstrated good correlation with body height in both males (r=0.66, P<0.01) and females (r=0.63, P<0.01). When 9 mm was defined as the critical distance between the tunnel centers to preserve a 2 mm bony bridge between the two tunnels, the cutoff value was calculated to be a height of 160 cm in males and 155 cm in females. Conclusion When AM and PL tunnels were placed anatomically in simulated double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, the distance between the two tunnel centers showed a strong positive correlation with body height. In cases with relatively short stature, the AM and PL tunnel apertures are considered to be at a higher risk of overlap when surgeons choose the double-bundle technique. PMID:26170727

  17. Atomistic Insights into the Oriented Attachment of Tunnel-Based Oxide Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yifei; Wood, Stephen M; He, Kun; Yao, Wentao; Tompsett, David; Lu, Jun; Nie, Anmin; Islam, M Saiful; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2016-01-26

    Controlled synthesis of nanomaterials is one of the grand challenges facing materials scientists. In particular, how tunnel-based nanomaterials aggregate during synthesis while maintaining their well-aligned tunneled structure is not fully understood. Here, we describe the atomistic mechanism of oriented attachment (OA) during solution synthesis of tunneled α-MnO2 nanowires based on a combination of in situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM), aberration-corrected scanning TEM with subangstrom spatial resolution, and first-principles calculations. It is found that primary tunnels (1 × 1 and 2 × 2) attach along their common {110} lateral surfaces to form interfaces corresponding to 2 × 3 tunnels that facilitate their short-range ordering. The OA growth of α-MnO2 nanowires is driven by the stability gained from elimination of {110} surfaces and saturation of Mn atoms at {110}-edges. During this process, extra [MnOx] radicals in solution link the two adjacent {110} surfaces and bond with the unsaturated Mn atoms from both surface edges to produce stable nanowire interfaces. Our results provide insights into the controlled synthesis and design of nanomaterials in which tunneled structures can be tailored for use in catalysis, ion exchange, and energy storage applications. PMID:26649473

  18. Atomistic Insights Into the Oriented Attachment of Tunnel-Based Oxide Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Yifei; Wood, Stephen M; He, Kun; Yao, Wentao; Tompsett, David; Lu, Jun; Nie, Anmin; Islam, M. Saiful; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Controlled synthesis of nanomaterials is one of the grand challenges facing materials scientists. In particular, how tunnel-based nanomaterials aggregate during synthesis while maintaining their well-aligned tunneled structure is not fully understood. Here, we describe the atomistic mechanism of oriented attachment (OA) during solution synthesis of tunneled α-MnO2 nanowires based on a combination of in situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM), aberration-corrected scanning TEM with subangstrom spatial resolution, and first-principles calculations. It is found that primary tunnels (1 × 1 and 2 × 2) attach along their common {110} lateral surfaces to form interfaces corresponding to 2 × 3 tunnels that facilitate their short-range ordering. The OA growth of α-MnO2 nanowires is driven by the stability gained from elimination of {110} surfaces and saturation of Mn atoms at {110}-edges. During this process, extra [MnOx] radicals in solution link the two adjacent {110} surfaces and bond with the unsaturated Mn atoms from both surface edges to produce stable nanowire interfaces. Our results provide insights into the controlled synthesis and design of nanomaterials in which tunneled structures can be tailored for use in catalysis, ion exchange, and energy storage applications.

  19. Resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of Mn12 acetate

    DOE PAGES

    Lendínez, S.; Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Terban, M. W.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Espin, J.; Imaz, I.; Maspoch, D.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-01-06

    We report measurements and theoretical analysis of resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of a molecular magnet. Amorphous nanospheres of Mn₁₂ acetate have been fabricated and characterized by chemical, infrared, TEM, X-ray, and magnetic methods. Magnetic measurements have revealed sharp tunneling peaks in the field derivative of the magnetization that occur at the typical resonant field values for the Mn₁₂ acetate crystal in the field parallel to the easy axis.Theoretical analysis is provided that explains these observations. We argue that resonant spin tunneling in a molecular magnet can be established in a powder sample, without the need for amore » single crystal and without aligning the easy magnetization axes of the molecules. This is confirmed by re-analyzing the old data on a powdered sample of non-oriented micron-size crystals of Mn₁₂ acetate. In conclusion, our findings can greatly simplify the selection of candidates for quantum spin tunneling among newly synthesized molecular magnets.« less

  20. Induced Superconductivity and Engineered Josephson Tunneling Devices in Epitaxial (111)-Oriented Gold/Vanadium Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Wei, Peng; Katmis, Ferhat; Chang, Cui-Zu; Moodera, Jagadeesh S

    2016-04-13

    We report a unique experimental approach to create topological superconductors by inducing superconductivity into epitaxial metallic thin film with strong spin-orbit coupling. Utilizing molecular beam epitaxy technique under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, we are able to achieve (111) oriented single phase of gold (Au) thin film grown on a well-oriented vanadium (V) s-wave superconductor film with clean interface. We obtained atomically smooth Au thin films with thicknesses even down to below a nanometer showing near-ideal surface quality. The as-grown V/Au bilayer heterostructure exhibits superconducting transition at around 3.9 K. Clear Josephson tunneling and Andreev reflection are observed in S-I-S tunnel junctions fabricated from the epitaxial bilayers. The barrier thickness dependent tunneling and the associated subharmonic gap structures (SGS) confirmed the induced superconductivity in Au (111), paving the way for engineering thin film heterostructures based on p-wave superconductivity and nano devices exploiting Majorana Fermions for quantum computing.

  1. Induced Superconductivity and Engineered Josephson Tunneling Devices in Epitaxial (111)-Oriented Gold/Vanadium Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Wei, Peng; Katmis, Ferhat; Chang, Cui-Zu; Moodera, Jagadeesh S

    2016-04-13

    We report a unique experimental approach to create topological superconductors by inducing superconductivity into epitaxial metallic thin film with strong spin-orbit coupling. Utilizing molecular beam epitaxy technique under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, we are able to achieve (111) oriented single phase of gold (Au) thin film grown on a well-oriented vanadium (V) s-wave superconductor film with clean interface. We obtained atomically smooth Au thin films with thicknesses even down to below a nanometer showing near-ideal surface quality. The as-grown V/Au bilayer heterostructure exhibits superconducting transition at around 3.9 K. Clear Josephson tunneling and Andreev reflection are observed in S-I-S tunnel junctions fabricated from the epitaxial bilayers. The barrier thickness dependent tunneling and the associated subharmonic gap structures (SGS) confirmed the induced superconductivity in Au (111), paving the way for engineering thin film heterostructures based on p-wave superconductivity and nano devices exploiting Majorana Fermions for quantum computing. PMID:26943807

  2. Fabrication of [001]-oriented tungsten tips for high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chaika, A. N.; Orlova, N. N.; Semenov, V. N.; Postnova, E. Yu.; Krasnikov, S. A.; Lazarev, M. G.; Chekmazov, S. V.; Aristov, V. Yu.; Glebovsky, V. G.; Bozhko, S. I.; Shvets, I. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the [001]-oriented single crystalline tungsten probes sharpened in ultra-high vacuum using electron beam heating and ion sputtering has been studied using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The electron microscopy data prove reproducible fabrication of the single-apex tips with nanoscale pyramids grained by the {011} planes at the apexes. These sharp, [001]-oriented tungsten tips have been successfully utilized in high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy imaging of HOPG(0001), SiC(001) and graphene/SiC(001) surfaces. The electron microscopy characterization performed before and after the high resolution STM experiments provides direct correlation between the tip structure and picoscale spatial resolution achieved in the experiments. PMID:24434734

  3. Mechanism of Orientation-Dependent Asymmetric Charge Transport in Tunneling Junctions Comprising Photosystem I

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recently, photoactive proteins have gained a lot of attention due to their incorporation into bioinspired (photo)electrochemical and solar cells. This paper describes the measurement of the asymmetry of current transport of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of the entire photosystem I (PSI) protein complex (not the isolated reaction center, RCI), on two different “director SAMs” supported by ultraflat Au substrates. The director SAMs induce the preferential orientation of PSI, which manifest as asymmetry in tunneling charge-transport. We measured the oriented SAMs of PSI using eutectic Ga–In (EGaIn), a large-area technique, and conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM), a single-complex technique, and determined that the transport properties are comparable. By varying the temperatures at which the measurements were performed, we found that there is no measurable dependence of the current on temperature from ±0.1 to ±1.0 V bias, and thus, we suggest tunneling as the mechanism for transport; there are no thermally activated (e.g., hopping) processes. Therefore, it is likely that relaxation in the electron transport chain is not responsible for the asymmetry in the conductance of SAMs of PSI complexes in these junctions, which we ascribe instead to the presence of a large, net dipole moment present in PSI. PMID:26057523

  4. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction Modeling of the Spatial Displacement, Extent and Rotational Orientation of Undisplaced Femoral Neck Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xin; Xu, Gui-Jun; Li, Zhi-Jun; Du, Chang-Ling; Han, Zhe; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Xinlong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to employ a new three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and modeling method to measure displacement of undisplaced femoral neck fractures (Garden stages I and II). We also aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Garden classification for determining the displacement of undisplaced femoral neck fractures. A total of 120 consecutive patients with undisplaced femoral neck fractures were enrolled between 2012 and 2014, including 60 within the Garden I group and 60 within the Garden II group. The displacements of the femoral head center (d1) and the lowest point of the fovea capitis femoris (d2) and rotational displacement of the femoral head (α) in the 3D model were measured with 3D computed tomography reconstruction and modeling. Five observers, trauma surgeons, were asked to found the centers of the femoral heads and the deepest points of the foveae. The intraobserver and inter-observer agreements were calculated using Fleiss’ kappa. The inter-observer and intra-observer kappa values were 0.937 and 0.985, respectively. Current method has good reliability. We discovered that many participants in our study had been misclassified by an anterior–posterior radiograph as having an “incomplete” fracture. In incomplete fracture of Garden stage I group, the average displacements d1 and d2 were 3.69 ± 1.77 mm and 14.51 ± 1.91 mm, respectively. The mean α was 4.91° ± 2.49°. For impacted fracture of Garden stage I, significant spatial displacement in the impacted fractures was observed (d1: 6.22 ± 3.36 mm; d2: 10.30 ± 5.73 mm; and α: 17.83° ± 10.72°). Similarly, significant spatial displacement was observed among the Garden stage II group (d1: 7.16 ± 4.58 mm; d2: 12.95 ± 8.25 mm; and α: 18.77° ± 9.10°). There was no significant difference in α, d1, and d2 between impacted fracture and Garden stage II groups (P > 0.05). However, significant differences were found between

  5. Differentiating amino acid residues and side chain orientations in peptides using scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Claridge, Shelley A; Thomas, John C; Silverman, Miles A; Schwartz, Jeffrey J; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Weiss, Paul S

    2013-12-11

    Single-molecule measurements of complex biological structures such as proteins are an attractive route for determining structures of the large number of important biomolecules that have proved refractory to analysis through standard techniques such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance. We use a custom-built low-current scanning tunneling microscope to image peptide structures at the single-molecule scale in a model peptide that forms β sheets, a structural motif common in protein misfolding diseases. We successfully differentiate between histidine and alanine amino acid residues, and further differentiate side chain orientations in individual histidine residues, by correlating features in scanning tunneling microscope images with those in energy-optimized models. Beta sheets containing histidine residues are used as a model system due to the role histidine plays in transition metal binding associated with amyloid oligomerization in Alzheimer's and other diseases. Such measurements are a first step toward analyzing peptide and protein structures at the single-molecule level.

  6. What is the orientation of the tip in a scanning tunneling microscope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mándi, Gábor; Teobaldi, Gilberto; Palotás, Krisztián

    2015-05-01

    The atomic structure and electronic properties of the tip apex can strongly affect the contrast of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images. This is a critical issue in STM imaging given the, to date unsolved, experimental limitations in precise control of the tip apex atomic structure. Definition of statistically robust procedures to indirectly obtain information on the tip apex structure is highly desirable as it would open up for more rigorous interpretation and comparison of STM images from different experiments. To this end, here we introduce a statistical correlation analysis method to obtain information on the local geometry and orientation of the tip used in STM experiments based on large scale simulations. The key quantity is the relative brightness correlation of constant-current topographs between experimental and simulated data. This correlation can be analyzed statistically for a large number of modeled tip orientations and geometries. Assuming a stable tip during the STM scans and based on the correlation distribution, it is possible to determine the tip orientations that are most likely present in an STM experiment, and exclude other orientations. This is especially important for substrates such as highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) since its STM contrast is strongly tip dependent, which makes interpretation and comparison of STM images very challenging. We illustrate the applicability of our method considering the HOPG surface in combination with tungsten tip models of two different apex geometries and 18,144 different orientations. We calculate constant-current profiles along the < 1 1 bar 0 0 > direction of the HOPG(0 0 0 1) surface in the | V | ⩽ 1V bias voltage range, and compare them with experimental data. We find that a blunt tip model provides better correlation with the experiment for a wider range of tip orientations and bias voltages than a sharp tip model. Such a combination of experiments and large scale simulations opens up

  7. Prior classical olfactory conditioning improves odour-cued flight orientation of honey bees in a wind tunnel.

    PubMed

    Chaffiol, Antoine; Laloi, David; Pham-Delègue, Minh-Hà

    2005-10-01

    Odours are key cues used by the honey bee in various situations. They play an important role in sexual attraction, social behaviour and location of profitable food sources. Here, we were interested in the role of odours in orientation at short distance, for instance the approach flight to a floral patch or in close proximity to the hive entrance. Using a newly designed wind tunnel, we investigated the orientation behaviour of the bee towards two different odours: a social odour and a floral component, linalool. We then tested the effect of prior olfactory conditioning (conditioning of the proboscis extension reflex) on subsequent flight orientation. We showed that both stimuli induced orientated behaviour (orientated flights, circling around the odour source) in up to 70% of the worker bees, social odour being slightly more attractive than the linalool. We found thereafter that orientation performance towards the floral compound can be significantly enhanced by prior classical olfactory learning. This type of information transfer, from a Pavlovian associative context to an orientation task, might allow future foragers to acquire, within the hive, relevant information about the odours and food they will encounter during their later foraging bouts.

  8. Arthroscopically confirmed femoral button deployment.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Rezende, Fernando C; Martins Neto, Ayrton; Fayard, Jean M; Thaunat, Mathieu; Kader, Deiary F

    2014-06-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is a graft suspension device for cruciate ligament reconstruction. It is an adjustable-length graft loop cortical fixation device designed to eliminate the requirement for loop length calculation and to facilitate complete graft fill of short femoral sockets that are common with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament placement. The adjustable loop length means "one size fits all," thus removing the need for multiple implant sizes and allowing graft tensioning even after fixation. However, the device has been associated with the same complications that have been described with EndoButton (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA) fixation. The button of the TightRope RT may remain in the femoral tunnel rather than flipping outside of the tunnel to rest on the lateral femoral cortex, or it may become jammed inside the femoral canal. Conversely, the button may be pulled too far off the femoral cortex into the overlying soft tissue and flip in the substance of the vastus lateralis. We describe a new and simple arthroscopic technique to directly visualize the deployment and seating of the TightRope button on the lateral cortex of the femur to avoid all the aforementioned complications. PMID:25126492

  9. Arthroscopically confirmed femoral button deployment.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Rezende, Fernando C; Martins Neto, Ayrton; Fayard, Jean M; Thaunat, Mathieu; Kader, Deiary F

    2014-06-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament TightRope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is a graft suspension device for cruciate ligament reconstruction. It is an adjustable-length graft loop cortical fixation device designed to eliminate the requirement for loop length calculation and to facilitate complete graft fill of short femoral sockets that are common with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament placement. The adjustable loop length means "one size fits all," thus removing the need for multiple implant sizes and allowing graft tensioning even after fixation. However, the device has been associated with the same complications that have been described with EndoButton (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA) fixation. The button of the TightRope RT may remain in the femoral tunnel rather than flipping outside of the tunnel to rest on the lateral femoral cortex, or it may become jammed inside the femoral canal. Conversely, the button may be pulled too far off the femoral cortex into the overlying soft tissue and flip in the substance of the vastus lateralis. We describe a new and simple arthroscopic technique to directly visualize the deployment and seating of the TightRope button on the lateral cortex of the femur to avoid all the aforementioned complications.

  10. POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH AUTOGRAFT OF THE DOUBLE SEMITENDINOSUS MUSCLES AND MIDDLE THIRD OF THE QUADRICEPS TENDON WITH DOUBLE FEMORAL AND SINGLE TIBIAL TUNNELS: CLINICAL RESULTS IN TWO YEARS FOLLOW UP

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Ricardo de Paula Leite; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Aihara, Tatsuo; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; Avakian, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the surgical aspects that may offer good anatomic and functional results in posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using an autologous graft of the quadriceps tendon and double semitendinosus through a double femoral tunnel. Methods: Fourteen patients with isolated PCL lesions, instability and pain were operated on by arthroscopy and evaluated according to the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scales. Posterior knee laxity was examined with a KT1000 arthrometer. Results: The mean postoperative posterior side-to-side difference was between 0-2 mm in 57.1% of patients and between 3 and 5 mm in 35.7% of cases. The average Lysholm score was 93 points in the final follow-up. In the IKDC evaluation, 3 patients were graded A, 10 were graded B, and 1 patient was graded C. Conclusions: Double bundle arthroscopic PCL reconstruction based on the anatomical positioning of the tunnels, with double semitendinosus tendon and single quadriceps, provides a clinically evident reduction in symptoms and restores satisfactory stability, although no statistically significant difference was found due to the small sample. PMID:27027083

  11. Contrast stability and 'stripe' formation in scanning tunnelling microscopy imaging of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: the role of STM-tip orientations.

    PubMed

    Mándi, Gábor; Teobaldi, Gilberto; Palotás, Krisztián

    2014-12-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is an important substrate in many technological applications and is routinely used as a standard in Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) calibration, which makes the accurate interpretation of the HOPG STM contrast of great fundamental and applicative importance. We demonstrate by STM simulations based on electronic structure obtained from first principles that the relative local orientation of the STM-tip apex with respect to the HOPG substrate has a considerable effect on the HOPG STM contrast. Importantly for experimental STM analysis of HOPG, the simulations indicate that local tip-rotations maintaining a major contribution of the d(3z(2)-r(2)) tip-apex state to the STM current affect only the secondary features of the HOPG STM contrast resulting in 'stripe' formation and leaving the primary contrast unaltered. Conversely, tip-rotations leading to enhanced contributions from m ≠ 0 tip-apex electronic states can cause a triangular-hexagonal change in the primary contrast. We also report a comparison of two STM simulation models with experiments in terms of bias-voltage-dependent STM topography brightness correlations and discuss our findings for the HOPG(0 0 0 1) surface in combination with tungsten tip models of different sharpnesses and terminations.

  12. Contrast stability and ‘stripe’ formation in scanning tunnelling microscopy imaging of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: the role of STM-tip orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mándi, Gábor; Teobaldi, Gilberto; Palotás, Krisztián

    2014-12-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is an important substrate in many technological applications and is routinely used as a standard in Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) calibration, which makes the accurate interpretation of the HOPG STM contrast of great fundamental and applicative importance. We demonstrate by STM simulations based on electronic structure obtained from first principles that the relative local orientation of the STM-tip apex with respect to the HOPG substrate has a considerable effect on the HOPG STM contrast. Importantly for experimental STM analysis of HOPG, the simulations indicate that local tip-rotations maintaining a major contribution of the d3z^2-r^2 tip-apex state to the STM current affect only the secondary features of the HOPG STM contrast resulting in ‘stripe’ formation and leaving the primary contrast unaltered. Conversely, tip-rotations leading to enhanced contributions from m ≠ 0 tip-apex electronic states can cause a triangular-hexagonal change in the primary contrast. We also report a comparison of two STM simulation models with experiments in terms of bias-voltage-dependent STM topography brightness correlations and discuss our findings for the HOPG(0 0 0 1) surface in combination with tungsten tip models of different sharpnesses and terminations.

  13. Dynamics of porphyrin adsorption on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite monitored by scanning tunnelling microscopy at the liquid/solid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Q.; Bragança, A. M.; Moura, N. M. M.; Faustino, M. A. F.; Alcácer, L.; Morgado, J.

    2013-05-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) at solid/tetradecane interface is used to study the dynamics of zinc(II)-octaethylporphyrin (ZnOEP) and zinc(II)-meso-tetradodecylporphyrin (ZnTDP) adsorption on the surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). ZnOEP exhibits a polymorphic behaviour, with a first metastable phase remaining for the first 2 h. This initial α-phase is then converted into a β-phase, where all porphyrins lie parallel to the substrate with a hexagonal arrangement, in agreement with previous reports. At variance with this behaviour, no metastable phases are found during ZnTDP adsorption under the same conditions. We consider that this different behaviour is due to the combination of a stronger interaction and lower mobility of ZnTDP on the HOPG surface.

  14. Band to band tunneling in III-V semiconductors: Implications of complex band structure, strain, orientation, and off-zone center contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Kausik

    2014-05-07

    In this paper, we use a tight binding Hamiltonian with spin orbit coupling to study the real and complex band structures of relaxed and strained GaAs. A simple d orbital on-site energy shift coupled with appropriate scaling of the off-diagonal terms is found to correctly reproduce the band-edge shifts with strain. Four different 〈100〉 strain combinations, namely, uniaxial compressive, uniaxial tensile, biaxial compressive, and biaxial tensile strain are studied, revealing rich valence band structure and strong relative orientation dependent tunneling. It is found that complex bands are unable to provide unambiguous tunneling paths away from the Brillouin zone center. Tunneling current density distribution over the Brillouin zone is computed using non-equilibrium Green's function approach elucidating a physical picture of band to band tunneling.

  15. Electron-bombarded ⟨110⟩-oriented tungsten tips for stable tunneling electron emission.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T K; Abe, T; Nazriq, N M K; Irisawa, T

    2016-03-01

    A clean tungsten (W) tip apex with a robust atomic plane is required for producing a stable tunneling electron emission under strong electric fields. Because a tip apex fabricated from a wire by aqueous chemical etching is covered by impurity layers, heating treatment in ultra-high vacuum is experimentally known to be necessary. However, strong heating frequently melts the tip apex and causes unstable electron emissions. We investigated quantitatively the tip apex and found a useful method to prepare a tip with stable tunneling electron emissions by controlling electron-bombardment heating power. Careful characterizations of the tip structures were performed with combinations of using field emission I-V curves, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (transmitted Debye-Scherrer and Laue) with micro-parabola capillary, field ion microscopy, and field emission microscopy. Tips were chemically etched from (1) polycrystalline W wires (grain size ∼1000 nm) and (2) long-time heated W wires (grain size larger than 1 mm). Heating by 10-40 W (10 s) was found to be good enough to remove oxide layers and produced stable electron emission; however, around 60 W (10 s) heating was threshold power to increase the tip radius, typically +10 ± 5 nm (onset of melting). Further, the grain size of ∼1000 nm was necessary to obtain a conical shape tip apex. PMID:27036780

  16. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Craig EJ, Clinchot DM. Femoral neuropathy. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation . 3rd ...

  17. Resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of Mn12 acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Lendínez, S.; Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Terban, M. W.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Espin, J.; Imaz, I.; Maspoch, D.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-01-06

    We report measurements and theoretical analysis of resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of a molecular magnet. Amorphous nanospheres of Mn₁₂ acetate have been fabricated and characterized by chemical, infrared, TEM, X-ray, and magnetic methods. Magnetic measurements have revealed sharp tunneling peaks in the field derivative of the magnetization that occur at the typical resonant field values for the Mn₁₂ acetate crystal in the field parallel to the easy axis.Theoretical analysis is provided that explains these observations. We argue that resonant spin tunneling in a molecular magnet can be established in a powder sample, without the need for a single crystal and without aligning the easy magnetization axes of the molecules. This is confirmed by re-analyzing the old data on a powdered sample of non-oriented micron-size crystals of Mn₁₂ acetate. In conclusion, our findings can greatly simplify the selection of candidates for quantum spin tunneling among newly synthesized molecular magnets.

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament tunnel placement.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Brian R; Ramme, Austin J; Britton, Carla L; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this cadaveric study was to analyze variation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tunnel placement between surgeons and the influence of preferred surgical technique and surgeon experience level using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). In this study, 12 surgeons drilled ACL tunnels on six cadaveric knees each. Surgeons were divided by experience level and preferred surgical technique (two-incision [TI], medial portal [MP], and transtibial [TT]). ACL tunnel aperture locations were analyzed using 3D CT scans and compared with radiographic ACL footprint criteria. The femoral tunnel location from front to back within the notch demonstrated a range of means of 16% with the TI tunnels the furthest back. A range of means of only 5% was found for femoral tunnel low to high positions by technique. The anterior to posterior tibial tunnel measure demonstrated wider variation than the medial to lateral position. The mean tibial tunnel location drilled by TT surgeons was more posterior than surgeons using the other techniques. Overall, 82% of femoral tunnels and 78% of tibial tunnels met all radiographic measurement criteria. Slight (1-7%) differences in mean tunnel placement on the femur and tibia were found between experienced and new surgeons. The location of the femoral tunnel aperture in the front to back plane relative to the notch roof and the anterior to posterior position on the tibia were the most variable measures. Surgeon experience level did not appear to significantly affect tunnel location. This study provides background information that may be beneficial when evaluating multisurgeon and multicenter collaborative ACL studies.

  19. Reconstruction of medial patello-femoral ligament: Comparison of two surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Criscenti, G; De Maria, C; Sebastiani, E; Tei, M; Placella, G; Speziali, A; Vozzi, G; Cerulli, G

    2016-06-01

    The medial patello-femoral ligament is considered the most important passive patellar stabilizer and its proper functionality is essential for the patello-femoral joint stability. In this work, 18 human knees were randomly divided into two groups and reconstructed through two different surgical techniques: the "Through tunnel tendon" and the "Double converging tunnel" reconstructions. Subsequently, the samples were mechanically tested to evaluate the structural properties of reconstructed femur-MPFL-Patella complex (rFMPC). Particular attention was given to maintain the anatomical orientation between the patella and the graft. Both procedures showed lower stiffness and higher ultimate strain and absorbed energy compared to the native MPFL, but the advantages of the double converging tunnel technique are related to the restoration of the native MPFL sail-shape, to a better stress distribution on the patella, to the use of a single interference screw as fixation device and to the simplicity, rapidity and cost-effectivity of the surgical procedure. The evaluation of the structural properties of rMPFL is fundamental to evaluate the adequacy of the different techniques to restore the physiological structural properties of the native MPFL. PMID:26894660

  20. Magnetic properties of epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films with various crystal orientations and tunnel magnetoresistance effect at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Nagahama, Taro Matsuda, Yuya; Tate, Kazuya; Kawai, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Nozomi; Hiratani, Shungo; Watanabe, Yusuke; Yanase, Takashi; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2014-09-08

    Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is a ferrimagnetic spinel ferrite that exhibits electric conductivity at room temperature (RT). Although the material has been predicted to be a half metal according to ab-initio calculations, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} electrodes have demonstrated a small tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect. Not even the sign of the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio has been experimentally established. Here, we report on the magnetic properties of epitaxial Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films with various crystal orientations. The films exhibited apparent crystal orientation dependence on hysteresis curves. In particular, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(110) films exhibited in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. With respect to the squareness of hysteresis, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (111) demonstrated the largest squareness. Furthermore, we fabricated MTJs with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}(110) electrodes and obtained a TMR effect of −12% at RT. The negative TMR ratio corresponded to the negative spin polarization of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} predicted from band calculations.

  1. Adsorption orientation and STM imaging of meta-benzyne resolved by scanning tunnelling microscopy and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simic-Milosevic, Violeta; Bocquet, Marie-Laure; Morgenstern, Karina

    2009-08-01

    Dissociative adsorption of doubly substituted benzene molecules leads to a molecule with two missing hydrogen atoms. We use scanning tunnelling microscopy at 5 K and density functional theory to investigate these benzyne molecules on Cu(1 1 1). Benzyne is either imaged as a depression, as a ring-shaped protrusion, or as a circular protrusion at different tunnelling parameters. Submolecular resolution and ab initio calculations give information on the adsorption properties about the in-situ formed biradical species.

  2. Femoral hernia repair

    MedlinePlus

    Femorocele repair; Herniorrhaphy; Hernioplasty - femoral ... During surgery to repair the hernia, the bulging tissue is pushed back in. The weakened area is sewn closed or strengthened. This repair ...

  3. Application of particle image velocimetry and the background-oriented schlieren technique in the high-enthalpy shock tunnel Göttingen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirmse, T.; Agocs, J.; Schröder, A.; Martinez Schramm, J.; Karl, S.; Hannemann, K.

    2011-06-01

    The applicability of the particle image velocimetry (PIV) and the background-oriented schlieren (BOS) techniques in the high-enthalpy shock tunnel Göttingen of the German Aerospace Center, DLR is demonstrated. As a part of this feasibility study two different experiments are performed. The velocity field past a wedge in a Mach 6 flow at a total specific enthalpy of 1.5 MJ/kg is determined by means of PIV and the results are compared to numerical predictions. The BOS technique is applied to investigate the density field in the shock layer of a sphere at 12 and 22 MJ/kg total specific enthalpies. Using a ray tracer method, the BOS results are compared to the data obtained by corresponding numerical computations.

  4. Electric field control of spin re-orientation in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions—CoFeB and MgO thickness dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hao; Naik, Vinayak Bharat; Liu, Ruisheng; Han, Guchang

    2014-07-01

    We report an investigation of electric-field (EF) control of spin re-orientation as functions of the thicknesses of CoFeB free layer (FL) and MgO layer in synthetic-antiferromagnetic pinned magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. It is found that the EF modulates the coercivity (Hc) of the FL almost linearly for all FL thicknesses, while the EF efficiency, i.e., the slope of the linearity, increases as the FL thickness increases. This linear variation in Hc is also observed for larger MgO thicknesses (≥1.5 nm), while the EF efficiency increases only slightly from 370 to 410 Oe nm/V when MgO thickness increases from 1.5 to 1.76 nm. We have further observed the absence of quasi-DC unipolar switching. We discuss its origin and highlight the underlying challenges to implement the EF controlled switching in a practical magnetic memory.

  5. Correlation Between Femoral Neck Shaft Angle and Surgical Management in Trainees With Femoral Neck Stress Fractures.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, Robyn L; Rivera, Jessica C; Tennent, David J; Johnson, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    The most common overuse injury leading to medical discharge of military recruits is a stress fracture. One of the high-risk stress fractures is of the lateral femoral neck which risks osteonecrosis of the femoral head, the need for arthroplasty and permanent disability. To prevent fracture progression early surgical intervention is recommended. Surgical repairs are performed in about 25% of cases of femoral neck stress fractures at military treatment facilities. Hip geometry is an important intrinsic risk for stress fractures. Loads in the average loading direction will not cause a fracture, but loads of extreme magnitude or extreme orientation may. The purpose of this study was to determine if, in the presence of femoral neck stress fracture, there is a correlation between femoral neck shaft angle, surgical treatment and outcomes. The results of this study suggest there is no correlation between return to full military duty rates, treatment, femoral neck shaft angle or fracture grade on MRI. Patients who underwent surgical fixation had greater fracture grade and pain than those that did not have surgery. Individuals who did not return to duty tended to have higher pain scores at initial evaluation.

  6. Scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of the ordered structures of dialkylamino hydroxylated squaraines adsorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Stawasz, M.E.; Sampson, D.L.; Parkinson, B.A.

    2000-03-07

    Squaraine dyes form aggregates in solution and in the solid state. The authors have found that squaraines form two-dimensional (2D) ordered layers when adsorbed onto HOPG from phenyloctane and from liquid crystalline solvents. The authors investigated with scanning tunneling microscopy the 2D structures of the absorbed phases of five bis(4-alkylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl) squaraines (both symmetric and asymmetric) and mixtures of these squaraines. Differences in the stability of the 2D structures and molecular packing are observed when the alkyl tail length and symmetry are varied. A transition in the 2D structure from a herringbone packing to a lamellar packing occurs between the tail lengths of 4 carbons and 8 carbons. Many of the compounds form a number of 2D polytypes on HOPG. Multilayers of squaraine molecules were observed for most of the studied molecules. Squaraines with tail lengths of 12 carbons exhibited a tendency toward registry with the HOPG substrate whereas all other squaraine compounds investigated showed a lack of molecule-substrate registry. Domain sizes of the investigated molecules varied from tens of nanometers to a micron.

  7. Activation, orientation and landing of female Culex quinquefasciatus in response to carbon dioxide and odour from human feet: 3-D flight analysis in a wind tunnel.

    PubMed

    Lacey, E S; Cardé, R T

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the interaction between carbon dioxide (CO(2) ) and human foot odour on activation, upwind orientation and landing of host-seeking female Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) (Diptera: Culicidae) in a wind tunnel. More mosquitoes landed on warmed glass beads coated with foot odour than on clean beads; adding a plume of 4% CO(2) did not influence the proportion of mosquitoes landing. A second experiment used 3-dimensional video tracking to assess flight performance. Activation was more rapid with CO(2) and with CO(2) + foot odour than with clean air or with foot odour alone. Upwind flights were fastest with CO(2) and with clean air, and slowest with foot odour; the CO(2) + foot odour treatment overlapped the previous three treatments in significance. Flight headings tended more towards due upwind with CO(2) and with clean air than with CO(2) + foot odour or with foot odour alone. In both experiments, many mosquitoes flew upwind in clean air. There was little evidence of females changing course upon entering or exiting the CO(2) plume or reacting to foot odour during flight.

  8. Electric field control of spin re-orientation in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions—CoFeB and MgO thickness dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Hao; Naik, Vinayak Bharat; Liu, Ruisheng; Han, Guchang

    2014-07-28

    We report an investigation of electric-field (EF) control of spin re-orientation as functions of the thicknesses of CoFeB free layer (FL) and MgO layer in synthetic-antiferromagnetic pinned magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. It is found that the EF modulates the coercivity (Hc) of the FL almost linearly for all FL thicknesses, while the EF efficiency, i.e., the slope of the linearity, increases as the FL thickness increases. This linear variation in Hc is also observed for larger MgO thicknesses (≥1.5 nm), while the EF efficiency increases only slightly from 370 to 410 Oe nm/V when MgO thickness increases from 1.5 to 1.76 nm. We have further observed the absence of quasi-DC unipolar switching. We discuss its origin and highlight the underlying challenges to implement the EF controlled switching in a practical magnetic memory.

  9. Tunnel closure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Attia, A.

    1995-07-01

    When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

  10. Total femoral replacement.

    PubMed

    Nerubay, J; Katznelson, A; Tichler, T; Rubinstein, Z; Morag, B; Bubis, J J

    1988-04-01

    Between 1973 and 1983, 19 patients with sarcoma of the femur were treated by adjuvant chemotherapy, excision of the entire femur, and replacement by a total femoral prosthesis. Five patients had excellent and nine had good functional results. Twelve patients died an average of 23 months after the procedure and seven are at present disease free. This limb-saving procedure permits rapid rehabilitation, prevents severe psychological problems, and improves the quality of life.

  11. A Simple Radiographic Sign of Vertical Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tunnel Placement.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Lutul Dashaun; Morris, Parisa M; Huston, Kellen L; Hall, Evan Tyler; Kaar, Scott

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe a novel radiographic sign indicative of vertical tunnel placement following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. We reviewed 190 consecutive ACL reconstructions. Operative records, patient charts, arthroscopic images, and preoperative and postoperative orthogonal plain radiographic images were reviewed. We made special note of the operative technique. Note was made of tunnel position and whether the posterior (proximal) aspect of Blumensaat line was violated on standard lateral knee radiographic images. Of 190 patients, 17 patients did not have postoperative imaging and were excluded. Of the 173 remaining knees, 163 were primary ACL reconstructions and 10 were revision ACL reconstructions. We found that no anatomically placed ACL femoral tunnel violated Blumensaat line. In all revision cases exhibiting violation of Blumensaat line, a new femoral tunnel was able to be drilled while completely avoiding the previously placed, nonanatomic ACL femoral tunnel. The principal findings of our study demonstrate that violation of Blumensaat line following ACL reconstruction is an indicator of vertical, nonanatomic femoral tunnel placement. Furthermore, presence of this radiographic sign indicates that an anatomically placed femoral tunnel may be drilled while completely avoiding the existing femoral tunnel during cases of revision ACL reconstruction.

  12. Prospective evaluation of femoral head viability following femoral neck fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, B.; Kroop, S.A.; Nepola, I.V.; Grantham, A.S.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-01-01

    The bone scans of 33 patients (pts) with recent subcapital fractures (fx) of the femur were evaluated prospectively to determine their value in predicting femoral head visability. Each of the 33 pts (ll men, 22 women, age range 30-92) had a pre-operative bone scan within 72 hrs of the fx (23 pts within 24 hrs). Anterior and posterior planar views of both hips and pinhole views (50% of pts) were obtained 2 hrs after administration of Tc-99m HDP. The femoral head was classified as perfused if it showed the same activity as the opposite normal side or if it showed only slightly decreased activity. Femoral heads showing absent activity were classified as nonperfused. Overall, 20 of the 33 pts showed a photopenic femoral head on the side of the fx. Only 2 pts showed increased activity at hte site of the fx. Internal fixation of the fx was performed in 23 pts, 12 of whom had one or more follow-up scans. Five of these 12 pts showed absent femoral head activity on their initial scan, but 2 showed later reperfusion. The other 7 pts showed good perfusion initially, with only 1 later showing decreased femoral head activity. The other 10 pts (7 of whom had absent femoral head activity) had immediate resection of the femoral head and insertion of a Cathcart prosthesis. The results suggest that femoral head activity seen on a bone scan in the immediate post-fx period is not always a reliable indicator of femoral head viability. Decreased femoral head activity may reflect, in part, compromised perfusion secondary to post-traumatic edema, with or without anatomic disruption of the blood supply.

  13. [Femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Gierer, P; Mittlmeier, T

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of femoral neck fractures increases exponentially with rising age. Young patients are rarely affected but when they are it is mostly due to high energy accidents, whereas older patients suffer from femoral neck fractures by low energy trauma due to osteoporotic changes of the bone mineral density. Treatment options have not essentially changed over the last few years. Non-operative treatment may be a choice in non-dislocated and impacted fractures. Due to the high risk of secondary fracture displacement prophylactic screw osteosynthesis is recommended even in Garden type I fractures. Osteosynthetic fracture stabilization with cannulated screws or angle stable sliding screws, is usually applied in non-displaced fractures and fractures in younger patients. Older patients need rapid mobilization after surgery; therefore, total hip arthroplasty and hemiarthroplasty are commonly used with a low incidence of secondary complications. In addition to sufficient operative treatment a guideline conform osteoprosis therapy should be initiated for the prophylaxis of further fractures and patients should undertake a suitable rehabilitation.

  14. Zero-bias anomaly of the tunneling spectroscopy on different crystal orientation of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ epitaxial thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hong-Wen; Yao, B. C.; Chi, C. C.; Wu, M. K.

    We report the tunneling spectroscopy on (100), (110) and (001) surfaces of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ epitaxial thin films using planar junctions made of Ag/Natural barrier/YBCO. Tunneling I-V curves are measured at various temperatures and in different magnetic fields. Both the experimental spectra of the (100) and (110) films show zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP). Surprisingly, we observed a narrower peak on top of the broader ZBCP for tunneling through the (100) films. The splitting of zero-bias conductance peak predicted by the theory was not observed for either parallel or perpendicularly applied magnetic field up to 6 teslas. Both the ZBCP of the (100) and (110) YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ films can be suppressed by the applied magnetic fields and disappear at the temperatures above T c.

  15. How to avoid the risk of intraoperative cartilage damage in anatomic four tunnel double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Siebold, Rainer; Benetos, Ioannis S; Sartory, Nico; He, Zhenming; Hariri, Nawid; Pässler, Hans H

    2010-01-01

    Double bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is technically demanding. In order to create four anatomical anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) bone tunnels many surgeons adopt new ways of tibial and femoral bone tunnel drilling. From surgical experience, these technical changes might increase the risk for intraoperative pitfalls. An intraoperative articular cartilage damage to the medial femoral condyle or the medial tibial plateau could be disastrous for the patient. It may be caused by an insufficient anteromedial portal technique for femoral AM and PL bone tunnel drilling or flat tibial AM or PL bone tunnel reaming. Potential pitfalls may be avoided by small modifications to the surgical technique. In this present technical note, a sequence of surgical steps are described, which may help to avoid articular cartilage damage to the medial femoral condyle and medial tibial plateau in anatomical four tunnel DB ACL reconstruction.

  16. Femoral approach to lead extraction.

    PubMed

    Mulpuru, Siva K; Hayes, David L; Osborn, Michael J; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2015-03-01

    Laser and radiofrequency energy-assisted lead extraction has greatly facilitated this complex procedure. Although success rates are high, in some instances alternate methods of extraction are required. In this review, we discuss techniques for femoral extraction of implanted leads and retained fragments. The major tools available, including commonly used snares and delivery tools, are discussed. We briefly describe combined internal jugular and femoral venous extraction approaches, as well as complimentary utilization of more than one technique via the femoral vein. Animated and procedural sequences are included to help the reader visualize the key components of these techniques. PMID:25311643

  17. [Pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Ken; Mashiba, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated microdamage accumulation in the fracture sites in the patients of subtrochanteric atypical femoral fracture with long term bisphosphonate therapy and of incomplete shaft fracture of lateral femoral bowing without bisphosphonate therapy. Based on these findings, pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture is revealed stress fracture caused by accumulation of microdamages between distal to the lesser trochanter and proximal to the supracondylar flare in the femur in association with severely suppressed bone turnover and/or abnormal lower limb alignment, that causes stress concentration on the lateral side cortex of the femur. PMID:26728533

  18. Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Günter; Schmalhorst, Jan; Thomas, Andre; Hütten, Andreas; Yuasa, Shinji

    In magnetoelectronic devices large opportunities are opened by the spin dependent tunneling resistance, where a strong dependence of the tunneling current on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the electrodes is found. Within a short time, the amplitude of the resistance change of the junctions increased dramatically. We will cover Al-O and MgO based junctions and present highly spin-polarized electrode materials such as Heusler alloys. Furthermore, we will give a short overview on applications such as read heads in hard disk drives, storage cells in MRAMs, field programmable logic circuits and biochips. Finally, we will discuss the currently growing field of current induced magnetization switching.

  19. Pseudopathologic fracture of the femoral neck

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, T.L. Jr.; Keats, T.E.; Goldner, R.; Stelling, C.B.; Logan, M.

    1981-11-01

    We have seen two cases of traumatic subcapital fractures of the femoral neck which resembled pathologic fractures on plain radiography. We have named this entity pseudopathologic fracture of the femoral neck and offer suggestions for why it occurs.

  20. Applying Cross-Pin System in Both Femoral and Tibial Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendons.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei; Liu, Yujie; Xue, Jing; Li, Haifeng; Wang, Junliang; Qu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Use of the RigidFix Cross Pin System (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) is a popular technique for femoral fixation of grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). However, tibial fixation is still limited to the use of interference screws and post fixation, and few surgeons apply the femoral RigidFix system in tibial fixation. Meanwhile, tunnel enlargement is still a problem that affects the outcome of ACLR with hamstring grafts. We have used the femoral RigidFix system in femoral and tibial fixation. The rod top of the guide frame should be placed under the level of the subchondral bone at the proximal end of the tibial tunnel to ensure that the pins will not be inserted into the joint. The pins are inserted through the center of the lateral tibia. Using our technique, the fixation points of the femur and tibia are close to the anterior cruciate ligament insertions, and full contact of the graft with the tunnel wall can be accomplished. On the basis of our preliminary observations and investigation, we are optimistic about the prospect of performing ACLR using the RigidFix system in femoral and tibial fixation. PMID:26697293

  1. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head after internal fixation for femoral neck fracture: histopathological investigation.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Kido, Hidehiko; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-08-01

    Late segmental collapse after internal fixation for femoral neck fracture is the phenomenon observed in post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ON), which has generally been reported to occur over a year or more after internal fixation. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head (SIF) has also been recognized to cause femoral head collapse, however, only two cases of SIF after internal fixation for femoral neck fracture have been reported. We report a case with femoral head collapse observed 5 months after internal fixation for femoral neck fracture, which was histopathologically diagnosed as SIF. Clinically, differentiating SIF from ON is important because some cases of SIF have been reported to heal without surgical treatments. The timing of femoral head collapse after femoral neck fracture may be different between SIF and post-traumatic ON.

  2. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  3. Subcapital osteotomy of the femoral neck for patients with healed slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Bali, K; Railton, P; Kiefer, G N; Powell, J N

    2014-11-01

    We report the clinical and radiological outcome of subcapital osteotomy of the femoral neck in the management of symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) resulting from a healed slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). We believe this is only the second such study in the literature. We studied eight patients (eight hips) with symptomatic FAI after a moderate to severe healed SCFE. There were six male and two female patients, with a mean age of 17.8 years (13 to 29). All patients underwent a subcapital intracapsular osteotomy of the femoral neck after surgical hip dislocation and creation of an extended retinacular soft-tissue flap. The mean follow-up was 41 months (20 to 84). Clinical assessment included measurement of range of movement, Harris Hip Score (HHS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis score (WOMAC). Radiological assessment included pre- and post-operative calculation of the anterior slip angle (ASA) and lateral slip angle (LSA), the anterior offset angle (AOA) and centre head-trochanteric distance (CTD). The mean HHS at final follow-up was 92.5 (85 to 100), and the mean WOMAC scores for pain, stiffness and function were 1.3 (0 to 4), 1.4 (0 to 6) and 3.6 (0 to 19) respectively. There was a statistically significant improvement in all the radiological measurements post-operatively. The mean ASA improved from 36.6° (29° to 44°) to 10.3° (5° to 17°) (p < 0.01). The mean LSA improved from 36.6° (31° to 43°) to 15.4° (8° to 21°) (p < 0.01). The mean AOA decreased from 64.4° (50° to 78°) 32.0° (25° to 39°) post-operatively (p < 0.01). The mean CTD improved from -8.2 mm (-13.8 to +3.1) to +2.8 mm (-7.6 to +11.0) (p < 0.01). Two patients underwent further surgery for nonunion. No patient suffered avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Subcapital osteotomy for patients with a healed SCFE is more challenging than subcapital re-orientation in those with an acute or sub-acute SCFE and an open physis. An effective

  4. Arthroplasty in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong Cheol; Jung, Kwangyoung

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive joint disease requiring early hip arthroplasty. The polyethylene-metal design using a 22-mm femoral head component, introduced by Charnley in 1950, has been widely used for over half a century. Since then, different materials with the capacity to minimize friction between bearing surfaces and various cement or cementless insert fixations have been developed. Although the outcome of second and third generation designs using better bearing materials and technologies has been favorable, less favorable results are seen with total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteonecrosis. Selection of appropriate materials for hip arthroplasty is important for any potential revisions that might become inevitable due to the limited durability of a prosthetic hip joint. Alternative hip arthroplasties, which include hemiresurfacing arthroplasty and bipolar hemiarthroplasty, have not been found to have acceptable outcomes. Metal-on-metal resurfacing has recently been suggested as a feasible option for young patients with extra physical demands; however, concerns about complications such as hypersensitivity reaction or pseudotumor formation on metal bearings have emerged. To ensure successful long-term outcomes in hip arthroplasty, factors such as insert stabilization and surfaces with less friction are essential. Understanding these aspects in arthroplasty is important to selection of proper materials and to making appropriate decisions for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:27536561

  5. The Channel Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. The undersea section of the tunnel is unsurpassed in length in the world. A proposal for a Channel tunnel was first put forward by a French engineer in 1802. In 1881, a first attempt was made at boring a tunnel from the English side; the work was halted after 800 m. Again in 1922, English workers started boring a tunnel, and advanced 120 m before it too was halted for political reasons. The most recent attempt was begun in 1987, and the tunnel was officially opened in 1994. At completion it was estimated that the project cost around $18 billion. It has been operating at a significant loss since its opening, despite trips by over 7 million passengers per year on the Eurostar train, and over 3 million vehicles per year.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring

  6. FEMORAL INSERTION OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: AN ANATOMICAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Aihara, Tatsuo; Neto, Leopoldo Viana Batista; Goarayeb, Dedley Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify objective parameters to guide correct location of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in the femur. Methods: The PCLs of 20 human cadavers were resected. The following portions were measured: distance from the most distal portion of the PCL, close to the roof, to the most anterior edge of the cartilage (AB); distance from the most proximal portion of the PCL, close to the roof, to the most anterior cartilage (AC); distance between the two parts of the ligament close to the roof (BC); distance from the distal edge in its posterior portion, to the more posterior joint edge (DE); distance from the distal edge of the ligament in its posterior portion, to the intercondylar roof (DF); and finally, the format of the ligament insertion and area of coverage on the femoral condyle. Results: The PCL has the shape of a quarter ellipse, with an average area of 153.5mm2. The mean distances found were: AB of 2.1mm, AC of 10.7mm, BC of 8.6mm DE of 12.4mm and DF of 16.8mm. Conclusions: The edge close to the roof of the anterolateral bundle is closer to the joint cartilage (2.1mm) than the posteromedial bundle is, which is 12.4mm from the edge proximal to the cartilage. These references should assist in better and more accurate positioning of femoral tunnels in PCL reconstruction. PMID:27027059

  7. The femoral sulcus in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lingaraj, Krishna; Bartlett, John

    2009-05-01

    The position of the femoral sulcus relative to the midline of the distal femoral resection in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was studied to determine if centralized placement of the femoral component on the distal femur was justified in terms of aligning the prosthetic sulcus with the native femoral sulcus. The location of the femoral sulcus was studied in 112 consecutive patients undergoing TKA. The mean sulcus position was 0.7 mm lateral to the midline of the distal femoral resection (SD 1.4, 95% CI, 0.5-1.0 mm). However, the variation in sulcus positions ranged from 4 mm medial to 4 mm lateral to the midline. The mean sulcus position in valgus knees was 1.0 mm lateral to the midline (SD 1.8), and that in varus knees was 0.7 mm lateral to the midline (SD 1.2) (P = 0.501). It appears prudent to centre the femoral component on the native sulcus rather than the midline of the distal femoral resection, so as to ensure accurate alignment of the prosthetic sulcus with the native sulcus and to encourage normal patella tracking.

  8. Unusual presentation of a femoral stress fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Wajnsztejn, Andre; Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Ejnisman, Benno

    2013-01-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries in sports medicine. Among these fractures, femoral neck stress fractures frequently have a benign course, especially when it happens in the medial aspect of the neck. This case report describes a stress fracture of the medial aspect of the femoral neck that developed a complete fracture and underwent surgical fixation. PMID:23283621

  9. Stress changes ahead of an advancing tunnel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abel, J.F.; Lee, F.T.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumentation placed ahead of three model tunnels in the laboratory and ahead of a crosscut driven in a metamorphic rock mass detected stress changes several tunnel diameters ahead of the tunnel face. Stress changes were detected 4 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into nearly elastic acrylic, 2??50 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into concrete, and 2 diameters ahead of a model tunnel drilled into Silver Plume Granite. Stress changes were detected 7??50 diameters ahead of a crosscut driven in jointed, closely foliated gneisses and gneissic granites in an experimental mine at Idaho Springs, Colorado. These results contrast markedly with a theoretical elastic estimate of the onset of detectable stress changes at 1 tunnel diameter ahead of the tunnel face. A small compressive stress concentration was detected 2 diameters ahead of the model tunnel in acrylic, 1.25 diameters ahead of the model tunnel in concrete, and 1 diameter ahead of the model tunnel in granite. A similar stress peak was detected about 6 diameters ahead of the crosscut. No such stress peak is predicted from elastic theory. The 3-dimensional in situ stress determined in the field demonstrate that geologic structure controls stress orientations in the metamorphic rock mass. Two of the computed principal stresses are parallel to the foliation and the other principal stress is normal to it. The principal stress orientations vary approximately as the foliation attitude varies. The average horizontal stress components and the average vertical stress component are three times and twice as large, respectively, as those predicted from the overburden load. An understanding of the measured stress field appears to require the application of either tectonic or residual stress components, or both. Laboratory studies indicate the presence of proportionately large residual stresses. Mining may have triggered the release of strain energy, which is controlled by geologic structure. ?? 1973.

  10. Femoral Aperture Fixation Improves Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Function When Added to Cortical Suspensory Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Mark D.; Shadbolt, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recommendations for bone tunnel placement during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have become more precise. However, these recommendations differ neither with the choice of graft nor with the method of fixation used. The influence of the method of femoral fixation used on the biomechanical function of a soft tissue ACL graft remains unknown. Hypothesis: Our null hypothesis was that adding femoral aperture fixation to femoral cortical fixation, using the same bone tunnels, will not alter the control of anterior translation (AT) and internal rotation (IR) during ACL reconstruction using a hamstring graft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 22 patients with an acute isolated ACL rupture underwent reconstruction using a single-bundle autologous hamstring graft. Computer navigation was used intraoperatively to plot the AT and IR during the pivot-shift test before reconstruction, after ACL reconstruction using cortical suspensory fixation, and after the addition of femoral aperture fixation. Statistical analysis (analysis of variance) was used to compare the AT and IR during the pivot shift at each stage in the procedure. Results: Before ACL reconstruction, the mean (±SD) AT was 14.2 ± 7.3 mm and mean IR was 17.2° ± 5.5°. After reconstruction using femoral cortical suspension, these figures were significantly reduced to 6.2 ± 3.5 mm and 12.5° ± 3.20°, respectively (P < .001). The addition of the aperture fixation was associated with a further significant reduction to 4.6 ± 3.2 mm and 10.4° ± 2.7°, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion: The addition of femoral aperture fixation to suspensory fixation results in a significant reduction in both the AT and IR that occurs during the pivot-shift assessment immediately after ACL reconstruction using autologous hamstring graft. Clinical Relevance: The most precise positioning of bone tunnels during soft tissue ACL reconstruction needs to take into consideration

  11. Femoral Aperture Fixation Improves Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Function When Added to Cortical Suspensory Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Mark D.; Shadbolt, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recommendations for bone tunnel placement during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have become more precise. However, these recommendations differ neither with the choice of graft nor with the method of fixation used. The influence of the method of femoral fixation used on the biomechanical function of a soft tissue ACL graft remains unknown. Hypothesis: Our null hypothesis was that adding femoral aperture fixation to femoral cortical fixation, using the same bone tunnels, will not alter the control of anterior translation (AT) and internal rotation (IR) during ACL reconstruction using a hamstring graft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 22 patients with an acute isolated ACL rupture underwent reconstruction using a single-bundle autologous hamstring graft. Computer navigation was used intraoperatively to plot the AT and IR during the pivot-shift test before reconstruction, after ACL reconstruction using cortical suspensory fixation, and after the addition of femoral aperture fixation. Statistical analysis (analysis of variance) was used to compare the AT and IR during the pivot shift at each stage in the procedure. Results: Before ACL reconstruction, the mean (±SD) AT was 14.2 ± 7.3 mm and mean IR was 17.2° ± 5.5°. After reconstruction using femoral cortical suspension, these figures were significantly reduced to 6.2 ± 3.5 mm and 12.5° ± 3.20°, respectively (P < .001). The addition of the aperture fixation was associated with a further significant reduction to 4.6 ± 3.2 mm and 10.4° ± 2.7°, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion: The addition of femoral aperture fixation to suspensory fixation results in a significant reduction in both the AT and IR that occurs during the pivot-shift assessment immediately after ACL reconstruction using autologous hamstring graft. Clinical Relevance: The most precise positioning of bone tunnels during soft tissue ACL reconstruction needs to take into consideration

  12. Removal of a broken guide wire entrapped in a fractured femoral neck.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing-hua; Ye, Tian-wen; Guo, Yong-fei; Wang, Chong-li; Chen, Ai-min

    2013-01-01

    Guide wire plays an important role in the fixation of femoral neck fracture with dynamic hip screw (DHS). Breakage of a guide wire during operation is a very rare condition. We met such a dilemma in DHS fixation of a 54-year-old male patient who sustained Garden type IV fracture of the right femoral neck. The distal end of the guide wire broke and was entrapped in the fractured femoral neck. We tried to get the broken part out by a cannulated drill. Reaming was started with the cannulated drill slowly rotating around the guide K-wire until the reamer fully contained the target under fluoroscope. A bone curette was used to get the broken wire out but failed, so we had to use the cannuated drill to dredge this bone tunnel. Finally the broken wire end was taken out, mixed with blood and bone fragments. Through the existing drilling channel, DHS fixation was easily finished. The patient had an uneventful recovery without avascular necrosis of femoral head or non-union of the fracture at one year's follow-up. A few methods can be adopted to deal with the broken guide wire. The way used in our case is less invasive but technically challenging. When the guide wire is properly positioned, this method is very practical and useful. PMID:23910678

  13. "Grand piano sign," a marker for proper femoral component rotation during total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Moyad, Thomas F; Hughes, Richard E; Urquhart, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    A malpositioned femoral component is an established risk factor for patellar instability and pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In the assessment of femoral rotation, several axes, including the transepicondylar axis, the posterior condylar axis, and the anteroposterior axis, are useful. However, these axes are not always easily applicable, particularly when significant deformity exists. An anecdotal method used by some surgeons involves assessing the shape of the anterior femoral surface osteotomy. Our observations from saw bone models and TKA led to our hypothesis that proper femoral component placement is indicated by a bimodal peak on the anterior femur, approximately twice as high on the lateral side than on the medial side. We use the term "grand piano sign" to describe the shape of the trochlea after the osteotomy is correctly completed. To our knowledge, this common observation has not been studied either in the laboratory or in vivo. Our cadaveric models demonstrated that the grand piano sign correlated with proper femoral rotation during TKA. Surgeons who are knowledgeable about this marker should find it helpful when orienting components during knee replacement surgery. PMID:22013571

  14. Unilateral Isolated Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Doğer, Emek; Köpük, Şule Y.; Çakıroğlu, Yiğit; Çakır, Özgür; Yücesoy, Gülseren

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To discuss a patient with a prenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency. Case. Antenatal diagnosis of unilateral isolated femoral focal deficiency was made at 20 weeks of gestation. The length of left femur was shorter than the right, and fetal femur length was below the fifth percentile. Proximal femoral focal deficiency was diagnosed. After delivery, the diagnosis was confirmed with skeletal radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. In prenatal ultrasonographic examination, the early recognition and exclusion of skeletal dysplasias is important; moreover, treatment plans should be initiated, and valuable information should be provided to the family. PMID:23984135

  15. [Medial femoral neck fracture. Controversies in treatment].

    PubMed

    Raaymakers, E L F B; Schafroth, M

    2002-02-01

    The treatment of the medial femoral neck fracture remains controversial until today. The goal of this paper is therefore, based on the literature, to show guidelines for optimal treatment: conservative treatment vs. operation, osteosynthesis vs. prosthesis, timing for osteosynthesis, open vs. closed reduction, choice of implant for osteosynthesis, postoperative treatment (weight bearing vs. non weight bearing), Pauwels-Osteotomy vs. prosthesis in cases op pseudarthrosis, femoral head prosthesis vs. total hip arthroplasty, bipolar vs. monopolar femoral head prosthesis, choice of classification. Further we want to point out which statements are evidence based and where we need further investigation.

  16. Looking into Tunnel Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    1999-01-01

    Describes how to make tunnel books, which are viewed by looking into a "tunnel" created by accordion-folded expanding sides. Suggests possible themes. Describes how to create a walk-through tunnel book for first grade students. (CMK)

  17. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm. Just a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ligament and ... difficult. Often, the cause is having a smaller carpal tunnel than other people do. Other causes include ...

  18. Meralgia Paresthetica and Femoral Acetabular Impingement: A Possible Association

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aiesha

    2010-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh. Etiology is divided into spontaneous and iatrogenic causes. To my knowledge this has never been attributed to femoral acetabular impingement. This case highlights the presence of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement syndrome thus raising the possibility of an association. Keywords Femoral acetabular impingement; Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; Dysesthesia; Nerve conduction studies PMID:22043261

  19. Clinical-radiographic correlation of the femoral insertion point of the graft in reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament☆

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro Júnior, Lúcio Flávio Biondi; Cenni, Marcos Henrique Frauendorf; Nicolai, Oscar Pinheiro; Carneiro, Guilherme Galvão Barreto; de Andrade, Rodrigo Cristiano; de Moraes, Vinícius Vidigal

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the radiographic positioning of the femoral tunnel and correlate this with the postoperative clinical results among patients undergoing reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) alone. Method This was a retrospective study in which 30 knees of 26 patients with recurrent dislocation of the patella that underwent MPFL reconstruction were evaluated. The femoral insertion point of the graft and the postoperative clinical condition were analyzed and correlated using the Kujala and Lysholm scales. Results 22 knees presented a femoral tunnel in the anatomical area (group A) and 8 outside of this location (group B). In group A, the mean score on the Kujala scale was 89.68 points and on the Lysholm scale was 92.45 points. In group B, the mean score on the Kujala scale was 84.75 points and on the Lysholm scale was 92 points. The difference between the means was not significant on either of the two scales. Conclusion Correlation with the clinical results did not show any difference in relation to the positioning of the femoral insertion of the graft. PMID:27218083

  20. Determining the rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty using the epicondylar axis.

    PubMed

    Berger, R A; Rubash, H E; Seel, M J; Thompson, W H; Crossett, L S

    1993-01-01

    The posterior condylar surfaces of the femur are routinely used as the reference for the rotational orientation of the femoral component during most primary total knee arthroplasties. The purpose of this investigation was to identify a clearly discernible, reproducible secondary anatomic axis useful for determining the rotational orientation of the femoral component when the posterior condylar surfaces cannot be used. Seventy-five embalmed anatomic specimen femurs were studied. A surgical epicondylar axis was defined as the line connecting the lateral epicondylar prominence and the medial sulcus of the medial epicondyle. The posterior condylar angle was measured as the angle between the posterior condylar surfaces and the surgical epicondylar axis. Measurement of the posterior condylar angle referenced from the surgical epicondylar axis yielded a mean posterior condylar angle of 3.5 degrees (+/- 1.2 degrees) of internal rotation for males and a mean posterior condylar angle of 0.3 degree (+/- 1.2 degrees) of internal rotation for females. Thus, rotational alignment of the femoral component can be accurately estimated using the posterior condylar angle. The posterior condylar angle, referenced from the surgical epicondylar axis, provides a visual rotational alignment check during primary arthroplasty and may improve alignment of the femoral component at revision.

  1. Flows In Model Human Femoral Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Lloyd H.; Kwack, Eug Y.; Crawford, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Flow is visualized with dye traces, and pressure measurements made. Report describes experimental study of flow in models of human femoral artery. Conducted to examine effect of slight curvature of artery on flow paths and distribution of pressure.

  2. Atypical periprosthetic femoral fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Woo, S B; Choi, S T; Chan, W L

    2016-08-01

    We report an 82-year-old woman who underwent fixation with a long-spanning cable-plate for a bisphosphonate-induced Vancouver B1 periprosthetic femoral fracture. Non-union and breakage of the plate occurred at 16 months and necessitated revision surgery using a long-stem femoral prosthesis augmented with a cable-plate construct. Bone union was achieved eventually after 10 months. PMID:27574277

  3. Femoral Bone Plug in Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, Ettore; Regazzola, Gianmarco M V; Murena, Luigi; Ronga, Mario; Cherubino, Paolo; Surace, Michele F

    2015-10-01

    The intramedullary alignment guides used in total knee replacement disrupt the intramedullary vessels, resulting in greater postoperative blood loss. The use of an autologous bone plug to seal the intramedullary femoral canal has been shown to be effective in reducing postoperative bleeding. The authors present a simple technique to create a bone plug from the anterior chamfer femoral cut to perfectly seal the intramedullary canal of the femur. PMID:26488774

  4. Analysis of risk factors for femoral head necrosis after internal fixation in femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Sun, Jun-Ying; Zha, Guo-Chun; Jiang, Tao; You, Zhen-Jun; Yuan, De-Jing

    2014-12-01

    Femoral head necrosis is a rare but devastating complication following femoral neck fracture. The reported incidence of avascular necrosis after femoral neck fracture fixation varies widely, and there is no consensus regarding its risk factors. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors for femoral head necrosis after internal fixation in femoral neck fracture. This retrospective study included 166 patients with femoral neck fractures treated with surgical reduction and internal fixation at the authors' institution from January 2004 to December 2008. Eight patients died for reasons unrelated to the surgery, and 12 patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 146 patients (146 fractures) were followed until union or until conversion to total hip arthroplasty. The patients included 61 males and 85 females with an average age of 47.5 years (range, 18-68 years). The authors analyzed the following factors: age, sex, Garden classification, reduction quality, surgical methods, injury-to-surgery interval, preoperative traction, weight-bearing time, and implant removal. All patients were followed for a mean of 52 months (range, 6-90 months). The incidence of femoral head necrosis was 14.4% (21/146). Garden classification (P=.012), reduction quality (P=.008), implant removal (P=.020), and preoperative traction (P=.003) were significantly associated with femoral head necrosis. Patient age (P=.990), sex (P=.287), injury-to-surgery interval (P=.360), weight-bearing time (P=.868), and surgical methods (P=.987) were not significantly associated with femoral head necrosis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, implant removal was not a significant risk factor for femoral head necrosis development (P=.498). Garden classification, reduction quality, and preoperative traction had a significant effect on femoral head necrosis development. PMID:25437087

  5. Tunneling nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Austefjord, Magnus Wiger; Gerdes, Hans-Hermann; Wang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are recently discovered thin membranous tubes that interconnect cells. During the last decade, research has shown TNTs to be diverse in morphology and composition, varying between and within cell systems. In addition, the discovery of TNT-like extracellular protrusions, as well as observations of TNTs in vivo, has further enriched our knowledge on the diversity of TNT-like structures. Considering the complex molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of TNTs, as well as their different functions in intercellular communication, it is important to decipher how heterogeneity of TNTs is established, and to address what roles the compositional elements have in the execution of various functions. Here, we review the current knowledge on the morphological and structural diversity of TNTs, and address the relation between the formation, the structure, and the function of TNTs. PMID:24778759

  6. Femoral neck shortening after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Stephanie M; Keijsers, Noël L; Praet, Stephan F E; Heetveld, Martin J; Bhandari, Mohit; Wilssens, Jean Pierre; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2013-07-01

    This study assesses femoral neck shortening and its effect on gait pattern and muscle strength in patients with femoral neck fractures treated with internal fixation. Seventy-six patients from a multicenter randomized controlled trial participated. Patient characteristics and Short Form 12 and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were collected. Femoral neck shortening, gait parameters, and maximum isometric forces of the hip muscles were measured and differences between the fractured and contralateral leg were calculated. Variables of patients with little or no shortening, moderate shortening, and severe shortening were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. Median femoral neck shortening was 1.1 cm. Subtle changes in gait pattern, reduced gait velocity, and reduced abductor muscle strength were observed. Age, weight, and Pauwels classification were risk factors for femoral neck shortening. Femoral neck shortening decreased gait velocity and seemed to impair gait symmetry and physical functioning. In conclusion, internal fixation of femoral neck fractures results in permanent physical limitations. The relatively young and healthy patients in our study seem capable of compensating. Attention should be paid to femoral neck shortening and proper correction with a heel lift, as inadequate correction may cause physical complaints and influence outcome. PMID:23823040

  7. Distance metrics for heme protein electron tunneling.

    PubMed

    Moser, Christopher C; Chobot, Sarah E; Page, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie

    2008-01-01

    There is no doubt that distance is the principal parameter that sets the order of magnitude for electron-tunneling rates in proteins. However, there continue to be varying ways to measure electron-tunneling distances in proteins. This distance uncertainty blurs the issue of whether the intervening protein medium has been naturally selected to speed or slow any particular electron-tunneling reaction. For redox cofactors lacking metals, an edge of the cofactor can be defined that approximates the extent in space that includes most of the wavefunction associated with its tunneling electron. Beyond this edge, the wavefunction tails off much more dramatically in space. The conjugated porphyrin ring seems a reasonable edge for the metal-free pheophytins and bacteriopheophytins of photosynthesis. For a metal containing redox cofactor such as heme, an appropriate cofactor edge is more ambiguous. Electron-tunneling distance may be measured from the conjugated heme macrocycle edge or from the metal, which can be up to 4.8 A longer. In a typical protein medium, such a distance difference normally corresponds to a approximately 1000 fold decrease in tunneling rate. To address this ambiguity, we consider both natural heme protein electron transfer and light-activated electron transfer in ruthenated heme proteins. We find that the edge of the conjugated heme macrocycle provides a reliable and useful tunneling distance definition consistent with other biological electron-tunneling reactions. Furthermore, with this distance metric, heme axially- and edge-oriented electron transfers appear similar and equally well described by a simple square barrier tunneling model. This is in contrast to recent reports for metal-to-metal metrics that require exceptionally poor donor/acceptor couplings to explain heme axially-oriented electron transfers.

  8. Prediction of femoral head collapse in osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Volokh, K Y; Yoshida, H; Leali, A; Fetto, J F; Chao, E Y S

    2006-06-01

    The femoral head deteriorates in osteonecrosis. As a consequence of that, the cortical shell of the femoral head can buckle into the cancellous bone supporting it. In order to examine the buckling scenario we performed numerical analysis of a realistic femoral head model. The analysis included a solution of the hip contact problem, which provided the contact pressure distribution, and subsequent buckling simulation based on the given contact pressure. The contact problem was solved iteratively by approximating the cartilage by a discrete set of unilateral linear springs. The buckling calculations were based on a finite element mesh with brick elements for the cancellous bone and shell elements for the cortical shell. Results of 144 simulations for a variety of geometrical, material, and loading parameters strengthen the buckling scenario. They, particularly, show that the normal cancellous bone serves as a strong supporting foundation for the cortical shell and prevents it from buckling. However, under the development of osteonecrosis the deteriorating cancellous bone is unable to prevent the cortical shell from buckling and the critical pressure decreases with the decreasing Young modulus of the cancellous bone. The local buckling of the cortical shell seems to be the driving force of the progressive fracturing of the femoral head leading to its entire collapse. The buckling analysis provides an additional criterion of the femoral head collapse, the critical contact pressure. The buckling scenario also suggests a new argument in speculating on the femoral head reinforcement. If the entire collapse of the femoral head starts with the buckling of the cortical shell then it is reasonable to place the reinforcement as close to the cortical shell as possible.

  9. Femoral lipectomy increases postprandial lipemia in women.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Teri L; Bessesen, Daniel H; Cox-York, Kimberly A; Erickson, Christopher B; Law, Christopher K; Anderson, Molly K; Wang, Hong; Jackman, Matthew R; Van Pelt, Rachael E

    2015-07-01

    Femoral subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) appears to be cardioprotective compared with abdominal SAT, possibly through better triglyceride (TG) sequestration. We hypothesized that removal of femoral SAT would increase postprandial TG through a reduction in dietary fatty acid (FA) storage. Normal-weight (means ± SD; BMI 23.9 ± 2.6 kg/m(2)) women (n = 29; age 45 ± 6 yr) were randomized to femoral lipectomy (LIPO) or control (CON) and followed for 1 yr. Regional adiposity was measured by DEXA and CT. A liquid meal labeled with [(14)C]oleic acid was used to trace the appearance of dietary FA in plasma (6-h postprandial TG), breath (24-h oxidation), and SAT (24-h [(14)C]TG storage). Fasting LPL activity was measured in abdominal and femoral SAT. DEXA leg fat mass was reduced after LIPO vs. CON (Δ-1.4 ± 0.7 vs. 0.1 ± 0.5 kg, P < 0.001) and remained reduced at 1 yr (-1.1 ± 1.4 vs. -0.2 ± 0.5 kg, P < 0.05), as did CT thigh subcutaneous fat area (-39.6 ± 36.6 vs. 4.7 ± 14.6 cm(2), P < 0.05); DEXA trunk fat mass and CT visceral fat area were unchanged. Postprandial TG increased (5.9 ± 7.7 vs. -0.6 ± 5.3 × 10(3) mg/dl, P < 0.05) and femoral SAT LPL activity decreased (-21.9 ± 22.3 vs. 10.5 ± 26.5 nmol·min(-1)·g(-1), P < 0.05) 1 yr following LIPO vs. CON. There were no group differences in (14)C-labeled TG appearing in abdominal and femoral SAT or elsewhere. In conclusion, femoral fat remained reduced 1 yr following lipectomy and was accompanied by increased postprandial TG and reduced femoral SAT LPL activity. There were no changes in storage of meal-derived FA or visceral fat. Our data support a protective role for femoral adiposity on circulating TG independent of dietary FA storage and visceral adiposity.

  10. Femoral lipectomy increases postprandial lipemia in women

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Teri L.; Bessesen, Daniel H.; Cox-York, Kimberly A.; Erickson, Christopher B.; Law, Christopher K.; Anderson, Molly K.; Wang, Hong; Jackman, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Femoral subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) appears to be cardioprotective compared with abdominal SAT, possibly through better triglyceride (TG) sequestration. We hypothesized that removal of femoral SAT would increase postprandial TG through a reduction in dietary fatty acid (FA) storage. Normal-weight (means ± SD; BMI 23.9 ± 2.6 kg/m2) women (n = 29; age 45 ± 6 yr) were randomized to femoral lipectomy (LIPO) or control (CON) and followed for 1 yr. Regional adiposity was measured by DEXA and CT. A liquid meal labeled with [14C]oleic acid was used to trace the appearance of dietary FA in plasma (6-h postprandial TG), breath (24-h oxidation), and SAT (24-h [14C]TG storage). Fasting LPL activity was measured in abdominal and femoral SAT. DEXA leg fat mass was reduced after LIPO vs. CON (Δ−1.4 ± 0.7 vs. 0.1 ± 0.5 kg, P < 0.001) and remained reduced at 1 yr (−1.1 ± 1.4 vs. −0.2 ± 0.5 kg, P < 0.05), as did CT thigh subcutaneous fat area (−39.6 ± 36.6 vs. 4.7 ± 14.6 cm2, P < 0.05); DEXA trunk fat mass and CT visceral fat area were unchanged. Postprandial TG increased (5.9 ± 7.7 vs. −0.6 ± 5.3 × 103 mg/dl, P < 0.05) and femoral SAT LPL activity decreased (−21.9 ± 22.3 vs. 10.5 ± 26.5 nmol·min−1·g−1, P < 0.05) 1 yr following LIPO vs. CON. There were no group differences in 14C-labeled TG appearing in abdominal and femoral SAT or elsewhere. In conclusion, femoral fat remained reduced 1 yr following lipectomy and was accompanied by increased postprandial TG and reduced femoral SAT LPL activity. There were no changes in storage of meal-derived FA or visceral fat. Our data support a protective role for femoral adiposity on circulating TG independent of dietary FA storage and visceral adiposity. PMID:25968576

  11. Tissue level microstructure and mechanical properties of the femoral head in the proximal femur of fracture patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linwei; Meng, Guangwei; Gong, He; Zhu, Dong; Gao, Jiazi; Fan, Yubo

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the regional variations of trabecular morphological parameters and mechanical parameters of the femoral head, as well as to determine the relationship between trabecular morphological and mechanical parameters. Seven femoral heads from patients with fractured proximal femur were scanned using a micro-CT system. Each femoral head was divided into 12 sub-regions according to the trabecular orientation. One trabecular cubic model was reconstructed from each sub-region. A total of 81 trabecular models were reconstructed, except three destroyed sub-regions from two femoral heads during the surgery. Trabecular morphological parameters, i.e. trabecular separation (Tb.Sp), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), specific bone surface (BS/BV), bone volume fraction (BV/TV), structural model index (SMI), and degree of anisotropy (DA) were measured. Micro-finite element analyses were performed for each cube to obtain the apparent Young's modulus and tissue level von Mises stress distribution under 1 % compressive strain along three orthogonal directions, respectively. Results revealed significant regional variations in the morphological parameters (). Young's moduli along the trabecular orientation were significantly higher than those along the other two directions. In general, trabecular mechanical properties in the medial region were lower than those in the lateral region. Trabecular mechanical parameters along the trabecular orientation were significantly correlated with BS/BV, BV/TV, Tb.Th, and DA. In this study, regional variations of microstructural features and mechanical properties in the femoral head of patients with proximal femur fracture were thoroughly investigated at the tissue level. The results of this study will help to elucidate the mechanism of femoral head fracture for reducing fracture risk and developing treatment strategies for the elderly.

  12. Micromotion of cemented and uncemented femoral components.

    PubMed

    Burke, D W; O'Connor, D O; Zalenski, E B; Jasty, M; Harris, W H

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the initial stability of cemented and uncemented femoral components within the femoral canals of cadaver femurs during simulated single limb stance and stair climbing. Both types were very stable in simulated single limb stance (maximum micromotion of 42 microns for cemented and 30 microns for uncemented components). However, in simulated stair climbing, the cemented components were much more stable than the uncemented components (76 microns as against 280 microns). There was also greater variation in the stability of uncemented components in simulated stair climbing, with two of the seven components moving 200 microns or more. Future implant designs should aim to improve the initial stability of cementless femoral components under torsional loads; this should improve the chances of bony ingrowth. PMID:1991771

  13. Emergency intravenous access through the femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Swanson, R S; Uhlig, P N; Gross, P L; McCabe, C J

    1984-04-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of femoral venous catheterization for resuscitation of critically ill patients in the emergency department setting. From May 1982 to April 1983, 100 attempts were made at percutaneous insertion of a large-bore catheter into the femoral veins of patients presenting to our emergency department in cardiac arrest or requiring rapid fluid resuscitation. Eighty-nine attempts were successful. Insertion was generally considered easy, and flow rates were excellent. The only noted complications were four arterial punctures and one minor groin hematoma. This study suggests that short-term percutaneous catheterization of the femoral vein provides rapid, safe, and effective intravenous access. PMID:6703430

  14. Navigated femoral shaft fracture treatment: current status.

    PubMed

    Hawi, Nael; Haentjes, Jonas; Suero, Eduardo M; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Krettek, Christian; Stübig, Timo; Hüfner, Tobias; Citak, Musa

    2012-01-01

    Femoral malrotation is a common complication after internal fixation of a femoral shaft fracture. The only valid, objective monitoring method is computer tomography-assisted torsion measurement between the proximal and distal femur; unfortunately, this can only be carried out postoperatively. A difference of 15° compared to the contralateral femur is seen as an indication for revision. With the development of computer-assisted surgery, new possibilities for performing torsion control and correction intraoperatively has been introduced. These methods also allow for navigation-assisted definition of the optimal incision site, intramedullary access, femoral nail and interlocking. The main problem lies in the extra time of surgery, which is due to performing all the steps of the surgery navigated. The solution for this problem is "hybrid navigation", in which the surgeon can select the steps he needs from the navigation system, depending on his experience or surgical technique.

  15. Optimizing Stability in Femoral Neck Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ye; Hao, Jiandong; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing stability of femoral neck fracture fixation is important in obtaining a successful outcome. The mechanical problems and strategies for achieving optimal stability differ depending on patients' age and degree of osteoporosis. Femoral neck fractures in younger adults usually result from high-energy trauma and have a vertical fracture pattern. Strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include placing additional screws at right angles to the fracture plane and medial buttress plate augmentation. In elderly patients, screw position relative to the intact cortical femoral neck bone is of critical importance. Additional strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include the concept of length stable fixation, use of adjunctive calcium phosphate cement, and use of novel fixed angle fixation implants. PMID:26488776

  16. Reverse distal femoral locking compression plate a salvage option in nonunion of proximal femoral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dumbre Patil, Sampat S; Karkamkar, Sachin S; Patil, Vaishali S Dumbre; Patil, Shailesh S; Ranaware, Abhijeet S

    2016-01-01

    Background: When primary fixation of proximal femoral fractures with implants fails, revision osteosynthesis may be challenging. Tracts of previous implants and remaining insufficient bone stock in the proximal femur pose unique problems for the treatment. Intramedullary implants like proximal femoral nail (PFN) or surface implants like Dynamic Condylar Screw (DCS) are few of the described implants for revision surgery. There is no evidence in the literature to choose one implant over the other. We used the reverse distal femur locking compression plate (LCP) of the contralateral side in such cases undergoing revision surgery. This implant has multiple options of fixation in proximal femur and its curvature along the length matches the anterior bow of the femur. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of this implant in salvage situations. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients of failed primary proximal femoral fractures who underwent revision surgery with reverse distal femoral locking plate from February 2009 to November 2012 were included in this retrospective study. There were 18 subtrochanteric fractures and two ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures, which exhibited delayed union or nonunion. The study included 14 males and six females. The mean patient age was 43.6 years (range 22–65 years) and mean followup period was 52.1 months (range 27–72 months). Delayed union was considered when clinical and radiological signs of union failed to progress at the end of four months from initial surgery. Results: All fractures exhibited union without any complications. Union was assessed clinically and radiologically. One case of ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fracture required bone grafting at the second stage for delayed union of the femoral shaft fracture. Conclusions: Reverse distal femoral LCP of the contralateral side can be used as a salvage option for failed fixation of proximal femoral fractures exhibiting nonunion. PMID:27512218

  17. Thermal creation of a spin current by Seebeck spin tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, R.; Le Breton, J. C.; Deac, A. M.; Saito, H.; Yuasa, S.

    2013-09-01

    The thermoelectric analog of spin-polarized tunneling, namely Seebeck spin tunneling, is a recently discovered phenomenon that arises from the spin-dependent Seebeck coefficient of a magnetic tunnel contact. In a tunnel junction with one ferromagnetic electrode and one non-magnetic electrode, a temperature difference between the two electrodes creates a spin current across the contact. Here, the basic principle and the observation of Seebeck spin tunneling are described. It is shown how it can be used to create a spin accumulation in silicon driven by a heat flow across a magnetic tunnel contact, without a charge tunnel current. The sign of the spin current depends on the direction of the heat flow, whereas its magnitude is anisotropic, i.e., dependent on the absolute orientation of the magnetization of the ferromagnet. The connection between Seebeck spin tunneling and the tunnel magneto-Seebeck effect, observed in metal magnetic tunnel junctions, is also clarified. Seebeck spin tunneling may be used to convert waste heat into useful thermal spin currents that aid or replace electrical spin current, and thereby improve the energy efficiency of spintronic devices and technologies.

  18. Blood flow interpretation in femoral pseudoaneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Sang-Ho; Choi, Young Ho; Kim, Hyoung-Ho; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Doh, Deog-Hee

    2013-06-01

    A femoral artery pseudoaneurysm is one complication of vascular intervention, and the incidence is increasing. Early management is then needed to avoid potential dangers from it. It differs from a true aneurysm in that it doesn't include any component of the vascular wall, and is not studied as much as a true aneurysm. Here, a model of a femoral pseudoaneurysm was made and a Computational Fluid Dynamics(CFD) simulation was verified with PIV experiment. Afterwards, a CFD simulation with two different models was performed to look for any findings which may help in developing new treatment methods.

  19. Management of femoral head osteonecrosis: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Goyal, Tarun; Sen, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is a disabling condition of young individuals with ill-defined etiology and pathogenesis. Remains untreated, about 70-80% of the patients progress to secondary hip arthritis. Both operative and nonoperative treatments have been described with variable success rate. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key for success in preserving the hip joint. Once femoral head collapses (>2 mm) or if there is secondary degeneration, hip conservation procedures become ineffective and arthroplasty remains the only better option. We reviewed 157 studies that evaluate different treatment modalities of ONFH and then a final consensus on treatment was made. PMID:25593355

  20. 4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific Standard Double-Track Tunnel, ca. 1913. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 18 (HAER No. CA-197), Tunnel 34 (HAER No. CA-206), and Tunnel 1 (HAER No. CA-207). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  1. Outcome of uncemented primary femoral stems for treatment of femoral head osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, Marc W; Hungerford, David S; Jones, Lynne C

    2009-04-01

    Cementless total hip replacement has been advocated for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. This study examined the outcome of the femoral stem of four generations of an uncemented, proximally porous-coated, chrome-cobalt total hip prosthesis. There were 158 cases in 141 osteonecrosis patients (74 men, 67 women) who had a mean age of 46 years (range, 17-83 years). The mean follow-up was 103 months (range, 20-235 months). The femoral components of 144 cases were not revised and had a mean Harris hip score of 84 (+/-15) at final follow-up. Of the 14 revisions (8.9%), the primary reasons for revision were loosening or significant osteolysis. There were one infection and one chronic dislocation. Proximally porous-coated, anatomic, press-fit stems provide excellent long-term results in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

  2. Variable-Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1921-01-01

    Wind Tunnel #2, building interior. Reinforced concrete foundation for Variable-Density Tunnel (VDT) under construction. The tank and contents weighed about 100 tons. Negative on roll #1 of copy negatives returned by National Archives on 70mm film rolls.

  3. Femoral fractures in the extremely elderly

    PubMed Central

    Guido, Giulio; Giannotti, Stefano; Bottai, Vanna; Ghilardi, Marco; Bianchi, Maria Giulia; Ceglia, Michael James

    2011-01-01

    Summary At the Trauma Unit of Pisa we performed an observational study reviewing nineties that about 200 patients were treated and underwent surgery for femoral neck fracture from 1998 to 2005. The clinical and radiographic results obtained were discrete, with a mortality of 42.5%, the survivors are still having a good quality of life. PMID:22461814

  4. Femoral Neck Version Affects Medial Femorotibial Loading

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, T. A.; Digas, Georgios; Bikos, Ch.; Karamoulas, V.; Magnissalis, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of the possible effect that femoral version may have on the bearing equilibrium conditions developed on the medial tibiofemoral compartment. A digital 3D solid model of the left physiological adult femur was used to create morphological variations of different neck-shaft angles (varus 115, normal 125, and valgus 135 degrees) and version angles (−10, 0, and +10 degrees). By means of finite element modeling and analysis techniques (FEM-FEA), a virtual experiment was executed with the femoral models aligned in a neutral upright position, distally supported on a fully congruent tibial tray and proximally loaded with a vertical only hip joint load of 2800 N. Equivalent stresses and their distribution on the medial compartment were computed and comparatively evaluated. Within our context, the neck-shaft angle proved to be of rather indifferent influence. Reduction of femoral version, however, appeared as the most influencing parameter regarding the tendency of the medial compartment to establish its bearing equilibrium towards posteromedial directions, as a consequence of the corresponding anteroposterior changes of the hip centre over the horizontal tibiofemoral plane. We found a correlation between femoral anteversion and medial tibiofemoral compartment contact pressure. Our findings will be further elucidated by more sophisticated FEM-FEA and by clinical studies that are currently planned. PMID:24959355

  5. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF CHILDREN DIAPHYSEAL FEMORAL FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Cassiano Ricardo; Traldi, Eduardo Franceschini; Posser, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the personal, fracture, treatment and complication characteristics among patients with pediatric femoral shaft fractures attended at the pediatric orthopedic service of the Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital. Methods: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study on a population consisting of patients with femoral shaft fractures, aged between birth and 14 years and 11 months, who were divided into four age groups. Information was obtained from medical records and was transferred to a survey questionnaire to present personal, fracture, treatment and complication variables. Results: The study population consisted of 96 patients. Their mean age was 6.8 years. The cases were predominantly among males, comprising closed fractures on the right side, in the middle third with a single line. Regarding fracture etiology, traffic accidents predominated overall in the sample. Most of the patients (74 to 77.1%) presented femoral fractures as their only injury. Conservative treatment predominated in the group younger than six years of age, and surgical treatment in the group aged 6 to 14 years and 11 months. The complications observed until bone union were: discrepancy, infection and movement limitation. The mean time taken for consolidation was 9.6 ± 2.4 weeks, varying with age. Conclusion: The features of these fractures were similar to those described in the literature and the treatment used showed good results. The Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital has used the treatment proposed in the literature for pediatric femoral shaft fractures. PMID:27042619

  6. Variable-Density Tunnel - Wind Tunnel #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    Underside of the Variable-Density Tunnel (VDT). The compressors are to the left. Balance detail - entrance view of wind tunnel #2. The photographer was probably shooting film for Dr. Joseph Ames' Wilbur Wright Memorial Lecture given to the Royal Aeronautical Society on May 31, 1923.

  7. The Tunnels of Samos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This 'Project Mathematics' series video from CalTech presents the tunnel of Samos, a famous underground aquaduct tunnel located near the capital of Pithagorion (named after the famed Greek mathematician, Pythagoras, who lived there), on one of the Greek islands. This tunnel was constructed around 600 BC by King Samos and was built under a nearby mountain. Through film footage and computer animation, the mathematical principles and concepts of why and how this aquaduct tunnel was built are explained.

  8. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  9. Bone tunnel enlargement after ACL reconstruction using autologous hamstring tendons: a CT study

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Raffaele; Vadalà, Antonio; Argento, Giuseppe; Di Sanzo, Vincenzo

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prospectively the increase in the size of the tibial and femoral bone tunnel following arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with quadrupled-hamstring autograft. Methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients underwent arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with quadrupled-hamstring autograft. Preoperative clinical evaluation was performed using the Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity level, and International Knee Documentation Committee forms and a KT-1000 arthrometer (side to side). Computed tomography (CT) of the femoral and tibial tunnel was performed on the day after operation in all cases and at mean follow-up of 10 months (range 9–11 months).Results: All of the clinical evaluation scales performed showed an overall improvement. The postoperative anterior laxity difference was <3 mm in 16 patients (70%) and 3–5 mm in seven patients (30%). The mean average femoral tunnel diameter increased significantly (3%) from 9.04±0.05 mm postoperatively to 9.3±0.8 mm at 10 months; tibial tunnel increased significantly (11%) from 9.03±0.04 mm to 10±0.8 mm. There were no statistically significant differences between tunnel enlargement, clinical results, and arthrometer evaluation. Conclusions: The rate of tunnel widening observed in this study seems to be lower than that reported in previous studies that used different techniques. We conclude that an anatomical surgical technique and a less aggressive rehabilitation process influenced the amount of tunnel enlargement after ACL reconstruction with doubled hamstrings. PMID:16683112

  10. Confocal Annular Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The physics of Josephson tunnel junctions drastically depends on their geometrical configurations and here we show that also tiny geometrical details play a determinant role. More specifically, we develop the theory of short and long annular Josephson tunnel junctions delimited by two confocal ellipses. The behavior of a circular annular Josephson tunnel junction is then seen to be simply a special case of the above result. For junctions having a normalized perimeter less than one, the threshold curves in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field of arbitrary orientations are derived and computed even in the case with trapped Josephson vortices. For longer junctions, a numerical analysis is carried out after the derivation of the appropriate motion equation for the Josephson phase. We found that the system is modeled by a modified and perturbed sine-Gordon equation with a space-dependent effective Josephson penetration length inversely proportional to the local junction width. Both the fluxon statics and dynamics are deeply affected by the non-uniform annulus width. Static zero-field multiple-fluxon solutions exist even in the presence of a large bias current. The tangential velocity of a traveling fluxon is not determined by the balance between the driving and drag forces due to the dissipative losses. Furthermore, the fluxon motion is characterized by a strong radial inward acceleration which causes electromagnetic radiation concentrated at the ellipse equatorial points.

  11. Autonomous Robotic Inspection in Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protopapadakis, E.; Stentoumis, C.; Doulamis, N.; Doulamis, A.; Loupos, K.; Makantasis, K.; Kopsiaftis, G.; Amditis, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an automatic robotic inspector for tunnel assessment is presented. The proposed platform is able to autonomously navigate within the civil infrastructures, grab stereo images and process/analyse them, in order to identify defect types. At first, there is the crack detection via deep learning approaches. Then, a detailed 3D model of the cracked area is created, utilizing photogrammetric methods. Finally, a laser profiling of the tunnel's lining, for a narrow region close to detected crack is performed; allowing for the deduction of potential deformations. The robotic platform consists of an autonomous mobile vehicle; a crane arm, guided by the computer vision-based crack detector, carrying ultrasound sensors, the stereo cameras and the laser scanner. Visual inspection is based on convolutional neural networks, which support the creation of high-level discriminative features for complex non-linear pattern classification. Then, real-time 3D information is accurately calculated and the crack position and orientation is passed to the robotic platform. The entire system has been evaluated in railway and road tunnels, i.e. in Egnatia Highway and London underground infrastructure.

  12. The Association of Femoral Neck Stress Fractures with Femoral Acetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Safran, Marc R.; Goldin, Michael; Anderson, Christian; Fredericson, Michael; Stevens, Kathryn J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if there is an increased incidence of femoral acetabular impingement (FAI) in patients presenting with stress fractures of the femoral neck. Methods: After IRB approval, the imaging studies of 25 athletes (22 females, 3 males, mean age 26, range 19 - 39 years) with femoral neck stress injuries were assessed for the presence of features suggesting FAI, including acetabular retroversion, coxa profunda, abnormal femoral head-neck junction, fibrocystic change, os acetabulae, labral tear and chondral injury. All subjects had to have an adequate AP Pelvis radiograph, a lateral radiograph of the affected hip, and an MRI of the affected hip. The alpha angle, anterior offset ratio, and center to edge (CE) angle were measured on radiographs. The grade of stress injury was determined on MR images. All images and measurements were made by a musculoskeletal fellowship trained radiologist, a fellowship trained orthopaedic surgeon, an orthopaedic sports medicine fellow and a physical medicine and rehabilitation resident. Charts were reviewed to determine treatment of the stress fracture, outcome and final follow up, as well as to determine if the patient had any further treatment for their hip. Results: Of the 25 hips (18 right, 7 left) with femoral neck stress reactions, 9 were grade 2 (bone marrow edema), 5 were grade 3 (high T2 and low T1 marrow signal), and 11 were grade 4 (stress fracture). Twenty patients (80%) had coxa profunda - where the floor of the cotyloid fossa touches or extends beyond the ilioischial line (incidence in general population is 15.2% of males, and 19.4% of females). Coxa profunda, defined by the floor of the cotyloid fossa touching or extending beyond the ilioischial line and a center edge angle of more than 35o, was present in 28% of subjects. Acetabular retroversion as assessed by the crossover sign was present in 42% (normal incidence is 5% of population). Center edge angle was greater than 35o in 20% and greater than 40 o

  13. Secure fixation of femoral bone plug with a suspensory button in anatomical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone graft

    PubMed Central

    TAKETOMI, SHUJI; INUI, HIROSHI; NAKAMURA, KENSUKE; YAMAGAMI, RYOTA; TAHARA, KEITARO; SANADA, TAKAKI; MASUDA, HIRONARI; TANAKA, SAKAE; NAKAGAWA, TAKUMI

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the efficacy and safety of using a suspensory button for femoral fixation in anatomical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) graft have not been established. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate bone plug integration onto the femoral socket and migration of the bone plug and the EndoButton (EB) (Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA, USA) after rectangular tunnel ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft. Methods thirty-four patients who underwent anatomical rectangular ACL reconstruction with BPTB graft using EB for femoral fixation and in whom three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) was performed one week and one year after surgery were included in this study. Bone plug integration onto the femoral socket, bone plug migration, soft tissue interposition, EB migration and EB rotation were evaluated on 3D CT. The clinical outcome was also assessed and correlated with the imaging outcomes. Results the bone plug was integrated onto the femoral socket in all cases. The incidence of bone plug migration, soft tissue interposition, EB migration and EB rotation was 15, 15, 9 and 56%, respectively. No significant association was observed between the imaging outcomes. The postoperative mean Lysholm score was 97.1 ± 5.0 points. The postoperative side-to-side difference, evaluated using a KT-2000 arthrometer, averaged 0.5 ± 1.3 mm. There were no complications associated with EB use. Imaging outcomes did not affect the postoperative KT side-to-side difference. Conclusions the EB is considered a reliable device for femoral fixation in anatomical rectangular tunnel ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:26889465

  14. Loosening of the femoral component of total hip replacement after plugging the femoral canal.

    PubMed

    Harris, W H; McCarthy, J C; O'Neill, D A

    1982-01-01

    A roentgen follow-up study was done of 171 total hip replacements at an average of 3.3 years (range 2 to 5 years) after insertion to assess the loosening rate in older adult patients (average age 60 years) in whom the medullary canal was plugged. The cement (Simplex P) was introduced using a cement gun. The femoral components used were CAD and HD-2 in design, made of chrome cobalt alloy. Evaluation was made according to three categories of loosening: definite (requiring evidence of migration of the component or the cement), probable (requiring a continuous radiolucent zone around the cement mantle in one or more radiographic views), or possible (requiring a radiolucent zone that occupied 50% or more of the cement-bone interface in one or more views but was not continuous). One hip was revised for a loose femoral component. Another patient has asymptomatic subsidence of the femoral component. Thus the total incidence of definitely loose femoral components was 1.1%. No hip was classified as probably loose. Seven hips (4%) were rated as possibly loose. Compared to four other reported series of similar groups of patients followed for like duration, this incidence of definitely loose components is statistically significantly less than in nonplugged canals. The other differences among the series compared, such as stem design, type of cement introduction, modulus of elasticity of the metal used, presence or absence of a collar, and dates during which the surgery was done, are also discussed. Plugging the femoral canal; introducing the cement with a cement gun; using a femoral stem that largely fills the medullary canal, has a collar, and has a rounded rectangular cross section with no medial stress risers made of a superalloy with a modulus of elasticity of about 200 GPa--all these factors were associated with a low (1.1%) incidence of femoral component loosening at 3 years. PMID:7166501

  15. Femoral taperosis: an accident waiting to happen?

    PubMed

    Wassef, A J; Schmalzried, T P

    2013-11-01

    A modular femoral head-neck junction has practical advantages in total hip replacement. Taper fretting and corrosion have so far been an infrequent cause of revision. The role of design and manufacturing variables continues to be debated. Over the past decade several changes in technology and clinical practice might result in an increase in clinically significant taper fretting and corrosion. Those factors include an increased usage of large diameter (36 mm) heads, reduced femoral neck and taper dimensions, greater variability in taper assembly with smaller incision surgery, and higher taper stresses due to increased patient weight and/or physical activity. Additional studies are needed to determine the role of taper assembly compared with design, manufacturing and other implant variables.

  16. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    SciTech Connect

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-02-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head.

  17. Alternative reliable techniques in femoral torsion measurement.

    PubMed

    Delialioglu, M Onder; Tasbas, Bulent A; Bayrakci, Kenan; Daglar, Bulent; Kurt, Murat; Agar, Mustafa; Gunel, Ugur

    2006-01-01

    The clinical and conventional bi-planar determinations of femoral torsion were compared with the tomographic technique, the reliability of which was confirmed. Femoral torsions were measured with the trochanteric prominence angle test, the sinus-wave bi-planar conventional radiographic technique, the modified Hermann bi-planar conventional radiographic technique and the limited three-dimensional volumetric tomography technique in 34 femora of 17 patients. There was a strong correlation between the modified Hermann and the limited tomography techniques for 14 intact and 20 fractured femora. If limited three-dimensional volumetric tomography cannot be obtained, the modified Hermann bi-planar conventional radiographic technique must be used in patients who have scarring about the proximal femur and obesity. Otherwise use of the trochanteric prominence angle test is much more cost-effective and is as accurate as the limited three-dimensional volumetric tomography technique.

  18. Microwave sterilization of femoral head allograft.

    PubMed

    Dunsmuir, Robert A; Gallacher, Grace

    2003-10-01

    The potential shortage of allograft bone has led to the need to investigate other sources of bone for allografts. Some allograft bone donated from primary total hip arthroplasty recipients must be discarded or treated to become usable as a result of bacterial contamination. Femoral head allografts were contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. A domestic microwave oven was used. The contaminated bone was exposed to microwave irradiation for different time periods. The samples were then cultured to attempt to grow the two bacterial species. The contaminated bone samples failed to grow any organisms after 2 min of exposure to microwave irradiation. This study shows that sterilization of femoral head allografts contaminated with S. aureus and B. subtilis can be achieved with microwave irradiation in a domestic microwave oven. This method of sterilization of bone allografts is cheap, easily used, and an effective way to process contaminated bone. PMID:14532216

  19. Femoral shaft stress fractures in athletes.

    PubMed

    Hershman, E B; Lombardo, J; Bergfeld, J A

    1990-01-01

    Stress fractures of the femoral shaft in athletes occur most commonly in the proximal third of the femur. They can, however, also be found in the mid- or distal third. Conservative treatment is highly successful in healing these fractures without complications. Athletes can usually return to activity in 8 to 14 weeks. Recognition of the symptoms characteristic of these fractures (vague thigh pain, diffuse tenderness, no trauma) will assist early diagnosis. Early definitive diagnosis can be made by radionuclide scanning or later, by plain radiography, if symptoms have been present for a sufficient period. Diagnosis is not limited to novice runners since runners with significant mileage, or baseball or basketball players, can develop femoral shaft stress fractures.

  20. Bipolar hemiarthroplasty in femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, R; Arya, R; Bhan, S

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-two elderly patients with a femoral neck fracture treated by bipolar hemiarthroplasty and 36 patients (matched for age) with an Austin-Moore hemiarthroplasty were followed-up and compared. Bipolar replacement resulted in a higher percentage of satisfactory results, less postoperative pain, greater range of movement, more rapid return to unassisted activity, fewer unsatisfactory results and no acetabular erosion. The device functioned as bipolar in all the cases studied for inner-bearing motion.

  1. Updated Outcomes of Prophylactic Femoral Fixation.

    PubMed

    Kreul, Sarah M; Sorger, Joel I; Rajamanickam, Victoria P; Heiner, John P

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increasing number of patients with metastatic bone disease (MBD), minimal data exist regarding outcomes of patients undergoing prophylactic femoral fixation for MBD when compared with other frequently performed orthopedic operations, such as hemiarthroplasty of the femur. The authors performed a retrospective database review evaluating these procedures due to similar operative times and patient populations and also reviewed common comorbidities such as body mass index (BMI). The goal was to provide updated results of prophylactic femoral fixation and evaluate whether certain patient risk factors (eg, BMI) altered 30-day survival for patients with MBD. The authors reviewed 1849 patients with and without MBD treated by prophylactic fixation and hemiarthroplasty from 2006 to 2011 identified in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. There were no significant differences in complications between patients undergoing surgical treatment for impending or actual femoral fracture. In addition, there were no differences between the 217 patients with MBD in either the hemiarthroplasty or prophylactic fixation groups because the rate of death within 30 days postoperatively was 5.56% and 3.30%, respectively (P=.526). When comparing BMI, obese patients had higher rates of wound infection, and underweight patients were more likely to develop pneumonia or die within 30 days postoperatively. Patients with impending femur fractures benefit from prophylactic fixation and perform as well in the short term as patients undergoing hemiarthroplasty. Certain BMI categories (underweight or obese) contributed to poorer outcomes. These findings provide updated information for discussing risks and benefits with surgical candidates.

  2. Autologous Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Failure Using the Anteromedial Portal Technique With Suspensory Femoral Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Galdi, Balazs; Reyes, Allan; Brabston, Eugene W.; Levine, William N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The anteromedial portal technique for drilling of the femoral tunnel during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been advocated by many surgeons as allowing improved access to the anatomical footprint. Furthermore, suspensory fixation of soft tissue grafts has become popularized because of complications associated with cross-pin fixation. Concerns regarding the use of both have recently arisen. Purpose: To raise awareness of the increased risk of graft failure when using the anteromedial portal technique with suspensory femoral fixation during ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: From November 1998 to August 2012, a total of 465 primary ACL reconstructions were performed using quadrupled hamstring autograft tendons, with drilling of the femoral tunnel performed via the transtibial portal. Graft fixation on the femur was achieved with cross-pin fixation, while interference screw fixation was used on the tibia. From September 2012 to October 2013, there were 69 reconstructions performed through an anteromedial portal. While there was no change in graft choice, a change was made to using suspensory femoral fixation. No other surgical or postoperative rehabilitation changes were made. Results: During the 14-year period in which ACL reconstructions were performed via the transtibial portal and with cross-pin fixation, 2 graft failures (0.4% failure rate) were reported. After switching to the anteromedial portal with suspensory fixation, 7 graft failures (10.1% failure rate) were reported over a 13-month period. These were 5 male and 2 female patients, with a mean age of 18.8 years—all elite athletes. The same surgical technique was used in all patients, and all patients had at least an 8 mm–diameter graft. Patients were cleared to return to sport at an average of 8.4 months postoperatively, after completing functional performance tests. Of the 7 patients, 6 sustained a rerupture of the graft within

  3. Prophylactic pinning for slipped capital femoral epiphysis: does it affect proximal femoral morphology?

    PubMed

    Cousins, Gerard R; Campbell, Donald M; Wilson, Neil I L; Maclean, Jamie G B

    2016-05-01

    This study was designed to determine whether prophylactic pinning of the unaffected hip in unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis affects the proximal femoral morphology. Twenty-four hips prophylactically pinned were compared with 26 cases observed. The articulotrochanteric distance (ATD) and the trochanteric-trochanteric distance (TTD) were measured. Postoperative radiographs were compared with final follow-up radiographs. The final TTD : ATD ratio was higher (P=0.048) in the pinned group, suggesting relative coxa vara/breva. There was a smaller difference between the two hips in the prophylactically pinned group (0.7) as opposed to those observed (1.47). Prophylactic pinning does not cause growth to stop immediately but alters the proximal femoral morphology.

  4. The cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Based on theoretical studies and experience with a low speed cryogenic tunnel and with a 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, the cryogenic wind tunnel concept was shown to offer many advantages with respect to the attainment of full scale Reynolds number at reasonable levels of dynamic pressure in a ground based facility. The unique modes of operation available in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel make possible for the first time the separation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and aeroelastic effects. By reducing the drive-power requirements to a level where a conventional fan drive system may be used, the cryogenic concept makes possible a tunnel with high productivity and run times sufficiently long to allow for all types of tests at reduced capital costs and, for equal amounts of testing, reduced total energy consumption in comparison with other tunnel concepts.

  5. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  6. Inelastic tunnel diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Power is extracted from plasmons, photons, or other guided electromagnetic waves at infrared to midultraviolet frequencies by inelastic tunneling in metal-insulator-semiconductor-metal diodes. Inelastic tunneling produces power by absorbing plasmons to pump electrons to higher potential. Specifically, an electron from a semiconductor layer absorbs a plasmon and simultaneously tunnels across an insulator into metal layer which is at higher potential. The diode voltage determines the fraction of energy extracted from the plasmons; any excess is lost to heat.

  7. Resonance enhanced tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Yoshimura, M.

    2000-12-01

    Time evolution of tunneling in thermal medium is examined using the real-time semiclassical formalism previously developed. Effect of anharmonic terms in the potential well is shown to give a new mechanism of resonance enhanced tunneling. If the friction from environment is small enough, this mechanism may give a very large enhancement for the tunneling rate. The case of the asymmetric wine bottle potential is worked out in detail.

  8. Femoral neck structure and function in early hominins.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Christopher B; Higgins, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    All early (Pliocene-Early Pleistocene) hominins exhibit some differences in proximal femoral morphology from modern humans, including a long femoral neck and a low neck-shaft angle. In addition, australopiths (Au. afarensis, Au. africanus, Au. boisei, Paranthropus boisei), but not early Homo, have an "anteroposteriorly compressed" femoral neck and a small femoral head relative to femoral shaft breadth. Superoinferior asymmetry of cortical bone in the femoral neck has been claimed to be human-like in australopiths. In this study, we measured superior and inferior cortical thicknesses at the middle and base of the femoral neck using computed tomography in six Au. africanus and two P. robustus specimens. Cortical asymmetry in the fossils is closer overall to that of modern humans than to apes, although many values are intermediate between humans and apes, or even more ape-like in the midneck. Comparisons of external femoral neck and head dimensions were carried out for a more comprehensive sample of South and East African australopiths (n = 17) and two early Homo specimens. These show that compared with modern humans, femoral neck superoinferior, but not anteroposterior breadth, is larger relative to femoral head breadth in australopiths, but not in early Homo. Both internal and external characteristics of the australopith femoral neck indicate adaptation to relatively increased superoinferior bending loads, compared with both modern humans and early Homo. These observations, and a relatively small femoral head, are consistent with a slightly altered gait pattern in australopiths, involving more lateral deviation of the body center of mass over the stance limb. PMID:23341246

  9. [Slipped capital femoral epiphysis associated with hyperparathyroidism. A case report].

    PubMed

    Khiari, Karima; Cherif, Lotfi; Ben Abdallah, Nejib; Maazoun, Imen; Hadj Ali, Insaf; Bentaarit, Chokri; Turki, Sami; Ben Maïz, Hedi

    2003-12-01

    Slippage of the upper femoral epiphysis can occur in association with multiple endocrine imbalances. A case of slipped femoral epiphysis with primary hyperparathyroidism is reported. The patient was an adolescent, 16 Years of age, who presented bilateral slipped epiphysis. Investigation showed that he had hypercalcemia (3.1 mmol/l) related to primary hyperparathyroidism. A parathyroid adenoma was removed. Outcome was favorable and the slipped femoral epiphyses did not require a specific treatment.

  10. Atom Tunneling in Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meisner, Jan; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-04-25

    Quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms is increasingly found to play an important role in many chemical transformations. Experimentally, atom tunneling can be indirectly detected by temperature-independent rate constants at low temperature or by enhanced kinetic isotope effects. In contrast, the influence of tunneling on the reaction rates can be monitored directly through computational investigations. The tunnel effect, for example, changes reaction paths and branching ratios, enables chemical reactions in an astrochemical environment that would be impossible by thermal transition, and influences biochemical processes. PMID:26990917

  11. Clinical Results of Internal Fixation of Subcapital Femoral Neck Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Ho; Shin, Joong Sup; Shin, Eun Ho; Ahn, Chi Hoon; Choi, Geon Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Subcapital femoral neck is known to cause many complications, such as avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head or nonunion, compared with other femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence of AVN and fixation failures in patients treated with internal fixation using cannulated screws for the subcapital femoral neck fractures. Methods This study targeted a total of 84 cases of subcapital femoral neck fractures that underwent internal fixation using cannulated screws. The average follow-up time after surgery was 36.8 months (range, 24 to 148 months). Results Nine hips (10.7%) showing AVN of the femoral head and 6 hips (7.1%) showing fixation failures were observed. The factors affecting the incidence of AVN of the femoral head after sustaining fractures correlated well with fracture types in the Garden classification (p = 0.030). The factors affecting fixation failure were the degree of reduction (p = 0.001) measured by the Garden alignment index and firm fixation (p = 0.009) assessed using the technique of 3-point fixation through the inferomedial cortical bone of the femoral neck. Conclusions The complication rates for subcapital femoral neck fractures were lower than those previously reported; hence, internal fixation could be a primary treatment option for these fractures. PMID:27247738

  12. [Isolated true aneurysm of the deep femoral artery].

    PubMed

    Salomon du Mont, L; Holzer, T; Kazandjian, C; Saucy, F; Corpataux, J M; Rinckenbach, S; Déglise, S

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysms of the deep femoral artery, accounting for 5% of all femoral aneurysms, are uncommon. There is a serious risk of rupture. We report the case of an 83-year-old patient with a painless pulsatile mass in the right groin due to an aneurysm of the deep femoral artery. History taking revealed no cardiovascular risk factors and no other aneurysms at other localizations. The etiology remained unclear because no recent history of local trauma or puncture was found. ACT angiography was performed, revealing a true isolated aneurysm of the deep femoral artery with a diameter of 90mm, beginning 1cm after its origin. There were no signs of rupture or distal emboli. Due to unsuitable anatomy for an endovascular approach, the patient underwent open surgery, with exclusion of the aneurysm and interposition of an 8-mm Dacron graft to preserve deep femoral artery flow. Due to their localization, the diagnosis and the management of aneurysms of the deep femoral artery can be difficult. Options are surgical exclusion or an endovascular approach in the absence of symptoms or as a bridging therapy. If possible, blood flow to the distal deep femoral artery should be maintained, the decision depending also on the patency of the superficial femoral artery. In case of large size, aneurysms of the deep femoral artery should be treated without any delay.

  13. Correlation Between Residual Displacement and Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head Following Cannulated Screw Fixation of Femoral Neck Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Xu, Gui-Jun; Han, Zhe; Jiang, Xuan; Zhang, Cheng-Bao; Dong, Qiang; Ma, Jian-Xiong; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to introduce a new method for measuring the residual displacement of the femoral head after internal fixation and explore the relationship between residual displacement and osteonecrosis with femoral head, and to evaluate the risk factors associated with osteonecrosis of the femoral head in patients with femoral neck fractures treated by closed reduction and percutaneous cannulated screw fixation. One hundred and fifty patients who sustained intracapsular femoral neck fractures between January 2011 and April 2013 were enrolled in the study. All were treated with closed reduction and percutaneous cannulated screw internal fixation. The residual displacement of the femoral head after surgery was measured by 3-dimensional reconstruction that evaluated the quality of the reduction. Other data that might affect prognosis were also obtained from outpatient follow-up, telephone calls, or case reviews. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to assess the intrinsic relationship between the risk factors and the osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head occurred in 27 patients (18%). Significant differences were observed regarding the residual displacement of the femoral head and the preoperative Garden classification. Moreover, we found more or less residual displacement of femoral head in all patients with high quality of reduction based on x-ray by the new technique. There was a close relationship between residual displacement and ONFH. There exists limitation to evaluate the quality of reduction by x-ray. Three-dimensional reconstruction and digital measurement, as a new method, is a more accurate method to assess the quality of reduction. Residual displacement of the femoral head and the preoperative Garden classification were risk factors for osteonecrosis of the femoral head. High-quality reduction was necessary to avoid complications. PMID:26632739

  14. Review of evolution of tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rayan, Faizal; Nanjayan, Shashi Kumar; Quah, Conal; Ramoutar, Darryl; Konan, Sujith; Haddad, Fares S

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is one of the commonest knee sport injuries. The annual incidence of the ACL injury is between 100000-200000 in the United States. Worldwide around 400000 ACL reconstructions are performed in a year. The goal of ACL reconstruction is to restore the normal knee anatomy and kinesiology. The tibial and femoral tunnel placements are of primordial importance in achieving this outcome. Other factors that influence successful reconstruction are types of grafts, surgical techniques and rehabilitation programmes. A comprehensive understanding of ACL anatomy has led to the development of newer techniques supplemented by more robust biological and mechanical concepts. In this review we are mainly focussing on the evolution of tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction, focusing on three main categories, i.e., anatomical, biological and clinical outcomes. The importance of tunnel placement in the success of ACL reconstruction is well researched. Definite clinical and functional data is lacking to establish the superiority of the single or double bundle reconstruction technique. While there is a trend towards the use of anteromedial portals for femoral tunnel placement, their clinical superiority over trans-tibial tunnels is yet to be established. PMID:25793165

  15. Tunnelled tensor fascia lata flap for complex abdominal wall reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Frederick; Buonocore, Samuel; Narayan, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the treatment of two patients with recurrent, infected abdominal wall defects using bilateral delayed and tunnelled pedicled tensor fascia lata (TFL) myofascial flaps. TFL flaps were elevated and delayed for 4 weeks in both cases. In the second case, Parietex Composite mesh was positioned underneath the TFL flap and allowed to incorporate. After a delay of 4 weeks, the flaps were harvested and tunnelled subcutaneously to repair the abdominal wall defect. Both patients have stable repairs but had donor site seromas requiring drainage. Cadaver dissection was also performed to identify structures related to TFL flap harvest. We identified a variant of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve that traversed the TFL flap, necessitating meticulous dissection during surgery. In summary, we describe a new technique of incorporating mesh into the TFL prior to flap harvest for reconstruction of complex abdominal wall. PMID:22707661

  16. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in Co/AlOx/Au tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Liu, R S; Michalak, L; Canali, C M; Samuelson, L; Pettersson, H

    2008-03-01

    We observe spin-valve-like effects in nanoscaled thermally evaporated Co/AlOx/Au tunnel junctions. The tunneling magnetoresistance is anisotropic and depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization direction of the Co electrode with respect to the current direction. We attribute this effect to a two-step magnetization reversal and an anisotropic density of states resulting from spin-orbit interaction. The results of this study points to future applications of novel spintronics devices involving only one ferromagnetic layer. PMID:18254603

  17. Shotcrete in tunnel design

    SciTech Connect

    Golser, J.; Galler, R.; Schubert, P.; Rabensteiner, K.

    1995-12-31

    Shotcrete is an important structural element for tunnel support. Green shotcrete is exposed to compression strain rates and tunnel design requires a realistic material law for shotcrete. A modified rate of flow method simulates shotcrete behavior very well and can be incorporated in Finite Element calculations.

  18. Micromachined Tunneling Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W.; Waltman, Stephen B.; Kaiser, William J.; Reynolds, Joseph K.

    1993-01-01

    Separation of tunneling electrodes adjusted by varying electrostatic force. Major components of tunneling transducer formed on two silicon chips by microfabrication techniques. Use of electrostatic deflection reduces sensitivity of transducer to thermal drift and simplifies design. Sensitivity suitable for applications in which larger acceleration-sensing instruments required.

  19. The carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2009-12-01

    The carpal bones are deeply convex anteriorly. This bony gutter is converted by the flexor retinaculum into a tube - the carpal tunnel, which conveys the median nerve, together with the long flexor tendons of the fingers and thumb, into the hand. It is of special interest to the surgeon because it is the site of a common nerve entrapment, the carpal tunnel syndrome.

  20. Development of Background-Oriented Schlieren for NASA Langley Research Center Ground Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Borg, Stephen; Jones, Stephen; Overmeyer, Austin; Walker, Eric; Goad, William; Clem, Michelle; Schairer, Edward T.; Mizukaki, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent wind tunnel tests performed at the NASA Langley Research Center where the Background-Oriented Schlieren (BOS) technique was used to provide information pertaining to flow-field density disturbances. The facilities in which the BOS technique was applied included the National Transonic Facility (NTF), Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel, 15-Inch Mach 6 High-Temperature Air Tunnel, Rotor Test Cell at the 14 by 22 Subsonic Tunnel, and a 13-Inch Low-Speed Tunnel.

  1. Eosinophilic granuloma of the capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Goto, Takahiro; Nemoto, Tetsuo; Ogura, Koichi; Imanishi, Jungo; Hozumi, Takahiro; Funata, Nobuaki

    2011-05-01

    Eosinophilic granuloma occurs almost exclusively in the diaphysis or metaphysis, when tubular bones are affected. The investigators present an extremely rare case of eosinophilic granuloma arising at the epiphysis of the femoral head in an 8-year-old boy. Plain radiographs and computed tomography showed a well-circumscribed radiolucent lesion, suggesting chondroblastoma or Brodie's abscess. However, the findings on magnetic resonance images were different from typical features of chondroblastoma or Brodie's abscess. The lesion was curetted. Histological diagnosis was eosinophilic granuloma. Differential diagnoses of a radiolucent lesion at the epiphysis in a child should include, though quite rare, eosinophilic granuloma.

  2. [The changes of bone architecture in atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Noriaki; Shimakura, Taketoshi; Takahash, Hideaki

    2013-07-01

    The feature of atypical femoral fracture is stress induced cortical bone reaction. It was considered to be the accumulation of microdamage which come from increasing of mechanical stress by femoral lateral bowing, and the decreased of ability of microdamage repair system. PMID:23811584

  3. Tunneling magnetoresistance of silicon chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2016-05-01

    The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of a silicon chain sandwiched between nickel electrodes was examined by using first-principles density functional theory. The relative orientation of the magnetization in a parallel-alignment (PA) configuration of two nickel electrodes enhanced the current with a bias less than 0.4 V compared with that in an antiparallel-alignment configuration. Consequently, the silicon chain-nickel electrodes yielded good TMR characteristics. In addition, there was polarized spin current in the PA configuration. The spin polarization of sulfur atoms functioning as a linking bridge between the chain and nickel electrode played an important role in the magnetic effects of the electric current. Moreover, the hybridization of the sulfur 3p orbital and σ-conjugated silicon 3p orbital contributed to increasing the total current.

  4. Current concepts in total femoral replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Deepak; Siqueira, Marcelo BP; Klika, Alison K; Higuera, Carlos A; Barsoum, Wael K; Joyce, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Total femoral replacement (TFR) is a salvage arthroplasty procedure used as an alternative to lower limb amputation. Since its initial description in the mid-20th century, this procedure has been used in a variety of oncologic and non-oncologic indications. The most compelling advantage of TFR is the achievement of immediate fixation which permits early mobilization. It is anticipated that TFR will be increasingly performed as the rate of revision arthroplasty rises worldwide. The existing literature is mainly composed of a rather heterogeneous mix of retrospective case series and a wide assortment of case reports. Numerous TFR prostheses are currently available and the surgeon must understand the unique implications of each implant design. Long-term functional outcomes are dependent on adherence to proper technique and an appropriate physical therapy program for postoperative rehabilitation. Revision TFR is mainly performed for periprosthetic infection and the severe femoral bone loss associated with aseptic revisions. Depending on the likelihood of attaining infection clearance, it may sometimes be advisable to proceed directly to hip disarticulation without attempting salvage of the TFR. Other reported complications of TFR include hip joint instability, limb length discrepancy, device failure, component loosening, patellar maltracking and delayed wound healing. Further research is needed to better characterize the long-term functional outcomes and complications associated with this complex procedure. PMID:26716087

  5. Variable-Density Tunnel - Wind Tunnel #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    Underside of the Variable-Density Tunnel (VDT). The compressors are to the left. Circular screened cone is shown. The photographer was probably shooting film for Dr. Joseph Ames' Wilbur Wright Memorial Lecture given to the Royal Aeronautical Society on May 31, 1923.

  6. Variable-Density Tunnel - Wind Tunnel #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    Equipment used for pressurizing the Variable-Density Tunnel (VDT): The VDT tunnel is on the right; the compressors are on the left. Figure 4 in the NACA Technical Report 227 (Part 2) identifies each piece of equipment visible in this diagram. Immediately visible in the lower left corner is the Booster Compressor. In the right rear (behind the tunnel) is Primary Compressor No. 1. (Primary Compressor No. 2 is not visible.) From NACA TR 227 (Part 2):'The air is compressed in two or three stages, according to the terminal pressure in the tank. A two-stage primary compressor is used up to a terminal pressure of about seven atmospheres. For pressures above this a booster compressor is used in conjunction with the primary compressor. The booster compressor may be used also as an exhauster when it is desired to operate the tunnel at pressures below that of the atmosphere. The primary compressors are driven by 250-horsepower synchronous motors and the booster compressor by a 150-horsepower squirrel-cage induction motor.' Jerome Hunsaker wrote in 'Forty Years of Aeronautical Research': 'In June 1921, the executive committee [of the NACA] decided to build a new kind of wind tunnel. Utilizing compressed air, it would allow for *scale effects in aerodynamic model experiments. This tunnel represented the first bold step by the NACA to provide its research personnel with the novel, often complicated, and usually expensive equipment necessary to press forward the frontiers of aeronautical science. It was designed by Dr. Max Munk, formerly of G*ttingen.' Eastman Jacobs wrote in an article in a 1927 article for Aviation that: 'The tunnel is inclosed (sic) within a steel shell, so that the density of the air inside may be increased by pumping air into the shell to a pressure of 300 lb. per sq. in. A 250 hp. motor, driving a propeller, circulates the air, drawing it through the five-foot test section at a velocity of about fifty miles per hour. The model is mounted in the throat of

  7. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  8. Occult fracture of the femoral neck associated with extensive osteonecrosis of the femoral head: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Kiyokazu; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Tadami

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although the subchondral portion of the femoral head is a common site for collapse in osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH), femoral-neck fracture rarely occurs during the course of ONFH. We report a case of occult insufficiency fracture of the femoral neck without conditions predisposing to insufficiency fractures, occurring in association with ONFH. Presentation of case We report a case of occult fracture of the femoral neck due to extensive ONFH in a 60-year-old man. No abnormal findings suggestive of ONFH were identified on radiographs, and the fracture occurred spontaneously without any trauma or unusual increase in activity. The patient’s medical history, age, and good bone quality suggested ONFH as a possible underlying cause. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was useful in determining whether the fracture was caused by ONFH or was instead a simple insufficiency fracture caused by steroid use. Discussion The patient was treated with bipolar hemiarthroplasty, but if we had not suspected ONFH as a predisposing condition, the undisplaced fracture might have been treated by osteosynthesis, and this would have led to nonunion or collapse of the femoral head. To avoid providing improper treatment, clinicians should consider ONFH as a predisposing factor in pathologic fractures of the femoral neck. Conclusion ONFH should be included in the differential diagnosis of insufficiency fracture of the femoral neck. PMID:26275737

  9. Anatomic ACL reconstruction: rectangular tunnel/bone-patellar tendon-bone or triple-bundle/semitendinosus tendon grafting.

    PubMed

    Shino, Konsei; Mae, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Yuta

    2015-05-01

    Anatomic ACL reconstruction is the reasonable approach to restore stability without loss of motion after ACL tear. To mimic the normal ACL like a ribbon, our preferred procedures is the anatomic rectangular tunnel (ART) technique with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) graft or the anatomic triple bundle (ATB) procedure with a hamstring (HS) tendon graft. It is important to create tunnel apertures inside the attachment areas to lessen the tunnel widening. To identify the crescent-shaped ACL femoral attachment area, the upper cartilage margin, the posterior cartilage margin and the resident's ridge are used as landmarks. To delineate the C-shaped tibial insertion, medial intercondylar ridge, Parson's knob and anterior horn of the lateral meniscus are helpful. In ART-BTB procedure which is suitable for male patients engaged in contact sports, the parallelepiped tunnels with rectangular apertures are made within the femoral and tibial attachment areas. In ATB-HS technique which is mainly applied to female athletes engaged in non-contact sports including skiing or basketball, 2 femoral and 3 tibial round tunnels are created inside the attachment areas. These techniques make it possible for the grafts to run as the native ACL without impingement to the notch or PCL. After femoral fixation with an interference screw or cortical fixation devices including Endobutton, the graft is pretensioned in situ by repetitive manual pulls at 15-20° of flexion, monitoring the graft tension with tensioners on a tensioning boot installed on the calf. Tibial fixation with pullout sutures is achieved using Double Spike Plate and a screw at the pre-determined amount of tension of 10-20N. While better outcomes with less failure rate are being obtained compared to those in the past, higher graft tear rate remains a problem. Improved preventive training may be required to avoid secondary ACL injuries.

  10. Anatomic ACL reconstruction: rectangular tunnel/bone-patellar tendon-bone or triple-bundle/semitendinosus tendon grafting.

    PubMed

    Shino, Konsei; Mae, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Yuta

    2015-05-01

    Anatomic ACL reconstruction is the reasonable approach to restore stability without loss of motion after ACL tear. To mimic the normal ACL like a ribbon, our preferred procedures is the anatomic rectangular tunnel (ART) technique with a bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) graft or the anatomic triple bundle (ATB) procedure with a hamstring (HS) tendon graft. It is important to create tunnel apertures inside the attachment areas to lessen the tunnel widening. To identify the crescent-shaped ACL femoral attachment area, the upper cartilage margin, the posterior cartilage margin and the resident's ridge are used as landmarks. To delineate the C-shaped tibial insertion, medial intercondylar ridge, Parson's knob and anterior horn of the lateral meniscus are helpful. In ART-BTB procedure which is suitable for male patients engaged in contact sports, the parallelepiped tunnels with rectangular apertures are made within the femoral and tibial attachment areas. In ATB-HS technique which is mainly applied to female athletes engaged in non-contact sports including skiing or basketball, 2 femoral and 3 tibial round tunnels are created inside the attachment areas. These techniques make it possible for the grafts to run as the native ACL without impingement to the notch or PCL. After femoral fixation with an interference screw or cortical fixation devices including Endobutton, the graft is pretensioned in situ by repetitive manual pulls at 15-20° of flexion, monitoring the graft tension with tensioners on a tensioning boot installed on the calf. Tibial fixation with pullout sutures is achieved using Double Spike Plate and a screw at the pre-determined amount of tension of 10-20N. While better outcomes with less failure rate are being obtained compared to those in the past, higher graft tear rate remains a problem. Improved preventive training may be required to avoid secondary ACL injuries. PMID:25753837

  11. Uncemented custom femoral components in hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose We have developed an individually designed, uncemented femoral component for achievement of improved strain distribution and fixation to the bone, to make uncemented stems more applicable in femurs of abnormal size and shape, and to improve the joint mechanics. Here we describe the design of the implant and present the results of a prospective clinical study with at least 7 years of follow-up. Patients and methods The prostheses are produced by CAD-CAM technique. The design of the stem is based on CT information, and the neck design is based on the surgeon's planning of the center of rotation, femoral head offset, and leg length correction. The first-generation stem produced before 2001 had a proximal HA coating and a sand-blasted distal part that was down-scaled to avoid contact with compact bone. The second-generation stem had a porous coating beneath the HA layer and the distal part of the stem was polished. The implant was used in 762 hips (614 patients) from 1995 until 2009. 191 of these hips were followed for 7 years and 83 others were followed for 10 years, and these hips are included in the present study. Mean age at surgery was 48 (20–65) years. Congenital dysplasia of the hip was the reason for osteoarthritis in 46% and 57% of the hips in respective groups. Merle d'Aubigné score was recorded in 152 and 75 hips in the two groups. Prostheses followed for 10 years, and almost all in the 7-year group, were first-generation stems. Results The 7- and 10-year cumulative revision rates were 1.1% and 2.4%, respectively, with stem revision for any reason as endpoint. The clinical results were similar at 7 and 10 years, with Merle d'Aubigné scores of 17. Intraoperative trochanteric fissures occurred in 2 of the 191 operations (1.0%); both healed after wiring. In hips followed for 7 years, 2 periprosthetic fractures occurred; exchange of the stem was necessary in both. One additional fracture occurred between 7 and 10 years, and it was

  12. Whose Orientations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutoff, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Jon A. Levisohn's article entitled "A Menu of Orientations in the Teaching of Rabbinic Literature." While the "menu" Levisohn describes in his groundbreaking work on orientations to the teaching of rabbinic texts will almost certainly be refined over time, even as it stands this article should be of…

  13. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... through NIH's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine are investigating the effects of acupuncture on pain, loss of median nerve function, and changes in the brain associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. In addition, a ...

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Recognition tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-07-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules.

  15. Three-dimensional characterization of the anterior cruciate ligament's femoral footprint.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Robert; Sybrowsky, Christian; Ramme, Austin; Amedola, Annuziati; Wolf, Brian R

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing use of three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) for researching anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions and tunnel placement. However, there is limited 3D CT data on the ACL footprint. The purpose of this study is to define the native ACL femoral footprint using 3D surface reconstructions of computed tomography (CT) imaging of cadaveric knees. The femoral insertion of the ACL was meticulously dissected and marked with drill holes in seven cadaveric knees. CT scans were performed on each specimen, and 3D computer models were created. Distance from the condyle edges to the margins of the footprint were referenced to the total condylar size. This was performed both parallel and perpendicular to the femoral axis as well as the intercondylar notch. The mean condylar depth (c/C) ratios along the axis of the femur were 0.45 ± 0.06 for the anterior border, 0.44 ± 0.08 for the posterior border, 0.26 ± 0.07 for the proximal border, and 0.63 ± 0.08 for the distal border. The mean notch (n/N) ratios for the four margins were 0.37 ± 0.04 for the anterior border, 0.67 ± 0.08 for the posterior border, 0.49 ± 0.07 for the proximal margin, and 0.50 ± 0.06 for the distal border. The mean c/C ratios parallel the intercondylar notch measured 0.23 ± 0.03 for the anterior border, 0.27 ± 0.04 for the posterior border, 0.37 ± 0.04 for the proximal border, and 0.12 ± 0.02 for the distal border. The mean n/N ratios perpendicular to the intercondylar notch measured 0.11 ± 0.06 for the anterior border, 0.52 ± 0.09 the posterior border, 0.29 ± 0.06 for the proximal border, and 0.30 ± 0.06 for the distal border. This study provides reference measures of the femoral footprint of the ACL using 3D CT. It will assist future studies that use advanced imaging to evaluate accuracy of ACL reconstruction.

  16. Channel-tunnels.

    PubMed

    Koronakis, V; Andersen, C; Hughes, C

    2001-08-01

    TolC and its many homologues comprise an alpha-helical transperiplasmic tunnel embedded in the bacterial outer membrane by a contiguous beta-barrel channel, providing a large exit duct for diverse substrates. The 'channel-tunnel' is closed at its periplasmic entrance, but can be opened by an 'iris-like' mechanism when recruited by substrate-engaged proteins in the cytosolic membrane.

  17. Determinants of femoral geometry and structure during adolescent growth.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, M C; Ashford, M W; Kiratli, B J; Bachrach, L K; Carter, D R

    1996-01-01

    Our goal was to understand developmental determinants of femoral structure during growth and sexual maturation by relating femoral measurements to gender and developmental factors (age, pubertal stage, height, and body mass). The bone mineral content of the femur was measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in 101 healthy Caucasian adolescents and young adults, 9-26 years of age. After some simplifying assumptions had been made, cross-sectional geometric properties of the femoral midshaft were estimated. Two geometry-based structural indicators, the section modulus and whole bone strength index, were calculated to assess the structural characteristics of the femur. Femoral strength, as described by these structural indicators, increased dramatically from childhood through young adulthood. Regressions were performed between these femoral measurements and the developmental factors. Our data show that of age, pubertal stage, body mass, and height, body mass is the strongest predictor of femoral cross-sectional properties, and the correlation of body mass with femoral cross-sectional structure is independent of gender. A model including all four developmental factors and gender did not substantially increase the accuracy of predictions compared with the model with body mass alone. In light of previous research, we hypothesize that body mass is an indicator of in vivo loading and that this in vivo loading influences the cross-sectional growth of the long bones.

  18. Morphological Study of the Newly Designed Cementless Femoral Stem

    PubMed Central

    Baharuddin, Mohd Yusof; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Mohd Noor, Alias

    2014-01-01

    A morphology study was essential to the development of the cementless femoral stem because accurate dimensions for both the periosteal and endosteal canal ensure primary fixation stability for the stem, bone interface, and prevent stress shielding at the calcar region. This paper focused on a three-dimensional femoral model for Asian patients that applied preoperative planning and femoral stem design. We measured various femoral parameters such as the femoral head offset, collodiaphyseal angle, bowing angle, anteversion, and medullary canal diameters from the osteotomy level to 150 mm below the osteotomy level to determine the position of the isthmus. Other indices and ratios for the endosteal canal, metaphyseal, and flares were computed and examined. The results showed that Asian femurs are smaller than Western femurs, except in the metaphyseal region. The canal flare index (CFI) was poorly correlated (r < 0.50) to the metaphyseal canal flare index (MCFI), but correlated well (r = 0.66) with the corticomedullary index (CMI). The diversity of the femoral size, particularly in the metaphyseal region, allows for proper femoral stem design for Asian patients, improves osseointegration, and prolongs the life of the implant. PMID:25025068

  19. Painful Spastic Hip Dislocation: Proximal Femoral Resection

    PubMed Central

    Albiñana, Javier; Gonzalez-Moran, Gaspar

    2002-01-01

    The dislocated hip in a non-ambulatory child with spastic paresis tends to be a painful interference to sleep, sitting upright, and perineal care. Proximal femoral resection-interposition arthroplasty is one method of treatment for this condition. We reviewed eight hips, two bilateral cases, with a mean follow-up of 30 months. Clinical improvement was observed in all except one case, with respect to pain relief and sitting tolerance. Some proximal migration was observed in three cases, despite routine post-operative skeletal traction in all cases and careful soft tissue interposition. One case showed significant heterotopic ossification which restricted prolonged sitting. This patient needed some occasional medication for pain. PMID:12180614

  20. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  1. The impact of proximal femoral morphology on failure strength with a mid-head resection short-stem hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Michael; Al Saied, Mohamed; Morison, Zachary; Sellan, Michael; Waddell, James P; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2014-12-01

    Mid-head resection short-stem hip arthroplasty is a conservative alternative to conventional total hip replacement and addresses proximal fixation challenges in patients not suitable for hip resurfacing. It is unclear whether proximal femoral morphology impacts the ultimate failure load of mid-head resection implanted femurs, thus the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of native neck-shaft angle (NSA) and coronal implant alignment on proximal femoral strength. In total, 36 synthetic femurs with two different proximal femoral morphologies were utilized in this study. Of them, 18 femurs with a varus NSA of 120° and 18 femurs with a valgus NSA of 135° were each implanted with a mid-head resection prosthesis. Femurs within the two different femoral morphology groups were divided into three equal coronal implant alignment groups: 10° valgus, 10° varus or neutral alignment. Prepared femurs were tested for stiffness and to failure in axial compression. There was no significant difference in stiffness nor failure load between femurs implanted with valgus-, varus- or neutrally aligned implants in femurs with a NSA of 120° (p = 0.396, p = 0.111, respectively). Femurs implanted in valgus orientation were significantly stiffer and failed at significantly higher loads than those implanted in varus alignment in femurs with a NSA of 135° (p = 0.001, p = 0.007, respectively). A mid-head resection short-stem hip arthroplasty seems less sensitive to clinically relevant variations of coronal implant alignment and may be more forgiving upon implantation in some femoral morphologies, however, a relative valgus component alignment is recommended.

  2. Bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture in a renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Pramod; Ahmad, Shiraz

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous bilateral femoral neck facture in a renal disease patient is not common. We report a case of 47-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure and on regular hemodialysis for the past 5 years who sustained bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture without history of trauma and injury and refused any surgical intervention. The patient was mobilised on wheel chair one year after the fractures. The cause of the fracture and the literature review of the bilateral femoral neck fracture in renal disease are discussed.

  3. Bilateral Femoral Neck Stress Fracture in Child: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gun-Woo; Yoon, Taek-Rim; Eshnazarovich, Eshnazarov Kamolhuja

    2016-01-01

    A femoral neck stress fracture in child is rare, particularly in bilateral case. It is easy to miss initially or may be misdiagnosed. The authors experienced a case of bilateral femoral neck stress fracture in a 10-year-old boy with bilateral hip. The patient was successfully healed by conservative treatment. We report this rare case with a review of the literature. A femoral neck stress fracture should be included in the differential diagnosis in children who present with sustained hip or groin pain. PMID:27777920

  4. Risk of Anterior Femoral Notching in Navigated Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background We retrospectively investigated the prevalence of femoral anterior notching and risk factors after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using an image-free navigation system. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 148 consecutive TKAs in 130 patients beginning in July 2005. Seventy knees (62 patients) underwent conventional TKA, and 78 knees (68 patients) received navigated TKA. We investigated the prevalence of femoral anterior notching and measured notching depth by conventional and navigated TKA. Additionally, the navigated TKA group was categorized into two subgroups according to whether anterior femoral notching had occurred. The degree of preoperative varus deformity, femoral bowing, and mediolateral suitability of the size of the femoral component were determined by reviewing preoperative and postoperative radiographs. The resection angle on the sagittal plane and the angle of external rotation that was set by the navigation system were checked when resecting the distal femur. Clinical outcomes were compared using range of motion (ROM) and the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAX) scores between the two groups. Results The prevalence of anterior femoral notching by conventional TKA was 5.7%, and that for navigated TKA was 16.7% (p = 0.037). Mean notching depth by conventional TKA was 2.92 ± 1.18 mm (range, 1.8 to 4.5 mm) and 3.32 ± 1.54 mm (range, 1.55 to 6.93 mm) by navigated TKA. Preoperative anterior femoral bowing was observed in 61.5% (p = 0.047) and both anterior and lateral femoral bowing in five cases in notching group during navigated TKA (p = 0.021). Oversized femoral components were inserted in 53.8% of cases (p = 0.035). No differences in clinical outcomes for ROM or the HSS and WOMAX scores were observed between the groups. A periprosthetic fracture, which was considered a notching-related side effect, occurred in one case each in the conventional and navigated TKA groups

  5. Use of Huckstep nail in the periimplant femoral shaft fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Kyun; Noh, Kyu Cheol; Chung, Kook Jin; Hwang, Ji Hyo

    2012-01-01

    87-year-old female underwent open reduction of distal femoral fracture and internal fixation with locking compression plate and bone graft. She was operated for ipsilateral proximal femoral fractures and stabilized by intramedullary interlocked nail 5 years ago. She developed stress fracture proximal to locked plate. We inserted Huckstep nail after removal of the previous operated proximal femoral nail without removing the remaining plate and screws. At 15 month followup the fractures have united. The Huckstep nail has multiple holes available for screw fixation at any level in such difficult situations. PMID:23325980

  6. Nuclear fluxes during coherent tunnelling in asymmetric double well potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, ChunMei; Manz, Jörn; Yang, Yonggang

    2015-08-01

    Previous results for nuclear fluxes during coherent tunnelling of molecules with symmetric double well potentials are extended to fluxes in asymmetric double well potentials. The theory is derived using the two-state approximation (TSA). The symmetric system serves as a reference. As an example, we consider the one-dimensional model of the tunnelling inversion of oriented ammonia, with semiclassical dipole coupling to an electric field. The tunnelling splitting increases with the dipole coupling by a factor f≥slant 1. The tunnelling time decreases by 1/f. The nuclear density appears as the sum of two parts: The tunnelling part decreases as {1/f}2 times the density of the symmetric reference, whereas the non-tunnelling part is the initial density times ≤ft({{1-1}/f}2\\right). Likewise, the nuclear flux decreases by 1/f, with essentially the same shape as for the symmetric reference, with maximum value at the potential barrier. Coherent nuclear tunnellings starting from the upper or lower wells of the asymmetric potential are equivalent. The results are universal, in the frame of the TSA, hence they allow straightforward extrapolations from one system to others. This is demonstrated by the prediction of isotope effects for five isotopomers of ammonia.

  7. 'Oxide-free' tip for scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colton, R. J.; Baker, S. M.; Baldeschwieler, J. D.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    A new tip for scanning tunneling microscopy and a tip repair procedure that allows one to reproducibly obtain atomic images of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite with previously inoperable tips are reported. The tips are shown to be relatively oxide-free and highly resistant to oxidation. The tips are fabricated with graphite by two distinct methods.

  8. Proximal femoral reconstruction with a constrained acetabulum in oncologic patients.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Muhammad Umar; Brien, Earl W

    2014-02-01

    Metallic endoprostheses are used for oncological reconstruction around the proximal femur and hip joint. Common modes of failure with hemiarthroplasty or standard hip arthroplasty after proximal femoral replacement include dislocation, late hip pain, and infection. The authors reviewed hospital records to identify patients undergoing constrained tripolar hip arthroplasty for oncological reasons between 2002 and 2012. Inclusion criterion was at least 12-cm proximal femoral resection, including patients with total femur reconstruction. A total of 33 patients were reviewed. Information regarding demographics, length of follow-up, treatment characteristics, and patient outcomes was extracted. Average follow-up for all patients was 912.33 days (30.4 months). Average follow-up was 1396.1 days for living patients and 428.6 days for deceased patients. Average estimated blood loss was 462.12 cc: an average of 1080 cc for patients undergoing total femoral resection and replacement and 315.8 cc for patients undergoing proximal femoral resection and replacement. Average operative time was 137.7 minutes: an average of 205 minutes for patients undergoing total femoral resection and replacement and 119.1 minutes for patients undergoing proximal femoral resection and replacement. Average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score was 21.7. There were no dislocations in the cohort. A constrained tripolar device can be safely used for oncological proximal femoral reconstructions while minimizing the risk of dislocation. Positioning of the acetabular implant in neutral anatomic version in conjunction with a neutral-placed femoral component provides the greatest range of motion, reduction of liner impingement, and improved hip stability.

  9. Brodie's abscess of the femoral neck simulating osteoid osteoma.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Yash; Maheshwari, Aditya V

    2007-10-01

    Subacute osteomyelitis (Brodie's abscess) is essentially a problem of diagnosis, and there may be considerable difficulty in distinguishing it from other benign and malignant bone lesions. Though reported in the metaphyseal region of the femur, Brodie's abscess is rarer in the femoral neck. The authors present a case of Brodie's abscess in the femoral neck, which clinico-radiologically simulated an osteoid osteoma. Retrospectively, the presence of a cortical sinus tract should have aroused suspicion.

  10. Femoral neck shaft angle in men with fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Tuck, S P; Rawlings, D J; Scane, A C; Pande, I; Summers, G D; Woolf, A D; Francis, R M

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Femoral neck shaft angle (NSA) has been reported to be an independent predictor of hip fracture risk in men. We aimed to assess the role of NSA in UK men. Methods. The NSA was measured manually from the DXA scan printout in men with hip (62, 31 femoral neck and 31 trochanteric), symptomatic vertebral (91), and distal forearm (67) fractures and 389 age-matched control subjects. Age, height, weight, and BMD (g/cm(2): lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total femur) measurements were performed. Results. There was no significant difference in mean NSA between men with femoral neck and trochanteric hip fractures, so all further analyses of hip fractures utilised the combined data. There was no difference in NSA between those with hip fractures and those without (either using the combined data or analysing trochanteric and femoral neck shaft fractures separately), nor between fracture subjects as a whole and controls. Mean NSA was smaller in those with vertebral fractures (129.2° versus 131°: P = 0.001), but larger in those with distal forearm fractures (129.8° versus 128.5°: P = 0.01). Conclusions. The conflicting results suggest that femoral NSA is not an important determinant of hip fracture risk in UK men.

  11. Femoral Component Survival in Hybrid Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clayton R; Perry, Kevin I

    2016-05-01

    Although the majority of North American surgeons perform total knee arthroplasty by cementing both the femoral and the tibial components, hybrid fixation with a press-fit femur and cemented tibia is an alternative form of total knee arthroplasty performed by some. Currently, there is a paucity of literature evaluating long-term outcomes after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. As such, the purpose of the current study was to describe the long-term results of total knee arthroplasty performed using the hybrid technique. The authors retrospectively reviewed a total of 77 hybrid total knee arthroplasties with at least 12 years of follow-up. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed to determine patient function and the incidence of femoral component failure after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. At the time of last follow-up, 76 of 77 (99%) of the femoral components remained in place without evidence of loosening. One femoral component failed due to aseptic loosening and was ultimately revised to a cemented femoral component without further complication. In addition, 1 tibial component and 2 patellar components failed due to aseptic loosening. Four tibial polyethylene liners were revised for polyethylene wear. In conclusion, press-fit fixation of the femoral component is a reliable and durable alternative to cemented fixation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):181-186.].

  12. Femoral Component Survival in Hybrid Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clayton R; Perry, Kevin I

    2016-05-01

    Although the majority of North American surgeons perform total knee arthroplasty by cementing both the femoral and the tibial components, hybrid fixation with a press-fit femur and cemented tibia is an alternative form of total knee arthroplasty performed by some. Currently, there is a paucity of literature evaluating long-term outcomes after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. As such, the purpose of the current study was to describe the long-term results of total knee arthroplasty performed using the hybrid technique. The authors retrospectively reviewed a total of 77 hybrid total knee arthroplasties with at least 12 years of follow-up. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed to determine patient function and the incidence of femoral component failure after hybrid total knee arthroplasty. At the time of last follow-up, 76 of 77 (99%) of the femoral components remained in place without evidence of loosening. One femoral component failed due to aseptic loosening and was ultimately revised to a cemented femoral component without further complication. In addition, 1 tibial component and 2 patellar components failed due to aseptic loosening. Four tibial polyethylene liners were revised for polyethylene wear. In conclusion, press-fit fixation of the femoral component is a reliable and durable alternative to cemented fixation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):181-186.]. PMID:27135453

  13. ACL mismatch reconstructions: influence of different tunnel placement strategies in single-bundle ACL reconstructions on the knee kinematics.

    PubMed

    Herbort, Mirco; Lenschow, Simon; Fu, Freddie H; Petersen, Wolf; Zantop, Thore

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the influence of tibial and femoral tunnel position in ACL reconstruction on knee kinematics, we compared ACL reconstruction with a tibial and femoral tunnel in anteromedial (AM-AM reconstruction) and in posterolateral footprint (PL-PL reconstruction) with a reconstruction technique with tibial posterolateral and femoral anteromedial tunnel placement (PL-AM reconstruction). In 9 fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees, the knee kinematics under simulated Lachman (134 N anterior tibial load) and a simulated pivot shift test (10 N/m valgus and 4 N/m internal tibial torque) were determined at 0°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion. Kinematics were recorded for intact, ACL-deficient, and single-bundle ACL reconstructed knees using three different reconstruction strategies in randomized order: (1) PL-AM, (2) AM-AM and (3) PL-PL reconstructions. Under simulated Lachman test, single-bundle PL-AM reconstruction and PL-PL reconstructions both showed significantly increased anterior tibial translation (ATT) at 60° and 90° when compared to the intact knee. At all flexion angles, AM-AM reconstruction did not show any statistical significant differences in ATT compared to the intact knee. Under simulated pivot shift, PL-AM reconstruction resulted in significantly higher ATT at 0°, 30°, and 60° knee flexion and AM-AM reconstructions showed significantly higher ATT at 30° compared to the intact knee. PL-PL reconstructions did not show any significant differences to the intact knee. AM-AM reconstructions restore the intact knee kinematics more closely when compared to a PL-AM technique resembling a transtibial approach. PL-PL reconstructions showed increased ATT at higher flexion angles, however, secured the rotational stability at all flexion angles. Due to the independent tibial and femoral tunnel location, a medial portal technique may be superior to a transtibial approach. PMID:20461359

  14. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane. The resulting infrared sensor can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. An alternative embodiment is implemented using a corrugated membrane to permit large deflection without complicated clamping and high deflection voltages. The alternative embodiment also employs a pinhole aperture in a membrane to accommodate environmental temperature variation and a sealed chamber to eliminate environmental contamination of the tunneling electrodes and undesireable accoustic coupling to the sensor.

  15. 203. Lickstone Ridge Tunnel. All but three of the tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    203. Lickstone Ridge Tunnel. All but three of the tunnel have minimum height of 13, which accommodates most large recreational vehicles. This tunnel has the lowest clearance at 11-3. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  16. View down tank tunnel (tunnel no. 2) showing pipes and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View down tank tunnel (tunnel no. 2) showing pipes and walkway of metal grating, side tunnel to tank 3 is on the left - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Diesel Purification Plant, North Road near Pierce Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Aorto-ventricular tunnel.

    PubMed

    McKay, Roxane

    2007-10-08

    Aorto-ventricular tunnel is a congenital, extracardiac channel which connects the ascending aorta above the sinutubular junction to the cavity of the left, or (less commonly) right ventricle. The exact incidence is unknown, estimates ranging from 0.5% of fetal cardiac malformations to less than 0.1% of congenitally malformed hearts in clinico-pathological series. Approximately 130 cases have been reported in the literature, about twice as many cases in males as in females. Associated defects, usually involving the proximal coronary arteries, or the aortic or pulmonary valves, are present in nearly half the cases. Occasional patients present with an asymptomatic heart murmur and cardiac enlargement, but most suffer heart failure in the first year of life. The etiology of aorto-ventricular tunnel is uncertain. It appears to result from a combination of maldevelopment of the cushions which give rise to the pulmonary and aortic roots, and abnormal separation of these structures. Echocardiography is the diagnostic investigation of choice. Antenatal diagnosis by fetal echocardiography is reliable after 18 weeks gestation. Aorto-ventricular tunnel must be distinguished from other lesions which cause rapid run-off of blood from the aorta and produce cardiac failure. Optimal management of symptomatic aorto-ventricular tunnel consists of diagnosis by echocardiography, complimented with cardiac catheterization as needed to elucidate coronary arterial origins or associated defects, and prompt surgical repair. Observation of the exceedingly rare, asymptomatic patient with a small tunnel may be justified by occasional spontaneous closure. All patients require life-long follow-up for recurrence of the tunnel, aortic valve incompetence, left ventricular function, and aneurysmal enlargement of the ascending aorta.

  18. Endovascular Treatment of a Ruptured Profunda Femoral Artery Branch After Fogarty Thrombectomy of a Femoro-Femoral Crossover Arterial Graft: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Manousaki, Eirini; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Kostas, Theodoros; Katsamouris, Asterios

    2010-02-15

    We present a very rare case of a life-threatening rupture of a profunda femoral artery distal branch after a Fogarty thrombectomy of a thrombosed crossover synthetic graft between the ipsilateral common femoral artery and a contralateral iliac-popliteal graft; the bleeding profunda femoral artery branch was successfully embolized with metallic coils through the axillary artery approach.

  19. Tunneling in axion monodromy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jon; Cottrell, William; Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    The Coleman formula for vacuum decay and bubble nucleation has been used to estimate the tunneling rate in models of axion monodromy in recent literature. However, several of Coleman's original assumptions do not hold for such models. Here we derive a new estimate with this in mind using a similar Euclidean procedure. We find that there are significant regions of parameter space for which the tunneling rate in axion monodromy is not well approximated by the Coleman formula. However, there is also a regime relevant to large field inflation in which both estimates parametrically agree. We also briefly comment on the applications of our results to the relaxion scenario.

  20. Reconstruction of femoral length from fragmentary femora

    PubMed Central

    Offei, Eric Bekoe; Osabutey, Casmiel Kwabena

    2016-01-01

    The reconstruction of femoral length (FL) from fragmentary femora is an essential step in estimating stature from fragmentary skeletal remains in forensic investigations. While regression formulae for doing this have been suggested for several populations, such formulae have not been established for Ghanaian skeletal remains. This study, therefore, seeks to derive regression formulae for reconstruction of FL from fragmentary femora of skeletal samples obtained from Ghana. Six measurements (vertical head diameter, transverse head diameter, bicondylar breadth, epicondylar breadth, sub-trochanteric anterior-posterior diameter, and sub-trochanteric transverse diameter) were acquired from different anatomical portions of the femur and the relationship between each acquired measurement and FL was analyzed using linear regression. The results indicated significantly moderate-to-high correlations (r=0.580–0.818) between FL and each acquired measurement. The error estimates of the regression formulae were relatively low (i.e., standard error of estimate, 13.66–19.28 mm), suggesting that the discrepancies between actual and estimated stature were relatively low. Compared with other measurements, sub-trochanteric transverse diameter was the best estimate of FL. In the absence of a complete femur, the regression formulae based on the assessed measurements may be used to infer FL, from which stature can be estimated in forensic investigations. PMID:27722014

  1. Femoral loading mechanics in the Virginia opossum, Didelphis virginiana: torsion and mediolateral bending in mammalian locomotion.

    PubMed

    Gosnell, W Casey; Butcher, Michael T; Maie, Takashi; Blob, Richard W

    2011-10-15

    Studies of limb bone loading in terrestrial mammals have typically found anteroposterior bending to be the primary loading regime, with torsion contributing minimally. However, previous studies have focused on large, cursorial eutherian species in which the limbs are held essentially upright. Recent in vivo strain data from the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana), a marsupial that uses a crouched rather than an upright limb posture, have indicated that its femur experiences appreciable torsion during locomotion as well as strong mediolateral bending. The elevated femoral torsion and strong mediolateral bending observed in D. virginiana might result from external forces such as a medial inclination of the ground reaction force (GRF), internal forces deriving from a crouched limb posture, or a combination of these factors. To evaluate the mechanism underlying the loading regime of opossum femora, we filmed D. virginiana running over a force platform, allowing us to measure the magnitude of the GRF and its three-dimensional orientation relative to the limb, facilitating estimates of limb bone stresses. This three-dimensional analysis also allows evaluations of muscular forces, particularly those of hip adductor muscles, in the appropriate anatomical plane to a greater degree than previous two-dimensional analyses. At peak GRF and stress magnitudes, the GRF is oriented nearly vertically, inducing a strong abductor moment at the hip that is countered by adductor muscles on the medial aspect of the femur that place this surface in compression and induce mediolateral bending, corroborating and explaining loading patterns that were identified in strain analyses. The crouched orientation of the femur during stance in opossums also contributes to levels of femoral torsion as high as those seen in many reptilian taxa. Femoral safety factors were as high as those of non-avian reptiles and greater than those of upright, cursorial mammals, primarily because the load

  2. Femoral loading mechanics in the Virginia opossum, Didelphis virginiana: torsion and mediolateral bending in mammalian locomotion.

    PubMed

    Gosnell, W Casey; Butcher, Michael T; Maie, Takashi; Blob, Richard W

    2011-10-15

    Studies of limb bone loading in terrestrial mammals have typically found anteroposterior bending to be the primary loading regime, with torsion contributing minimally. However, previous studies have focused on large, cursorial eutherian species in which the limbs are held essentially upright. Recent in vivo strain data from the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana), a marsupial that uses a crouched rather than an upright limb posture, have indicated that its femur experiences appreciable torsion during locomotion as well as strong mediolateral bending. The elevated femoral torsion and strong mediolateral bending observed in D. virginiana might result from external forces such as a medial inclination of the ground reaction force (GRF), internal forces deriving from a crouched limb posture, or a combination of these factors. To evaluate the mechanism underlying the loading regime of opossum femora, we filmed D. virginiana running over a force platform, allowing us to measure the magnitude of the GRF and its three-dimensional orientation relative to the limb, facilitating estimates of limb bone stresses. This three-dimensional analysis also allows evaluations of muscular forces, particularly those of hip adductor muscles, in the appropriate anatomical plane to a greater degree than previous two-dimensional analyses. At peak GRF and stress magnitudes, the GRF is oriented nearly vertically, inducing a strong abductor moment at the hip that is countered by adductor muscles on the medial aspect of the femur that place this surface in compression and induce mediolateral bending, corroborating and explaining loading patterns that were identified in strain analyses. The crouched orientation of the femur during stance in opossums also contributes to levels of femoral torsion as high as those seen in many reptilian taxa. Femoral safety factors were as high as those of non-avian reptiles and greater than those of upright, cursorial mammals, primarily because the load

  3. Femoral neck-shaft angle in extra-capsular proximal femoral fracture fixation; does it make a TAD of difference?

    PubMed

    Walton, N P; Wynn-Jones, H; Ward, M S; Wimhurst, J A

    2005-11-01

    The effect of femoral neck-shaft angle and implant type on the accuracy of lag screw placement in extra-capsular proximal femoral fracture fixation was investigated. Radiographs of all extra-capsular proximal femoral fractures seen in one unit over 18 months were reviewed. Of 399 cases, 307 (237 female, 70 male) were included in the study as they had no contra-lateral proximal femoral metal work. Femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA) of the uninjured hip and magnification adjusted tip-apex distance (TAD) of femoral head lag screw were measured. Type of fixation implant was 135 degrees classic hip screw (CHS) (n=144) or 130 degrees intra-medullary hip screw (IMHS) (n=163). Mean contra-lateral NSA was 130.2 degrees (112.9--148 degrees ) and 64 patients (58 female, 6 male) had a NSA <125 degrees . Mean adjusted TAD was 18.7 mm (5.8--43.8mm) and 88.9% of cases had a TAD of less than 25 mm. TAD values were significantly greater using an IMHS if NSA was <125 degrees than if NSA was >125 degrees (p=0.028). This was not the case with the CHS. The use of the 130 degrees -IMHS in patients with a NSA <125 degrees leads to poorer lag screw placement than if NSA >125 degrees and caution is advocated when using this device in such cases.

  4. Eliminating Wind Tunnel Flow Breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Undesirable vortexes near floor in small wind tunnels suppressed by simple device that alters flow pattern there. Air is injected along floor and interacts with backflow from wind-tunnel model. Results in smoother, more correct air-flow and to more-reliable wind-tunnel data.

  5. Scanning tunneling microscope nanoetching method

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yun-Zhong; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Andres, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming uniform nanometer sized depressions on the surface of a conducting substrate. A tunneling tip is used to apply tunneling current density sufficient to vaporize a localized area of the substrate surface. The resulting depressions or craters in the substrate surface can be formed in information encoding patterns readable with a scanning tunneling microscope.

  6. Femoral articular shape and geometry. A three-dimensional computerized analysis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Siu, D; Rudan, J; Wevers, H W; Griffiths, P

    1996-02-01

    An average, three-dimensional anatomic shape and geometry of the distal femur were generated from x-ray computed tomography data of five fresh asymptomatic cadaver knees using AutoCAD (AutoDesk, Sausalito, CA), a computer-aided design and drafting software. Each femur model was graphically repositioned to a standardized orientation using a series of alignment templates and scaled to a nominal size of 85 mm in mediolateral and 73 mm in anteroposterior dimensions. An average generic shape of the distal femur was synthesized by combining these pseudosolid models and reslicing the composite structure at different elevations using clipping and smoothing techniques in interactive computer graphics. The resulting distal femoral geometry was imported into a computer-aided manufacturing system, and anatomic prototypes of the distal femur were produced. Quantitative geometric analyses of the generic femur in the coronal and transverse planes revealed definite condylar camber (3 degrees-6 degrees) and toe-in (8 degrees-10 degrees) with an oblique patellofemoral groove (15 degrees) with respect to the mechanical axis of the femur. In the sagittal plane, each condyle could be approximated by three concatenated circular arcs (anterior, distal, and posterior) with slope continuity and a single arc for the patellofemoral groove. The results of this study may have important implications in future femoral prosthesis design and clinical applications. PMID:8648311

  7. Extended proximal femoral osteotomy. A new technique for femoral revision arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Younger, T I; Bradford, M S; Magnus, R E; Paprosky, W G

    1995-06-01

    An osteotomy technique for removal of distally fixed cemented and cementless femoral components is described. The anterolateral proximal femur is cut for one third of its circumference, extended distally, and levered open on an anterolateral hinge of periosteum and muscle. This creates an intact muscle-osseous sleeve composed of the gluteus medius, greater trochanter, anterolateral femoral diaphysis, and vastus lateralis, and exposes the fixation surface as well as distal cement. This technique combines the advantages of an extremely wide exposure of component fixation surfaces and preservation of soft tissue attachments to cut bone. In addition, it allows alteration of the proximal femur to facilitate accurate and safe distal cement removal and canal machining under direct vision. The possibility of placing the component in varus is eliminated. The proximal femur is allowed to conform more accurately to the revision prosthesis, a weakened or damaged trochanter is protected from iatrogenic injury, and soft tissue tension can be adjusted. The osteotomy is then repaired with cerclage wires or cables. The first 20 patients treated with this technique are reviewed. Excellent cement and component removal and optimal revision component implantation were obtained with no change in postoperative regimen and reliable healing.

  8. Quiet wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, P. W.; Schutzenhofer, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    Simple and inexpensive technique suppresses background noise generated by pores in wind tunnel wall lining and makes aerodynamic data more accurate and reliable. Porous walls are covered with wire-mesh screen. Screen offers smoother surface to airflow and damps vortexes and resonance caused by wall perforations; yet it provides enough open area for perforations to cancel shock waves generated by model.

  9. Propeller Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    This picture shows a general view of the Propeller Research Tunnel engine room under construction. Workmen were installing the two submarine diesel engines that would power the PRT. The room was constructed of concrete with corrugated metal siding and roofing with the intention of making the engine room as fireproof as possible.

  10. Prions tunnel between cells.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Hans-Hermann

    2009-03-01

    Prions are abnormal isoforms of host proteins that are the infectious agents in certain mammalian neurodegenerative diseases. How prions travel from their peripheral entry sites to the brain where they cause disease is poorly understood. A new study finds that tunnelling nanotubes are important for the intercellular transfer of prions during neuroinvasion.

  11. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansoldi, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-03-15

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. We discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in the literature.

  12. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, James Leo; Dagum, Alexander B.

    1992-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a very common hand problem usually presenting with nighttime pain, numbness, and loss of dexterity. Controversy arises over the diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of results. Nighttime splinting will improve the symptoms in some patients. If this fails, excellent results can be achieved with surgical decompression of the median nerve in the carpal canal. PMID:21221355

  13. Full Scale Tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Interior view of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model. (Small human figures have been added for scale.) On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow.

  14. Dry wind tunnel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ping-Chih (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a ground flutter testing system without a wind tunnel, called Dry Wind Tunnel (DWT) System. The DWT system consists of a Ground Vibration Test (GVT) hardware system, a multiple input multiple output (MIMO) force controller software, and a real-time unsteady aerodynamic force generation software, that is developed from an aerodynamic reduced order model (ROM). The ground flutter test using the DWT System operates on a real structural model, therefore no scaled-down structural model, which is required by the conventional wind tunnel flutter test, is involved. Furthermore, the impact of the structural nonlinearities on the aeroelastic stability can be included automatically. Moreover, the aeroservoelastic characteristics of the aircraft can be easily measured by simply including the flight control system in-the-loop. In addition, the unsteady aerodynamics generated computationally is interference-free from the wind tunnel walls. Finally, the DWT System can be conveniently and inexpensively carried out as a post GVT test with the same hardware, only with some possible rearrangement of the shakers and the inclusion of additional sensors.

  15. Structural and functional studies of bioobjects prepared from femoral heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, I. A.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Podorozhnaya, V. T.; Popova, K. S.; Uvarkin, P. V.

    2015-11-01

    Results of examination of physicomechanical characteristics of samples of medial femoral head cuts are presented. The samples of medial femoral head cuts resected in 6 patients with coxarthrosis in primary endoprosthetic replacement of a coxofemoral joint have been tested for micro- and nanohardness. Young's modulus and elemental composition of bone tissue have been investigated. To estimate the architectonics of cancellous tissue of the femoral head, adjacent cuts of the same patient have been analyzed. The porosity of bone tissue was estimated from macroscopic images obtained using macrophotography. The total porosity is calculated as the ratio of the total length of straight line segments overlapping pores to the total length of secants. A three-point bending test of the samples has shown that their strength changed from 0.187 to 1.650 MPa and their elasticity modulus changes from 1.69 to 8.15 MPa. The microhardness of the samples changes in the range 220-265 MPa and the average microhardness of medial femoral head cuts is 240 MPa. The elemental composition of medial femoral head cuts is represented by basic Ca, P, O, Na and Mg elements as well as by Sn, S, Fe, Cr, and C in microamounts. The atomic Ca to P ratio for bone tissue is 1.55. It is revealed that pores of the upper part of the femoral head have a more regular shape and in the lower part they are more elongated along the cut and occupy a larger volume. The lower part of the femoral head has a higher porosity (39 and 33%) than the upper part (34 and 30%). The total porosity of all samples does not exceed 37%.

  16. Structural and functional studies of bioobjects prepared from femoral heads

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, I. A. Podorozhnaya, V. T.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Popova, K. S. Uvarkin, P. V.

    2015-11-17

    Results of examination of physicomechanical characteristics of samples of medial femoral head cuts are presented. The samples of medial femoral head cuts resected in 6 patients with coxarthrosis in primary endoprosthetic replacement of a coxofemoral joint have been tested for micro- and nanohardness. Young’s modulus and elemental composition of bone tissue have been investigated. To estimate the architectonics of cancellous tissue of the femoral head, adjacent cuts of the same patient have been analyzed. The porosity of bone tissue was estimated from macroscopic images obtained using macrophotography. The total porosity is calculated as the ratio of the total length of straight line segments overlapping pores to the total length of secants. A three-point bending test of the samples has shown that their strength changed from 0.187 to 1.650 MPa and their elasticity modulus changes from 1.69 to 8.15 MPa. The microhardness of the samples changes in the range 220–265 MPa and the average microhardness of medial femoral head cuts is 240 MPa. The elemental composition of medial femoral head cuts is represented by basic Ca, P, O, Na and Mg elements as well as by Sn, S, Fe, Cr, and C in microamounts. The atomic Ca to P ratio for bone tissue is 1.55. It is revealed that pores of the upper part of the femoral head have a more regular shape and in the lower part they are more elongated along the cut and occupy a larger volume. The lower part of the femoral head has a higher porosity (39 and 33%) than the upper part (34 and 30%). The total porosity of all samples does not exceed 37%.

  17. Radiological assessment of the femoral bowing in Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaal, Ahmed Hamed Kassem; Yamamoto, Norio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Morsy, Ahmad Fawaz; Miwa, Shinji; Kajino, Yoshitomo; Rubio, Donnel A.; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Differences in the magnitude of bowing between races are well-known characteristics of the femur. Asian races have an increased magnitude of femoral bowing but most of the orthopedic implants designed for the femur do not match this exaggerated bowing. We calculated the sagittal and coronal femoral bowing in the Japanese population at different levels of the femur and addressed its surgical significance. Material and methods: We calculated the sagittal and coronal bowing of 132 Japanese femora using CT scan of the femur. A mathematical calculation of the radius of curvature at proximal, middle, and distal regions of the femur was used to determine the degree of femoral bowing. Results: Mean sagittal bowing of the femur was 581, 188, and 161 mm for the proximal, middle, and distal thirds of the femur and mean lateral bowing was 528, 5092, and 876 mm, respectively. Mean sagittal and coronal bowing for the whole femur was 175 and 2640 mm, respectively. No correlation was found between age, gender, length of femur, and the degree of bowing. Conclusion: Our study reveals that femoral bowing in the Japanese population is 175 mm in the sagittal plane and 2640 mm in the coronal plane; these values are greater than the femoral bowing in other ethnic groups studied in the literature. This may result in varying degrees of mismatch between the western-manufactured femoral intramedullary implants and the Japanese femur. We recommend that orthopedic surgeons to accurately perform preoperative evaluation of the femoral bowing to avoid potential malalignment, rotation, and abnormal stresses between the femur and implant. PMID:27163091

  18. Industrial Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasor, Leslie; Brooks, Valerie

    These eight modules for an industrial orientation class were developed by a project to design an interdisciplinary program of basic skills training for disadvantaged students in a Construction Technology Program (see Note). The Drafting module overviews drafting career opportunities, job markets, salaries, educational requirements, and basic…

  19. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: report of a task force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

    PubMed

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Ebeling, Peter R; Abrahamsen, Bo; Adler, Robert A; Brown, Thomas D; Cheung, Angela M; Cosman, Felicia; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Dell, Richard; Dempster, David; Einhorn, Thomas A; Genant, Harry K; Geusens, Piet; Klaushofer, Klaus; Koval, Kenneth; Lane, Joseph M; McKiernan, Fergus; McKinney, Ross; Ng, Alvin; Nieves, Jeri; O'Keefe, Regis; Papapoulos, Socrates; Sen, Howe Tet; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H; Weinstein, Robert S; Whyte, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Reports linking long-term use of bisphosphonates (BPs) with atypical fractures of the femur led the leadership of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) to appoint a task force to address key questions related to this problem. A multidisciplinary expert group reviewed pertinent published reports concerning atypical femur fractures, as well as preclinical studies that could provide insight into their pathogenesis. A case definition was developed so that subsequent studies report on the same condition. The task force defined major and minor features of complete and incomplete atypical femoral fractures and recommends that all major features, including their location in the subtrochanteric region and femoral shaft, transverse or short oblique orientation, minimal or no associated trauma, a medial spike when the fracture is complete, and absence of comminution, be present to designate a femoral fracture as atypical. Minor features include their association with cortical thickening, a periosteal reaction of the lateral cortex, prodromal pain, bilaterality, delayed healing, comorbid conditions, and concomitant drug exposures, including BPs, other antiresorptive agents, glucocorticoids, and proton pump inhibitors. Preclinical data evaluating the effects of BPs on collagen cross-linking and maturation, accumulation of microdamage and advanced glycation end products, mineralization, remodeling, vascularity, and angiogenesis lend biologic plausibility to a potential association with long-term BP use. Based on published and unpublished data and the widespread use of BPs, the incidence of atypical femoral fractures associated with BP therapy for osteoporosis appears to be very low, particularly compared with the number of vertebral, hip, and other fractures that are prevented by BPs. Moreover, a causal association between BPs and atypical fractures has not been established. However, recent observations suggest that the risk rises with increasing duration of

  20. Introduction to cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The background to the evolution of the cryogenic wind tunnel is outlined, with particular reference to the late 60's/early 70's when efforts were begun to re-equip with larger wind tunnels. The problems of providing full scale Reynolds numbers in transonic testing were proving particularly intractible, when the notion of satisfying the needs with the cryogenic tunnel was proposed, and then adopted. The principles and advantages of the cryogenic tunnel are outlined, along with guidance on the coolant needs when this is liquid nitrogen, and with a note on energy recovery. Operational features of the tunnels are introduced with reference to a small low speed tunnel. Finally the outstanding contributions are highlighted of the 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) at NASA Langley Research Center, and its personnel, to the furtherance of knowledge and confidence in the concept.

  1. Techniques For Mass Production Of Tunneling Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W.; Podosek, Judith A.; Reynolds, Joseph K.; Rockstad, Howard K.; Vote, Erika C.; Kaiser, William J.

    1993-01-01

    Techniques for mass production of tunneling electrodes developed from silicon-micromachining, lithographic patterning, and related microfabrication processes. Tunneling electrodes named because electrons travel between them by quantum-mechanical tunneling; tunneling electrodes integral parts of tunneling transducer/sensors, which act in conjunction with feedback circuitry to stabilize tunneling currents by maintaining electrode separations of order of 10 Angstrom. Essential parts of scanning tunneling microscopes and related instruments, and used as force and position transducers in novel microscopic accelerometers and infrared detectors.

  2. The effect of a twin tunnel on the propagation of ground-borne vibration from an underground railway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, K. A.; Hunt, H. E. M.; Hussein, M. F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate predictions of ground-borne vibration levels in the vicinity of an underground railway are greatly sought after in modern urban centres. Yet the complexity involved in simulating the underground environment means that it is necessary to make simplifying assumptions about this system. One such commonly made assumption is to ignore the effects of neighbouring tunnels, despite the fact that many underground railway lines consist of twin-bored tunnels, one for the outbound direction and one for the inbound direction. This paper presents a unique model for two tunnels embedded in a homogeneous, elastic fullspace. Each of these tunnels is subject to both known, dynamic train forces and dynamic cavity forces. The net forces acting on the tunnels are written as the sum of those tractions acting on the invert of a single tunnel, and those tractions that represent the motion induced by the neighbouring tunnel. By apportioning the tractions in this way, the vibration response of a two-tunnel system is written as a linear combination of displacement fields produced by a single-tunnel system. Using Fourier decomposition, forces are partitioned into symmetric and antisymmetric modenumber components to minimise computation times. The significance of the interactions between two tunnels is quantified by calculating the insertion gains, in both the vertical and horizontal directions, that result from the existence of a second tunnel. The insertion-gain results are shown to be localised and highly dependent on frequency, tunnel orientation and tunnel thickness. At some locations, the magnitude of these insertion gains is greater than 20 dB. This demonstrates that a high degree of inaccuracy exists in any surface vibration prediction model that includes only one of the two tunnels. This novel two-tunnel solution represents a significant contribution to the existing body of research into vibration from underground railways, as it shows that the second tunnel has a significant

  3. Is the femoral head dead or alive before surgery of slipped capital femoral epiphysis? Interest of perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Edouard, Chambenois; Raphaël, Vialle; Hubert, Ducou Le Pointe

    2014-01-01

    Background The most common complication of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head. Surgical treatments including reduction of the femoral head are considered as a risk factor for avascular necrosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) into the surgical decision-making sequence. Methods Eighteen children with 19 slipped capital femoral epiphysis were retrospectively included. SFCE was unstable in nine cases and stable in ten cases. The slip angle was higher than 60° in 14 cases. Perfusion MRI with dynamic gadolinium-enhanced subtraction sequences were done in all the cases before and after surgical treatment. Results On nineteen hips, eight were devascularized before surgery. All were unstable. After surgery, six on eight had a complete revascularization, one had a focal necrosis and one remained devascularized. A postoperative devascularization with normal preoperative MRI was noted once. On nineteen hips, a total of three avascular necrosis occurred. Conclusion Perfusion MRI is useful to assess preoperative and postoperative vascular status in SFCE. Preoperative devascularization could improve or stay equal after surgical treatment. Persistent devascularization could be responsible for avascular necrosis of the femoral head. PMID:25983464

  4. Trans-femoral thromboaspiration for upper extremity ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gordhan, Ajeet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular trans-femoral access catheter aspiration of thrombus within the proximal subclavian, brachial, radial and ulnar arteries for symptomatic upper extremity ischemic pain has not been previously reported. We describe a case in which a successful clinical outcome was achieved using long length neuro-endovascular aspiration catheters. Presentation of case A 45 year old female presented with diffuse left upper limb pain. Sonography revealed compromised upper extremity blood flow. Thrombus was identified in the proximal left subclavian artery by CT angiography. Surgical retrograde brachial artery access thrombectomy was performed. Occlusion of the left vertebral artery with embolic infarcts of the cerebellar hemispheres was noted post-procedurally. Trans-femoral mechanical aspiration thrombectomy and angioplasty of the subclavian, brachial, ulnar and radial arteries was subsequently performed with successful recanalization. Conclusion Recanalization of vasculature to the upper arm through safer femoral access can be achieved with thrombo-aspiration catheters of sufficient length. PMID:26708945

  5. A Case of Late Femoral Pseudoaneurysm Caused by Stent Disconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Rivolta, Nicola; Fontana, Federico; Piffaretti, Gabriele Tozzi, Matteo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2010-10-15

    We present the case of a late superficial femoral artery stent disconnection causing an asymptomatic pseudoaneurysm successfully treated with a stent-graft. A 67-year-old female was referred to our department for evaluation of claudication of the left lower limb and was diagnosed to have a total occlusion of the superficial femoral artery. Three nitinol stents were used to revascularize this artery. At 48 months, duplex-ultrasonography control revealed the presence of a 45-mm saccular femoral dilatation; X-rays and CT angiography showed fractures of the proximal stents and the presence of a pseudoaneurysm at the site of the distal stents disconnection. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded using two stent-grafts. We conclude that patients and surgeons should be aware of structural complications with all stents. Rigorous follow-up controls should be mandatory. Endovascular repair proved to be feasible and durable to manage a previous endovascular procedure.

  6. Emergency Stenting of a Ruptured Infected Anastomotic Femoral Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Giannopoulos, Athanasios; Tsigris, Chris; Papadopouli, Katerina; Tsiodras, Sotiris; Bastounis, Elias

    2007-11-15

    A 74-year-old man presented with a ruptured infected anastomotic femoral pseudoaneurysm. Due to severe medical comorbidities he was considered unsuitable for conventional surgical management and underwent an emergency endovascular repair with a balloon-expandable covered stent. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded successfully and the patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery with long-term suppressive antimicrobials. He remained well for 10 months after the procedure with no signs of recurrent local or systemic infection and finally died from an acute myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, emergency endovascular treatment of a free ruptured bleeding femoral artery pseudoaneurysm has not been documented before in the English literature. This case illustrates that endovascular therapy may be a safe and efficient alternative in the emergent management of ruptured infected anastomotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysms when traditional open surgery is contraindicated.

  7. Bilateral midshaft femoral fractures in an adolescent baseball player.

    PubMed

    Ju, D G; Mogayzel, P J; Sponseller, P D; Familiari, F; McFarland, E G

    2016-07-01

    Bone disease, specifically low bone mineral density, is a common and undertreated complication that begins during childhood in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This case describes a male baseball player, aged 14years, with undiagnosed CF who sustained a left midshaft femoral fracture while running toward base; 8months later, he sustained a right midshaft femoral fracture under similar conditions. After the second fracture, further evaluation revealed low bone mineral density and CF. There is no previously published report of pathologic fractures occurring in the femoral shaft in an athlete with undiagnosed CF. Patients with CF have a higher fracture rate. Low-energy fractures of major bones in athletically active individuals should be viewed with suspicion for an underlying process.

  8. Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head: Are Any Genes Involved?

    PubMed Central

    Pouya, Farzaneh; Kerachian, Mohammad Amin

    2015-01-01

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) is a pathologic process that results from interruption of blood supply to the femur bone resulting in the death of bone cells and collapse of the femoral head. Nontraumatic ANFH continues to be a significant challenge to orthopedic surgeons. While the exact mechanisms remain elusive, many new insights have emerged from research in the last decade that has given us a clearer picture of the pathogenesis of nontraumatic ANFH. Progression to the end stage of ANFH appears to be related to five main mechanisms: hypercoagulable conditions, angiogenesis suppressions, hyperadipogenesis, heritable states, and switching the bone remodelling into bone resorption. Researchers have been examining the pathogenic mechanisms of ANFH but none of these theories have been firmly confirmed although some appear more plausible than the others. All of these factors can switch bone remodelling into bone resorption, which can further lead to ANFH progression ending up to femoral head collapse. PMID:26213697

  9. Bilateral midshaft femoral fractures in an adolescent baseball player.

    PubMed

    Ju, D G; Mogayzel, P J; Sponseller, P D; Familiari, F; McFarland, E G

    2016-07-01

    Bone disease, specifically low bone mineral density, is a common and undertreated complication that begins during childhood in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This case describes a male baseball player, aged 14years, with undiagnosed CF who sustained a left midshaft femoral fracture while running toward base; 8months later, he sustained a right midshaft femoral fracture under similar conditions. After the second fracture, further evaluation revealed low bone mineral density and CF. There is no previously published report of pathologic fractures occurring in the femoral shaft in an athlete with undiagnosed CF. Patients with CF have a higher fracture rate. Low-energy fractures of major bones in athletically active individuals should be viewed with suspicion for an underlying process. PMID:26927602

  10. Possibility of hyperbolic tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mimoso, Jose P.

    2010-08-15

    Traversable wormholes are primarily useful as 'gedanken experiments' and as a theoretician's probe of the foundations of general relativity. In this work, we analyze the possibility of having tunnels in a hyperbolic spacetime. We obtain exact solutions of static and pseudo-spherically symmetric spacetime tunnels by adding exotic matter to a vacuum solution referred to as a degenerate solution of class A. The physical properties and characteristics of these intriguing solutions are explored, and through the mathematics of embedding it is shown that particular constraints are placed on the shape function, that differ significantly from the Morris-Thorne wormhole. In particular, it is shown that the energy density is always negative, and the radial pressure is positive, at the throat, contrary to the Morris-Thorne counterpart. Specific solutions are also presented by considering several equations of state, and by imposing restricted choices for the shape function or the redshift function.

  11. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Rockstad, Howard K. (Inventor); Reynolds, Joseph K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane which would otherwise change deflection depending upon incident infrared radiation. The resulting infrared sensor will meet or exceed the performance of all other broadband, uncooled, infrared sensors and can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. The technology is readily implemented as a small-format linear array suitable for commercial and spacecraft applications.

  12. Tunnel magnetoresistance of diamondoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2016-10-01

    Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of diamondoids has been predicted by first principles density functional theory. Diamantane was used as a basic molecular proxy for diamondoids because hydrogen atoms in the apical position are easily substituted for a thiol group. The pristine diamantane exhibited a low TMR ratio of 7%, and boron-substitution considerably decreased the TMR ratio. Conversely, nitrogen-substitution enhanced the TMR ratio by up to 20%. Heteroatom-substitution changes the tunneling probabilities by varying the molecular bond lengths. Furthermore, when the spins of the electrodes are parallel, the heteroatoms resulted in transmittance probabilities at an energy range near the Fermi level. Consequently, heteroatom-substitution can control the TMR ratios of diamondoids very well.

  13. On tunneling across horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanzo, L.

    2011-07-01

    The tunneling method for stationary black holes in the Hamilton-Jacobi variant is reconsidered in the light of some critiques that have been moved against. It is shown that once the tunneling trajectories have been correctly identified the method is free from internal inconsistencies, it is manifestly covariant, it allows for the extension to spinning particles and it can even be used without solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. These conclusions borrow support on a simple analytic continuation of the classical action of a pointlike particle, made possible by the unique assumption that it should be analytic in the complexified Schwarzschild or Kerr-Newman space-time. A more general version of the Parikh-Wilczek method will also be proposed along these lines.

  14. Unitary Plan Supersonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    Unitary Plan Supersonic Tunnel: In this aerial photograph of construction in the early 1950s, the return air passages are shown in the rear, center. This area was later covered with walls and a roof so that upon completion of the facility, it was not visible from the exterior. Three air storage spheres and the cooling tower are at the extreme right of the building. The spheres store dry air at 150 pounds per square inch. The cooling tower dissipates heat from coolers that control the test air temperature. One of many research facilities at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel is used for experimental investigations at supersonic speeds.

  15. Spontaneous modular femoral head dissociation complicating total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Talmo, Carl T; Sharp, Kinzie G; Malinowska, Magdalena; Bono, James V; Ward, Daniel M; LaReau, Justin

    2014-06-01

    Modular femoral heads have been used successfully for many years in total hip arthroplasty. Few complications have been reported for the modular Morse taper connection between the femoral head and trunnion of the stem in metal-on-polyethylene bearings. Although there has always been some concern over the potential for fretting, corrosion, and generation of particulate debris at the modular junction, this was not considered a significant clinical problem. More recently, concern has increased because fretting and corrosive debris have resulted in rare cases of pain, adverse local tissue reaction, pseudotumor, and osteolysis. Larger femoral heads, which have gained popularity in total hip arthroplasty, are suspected to increase the potential for local and systemic complications of fretting, corrosion, and generation of metal ions because of greater torque at the modular junction. A less common complication is dissociation of the modular femoral heads. Morse taper dissociation has been reported in the literature, mainly in association with a traumatic event, such as closed reduction of a dislocation or fatigue fracture of the femoral neck of a prosthesis. This report describes 3 cases of spontaneous dissociation of the modular prosthetic femoral head from the trunnion of the same tapered titanium stem because of fretting and wear of the Morse taper in a metal-on-polyethylene bearing. Continued clinical and scientific research on Morse taper junctions is warranted to identify and prioritize implant and surgical factors that lead to this and other types of trunnion failure to minimize complications associated with Morse taper junctions as hip implants and surgical techniques continue to evolve.

  16. Light tunneling in clouds.

    PubMed

    Nussenzveig, H Moyses

    2003-03-20

    Solar radiation, traveling outside cloud water droplets, excites sharp resonances and surface waves by tunneling into the droplets. This effect contributes substantially to the total absorption (typically, of the order of 20%) and yields the major contribution to backscattering, producing the meteorological glory. Usual computational practices in atmospheric science misrepresent resonance contributions and cannot be relied on in the assessment of possible anomalies in cloud absorption.

  17. Femoral neck trabecular patterns predict osteoporotic fractures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard L; Dacre, Jane E; Hart, Deborah J; Spector, Tim D

    2002-07-01

    In this paper we show that texture analysis of femoral neck trabecular patterns can be used to predict osteoporotic fractures. The study is based on a sample of 123 women aged 44-66 years with and without fractures. We analyzed trabecular patterns using the Co-occurrence Matrix texture analysis algorithm and compared the predictive utility of the textural data with densitometry. Logistic regression was used to estimate the predictive utility, exp(B), of clinical and textural data per standard deviation. Reproducibility was also demonstrated using paired films at 1-year intervals (CoV=4.5%). Bone mass estimated by DEXA measurements of the spine and hip were the most predictive of fractures giving a two-fold increase in fractures per s.d. bone mass loss (95% CI: 1.2-3.1, p<0.005). Age was also highly predictive with fracture risk increasing by 1.07-fold per year (95% CI: 1.01-1.14, p<0.02). Trabecular texture was found to give a lower, but significant, prediction of fracture of 1.5-fold per s.d. trabecular pattern loss (95% CI: 0.96-2.31, p<0.05). Combining age, weight, and trabecular texture increased the fracture prediction to 1.78-fold per s.d. (95% CI: 1.19-2.67). Combining trabecular texture with densitometry increased the predictive ability to 2.06-fold per s.d. (95% CI: 1.32-3.22) and combined with age and weight as well increased exp(B) to 2.1-fold per s.d. (95% CI: 1.32-3.35). This shows that osteoporotic trabecular texture changes can be "measured." Moreover, the combination of age, weight, and trabecular texture is more predictive than either alone. We propose therefore that this trabecular texture analysis is both reproducible and clinically meaningful. The application of such methods could be used to improve the estimation of fracture risk in conjunction with other clinical data, or where densitometry data cannot be obtained (e.g., in retrospective studies). PMID:12148717

  18. Evaluating tunnel kiln performance

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, K.R.; Carty, W.M.; Ninos, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Process improvements in the production of whitewares provide the potential for substantial savings for manufacturers. A typical whiteware manufacturer incurs an annual defective product loss of {approximately}$20 million when accounting for raw materials, energy, labor and waste disposal. Reduction in defective product loss of 1% could result in a savings in excess of $1 million annually. This study was designed to establish benchmarks for two conventional tunnel kilns used to bisque-fire dinnerware at Buffalo China Inc. (Buffalo, NY). The benchmark was established by assessing the current conditions and variability of the two tunnel kilns as a function of the fracture strength of sample bars that were made from production body. Sample bars were fired in multiple locations in both kilns to assess the conditions and variability of firing within each kiln. Comparison of strength results between the two kilns also was assessed. These comparisons were accomplished through applied statistical analysis, wherein significant statistical variations were identified and isolated for both tunnel kilns. The statistical methods and tools used in this analysis are readily accessible to manufacturers, thus allowing implementation of similar analysis, or benchmarking, in-house.

  19. Ferroelectric tunnel memristor.

    PubMed

    Kim, D J; Lu, H; Ryu, S; Bark, C-W; Eom, C-B; Tsymbal, E Y; Gruverman, A

    2012-11-14

    Strong interest in resistive switching phenomena is driven by a possibility to develop electronic devices with novel functional properties not available in conventional systems. Bistable resistive devices are characterized by two resistance states that can be switched by an external voltage. Recently, memristors-electric circuit elements with continuously tunable resistive behavior-have emerged as a new paradigm for nonvolatile memories and adaptive electronic circuit elements. Employment of memristors can radically enhance the computational power and energy efficiency of electronic systems. Most of the existing memristor prototypes involve transition metal oxide resistive layers where conductive filaments formation and/or the interface contact resistance control the memristive behavior. In this paper, we demonstrate a new type of memristor that is based on a ferroelectric tunnel junction, where the tunneling conductance can be tuned in an analogous manner by several orders of magnitude by both the amplitude and the duration of the applied voltage. The ferroelectric tunnel memristors exhibit a reversible hysteretic nonvolatile resistive switching with a resistance ratio of up to 10(5) % at room temperature. The observed memristive behavior is attributed to the field-induced charge redistribution at the ferroelectric/electrode interface, resulting in the modulation of the interface barrier height. PMID:23039785

  20. Ferroelectric tunnel memristor.

    PubMed

    Kim, D J; Lu, H; Ryu, S; Bark, C-W; Eom, C-B; Tsymbal, E Y; Gruverman, A

    2012-11-14

    Strong interest in resistive switching phenomena is driven by a possibility to develop electronic devices with novel functional properties not available in conventional systems. Bistable resistive devices are characterized by two resistance states that can be switched by an external voltage. Recently, memristors-electric circuit elements with continuously tunable resistive behavior-have emerged as a new paradigm for nonvolatile memories and adaptive electronic circuit elements. Employment of memristors can radically enhance the computational power and energy efficiency of electronic systems. Most of the existing memristor prototypes involve transition metal oxide resistive layers where conductive filaments formation and/or the interface contact resistance control the memristive behavior. In this paper, we demonstrate a new type of memristor that is based on a ferroelectric tunnel junction, where the tunneling conductance can be tuned in an analogous manner by several orders of magnitude by both the amplitude and the duration of the applied voltage. The ferroelectric tunnel memristors exhibit a reversible hysteretic nonvolatile resistive switching with a resistance ratio of up to 10(5) % at room temperature. The observed memristive behavior is attributed to the field-induced charge redistribution at the ferroelectric/electrode interface, resulting in the modulation of the interface barrier height.

  1. Analysis of shield tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. Q.; Yue, Z. Q.; Tham, L. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Lee, C. F.; Hashimoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-dimensional finite element model for the analysis of shield tunnels by taking into account the construction process which is divided into four stages. The soil is assumed to behave as an elasto-plastic medium whereas the shield is simulated by beam-joint discontinuous model in which curved beam elements and joint elements are used to model the segments and joints, respectively. As grout is usually injected to fill the gap between the lining and the soil, the property parameters of the grout are chosen in such a way that they can reflect the state of the grout at each stage. Furthermore, the contact condition between the soil and lining will change with the construction stage, and therefore, different stress-releasing coefficients are used to account for the changes. To assess the accuracy that can be attained by the method in solving practical problems, the shield tunnelling in the No. 7 Subway Line Project in Osaka, Japan, is used as a case history for our study. The numerical results are compared with those measured in the field. The results presented in the paper show that the proposed numerical procedure can be used to effectively estimate the deformation, stresses and moments experienced by the surrounding soils and the concrete lining segments. The analysis and method presented in this paper can be considered to be useful for other subway construction projects involving shield tunnelling in soft soils. Copyright

  2. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  3. Giant spin-dependent thermoelectric effect in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiwei; Hehn, Michel; Chaput, Laurent; Negulescu, Béatrice; Andrieu, Stéphane; Montaigne, François; Mangin, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects in magnetic nanostructures and the so-called spin caloritronics are attracting much interest. Indeed it provides a new way to control and manipulate spin currents, which are key elements of spin-based electronics. Here we report on a giant magnetothermoelectric effect in a magnetic tunnel junction. The thermovoltage in this geometry can reach 1 mV. Moreover a magnetothermovoltage effect could be measured with ratio similar to the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio. The Seebeck coefficient can then be tuned by changing the relative magnetization orientation of the two magnetic layers in the tunnel junction. Therefore, our experiments extend the range of spintronic devices application to thermoelectricity and provide a crucial piece of information for understanding the physics of thermal spin transport. PMID:22434187

  4. Insights into the Dynamic Response of Tunnels in Jointed Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F E

    2004-11-01

    Tunnels in jointed rocks can be subjected to severe dynamic loads because of rock bursts, coal bumps, and large earthquakes. A series of 3-dimensional simulations was performed, based on discrete element analysis to gain insights into the parameters that influence the response of such tunnels. The simulations looked at the effect of joint set orientation, the effect of joint spacing, the effect of pulse shape for a given displacement, and the influence of using rigid versus deformable blocks in the analyses. The results of this modeling were also compared to field evidence of dynamic tunnel failures. This comparison reinforced the notion that 3-dimensional discrete element analysis can capture very well the kinematics of structures in jointed rock under dynamic loading.

  5. Tunnelling from black holes and tunnelling into white holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Bhramar; Ghosh, A.; Mitra, P.

    2008-03-01

    Hawking radiation is nowadays being understood as tunnelling through black hole horizons. Here, the extension of the Hamilton-Jacobi approach to tunnelling for non-rotating and rotating black holes in different non-singular coordinate systems not only confirms this quantum emission from black holes but also reveals the new phenomenon of absorption into white holes by quantum mechanical tunnelling. The rôle of a boundary condition of total absorption or emission is also clarified.

  6. [Femoral head chondroblastoma and reconstruction with osteochondral allograft. Case report].

    PubMed

    Orlando-Díaz, C; Guzmán-Vargas, R; Rincon-Cardozo, D F; Mantilla-León, N; Camacho-Casas, J A

    2014-01-01

    Femoral head chondroblastoma is an infrequent tumor, accounting for approximately 1-2% of benign bone tumors. It occurs more frequently in young male patients. It's most frequent locations include the proximal humerus, proximal femur, distal femur and proximal tibia. The femoral head is the third most frequent site of this tumor. There is no specific treatment for this entity; reported treatments range from acetabular osteotomies and osteochondral grafts, to vascularized fibular grafts, all of them with good results. However, this tumor is clinically unpredictable if left untreated. We report a case managed with osteochondral graft and followed-up for three years after the surgical procedure.

  7. Optimization of a Cemented Femoral Prosthesis Considering Bone Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Corso, Leandro Luis; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Schnaid, Fernando; Zanrosso, Crisley Dossin; Marczak, Rogério José

    2016-01-01

    The study presents a numerical methodology for minimizing the bone loss in human femur submitted to total hip replacement (THR) procedure with focus on cemented femoral stem. Three-dimensional computational models were used to describe the femoral bone behavior. An optimization procedure using the genetic algorithm (GA) method was applied in order to minimize the bone loss, considering the geometry and the material of the prosthesis as well as the design of the stem. Internal and external bone remodeling were analyzed numerically. The numerical method proposed here showed that the bone mass loss could be reduced by 24%, changing the design parameters. PMID:26540616

  8. Intramedullary locking femoral nails. Experience with the AO nail.

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, A. B.; Yeates, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    The AO interlocking nail was introduced to the Ulster Hospital, Dundonald in 1988 and since then has been used in over 50 patients with femoral shaft fractures. We have reviewed 45 patients with 46 femoral shaft fractures treated between June 1988 and April 1990. These included four compound fractures and 13 comminuted fractures. The results compare favourably with other series. The union rate was 98% and there were no instances of deep infection. The alternative treatment methods available are discussed along with a review of the relevant literature. Images Fig 3 Fig 5 PMID:1785145

  9. [Femoral head chondroblastoma and reconstruction with osteochondral allograft. Case report].

    PubMed

    Orlando-Díaz, C; Guzmán-Vargas, R; Rincon-Cardozo, D F; Mantilla-León, N; Camacho-Casas, J A

    2014-01-01

    Femoral head chondroblastoma is an infrequent tumor, accounting for approximately 1-2% of benign bone tumors. It occurs more frequently in young male patients. It's most frequent locations include the proximal humerus, proximal femur, distal femur and proximal tibia. The femoral head is the third most frequent site of this tumor. There is no specific treatment for this entity; reported treatments range from acetabular osteotomies and osteochondral grafts, to vascularized fibular grafts, all of them with good results. However, this tumor is clinically unpredictable if left untreated. We report a case managed with osteochondral graft and followed-up for three years after the surgical procedure. PMID:26016291

  10. Displaced femoral neck fractures: is there a standard of care?

    PubMed

    Macaulay, William; Yoon, Richard S; Parsley, Brian; Nellans, Kate W; Teeny, Steven M

    2007-09-01

    Many factors must be considered in treating displaced femoral neck fractures. For younger patients, ORIF is preferred, whereas arthroplasty is the better option for elderly patients. For institutionalized elderly patients with a low activity level or impaired mental status, the choice should be hemiarthroplasty (either unipolar or bipolar). For high-demand, active patients, evidence continues to mount toward THA as the favored treatment option. However, there is a need for larger clinical trials to demonstrate the most cost-effective way to treat sub-populations of an ever-growing number of patients with displaced femoral neck fractures.

  11. Subcapital Correction Osteotomy for Malunited Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Lucas A.; Gililland, Jeremy; Pelt, Christoper; Peters, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), causing posterior and inferior displacement and retroversion of the femoral head, is a well-recognized etiology for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and can lead to premature arthritis in the young adult. The treatment of malunited SCFE remains controversial. Surgical dislocation and subcapital correction osteotomy (SCO) has been described as a powerful method to correct the proximal femoral deformity. Methods Between January 2003 and January 2010, 11 patients (12 hips) with closed femoral physes and symptomatic FAI from malunited SCFE were treated with surgical dislocation and SCO. We performed a retrospective review of patient histories, physical exams, operative findings, and pre and postoperative anteroposterior (AP) and groin lateral (GLat) radiographs. Mean follow-up was 61 months. Results There were 4 female and 7 male patients with an average age of 15 years at the time of SCO. On the AP radiograph the mean inferior femoral head displacement (AP epiphyseal-neck angle) was significantly improved (-26° to -6°, p<0.001). On the groin lateral radiograph the mean posterior femoral head displacement (Lateral epiphyseal-neck angle) was significantly improved (-45° to -3°, p<0.001). The mean alpha angle was also significantly improved on both views (AP: 85° to 56°, P<0.001; GLat: 85° to 46°, p<0.001). Operative findings included one femoral osteochondral defect, 8 Outerbridge grade 3-4 acetabular cartilage lesions, and 10 labral lesions. Significant improvement of the mean Harris hip score (HHS) was seen at latest follow-up (54 to 77, p=0.016). Complications occurred in 4 of the 12 cases with AVN in two patients, a worse postoperative HHS in one patient, and failure of fixation treated successfully with revision open reduction internal fixation in one patient. Conclusions Subcapital correction osteotomy as an adjunct to surgical dislocation and osteochondroplasty can be used to correct the deformity of

  12. Lower reoperation rate for cemented femoral stem than for uncemented femoral stem in primary total hip arthroplasty following a displaced femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Michelle F.; Jakobsen, Thomas; Bensen, Anne S.; Krarup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute displaced femoral neck fractures are often treated with cemented hemiarthroplasty (HA). There is increasing evidence that total hip arthroplasty (THA) may be a better alternative, but the degree to which the fixation of the femoral stem used affects the outcome is not fully known. The aim of this study is to compare rates of operative complications and implant survival following THA treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures with either a cemented or an uncemented femoral stem. Methods: The study consists of two groups of patients (N = 334), who were treated for a displaced femoral neck fracture with THA at the Regional Hospital of Viborg during 2007–2012. The first group (50.9%) had uncemented (Corail®) stem while the second group (49.1%) had cemented (Exeter®) stem implanted. Nearly all patients had uncemented dual mobility cup (Saturne®) as acetabular component and were followed up to three months postoperatively. Data regarding rates of implant survival and operative complications were obtained by retrospective review of medical records. Results: We found a statistically significant difference regarding rates of postoperative reoperation with 1.2% (95% CI 0.005–0.03) for cemented and 5.9% (95% CI 0.02–0.09) for uncemented stem (p = 0.02). The main causes for reoperation were peri-prosthetic fractures and deep infections. There was no difference regarding dislocation or peroperative complications. Rates of dislocation were 4.3% (95% CI 0.012–0.07) for cemented and 3.5% (95% CI 0.008–0.06) for uncemented stem (p = 0.72). Rates of peroperative complications were 6.1% (95% CI 0.024–0.1) for cemented and 8.2% (95% CI 0.04–0.12) for uncemented stem (p = 0.1). Discussion: Our results indicate that cemented femoral stem is superior to cementless when rates of reoperation are compared. PMID:27163081

  13. Osteochondral Autograft from the Ipsilateral Femoral Head by Surgical Dislocation for Treatment of Femoral Head Fracture Dislocation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Won, Yougun; Lee, Gi Soo; Kim, Sang Bum; Kim, Sun Joong; Yang, Kyu Hyun

    2016-11-01

    As anatomical reduction of the articular surface of femoral head fractures and restoration of damaged cartilage are essential for good long-term results, many treatment options have been suggested, including fixation of the fracture using various surgical exposures and implants, as well as arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, bone marrow stimulating techniques, osteochondral allograft, autograft, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. We report a case of osteochondral autograft harvested from its own femoral articular surface through surgical hip dislocation. The osteochondral graft was harvested from the inferior non-weight-bearing articular surface and grafted to the osteochondral defect. One year later, the clinical and radiological results were good, without the collapse of the femoral head or arthritic change. This procedure introduced in our case is considered convenient and able to lessen surgical time without morbidity of the donor site associated with the harvest. PMID:27593886

  14. Osteochondral Autograft from the Ipsilateral Femoral Head by Surgical Dislocation for Treatment of Femoral Head Fracture Dislocation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Won, Yougun; Kim, Sang Bum; Kim, Sun Joong; Yang, Kyu-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    As anatomical reduction of the articular surface of femoral head fractures and restoration of damaged cartilage are essential for good long-term results, many treatment options have been suggested, including fixation of the fracture using various surgical exposures and implants, as well as arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, bone marrow stimulating techniques, osteochondral allograft, autograft, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. We report a case of osteochondral autograft harvested from its own femoral articular surface through surgical hip dislocation. The osteochondral graft was harvested from the inferior non-weight-bearing articular surface and grafted to the osteochondral defect. One year later, the clinical and radiological results were good, without the collapse of the femoral head or arthritic change. This procedure introduced in our case is considered convenient and able to lessen surgical time without morbidity of the donor site associated with the harvest. PMID:27593886

  15. Evaluation in femoral neck fracture scintimetry: modes of region of interest selection and influence on results

    SciTech Connect

    Holmberg, S.; Mesko, L.; Stroemqvist, B.; Thorngren, K.G.

    1985-04-01

    Different sized ROIs within the femoral head and different modes of calculation were used in (/sup 99m/Tc)MDP scintimetry after femoral neck fracture. In preoperative scintimetry, correction for increased trochanteric uptake gave the best discrimination, whereas in postoperative scintimetry the direct ratio fractured/intact femoral head was superior. The change in ROI size had little influence.

  16. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3570 - Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3570 Knee joint femoral (hemi-knee) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femoral...

  11. Submucosal tunneling techniques: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujihara, Shintaro; Nishiyama, Noriko; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Matsunaga, Tae; Tani, Johji; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Morishita, Asahiro; Oryu, Makoto; Iwama, Hisakazu; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Advances in endoscopic submucosal dissection include a submucosal tunneling technique, involving the introduction of tunnels into the submucosa. These tunnels permit safer offset entry into the peritoneal cavity for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Technical advantages include the visual identification of the layers of the gut, blood vessels, and subepithelial tumors. The creation of a mucosal flap that minimizes air and fluid leakage into the extraluminal cavity can enhance the safety and efficacy of surgery. This submucosal tunneling technique was adapted for esophageal myotomy, culminating in its application to patients with achalasia. This method, known as per oral endoscopic myotomy, has opened up the new discipline of submucosal endoscopic surgery. Other clinical applications of the submucosal tunneling technique include its use in the removal of gastrointestinal subepithelial tumors and endomicroscopy for the diagnosis of functional and motility disorders. This review suggests that the submucosal tunneling technique, involving a mucosal safety flap, can have potential values for future endoscopic developments. PMID:24741323

  12. Arbitrary tip orientation in STM simulations: 3D WKB theory and application to W(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mándi, Gábor; Nagy, Norbert; Palotás, Krisztián

    2013-11-01

    We extend the orbital-dependent electron tunnelling model implemented within the three-dimensional (3D) Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) atom-superposition approach for simulating scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) by including arbitrary tip orientations. The orientation of the tip is characterized by a local coordinate system centred on the tip apex atom obtained by a rotation with respect to the sample coordinate system. The rotation is described by the Euler angles. Applying our method, we highlight the role of the real-space shape of the electron orbitals involved in the tunnelling, and analyse the convergence and the orbital contributions of the tunnelling current above the W(110) surface depending on the orientation of a model tungsten tip. We also simulate STM images at constant-current condition, and find that their quality depends very much on the tip orientation. Some orientations result in protrusions on the images that do not occur above W atoms. The presence of such apparent atom positions makes it difficult to identify the exact position of surface atoms. It is suggested that this tip orientation effect should be considered in the evaluation of experimental STM images on other surfaces as well. The presented computationally efficient tunnelling model could prove to be useful for obtaining more information on the local tip geometry and orientation by comparing STM experiments to a large number of simulations with systematically varied tip orientations.

  13. Arbitrary tip orientation in STM simulations: 3D WKB theory and application to W(110).

    PubMed

    Mándi, Gábor; Nagy, Norbert; Palotás, Krisztián

    2013-11-01

    We extend the orbital-dependent electron tunnelling model implemented within the three-dimensional (3D) Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) atom-superposition approach for simulating scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) by including arbitrary tip orientations. The orientation of the tip is characterized by a local coordinate system centred on the tip apex atom obtained by a rotation with respect to the sample coordinate system. The rotation is described by the Euler angles. Applying our method, we highlight the role of the real-space shape of the electron orbitals involved in the tunnelling, and analyse the convergence and the orbital contributions of the tunnelling current above the W(110) surface depending on the orientation of a model tungsten tip. We also simulate STM images at constant-current condition, and find that their quality depends very much on the tip orientation. Some orientations result in protrusions on the images that do not occur above W atoms. The presence of such apparent atom positions makes it difficult to identify the exact position of surface atoms. It is suggested that this tip orientation effect should be considered in the evaluation of experimental STM images on other surfaces as well. The presented computationally efficient tunnelling model could prove to be useful for obtaining more information on the local tip geometry and orientation by comparing STM experiments to a large number of simulations with systematically varied tip orientations.

  14. Mechanical properties of femoral diaphysis and femoral neck of female rats chronically exposed to various levels of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Brzóska, M M; Majewska, K; Moniuszko-Jakoniuk, J

    2005-04-01

    The effect of chronic exposure to cadmium (Cd) on the mechanical properties of femoral diaphysis and femoral neck was investigated on a rat model of human exposure. Three-week-old female Wistar rats were exposed to Cd in drinking water at concentrations of 1, 5, 50, or 100 mg/L for 12 months. Biomechanical properties of the femoral diaphysis were evaluated in a three-point bending test and those of the femoral neck in a bending test with vertical loading of the head. Bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) at the whole femur, and BMD at the diaphysis and proximal femur (head and neck region) of the Cd-treated rats decreased in a dose-dependent manner, except for the diaphyseal BMD at a Cd concentration of 1 mg/L. Exposure to Cd concentrations of 1 and 5 mg/L had only little effect on the diaphyseal mechanical properties (decreased yield load with unchanged bending strength, stiffness, yield stress, ultimate stress, and Young modulus), whereas the bending strength and stiffness of the neck decreased and the yield load clearly tended to decline or declined. The effect of Cd at the two locations was more marked in the 50 and 100 mg/L groups, and changes in the bone geometry were observed in these animals. The results clearly revealed that chronic, even low-level, exposure to Cd results in demineralization and weakening of the femur. The femoral neck seems to be more vulnerable than the diaphysis to failure from Cd. We conclude that environmental exposure to Cd may be an important risk factor for femoral neck fracture.

  15. Femoral Condyles Tangential Views: An Effective Method to Detect the Screw Penetration of Femoral Condyles After Retrograde Nailing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhan-Le; Yu, Xian; Chen, Wei; Liu, Yue-Ju; Yu, Kun-Lun; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative knee soft tissue irritation is a common complication after retrograde nail fixation of femoral fractures. Distal locking screw prominence is one of the causes for soft tissue irritation. This study aimed to determine whether the use of the femoral condyles tangential views improve the diagnostic accuracy compared with anteroposterior (A-P) view in detecting distal locking screw penetrations during retrograde femoral nailing. Methods: The angle between the sagittal plane and lateral aspect of the condyle and the angle between the sagittal plane and medial aspect of condyle were measured on computed tomography (CT) images. After the angles were measured and recorded, cadaveric femurs were used in a simulated surgical procedure. The retrograde femoral nail was inserted into the femur and placed distal locking screws, which were left 2, 4, and 6 mm proud of the medial and lateral condyles for each femur. A-P view, lateral condyle tangential view and medial condyle tangential view were obtained. All fluoroscopic images were recorded and sent to three observers blinded to the experimental procedure to determine whether screws penetrated the condyle cortex or not. Results: According to the results of CT scan, the lateral condyle view was 20.88 ± 0.98° and the medial condyle view was 40.46 ± 3.14°. In the A-P view, we detected 0% at 2 mm penetration, 16.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 25.0% (medial condyle screw) at 4 mm, and 41.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 58.3% (medial condyle screw) at 6 mm. In the lateral tangential view, we detected 91.7% at 2 mm penetration of the lateral condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. In the medial tangential view, we detected 66.7% at 2 mm penetration of the medial condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. The femoral condyle tangential views provided significant improvement in detecting screw penetrations at all lengths (2, 4, and 6 mm) compared with the A-P view (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The femoral condyles tangential

  16. Orbiter Model in Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engineer holding a replica of the proposed Liquid Booster Module, observes the testing of a small Space Shuttle orbiter model at 14 Wind Tunnel at MSFC. 14 Wind Tunnel is a trisonic wind tunnel, which is capable of running subsonic, transonic, and supersonic. It is used to test the integrity of rockets and launch vehicles in launch and reentry environments. The Wind Tunnel was used to test rockets and launch vehicles from the Jupiter C through the Saturn family up to the current Space Shuttle and will be used to test future advanced launch vehicles.

  17. Influence of Geological Conditions on Deformation Behavior of Tunnel-A Case Study on Tseng-Wen Reservoir Transbasin Diversion Tunnel, Tainan, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, C. C.; Ku, C. Y.; Chen, C. S.; Hsu, S. M.; Yang, C. H.

    2009-04-01

    . Several papers and reports were indicated the variations of longitudinal deformations of the tunnel depend on the geological conditions ahead of its face. To the excavation of tunnels, precise prediction of the geological conditions ahead of the tunnel face is important for the economy, safety and efficiency of the project. In particular, sections of poor ground, such as faults and fracture zones, are likely to require changes in construction methods as well as tunnel support patterns, and could thus impede the progress of construction. Therefore, it is desirable to obtain high quality data on geology and properties of rock masses in advance. In this study, a three-dimensional numerical code, called FLAC3D, was used to analyze the Tseng-Wen Reservoir Transbasin Diversion Tunnel, Taiwan deformation when excavation through the interface of different geological conditions. This study presents the results from a systematic three-dimensional analysis in varying ground conditions, which compares vertical (radial) displacements measured at the roof, vector orientations associated with these roof displacements and tunnel face displacements. These numerical results suggest that the vector orientation provided additional information not obtained from traditional radial displacements or face extrusion. The deformations of crown and longitudinal of tunnel would be increased if the rock is weak ground ahead of the excavation. If the rock is hard ground ahead of the excavation, the deformation would be decreased. The plots of influence lines and trend lines were used to predict the geological condition ahead of the excavation face. The results showed that the variations of influence lines and trend lines were depended on the geological conditions. Additionally, the numerical analyses were also carried out with the transition interface inclined at the degrees of 90 and 120 with respect to tunnel axis. The results were found that when the transition interface is at an angle, vertical

  18. MgB{sub 2}: directional tunneling two-band superconductivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Iavarone, M.; Karapetrov, G.; Koshelev, A.; Kwok, W. K.; Hinks, D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kang, W. N.; Choi, E.-M.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, S.-I.; Pohang Univ.

    2003-02-01

    We have studied the anisotropic superconductor MgB{sub 2} using a combination of scanning electron microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Tunneling spectroscopy performed on thin films and pellets reveals two distinct energy gaps at {Delta}{sub 1} = 2.3 meV and {Delta}{sub 2} = 7.1 meV. On different crystallites within the polycrystalline sample different spectral weights of the partial densities of states (PDOS) were observed. They reflect different tunneling directions with respect to the crystallographic orientation of the grain in a multiband system. Indeed when tunneling in the c-axis films only one superconducting gap is observed, which is associated with the 3D band in this system. Temperature evolution of the tunneling spectra reveals that both gaps close simultaneously near the bulk critical temperature. Our experimental findings are consistent with the two-band superconductivity scenario in the presence of strong pair interaction between the two bands [1].

  19. Topography-specific isotropic tunneling in nanoparticle monolayer with sub-nm scale crevices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guisheng; Jiao, Weihong; Yi, Lizhi; Zhang, Yuejiao; Wu, Ke; Zhang, Chao; Lv, Xianglong; Qian, Lihua; Li, Jianfeng; Yuan, Songliu; Chen, Liang

    2016-10-01

    Material used in flexible devices may experience anisotropic strain with identical magnitude, outputting coherent signals that tend to have a serious impact on device reliability. In this work, the surface topography of the nanoparticles (NPs) is proposed to be a parameter to control the performance of strain gauge based on tunneling behavior. In contrast to anisotropic tunneling in a monolayer of spherical NPs, electron tunneling in a monolayer of urchin-like NPs actually exhibits a nearly isotropic response to strain with different loading orientations. Isotropic tunneling of the urchin-like NPs is caused by the interlocked pikes of these urchin-like NPs in a random manner during external mechanical stimulus. Topography-dependent isotropic tunneling in two dimensions reported here opens a new opportunity to create highly reliable electronics with superior performance.

  20. Topography-specific isotropic tunneling in nanoparticle monolayer with sub-nm scale crevices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guisheng; Jiao, Weihong; Yi, Lizhi; Zhang, Yuejiao; Wu, Ke; Zhang, Chao; Lv, Xianglong; Qian, Lihua; Li, Jianfeng; Yuan, Songliu; Chen, Liang

    2016-10-01

    Material used in flexible devices may experience anisotropic strain with identical magnitude, outputting coherent signals that tend to have a serious impact on device reliability. In this work, the surface topography of the nanoparticles (NPs) is proposed to be a parameter to control the performance of strain gauge based on tunneling behavior. In contrast to anisotropic tunneling in a monolayer of spherical NPs, electron tunneling in a monolayer of urchin-like NPs actually exhibits a nearly isotropic response to strain with different loading orientations. Isotropic tunneling of the urchin-like NPs is caused by the interlocked pikes of these urchin-like NPs in a random manner during external mechanical stimulus. Topography-dependent isotropic tunneling in two dimensions reported here opens a new opportunity to create highly reliable electronics with superior performance. PMID:27575748

  1. Observation of surface states on gold films by electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambe, J.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) is a useful technique for the study of vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on the surface of the insulating layer in a metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction. A detailed study of electron tunneling in aluminum-aluminum oxide-gold (Al-Al2O3-Au) tunnel junctions has been conducted with an overall goal of exploring possible mechanisms in such a thin film device useful for chemical sensing. For an understanding of the electronic effects in the presence of chemicals in a junction, the electronic surface properties of the metallic films in a clean tunnel junction must be established. The present investigation is concerned with room temperature observations of electronic states on the surface of highly oriented gold film in Al-Al2O3-Au junctions.

  2. Topography-specific isotropic tunneling in nanoparticle monolayer with sub-nm scale crevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guisheng; Jiao, Weihong; Yi, Lizhi; Zhang, Yuejiao; Wu, Ke; Zhang, Chao; Lv, Xianglong; Qian, Lihua; Li, Jianfeng; Yuan, Songliu; Chen, Liang

    2016-10-01

    Material used in flexible devices may experience anisotropic strain with identical magnitude, outputting coherent signals that tend to have a serious impact on device reliability. In this work, the surface topography of the nanoparticles (NPs) is proposed to be a parameter to control the performance of strain gauge based on tunneling behavior. In contrast to anisotropic tunneling in a monolayer of spherical NPs, electron tunneling in a monolayer of urchin-like NPs actually exhibits a nearly isotropic response to strain with different loading orientations. Isotropic tunneling of the urchin-like NPs is caused by the interlocked pikes of these urchin-like NPs in a random manner during external mechanical stimulus. Topography-dependent isotropic tunneling in two dimensions reported here opens a new opportunity to create highly reliable electronics with superior performance.

  3. Chondroblastoma of the femoral head: management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Strong, D P; Grimer, R J; Carter, S R; Tillman, R M; Abudu, A

    2010-03-01

    Chondroblastoma of the femoral head presents particular problems in treatment because the tumour is surrounded by articular cartilage on one side and epiphyseal plate on the other. Ten patients underwent treatment for a chondroblastoma involving the proximal femoral capital epiphysis. The patients were aged between eight and 19 years and in four the epiphysis was not yet fused. Five had curettage via a drill hole created up the femoral neck, of whom two developed local recurrence. Five had a direct approach to the chondroblastoma through the femoral neck, and there were no local recurrences in this group. Both patients with local recurrence were under 14 years of age-one was cured by a direct approach through the neck of the femur and the other by lifting a trap door of articular cartilage. Apart from one patient with a temporary leg length discrepancy, there were no other complications. We conclude that a direct approach is likely to lead to the best outcome for this rare condition.

  4. Progressive slippage after pinning for slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Sanders, James O; Smith, William J; Stanley, Earl A; Bueche, Matthew J; Karol, Lori A; Chambers, Henry G

    2002-01-01

    The authors retrospectively reviewed seven cases of progressive slipped capital femoral epiphysis after screw fixation. All seven patients initially presented with chronic symptoms, and five had an acute exacerbation of symptoms with the appearance of an acute-on-chronic slip. Of the other two, one had obvious motion at the proximal femoral physis and the other had increased symptoms but did not have an obvious acute slip radiographically. All underwent percutaneous screw fixation. In four patients a single screw was placed, and in three patients two screws were placed. No patient became symptom-free after surgery. Slip progression was noted on average 5 months after treatment. Radiographs in all patients revealed an increase in slip severity and loss of screw purchase in the femoral neck while fixation in the proximal femoral epiphysis remained secure. One patient had hypothyroidism and another Cushing disease, both diagnosed after the slipped epiphysis. Slips occurring in children with underlying endocrinopathies, and unstable slips in children with a history of antecedent knee or hip pain (commonly called an acute-on-chronic slip) may be susceptible to screw fixation failure. In such patients, close radiographic follow-up, particularly in the presence of continued symptoms, is required to document slip progression and fixation failure as soon as possible.

  5. Lower limb surgeries under combined femoral and sciatic nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Lipsy; Attri, Joginder Pal; Verma, Pawan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral nerve blocks are gaining popularity for many infraumblical surgeries with the development of new techniques such as ultrasound and peripheral nerve stimulator. It provides stable hemodynamic, better, and prolonged postoperative analgesia. This study was carried out to see the effectiveness of combined femoral and sciatic nerve block with ropivacaine alone and by adding fentanyl. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 100 patients scheduled for lower limb surgeries and were randomly divided into two groups of 50 each. In Group A, patients received 20 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine for femoral nerve block and same dose for sciatic nerve block and in Group B, 25 μg fentanyl was added each for femoral nerve and sciatic nerve block along with ropivacaine. All hemodynamic parameters, onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks were noted. The patient characteristics were analyzed using the “Chi-square tests” and the intergroup comparison of the parametric data was carried out using the unpaired t-test using software IBM SPSS 17.0. Results: Combined femoral and sciatic nerve block provide longer duration of postoperative analgesia of about 12–13 h. All the above-mentioned parameters were statistically non-significant. Conclusion: Hence in this study, onset and duration of sensory and motor block was comparable in both groups. However postoperative analgesia was prolonged as compared to neuraxial blockade without any hemodynamic instability. PMID:27746528

  6. Exactech Opteon Femoral Component Fracture 12 Years after Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shaun P.; Antoci, Valentin; Kadzielski, John J.; Vrahas, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Arthroplasty implant fracture is a rare but critical complication that requires difficult revision surgery, often with poor results, patient disability, and significant cost. Several reports show component fracture either at the stem or at the neck interface after a relatively short postoperative course. We report such failure after 12 years, suggesting no safe period after which femoral implant fracture does not occur. PMID:26955493

  7. Performance of CF/PA12 composite femoral stems.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Melissa; Bureau, Martin N; Yahia, L'Hocine

    2008-02-01

    This study presents the microstructural and mechanical behavior of the CF/PA12 composite material developed as well as its biomechanical performance when used for the fabrication of femoral stems. The static tests were performed to evaluate the compressive and flexural modulus as well as the ultimate compressive and bending strength. It was found that CF/PA12 composite had bone-matching properties in the same order of magnitude as cortical bone in the femur. Density and void content measurements were also done to assess the consolidation quality. Dynamic fatigue testing was conducted on both CF/PA12 cylinders and femoral stems to evaluate the long term durability and mechanical reliability of the composite. Compression-compression cyclic loading was used at a frequency of 6 Hz with loads varying between 17 kN and 22 kN for the composite cylinders while a frequency of 10 Hz and load of 2300 N was employed for the femoral stems. Results indicate that the fatigue performance of CF/PA12 composite surpasses by far the required fatigue performance for total hip prosthesis (THP) stems. The overall performance of the CF/PA12 femoral stems confirms that this composite is an excellent candidate material for orthopedic applications such as THP stems. PMID:17619978

  8. Quadratus lumborum block for femoral–femoral bypass graft placement

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kunitaro; Mitsuda, Shingo; Tokumine, Joho; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Moriyama, Kumi; Yorozu, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Atherosclerosis has a complex etiology that leads to arterial obstruction and often results in inadequate perfusion of the distal limbs. Patients with atherosclerosis can have severe complications of this condition, with widespread systemic manifestations, and the operations undertaken are often challenging for anesthesiologists. Case report: A 79-year-old woman with chronic heart failure and respiratory dysfunction presented with bilateral gangrene of the distal lower extremities with obstruction of the left common iliac artery due to atherosclerosis. Femoral–femoral bypass graft and bilateral foot amputations were planned. Spinal anesthesia failed due to severe scoliosis and deformed vertebrae. General anesthesia was induced after performing multiple nerve blocks including quadratus lumborum, sciatic nerve, femoral nerve, lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, and obturator nerve blocks. However, general anesthesia was abandoned because of deterioration in systemic perfusion. The surgery was completed; the patient remained comfortable and awake without the need for further analgesics. Conclusion: Quadratus lumborum block may be a useful anesthetic technique to perform femoral–femoral bypass. PMID:27583851

  9. Scaling in Theropod Dinosaurs: Femoral Bone Strength and Locomotion II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In the second paper of this series, the effect of transverse femoral stresses due to locomotion in theropod dinosaurs of different sizes was examined for the case of an unchanging leg geometry. Students are invariably thrilled to learn about theropod dinosaurs, and this activity applies the concepts of torque and stress to the issue of theropod…

  10. Poultry femoral head separation and necrosis: A review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head separation (FHS) is a degenerative skeletal problem in fast growing poultry where the growth plate of proximal femur separates from its articular cartilage. FHS can remain asymptomatic but under strenuous conditions the damage is pronounced leading to lameness. The etiology of FHS is po...

  11. Retained portion of latex glove during femoral nailing. Case report.

    PubMed

    Sadat-Ali, M; Marwah, S; al-Habdan, I

    1996-11-01

    A case of retained glove during Kuntscher intramedullary nailing is described. An abscess around the glove could have lead to osteomyelitis. One need to be cautious feeling the top end of the nail while femoral nailing to avoid such a complication.

  12. View of Water Storage Tank off entrance tunnel. Tunnel at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Water Storage Tank off entrance tunnel. Tunnel at left of image to Launch Silos - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; an fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293)

  14. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; and fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293).

  15. First-principles study of spin transport in Fe-SiCNT-Fe magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Sudhanshu; Jalu, Surendra

    2015-08-01

    We report first-principles calculations of spin-dependent quantum transport in Fe-SiCNT-Fe magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). Perfect spin filtration effect and substantial tunnel magnetoresistance are obtained, which suggests SiCNTs as a suitable candidate over CNTs for implementing 1D MTJs. The calculated tunnel magnetoresistance is several hundred percent at zero bias voltage, it reduces to nearly zero after the bias voltage of about 1 V. When the orientation of magnetic configurations of both electrodes is parallel, the zero bias spin injection factor is staggering 99% and remains reasonably high in the range of 60%-75% after the bias voltage of 0.6 V.

  16. Imaging graphite in air by scanning tunneling microscopy - Role of the tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, R. J.; Baker, S. M.; Driscoll, R. J.; Youngquist, M. G.; Baldeschwieler, J. D.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1988-04-01

    Atomically resolved images of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in air at point contact have been obtained. Direct contact between tip and sample or contact through a contamination layer provides a conduction mechanism in addition to the exponential tunneling mechanism responsible for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging. Current-voltage (I-V) spectra were obtained while scanning in the current imaging mode with the feedback circuit interrupted in order to study the graphite imaging mechanism. Multiple tunneling tips are probably responsible for images without the expected hexagonal or trigonal symmetry. The observations indicate that the use of HOPG for testing and calibration of STM instrumentation may be misleading.

  17. Single molecule tunneling spectroscopy investigation of reversibly switched dipolar vanadyl phthalocyanine on graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jialin; Wang, Zhunzhun; Li, Zhenyu E-mail: phycw@nus.edu.sg; Niu, Tianchao; Chen, Wei E-mail: phycw@nus.edu.sg

    2014-03-17

    We report a spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) investigation of reversibly switchable dipolar vanadyl phthalocyanine (VOPc) on graphite by using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. VOPc molecule can be switched between O-up and O-down configurations by changing the polarity of the pulse voltage applied to the tip, actuated by the inelastic tunneling electrons. The spatially resolved STS measurements allow the identification of the electronic structures of VOPc with different dipole orientation. The present approach provides geometry images and electronic characterization of a molecular switch on surface spontaneously.

  18. Orienting hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Hope, Anna E; Sugarman, Laurence I

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a new frame for understanding hypnosis and its clinical applications. Despite great potential to transform health and care, hypnosis research and clinical integration is impaired in part by centuries of misrepresentation and ignorance about its demonstrated efficacy. The authors contend that advances in the field are primarily encumbered by the lack of distinct boundaries and definitions. Here, hypnosis, trance, and mind are all redefined and grounded in biological, neurological, and psychological phenomena. Solutions are proposed for boundary and language problems associated with hypnosis. The biological role of novelty stimulating an orienting response that, in turn, potentiates systemic plasticity forms the basis for trance. Hypnosis is merely the skill set that perpetuates and influences trance. This formulation meshes with many aspects of Milton Erickson's legacy and Ernest Rossi's recent theory of mind and health. Implications of this hypothesis for clinical skills, professional training, and research are discussed.

  19. Retrofitting tunnel kilns

    SciTech Connect

    Lukacs, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    Significant benefits can be achieved by retrofitting tunnel kilns. The decision-making process to do so starts with evaluating short- and long-term goals. Plant goals can influence tradeoffs in burner sizing, burner choice and control scheme. The evaluation includes consideration of increased production, reduced breakage during heating and cooling, improved quality, ability to quickly change products, reduced fuel use, reduced energy consumption and/or improved control. The efforts in one area affect performance in other areas. For example, reduced fuel use implies reduced energy consumption. Regardless of the priority of the goals, the first step is an evaluation of the existing burners.

  20. Aseptic necrosis in compressed air tunnel workers using current OSHA decompression schedules.

    PubMed

    Kindwall, E P; Nellen, J R; Spiegelhoff, D R

    1982-10-01

    Aseptic necrosis (dysbaric osteonecrosis) was discovered in two compressed air tunnel workers who had used the present Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) decompression tables for compressed air tunneling at pressures greater than 36 pounds per square inch gauge (psig). A roentgenographic study was made of 21 men who had worked at pressures up to 43 psig using the OSHA schedules. Bone scanning was also included. Seven of the men (33%) were found to have aseptic necrosis involving the shoulders, hips or distal femoral shafts and proximal tibia. It became evident that the present OSHA schedules caused not only an unacceptable incidence of decompression sickness but also aseptic necrosis at pressures over 36 psig. New interim tables that are more conservative and that use either air or oxygen as a breathing gas during decompression are undergoing laboratory and worksite evaluation.

  1. Virtual-detector approach to tunnel ionization and tunneling times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teeny, Nicolas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Bauke, Heiko

    2016-08-01

    Tunneling times in atomic ionization are studied theoretically by a virtual detector approach. A virtual detector is a hypothetical device that allows one to monitor the wave function's density with spatial and temporal resolution during the ionization process. With this theoretical approach, it becomes possible to define unique moments when the electron enters and leaves with highest probability the classically forbidden region from first principles and a tunneling time can be specified unambiguously. It is shown that neither the moment when the electron enters the tunneling barrier nor when it leaves the tunneling barrier coincides with the moment when the external electric field reaches its maximum. Under the tunneling barrier as well as at the exit the electron has a nonzero velocity in the electric field direction. This nonzero exit velocity has to be incorporated when the free motion of the electron is modeled by classical equations of motion.

  2. Analysis of Femoral Components of Cemented Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shantanu; Harsha, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    There have been continuous on-going revisions in design of prosthesis in Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) to improve the endurance of hip replacement. In the present work, Finite Element Analysis was performed on cemented THA with CoCrMo trapezoidal, CoCrMo circular, Ti6Al4V trapezoidal and Ti6Al4V circular stem. It was observed that cross section and material of femoral stem proved to be critical parameters for stress distribution in femoral components, distribution of interfacial stress and micro movements. In the first part of analysis, designs were investigated for micro movements and stress developed, for different stem materials. Later part of the analysis focused on investigations with respect to different stem cross sections. Femoral stem made of Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) resulted in larger debonding of stem at cement-stem interface and increased stress within the cement mantle in contrast to chromium alloy (CoCrMo) stem. Thus, CoCrMo proved to be a better choice for cemented THA. Comparison between CoCrMo femoral stem of trapezium and circular cross section showed that trapezoidal stem experiences lesser sliding and debonding at interfaces than circular cross section stem. Also, trapezium cross section generated lower peak stress in femoral stem and cortical femur. In present study, femur head with diameter of 36 mm was considered for the analysis in order to avoid dislocation of the stem. Also, metallic femur head was coupled with cross linked polyethylene liner as it experiences negligible wear compared to conventional polyethylene liner and unlike metallic liner it is non carcinogenic.

  3. Current concepts on osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Angeler, Joaquin; Gianakos, Arianna L; Villa, Jordan C; Ni, Amelia; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that 20000 to 30000 new patients are diagnosed with osteonecrosis annually accounting for approximately 10% of the 250000 total hip arthroplasties done annually in the United States. The lack of level 1 evidence in the literature makes it difficult to identify optimal treatment protocols to manage patients with pre-collapse avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and early intervention prior to collapse is critical to successful outcomes in joint preserving procedures. There have been a variety of traumatic and atraumatic factors that have been identified as risk factors for osteonecrosis, but the etiology and pathogenesis still remains unclear. Current osteonecrosis diagnosis is dependent upon plain anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral radiographs of the hip, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generally, the first radiographic changes seen by radiograph will be cystic and sclerotic changes in the femoral head. Although the diagnosis may be made by radiograph, plain radiographs are generally insufficient for early diagnosis, therefore MRI is considered the most accurate benchmark. Treatment options include pharmacologic agents such as bisphosphonates and statins, biophysical treatments, as well as joint-preserving and joint-replacing surgeries. the surgical treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head can be divided into two major branches: femoral head sparing procedures (FHSP) and femoral head replacement procedures (FHRP). In general, FHSP are indicated at pre-collapse stages with minimal symptoms whereas FHRP are preferred at post-collapse symptomatic stages. It is difficult to know whether any treatment modality changes the natural history of core decompression since the true natural history of core decompression has not been delineated. PMID:26396935

  4. Pentosan reduces osteonecrosis of femoral head in SHRSP.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Noriaki; Kumagai, Kenji; Osaki, Makoto; Murata, Masakazu; Tomita, Masato; Hozumi, Akira; Nozaki, Yoshihiro; Niwa, Masami

    2010-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress is considered one of the main causes of steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a steroid hormone and pentosan polysulfate sodium (pentosan), a heparin analog, in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) as a model of ONFH. One hundred twenty-three 13-week-old male SHRSP/Izm rats were divided into four groups: a control group (group C), pentosan-administered group (group P), steroid-administered group (group S), and group administered pentosan plus steroid (group PS). Methylprednisolone acetate, as the steroid hormone, at a dose of 4 mg (15 mg/kg) was administered at 15 weeks of age. Pentosan at a dose of 3 mg/day/kg was continuously administered intraperitoneally from 13 weeks of age for 4 weeks. Rats were sacrificed at 17 weeks of age, and heart blood and both femora were collected. Triglyceride levels were significantly lower in group PS than in group S, indicating that pentosan improves lipid metabolism. The incidence of histologic ONFH was significantly lower in group P, at 14.8% (10/71 femoral heads), than in group C, at 30.4% (17/56 femoral heads), and significantly lower in group PS, at 40.8% (29/71 femoral heads), than in group S, at 91.3% (42/46 femoral heads), indicating that pentosan markedly inhibits ONFH. Immunohistochemical staining for oxidative stress showed that the stainability was significantly lower in group PS than in group S. Pentosan seems to reduce the incidence of ONFH in SHRSP by improving lipid metabolism and decreasing oxidative stress.

  5. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  6. A clinical study of the rotational alignment of the femoral component in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liangjia; Liu, Xiaomin; Liu, Changlu; Liu, Yingli

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The reasons for femorotibial rotational malalignment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were analyzed to provide evidence for clinical knee joint surgery and to reduce complications. [Subjects and Methods] Ninety knees of 60 patients were selected and randomly divided into two groups (n=30). For one group, rotational alignment of the femoral component was determined by the transepicondylar axis and TKA was performed. For the other group, rotational alignment of the femoral component was conducted through 3° external rotation of the posterior femoral condyles. Knee joint specimens were operated with TKA and various biomechanical indices were measured. [Results] The femoral epicondylar axis was a constant, reliable reference for femoral component rotational alignment. When the femoral component was rotated by 0° versus the epicondylar axis, the peak contact pressure on the patellofemoral joint was optimal. When the femoral component was arranged in parallel with Whiteside’s line, the peak contact pressure on the patellofemoral joint varied largely. The patellofemoral contact areas of the two groups were similar. [Conclusion] Axial rotational alignment of the femoral component influenced the contact pressure of patellofemoral joints in TKA more significantly than external rotation of the femoral condyles. It is more reliable to use the femoral epicondylar axis as the reference for the rotational alignment of the femoral component. PMID:26311929

  7. Resected femoral anthropometry for design of the femoral component of the total knee prosthesis in a Korean population

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Dai-Soon; Han, Suhyoun; Han, Chang Whan

    2010-01-01

    We measured the mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) length, height and widths of the anterior, posterior and inferior section of the resected distal femurs using three dimensional computer tomographic measurements in 200 knees from 100 cadavers. We also calculated the aspect ratio (ML/AP) and compared the measured parameters with that of six conventionally used total knee femoral prostheses. We found that the average ML (70.2±5.5 mm) and AP (53.9±3.8 mm) dimensions from our study were lower than those reported from Western populations. The aspect ratio showed a progressive decline with an increasing antero-posterior dimension. All of the compared designs showed undersizing for the mediolateral dimension distally and for the widths of the resected medial and lateral posterior femoral condyles. But some of the compared designs showed oversizing for the height of the resected medial and lateral posterior femoral condyles. This study provides guidelines for designing a suitable femoral component for total knee prostheses that fit Asian populations. PMID:21212865

  8. Range of motion in a modular femoral stem system with a variety of neck options.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Sanaz; Chun, Sungwook; Cowan, James B; Bragdon, Charles; Malchau, Henrik; Rubash, Harry E

    2013-10-01

    Modular femoral stem systems decouple leg length, offset, and version. The hip ROM and type of impingement for 162 femoral head/neck combinations were measured at four extreme hip positions in a Sawbones pelvis and femur to identify constructs that lead to early impingement. Hip ROM increased in all positions with increasing head size and neck length. We identified a new type of impingement created by the build-up of the proximal femoral stem: femoral stem on acetabular liner impingement. Seventy percent of neutral neck options achieved our definition of acceptable ROM. In general, when utilizing a modular femoral stem, surgeons can minimize impingement by choosing the longest femoral neck that does not over-lengthen the limb, using the largest femoral head accommodated by the cup, and avoiding neck version unless the cup or stem is malaligned. PMID:23886407

  9. Early Childhood: Funnels and Tunnels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowlkes, Mary Anne

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using funnels and tunnels in combination with water, blocks, transportation toys, and other materials to help teach preschoolers to make predictions. Many examples are included for using funnels to understand properties of liquids and for using tunnels to predict order. (DH)

  10. Tunneling in Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaever, Ivar

    2002-03-01

    It has been said that Thomas Edison's greatest invention was that of the "Research Laboratory" as a social institution. My greatest discovery was when I learned at 29 years of age that it was possible to work in such an institution and get paid for doing research. I had become interested in physics, gotten a job at General Electric Research Laboratory and found a great mentor in John C. Fischer, who besides instructing me in physics told me that sooner or later we all would become historians of science. I guess for me that time is now, because I have been asked to tell you about my second greatest discovery: Tunneling in superconductors. My great fortune was to be at the right place at the right time, where I had access to outstanding and helpful (not necessary an oxymoron) physicists. Hopefully I will be able to convey to you some of the fun and excitement of that area in this recollection. If you become real interested you may find a written version in my Nobel Prize talk: "Electron Tunneling and Superconductivity" Les Prix Nobel en 1973 or Science 183, 1253-1258 1974 or Reviews of Modern Physics 46 (2), 245-250 1974

  11. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  12. Two tunnels to inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, Anthony; Johnson, Matthew C.

    2006-06-15

    We investigate the formation via tunneling of inflating (false-vacuum) bubbles in a true-vacuum background, and the reverse process. Using effective potentials from the junction condition formalism, all true- and false-vacuum bubble solutions with positive interior and exterior cosmological constant, and arbitrary mass are catalogued. We find that tunneling through the same effective potential appears to describe two distinct processes: one in which the initial and final states are separated by a wormhole (the Farhi-Guth-Guven mechanism), and one in which they are either in the same hubble volume or separated by a cosmological horizon. In the zero-mass limit, the first process corresponds to the creation of an inhomogenous universe from nothing, while the second mechanism is equivalent to the nucleation of true- or false-vacuum Coleman-De Luccia bubbles. We compute the probabilities of both mechanisms in the WKB approximation using semiclassical Hamiltonian methods, and find that--assuming both process are allowed--neither mechanism dominates in all regimes.

  13. Carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chammas, M

    2014-04-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the commonest entrapment neuropathy and is due to combined compression and traction on the median nerve at the wrist. It is often idiopathic. Although spontaneous resolution is possible, the usual natural evolution is slow progression. Diagnosis is mainly clinical depending on symptoms and provocative tests. An electromyogram is recommended preoperatively and in cases of work-related disease. Medical treatment is indicated early on or in cases with no deficit and consists of steroid injection in the canal or a night splint in neutral wrist position. Surgical treatment is by section of the flexor retinaculum and is indicated in resistance to medical treatment, in deficit or acute cases. Mini-invasive techniques such as endoscopic and mini-open approaches to carpal tunnel release with higher learning curves are justified by the shorter functional recovery time compared to classical surgery, but with identical long-term results. The choice depends on the surgeon's preference, patient information, stage of severity, etiology and availability of material. Results are satisfactory in 90% of cases. Nerve recovery depends on the stage of severity as well as general patient factors. Recovery of force takes about 2-3 months after the disappearance of 'pillar pain'. This operation has a benign reputation with a 0.2-0.5% reported neurovascular complication rate.

  14. Modified T-Graft for Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in a Patient with Small-Caliber Femoral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, Daniel; El-Banayosy, Aly; Koerner, Michael M.; Reed, Amy B.

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is generally used as a last resort to provide cardiopulmonary support in patients whose advanced cardiac or respiratory failure does not respond to less invasive treatments. Lower-limb ischemia secondary to the large diameter of the arterial cannula is one of ECMO's major limitations: in patients who have small-caliber arteries, the cannulas can reduce native blood flow. The creation of a T-graft—a well-described technique to avoid limb ischemia—enables flow into the ECMO cannula without jeopardizing blood flow to the limb. However, leaving the graft exposed through an open groin wound can result in dislodgment, and it increases the risk of infection. We describe our modification of a conventional T-graft in an 18-year-old woman who had systolic heart failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and small-caliber femoral vessels. We tunneled a polytetrafluoroethylene graft inside a Dacron graft, then ran the combined graft through a subcutaneous tunnel similar to that created for a peripheral bypass. Thus, the graft was protected from environmental exposure and the risk of infection. Our technique seems safer and more secure than the original T-graft technique, and we recommend its consideration during ECMO cannulation. PMID:26664305

  15. Tunnel electroresistance through organic ferroelectrics

    PubMed Central

    Tian, B. B.; Wang, J. L.; Fusil, S.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, X. L.; Sun, S.; Shen, H.; Lin, T.; Sun, J. L.; Duan, C. G.; Bibes, M.; Barthélémy, A.; Dkhil, B.; Garcia, V.; Meng, X. J.; Chu, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Organic electronics is emerging for large-area applications such as photovoltaic cells, rollable displays or electronic paper. Its future development and integration will require a simple, low-power organic memory, that can be written, erased and readout electrically. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile memory in which the ferroelectric polarisation state of an organic tunnel barrier encodes the stored information and sets the readout tunnel current. We use high-sensitivity piezoresponse force microscopy to show that films as thin as one or two layers of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) remain switchable with low voltages. Submicron junctions based on these films display tunnel electroresistance reaching 1,000% at room temperature that is driven by ferroelectric switching and explained by electrostatic effects in a direct tunnelling regime. Our findings provide a path to develop low-cost, large-scale arrays of organic ferroelectric tunnel junctions on silicon or flexible substrates. PMID:27143121

  16. Tunneling in thin MOS structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent results on tunneling in thin MOS structures are described. Thermally grown SiO2 films in the thickness range of 22-40 A have been shown to be effectively uniform on an atomic scale and exhibit an extremely abrupt oxide-silicon interface. Resonant reflections are observed at this interface for Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and are shown to agree with the exact theory for a trapezoidal barrier. Tunneling at lower fields is consistent with elastic tunneling into the silicon direct conduction band and, at still lower fields, inelastic tunneling into the indirect conduction band. Approximate dispersion relations are obtained over portions of the silicon-dioxide energy gap and conduction band.

  17. Carpal tunnel syndrome and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Baum, H; Lüdecke, D K; Herrmann, H D

    1986-01-01

    50 patients with acromegaly and carpal tunnel syndrome have been examined electrophysiologically before and after transnasal operation of the pituitary adenoma. 32 of the 50 patients (64%) had symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. 13 of them had neurological deficits. 28 of the examined patients had pathological neurographical findings only. About 1 week post-operatively DL was decreased in 43%; in 10 out of 13 patients with neurological deficits DL decreased. GH was normalized in 80% and reduced to 5-10 micrograms/l in a further 10%. The investigation did not show whether the carpal tunnel syndrome only depended on a GH increase or on other factors also such as e.g., on the duration of symptoms or tissue changes. None of the patients had the transversal carpal ligament operated on. The coincidence between acromegaly and carpal tunnel syndrome was 64%. In 3 cases the carpal tunnel syndrome was the leading sign to the diagnosis of acromegaly.

  18. Tunnel electroresistance through organic ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, B. B.; Wang, J. L.; Fusil, S.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, X. L.; Sun, S.; Shen, H.; Lin, T.; Sun, J. L.; Duan, C. G.; Bibes, M.; Barthélémy, A.; Dkhil, B.; Garcia, V.; Meng, X. J.; Chu, J. H.

    2016-05-01

    Organic electronics is emerging for large-area applications such as photovoltaic cells, rollable displays or electronic paper. Its future development and integration will require a simple, low-power organic memory, that can be written, erased and readout electrically. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile memory in which the ferroelectric polarisation state of an organic tunnel barrier encodes the stored information and sets the readout tunnel current. We use high-sensitivity piezoresponse force microscopy to show that films as thin as one or two layers of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) remain switchable with low voltages. Submicron junctions based on these films display tunnel electroresistance reaching 1,000% at room temperature that is driven by ferroelectric switching and explained by electrostatic effects in a direct tunnelling regime. Our findings provide a path to develop low-cost, large-scale arrays of organic ferroelectric tunnel junctions on silicon or flexible substrates.

  19. Tunnel electroresistance through organic ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Tian, B B; Wang, J L; Fusil, S; Liu, Y; Zhao, X L; Sun, S; Shen, H; Lin, T; Sun, J L; Duan, C G; Bibes, M; Barthélémy, A; Dkhil, B; Garcia, V; Meng, X J; Chu, J H

    2016-01-01

    Organic electronics is emerging for large-area applications such as photovoltaic cells, rollable displays or electronic paper. Its future development and integration will require a simple, low-power organic memory, that can be written, erased and readout electrically. Here we demonstrate a non-volatile memory in which the ferroelectric polarisation state of an organic tunnel barrier encodes the stored information and sets the readout tunnel current. We use high-sensitivity piezoresponse force microscopy to show that films as thin as one or two layers of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) remain switchable with low voltages. Submicron junctions based on these films display tunnel electroresistance reaching 1,000% at room temperature that is driven by ferroelectric switching and explained by electrostatic effects in a direct tunnelling regime. Our findings provide a path to develop low-cost, large-scale arrays of organic ferroelectric tunnel junctions on silicon or flexible substrates. PMID:27143121

  20. Three Point Bending Test of Human Femoral Tissue: An Essay in Ancient and Modern Bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Bárcenas, L. A.; Trejo-Camacho, H.; Suárez-Estrella, I.; Heredia, A.; Magaña, C.; Bucio, L.; Orozco, E.

    2003-09-01

    Some procedures for characterising the mechanical properties of femur diaphysis are reviewed here. We have used the three point bending test to measure the relative rupture modulus of ancient healthy human tissues (1250, 800, 614, and 185 years BP) as well as recent bones. The maximum resistance to fracture was measured applying a force (by a wedge) over the femoral inner surface. The maximum rupture strength was about 150 MPa for recent bone and decreased as the antiquity increased. The typical anisotropy that is observed in this kind of tissues is due to the anisotropical orientation of fibres as well as the textured orientation of the apatite crystals over the collagen fibres. Therefore we found that ancient bones show less fracture strength probably due to an abiotic crystal growth phenomenon during the diagenesis process. By LVSEM analysis we have found that in recent samples the fracture surface is irregular due to the crosslinking interactions between the collagen molecules, in comparison with the ancient samples, where a smooth surface is clearly appreciated as the antiquity of the sample increases. The results reported here strongly suggest that these composites should contain a fibrillar phase as a matrix constituted mainly by a natural polymer (i.e. collagen, cellulose, etc.). Moreover, this composite must have a minimum rupture strength of about 150 MPa.

  1. A new automatic landmark extraction framework on ultrasound images of femoral condyles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Sibut, Agnès; Nakib, Amir; Petit, Eric; Leitner, François

    2012-03-01

    In Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS), surgeons have to acquire some anatomical landmarks as inputs to the system. To do so, they use manual pointers that are localized in the Operating Room (OR) space using an infrared camera. When the needed landmark is not reachable through an opening, it is palpated directly on skin and there is a loss of precision that can vary from several millimeters to centimeters depending on the thickness of soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a new framework based on three main steps to register the bone surface and extract automatically anatomical landmarks with an ultrasound probe. This framework is based on an oriented gradient calculation, a simulated-compound and a contour closure using a graph representation. The oriented gradient allows extracting a set of pixels that probably belong to the bone surface. The simulatedcompound step allows using ultrasound images properties to define a set of small segments which may belong to the bone surface, and the graph representation allows eliminating false positive detection among remaining segments. The proposed method has been validated on a database of 230 ultrasound images of anterior femoral condyles (on the knee). The average computation time is 0.11 sec per image, and average errors are: 0.54 mm for the bone surface extraction, 0.31 mm for the condylar line, and 1.4 mm for the trochlea middle.

  2. Statistical Shape Modeling of Proximal Femoral Shape Deformities in Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease and Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Elaine F.; Farnsworth, Christine L.; Koziol, James A.; Hosalkar, Harish S.; Sah, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The current understanding of morphological deformities of the hip such as femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD), and slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is based on 2-dimensional metrics, primarily involving the femoral head, that only partially describe the complex skeletal morphology. Objective This study aimed to improve the 3-dimensional understanding of shape variations during normal growth, and in LCPD and SCFE, through statistical shape modeling. Design Thirty-two patients with asymptomatic, LCPD, and SCFE hips, determined from physical and radiographic examination, were scanned using 3-D CT at a voxel size of (0.5–0.9mm)2 in-plane and 0.63mm slice thickness. Statistical shape modeling was performed on segmented proximal femoral surfaces to determine modes of variation and shape variables quantifying 3-D shape. In addition, conventional variables were determined for all femora. Results Proximal femur shape was described by 8 modes of variation and corresponding shape variables. Statistical shape variables were distinct with age and revealed coordinated, growth-associated differences in neck length-to-width ratio, femoral head medialization, and trochanter protrusion. After size and age-based shape adjustment, diseased proximal femora were characterized by shape variables distinct from those of asymptomatic hips. The shape variables defined morphology in health and disease, and were correlated with certain conventional variables of shape, including neck-shaft angle, head diameter, and neck diameter. Conclusion 3-D quantitative analyses of proximal femoral bone shape during growth and in disease are useful for furthering the understanding of normal and abnormal shape deviations which affect cartilage biomechanics and risk of developing osteoarthritis. PMID:23274103

  3. Proximal Femoral Nail Antirotation Versus Reverse Less Invasive Stabilization System-distal Femur for Treating Proximal Femoral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuan; Wang, Ying; Ma, XinLong; Ma, JianXiong; Wang, Chen; Zhang, ChengBao; Han, Zhe; Sun, Lei; Lu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of 2 surgical techniques that are used to treat proximal femoral fractures. A systematic literature search (up to December 2014) was conducted in Medline, Embase, PubMed, and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to screen for studies comparing proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) with less invasive stabilization system–distal femur (LISS-DF) for proximal femoral fractures. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of the included studies and extracted data. Surgical information and postoperative outcomes were analyzed. A total of 7 studies with 361 patients who satisfied the eligibility criteria included 3 randomized controlled trials and 4 case-controlled trials associated with PFNA versus LISS in treating proximal femoral fractures. Our results demonstrated that there was a significant reduction in hospital stay and time to weight-bearing ambulation and bone healing for PFNA compared with LISS (odds ratio [OR] −1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] −2.92 to −0.05; OR −7.08, 95% CI −8.32 to −5.84; OR −2.71, 95% CI −4.76 to 0.67). No statistically significant difference was observed between the 2 groups for operative time, blood loss volume, Harris hip score, and incidence of complications. Based on the results of this analysis, we inferred that PFNA is safer and more effective than reverse LISS-DF in patients undergoing osteosynthesis for proximal femoral fractures, and that PFNA is associated with reduced hospital stays and reduced time to weight-bearing ambulation and bone healing. Nonetheless, in certain cases in which PFNA is not suitable due to abnormal structure of the proximal femur or particularly unstable fractures, the LISS plate technique could be a useful alternative. PMID:27057840

  4. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    priority of the discovery in the literature, which was partly caused by the existence of the Iron Curtain. I had already enjoyed contact with Boris in the 1980s when the two volumes of Landau Level Spectroscopy were being prepared [2]. He was one of the pioneers of magneto-optics in semiconductors. In the 1950s the band structure of germanium and silicon was investigated by magneto-optical methods, mainly in the United States. No excitonic effects were observed and the band structure parameters were determined without taking account of excitons. However, working with cuprous oxide, which is a direct semiconductor with a relative large energy gap, Zakharchenya and his co-worker Seysan showed that in order to obtain correct band structure parameters, it is necessary to take excitons into account [3]. About 1970 Boris started work on optical orientation. Early work by Hanle in Germany in the 1920s on the depolarization of luminescence in mercury vapour by a transverse magnetic field was not appreciated for a long time. Only in the late 1940s did Kastler and co-workers in Paris begin a systematic study of optical pumping, which led to the award of a Nobel prize. The ideas of optical pumping were first applied by Georges Lampel to solid state physics in 1968. He demonstrated optical orientation of free carriers in silicon. The detection method was nuclear magnetic resonance; optically oriented free electrons dynamically polarized the 29Si nuclei of the host lattice. The first optical detection of spin orientation was demonstrated by with the III-V semiconductor GaSb by Parsons. Due to the various interaction mechanisms of spins with their environment, the effects occurring in semiconductors are naturally more complex than those in atoms. Optical detection is now the preferred method to detect spin alignment in semiconductors. The orientation of spins in crystals pumped with circularly polarized light is deduced from the degree of circular polarization of the recombination

  5. Differences in Femoral Geometry and Structure Due to Immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiratli, Beatrice Jenny; Yamada, M.; Smith, A.; Marcus, R. M.; Arnaud, S.; vanderMeulen, M. C. H.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Reduction in bone mass of the lower extremity is well documented in individuals with paralysis resulting from spinal cord injury (SCI). The consequent osteopenia leads to elevated fracture risk with fractures occurring more commonly in the femoral shaft and supracondylar regions than the hip. A model has recently been described to estimate geometry and structure of the femoral midshaft from whole body scans by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Increases in femoral geometric and structural properties during growth were primarily related to mechanical loading as reflected by body mass. In this study, we investigate the relationship between body mass and femoral geometry and structure in adults with normal habitual mechanical loading patterns and those with severely reduced loading. The subjects were 78 ambulatory men (aged 20-72 yrs) and 113 men with complete paralysis from SCI of more than 4 years duration (aged 21 73 yrs). Subregional analysis was performed on DXA whole body scans to obtain bone mineral content (BMC, g), cortical thickness (cm), crosssectional moment of inertia (CSMI, cm4), and section modulus (cm3) of the femoral midshaft. All measured bone variables were significantly lower in SCI compared with ambulatory subjects: -29% (BMC), -33% (cortical thickness), -23% (CSMI), and -22% (section modulus) while body mass was not significantly different. However, the associations between body mass and bone properties were notably different; r2 values were higher for ambulatory than SCI subjects in regressions of body mass on BMC (0.48 vs 0.20), CSMI (0.59 vs 0.32), and section modulus (0.59 vs 0.31). No association was seen between body mass and cortical thickness for either group. The greatest difference between groups is in the femoral cortex, consistent with reduced bone mass via endosteal expansion. The relatively lesser difference in geometric and structural properties implies that there is less effect on mechanical integrity than would be expected from

  6. Successful Return to Sport Following Distal Femoral Varus Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Voleti, Pramod Babu; Degen, Ryan; Tetreault, Danielle; Krych, Aaron John; Williams, Riley J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Distal femoral varus osteotomy is an effective treatment for unloading valgus knee malalignment; however, there is limited evidence on the ability for patients to return to athletics following this procedure. The purpose of this study is to report the functional outcomes and return to sport for athletic patients that underwent distal femoral varus osteotomy. Methods: A consecutive series of athletic patients that had undergone distal femoral varus osteotomy for symptomatic lateral compartment overload and valgus knee malalignment were prospectively reviewed. All patients had a minimum of 2-year follow-up. Radiographs were assessed to determine pre-operative and post-operative alignment. Details regarding sport of interest, ability to return to sport, and timing of return were obtained from the patients. Prospective institutional registries were utilized to collect pre-operative and post-operative Marx Activity Scale and International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form (IKDC) scores; these values were compared using paired t-tests with p < 0.05 as the threshold for significance. Results: A total of 13 patients with a mean age of 24 years (range: 17-35) and a mean follow-up of 43 months (range: 24-74) were included in the study. Six patients underwent medial closing wedge osteotomy, and seven patients underwent lateral opening wedge osteotomy. The mean alignment correction was 8 degrees (range: 5-13). Nine patients underwent one or more concomitant procedures at the time of the osteotomy: 6 lateral femoral condyle osteochondral allografts, 2 partial lateral meniscectomies, 1 lateral meniscus allograft transplantation, and 1 revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. All patients were able to successfully return to their sport of choice (4 soccer, 2 softball, 2 running, 1 football, 1 basketball, 1 ice hockey, 1 volleyball, 1 rowing) at a mean of 11 months (range: 9-13). Furthermore, all 13 patients demonstrated an

  7. Electromagnetics for Detecting Shallow Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, I.

    2006-05-01

    Detecting tunnels by geophysical means, even very shallow ones, has been difficult, to say the least. Despite heavy R&D funding from the military since the early 70s, geophysicists have not produced tools that are simple and practical enough to meet the military needs. The initial interest and R&D funding on the subject perhaps started with the Vietcong tunnels in the 60s. Tunnels in the Korean DMZ, first found in the mid 70s, sharply escalated the R&D spending. During the 90s, covert tunnels along the US-Mexico border have kept the topic alive but at a minimal funding level. Most recent interest appears to be in the terrorism-related shallow tunnels, more or less anywhere in the regions of conflict. Despite the longstanding effort in the geophysical community under heavy public funding, there is a dearth of success stories where geophysicists can actually claim to have found hitherto unknown tunnels. For instance, geophysics has not discovered a single tunnel in Vietnam or in Korea! All tunnels across the Korean DMZ were found from human intelligence. The same is true to all illicit tunnels found along the southwestern border. The tunnels under discussion are clandestine, which implies that the people who built them do not wish others to succeed in finding them. The place around the tunnel, therefore, may not be the friendliest venue for surveyors to linger around. The situation requires tools that are fast, little noticeable, and hardly intrusive. Many geophysical sensors that require ground contacts, such as geophones and electrodes that are connected by a myriad of cables, may not be ideal in this situation. On the other hand, a sensor that can be carried by vehicle without stopping, and is nothing obviously noticeable to bystanders, could be much more acceptable. Working at unfriendly environment also requires forgoing our usual practices where we collect data leisurely and make pretty maps later. To be useful, geophysical tools must be able to process

  8. Tunneling electroresistance effect in ferroelectric tunnel junctions at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Gruverman, A; Wu, D; Lu, H; Wang, Y; Jang, H W; Folkman, C M; Zhuravlev, M Ye; Felker, D; Rzchowski, M; Eom, C-B; Tsymbal, E Y

    2009-10-01

    Using a set of scanning probe microscopy techniques, we demonstrate the reproducible tunneling electroresistance effect on nanometer-thick epitaxial BaTiO(3) single-crystalline thin films on SrRuO(3) bottom electrodes. Correlation between ferroelectric and electronic transport properties is established by direct nanoscale visualization and control of polarization and tunneling current. The obtained results show a change in resistance by about 2 orders of magnitude upon polarization reversal on a lateral scale of 20 nm at room temperature. These results are promising for employing ferroelectric tunnel junctions in nonvolatile memory and logic devices. PMID:19697939

  9. Frequency driven inversion of tunnel magnetoimpedance and observation of positive tunnel magnetocapacitance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parui, Subir; Ribeiro, Mário; Atxabal, Ainhoa; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Sun, Xiangnan; Llopis, Roger; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E.

    2016-08-01

    The relevance for modern computation of non-volatile high-frequency memories makes ac-transport measurements of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) crucial for exploring this regime. Here, we demonstrate a frequency-mediated effect in which the tunnel magnetoimpedance reverses its sign in a classical Co/Al2O3/NiFe MTJ, whereas we only observe a gradual decrease in the tunnel magnetophase. Such effects are explained by the capacitive coupling of a parallel resistor and capacitor in the equivalent circuit model of the MTJ. Furthermore, we report a positive tunnel magnetocapacitance effect, suggesting the presence of a spin-capacitance at the two ferromagnet/tunnel-barrier interfaces. Our results are important for understanding spin transport phenomena at the high frequency regime in which the spin-polarized charge accumulation due to spin-dependent penetration depth at the two interfaces plays a crucial role.

  10. Variable-Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1921-01-01

    The outside pressure shell for the Variable-Density Tunnel (VDT). The shell, or 'tank' as it was called, was built in the Newport News Shipyard and traveled by barge to Langley. The tank could withstand a working pressure of 21 atmospheres. Elton Miller described it in NACA TR No. 227 (pp. 411-412): 'It is built of steel plates lapped and riveted according to the usual practice in steam boiler construction, although, because of the size of the tank and the high working pressure, the construction is unusually heavy. There is a cylindrical body portion of 2-1/8 inch (53.98 millimeters) steel plate with hemispherical ends 1-1/4 inches (31.75 millimeters) in thickness.'

  11. Mars Surface Tunnel Element Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Jefferies, Sharon; Howe, A. Scott; Howard, Robert; Mary, Natalie; Watson, Judith; Lewis, Ruthan

    2016-01-01

    When the first human visitors on Mars prepare to return to Earth, they will have to comply with stringent planetary protection requirements. Apollo Program experience warns that opening an EVA hatch directly to the surface will bring dust into the ascent vehicle. To prevent inadvertent return of potential Martian contaminants to Earth, careful consideration must be given to the way in which crew ingress their Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). For architectures involving more than one surface element-such as an ascent vehicle and a pressurized rover or surface habitat-a retractable tunnel that eliminates extravehicular activity (EVA) ingress is an attractive solution. Beyond addressing the immediate MAV access issue, a reusable tunnel may be useful for other surface applications, such as rover to habitat transfer, once its primary mission is complete. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) team is studying the optimal balance between surface tunnel functionality, mass, and stowed volume as part of the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). The study team began by identifying the minimum set of functional requirements needed for the tunnel to perform its primary mission, as this would presumably be the simplest design, with the lowest mass and volume. This Minimum Functional Tunnel then becomes a baseline against which various tunnel design concepts and potential alternatives can be traded, and aids in assessing the mass penalty of increased functionality. Preliminary analysis indicates that the mass of a single-mission tunnel is about 237 kg, not including mass growth allowance.

  12. Spin tunneling in conducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovsky, A.

    1998-12-31

    Different tunneling mechanisms in conventional and half-metallic ferromagnetic tunnel junctions are analyzed within the same general method. Direct tunneling is compared with impurity-assisted, surface state assisted, and inelastic contributions to a tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). Theoretically calculated direct tunneling in iron group systems leads to about a 30% change in resistance, which is close to experimentally observed values. It is shown that the larger observed values of the TMR might be a result of tunneling involving surface polarized states. The authors find that tunneling via resonant defect states in the barrier radically decreases the TMR (down to 4% with Fe-based electrodes), and a resonant tunnel diode structure would give a TMR of about 8%. With regards to inelastic tunneling, magnons and phonons exhibit opposite effects: one-magnon emission generally results in spin mixing and, consequently, reduces the TMR, whereas phonons are shown to enhance the TMR. The inclusion of both magnons and phonons reasonably explains an unusually bias dependence of the TMR. The model presented here is applied qualitatively to half-metallics with 100% spin polarization, where one-magnon processes are suppressed and the change in resistance in the absence of spin-mixing on impurities may be arbitrarily large. Even in the case of imperfect magnetic configurations, the resistance change can be a few 1,000%. Examples of half-metallic systems are CrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} and CrO{sub 2}/RuO{sub 2}, and an account of their peculiar band structures is presented. The implications and relation of these systems to CMR materials, which are nearly half-metallic, are discussed.

  13. Iliacus haematoma causing femoral nerve palsy: an unusual trampolining injury.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Simon; Berg, Andrew James; Lupu, Andreea; Jennings, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented to accident and emergency following a trampolining injury. Initially, the patient was discharged, diagnosed with a soft tissue injury, but he re-presented 48 h later with worsening low back pain and neurological symptoms in the left leg. Subsequent MRI revealed a left iliacus haematoma causing a femoral nerve palsy. The patient was managed conservatively and by 6 months post injury all symptoms had resolved. This is the first reported case of an iliacus haematoma causing a femoral nerve palsy, after a trampolining injury. We believe this case highlights to our fellow clinicians the importance of a detailed history when assessing patients with trampolining injuries to evaluate the true force of injury. It also acts as a reference for clinicians in managing similar cases in future. PMID:26216923

  14. PROXIMAL FEMORAL EPIPHYSIOLYSIS AND SUBCLINICAL HYPOTHYROIDISM: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Grasiele Correa; Grossi, Gabriela; Coelho, Sílvio Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Proximal femoral epiphysiolysis is an orthopedic disease that is prevalent during adolescence, because this coincides with the time of greatest growth of osteomuscular structures. Curiously, some patients present this disease early, and this outcome converts to the possible etiological explanation that the slippage might occur through a growth spurt. For these patients, the genesis of the slippage has not yet been elucidated, but endocrine disorders have been noted as possible causes. In an attempt to strengthen the theory of endocrinological etiology and present the results from surgical treatment for this pathological condition, the case of a male patient aged 9 years and 3 months with proximal femoral epiphysiolysis and subclinical hypothyroidism who was diagnosed and treated at our university's teaching hospital is reported here. PMID:27047883

  15. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy for avascular necrosis of femoral head.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Huang, Chung-Cheng; Yip, Han-Kan; Russo, Sergio

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is multifactorial. Treatment of ONFH is disease stage dependent. For early stages, femoral head preservation procedures are preferred including core decompression, muscle pedicle grafting and de-rotational osteotomy. Core decompression with bone grafting is considered the gold standard. However, the results are inconsistence and unpredictable. An effective non-invasive method of treatment is imperative. Recently, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) has shown beneficial effects in ONFH. ESWT improves pain and function of the hip and regression of the ONFH lesion. ESWT is more effective than core decompression with or without bone grafting, cocktail therapy that combined HBO, ESWT and oral alendronate is shown effective for patients with early osteonecrosis. The purpose of the article is to review, update and summarize the clinical treatment of ONFH using shockwave therapy.

  16. Computer assisted measurement of femoral cortex thickening on radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Yixun; Chen, Foster; Summers, Ronald M.; Bhattacharyya, Timothy

    2013-03-01

    Radiographic features such as femoral cortex thickening have been frequently observed with atypical subtrochanteric fractures. These features may be a valuable finding to help prevent fractures before they happen. The current practice of manual measurement is often subjective and inconsistent. We developed a semi-automatic tool to consistently measure and monitor the progress of femoral cortex thickening on radiographs. By placing two seed points on each side of the femur, the program automatically extracts the periosteal and endosteal layers of the cortical shell by active contour models and B-spline fitting. Several measurements are taken along the femur shaft, including shaft diameter, cortical thickness, and integral area for medial and lateral cortex. The experiment was conducted on 52 patient datasets. The semi-automatic measurements were validated against manual measurements on 52 patients and demonstrated great improvement in consistency and accuracy (p<0.001).

  17. Treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head: everything's new.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, David S

    2007-06-01

    Since the 1970s, the mantra of those treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head was to save the head at all costs. Total hip arthroplasty (THA), the only effective surgical treatment once the head has mechanically and clinically failed, had a poor track record for young active patients. Recently, THA using highly cross-linked polyethylene, metal-on-metal bearing surfaces, or ceramic-on-ceramic bearing surfaces have given promising results, changing the "save-at-all-costs" paradigm. Operations that have a low success rate, high complication rate or morbidity, or compromise subsequent THA can no longer be justified. This includes femoral osteotomy and free vascularized fibular graft. Core decompression is justified, when indicated, because of its low morbidity and absence of complications with subsequent THA.

  18. A case of femoral fracture in klippel trenaunay syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nahas, Sam; Wong, Fabian; Back, Diane

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of Klippel Trenaunay syndrome (KTS) who presented with severe bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA). Preoperative planning was commenced for a total knee replacement (TKR). Whilst on the waiting list the patient suffered a fall and sustained a complete femoral diaphysis fracture. Conservative management in the form of skin traction was initially chosen as significant extra- and intramedullary vascular malformations posed an increased risk of perioperative bleeding. This failed to progress to union, and so open reduction and internal fixation was performed. This subsequently resulted in on-going delayed union, which was subsequently managed with low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS, otherwise known as Exogen (Bioventus. exogen. Secondary exogen, 2012)). There are only two previous documented cases of femoral fracture in KTS. This is the first report of a patient with this rare syndrome receiving this treatment. We discuss the management of fracture in this challenging group of patients. PMID:25478269

  19. Hip Arthroscopy for Excision of Osteoid Osteoma of Femoral Neck

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hatem Galal; Abdulla Babaqi, AbdulRahman; AbdelSalam El-Assal, Maher

    2014-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is the most commonly seen benign bone-forming lesion. It can occur anywhere, including the metaphyseal regions of small and large bones. We present 2 cases that underwent an arthroscopic technique for removal of OO of the femoral neck. The diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography in addition to magnetic resonance imaging. The lesions were accessed arthroscopically and excised by unroofing and curettage. The clinical and radiographic findings are presented, along with the surgical management. The patients improved dramatically postoperatively. OO of the femoral neck should be included in the differential diagnosis of hip pain in young patients. Arthroscopic excision and curettage provide a good choice for management, with low morbidity and rapid recovery. PMID:24749036

  20. Conservative management of femoral shaft fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Moses, T; Pan, K L; Razak, M

    1998-09-01

    Thirty-two children with femoral shaft fractures were treated conservatively with initial skin traction followed by an additional period in a spica cast. After 12 to 20 months of follow up, none had any pain and all of them were attending school without problems. Shortening of more than 2 cm occurred in 6 (19%) of the 32 patients. The most important factor associated with shortening was an overlap of more than 2 cm of shortening of the fracture ends at the time of cast fitting. The average compensatory overgrowth at final assessment was 7 mm. Angular deformity did not pose a problem. This is a safe, simple and practical method to treat childhood femoral shaft fractures.

  1. Osteochondral Fractures of the Lateral Femoral Trochlea in Young Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Method: Between May 2012 and September 2014 cluster of five patients with large osteochondral fractures of the lateral femoral trochlea were treated at our institution. These all occurred in high level male athletes, one at a decathlete and the other four soccer players. The MRI scan showed a characteristic appearance of a large subchondral fracture involving most of the lateral femoral trochlea. All patients were symptomatic. The patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using headless compression screws. The operative technique and short term results will be outlined. Results: Fixation appears successful in most cases. Conclusion: This appears to be a repetitive trauma related injury that occurs in young high-level athletes.

  2. Dual-Element Tunneling Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Rockstad, Howard K.; Reynolds, Joseph K.

    1994-01-01

    Improved micromachined tunneling accelerometer contains two deflecting transducer elements: One an elastically supported proof mass having relatively low resonant frequency; other cantilever tunneling transducer that tracks displacement of proof mass and has relatively high resonant frequency ({sup a} 10 kHz). Deflection voltage generated by circuit like described in "Wideband Feedback Circuit for Tunneling Sensor" (NPO-18866). Accelerometers of this type suited for underwater acoustic measurements, detecting vibrations associated with malfunctions in vehicles, detecting seismic signals, monitoring and controlling vibrations in structures, and other applications.

  3. Removal of well-fixed fixed femoral stems.

    PubMed

    Laffosse, J-M

    2016-02-01

    The removal of a well-fixed prosthetic stem raises technical challenges. The objective is not only to remove the material, but also to prepare the implantation of a new prosthesis. Cemented stems are only very rarely unremovable; extraction of the cement mantle and plug raises the greatest difficulties. The main risk is cortex perforation, and a radiograph should be obtained at the slightest doubt. The removal of cementless stems carries a higher risk of fracture. Difficulties should be anticipated based on thorough familiarity with the implant design and on evaluations of implant fixation and bone stock. The intramedullary approach is usually sufficient to extract a cemented or cementless, well fixed, standard stem. Routine use of a transfemoral approach is warranted only in the following situations: revision surgery for infection, S-shaped stem, long stem, curvature or angulation of the femoral shaft, or unfeasible hip dislocation. However, the possibility that the intramedullary approach may need to be converted to a transfemoral approach should be anticipated. Thus, preoperative planning must include determination of the optimal length of a femoral osteotomy or femoral flap, should one be needed, and the surgeon must have access to all the revision implants and tools that might be needed for re-implantation. Experience with the various techniques is indispensable, as a well-performed extensive approach is associated with less morbidity than a fracture or trajectory error. There are three main techniques, which are described here: intramedullary extraction of a cementless stem, intramedullary extraction of a cemented stem, and transfemoral extraction through an extended trochanterotomy. The patients should receive detailed information on the difficulties of femoral stem removal and on the available solutions. PMID:26797009

  4. Femoral neck non-union treatment by valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy in femoral neck non-union. METHODS : Forty-two patients with femoral neck fractures with non-union treated using Pauwels' intertrochanteric osteotomy were reviewed. Demographics, time elapsed between fracture and surgery, follow--up, osteosynthesis used, Garden's classification, limb shortening, and x-rays were evaluated. RESULTS : Twenty-two men and 20 women were reviewed. The youngest patient was 18 years old and the oldest 65 years old, with a mean age of 42.4 years (±11.2). The minimum follow-up was 2 years, with a mean of 10.2 years. The average time elapsed between initial fracture and osteotomy was 6.5 months. Twel-ve cases were neglected femoral neck fractures. Nineteen patients were classified as Garden III, and 23 patients as Garden IV. After valgus osteotomy, non-union healing was observed in 38 patients (38/42; 90.4%). Healing of thirty-seven cases of pseudoarthrosis were obtained after the first-attempt osteotomy, and one case required two operations for healing. The osteotomy failed in four cases. Conside-ring the healed osteotomies, good to excellent functional results were achieved in 80.9% (34/42) of the patients. Total hip replacement was subsequently performed in 14.2% (6/42) of the patients for unfavoura-ble outcomes (two for cutting out, two for osteonecrosis, and two for osteoarthritis). CONCLUSIONS : Valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy has a high success rate in archiving healing in femoral neck non-union with good functional results. It is a biological and effective method. Level of Evidence IV, Therapeutic Study. PMID:27057146

  5. Femoral neck erosions: sign of hip joint synovial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.P.; Weissman, B.N.; Naimark, A.

    1983-07-01

    Pathologic synovial processes in the hip joint can cause characteristic extrinsic erosions of the femoral neck, which in extreme cases produce an ''apple core'' appearance. Nine such cases of synovial diseases, including synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and amyloidosis, that demonstrate this radiographic finding are presented. The anatomic relations of the hip joint that result in theis appearance, differential diagnosis, and radiographic techniques useful in diagnosis are discussed.

  6. [Merle D'Aubigne's oblique proximal femoral osteotomy. Surgical technique].

    PubMed

    López Sosa, Francisco H; Valentín-Guerrero, Santiago; Miranda-López, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Proximal femoral osteotomy with the technique described by Merle D'AubignC and Valliant was used in the treatment of adult patients with osteoarthritis or idiopathic avascular necrosis. Dr. Antonio Flores applied this technique to children with subluxation and acetabular dysplasia, identified with exaggerated anteversion and valgus of the proximal femur. He reported correction of the deformity in 75% of patients. The purpose of this paper is to describe the technique, its indications and complications.

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Complications of Femoral Arterial Access

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetis, Dimitrios

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular repair of femoral arterial access complications is nowadays the treatment of choice in a group of patients who cannot tolerate vascular reconstruction and bleeding due to advanced cardiovascular disease. Endovascular procedures can be performed under local anesthesia, are well tolerated by the patient, and are associated with a short hospitalization time. Ninitinol stent technology allows for safe stent and stent-graft extension at the common femoral artery (CFA) level, due to increased resistance to external compression and bending stress. Active pelvic bleeding can be insidious, and prompt placement of a stent-graft at the site of leakage is a lifesaving procedure. Percutaneous thrombin injection under US guidance is the treatment of choice for femoral pseudoaneurysms (PAs); this can theoretically be safer with simultaneous balloon occlusion across the entry site of a PA without a neck or with a short and wide neck. In a few cases with thrombin failure due to a large arterial defect or accompanying arteriovenous fistula (AVF), a stent-graft can be deployed. The vast majority of catheter-induced AVFs can be treated effectively with stent-graft implantation even if they are located very close to the femoral bifurcation. Obstructive dissection flaps localized in the CFA are usually treated with prolonged balloon inflation; however, in more extensive dissections involving iliac arteries, self-expanding stents should be deployed. Iliofemoral thrombosis can be treated effectively with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) followed by prolonged balloon inflation or stent placement. Balloon angioplasty and CDT can occasionally be used to treat stenoses and occlusions complicating the use of percutaneous closure devices.

  8. A low morbidity surgical approach to the sheep femoral trochlea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ovine stifle joint is an important location for investigations on the repair of articular cartilage defects in preclinical large animals. The classical medial parapatellar approach to the femoral trochlea is hazardous because of the high risk of postoperative patellar luxation. Here, we describe a low morbidity surgical exposure of the ovine trochlea without the necessity for intraoperative patellar luxation. Methods Bilateral surgical exposure of the femoral trochlea of the sheep stifle joint was performed using the classical medial parapatellar approach with intraoperative lateral patellar luxation and transection of the medial patellar retinaculum in 28 ovine stifle joints. A low morbidity approach was performed bilaterally in 116 joints through a mini-arthrotomy without the need to transect the medial patellar retinaculum or the oblique medial vastus muscle nor surgical patellar luxation. Postoperatively, all 72 animals were monitored to exclude patellar luxations and deep wound infections. Results The novel approach could be performed easily in all joints and safely exposed the distal two-thirds of the medial and lateral trochlear facet. No postoperative patellar luxations were observed compared to a postoperative patellar luxation rate of 25% experienced with the classical medial parapatellar approach and a re-luxation rate of 80% following revision surgery. No signs of lameness, wound infections, or empyema were observed for both approaches. Conclusions The mini-arthrotomy presented here yields good exposure of the distal ovine femoral trochlea with a lower postoperative morbidity than the classical medial parapatellar approach. It is therefore suitable to create articular cartilage defects on the femoral trochlea without the risk of postoperative patellar luxation. PMID:23286467

  9. Langley Spin Tunnel - Free Flight Tunnel - and models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1939-01-01

    Model shop for NACA Spin Tunnel and Free Flight Tunnel. Dynamically and geometrically accurate models with movable control surfaces are made here by men whose training as toy model makers is producing valuable results. The models are used for study of the stability and control of aircraft which is an essential basis for safety. Photograph published in Winds of Change, a 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 10), by James Schultz.

  10. Carpal tunnel syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Van Meir, Nathalie; De Smet, Luc

    2003-10-01

    transverse carpal ligament. Intensive sports practice has been reported as an aetiological factor in several cases of childhood CTS. Nerve territory oriented macrodactily, a benign localised form of gigantism, is another unusual cause of CTS in children, as are fibrolipomas of the median nerve or intraneural perineuroma or haemangioma of the median nerve. Acute cases have been reported in children with haemophilia, secondary to local bleeding. Another local cause is a musculotendinous malformation of the palmaris longus, the flexor digitorum superficialis, the flexor carpi radialis brevis (a supernumerary muscle), the first lumbricalis or the palmaris brevis. Isolated cases of childhood CTS have also been reported in Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, in Poland's syndrome and in scleroderma. Finally, several cases have been noted following trauma, most often related with epiphysiolysis of the distal radius. Immediate reduction has cleared the problem in most cases, but exploration of the median nerve should be considered otherwise, and also in cases with delayed occurrence of symptoms. Overall 145 of the 163 reviewed cases have undergone open carpal tunnel release. Childhood CTS often has an unusual presentation, with modest complaints and children are often too young to communicate their problem. In CTS with specific aetiologies such as storage disease, the symptoms may be masked by the skeletal dysplasia and joint stiffness. Every child with even mild symptoms must be thoroughly examined and a family history must be taken. Children with storage disease may benefit from early clinical and electrophysiological screening before they develop obvious clinical signs. PMID:14648946

  11. [Femoral venous catheterization. Does it really need to be avoided?].

    PubMed

    Lorente, L; León, C

    2009-12-01

    The guidelines to prevent central venous catheter related bloodstream infections (CVCBSI) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of 2002, Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Crítica y Unidades Coronarias/ Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica (SEMICYUC/SEIMC) of 2004, and the recently published guidelines of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America/Infectious Diseases Society of America (SHEA(IDSA) of 2008 have recommended using the subclavian vein and avoiding the use of the femoral vein. They also recommend considering the use of antiseptic- or antimicrobial-impregnated CVCs for hospital units or groups of patients with a high incidence of CVCBSI. When implementing these guidelines, two questions could be asked: 1) Could the abuse of the subclavian vein and avoiding the use of the femoral vein imply a decrease in the incidence of CVCBSI, but an increase in the rate of mechanical complications as pneumothorax and/or hemothorax? 2) Couldn't antimicrobial-impregnated CVCs be used to prevent CVCBSI when the femoral venous access is used?

  12. An Advanced Quantitative Echosound Methodology for Femoral Neck Densitometry.

    PubMed

    Casciaro, Sergio; Peccarisi, Marco; Pisani, Paola; Franchini, Roberto; Greco, Antonio; De Marco, Tommaso; Grimaldi, Antonella; Quarta, Laura; Quarta, Eugenio; Muratore, Maruizio; Conversano, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the clinical feasibility and the accuracy in femoral neck densitometry of the Osteoporosis Score (O.S.), an ultrasound (US) parameter for osteoporosis diagnosis that has been recently introduced for lumbar spine applications. A total of 377 female patients (aged 61-70 y) underwent both a femoral dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and an echographic scan of the proximal femur. Recruited patients were sub-divided into a reference database used for ultrasound spectral model construction and a study population for repeatability assessments and accuracy evaluations. Echographic images and radiofrequency signals were analyzed through a fully automatic algorithm that performed a series of combined spectral and statistical analyses, providing as a final output the O.S. value of the femoral neck. Assuming DXA as a gold standard reference, the accuracy of O.S.-based diagnoses resulted 94.7%, with k = 0.898 (p < 0.0001). Significant correlations were also found between O.S.-estimated bone mineral density and corresponding DXA values, with r(2) up to 0.79 and root mean square error = 5.9-7.4%. The reported accuracy levels, combined with the proven ease of use and very good measurement repeatability, provide the adopted method with a potential for clinical routine application in osteoporosis diagnosis.

  13. [Treatment of femoral neck fractures using a total hip prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Ansorge, D; Hack, U

    1983-01-01

    From October 1. 1977 to December 1. 1982 106 patients suffering from fractures of the femoral neck (n = 75) or necroses of the femoral head and nonunions of the neck fracture respectively (n = 33) underwent total hip replacement by TEP (type Müller-Charnley). The results obtained were much better in comparison to other methods of treatment: less complications, shortening of in-hospital stay (average 21.1 days) and satisfactory till good late results in 82.8%. The mortality rate came up to 13.9% (fractures: 20.0%, necrosis of the head and nonunion: 0.0%). Concerning complications we observed wound infections 0.9%, dislocations 1.9%, twice fractures of the thigh bone, twice loosening of the shaft of the prosthesis and once its fracture. The authors emphasize that in spite of the good results obtained for the time being total hip replacement for fractures of the femoral neck should be reserved to special wards.

  14. Custom Knee Device for Knee Contractures After Internal Femoral Lengthening.

    PubMed

    Bhave, Anil; Shabtai, Lior; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Standard, Shawn C; Paley, Dror; Herzenberg, John E

    2015-07-01

    The development of knee flexion contractures is among the most common problems and complications associated with lengthening the femur with an internal device or external fixator. Conservative treatment strategies include physical therapy, serial casting, and low-load prolonged stretching with commercially available splinting systems. The authors developed an individually molded, low-cost custom knee device with polyester synthetic conformable casting material to treat knee flexion contractures. The goal of this study was to evaluate the results of treatment with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy in patients who had knee flexion contracture during femoral lengthening with an intramedullary lengthening femoral nail. This retrospective study included 23 patients (27 limbs) who underwent femoral lengthening with an internal device for the treatment of limb length discrepancy. All patients had a knee flexion contracture raging from 10° to 90° during the lengthening process and were treated with a custom knee device and specialized physical therapy. The average flexion contracture before treatment was 36°. The mean amount of lengthening was 5.4 cm. After an average of 3.8 weeks of use of the custom knee device, only 2 of 27 limbs (7.5%) had not achieved complete resolution of the flexion contracture. The average final extension was 1.4°. Only 7 of 27 limbs (26%) required additional soft tissue release. The custom knee device is an inexpensive and effective method for treating knee flexion contracture after lengthening with an internal device.

  15. Developing a sensation information message for femoral arteriography.

    PubMed

    Clark, C R; Gregor, F M

    1988-03-01

    Sensation information is proposed as a way of decreasing the patient's distress during a threatening health care event. A first step in developing a sensation information message is to determine the content of the message. This study, using a systematic theory-based methodology, was conducted to describe and validate the common physical sensations experienced by patients undergoing the diagnostic procedure of femoral arteriography. (A conceptual framework based on how an individual perceives or senses a situation was used.) A three-stage survey design was used including: (1) tool development following observation of the procedure and pilot-testing of the interview schedule, (2) interview of patients who had undergone femoral arteriography about the sensations experienced during the procedure, and (3) validation of the responses. Twenty-one steps in the femoral arteriography procedure of which patients were aware were identified. Nine 'feeling' sensations commonly experienced during the procedure and the sights and sounds associated with the procedure were determined. The sequencing and duration of procedure steps were observed and the environment in which the procedure was performed was described.

  16. A Case of Bilateral Aseptic Necrosis of the Femoral Head.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Diana; Trăistaru, Rodica; Kamal, C K; Alexandru, D O; Mogoantă, L; Grecu, D C

    2014-01-01

    Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head is a disease whose etiology is not completely elucidated and generally affects young adults aged between 30 and 50 years. In a significant number of patients bilateral disease occurs, which makes detection in its early stages constitute an important objective. We present the case of a male patient, aged 23 years, with the following risk factors: smoking and chronic alcohol consumption, who is diagnosed with aseptic necrosis of the left femoral head, ARCO stage IV, and in just six months after the diagnosis and hip arthroplasty, he suffers an injury which leads to the same diagnosis in the contralateral hip. We want to emphasize that for all patients with a high index of suspicion there should be an MRI examination, because the plane radiographs or CT are most often not relevant in detecting early signs of this condition. Diagnosis of aseptic necrosis of the femoral head in the early stages is a necessity in order to obtain an optimal result of conservative treatment.

  17. A Case of Bilateral Aseptic Necrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    KAMAL, DIANA; TRĂISTARU, RODICA; KAMAL, C.K.; ALEXANDRU, D.O.; MOGOANTĂ, L.; GRECU, D.C.

    2014-01-01

    Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head is a disease whose etiology is not completely elucidated and generally affects young adults aged between 30 and 50 years. In a significant number of patients bilateral disease occurs, which makes detection in its early stages constitute an important objective. We present the case of a male patient, aged 23 years, with the following risk factors: smoking and chronic alcohol consumption, who is diagnosed with aseptic necrosis of the left femoral head, ARCO stage IV, and in just six months after the diagnosis and hip arthroplasty, he suffers an injury which leads to the same diagnosis in the contralateral hip. We want to emphasize that for all patients with a high index of suspicion there should be an MRI examination, because the plane radiographs or CT are most often not relevant in detecting early signs of this condition. Diagnosis of aseptic necrosis of the femoral head in the early stages is a necessity in order to obtain an optimal result of conservative treatment. PMID:26788359

  18. Hip replacement in femoral head osteonecrosis: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Celli, Fabio; Casella, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive disease that usually affects young adults with high functional demands and can have devastating effects on hip joint. The treatment depends on extent and location of the necrosis lesion and on patient’s factors, that suggest disease progression, collapse probability and also implants survival. Non-idiopathic osteonecrosis patients had the worst outcome. There is not a gold standard treatment and frequently it is necessary a multidisciplinary approach. Preservation procedures of the femoral head are the first choice and can be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Replacement procedure remains the main treatment after failure of preserving procedures and in the late-stage ONFH, involving collapse of the femoral head and degenerative changes to the acetabulum. Resurfacing procedure still has good results but the patient selection is a critical factor. Total hip arthroplasties had historically poor results in patients with osteonecrosis. More recently, reports have shown excellent results, but implant longevity and following revisions are still outstanding problems. PMID:27134633

  19. The femoral head/neck offset and hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Beaulé, P E; Harvey, N; Zaragoza, E; Le Duff, M J; Dorey, F J

    2007-01-01

    Because the femoral head/neck junction is preserved in hip resurfacing, patients may be at greater risk of impingement, leading to abnormal wear patterns and pain. We assessed femoral head/neck offset in 63 hips undergoing metal-on-metal hip resurfacing and in 56 hips presenting with non-arthritic pain secondary to femoroacetabular impingement. Most hips undergoing resurfacing (57%; 36) had an offset ratio or= 50.5 degrees. Most hips undergoing resurfacing have an abnormal femoral head/neck offset, which is best assessed in the sagittal plane. PMID:17259408

  20. Troubleshooting the Femoral Attachment During Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Burrus, M. Tyrrell; Werner, Brian C.; Conte, Evan J.; Diduch, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has been recognized as an important soft tissue restraint in preventing lateral patellar translation. As many patients with acute or chronic patellar instability will have a deficient MPFL, reconstruction of this ligament is becoming more common. Appropriately, significant research has been undertaken regarding graft biomechanics and techniques, as intraoperative errors in graft placement often result in poor patient outcomes. Although the research has not answered all of the dilemmas encountered during reconstruction, publications consistently emphasize the importance of re-establishing an anatomic femoral attachment. The purpose of this study was to briefly review the current literature on MPFL reconstruction. Graft selection and patellar graft attachment and fixation are discussed, but the main focus is the femoral attachment as this is where most errors are seen and, unfortunately, where getting it right appears to matter the most. Using a sawbones knee model, the concepts of an MPFL graft that is “high and tight” or “low and loose” are presented, with the goal of providing physicians with intraoperative tools to adjust an incorrectly placed femoral MPFL attachment. This model is also used to justify the recommendation of graft fixation in 30° to 45° of knee flexion. PMID:26535373

  1. Implant Size Availability Affects Reproduction of Distal Femoral Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Morris, William Z; Gebhart, Jeremy J; Goldberg, Victor M; Wera, Glenn D

    2016-07-01

    A total knee arthroplasty system offers more distal femoral implant anterior-posterior (AP) sizes than its predecessor. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of increased size availability on an implant system's ability to reproduce the AP dimension of the native distal femur. We measured 200 cadaveric femora with the AP-sizing guides of Zimmer (Warsaw, IN) NexGen (8 sizes) and Zimmer Persona (12 sizes) total knee arthroplasty systems. We defined "size deviation" as the difference in the AP dimension between the anatomic size of the native femur and the closest implant size. We defined satisfactory reproduction of distal femoral dimensions as < 1 mm difference between the implant and native femur size. The NexGen system was associated with a mean 0.46 mm greater implant size deviation than Persona (p < 0.001). When using a 1 mm size deviation as a cutoff for satisfactory replication of the native distal femoral anatomy, 85/200 specimens (42.5%) were a poor fit by NexGen, but a satisfactory fit by Persona. Only 1/200 specimens (0.5%) was a poor fit by Persona, but a satisfactory fit by NexGen (p < 0.001). The novel knee system with 12 versus 8 sizes reproduces the AP dimension of the native distal femur more closely than its predecessor. Further study is needed to determine the clinical impact of these differences.

  2. Slipped Distal Femoral Epiphysis in Congenital Insensitivity to Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, M Javed; Rex, C; Vignesh, R; Chavan, Madhav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) is a rare disorder, and often presents to an orthopaedic surgeon as recurrent fractures, dislocations, pseudoarthrosis, osteomyelitis etc. Here, we report a case of congenital insensitivity to pain presenting with distal femoral physeal separation in a child. Case Report: A 12-year-old girl child came with complaints of limp while walking and swelling in the left knee for past 5 weeks. Mother gave a history that the girl is a known case of congenital insensitivity to pain with clear history of no pain on intramuscular injection since birth. She was born of consanguineous marriage and had no significant trauma, fever, other joint involvement or any features of rheumatism. On local examination, she had no bony tenderness, mild warmth, and moderate knee effusion with restricted range of movement. Plain radiograph showed epiphysiolysis of distal femur with widening of physis. Examination under anaesthesia demonstrated gross movement indicating lower femoral physeal separation. This unstable distal femoral epiphysis was treated under general anaesthesia with closed reduction, percutaneous cross pinning and above knee plaster cast. Conclusion: Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) is a rare disorder to diagnose. Emphasis is given on early diagnosis of orthopaedic problems and prompt treatment, educating parents and prevention of accidents. Physeal separation without significant trauma must prompt an orthopaedic surgeon to think about congenital insensitivity to pain as a differential diagnosis. PMID:27703943

  3. Molecular orientation transition of organic thin films on graphite: the effect of intermolecular electrostatic and interfacial dispersion forces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Huang, Han; Thye, Andrew; Wee, Shen

    2008-09-28

    In situ low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy investigation reveals a molecular orientation transition of organic thin films of pentacene and p-sexiphenyl on graphite, arising from the delicate balance between the intermolecular electrostatic and interfacial dispersion forces.

  4. Tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hansmire, W.H.; Munzer, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    The current status of tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is presented in this paper. The Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a key part of the YMP, has been long in development and construction is ongoing. This is a progress report on the tunneling aspects of the ESF as of January 1, 1996. For purposes of discussion in this summary, the tunneling has progressed in four general phases. The paper describes: tunneling in jointed rock under low stress; tunneling through the Bow Ridge Fault and soft rock; tunneling through the Imbricate Fault Zone; and Tunneling into the candidate repository formation.

  5. A Model for the Behavior of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan John Baker

    2003-08-05

    A magnetic tunnel junction is a device that changes its electrical resistance with a change in an applied magnetic field. A typical junction consists of two magnetic electrodes separated by a nonmagnetic insulating layer. The magnetizations of the two electrodes can have two possible extreme configurations, parallel and antiparallel. The antiparallel configuration is observed to have the higher measured resistance and the parallel configuration has the lower resistance. To switch between these two configurations a magnetic field is applied to the device which is primarily used to change the orientation of the magnetization of one electrode usually called the free layer, although with sufficient high magnetic field the orientation of the magnetizations of both of the electrodes can be changed. The most commonly used models for describing and explaining the electronic behavior of tunnel junctions are the Simmons model and the Brinkman model. However, both of these models were designed for simple, spin independent tunneling. The Simmons model does not address the issue of applied magnetic fields nor does it address the form of the electronic band structure in the metallic electrodes, including the important factor of spin polarization. The Brinkman model is similar, the main difference between the two models being the shape of the tunneling barrier potential between the two electrodes. Therefore, the research conducted in this thesis has developed a new theoretical model that addresses these important issues starting from basic principles. The main features of the new model include: the development of equations for true spin dependent tunneling through the insulating barrier, the differences in the orientations of the electrode magnetizations on either side of the barrier, and the effects of the density of states function on the behavior of the junction. The present work has explored densities of states that are more realistic than the simplified free electron density

  6. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ACL RECONSTRUCTION WITH ANATOMICAL POSITIONING OF THE TUNNELS USING THE PATELLAR TENDON VERSUS HAMSTRING TENDON

    PubMed Central

    de Pádua, Vitor Barion Castro; Maldonado, Hilário; Vilela, Júlio César Rodrigues; Provenza, Alexandre Ribeira; Monteiro, Cleverson; de Oliveira Neto, Heleno Cavalcante

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare ACL reconstruction with anatomical positioning of the tunnels using the hamstring or patellar tendons. Methods: We prospectively evaluated 52 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction using the Chambat's technique, with anatomical positioning of the tunnels drilled outside in. They were divided into group A, with 27 patients, using the patellar tendon as a graft, and group B, with 25 patients, using the hamstring. Results: In group A 26 patients were very satisfied or satisfied and 1 unhappy, in group B. 25 patients were very satisfied or satisfied with the procedure (p = 0.990). According to the Lysholm scale, group A had a mean score of 96.11 and group B, 95.32 (p=0.594). In relation to preoperative IKDC, 100% of the patients in group A and 92% of those in group B were IKDC C or D (p = 0.221); in the assessment with a minimum of two-year follow-up, 96% of group A and 92% of group B were IKDC A or B (p = 0.256). The Lachman test, pivot shift, return to sports activities, and the comparative difference in anterior translation (RolimeterTM) also showed no statistically significant difference. In group A, 5 patients (18.5%) were unable to kneel on a hard surface, whereas no patient in group B had this complaint. Conclusion: The anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction presents similar results using the hamstring or patellar tendon with anatomical positioning of the tunnels. Drilling the femoral tunnel outside in is a reproducible and accurate option in the correct placement the femoral tunnel. PMID:27027082

  7. Automated As-Built Model Generation of Subway Tunnels from Mobile LiDAR Data.

    PubMed

    Arastounia, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes fully-automated methods for as-built model generation of subway tunnels employing mobile Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. The employed dataset is acquired by a Velodyne HDL 32E and covers 155 m of a subway tunnel containing six million points. First, the tunnel's main axis and cross sections are extracted. Next, a preliminary model is created by fitting an ellipse to each extracted cross section. The model is refined by employing residual analysis and Baarda's data snooping method to eliminate outliers. The final model is then generated by applying least squares adjustment to outlier-free data. The obtained results indicate that the tunnel's main axis and 1551 cross sections at 0.1 m intervals are successfully extracted. Cross sections have an average semi-major axis of 7.8508 m with a standard deviation of 0.2 mm and semi-minor axis of 7.7509 m with a standard deviation of 0.1 mm. The average normal distance of points from the constructed model (average absolute error) is also 0.012 m. The developed algorithm is applicable to tunnels with any horizontal orientation and degree of curvature since it makes no assumptions, nor does it use any a priori knowledge regarding the tunnel's curvature and horizontal orientation. PMID:27649172

  8. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  9. Tunnel construction for a desertron

    SciTech Connect

    Hinterberger, H.; Huson, F.R.

    1983-03-27

    The tunnel in this model of construction is 3-1/2 feet wide by 5 feet high. It is assumed that the tunnel contains a rail system and guidance system for: (1) An enclosed car used for transport of 2 people and some tools. (2) A magnet mover. This robot could pick up a magnet and transport it at about 10 miles per hour. (3) An alignment robot. The alignment robot would intercept E.M. waves (microwaves, lasers) to determine its position in the tunnel. Then workers could come along inside the tunnel hoop and nail it together and to the floor. The trench would then be back-filled with a 1 foot berm on top. A rail system would be installed and a support stand for the magnet.

  10. Icing Research Tunnel Test Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Icing Research Tunnel Test Section NASA technician measuring ice deposits on an airfoil after completing a test at the Lewis Research Center. NASA Lewis is now known as John H. Glean Research Center at Lewis Field.

  11. Tunneling Plasmonics in Bilayer Graphene.

    PubMed

    Fei, Z; Iwinski, E G; Ni, G X; Zhang, L M; Bao, W; Rodin, A S; Lee, Y; Wagner, M; Liu, M K; Dai, S; Goldflam, M D; Thiemens, M; Keilmann, F; Lau, C N; Castro-Neto, A H; Fogler, M M; Basov, D N

    2015-08-12

    We report experimental signatures of plasmonic effects due to electron tunneling between adjacent graphene layers. At subnanometer separation, such layers can form either a strongly coupled bilayer graphene with a Bernal stacking or a weakly coupled double-layer graphene with a random stacking order. Effects due to interlayer tunneling dominate in the former case but are negligible in the latter. We found through infrared nanoimaging that bilayer graphene supports plasmons with a higher degree of confinement compared to single- and double-layer graphene, a direct consequence of interlayer tunneling. Moreover, we were able to shut off plasmons in bilayer graphene through gating within a wide voltage range. Theoretical modeling indicates that such a plasmon-off region is directly linked to a gapped insulating state of bilayer graphene, yet another implication of interlayer tunneling. Our work uncovers essential plasmonic properties in bilayer graphene and suggests a possibility to achieve novel plasmonic functionalities in graphene few-layers.

  12. [Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head in young adults].

    PubMed

    Vasey, H M

    1984-01-01

    Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head is a well-defined entity. The underlying diseases originate from very different types of pathological conditions. Alcoholism, cortisone therapy, gout or hyperuricemia, sickle cell anaemia and others all lead, through various pathways, to the impairment of the medullary blood flow. In many instances, a compartment syndrome can be demonstrated in the femoral head. Death of the osteocytes follows bone marrow necrosis. Revascularisation originates in the periphery of the necrotic segment. Vascular buds and fibroblasts invade the medullary space. New bone is laid over the necrotic trabeculae. Mechanical failure results from changes in the bony framework at three different levels. The subchondral boneplate may be weakened by the process of revascularisation, the necrotic trabeculae may fail because of diminished stiffness and strength, and overloading has been demonstrated at the junction between dead and living bone. Elevation of the intramedullary pressure is the first objective sign of impending or established bone necrosis. Scintigraphy with Technetium 99 m - Sulphur colloid can now show the early stages of marrow necrosis. Roentgenographic changes only appear in a later phase of the disease. Aseptic necrosis must be considered as involving both hips, unless proven otherwise. Attention given to the "silent hip" may allow salvage and prevent the occurrence of osteo-arthritic changes leaving merely unilateral disease. As long as the geometrical shape of the femoral head is maintained operation may well prove useful. The aim at this stage is to prevent collapse. It is impossible to know in the early stages whether mechanical failure will occur, but there is general agreement that the femoral head will eventually undergo deformation. A spherical epiphysis is therefore considered a success. All the conservative methods aim to decompress the medullary cavity. Core biopsy, curettage, bone grafting and intertrochanteric osteotomy all have

  13. Guidelines for tunneling in enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Christopher C.; Ross Anderson, J. L.; Dutton, P. Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Summary Here we extend the engineering descriptions of simple, single-electron-tunneling chains common in oxidoreductases to quantify sequential oxidation-reduction rates of two-or-more electron cofactors and substrates. We identify when nicotinamides may be vulnerable to radical mediated oxidation-reduction and merge electron-tunneling expressions with the chemical rate expressions of Eyring. The work provides guidelines for the construction of new artificial oxidoreductases inspired by Nature but adopting independent design and redox engineering. PMID:20460101

  14. Quantum tunneling in flux compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Schwartz-Perlov, Delia; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2009-12-01

    We identify instantons representing vacuum decay in a 6-dimensional toy model for string theory flux compactifications, with the two extra dimensions compactified on a sphere. We evaluate the instanton action for tunneling between different flux vacua, as well as for the decompactification decay channel. The bubbles resulting from flux tunneling have an unusual structure. They are bounded by two-dimensional branes, which are localized in the extra dimensions. This has important implications for bubble collisions.

  15. CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME AND WORK

    PubMed Central

    Newington, Lisa; Harris, E Clare; Walker-Bone, Karen

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome and frequently presents in working-aged adults. Its mild form causes ‘nuisance’ symptoms including dysaesthesia and nocturnal waking. At its most severe however it can significantly impair motor function and weaken pinch grip. This review will discuss the anatomy of the carpal tunnel and the clinical presentation of the syndrome as well as the classification and diagnosis of the condition. Carpal tunnel syndrome has a profile of well-established risk factors including individual factors and predisposing co-morbidities, which will be briefly discussed. However, there is a growing body of evidence for an association between carpal tunnel syndrome and various occupational factors, which will also be discussed. Management of carpal tunnel syndrome, conservative and surgical will be described. Finally, we will discuss the issue of safe return to work post carpal tunnel release surgery and the lack of evidence-based guidelines. PMID:26612240

  16. Pelvic migration of the helical blade after treatment of transtrochanteric fracture using a proximal femoral nail.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Pedro Luciano Teixeira; Castelo, Luís Sá; Lopes, António Lemos; Maio, Marta; Miranda, Adélia; Dias, António Marques

    2016-01-01

    Proximal femoral nails with a helical blade are a new generation of implants used for treating transtrochanteric fractures. The blade design provides rotational and angular stability for the fracture. Despite greater biomechanical resistance, they sometimes present complications. In the literature, there are some reports of cases of perforation of the femoral head caused by helical blades. Here, a clinical case of medial migration of the helical blade through the femoral head and acetabulum into the pelvic cavity is presented.

  17. Effect of microgravity on renal and femoral flows during LBNP & intravenous saline load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbeille, P.; Gaffney, F. A.; Beck, L.; Coulon, J.; Porcher, M.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1996-01-01

    Renal and femoral hemodynamics were studied in crew members at rest and during lower body negative pressure before and after the D-2 Spacelab mission and with intravenous saline loading. Specific measurements included renal vascular resistance, femoral arterial flow, and vascular resistance, along with other cardiovascular parameters. Cardiovascular adaptation to microgravity is discussed with a focus on changes observed in femoral and renal vascular resistance.

  18. Femoral head epiphysis growth and development among Chinese children aged 0-5 years.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiayou; Tang, Jin; Zhou, Libo; Zeng, Rong; Mou, Jinsong; Zhang, Lingli

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the pattern of femoral head epiphysis growth and development among Chinese children. Between January and December, 2007, we randomly sampled 1,450 healthy Chinese children (0-5 years old) from Hunan Provincial Children's Hospital in Changsha, Hunan, China. The diameter of femoral head epiphysis was measured by pelvic X-ray photography and processed by medical image processing software. The growth of femoral head epiphysis in girls was 2-3 months earlier than that in boys. The diameter of femoral head epiphysis increased with advancing age in both girls and boys, but the diameter of femoral head epiphysis in 2, 3, 4, 6, and 10-month-old girls was significantly larger than that in boys. Cubic regression equations between the diameter of femoral head epiphysis and age were created for boys and girls that could be used to predict the diameter of femoral head epiphysis. In conclusion, there was gender difference in femoral head epiphysis growth and development among Chinese children, and our prediction models will provide the guidance for early diagnosis of diseases related to the growth and development of the femoral head epiphysis.

  19. Periprosthetic Atypical Femoral Fracture-like Fracture after Hip Arthroplasty: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jae; Min, Byung-Woo; Jang, Hyung-Kyu; Ye, Hee-Uk; Lim, Kyung-Hwan

    2015-09-01

    Atypical femoral fractures are stress or insufficient fractures induced by low energy trauma or no trauma and have specific X-ray findings. Although the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research has excluded periprosthetic fractures from the definition of an atypical femoral fracture in 2013, this is still a matter of controversy because some authors report periprosthetic fractures showing specific features of atypical fractures around a well-fixed femoral stem. We report 3 cases of periprosthetic femur fractures that had specific radiographic features of atypical femoral fractures in patients with a history of prolonged bisphosphonate use; we also review relevant literature. PMID:27536624

  20. Cystic Disease of the Groin Presenting as Compression of a Femoral Vessel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Hwang, Deokbi; Park, Sujin; Jeong, Won-Ju; Seo, An Na; Huh, Seung

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we describe our diagnosis and treatment of two patients who presented with femoral vessel compression caused by a cystic lesion in the groin. One case was diagnosed as adventitial cystic disease (ACD) of the common femoral artery resulting in leg claudication and the other was diagnosed as a ganglion cyst (GC) causing femoral vein compression and unilateral leg swelling. The operative findings differed between these two cases with respect to the dissection of the cyst and femoral vessel, but the postoperative histological examination results were similar. The pathogenesis of ACD and GC is not fully understood, and further investigation is needed to delineate the exact pathology of these uncommon conditions.

  1. Subtrochanteric femur fracture after removal of screws for femoral neck fracture in a child.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang Soon; Lee, Si Wook

    2015-01-01

    Displaced femoral neck fractures are rare in children and are associated with a high rate of complications. Subtrochanteric fractures after cannulated screw fixation of femoral neck fractures in adults are well recognized, and there are several reports on the topic. However, there are no reports on complications related to hardware or subtrochanteric fractures after removal of the screws in the treatment of femoral neck fractures in children. Here we report the case of a 10-year-old boy who sustained a subtrochanteric fracture after the screw removal and healing that followed a femoral neck fracture. PMID:25566556

  2. Troll Phase 1: Landfall tunnel inspection by use of virtual reality technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlmann, J.H.; Skjei, S.E.

    1996-12-31

    The Troll Phase 1 landfall of both import and export pipelines to/from the Kollsnes onshore gas drying and compression plant is via a waterfilled 3,7 km long tunnel system with its deepest point 235 m below mean sea level. This paper describes the methods developed for inspection of the waterfilled tunnel system by utilization of a conventional Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV). These comprise three main elements, i.e., ROV intervention into a partially horizontal tunnel up to a length of 4 km, an inspection and reporting system developed for the presentation of survey data and the use of virtual reality techniques for representing the location and orientation of the ROV within the tunnel complex to the pilot in real time.

  3. Electronic Signatures of all Four DNA Nucleosides in a Tunneling Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shuai

    2011-03-01

    New approaches to DNA sequencing are required to reduce costs and increase the availability of personalized genomics. Using Scanning Tunneling Microscope as a tool, we report measurements of the current signals generated as free nucleosides diffuse into a tunnel junction in which both electrodes are functionalized with a reagent that presents a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor to the nucleosides. This functionalization serves to both limit the range of molecular orientations in the tunnel gap and reduce the contact resistance, increasing the selectivity of the tunneling signal, so that a direct readout may be possible with a few repeated reads. This work was supported by a grant from the Sequencing Technology Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute (HG004378).

  4. Development of Femoral Head Interior Supporting Device and 3D Finite Element Analysis of its Application in the Treatment of Femoral Head Avascular Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dongmin; Ye, Ming; Li, Xinfa; Yang, Lifeng

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop and perform the 3D finite element analysis of a femoral head interior supporting device (FHISD). Material/Methods The 3D finite element model was developed to analyze the surface load of femoral head and analyze the stress and strain of the femoral neck, using the normal femoral neck, decompressed bone graft, and FHISD-implanted bone graft models. Results The stress in the normal model concentrated around the femoral calcar, with displacement of 0.3556±0.1294 mm. In the decompressed bone graft model, the stress concentrated on the femur calcar and top and lateral sides of femoral head, with the displacement larger than the normal (0.4163±0.1310 mm). In the FHISD-implanted bone graft model, the stress concentrated on the segment below the lesser trochanter superior to the femur, with smaller displacement than the normal (0.1856±0.0118 mm). Conclusions FHISD could effectively maintain the biomechanical properties of the femoral neck. PMID:26010078

  5. Tunneling in strongly correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Marianna

    Tunneling studies of strongly correlated materials provide information about the nature of electronic correlations, which is vital for investigation of emergent materials at the microscopic level. In particular, scanning tunneling spectroscopy/microscopy (STS/STM) studies have made major contributions to understanding cuprate superconductors (66), yet there is a sense that huge STM data arrays contain much more precious information to be extracted and analyzed. One of the most pressing questions in the field is how to improve the data analysis, so as to extract more information from STM data. A dominant trend in STM data analysis has been to interpret the data within a particular microscopic model, while using only basic data analysis tools. To decrease the reliance of the STM data interpretation on particular microscopic models, further advances in data analysis methods are necessary. In Chapter 2 of this Thesis, we discuss how one can extract information about the phase of the order parameter from STM data. We show that symmetrized and anti-symmetrized correlators of local density of states give rise to observable coherence factor effects. In Chapter 3, we apply this framework to analyze the recent scanning tunneling experiments on an underdoped cuprate superconductor Ca2-xNaxCuO2Cl2 by T. Hanaguri et al. (60). In Chapter 4, we propose a model for nodal quasiparticle scattering in a disordered vortex lattice. Recently, scanning tunneling studies of a Kondo lattice material URu2Si2 became possible (117). If it proves possible to apply scanning tunneling spectroscopy to Kondo lattice materials, then remarkable new opportunities in the ongoing investigation may emerge. In Chapter 5, we examine the effect of co-tunneling to develop a theory of tunneling into a Kondo lattice. We find that the interference between the direct tunneling and the co-tunneling channels leads to a novel asymmetric lineshape, which has two peaks and a gap. The presence of the peaks suggests

  6. In Situ Observation and Selective Electrochemical Deposition of Polypyrrole by Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasano, Kiyotaka; Nakamura, Kazunori; Kaneto, Keiichi

    1993-06-01

    Electrodeposition of polypyrrole and its selective deposition on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate was observed in situ by means of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) in an electrochemical cell. The results indicated that the STM can be used to manipulate the electrodeposition of conducting polymers.

  7. From wall graft to roof graft: reassessment of femoral posterior cruciate ligament positioning.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Bradley S; Maak, Travis; Cross, Michael B; Plaskos, Christopher; Wickiewicz, Thomas; Amis, Andrew; Pearle, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    In many technique guides for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction, the PCL is depicted on the wall of the medial femoral condyle (MFC). We hypothesized that most of the anterolateral (AL) bundle originates on the roof of the intercondylar notch (ICN), not on the wall. Using a surgical navigation system, we delineated and morphed in the computer the entire PCL footprint-the AL bundle, the posteromedial (PM) bundle, and the Humphrey ligament (HL)-of 7 fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens. A clock face was defined in the en face view, with the 12-o'clock axis pointing anteriorly through the top of the notch and the roof being the region between 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock. The AL-bundle, PM-bundle, and HL positions were calculated in terms of this clock-face definition. Mean centroids (o'clock position) over all specimens of AL bundle, PM bundle, and HL were, respectively, 10:49, 9:43, and 9:00 on the left knee and 1:11, 2:17, and 3:00 on the right knee. Mean areas were 63 mm(2) (AL bundle), 63 mm(2) (PM bundle), and 45 mm(2) (HL). In 5 of the 7 specimens tested, 100% of the AL bundle originated on the roof of the ICN. Conversely, 66% of the PM bundle and 100% of the HL inserted on the wall of the MFC rather than on the intercondylar roof. Using computer navigation software, we determined that most of the AL bundle originates on the roof of the ICN and that the PM bundle is centered near the transition between the roof and the wall of the MFC. These findings contradict the depiction in most technique guides for PCL reconstruction. Implant companies and surgeons should modify their techniques to shift PCL graft tunnels from the wall of the MFC to the roof of the ICN. PMID:22022678

  8. Theoretical study of phosphorene tunneling field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jiwon; Hobbs, Chris

    2015-02-01

    In this work, device performances of tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) based on phosphorene are explored via self-consistent atomistic quantum transport simulations. Phosphorene is an ultra-thin two-dimensional (2-D) material with a direct band gap suitable for TFETs applications. Our simulation shows that phosphorene TFETs exhibit subthreshold slope below 60 mV/dec and a wide range of on-current depending on the transport direction due to highly anisotropic band structures of phosphorene. By benchmarking with monolayer MoTe2 TFETs, we predict that phosphorene TFETs oriented in the small effective mass direction can yield much larger on-current at the same on-current/off-current ratio than monolayer MoTe2 TFETs. It is also observed that a gate underlap structure is required for scaling down phosphorene TFETs in the small effective mass direction to suppress the source-to-drain direct tunneling leakage current.

  9. Theoretical study of phosphorene tunneling field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jiwon; Hobbs, Chris

    2015-02-23

    In this work, device performances of tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) based on phosphorene are explored via self-consistent atomistic quantum transport simulations. Phosphorene is an ultra-thin two-dimensional (2-D) material with a direct band gap suitable for TFETs applications. Our simulation shows that phosphorene TFETs exhibit subthreshold slope below 60 mV/dec and a wide range of on-current depending on the transport direction due to highly anisotropic band structures of phosphorene. By benchmarking with monolayer MoTe{sub 2} TFETs, we predict that phosphorene TFETs oriented in the small effective mass direction can yield much larger on-current at the same on-current/off-current ratio than monolayer MoTe{sub 2} TFETs. It is also observed that a gate underlap structure is required for scaling down phosphorene TFETs in the small effective mass direction to suppress the source-to-drain direct tunneling leakage current.

  10. Variational transition-state theory with optimized orientation of the dividing surface and semiclassical tunneling calculations for deuterium and muonium kinetic isotope effects in the free radical association reaction H + C{sub 2}H{sub 4} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, J. ||; Corchado, J.C. |; Gonzalez-Lafont, A.; Lluch, J.M.; Truhlar, D.G.

    1999-07-01

    The authors have used canonical variational transition-state theory with multidimensional tunneling contributions (CVT/MT) to calculate 21 kinetic isotope effects (KIE) for the addition of hydrogen atom to ethylene. The potential energies are obtained by variable scaling of external correlation (VSEC). The reorientation of the dividing surface (RODS) algorithm is employed so that the same reaction path can be used for every isotopic substitution. The results show the importance of the tunneling effect for explaining the trends in the KIEs in this almost barrierless reaction. The authors have predicted the regioselectivity for three different isotopically substituted substrates and have shown how the addition to the most substituted carbon is kinetically favored, especially at low temperature. However, their calculations show no cis/trans selectivity for the isotopically substituted ethylene substrate.

  11. Improved multidimensional semiclassical tunneling theory.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Albert F

    2013-12-12

    We show that the analytic multidimensional semiclassical tunneling formula of Miller et al. [Miller, W. H.; Hernandez, R.; Handy, N. C.; Jayatilaka, D.; Willets, A. Chem. Phys. Lett. 1990, 172, 62] is qualitatively incorrect for deep tunneling at energies well below the top of the barrier. The origin of this deficiency is that the formula uses an effective barrier weakly related to the true energetics but correctly adjusted to reproduce the harmonic description and anharmonic corrections of the reaction path at the saddle point as determined by second order vibrational perturbation theory. We present an analytic improved semiclassical formula that correctly includes energetic information and allows a qualitatively correct representation of deep tunneling. This is done by constructing a three segment composite Eckart potential that is continuous everywhere in both value and derivative. This composite potential has an analytic barrier penetration integral from which the semiclassical action can be derived and then used to define the semiclassical tunneling probability. The middle segment of the composite potential by itself is superior to the original formula of Miller et al. because it incorporates the asymmetry of the reaction barrier produced by the known reaction exoergicity. Comparison of the semiclassical and exact quantum tunneling probability for the pure Eckart potential suggests a simple threshold multiplicative factor to the improved formula to account for quantum effects very near threshold not represented by semiclassical theory. The deep tunneling limitations of the original formula are echoed in semiclassical high-energy descriptions of bound vibrational states perpendicular to the reaction path at the saddle point. However, typically ab initio energetic information is not available to correct it. The Supporting Information contains a Fortran code, test input, and test output that implements the improved semiclassical tunneling formula. PMID:24224758

  12. Proximal Femoral Geometry as Fracture Risk Factor in Female Patients with Osteoporotic Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Proximal femoral geometry may be a risk factor of osteoporotic hip fractures. However, there existed great differences among studies depending on race, sex and age of subjects. The purpose of the present study is to analyze proximal femoral geometry and bone mineral density (BMD) in the osteoporotic hip fracture patients. Furthermore, we investigated proximal femoral geometric parameters affecting fractures, and whether the geometric parameters could be an independent risk factor of fractures regardless of BMD. Methods This study was conducted on 197 women aged 65 years or more who were hospitalized with osteoporotic hip fracture (femur neck fractures ; 84, intertrochanteric fractures; 113). Control group included 551 women who visited to check osteoporosis. Femur BMD and proximal femoral geometry for all subjects were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and compared between the control and fracture groups. Besides, proximal femoral geometric parameters associated with fractures were statistically analyzed. Results There were statistically significant differences in the age and weight, cross-sectional area (CSA)/length/width of the femoral neck and BMD of the proximal femur between fracture group and control group. BMD of the proximal femur in the control group was higher than in the fracture group. For the femoral neck fractures group, the odds ratio (OR) for fractures decrease in the CSA and neck length (NL) of the femur increased by 1.97 times and 1.73 times respectively, regardless of BMD. The OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.53 times. In the intertrochanteric fracture group, the OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.45 times regardless of BMD. Conclusions We found that an increase of the femoral neck width could be a proximal femoral geometric parameter which plays important roles as a risk factor for fracture independently of BMD. PMID:27622182

  13. An integrated CAD/CAM/robotic milling method for custom cementless femoral prostheses.

    PubMed

    Wen-ming, Xi; Ai-min, Wang; Qi, Wu; Chang-hua, Liu; Jian-fei, Zhu; Fang-fang, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Aseptic loosening is the primary cause of cementless femoral prosthesis failure and is related to the primary stability of the cementless femoral prosthesis in the femoral cavity. The primary stability affects both the osseointegration and the long-term stability of cementless femoral prostheses. A custom cementless femoral prosthesis can improve the fit and fill of the prosthesis in the femoral cavity and decrease the micromotion of the proximal prosthesis such that the primary stability of the custom prosthesis can be improved, and osseointegration of the proximal prosthesis is achieved. These results will help to achieve long-term stability in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In this paper, we introduce an integrated CAD/CAM/robotic method of milling custom cementless femoral prostheses. The 3D reconstruction model uses femoral CT images and 3D design software to design a CAD model of the custom prosthesis. After the transformation matrices between two units of the robotic system are calibrated, consistency between the CAM software and the robotic system can be achieved, and errors in the robotic milling can be limited. According to the CAD model of the custom prosthesis, the positions of the robotic tool points are produced by the CAM software of the CNC machine. The normal vector of the three adjacent robotic tool point positions determines the pose of the robotic tool point. In conclusion, the fit rate of custom pig femur stems in the femoral cavities was 90.84%. After custom femoral prostheses were inserted into the femoral cavities, the maximum gaps between the prostheses and the cavities measured less than 1 mm at the diaphysis and 1.3 mm at the metaphysis. PMID:26210779

  14. Proximal Femoral Geometry as Fracture Risk Factor in Female Patients with Osteoporotic Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Proximal femoral geometry may be a risk factor of osteoporotic hip fractures. However, there existed great differences among studies depending on race, sex and age of subjects. The purpose of the present study is to analyze proximal femoral geometry and bone mineral density (BMD) in the osteoporotic hip fracture patients. Furthermore, we investigated proximal femoral geometric parameters affecting fractures, and whether the geometric parameters could be an independent risk factor of fractures regardless of BMD. Methods This study was conducted on 197 women aged 65 years or more who were hospitalized with osteoporotic hip fracture (femur neck fractures ; 84, intertrochanteric fractures; 113). Control group included 551 women who visited to check osteoporosis. Femur BMD and proximal femoral geometry for all subjects were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and compared between the control and fracture groups. Besides, proximal femoral geometric parameters associated with fractures were statistically analyzed. Results There were statistically significant differences in the age and weight, cross-sectional area (CSA)/length/width of the femoral neck and BMD of the proximal femur between fracture group and control group. BMD of the proximal femur in the control group was higher than in the fracture group. For the femoral neck fractures group, the odds ratio (OR) for fractures decrease in the CSA and neck length (NL) of the femur increased by 1.97 times and 1.73 times respectively, regardless of BMD. The OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.53 times. In the intertrochanteric fracture group, the OR for fractures increase in the femoral neck width increased by 1.45 times regardless of BMD. Conclusions We found that an increase of the femoral neck width could be a proximal femoral geometric parameter which plays important roles as a risk factor for fracture independently of BMD.

  15. An integrated CAD/CAM/robotic milling method for custom cementless femoral prostheses.

    PubMed

    Wen-ming, Xi; Ai-min, Wang; Qi, Wu; Chang-hua, Liu; Jian-fei, Zhu; Fang-fang, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Aseptic loosening is the primary cause of cementless femoral prosthesis failure and is related to the primary stability of the cementless femoral prosthesis in the femoral cavity. The primary stability affects both the osseointegration and the long-term stability of cementless femoral prostheses. A custom cementless femoral prosthesis can improve the fit and fill of the prosthesis in the femoral cavity and decrease the micromotion of the proximal prosthesis such that the primary stability of the custom prosthesis can be improved, and osseointegration of the proximal prosthesis is achieved. These results will help to achieve long-term stability in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In this paper, we introduce an integrated CAD/CAM/robotic method of milling custom cementless femoral prostheses. The 3D reconstruction model uses femoral CT images and 3D design software to design a CAD model of the custom prosthesis. After the transformation matrices between two units of the robotic system are calibrated, consistency between the CAM software and the robotic system can be achieved, and errors in the robotic milling can be limited. According to the CAD model of the custom prosthesis, the positions of the robotic tool points are produced by the CAM software of the CNC machine. The normal vector of the three adjacent robotic tool point positions determines the pose of the robotic tool point. In conclusion, the fit rate of custom pig femur stems in the femoral cavities was 90.84%. After custom femoral prostheses were inserted into the femoral cavities, the maximum gaps between the prostheses and the cavities measured less than 1 mm at the diaphysis and 1.3 mm at the metaphysis.

  16. Femoral neck anteversion measurement using linear slot scanning radiography.

    PubMed

    Chimhundu, Chipo; Sivarasu, Sudesh; Steiner, Stefan; Smit, Julian; Douglas, Tania S

    2016-02-01

    Measurements between anatomical landmarks on radiographs are useful for diagnosis and treatment planning in the orthopedic field. Direct measurement on single radiographic images, however, does not truly reflect spatial relationships, as depth information is lost. We used stereo images from a slot scanning X-ray machine to estimate coordinates of three-dimensional (3D) bony landmarks for femoral neck anteversion (FNA) measurement. A set of 7 landmarks consisting of the centre of the femoral head; the centre of the base of the femoral neck; the medial and lateral condyles; the medial and lateral posterior condyles; and finally the centre of the knee; were found to be identifiable and suitable for radiographic measurement. The reconstructed 3D coordinates were then used to define the 3D geometry of the anatomical axes required to estimate FNA. Stereophotogrammetric measurements on a sample of 30 dry right adult femurs were compared to reference values obtained using the Kingsley Olmstead method applied to photographic images. A strong positive correlation (0.998) was found and the mean ± standard deviation of the stereophotogrammetric approach (13.08 ± 6.87)° was comparable to that of the Kingsley Olmstead method (13.14 ± 6.88)°. Intra- and inter-observer reliability were high, with the lower bound of the 95% confidence interval above 0.98 for the intra-class correlation coefficient. The results merit further validation against three dimensional imaging technology such as computed tomography, to confirm stereophotogrammetry as a suitable alternative for FNA measurement. PMID:26776374

  17. Femoral neck geometry in overweight and normal weight adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    El Hage, Rawad; Moussa, Elie; Jacob, Christophe

    2010-09-01

    Being overweight is associated with increased bone mineral content, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone strength in adults. However, the effect of being overweight on bone strength during adolescence is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to compare femoral neck geometry in overweight and normal weight adolescent girls. This study included 22 overweight (BMI > 25 kg/m(2)) adolescent girls (15.4 +/- 2.4 years old) and 20 maturation-matched (15.2 +/- 1.9 years old) controls (BMI < 25 kg/m(2)). Body composition and BMD were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). To evaluate bone geometry, DXA scans were analyzed at the femoral neck by the hip structure analysis (HSA) program. Cross-sectional area (CSA), an index of axial compression strength, section modulus (Z), an index of bending strength, cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI), cortical thickness (CT), and buckling ratio (BR) were measured from bone mass profiles. Lean mass, body weight, fat mass, and BMI were higher in overweight girls compared to controls (P < 0.001). CSA, Z, and CSMI were higher in overweight girls compared to controls (P < 0.05; P < 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively). CT and BR were not significantly different between the two groups. After adjustment for body weight, lean mass, or fat mass, using a one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), there were no differences between the two groups (overweight and controls) regarding the HSA variables (CSA, Z, CSMI, CT, and BR). In conclusion, this study suggests that overweight adolescent girls have greater indices of bone axial and bending strength in comparison to controls at the femoral neck. PMID:20364283

  18. Heterologous mesenchymal stem cells successfully treat femoral pseudarthrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the effectiveness of treating pseudarthrosis in rats by using bone marrow cell suspensions or cultures of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells Methods Thirty-eight specific pathogen-free (SPF) animals were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1, Control, without surgical intervention; Group 2 (Placebo), experimental model of femoral pseudarthrosis treated only with saline solution; Group 3, experimental model of femoral pseudarthrosis treated with heterologous bone marrow cells suspension; Group 4, experimental model of femoral pseudarthrosis treated with cultures of heterologous mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow. When pseudarthrosis was confirmed by simple radiological studies, digital radiography and histopathology after a 120-day postoperative period, Groups 2, 3 and 4 were treated as above. At 30, 60 and 90 days after the treatment, all animals were evaluated by simple radiological studies, and at the end of the experiment, the animals were assessed by computed axial tomography and anatomopathological and histomorphometric examinations. Results Injected cells were detected in the areas affected by pseudarthrosis using scintigraphy within the first 24 hours after their administration. After 60 days, the animals of Group 3 showed callus formation while the animals of Group 4 presented periosteal reaction and had some consolidated areas. In contrast, Group 2 showed a predominance of fibro-osteoid tissue. After 90 days, bone consolidation and remodeling was observed in all animals from Group 3 whereas animals from Group 4 exhibited partial consolidation and those ones from Group 2 persisted with pseudarthrosis. Conclusion The treatment with heterologous bone marrow cells suspension proved to be effective in the treatment of pseudarthrosis whereas cultures of heterologous bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells did not show the same potential to aid bone healing. PMID:22429995

  19. Anatomical evaluation of CT-MRI combined femoral model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon S; Seon, Jong K; Shin, Vladimir I; Kim, Gyu-Ha; Jeon, Moongu

    2008-01-01

    Background Both CT and MRI are complementary to each other in that CT can produce a distinct contour of bones, and MRI can show the shape of both ligaments and bones. It will be ideal to build a CT-MRI combined model to take advantage of complementary information of each modality. This study evaluated the accuracy of the combined femoral model in terms of anatomical inspection. Methods Six normal porcine femora (180 ± 10 days, 3 lefts and 3 rights) with ball markers were scanned by CT and MRI. The 3D/3D registration was performed by two methods, i.e. the landmark-based 3 points-to-3 points and the surface matching using the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. The matching accuracy of the combined model was evaluated with statistical global deviation and locally measure anatomical contour-based deviation. Statistical analysis to assess any significant difference between accuracies of those two methods was performed using univariate repeated measures ANOVA with the Turkey post hoc test. Results This study revealed that the local 2D contour-based measurement of matching deviation was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm in the femoral condyle, and in the middle femoral shaft. The global 3D contour matching deviation of the landmark-based matching was 1.1 ± 0.3 mm, but local 2D contour deviation through anatomical inspection was much larger as much as 3.0 ± 1.8 mm. Conclusion Even with human-factor derived errors accumulated from segmentation of MRI images, and limited image quality, the matching accuracy of CT-&-MRI combined 3D models was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm in terms of local anatomical inspection. PMID:18234068

  20. Conversion of Non-Tunneled to Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Thuong G. Van Fimmen, Derek; Han, Laura; Funaki, Brian S.; Santeler, Scott; Lorenz, Jonathan

    2007-04-15

    Purpose. To determine the safety and efficacy of conversion of non-tunneled (temporary) catheters to tunneled catheters in hemodialysis patients. Methods. A retrospective review of 112 consecutive conversions in 111 patients was performed over a period of 4 years. Fourteen patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 97 patients had clinical follow-up. Temporary catheters were converted to tunneled catheters utilizing the same internal jugular venotomy sites and a modified over-the-wire technique with use of a peel-away sheath . Follow-up clinical data were reviewed. Results. Technical success was achieved in all 112 procedures. None of the 97 patients with follow-up suffered early infection within 30 days. The total number of follow-up catheter days was 13,659 (range 2-790). Cases of confirmed and suspected bacteremia requiring catheter removal occurred at a frequency of 0.10 per 100 catheter days. Suspected catheter infection treated with antibiotics but not requiring catheter intervention occurred at a frequency of 0.04 per 100 catheter days. Frequency of all suspected or confirmed infections was 0.14 per 100 catheter days. Catheter interventions as a result of poor blood flow, inadvertent removal, catheter fracture, or kinking occurred at a rate of 0.18 per 100 catheter days. Life table analysis revealed primary patency rates of 86%, 64%, and 39% at 30 days, 90 days, and 180 days, respectively. Conclusion. Conversion of temporary catheters to tunneled catheters using the pre-existing venotomy sites is safe and has low rates of infection and malfunction. These rates are comparable to previously published rates for tunneled catheters placed de novo and tunneled catheter exchanges.

  1. Cystic adventitial disease of the common femoral vein.

    PubMed

    Jayaraj, Arjun; Shalhub, Sherene; Deubner, Heike; Starnes, Benjamin W

    2011-05-01

    Cystic adventitial disease of blood vessels is a rare condition, more so when veins are involved. We report the case of a 36-year-old man who was referred to us after an intraoperative diagnosis of a left common femoral vein mass. This patient, who had a history of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, had presented to an outside facility with recurrent left lower extremity pain and swelling. At our hospital, he underwent excision of the vein mass with interposition vein grafting using the left internal jugular vein. In this report, we discuss the presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and pathology of this rare condition. PMID:21549936

  2. [Cell therapy for aseptic necrosis of femoral head].

    PubMed

    Toguchida, Junya; Aoyama, Tomoki; Goto, Koji; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Kasai, Yasunari

    2011-12-01

    As the clinical application of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), we have engaged in the development of cell transplantation therapy for aseptic necrosis of femoral head. Based on the results obtained by in vitro and in vivo preclinical experiments, we established the protocol for the clinical trial combining MSC with vascularized bone grafts. The protocol was approved by IRB on November 25, 2007, and the first case was operated on February 22, 2008. Since then 10 cases have been successfully treated and were followed at least 24 months with satisfactory results.

  3. Surgical treatment of noniatrogenic trauma of the femoral arteries.

    PubMed

    Wolosker, N; Guadêncio, A; Kuzniec, S; Rosoky, R A; Kalume, C; Neves, C A; Aun, R; Langer, B

    1996-01-01

    Trauma to the femoral arteries corresponds to 30 percent of all arterial traumas. The authors reviewed 74 patients with noniatrogenic trauma of the femoral arteries treated from January 1991 to December 1993. Ages ranged from 11 to 50 years, with a mean of 24. Seventy-one patients were male and three female. Fifty-two patients (70.2 percent) were white, 20 (27 percent) were black and two (2.8 percent) were Asian. Trauma due to firearms had the highest incidence, with 61 cases (82.4 percent). Absence of pulse was the most frequent clinical symptom (62.5 percent). Severe ischemia, with risk of loss of limb, was found in 66.2 percent of the cases. The superficial femoral artery was impaired in 77 percent of the cases. A preoperative arteriography was performed on only five patients, victims of multiple penetrating trauma or an asymptomatic penetrating wound along a vessel passage. In six cases, arterial and venous ligature was the chosen procedure. In three cases, a primary arterial anantomosis was performed. Simple arterriorraphy was feasible in one patient. In 64 of the patients, a venous graft was undertaken using a segment of the inverted great saphenous vein withdrawn from the other lower limb. Fasciotomoy was used in 32 patients (43.2 percent), all of whom exhibited pasting of the lower limb muscles at admission. One patient died during the immediate postoperative period as the result of multiple organ failure caused by polytraumatism. Preservation of the limb was attained in 72 patients (97.3 percent) Severe, previously-incurred ischemia was responsible for the only two amputations, aggravated by an exceedingly long delay between the time of injury and surgery. One of these patients, in addition to severe ischemia, had extensive injuries to the soft tissues. We conclude that trauma of the femoral arteries, attended while the limb still maintains its vitality, has a positive clinical outcome with a high rate of limb preservation. Mortality usually results from

  4. National Wind Tunnel Complex (NWTC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Wind Tunnel Complex (NWTC) Final Report summarizes the work carried out by a unique Government/Industry partnership during the period of June 1994 through May 1996. The objective of this partnership was to plan, design, build and activate 'world class' wind tunnel facilities for the development of future-generation commercial and military aircraft. The basis of this effort was a set of performance goals defined by the National Facilities Study (NFS) Task Group on Aeronautical Research and Development Facilities which established two critical measures of improved wind tunnel performance; namely, higher Reynolds number capability and greater productivity. Initial activities focused upon two high-performance tunnels (low-speed and transonic). This effort was later descoped to a single multipurpose tunnel. Beginning in June 1994, the NWTC Project Office defined specific performance requirements, planned site evaluation activities, performed a series of technical/cost trade studies, and completed preliminary engineering to support a proposed conceptual design. Due to budget uncertainties within the Federal government, the NWTC project office was directed to conduct an orderly closure following the Systems Design Review in March 1996. This report provides a top-level status of the project at that time. Additional details of all work performed have been archived and are available for future reference.

  5. Dual tunneling-unit scanning tunneling microscope for length measurement based on crystalline lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Higuchi, T.; Nishioki, N.

    1997-01-01

    A dual tunneling-unit scanning tunneling microscope (DTU STM) was developed for nm order length measurement with wide scan range. The crystalline lattice of highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) was used as reference scale. A reference unit was set up on top of a test unit. The reference sample holder and the probe tip of test unit were attached to one single XY scanner on either surface, while the test sample holder was open. This enables simultaneous acquisition of wide images of HOPG and test sample. The length in test sample image was measured by counting the number of HOPG lattices. An inchworm actuator and an impact drive mechanism were introduced to roughly position probe tips. The XY scanner was designed to be elastic to eliminate image distortion. Some comparison experiments using two HOPG chips were carried out in air. The DTU STM is confirmed to be a stable and more powerful device for length measurement which has nanometer accuracy when covering a wide scan range up to several micrometers, and is capable of measuring comparatively large and heavy samples. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

  6. Limited femoral navigation versus conventional intramedullary femoral jig based instrumentation for achieving optimal restoration of mechanical axis post total knee arthroplasty: a prospective comparative study of 200 knees.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nilen A; Patil, Hitendra G; Dhawale, Amol S; Khedkar, Bipin M

    2015-04-01

    A prospective comparative study was conducted to compare the mechanical axis post total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between two groups: In the first group of 100 knees (ASM group) Articular Surface Mounted navigation system was used to guide the distal femoral cut. In the second group of 100 knees (JIG group) conventional intramedullary femoral jig was used. The postoperative mechanical axis of the leg was within 3° of neutral alignment in 90% of the TKA in the ASM group (mean 178.12°) as compared to 74% in the JIG group (mean 177.02°). This difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The data presented show that the use of limited femoral navigation leads to more accurate restoration of mechanical axis alignment when compared to conventional intramedullary femoral jigs.

  7. Other cryogenic wind tunnel projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    The first cryogenic tunnel was built in 1972. Since then, many cryogenic wind-tunnel projects were started at aeronautical research centers around the world. Some of the more significant of these projects are described which are not covered by other lecturers at this Special Course. Described are cryogenic wind-tunnel projects in five countries: China (Chinese Aeronautical Research and Development Center); England (College of Aeronautics at Cranfield, and Royal Aerospace Establishment-Bedford); Japan (National Aerospace Laboratory, University of Tsukuba, and National Defense Academy); United States (Douglas Aircraft Co., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and NASA Langley); and U.S.S.R. (Central Aero-Hydronamics Institute (TsAGI), Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (ITAM), and Physical-Mechanical Institute at Kharkov (PMI-K).

  8. Other Cryogenic Wind Tunnel Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    The first cryogenic tunnel was built at the NASA Langley Research Center in 1972. Since then, many cryogenic wind-tunnels have been built at aeronautical research centers around the world. In this lecture some of the more interesting and significant of these projects that have not been covered by other lecturers at this Special Course are described. In this lecture authors describe cryogenic wind-tunnel projects at research centers in four countries: China (Chinese Aeronautical Research and Development Center); England (College of Aeronautics at Cranfield, and Defence Research Agency - Bedford); Japan (National Aerospace Laboratory, University of Tsukuba, and National Defense Academy); and United States (Douglas Aircraft Co., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and NASA Langley).

  9. Carpal tunnel syndrome and work.

    PubMed

    Newington, Lisa; Harris, E Clare; Walker-Bone, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral nerve entrapment syndrome, and it frequently presents in working-aged adults. Its mild form causes 'nuisance' symptoms including dysaesthesia and nocturnal waking. At its most severe, CTS can significantly impair motor function and weaken pinch grip. This review discusses the anatomy of the carpal tunnel and the clinical presentation of the syndrome as well as the classification and diagnosis of the condition. CTS has a profile of well-established risk factors including individual factors and predisposing co-morbidities, which are briefly discussed. There is a growing body of evidence for an association between CTS and various occupational factors, which is also explored. Management of CTS, conservative and surgical, is described. Finally, the issue of safe return to work post carpal tunnel release surgery and the lack of evidence-based guidelines are discussed.

  10. A biomechanical evaluation of proximal femoral nail antirotation with respect to helical blade position in femoral head: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jin-Ho; Garg, Anant Kumar; Oh, Jong-Keon; Oh, Chang-Wug; Lee, Sung-Jae; Myung-Rae, Cho; Kim, Min-Keun; Kim, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Despite new developments in the management of osteoporotic fractures, complications like screw cutout are still found in the fixation of proximal femur fractures even with biomechanically proven better implants like proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA). The purpose of this cadaveric study was to investigate the biomechanical stability of this device in relation to two common positions (center-center and inferior-center) of the helical blade in the femoral head in unstable trochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: Eight pairs of human cadaveric femurs were used; in one group [center-center (C-C) group], the helical blade of PFNA was fixed randomly in central position both in anteroposterior and lateral view, whereas in the other group it was fixed in inferior one-third position in anteroposterior and in central position in lateral view [inferior-center (I-C) group]. Unstable intertrochanteric fracture was created and each specimen was loaded cyclically till load to failure Results: Angular and rotational displacements were significantly higher within the C-C group compared to the I-C group in both unloaded and loaded condition. Loading to failure was higher in the I-C group compared to the C-C group. No statistical significance was found for this parameter. Correlations between tip apex distance, cyclic loading which lead to femoral head displacement, and ultimate load to failure showed a significant positive relationship. Conclusion: The I-C group was superior to the C-C group and provided better biomechanical stability for angular and rotational displacement. This study would be a stimulus for further experimental studies with larger number specimens and complex loading protocols at multicentres. PMID:23325963

  11. Effect of intracapsular hyperpressure on femoral head blood flow. Laser Doppler flowmetry in dogs.

    PubMed

    Vegter, J; Klopper, P J

    1991-08-01

    Intracapsular hyperpressure in the hip joint of dogs affected femoral head blood flow, especially in the juvenile animals. Graphic recording of the laser Doppler signal curve using rapid sampling time demonstrated venous hip joint tamponade in both juvenile and adult dogs. Laser Doppler flowmetry seems to be a sensitive and reproducible method to demonstrate femoral-head blood-flow changes.

  12. Trans-femoral amputee pilots: criteria for return to the fighter cockpit.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Goldstein, Liav; Heim, Michael; Barenboim, Erez; Dudkiewicz, Israel

    2005-04-01

    Proximal lower limb amputations (trans-femoral) usually leave amputees with significant functional disturbances. This article contains information regarding three pilots with trans-femoral amputations that returned swiftly to continue their aeronautical careers despite their disabilities. Adaptations are needed in the limb prostheses to enable the amputees to access the minimally spaced cockpit.

  13. Effect of the high femoral osteotomy upon the vascularity and blood supply of the hip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Day, B.; Shim, S.S.; Leung, G.

    1984-05-01

    This investigation was done to study the effects of high femoral osteotomy upon the vascularity and blood supply of the hip and to further our knowledge of its physiologic basis. We have used established methods of study, including bone scans, microangiography, isotope clearance and perosseous venography, and based upon the results of these studies, we have reached certain conclusions. First, high femoral osteotomy increases the blood flow and vascularity in the hip joint, the femoral head and neck and the great trochanter. Second, bone scanning techniques using /sup 99m/Tc labeled diphosphonate have shown increased uptake in the femoral head and neck after high femoral osteotomy. The localization was done using a Digital Gamma III computer, and the activity on the osteotomy side at two weeks was 3.5 times as great as on the control side. By 16 weeks postoperatively, there was still two times as much activity on the osteotomy side. Third, microangiography showed increased vascularity both at the osteotomy site and in the femoral head and neck and the greater trochanter on that side. Such an increase in vascularity first became evident two weeks after osteotomy and persisted during the four month period studied. Fourth, the results of the /sup 99m/Tc diphosphonate clearance study showed a 25 per cent increase in femoral head blood flow on the operative side. Fifth, perosseous venography of the femoral head and neck showed a marked increase in venous drainage through the osteotomy site in the immediate postosteotomy stage.

  14. Bilateral spontaneous fracturing of the femoral neck in a patient with renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Flavio Luís; Dalio, Renato Bellini; Sugo, Arthur Tomotaka; Picado, Celso Hermínio Ferraz

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral fracturing of the femoral neck in a patient with renal osteodystrophy who was treated by means of osteosynthesis. In this type of patient, there is a need to remain watchful for the possibility of occurrences of spontaneous fracturing of the femoral neck, even if the initial radiographic examination is normal. PMID:26229859

  15. The effect of postural control and balance on femoral anteversion in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Karabicak, Gul Oznur; Balcı, Nilay Comuk; Gulsen, Mustafa; Ozturk, Basar; Cetin, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to investigate the relationships between femoral anteversion and functional balance and postural control in children with spastic cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty children with spastic cerebral palsy (mean age=12.4 ± 4.5) with grosss motor functional classification system levels I, II, and III were recruited for this study. Functional balance was evaluated using the Pediatric Balance Scale, postural control was evaluated using the Trunk Control Measurement Scale, and femoral anteversion was assessed with a handheld goniometer using the great trochanter prominence method. [Results] The results indicated that there was significant correlation between femoral anteversion and Trunk Control Measurement Scale dynamic reaching score. There were no significant correlation between femoral anteversion and the Trunk Control Measurement Scale static sitting balance, Trunk Control Measurement Scale selective movement control, total Trunk Control Measurement Scale and Pediatric Balance Scale results. [Conclusion] Increased femoral anteversion has not correlation with functional balance, static sitting, and selective control of the trunk. Femoral anteversion is related to dynamic reaching activities of the trunk, and this may be the result of excessive internal pelvic rotation. It is important for the health professionals to understand that increased femoral anteversion needs to be corrected because in addition to leading to femoral internal rotation during walking, it also effects dynamic reaching activities of spastic children with cerebral palsy. PMID:27390397

  16. Proteomic changes in plasma of broiler chickens with femoral head necrosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head necrosis (FHN) is a skeletal problem in broiler chickens where the proximal femoral head cartilage shows susceptibility to separation from its growth plate. The FHN selected birds showed higher bodyweights and reduced plasma cholesterol. The proteomic differences in the plasma of health...

  17. Efficacies of surgical treatments based on Harris hip score in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chengwei; Yang, Fengjian; Lin, Weilong; Fan, Yongqian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacies of four surgical treatments, i.e., total hip arthroplasty (THA), internal fixation (IF), hemiarthroplasty (HA), and artificial femoral head replacement (artificial FHR), by performing a network meta-analysis based on Harris hip score (HHS) in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture. Methods: In strict accordance with specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, randomized controlled trails (RCTs) were screened and selected from a larger group of studies that were retrieved through a comprehensive search of scientific literature databases, further complimented by manual search. The resultant high-quality data from final selected studies were analyzed using Stata 12.0 software. Results: A total of 3680 studies were initially retrieved from database search, and 15 RCTs were eventually incorporated into this meta-analysis, containing 1781 elderly patients who had undergone various surgical treatments for femoral neck fracture (THA group = 604; HA group = 604; IF group = 495; artificial FHR group = 78). Our major result revealed a statistically significant difference in HHS of femoral neck fracture when HA and IF groups were compared with THA. No differences were detected in the HHS of femoral neck fracture undergoing artificial FHR and THA. The surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) value of HHS, in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture after surgery, revealed that IF has the highest value. Conclusions: The current network meta-analysis results suggest that IF is the superlative surgical procedure for femoral neck fracture patients, and IF significantly improves the HHS in femoral neck fracture patients. PMID:26221216

  18. Ultrasonographic Measurement of the Femoral Cartilage Thickness in Hemiparetic Patients after Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunc, Hakan; Oken, Oznur; Kara, Murat; Tiftik, Tulay; Dogu, Beril; Unlu, Zeliha; Ozcakar, Levent

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the femoral cartilage thicknesses of hemiparetic patients after stroke using musculoskeletal ultrasonography and to determine whether there is any correlation between cartilage thicknesses and the clinical characteristics of the patients. Femoral cartilage thicknesses of both knees were measured in 87 (33…

  19. Serum chemistry and histopathology of broiler femoral head necrosis and tibial dyschondroplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head necrosis (FHN) and tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) are two major leg problems in young meat type poultry which cause lameness, bone deformity and infections. Whereas FHN results from disarticulation of the femoral growth plate from the articular cartilage, TD lesions are characterized by i...

  20. Histopathology and serum clinical chemistry evaluation of broilers with femoral head separation disorder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Femoral head disarticulation (FHD) and necrosis is a sporadic leg problem of unknown etiology in broiler breeders. To determine the underlying physiology of FHD, the blood chemistry and the histopathology of the femoral heads of the affected chickens were compared with their age matched controls. Ch...

  1. Adventitial cystic disease of the common femoral vein presenting as deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Chun, Ho Jong; Hwang, Jeong Kye; Kim, Ji Il; Kim, Sang Dong; Park, Sun-Cheol; Moon, In Sung

    2016-07-01

    Adventitial cystic disease of the common femoral vein is a rare condition. We herein report the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with painless swelling in her left lower leg that resembled deep vein thrombosis. She underwent femoral exploration and excision of the cystic wall. The presentation, investigation, treatment, and pathology of this condition are discussed with a literature review.

  2. Tunnelling in van der Waals heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Artem; Novoselov, Kostya; Geim, Andre; Eaves, Laurence; Falko, Vladimir

    When graphene and other conductive two-dimensional (2D) materials are separated by an atomically thin insulating 2D crystal, quantum mechanical tunnelling leads to appreciable current between two 2D conductors due to the overlap of their wavefunctions. These tunnel devices demonstrate interesting physics and potential for applications: such effects as resonant tunnelling, negative differential conductance, light emission and detection have already been demonstrated. In this presentation we will outline the current status and perspectives of tunnelling transistors based on 2D materials assembled into van der Waals heterostructures. Particularly, we will present results on mono- and bilayer graphene tunnelling, tunnelling in 2D crystal-based quantum wells, and tunnelling in superconducting 2D materials. Such effects as momentum and chirality conservation, phonon- and impurity-assisted tunnelling will also be discussed. Finally, we will ponder the implications of discovered effects for practical applications.

  3. Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers.

    PubMed

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V; Dykman, Mark; Denchev, Vasil S; Amin, Mohammad H; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-07

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational multiqubit tunnelling has not yet been observed, and a theory of co-tunnelling under high- and low-frequency noises is lacking. Here we show that 8-qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational primitive where classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In support of the design of quantum annealers we develop a nonperturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics. This theory accurately predicts the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunnelling subject to the polaron effect. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunnelling outperforms thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive.

  4. Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers

    PubMed Central

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V.; Dykman, Mark; Denchev, Vasil S.; Amin, Mohammad H.; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational multiqubit tunnelling has not yet been observed, and a theory of co-tunnelling under high- and low-frequency noises is lacking. Here we show that 8-qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational primitive where classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In support of the design of quantum annealers we develop a nonperturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics. This theory accurately predicts the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunnelling subject to the polaron effect. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunnelling outperforms thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive. PMID:26739797

  5. Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V.; Dykman, Mark; Denchev, Vasil S.; Amin, Mohammad H.; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational multiqubit tunnelling has not yet been observed, and a theory of co-tunnelling under high- and low-frequency noises is lacking. Here we show that 8-qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational primitive where classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In support of the design of quantum annealers we develop a nonperturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics. This theory accurately predicts the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunnelling subject to the polaron effect. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunnelling outperforms thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive.

  6. Quantum control of molecular tunneling ionization in the spatiotemporal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmura, Hideki; Saito, Naoaki; Morishita, Toru

    2011-06-15

    We report on a method that can control molecular photoionization in both space and time domains. The directionally asymmetric molecular tunneling ionization induced by intense (5.0 x 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}) phase-controlled two-color laser pulses consisting of fundamental and second-harmonic light achieves the selective ionization of asymmetric molecules in the space domain, and manipulates the birth time and direction of photoelectron emission on an attosecond time scale. This method provides a powerful tool for tracking the quantum dynamics of photoelectrons by using phase-dependent oriented molecules as a phase reference in simultaneous ion-electron detection.

  7. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β. PMID:25871745

  8. Proximal femoral diaphyseal cross-sectional geometry in Orrorin tugenensis.

    PubMed

    Bleuze, M

    2012-06-01

    Functional adaptations in femora attributed to Orrorin tugenensis provide a unique opportunity to examine locomotor behavior very early in the hominin lineage. This study examines relative cortical thickness, cortical area (CA) relative to the polar moment of area (J), and J relative to femoral head superoinferior diameter (FHD) in the proximal femur of O. tugenensis (BAR 1002'00 and BAR 1003'00), and compares patterns in this early hominin with those in a sample of modern humans (N=31), Plio-Pleistocene fossil hominins (N=8), Pan troglodytes troglodytes (N=13), and Pan paniscus (N=3). Relative cortical thickness and CA relative to J in the proximal femur of O. tugenensis are comparable to patterns generally found in other fossil hominins. Proximal femoral diaphyseal J relative to FHD in BAR 1002'00 is similar to patterns found in fossil hominins typically attributed to a non-Homo genus (i.e. SK 82, SK 97, and KNM-ER 738). Cross-sectional geometric patterns in the proximal femur of Orrorin are not unlike those generally found in australopithecines and fossil Homo. While the results of this study cannot confirm unequivocally that Orrorin was an obligate biped, a mode of locomotion comparable to that proposed for australopithecines cannot be ruled out. PMID:22609080

  9. Femoral nerve block for patient undergoing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Bong Ha; Lee, Hyeon Jung; Lee, Hyung Gon; Kim, Man Young; Park, Keun Suk; Choi, Jeong Il; Yoon, Myung Ha; Kim, Woong Mo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The existence of peripheral opioid receptors and its effectiveness in peripheral nerve block remain controversial. The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blinded study was to examine the analgesic effects of adding fentanyl to ropivacaine for continuous femoral nerve block (CFNB) using patient-controlled analgesia after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods: The patients were divided into 2 groups, each with n = 40 in ropivacaine (R) group and n = 42 in R with fentanyl (R + F) group. After operation, the patients in each group received R + F and R alone via a femoral nerve catheter, respectively. We assessed the visual analog scale (VAS) pain immediately before administration (baseline) and at 15, 30, and 60 minutes on postanesthesia care unit (PACU), and resting and ambulatory VAS score up to 24 hours. Results: Overall, the average VAS scores in the R + F group were slightly lower than those of the R group. However, the VAS score differences between groups were not statistically significant, except for 30 minutes (P = 0.009) in PACU. R group showed higher supplemental analgesics consumption in average compared with R + F group, but not significant. Conclusion: Additional fentanyl did not show prominent enhancement of analgesic effect in the field of CFNB after TKA. PMID:27603376

  10. Distal Femoral Complications Following Antegrade Intramedullary Nail Placement

    PubMed Central

    Fantry, Amanda J.; Elia, Gregory; Vopat, Bryan G.; Daniels, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    While antegrade nailing for proximal and diaphyseal femur fractures is a commonly utilized fixation method with benefits including early mobilization and high rates of fracture union, both intraoperative and postoperative complications may occur. Intraoperative errors include leg length discrepancy, anterior cortical perforation, malreduction of the fracture, and neurovascular injury, and postoperative complications include nonunion, malunion, infection, and hardware failure. This case series reviews complications affecting the distal femur after intramedullary nailing including fracture surrounding a distal femoral interlocking screw (Case #1), nonunion after dynamization with nail penetration into the knee joint (Case #2), and anterior cortical perforation (Case #3). Prevention of intraoperative and postoperative complications surrounding intramedullary nailing requires careful study of the femoral anatomy and nail design specifications (radius of curvature), consideration of the necessity of distal interlocking screws, the need for close radiographic follow-up after nail placement with X-rays of the entire length of the nail, and awareness of possible nail penetration into the knee joint after dynamization. PMID:25874066

  11. Femoral venous catheters: a safe alternative for delivering parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, B; Kanter, G; Titus, D

    1994-04-01

    Femoral vein catheterization is an alternative method of obtaining central venous access. Placement of femoral venous catheters (FVCs) is possible in the majority of patients, suitable for most indications, and associated with a low complication rate during insertion. We wished to determine the incidence of infections or other complications resulting when parenteral nutrition was delivered through FVCs. Fifty-two patients were followed from a hospital-wide population including patients in the critical care units. Triple-lumen catheters were placed by using the sterile Seldinger technique, and sites were examined daily for inflammation. Bacteriologic surveillance was accomplished by submitting the catheter tip for semiquantitative cultures. If catheter line sepsis was suspected, blood samples for cultures were drawn through the catheter and peripherally. The rate of occurrence of colonized catheters was 9.6% (five of 52), and catheter sepsis was found in one case (1.9%). Other than inflammation at six (11.5%) of 52 catheter sites, noninfectious complications of FVCs were not found. On the basis of these findings, we consider FVC-delivered parenteral alimentation a safe and effective alternative to other forms of central venous access.

  12. BLEEDING OF FEMORAL HEAD DURING TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY FOR OSTEOARTHROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Sotomayor, Marco Yánez; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Silva, Marcelo Faria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the bleeding of the femoral head on hip osteoarthritis in patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. Methods: One hundred and three hips affected by primary hip osteoarthritis were evaluated. After surgical dislocation, the femoral head was divided into four quadrants, and micro perforations were made in order to observe and assess the presence of bleeding, as early type (EB), late type (LB) or without bleeding (WB). Results: We observed early bleeding (EB) in the upper quadrant in 16 hips (15.5%), late bleeding in 14 hips (13.6%) and no bleeding (WB) in 73 hips (70.9%). The anterior quadrant showed EB in 24 hips (23.3%), LB in 7 hips (6.8%) and WB in 72 hips (69.9%). The lower quadrant presented EB in 40 hips (38.8%), LB 14 hips (13.6%) and WB in 49 hips (47.6%). The posterior quadrant showed EB in 39 hips (37.9%), LB 19 hips (18.4%) and WB in 45 hips (43.7%). Comparing BMI and gender, we found no association between these parameters (p> 0.05). Conclusions: The inferior and posterior quadrant had the highest bleeding levels, following the path of the medial circumflex artery. Level of Evidence III, Therapeutic Study. PMID:26981036

  13. Conservative treatment of a femoral neck fracture following nail removal.

    PubMed

    Legnani, Claudio; Dondi, Alessandra; Pietrogrande, Luca

    2013-07-01

    With increased longevity, the management of fragility fractures in the elderly is becoming more frequent. In particular, hip fractures have considerable importance due to the significant morbidity and mortality. A 67-year-old woman underwent intramedullary nail (IMN) removal inserted for a pertrochanteric fracture that had occurred 20 months earlier. This was indicated due to continuous discomfort related to the protruding apex of the implant over the great trochanter. Due to pain persistence two days after surgery, a computed tomography (CT) scan was performed, documenting a minimally displaced impacted subcapital femoral neck fracture. Conservative management with close radiographic follow-up was conducted. After six months, the patient had returned to previous daily activities and a satisfactory range of motion was achieved without pain on walking. The purpose of our paper is to discuss the decision of removing hardware in the elderly osteoporotic patient and to analyze the possibility to conservatively treat an impacted minimally displaced subcapital fracture occurring after the removal of an IMN inserted previously for the treatment of a trochanteric fracture. In the elderly population with decreased bone quality, the removal of intramedullary implants of the proximal femur should be carefully evaluated, and osteoporotic patients undergoing reduction and fixation of femoral fractures should be encouraged to start antiosteoporotic therapy (bisphosphonate, teriparatide) to reduce the risk of further bone loss. Conservative treatment should be considered for the management of lesser symptomatic minimally displaced impacted fractures, where the inherent stability of the fracture allows rapid healing without further surgical attempts.

  14. Wear and degradation on retrieved zirconia femoral heads.

    PubMed

    Nogiwa-Valdez, A A; Rainforth, W M; Stewart, T D

    2014-03-01

    Zirconia femoral heads retrieved from patients after different implantation periods (up to 13 years) were analysed using vertical scanning interferometry, atomic force microscopy and Raman microspectroscopy. A range of topographical and compositional changes on the surface of the retrievals are reported in this work. The study revealed that changes in roughness are the result of a combination of factors, i.e. scratching, surface upheaval due to transformation to the monoclinic phase and grain pull-out. Clusters of transformed monoclinic grains were observed on heads implanted for more than 3 years. The phase composition of these clusters was confirmed by Raman microspectroscopy. Increased abrasive wear and a higher monoclinic phase content concentrated on the pole of the femoral heads, confirming that the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation was not only induced by the tetragonal phase metastability and environmental conditions but mechanical and tribological factors, also affected the transformation kinetics. Additionally, the head implanted for 13 years showed evidence of a self-polishing mechanism leading to a considerable smoothening of the surface. These observations provide an insight into the interrelated mechanisms underlying the wear and transformation process on zirconia ceramics during implantation. PMID:24140384

  15. The Economic Burden of Femoral Neck Fractures in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, K D; Gordon, C; Ducasse, G; Williams, S

    2014-09-01

    Osteoporotic femoral neck fractures are increasing as the population ages. There is a significant cost to care for patients with such fractures. We prospectively analysed the in-hospital cost of managing 85 patients admitted to the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) with such fractures. The majority of patients were females, 78.8%, and the mean age of the cohort was 83.7 years. There was a significant difference in the mean preoperative delay and length of stay between those patients treated publicly as compared to those treated privately, 9.6 vs 3.1 days and 18.9 vs 8.8 days, respectively. The mean acute cost of those treated publicly was 39% of the cost of those treated privately, J$110 878.80 vs J$284 287.61. The economic cost per year to the country for the acute management of femoral neck fractures was calculated at J$46 264 528.76 which is 0.30% of the 2005-2006 budgetary allocation for health. This cost was significantly associated with the length of hospital stay and the number of complications developed.

  16. The Economic Burden of Femoral Neck Fractures in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, KD; Gordon, C; Ducasse, G; Williams, S

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Osteoporotic femoral neck fractures are increasing as the population ages. There is a significant cost to care for patients with such fractures. We prospectively analysed the in-hospital cost of managing 85 patients admitted to the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) with such fractures. The majority of patients were females, 78.8%, and the mean age of the cohort was 83.7 years. There was a significant difference in the mean preoperative delay and length of stay between those patients treated publicly as compared to those treated privately, 9.6 vs 3.1 days and 18.9 vs 8.8 days, respectively. The mean acute cost of those treated publicly was 39% of the cost of those treated privately, J$110 878.80 vs J$284 287.61. The economic cost per year to the country for the acute management of femoral neck fractures was calculated at J$46 264 528.76 which is 0.32% of the 2005-2006 budgetary allocation for health. This cost was significantly associated with the length of hospital stay and the number of complications developed. PMID:25781282

  17. Proximal femoral diaphyseal cross-sectional geometry in Orrorin tugenensis.

    PubMed

    Bleuze, M

    2012-06-01

    Functional adaptations in femora attributed to Orrorin tugenensis provide a unique opportunity to examine locomotor behavior very early in the hominin lineage. This study examines relative cortical thickness, cortical area (CA) relative to the polar moment of area (J), and J relative to femoral head superoinferior diameter (FHD) in the proximal femur of O. tugenensis (BAR 1002'00 and BAR 1003'00), and compares patterns in this early hominin with those in a sample of modern humans (N=31), Plio-Pleistocene fossil hominins (N=8), Pan troglodytes troglodytes (N=13), and Pan paniscus (N=3). Relative cortical thickness and CA relative to J in the proximal femur of O. tugenensis are comparable to patterns generally found in other fossil hominins. Proximal femoral diaphyseal J relative to FHD in BAR 1002'00 is similar to patterns found in fossil hominins typically attributed to a non-Homo genus (i.e. SK 82, SK 97, and KNM-ER 738). Cross-sectional geometric patterns in the proximal femur of Orrorin are not unlike those generally found in australopithecines and fossil Homo. While the results of this study cannot confirm unequivocally that Orrorin was an obligate biped, a mode of locomotion comparable to that proposed for australopithecines cannot be ruled out.

  18. Radial Versus Femoral Access for Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Helen; Sastry, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    The feasibility and safety of transradial coronary intervention was demonstrated soon after the description of the transfemoral approach, despite which the use of the femoral artery still dominates in acute coronary syndrome intervention. The advantages of using the radial artery are virtual elimination of access site complications and an important reduction in bleeding, both of which are of utmost importance to the patient with myocardial infarction. Randomised controlled trials have now documented what seems inherent; that transradial intervention should bring with it an advantage in terms of morbidity and mortality in this cohort. The potential disadvantages in terms of speed of procedure and radiation exposure are negated by operator experience. Registries have illustrated that conversion on a large scale from the femoral to the transradial approach is safe and saves lives, most convincingly so in acute coronary syndrome intervention. This review discusses the potential benefits and risks of the alternative access sites in acute patients and explores how these are borne out in the published data.

  19. Bone impregnated hip screw in femoral neck fracture: Clinicoradiological results

    PubMed Central

    Sundar Raj, PK; Nuuman, Jiju A; Pattathil, Amish Sunder

    2015-01-01

    Background: Femoral neck fractures are treated either by internal fixation or arthroplasty. Usually, cannulated cancellous screws are used for osteosynthesis of fracture neck of femur. The bone impregnated hip screw (BIHS) is an alternative implant, where osteosyntehsis is required in femoral neck fracture. Materials and Methods: The BIHS is a hollow screw with thread diameter 8.3 mm, shank diameter 6.5 mm and wall thickness 2.2 mm and holes in the shaft of the screw with diameter 2 mm, placed in a staggered fashion. Biomechanical and animal experimental studies were done. Clinical study was done in two phases: Phase 1 in a group of volunteers, only with BIHS was used in a pilot study and phase 2 comparative study was done in a group with AO cannulated screws and the other group treated with BIHS. Results: In the phase 1 study, out of 15 patients, only one patient had delayed union. In phase 2, there were 78 patients, 44 patients in BIHS showed early union, compared to the rest 34 cases of AO cannulated screws Out of 44 patients with BIHS, 41 patients had an excellent outcome, 2 had nonunions and one implant breakage was noted. Conclusions: Bone impregnated hip screw has shown to provide early solid union since it incorporates the biomechanical principles and also increases the osteogenic potential and hence, found superior to conventional cannulated cancellous screw. PMID:26015608

  20. A simple new technique for the removal of fractured femoral stems: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The removal of broken femoral stems has become a major issue in revision surgery, and is a technically difficult and time-consuming procedure. Case presentation We present a case of a fracture of a cementless long femoral stem in a 65-year-old, white Caucasian man. The distal part was removed with a special longitudinal osteotomy through the anterior cortex extending distally for 10cm. It was then followed by a transversal osteotomy 2cm below the tip of the femoral stump to allow enough space for two locking pliers. Simultaneously using a lamina spreader on the distal part, the broken stem was extracted while hammering on two locking pliers. Conclusions We developed a simple and easy technique for the removal of a broken femoral stem that can be applied to all kinds of femoral stems and intramedullary nails regardless of their cross section. We used ordinary surgical instruments and spared the remaining bone stock. PMID:24886067

  1. Traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head in a healed trochanteric fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Iwakura, Takashi; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman sustained a trochanteric fracture of the left femur after a fall. Fracture fixation was performed using proximal femoral nail antirotation (PFNA) II, and she was able to walk with a T-cane after 3 months. Eleven months following the operation, the patient presented with left hip pain after a fall. Radiographs showed a subchondral collapse of the femoral head located above the blade tip. The authors removed the PFNA-II and subsequently performed cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Histological evaluation of the femoral head showed osteoporosis with no evidence of osteonecrosis. Repair tissue, granulation tissue and callus formation were seen at the collapsed subchondral area. Based on these findings, a traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head in a healed trochanteric fracture was diagnosed. A traumatic subchondral fracture of the femoral head may need to be considered as a possible diagnosis after internal fixation of the trochanteric fracture. PMID:25015169

  2. Intraoperative measurement of rotational stability of femoral components of total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Harris, W H; Mulroy, R D; Maloney, W J; Burke, D W; Chandler, H P; Zalenski, E B

    1991-05-01

    High out-of-plane forces acting on the hip joint can produce important rotational micromotion of the femoral component. This micromotion at the prosthesis interface may be detrimental to the stability of the implant. In cementless femoral implants this could prevent bone ingrowth, and in the cemented component this could cause generation of particulate debris, lysis, and loosening. The introduction of the torque wrench micrometer for assessment of intraoperative femoral component stability can quantify the initial stability of primary cementless femoral components and critically evaluate the stability (at either the initial or revision arthroplasty) of both cemented and cementless femoral components. It allows the surgeon to produce a known torque in the direction and magnitude of the out-of-plane forces that load the hip in vivo. PMID:2019039

  3. Closed Intramedullary Derotational Osteotomy and Hip Arthroscopy for Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement From Femoral Retroversion

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Gupta, Nikhil; Martin, Hal D.

    2014-01-01

    Femoral retroversion is an uncommon cause of cam femoroacetabular impingement that may require surgical treatment beyond arthroscopic or open femoroplasty. We present the case of a young adult with bilateral severe femoral retroversion in whom such treatment failed. We discuss the rationale, surgical technique, and outcome of this patient, who underwent bilateral closed intramedullary derotational proximal femoral osteotomies and interlocked nailing with adjunctive pre- and post-osteotomy hip arthroscopies. Clinical improvement with normal foot progression angles, radiographic union, and resolution of bilateral cam femoroacetabular impingement from femoral retroversion was achieved. This surgery permits rapid institution of weight-bearing ambulation and an early rehabilitative program. Femoral retroversion may be an underappreciated and insufficiently treated cause of cam femoroacetabular impingement that may be readily detected and successfully remedied with this less invasive procedure. PMID:24749047

  4. The Influence of Hip Rotation on Femoral Offset Following Short Stem Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boese, Christoph K; Bredow, Jan; Ettinger, Max; Eysel, Peer; Thorey, Fritz; Lechler, Philipp; Budde, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Short stem total hip arthroplasty (THA) is thought to be an advantageous surgical option for young patients. Femoral offset has been identified as an important factor for clinical outcome of THA. However, little is known on functional implications of femoral offset after short stem THA. Importantly, hip rotation influences the projected femoral offset and may lead to significant underestimation. Therefore, a novel method to identify and account for hip rotation was applied to a prospectively enrolled series of 37 patients (48 radiographs) undergoing short stem THA. Repeated measurements were performed and intraobserver and interobserver reliability was assessed and femoral offset was corrected for rotation. Based on this study, rotation-correction of femoral offset is of highest relevance for the correct interpretation in future studies.

  5. Fracture toughness of human femoral neck: effect of microstructure, composition, and age.

    PubMed

    Yeni, Y N; Norman, T L

    2000-05-01

    The effects of porosity and pore size; osteonal area, size, and density; mineral content; water content; wet and dry apparent densities; and age on mode I (tensile) and mode II (shear) strain energy release rate were investigated for femoral neck cortical bone from human cadavers aged >/=50 years. The results suggest that porosity- and density-based parameters that are related to bone quantity are more consistently determinant for femoral neck fracture toughness than morphology-based parameters that are related to microstructural organization. Bone features examined here were more explanatory for shear than tension fracture toughness. Tension and shear fracture toughness did not change with age, unlike in previous reports investigating the femoral and tibial shaft. It was concluded that the femoral neck is different from the femoral and tibial shaft in terms of its microstructure and composition and in its relationship of fracture toughness to its constituents and age. PMID:10773590

  6. Transverse femoral implant prominence: four cases demonstrating a preventable complication for ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Argintar, Evan; Scherer, Benjamin; Jordan, Tom; Klimkiewicz, John

    2010-12-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is a commonly occurring injury that often demands surgical reconstruction. Although the utility of this operation is widely accepted, many specific components, including graft fixation technique, remain controversial. Many clinicians favor transverse femoral implant fixation for soft tissue ACL grafts. This technique can be accomplished successfully; however, in a minority of the cases, the femoral implant can be excessively prominent, leading to iatrogenic postoperative iliotibial band syndrome. This article presents 4 patients that developed postoperative iliotibial band syndrome resulting from transverse femoral implant prominence. Despite achievement of knee ligamentous stability, implant prominence compromised final clinical results following ACL reconstruction. Through change in Lysholm value, we reviewed the clinical outcomes of these patients following femoral implant hardware removal for treatment of iliotibial band syndrome. On hardware removal, all patients demonstrated complete symptomatic improvement, mirroring an average Lysholm value increase of 38. We believe transverse femoral implant prominence is avoidable, and subsequent iliotibial band syndrome is a preventable postoperative complication.

  7. Spontaneous and bilateral necrosis of the femoral head in a young experimental beagle dog.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Kurotaki, Tetsuro; Yamada, Naoaki; Kumabe, Shino; Doi, Takuya; Wako, Yumi; Tsuchitani, Minoru

    2015-04-01

    This report describes the pathological characterizations of a rare case of necrosis of the femoral head that was spontaneous, bilateral, avascular and nontraumatic. A 14-month-old beagle dog was presented with pain in the hind limbs. At necropsy, the articular surface in the bilateral femoral head was markedly irregular. There were no gross abnormalities other than in the hip joints. Microscopically, a wide range of trabecular bone necrosis localized in the subchondral area was observed in both femoral heads. In the right femoral head, fibrosis and proliferative vessels were noted in the subchondral area. The articular cartilage was thickened irregularly, but there was no evidence of cartilage necrosis. The bone marrow adjacent to the affected area showed severe depression. In the metaphysis, atrophic bone marrow, but not bone necrosis, was observed. This was a rare case of spontaneous necrosis of the femoral head in an experimental beagle dog. PMID:26028821

  8. Spontaneous and bilateral necrosis of the femoral head in a young experimental beagle dog

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Kurotaki, Tetsuro; Yamada, Naoaki; Kumabe, Shino; Doi, Takuya; Wako, Yumi; Tsuchitani, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the pathological characterizations of a rare case of necrosis of the femoral head that was spontaneous, bilateral, avascular and nontraumatic. A 14-month-old beagle dog was presented with pain in the hind limbs. At necropsy, the articular surface in the bilateral femoral head was markedly irregular. There were no gross abnormalities other than in the hip joints. Microscopically, a wide range of trabecular bone necrosis localized in the subchondral area was observed in both femoral heads. In the right femoral head, fibrosis and proliferative vessels were noted in the subchondral area. The articular cartilage was thickened irregularly, but there was no evidence of cartilage necrosis. The bone marrow adjacent to the affected area showed severe depression. In the metaphysis, atrophic bone marrow, but not bone necrosis, was observed. This was a rare case of spontaneous necrosis of the femoral head in an experimental beagle dog. PMID:26028821

  9. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  19. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  20. 49 CFR 177.810 - Vehicular tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vehicular tunnels. 177.810 Section 177.810... Information and Regulations § 177.810 Vehicular tunnels. Except as regards Class 7 (radioactive) materials... through any urban vehicular tunnel used for mass transportation....

  1. 43 CFR 3832.40 - Tunnel sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tunnel sites. 3832.40 Section 3832.40..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.40 Tunnel sites....

  2. 43 CFR 3832.40 - Tunnel sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tunnel sites. 3832.40 Section 3832.40..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.40 Tunnel sites....

  3. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  4. 49 CFR 177.810 - Vehicular tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vehicular tunnels. 177.810 Section 177.810... Information and Regulations § 177.810 Vehicular tunnels. Except as regards Class 7 (radioactive) materials... through any urban vehicular tunnel used for mass transportation....

  5. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  6. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  7. 43 CFR 3832.40 - Tunnel sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tunnel sites. 3832.40 Section 3832.40..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.40 Tunnel sites....

  8. 7 CFR 58.621 - Freezing tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Freezing tunnels. 58.621 Section 58.621 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....621 Freezing tunnels. Freezing tunnels for quick freezing at extremely low temperatures shall...

  9. 49 CFR 177.810 - Vehicular tunnels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vehicular tunnels. 177.810 Section 177.810... Vehicular tunnels. Except as regards Class 7 (radioactive) materials, nothing contained in parts 170-189 of... tunnel used for mass transportation....

  10. 43 CFR 3832.40 - Tunnel sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tunnel sites. 3832.40 Section 3832.40..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LOCATING MINING CLAIMS OR SITES Tunnel Sites § 3832.40 Tunnel sites....

  11. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  12. Small diameter acetabulum and femoral head in total hip arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip, with no femoral osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Verettas, Dionysios-Alexandros; Chloropoulou, Pelagia; Xarchas, Konstantinos; Drosos, Georgios; Ververidis, Athanasios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of 66 total hip arthroplasties in 62 patients of mean age 46 years (24-74 years), with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In all cases the centre of rotation of the new hip was positioned at the site of the true acetabulum. In all patients cementless press fit acetabular components of small diameter (42-44 mm) were used, articulating exclusively with a 22.25 mm modular metal femoral head, without the use of bone grafts or shortening osteotomies of the femur. Despite the use of small diameter femoral heads the rate of dislocation was 3%. After an average follow-up period of 9 years (4-18 years), no revisions were required for infection, loosening or wear or implant migration. Osteolytic lesions were seen in the periacetabular region in 3 patients who were symptom free. A total of 2 revisions were required for instability and 2 patients had the wires of their trochanteric osteotomy removed because of bursitis. Leg length inequality was improved in 55% of the patients and one postoperative transient sciatic nerve lesion settled within 4 months. We believe that in patients with painful dysplastic hips, the use of small diameter implants with the centre of rotation at the true acetabulum, can give very satisfactory results, without any supplementary procedures. PMID:25907394

  13. Small diameter acetabulum and femoral head in total hip arthroplasty for developmental dysplasia of the hip, with no femoral osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Verettas, Dionysios-Alexandros; Chloropoulou, Pelagia; Xarchas, Konstantinos; Drosos, Georgios; Ververidis, Athanasios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of 66 total hip arthroplasties in 62 patients of mean age 46 years (24-74 years), with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In all cases the centre of rotation of the new hip was positioned at the site of the true acetabulum. In all patients cementless press fit acetabular components of small diameter (42-44 mm) were used, articulating exclusively with a 22.25 mm modular metal femoral head, without the use of bone grafts or shortening osteotomies of the femur. Despite the use of small diameter femoral heads the rate of dislocation was 3%. After an average follow-up period of 9 years (4-18 years), no revisions were required for infection, loosening or wear or implant migration. Osteolytic lesions were seen in the periacetabular region in 3 patients who were symptom free. A total of 2 revisions were required for instability and 2 patients had the wires of their trochanteric osteotomy removed because of bursitis. Leg length inequality was improved in 55% of the patients and one postoperative transient sciatic nerve lesion settled within 4 months. We believe that in patients with painful dysplastic hips, the use of small diameter implants with the centre of rotation at the true acetabulum, can give very satisfactory results, without any supplementary procedures.

  14. The modified Dunn procedure for slipped capital femoral epiphysis does not reduce the length of the femoral neck

    PubMed Central

    Cosma, Dan; Vasilescu, Dana Elena; Corbu, Andrei; Văleanu, Mădălina; Vasilescu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is evolving, with the development of new surgical techniques. |We wanted to study if modified Dunn procedure restores the normal alignment of the proximal femur and the risk of avascular necrosis is increased. Methods: This is a single centre, retrospective study, comparing the outcomes of in situ pinning and modified Dunn procedure. Between 2001 and 2014, 7 children (7 hips) underwent the modified Dunn procedure and 10 children (10 hips) pinning in situ for stable and unstable SCFE. Mean age of the patients was 12.7 years with a median follow-up of 18 months. Results: The radiological parameters improved in the modified Dunn procedure group, while the length of the femoral neck didn’t change significantly (p=0.09). Postoperative clinical outcomes were slightly better in the modified Dunn procedure group (6 hips out of 7 had good and excellent results) compared to the pinning in situ group (8 good and excellent results out of 10 hips) (p=0.04). No avascular necrosis was found and there were no cases of chondrolysis. Conclusion: Radiographic parameters of the proximal femur assessed in our study improved in all hips that underwent modified Dunn procedure, without the creation of secondary deformities. PMID:27182244

  15. A Seamless Ubiquitous Telehealthcare Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Po-Hsun; Lin, Bor-Shing; Yu, Chu; Hu, Shun-Hsiang; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Mobile handheld devices are rapidly using to implement healthcare services around the World. Fundamentally, these services utilize telemedicine technologies. A disconnection of a mobile telemedicine system usually results in an interruption, which is embarrassing, and reconnection is necessary during the communication session. In this study, the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) is adopted to build a stable session tunnel to guarantee seamless switching among heterogeneous wireless communication standards, such as Wi-Fi and 3G. This arrangement means that the telemedicine devices will not be limited by a fixed wireless connection and can switch to a better wireless channel if necessary. The tunnel can transmit plain text, binary data, and video streams. According to the evaluation of the proposed software-based SCTP-Tunnel middleware shown, the performance is lower than anticipated and is slightly slower than a fixed connection. However, the transmission throughput is still acceptable for healthcare professionals in a healthcare enterprise or home care site. It is necessary to build more heterogeneous wireless protocols into the proposed tunnel-switching scheme to support all possible communication protocols. In addition, SCTP is another good choice for promoting communication in telemedicine and healthcare fields. PMID:23917812

  16. Aorta-right atrial tunnel.

    PubMed

    Sai Krishna, Cheemalapati; Baruah, Dibya Kumar; Reddy, Gangireddy Venkateswara; Panigrahi, Nanda Kishore; Suman, Kalagara; Kumar, Palli Venkata Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Aorta-right atrial tunnel is a vascular channel that originates from one of the sinuses of Valsalva and terminates in either the superior vena cava or the right atrium. The tunnel is classified as anterior or posterior, depending upon its course in relation to the ascending aorta. An origin above the sinotubular ridge differentiates the tunnel from an aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva, and the absence of myocardial branches differentiates it from a coronary-cameral fistula. Clinical presentation ranges from an asymptomatic precordial murmur to congestive heart failure. The embryologic background and pathogenesis of this lesion are attributable either to an aneurysmal dilation of the sinus nodal artery or to a congenital weakness of the aortic media. In either circumstance, progressive enlargement of the tunnel and ultimate rupture into the low-pressure right atrium could occur under the influence of the systemic pressure.The lesion is diagnosed by use of 2-dimensional echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Computed tomographic angiography is an additional noninvasive diagnostic tool. The possibility of complications necessitates early therapy, even in asymptomatic patients or those with a hemodynamically insignificant shunt. Available treatments are catheter-based intervention, external ligation under controlled hypotension, or surgical closure with the patient under cardiopulmonary bypass.Herein, we discuss the cases of 2 patients who had this unusual anomaly. We highlight the outcome on follow-up imaging (patient 1) and the identification and safe reimplantation of the coronary artery (patient 2).

  17. A seamless ubiquitous telehealthcare tunnel.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Po-Hsun; Lin, Bor-Shing; Yu, Chu; Hu, Shun-Hsiang; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2013-08-02

    Mobile handheld devices are rapidly using to implement healthcare services around the World. Fundamentally, these services utilize telemedicine technologies. A disconnection of a mobile telemedicine system usually results in an interruption, which is embarrassing, and reconnection is necessary during the communication session. In this study, the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) is adopted to build a stable session tunnel to guarantee seamless switching among heterogeneous wireless communication standards, such as Wi-Fi and 3G. This arrangement means that the telemedicine devices will not be limited by a fixed wireless connection and can switch to a better wireless channel if necessary. The tunnel can transmit plain text, binary data, and video streams. According to the evaluation of the proposed software-based SCTP-Tunnel middleware shown, the performance is lower than anticipated and is slightly slower than a fixed connection. However, the transmission throughput is still acceptable for healthcare professionals in a healthcare enterprise or home care site. It is necessary to build more heterogeneous wireless protocols into the proposed tunnel-switching scheme to support all possible communication protocols. In addition, SCTP is another good choice for promoting communication in telemedicine and healthcare fields.

  18. [Modified Class II tunnel preparation].

    PubMed

    Rimondini, L; Baroni, C

    1991-05-15

    Tunnel preparations for restoration of Class II carious lesions in primary molars preserve the marginal ridge and minimize sacrifice of healthy tooth substructure. Materials with improved bonding to tooth structure and increase potential for fluoride release allow Class II restorations without "extension for prevention". PMID:1864420

  19. SCALING: Wind Tunnel to Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2006-01-01

    Wind tunnels have wide-ranging functionality, including many applications beyond aeronautics, and historically have been the major source of information for technological aerodynamics/aeronautical applications. There are a myriad of scaling issues/differences from flight to wind tunnel, and their study and impacts are uneven and a function of the particular type of extant flow phenomena. Typically, the most serious discrepancies are associated with flow separation. The tremendous ongoing increases in numerical simulation capability are changing and in many aspects have changed the function of the wind tunnel from a (scaled) "predictor" to a source of computational calibration/validation information with the computation then utilized as the flight prediction/scaling tool. Numerical simulations can increasingly include the influences of the various scaling issues. This wind tunnel role change has been occurring for decades as computational capability improves in all aspects. Additional issues driving this trend are the increasing cost (and time) disparity between physical experiments and computations, and increasingly stringent accuracy requirements.

  20. Spinoff from Wind Tunnel Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Douglas Juanarena, a former NASA Langley instrument design engineer, found a solution to the problem of long, repetitive tunnel runs needed to measure airflow pressures. Electronically scanned pressure (ESP) replaced mechanical systems with electronic sensors. Juanarena licensed the NASA-patented technology and now manufactures ESP modules for research centers, aerospace companies, etc.

  1. Tunnel Vision in Environmental Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Alan

    1982-01-01

    Discusses problem-solving styles in environmental management and the specific deficiencies in these styles that might be grouped under the label "tunnel vision," a form of selective attention contributing to inadequate problem-formulation, partial solutions to complex problems, and generation of additional problems. Includes educational…

  2. Mars Surface Tunnel Element Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Mary, Natalie; Howe, A. Scott; Jeffries, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    How Mars surface crews get into their ascent vehicle has profound implications for Mars surface architecture. To meet planetary protection protocols, the architecture has get Intravehicular Activity (IVA)-suited crew into a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) without having to step outside into the Mars environment. Pushing EVA suit don/doff and EVA operations to an element that remains on the surface also helps to minimize MAV cabin volume, which in turn can reduce MAV cabin mass. Because the MAV will require at least seven kilograms of propellant to ascend each kilogram of cabin mass, minimal MAV mass is desired. For architectures involving more than one surface element-such as an ascent vehicle and a pressurized rover or surface habitat-a retractable tunnel is an attractive solution. Beyond addressing the immediate MAV access issue, a reusable tunnel may be useful for other surface applications once its primary mission is complete. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) team is studying the optimal balance between surface tunnel functionality, mass, and stowed volume as part of the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). The "Minimum Functional Tunnel" is a conceptual design that performs a single function. Having established this baseline configuration, the next step is to trade design options, evaluate other applications, and explore alternative solutions.

  3. The recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kern, B C; Brock, M; Rudolph, K H; Logemann, H

    1993-01-01

    Sixteen out of 720 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who had undergone surgery since 1979 were reoperated for a "recurrence" (2.2%). Twelve of these patients had been originally operated on in our department. Thus, our own recurrence rate is 1.7%. Three patients deteriorated following surgery, 6 had an unsatisfactory improvement, and in 7 the symptoms recurred after initial improvement. Eight of the reoperated patients had a predisposing disease (terminal renal insufficiency, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, acromegaly). In 10 of the 16 cases the initial operation had been carried out by surgeons in the first three years of training. Reoperation revealed incomplete splitting of the transverse carpal ligament in 10 cases, compression of the median nerve by the scar in 4, injury of the muscular branch in 1, and an anatomical variant as cause of incomplete decompression in 1 patient. "Recurrences" after carpal tunnel surgery are predominantly due to inadequacies of the first procedure. A remarkable number of patients (50%) has predisposing diseases. Interfascicular or epineural neurolysis and complete exposure and neurolysis of the median nerve and its branches is necessary only in cases of recurrence. Their omission at the first surgery does not result in an increased recurrence rate. Our observations indicate that the number of operations for recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome can probably be reduced when the first operation is performed with care and experience. Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to a systemic disease are particularly at risk.

  4. Tunneling in the SIS Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu.; Kohandel, M.

    2000-09-01

    We discuss the effects caused by the layered structure of high temperature superconductors (HTS). We use the layered S-N model to obtain the tunneling current of the SIS structure. The current-voltage characteristic is calculated in the limit cases when dI/dV is proportional to the state density of HTS.

  5. A seamless ubiquitous telehealthcare tunnel.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Po-Hsun; Lin, Bor-Shing; Yu, Chu; Hu, Shun-Hsiang; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2013-08-01

    Mobile handheld devices are rapidly using to implement healthcare services around the World. Fundamentally, these services utilize telemedicine technologies. A disconnection of a mobile telemedicine system usually results in an interruption, which is embarrassing, and reconnection is necessary during the communication session. In this study, the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) is adopted to build a stable session tunnel to guarantee seamless switching among heterogeneous wireless communication standards, such as Wi-Fi and 3G. This arrangement means that the telemedicine devices will not be limited by a fixed wireless connection and can switch to a better wireless channel if necessary. The tunnel can transmit plain text, binary data, and video streams. According to the evaluation of the proposed software-based SCTP-Tunnel middleware shown, the performance is lower than anticipated and is slightly slower than a fixed connection. However, the transmission throughput is still acceptable for healthcare professionals in a healthcare enterprise or home care site. It is necessary to build more heterogeneous wireless protocols into the proposed tunnel-switching scheme to support all possible communication protocols. In addition, SCTP is another good choice for promoting communication in telemedicine and healthcare fields. PMID:23917812

  6. Theories of Sexual Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storms, Michael D.

    1980-01-01

    Results indicated homosexuals, heterosexuals, and bisexuals did not differ within each sex on measures of masculinity and femininity. Strong support was obtained for the hypothesis that sexual orientation relates primarily to erotic fantasy orientation. (Author/DB)

  7. Lateral orientation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest, and the ears are lateral to the head. A medial orientation is a position toward the midline of the body. An example of medial orientation is the eyes, which are medial to the ears on the head.

  8. They Call it Orienteering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wexler, Mark

    1977-01-01

    Through the use of personal anecdotes, the author details his initial experience with orienteering, a sport rapidly increasing in popularity that teaches people not to get lost in the woods. Sources of information about orienteering are provided. (BT)

  9. Distal femoral derotational osteotomy with external fixation for correction of excessive femoral anteversion in patients with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Skiak, Eyad; Karakasli, Ahmet; Basci, Onur; Satoglu, Ismail S; Ertem, Fatih; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2015-09-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy (CP) disorder often develop rotational hip deformity. Increasing deformities impair already diminished walking abilities; femoral osteotomies are often performed to maintain and improve walking abilities. Fixation of osteotomies with condylar plates has been used successfully, but does not often enable immediate postoperative full weight-bearing. To avoid considerable postoperative rehabilitation deficit and additional bone loss because of inactivity, a postoperative treatment with full weight-bearing, is therefore, desirable. Self-tapping Schanz screws with a unilateral external fixator crossing the knee joint providing stronger anchoring in osteopenic bone might fulfill these demands. A retrospective study was carried out on 27 ambulatory CP patients, mean age 17.5 years (range 9-22 years); 11 patients with bilateral severe intoeing deformities underwent a supracondylar femoral osteotomy between September 2008 and April 2012. All patients were allowed to bear their full weight postoperatively. The aim of this study was to describe the technique, the results of this technique, to evaluate the time required for bone healing, and the type of complications associated with a distal derotational femoral osteotomy fixed with a uniaxial external fixator crossing the knee joint. A total of 27 patients were studied [mean weight 48.8 kg (range 29.8-75 kg)]. The mean preoperative rotation included internal rotation of 69° and external rotation of 17°. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically for a minimum of 1 year after surgery. There was a significant decrease in the mean medial rotation from 69° to 32° (P=0.00034). The lateral rotation increased significantly from preoperative 17° to postoperative 45° (P=0.0011). The femoral anteversion decreased significantly from a mean of 55° preoperatively to a mean 17° postoperatively (P=0.030). All patients, except one, achieved solid fusion uneventfully. One patient was a

  10. Can p-channel tunnel field-effect transistors perform as good as n-channel?

    SciTech Connect

    Verhulst, A. S. Pourghaderi, M. A.; Collaert, N.; Thean, A. V.-Y.; Verreck, D.; Van de Put, M.; Groeseneken, G.; Sorée, B.

    2014-07-28

    We show that bulk semiconductor materials do not allow perfectly complementary p- and n-channel tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs), due to the presence of a heavy-hole band. When tunneling in p-TFETs is oriented towards the gate-dielectric, field-induced quantum confinement results in a highest-energy subband which is heavy-hole like. In direct-bandgap IIIV materials, the most promising TFET materials, phonon-assisted tunneling to this subband degrades the subthreshold swing and leads to at least 10× smaller on-current than the desired ballistic on-current. This is demonstrated with quantum-mechanical predictions for p-TFETs with tunneling orthogonal to the gate, made out of InP, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As, InAs, and a modified version of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As with an artificially increased conduction-band density-of-states. We further show that even if the phonon-assisted current would be negligible, the build-up of a heavy-hole-based inversion layer prevents efficient ballistic tunneling, especially at low supply voltages. For p-TFET, a strongly confined n-i-p or n-p-i-p configuration is therefore recommended, as well as a tensily strained line-tunneling configuration.

  11. Preparation of YBCO single-crystal surfaces for angularly resolved planar tunneling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, Benoit; Charalambous, M.; Guillou, H.; Chaussy, J.; Lejay, P.; Pissas, M.

    1998-03-01

    For BCS superconductors, tunneling has proven to be a valuable tool. Indeed, using multiple recrystallisation techniques, planar junctions could be prepared along various crystalline directions enabling a direct mapping of the superconducting gap. For various reasons, such techniques are difficult (if not impossible) to apply to high-Tc materials. Furthermore, due to the small thickness of the single crystals, very few planar tunneling results into the basal plane are availlable. We present a new sample preparation technique which enables us to prepare surfaces for planar tunneling in any direction in the basal plane. After proper orientation of the high-Tc single crystal, the surface is mechanically polished using fine diamond paste. Such process routinely yields samples with rms surface roughness as low as 15ÅThe sample is then ion-polished with normal incidence xenon atoms and the tunneling barrier and counter-electrode are evaporated in-situ. Preliminary tunneling results for Au/YBCO and Nb/YBCO will be presented for twinned single crystals with tunneling in the (100) and (110) directions.

  12. Macroscopic Measurement of Resonant Magnetization Tunneling in High-Spin Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, M. P.; Tejada, J.; Ziolo, R.

    1996-05-01

    We report the observation of steps at regular intervals of magnetic field in the hysteresis loop of a macroscopic sample of oriented Mn12O12(CH3COO)16(H2O)4 crystals. The magnetic relaxation rate increases substantially when the field is tuned to a step. We propose that these effects are manifestations of thermally assisted, field-tuned resonant tunneling between quantum spin states, and attribute the observation of quantum-mechanical phenomena on a macroscopic scale to tunneling in a large (Avogadro's) number of magnetically identical molecules.

  13. Management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head: A novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Samy, Ahmed M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a debilitating disease in orthopedics, frequently progressing to femoral head collapse and osteoarthritis. It is thought to be a multifactorial disease. ONFH ultimately results in femoral head collapse in 75–85% of untreated patients. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) yields satisfactory results in the treatment of the end stage of the disease. However, disease typically affects males between the ages of 20 and 40 years and joint replacement is not the ideal option for younger patients. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells and platelet rich plasma (PRP) have been used as an adjunct to core decompression to improve clinical success in the treatment of precollapse hips. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of 40 hips in 30 patients was done. There were 19 males and 11 females with a mean age 36.7 ± 6.93 years. The indication for the operation was restricted primarily to modified Ficat stages IIb and III. 16 hips (40%) had stage IIb and 24 hips (60%) had stage III ONFH. The period of follow up ranged between 36–50 months with a mean 41.4 ± 3.53 months. All patients were assessed clinically during pre- and post-operative period according to the Harris Hip Score (HHS), Visual Analog Score (VAS) and radiologically by X-rays. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was done preoperatively to confirm the diagnosis and every 6 months postoperatively for assessment of healing. The operative procedure include removal of necrotic area with drilling then the cavity was filled with a composite of bone graft mixed with PRP. Results: The mean HHS improved from 46.0 ± 7.8 preoperatively to 90.28 ± 19 at the end of followup (P < 0.0001). The mean values of VAS were 78 ± 21 and 35 ± 19 at preoperatively period and final followup, respectively, with an average reduction of 43 points. Conclusion: We found that the use of PRP with collagen sheet can increase the reparable capacity after drilling of necrotic segment in stage IIb and

  14. Symptomatic atypical femoral fractures are related to underlying hip geometry.

    PubMed

    Taormina, David P; Marcano, Alejandro I; Karia, Raj; Egol, Kenneth A; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2014-06-01

    The benefits of bisphosphonates are well documented, but prolonged use has been associated with atypical femur fractures. Radiographic markers for fracture predisposition could potentially aid in safer medication use. In this case-control designed study, we compared hip radiographic parameters and the demographic characteristics of chronic bisphosphonate users who sustained an atypical femoral fracture with a group of chronic bisphosphonate users who did not sustain an atypical femur fracture and also a group who sustained an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Radiographic parameters included were neck-shaft angle (NSA), hip-axis length (HAL) and center-edge angle (CE). Multivariate regression was used to evaluate the relationship between radiographic measures and femur fracture. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis determined cut-off points for neck-shaft angle and risk of atypical femur fracture. Ultimately, pre-fracture radiographs of 53 bisphosphonate users who developed atypical fracture were compared with 43 asymptomatic chronic bisphosphonate users and 64 intertrochanteric fracture patients. Duration of bisphosphonate use did not statistically differ between users sustaining atypical fracture and those without fracture (7.9 [±3.5] vs. 7.7 [±3.3] years, p=0.7). Bisphosphonate users who fractured had acute/varus pre-fracture neck-shaft angles (p<0.001), shorter hip-axis length (p<0.01), and narrower center-edge angles (p<0.01). Regression analysis revealed associations between neck-shaft angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.81-0.97; p=0.01), center edge angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.80-0.99]; p=0.03), and BMI (OR=1.15 [95% CI=1.02-1.31; p=0.03) with fracture development. ROC curve analysis (AUC=0.67 [95% CI=0.56-0.79]) determined that a cut-off point for neck-shaft angle <128.3° yielded 69% sensitivity and 63% specificity for development of atypical femoral fracture. Ultimately, an acute/varus angle of the femoral neck, high BMI, and narrow center-edge angle were

  15. Tunneling time, what is its meaning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, C. R.; Orlando, G.; Vampa, G.; Brabec, T.

    2015-03-01

    The tunnel time ionization dynamics for bound systems in laser fields are investigated. Numerical analysis for a step function switch-on of the field allows for the tunnel time to be defined as the time it takes the ground state to develop the under-barrier wavefunction components necessary to achieve the static field ionization rate. A relation between the tunnel time and the Keldysh time is established. The definition of the tunnel time is extended to time varying fields and experimental possibilities for measuring the tunnel time are discussed.

  16. Aeroelastic instability stoppers for wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Ricketts, R. H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A mechanism for diverting the flow in a wind tunnel from the wing of a tested model is described. The wing is mounted on the wall of a tunnel. A diverter plate is pivotally mounted on the tunnel wall ahead of the model. An actuator fixed to the tunnel is pivotably connected to the diverter plate, by plunger. When the model is about to become unstable during the test the actuator moves the diverter plate from the tunnel wall to divert maintaining stable model conditions. The diverter plate is then retracted to enable normal flow.

  17. INSIGHTS INTO THE DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF TUNNELS IN JOINTED ROCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F E; Morris, J P

    2005-02-17

    Tunnels in jointed rocks can be subjected to severe dynamic loads because of rock bursts, coal bumps, and large earthquakes. A series of 3-dimensional simulations was performed, based on discrete element analysis to gain insights into the parameters that influence the response of such tunnels. The simulations looked at the effect of joint set orientation, the effect of joint spacing, the effect of peak displacement for a given peak velocity, the effect of pulse peak velocity for a given displacement, the influence of using rigid versus deformable blocks in the analyses, and the effect of repeated loading. The results of this modeling were also compared to field evidence of dynamic tunnel failures. This comparison reinforced the notion that 3-dimensional discrete element analysis can capture very well the kinematics of structures in jointed rocks under dynamic loading. The paper concludes with a glimpse into the future. Results are shown for a 3-dimensional discrete element massively parallel simulation with 100 million contact elements, performed with the LLNL LDEC code.

  18. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T.

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  19. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy: breakthroughs and highlights.

    PubMed

    Bode, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The principle of scanning tunneling microscopy, an imaging method with atomic resolution capability invented by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982, can be adapted for surface magnetism studies by using magnetic probe tips. The contrast mechanism of this so-called spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy, or SP-STM, relies on the tunneling magneto-resistance effect, i.e. the tip-sample distance as well as the differential conductance depend on the relative magnetic orientation of tip and sample. To illustrate the working principle and the unique capabilities of SP-STM, this compilation presents some key experiments which have been performed on various magnetic surfaces, such as the topological antiferromagnet Cr(001), a double-layer of Fe which exhibits a stripe- domain pattern with about 50 nm periodicity, and the Mn monolayer on W(110), where the combination of experiment and theory reveal an antiferromagnetic spin cycloid. Recent experimental results also demonstrate the suitability of SP-STM for studies of dynamic properties, such as the spin relaxation time of single magnetic nanostructures. PMID:22546192

  20. 2. 'Tunnel No 6 West End, Front Elevation, Sectional Elevation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. 'Tunnel No 6 West End, Front Elevation, Sectional Elevation on Centerline of Portal,' Southern Pacific Standard Single-Track Tunnel, 1910. Tunnel 6, which today would be Tunnel 20, was daylighted and no longer exists. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 23 (HAER No. CA-198), Tunnel 24 (HAER No. CA-200), Tunnel 25 (HAER No. CA-201), Tunnel 27 (HAER No. CA-203), Tunnel 28 (HAER No. CA-204), and Tunnel 29 (HAER No. CA-205). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  1. [Progress in diagnosis and treatment of ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fracture].

    PubMed

    Du, C G; Zhang, Y Z; Chen, W

    2016-07-01

    Ipsilateral femoral neck and shaft fractures are rare injuries, which are often caused by high-energy trauma and combined with multiple injuries, such as thoracic and abdominal injury, head injuries, and fractures of other sites.Delayed or missed diagnosis of the ipsilateral femoral neck fracture often occurs.When patients with femoral shaft fractures caused by high-energy trauma are admitted into hospital, physical examination should be conducted carefully.In addition to femoral shaft fractures, radiographs of the ipsilater hip and knee joints should been taken, simultaneously taking into consideration the potential effect of anteversion angle on the demonstration of femoral neck fracture.Computed tomograph and magnetic resonance imaging are advised to perform if necessary to facilitate early and accurate diagnosis of ipsilateral femoral neck fracture.Comprehensive evaluation should be done based on age, physical condition, associated injuries as well as fracture site, classification and injury severity.Accordingly, proper and reasonable surgical plan is made.During the operation, anatomical reduction of the fractures, especially femoral neck fractures, should be achieved, and then fixed with appropriate internal implants.Besides, attention should also be paid to the treatment of associated injuries as well as the prevention and management of complications. PMID:27373484

  2. Wheelchair ergonomic hand drive mechanism use improves wrist mechanics associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zukowski, Lisa A; Roper, Jaimie A; Shechtman, Orit; Otzel, Dana M; Hovis, Patty W; Tillman, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Among conventional manual wheelchair (CMW) users, 49% to 63% experience carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) that is likely induced by large forces transmitted through the wrist and extreme wrist orientations. The ergonomic hand drive mechanism (EHDM) tested in this study has been shown to utilize a more neutral wrist orientation. This study evaluates the use of an EHDM in terms of wrist orientations that may predispose individuals to CTS. Eleven adult full-time CMW users with spinal cord injury participated. Motion data were captured as participants propelled across a flat surface, completing five trials in a CMW and five trials in the same CMW fitted with the EHDM. Average angular wrist orientations were compared between the two propulsion styles. Use of the EHDM resulted in reduced wrist extension and ulnar deviation. The shift to more neutral wrist orientations observed with EHDM use may reduce median nerve compression.

  3. Scaling in Theropod Dinosaurs: Femoral Bone Strength and Locomotion II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Scott

    2015-03-01

    In the second paper1 of this series, the effect of transverse femoral stresses due to locomotion in theropod dinosaurs of different sizes was examined for the case of an unchanging leg geometry. Students are invariably thrilled to learn about theropod dinosaurs, and this activity applies the concepts of torque and stress to the issue of theropod locomotion. In this paper, our model calculation of Ref. 1 is extended to incorporate the fact that larger animals run with straighter legs. As in Ref. 1, students use geometric data for the femora of theropod dinosaurs to analyze their locomotion abilities. This can either be an in-class activity or given as a homework problem. Larger theropods are found to be less athletic in their movements than smaller theropods since the stresses in the femora of large theropods are closer to breaking their legs than smaller theropods.

  4. Mechanical properties of porcine femoral cortical bone measured by nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liang; Chittenden, Michael; Schirer, Jeffrey; Dickinson, Michelle; Jasiuk, Iwona

    2012-06-26

    This study uses a nanoindentation technique to examine variations in the local mechanical properties of porcine femoral cortical bone under hydrated conditions. Bone specimens from three age groups (6, 12 and 42 months), representing developing bone, ranging from young to mature animals, were tested on the longitudinal and transverse cross-sectional surfaces. Elastic modulus and hardness of individual lamellae within bone's microstructure: laminar bone, interstitial bone, and osteons, were measured. Both the elastic modulus and hardness increased with age. However, the magnitudes of these increases were different for each microstructural component. The longitudinal moduli were higher than the transverse moduli. Dehydrated samples were also tested to allow a comparison with hydrated samples and these resulted in higher moduli and hardness than the hydrated samples. Again, the degree of variation was different for each microstructural component. These results indicate that the developmental changes in bone have different rates of mechanical change within each microstructural component.

  5. A critical assessment of proximal macrotexturing on cemented femoral components.

    PubMed

    Duffy, G P; Muratoglu, O K; Biggs, S A; Larson, S L; Lozynsky, A J; Harris, W H

    2001-12-01

    We analyzed the cement-metal interface of 3 different types of femoral components that had proximal macrotexturing after in vitro insertion and after fatigue testing designed to produce debonding and micromotion. These components were compared with clinical retrieval specimens. The cement did not flow into the macrotexturing; rather, hollow, brittle volcanoes or calderas were formed. These fragile protrusions of cement become worn down or abraded by debonded components. This abrasion of cement may contribute to the early and aggressive osteolysis seen in some of these early failures with proximal macrotextured components. The formation of these volcanos and calderas can be aborted by placing bone-cement onto the macrotexturing before stem insertion. This simple technique allows the macrotexturing to be filled with cement. PMID:11742450

  6. Bilateral Femoral Nutrient Foraminal Cement Penetration during Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Coomber, Ross; Bhumbra, Rej S; Marston, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Cement pressurisation is important for the insertion of both the acetabular and femoral components during Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA). Secondary to pressurization the rare phenomenon of unilateral cement incursion into the nutrient foramen has previously been reported. No bilateral case has been reported to date. This has implications both for misdiagnosis of periprosthetic fractures and for medico-legal consequences due to a presumed adverse intra-operative event. Case Report: We present a case report of a 59 year old, caucasian female who underwent staged bilateral cemented Stanmore THA. The post-operative radiographs demonstrate evidence of bilateral nutrient foramen penetration intra-operatively by standard viscosity cement. The patient suffered no adverse consequences. Conclusions: In summary, cement extravasation into the nutrient foramen is an important differential to be considered in presence of posterior-medial cement in the diaphysis of femur following THA. This requires no further intervention and has no effect on the outcome.

  7. Orrorin tugenensis femoral morphology and the evolution of hominin bipedalism.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Brian G; Jungers, William L

    2008-03-21

    Bipedalism is a key human adaptation and a defining feature of the hominin clade. Fossil femora discovered in Kenya and attributed to Orrorin tugenensis, at 6 million years ago, purportedly provide the earliest postcranial evidence of hominin bipedalism, but their functional and phylogenetic affinities are controversial. We show that the O. tugenensis femur differs from those of apes and Homo and most strongly resembles those of Australopithecus and Paranthropus, indicating that O. tugenensis was bipedal but is not more closely related to Homo than to Australopithecus. Femoral morphology indicates that O. tugenensis shared distinctive hip biomechanics with australopiths, suggesting that this complex evolved early in human evolution and persisted for almost 4 million years until modifications of the hip appeared in the late Pliocene in early Homo. PMID:18356526

  8. Concurrent femoral neck fractures following pelvic irradiation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Fracture of the neck of the femur is common in older people. It often occurs in a single hip, with osteoporosis being the most common cause. Sometimes this fracture may also occur following pelvic irradiation, though this is not common. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first reported case in Nigeria of concurrent bilateral fractures of the femoral neck following pelvic irradiation. Case presentation A 74-year-old Nigerian woman presented at our surgical outpatients department with a 5-month history of pain in both hips and a 4-month history of inability to walk. She had had pelvic irradiation for carcinoma of the cervix 2 years earlier. Pelvic radiographs confirmed bilateral subcapital neck fractures. Conclusion Patients with hip pain who have been treated with pelvic irradiation should be thoroughly investigated for hip fractures. PMID:20066055

  9. Tibial Tunnel Cyst Formation after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Non-Bioabsorbable Interference Screw.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Yogesh V; Bhaskar, Deepu; Phaltankar, Padmanabh M; Charalambous, Charalambos P

    2015-12-01

    Tibial cyst formation following the use of bioabsorbable interference screws in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is well-described; however, cyst formation after the use of metallic interference screws is not well-documented. We describe a case of osteolytic lesion of the proximal tibia presenting to us 20 years after ACL reconstruction using an autologous bone-tendon-bone graft. The original graft fixation technique was interference fixation with a metal screw in the tibial and femoral tunnels. A two-stage revision reconstruction of the ACL was undertaken with curettage and bone grafting of the tibial lesion in the first stage and reconstruction using a four-strand hamstring tendon in the second stage. The patient recovered satisfactorily with complete healing of the cyst and returned to pre-injury level of activities. We have reviewed case reports and case series that describe the aetiology of intra-osseous cyst formation following ACL reconstruction. PMID:26673117

  10. Continuous Mapping of Tunnel Walls in a Gnss-Denied Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Michael A.; Min, Cao; Zhang, Deijin

    2016-06-01

    The need for reliable systems for capturing precise detail in tunnels has increased as the number of tunnels (e.g., for cars and trucks, trains, subways, mining and other infrastructure) has increased and the age of these structures and, subsequent, deterioration has introduced structural degradations and eventual failures. Due to the hostile environments encountered in tunnels, mobile mapping systems are plagued with various problems such as loss of GNSS signals, drift of inertial measurements systems, low lighting conditions, dust and poor surface textures for feature identification and extraction. A tunnel mapping system using alternate sensors and algorithms that can deliver precise coordinates and feature attributes from surfaces along the entire tunnel path is presented. This system employs image bridging or visual odometry to estimate precise sensor positions and orientations. The fundamental concept is the use of image sequences to geometrically extend the control information in the absence of absolute positioning data sources. This is a non-trivial problem due to changes in scale, perceived resolution, image contrast and lack of salient features. The sensors employed include forward-looking high resolution digital frame cameras coupled with auxiliary light sources. In addition, a high frequency lidar system and a thermal imager are included to offer three dimensional point clouds of the tunnel walls along with thermal images for moisture detection. The mobile mapping system is equipped with an array of 16 cameras and light sources to capture the tunnel walls. Continuous images are produced using a semi-automated mosaicking process. Results of preliminary experimentation are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the system for the generation of seamless precise tunnel maps.

  11. Outcome and incidence of periprosthetic supracondylar femoral fractures in TKA

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Somesh P; Bhalodiya, Haresh P

    2013-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic supracondylar femoral fractures following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are infrequent, but is a devastating complication. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence and outcomes of periprosthetic supracondylar femoral fractures following TKA using nonoperative as well as open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) techniques. Materials and Methods: Between January 2004 and December 2010, we followed 3,920 operated patients of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and identified 23 patients with periprosthetic supracondylar fractures. A retrospective analysis of the records of these patients was conducted. Details regarding pre fracture status, treatment offered and the present status were also recorded and analyzed. Time from index arthroplasty to periprosthetic fracture ranged from five days to six years. There were 17 women and 6 men and the average age was 68.26 years (range 52-83 years). Of the 23 patients, 20 patients were treated by operative method, whereas only three patients with relatively undisplaced fractures were treated nonoperatively. Results: The total incidence of periprosthetic fractures in operated cases of TKA was 0.58%. Three patients had infection after surgery. As per radiological assessment, two of three conservatively treated cases had malunion, whereas among 20 cases treated operatively, 16 had primary union with one malunion. Two patients had union after bone grafting, whereas two had nonunion. The average reduction in the knee score after fracture was 20.53%. Twenty one patients were able to achieve limited but independent activity. Conclusions: Desirable results for periprosthetic fractures can be obtained if proper and timely intervention is done, taking into account the other comorbid conditions. However, short duration of followup and small number of patients were major limiting factors in this study. PMID:24379465

  12. Femoral Strength after Induced Lesions in Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

    PubMed Central

    Belill, Kathryn A; Settle, Timothy L; Angel, C Roselina; Kim, Seon-Woo; Rothwell, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Rats are a common model for the study of bone healing, with the cranium, femur, and tibia being the bones studied most frequently. This study examines noncritical-sized lesions that would allow rats to continue to bear weight without the need for fixation but that are sufficiently large to enable characterization of the healing process. We compared the femoral bone strength associated with 3 lesion sizes selected for use in future studies. Sprague–Dawley rats (age, 10 to 16 wk) were used to assess the ultimate breaking strength, stress, and break force of normal, unmanipulated femurs. We then created lesions of 3 different sizes in the mid- to distal diaphysis of the left and right femurs and characterized the associated decreases in bone strength. Femurs (n= 85) for this study were collected through tissue sharing from rats used in other acute surgical procedures and were tested by using a 3-point bending flexural materials-testing machine. Our hypothesis was that, as a model for bone healing, 3 induced lesions of different sizes would show incremental and proportional decreases in femoral strength, with the intermediate-sized (1.5-mm) lesion demonstrating a decrease of 20% to 40%. A lesion of 1.5 mm yielded a decrease in strength of 17% for both the left and right femurs. The strength of left femurs carrying intermediate lesions was significantly less than that of control, uninjured femur bones. In addition to providing validation for our own future bone-healing project, these data are a useful baseline for other investigators studying bone healing in a rat femur model. PMID:24956210

  13. Outcome after conservatively managed intracapsular fractures of the femoral neck

    PubMed Central

    Green, NL; Sudahar, T; Makwana, NK; Whittaker, JP

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In 2012, 2.6% of hip-fracture patients in the UK were treated conservatively. There is little data on outcome for these patients. However, one study demonstrated that though 30-day mortality is higher, mortality over the rest of the year is comparable with that in surgical groups. Therefore, we assessed conservatively managed patients in our unit. Methods Patients with intracapsular fractures of the femoral neck treated by conservative means between 2010 and 2012 inclusive were identified. Data were collected: American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) grade, Nottingham Hip Fracture Score (NHFS), mobility, mortality (30 days and one year) and pain levels. Results Thirty-two patients formed the study cohort. Mean age was 85.6 years. Median ASA grade was 4. Mortality at 30 days and one year was 31.3% and 56.3%, respectively. There was one case of pneumonia and one of infection. Pressure sores or venous thromboembolism were not documented. Three patients underwent surgery once their health improved. In general, mobility was decreased, but 30.8% of patients could mobilise with two aids or a frame. Only two cases had ongoing problems with pain. Conclusions Our data are similar to those published previously. Our patients were likely to have higher mortality data due to selection bias. Thirty-day mortality was significantly higher than the national average, but patients surviving 30 days had a prevalence of mortality similar to those managed by surgical means. Despite mobility decreasing from the pre-admission status, a considerable number of patients were free of pain and could mobilise. These data suggest that conservative management of intracapsular fractures of the femoral neck can produce acceptable results. PMID:26263935

  14. Calcar Preservation Arthroplasty for Unstable Intertrochanteric Femoral Fractures in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Togrul, Emre; Kose, Ozkan

    2015-01-01

    Background The treatment of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in elderly is still controversial. The purpose of this study is to present treatment strategies for unstable intertrochanteric fractures with hemiarthroplasty using standard uncemented collared femoral stems and at the same time preserving the fractured calcar fragment. Methods Fifty-four patients aged 75 years or older with unstable intertrochanteric fractures were included in this prospective cohort study. All patients were treated with calcar preserving hemiarthroplasty using cementless collored femoral stems. Fractured calcar fragment was stabilized either by compaction between the implant and femur or fixed with cable grip system. Follow-up evaluations were performed at least 24 months and later. Palmer and Parker mobility score and visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score were assessed. We also analyzed radiographs of the operated hip at each follow-up visit. Results The patients were 15 males and 39 females with a mean age of 81.3 years (range, 75 to 93 years). The average operative time was 86.6 minutes. The mean transfused blood units were 1.2 units. The average duration of hospital stay was 5.3 days. The preoperative mean mobility score was 6.20. This score was found to be 4.96 on postoperative third day and 5.90 at 24 months postoperatively. The results of the statistical analysis revealed significant increase in the mobility scores at each follow-up after three days. Radiological interpretation revealed no loosening in the cable-grip systems, and no significant subsidence (> 5 mm) of prosthesis was observed. Conclusions Calcar preservation arthroplasty is a good option for elderly patients with severe osteoporosis, frail constitution and the patients who are at higher risk for second operation due to unstable intertrochanteric fractures. PMID:26640625

  15. HEMIARTHROPLASTY IN THE TREATMENT FRACTURES OF THE FEMORAL NECK

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Nelson Keiske; de Andrade Lima, Guilherme Didier; Honda, Emerson Kiyoshi; Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli; Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; Júnior, Walter Ricioli; de Queiroz, Marcelo Cavalheiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To epidemiologically and clinically evaluate patients with displaced femoral neck fractures that were surgically treatment with cemented hip hemiarthroplasty. Methods: All patients with displaced femoral neck fractures (Garden III and IV) who underwent cemented hip hemiarthroplasty using a unipolar prosthesis (Thompson), by means of a posterolateral access between June 2005 and September 2008 were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Seventy patients were initially evaluated. Their mean age was 83.1 years. The patients were predominantly female (84.3%). Thirty-six patients were monitored as outpatients for periods ranging from 10 to 48 months (mean of 26.5 months). Fifteen patients were lost to follow-up. Nineteen patients died, and the mortality rate within the first year was 25.4%. Patients classified as ASA III had a mortality rate of 25.7% and ASA II patients, a rate of 12.1%. Two patients had symptomatic deep vein thrombosis; one patient had an operative wound infection; and none of the patients presented hip dislocation. Most of the patients did not experience pain. Twelve patients (33%) showed deterioration of their walking ability. Conclusion: There were no cases of hip dislocation. Patients classified as ASA III had a higher mortality rate than did patients with ASA I or II. There was a worsening of walking ability in 33% of the patients. No revision due to loosening or pain was needed for any patient. Thirty patients did not present any pain (83.3%), four presented moderate pain (11.1%) and two presented intense pain (5.5%). PMID:27022567

  16. Efficiency of the Lausanne Clinical Pathway for Proximal Femoral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Nicole; Chevalley, François; Rubli, Eve; Coti, Pauline; Farron, Alain; Jolles, Brigitte M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Introduction: The number of hip fractures is rising, due to increases in life expectancy. In such cases, patients are at risk from post-operative complications and subsequently the average length of hospitalization may be extended. In 2011, we established a clinical pathway (CP), a specific model of care for patient-care management, to improve the clinical and economic outcomes of proximal femoral fracture management in elderly patients. The goal was to evaluate the CP using clinical, process, and financial indicators. Methods: We included all surgical patients aged 65 and over, admitted to the emergency department with a fracture of the proximal femur following a fall. Assessment parameters included three performance indicators: clinical, process, and financial. The clinical indicators were the presence or absence of acute delirium on the third post-operative day, diagnosis of nosocomial pneumonia, and the number of patients fulfilling at least 75% of their nutritional requirements at the end of the hospitalization period. The process indicator was the time interval between arrival at the emergency department and surgery. The financial indicator was based on the number of days spent in hospital. Results: From 2011 to 2013, 669 patients were included in the CP. We observed that the average length of stay in hospital decreased as soon as the CP was implemented and stabilized afterwards. The goal of 90% of patients undergoing surgery within 48 h of arrival in the emergency department was surpassed in 2013 (93.1%). Furthermore, we observed an improvement in the clinical indicators. Conclusion: The application of a CP allowed an improvement in the qualitative and quantitative efficiency of proximal femoral fracture management in elderly patients, in terms of clinical, process, and financial factors. PMID:25745631

  17. Femoral-facial syndrome in an infant of a diabetic mother.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Saleem; Alsaedi, Saad Abdullah; Al-Wassia, Heidi; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousef

    2015-07-06

    Femoral-facial syndrome (FFS) is a very rare multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. The authors describe a case of FFS in a 2-day-old infant of a diabetic mother. The phenotypic features include bilateral symmetrical femoral involvement with completely aplastic right-sided femur, severely hypoplastic left femur and unusual facial dysmorphic features without other skeleton/spinal and genitourinary anomalies. Cases of FFS need to be carefully evaluated because of the similarity between FFS and caudal dysgenesis, a condition frequently related to maternal diabetes and with other syndromes characterised by femoral hypoplasia and associated anomalies, which can pose a diagnostic challenge.

  18. Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture of the Femoral Head Caused by Excessive Lateralization of the Acetabular Rim

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Goto, Tomohiro; Hamada, Daisuke; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Wada, Keizo; Fukuta, Shoji; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 53-year-old woman with subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) of the femoral head without history of severe osteoporosis or overexertion. Plain radiographs showed acetabular overcoverage with excessive lateralization of the acetabular rim. A diagnosis of SIF was made by typical MRI findings of SIF. The lesion occurred at the antipodes of the extended rim. Increased mechanical stress over the femoral head due to impingement against the excess bone was suspected as a cause of SIF. The distinct femoral head deformity is consistent with this hypothesis. This is the first report of SIF associated with acetabular overcoverage. PMID:27293935

  19. Successful Angioplasty of a Superficial Femoral Artery Stenosis Caused by a Suture-Mediated Closure Device

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmete, Joseph J. Dasika, Narasimham; Forauer, Andrew R.; Cho, Kyung; Williams, David M.

    2003-08-15

    We report the successful angioplasty of an acute arterial narrowing after suture-mediated closure (SMC) of a femoral arterial puncture. A 75-year-old woman underwent a cerebral arteriogramvia a right common femoral artery puncture. The arteriotomy site was closed with a SMC device. Four days after placement the patient complained of pain in her right calf after walking. An arteriogram 7 days after SMC showed a severe focal stenosis at the origin of the superficial femoral artery involving the presumed puncture site. The lesion was successfully treated with balloon angioplasty. The patient at 6 months was asymptomatic.

  20. A case of an atypical femoral fracture associated with bacterial biofilm--pathogen or bystander?

    PubMed

    Howe, T S; Ehrlich, G D; Erlich, G; Koh, J S B; Ng, A C M; Costerton, W

    2013-05-01

    We report a case of an 86-year-old woman with an atypical femoral fracture (AFF) who was treated with intramedullary nailing followed by lateral femoral plating. She developed a second femoral shaft fracture distal to the intramedullary nail which required a second operation. Biopsy of the periosteum overlying the site of the initial proximal AFF was sent for pathogen analysis. Using the Ibis T5000 platform and the BAC plate assay, a polymicrobial infection was diagnosed consisting of Bifidobacterium subtile and Pseudomonas mendocina. This raises the possibility that bacterial infections may play some role in atypical fractures of the femur.