Science.gov

Sample records for femoral venous catheter

  1. [Femoral venous catheter: an unusual complication].

    PubMed

    Garcia, P; Mora, A; Trambert, P; Maler, E; Courant, P

    2000-08-01

    We report an erratic course of a venous femoral catheter which was in the abdominal cavity in a patient with an haemoperitoneum and an hepatic injury. This complication led to an inefficiency of the transfusion and a worsening of the haemoperitoneum.

  2. Femoral venous catheters: a safe alternative for delivering parenteral alimentation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, B; Kanter, G; Titus, D

    1994-04-01

    Femoral vein catheterization is an alternative method of obtaining central venous access. Placement of femoral venous catheters (FVCs) is possible in the majority of patients, suitable for most indications, and associated with a low complication rate during insertion. We wished to determine the incidence of infections or other complications resulting when parenteral nutrition was delivered through FVCs. Fifty-two patients were followed from a hospital-wide population including patients in the critical care units. Triple-lumen catheters were placed by using the sterile Seldinger technique, and sites were examined daily for inflammation. Bacteriologic surveillance was accomplished by submitting the catheter tip for semiquantitative cultures. If catheter line sepsis was suspected, blood samples for cultures were drawn through the catheter and peripherally. The rate of occurrence of colonized catheters was 9.6% (five of 52), and catheter sepsis was found in one case (1.9%). Other than inflammation at six (11.5%) of 52 catheter sites, noninfectious complications of FVCs were not found. On the basis of these findings, we consider FVC-delivered parenteral alimentation a safe and effective alternative to other forms of central venous access.

  3. Catheter-related bacteremia from femoral and central internal jugular venous access.

    PubMed

    Lorente, L; Jiménez, A; García, C; Galván, R; Castedo, J; Martín, M M; Mora, M L

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this prospective observational study was to determine the influence of femoral and central internal jugular venous catheters on the incidence of catheter-related bacteremia (CRB). We included patients admitted to a 12-bed polyvalent medico-surgical intensive care unit over 4 years who received one or more femoral or central internal jugular venous catheters. We diagnosed 16 cases of CRB in 208 femoral catheters and 22 in 515 central internal jugular venous catheters. We found a higher incidence of CRB with femoral (9.52 per 1,000 catheter days) than with central internal jugular venous access (4.83 per 1,000 catheter days; risk ratio = 1.93; 95% confidence interval: 1.03-3.73; P = 0.04). Central internal jugular venous access could be considered a safer route of venous access than femoral access in minimizing the risk of central venous catheter-related bacteremia.

  4. Cost/benefit analysis of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated venous catheters for femoral access.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo; Lecuona, María; Jiménez, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Lisset; Diosdado, Sara; Marca, Lucía; Mora, María L

    2014-10-01

    Sixty-four patients with chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters had a lower rate of catheter-related bloodstream infection and lower central venous catheter-related costs per catheter day than 190 patients with a standard catheter.

  5. Five-Lumen Antibiotic-Impregnated Femoral Central Venous Catheters in Severely Burned Patients: An Investigation of Device Utility and Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce C; Mian, Mohammad A H; Mullins, Robert F; Hassan, Zaheed; Shaver, Joseph R; Johnston, Krystal K

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) rate in a severely burned patient population, many of whom required prolonged use of central venous catheters (CVCs). Between January 2008 and June 2012, 151 patients underwent placement of 455 five-lumen minocycline/rifampin-impregnated CVCs. CRBSI was defined as at least one blood culture (>100,000 colonies) and one simultaneous roll-plate CVC tip culture (>15 colony forming units) positive for the same organism. Most patients had accidental burns (81.5%) with a mean TBSA of 50%. A mean of three catheters were inserted per patient (range, 1-25). CVCs were inserted in the femoral vein (91.2%), subclavian vein (5.3%), and internal jugular vein (3.3%). Mean overall catheter indwell time was 8 days (range, 0-39 days). The overall rate of CRBSI per 1000 catheter days was 11.2; patients with a TBSA >60% experienced significantly higher rates of CRBSI than patients with a TBSA ≤60% (16.2 vs 7.3, P = .01). CVCs placed through burned skin were four times more likely to be associated with CRBSI than CVCs placed through intact skin. The most common infectious organism was Acinetobacter baumannii. Deep venous thrombosis developed in eleven patients (7%). The overall rate of CRBSI was 11.2, consistent with published rates of CRBSI in burn patients. Thus, femoral placement of 5-lumen CVCs did not result in increased CRBSI rates. These data support the safety of femoral CVC placement in burn patients, contrary to the Centers for Disease Control recommendation to avoid femoral CVC insertion.

  6. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections. Centers For Disease Control and Prevention. April 2011. ... MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. ...

  7. Central venous catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  8. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  9. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Wiegel, Martin; Josten, Christoph; Reske, Andreas W.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention. PMID:26504733

  10. [Femoral arteriovenous fistula: a late uncommon complication of central venous catheterization].

    PubMed

    Conz, P A; Malagoli, A; Normanno, M; Munaro, D

    2007-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was admitted due to AV graft thrombosis; given the technical impossibility of performing other native AV fistulas, we chose to insert a tunnelled central venous catheter. Considering the vascular history of the patient, the central venous catheter could not be placed into the internal jugular vein; it was therefore put into the left femoral vein. Following a 3-month-period of the catheter working properly, the patient was hospitalized due to sudden acute pain in the left thigh. In a few days the patient developed an important haematoma with serious anemization in the left lower limb. Ultrasonography showed the presence of a fistula between the left common femoral artery and the femoral vein, leading to the subsequent successful positioning of a stent into the common femoral artery through right trans-femoral access. Angiography examination showed the femoral vein patency along the proximal stretch with respect to the function of the tunnelled venous catheter.

  11. Anatomical basis of central venous catheter fracture.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark O

    2008-03-01

    Central venous catheter fracture is a rare complication of long-term indwelling subclavian venous access. Subclavian vein access has been the recommended approach for placing central venous catheters. The anatomical landmark method for subclavian access remains a highly successful and nonequipment-dependent method for rapid central access. More recently, the internal jugular vein approach has emerged as the preferred route for long-term central venous access. However, variations in internal jugular vein anatomy make the landmark method less reliable. Use of two-dimensional real-time ultrasound during internal jugular vein access is associated with better success, a lower complication rate, and faster access. A case of central venous catheter fracture initiated an internal review of long-term central venous access procedures. We have converted to a predominantly internal jugular vein approach. This case report and literature review may assist other physicians and institutions in re-evaluating long-term central venous access protocols.

  12. Infections associated with the central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Drasković, Biljana; Fabri, Izabella; Benka, Anna Uram; Rakić, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheters are of an essential importance to critically ill patients who require long-term venous access for various purposes. Their use made the treatment much easier, but still they are not harmless and are prone to numerous complications. Catheter infections represent the most significant complication in their use. The frequency of infections varies in different patient care settings, but their appearance mostly depends on the patient's health condition, catheter insertion time, localization of the catheter and type of the used catheter. Since they are one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections and related to significant number of morbidity and mortality in intensive care units, it is very important that maximal aseptic precautions are taken during the insertion and the maintenance period. Prevention of infection of the central venous catheters demands several measures that should be applied routinely.

  13. Thrombolytic therapy for central venous catheter occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Jacquelyn L.; Reiss, Ulrike; Wilimas, Judith A.; Metzger, Monika L.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Howard, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Long-term central venous catheters have improved the quality of care for patients with chronic illnesses, but are complicated by obstructions which can result in delay of treatment or catheter removal. Design and Methods This paper reviews thrombolytic treatment for catheter obstruction. Literature from Medline searches using the terms “central venous catheter”, “central venous access device” OR “central venous line” associated with the terms “obstruction”, “occlusion” OR “thrombolytic” was reviewed. Efficacy of thrombolytic therapy, central venous catheter clearance rates and time to clearance were assessed. Results Alteplase, one of the current therapies, clears 52% of obstructed catheters within 30 min with 86% overall clearance (after 2 doses, when necessary). However, newer medications may have higher efficacy or shorter time to clearance. Reteplase cleared 67–74% within 30–40 min and 95% of catheters overall. Occlusions were resolved in 70 and 83% of patients with one and 2 doses of tenecteplase, respectively. Recombinant urokinase cleared 60% of catheters at 30 min and 73% overall. Alfimeprase demonstrated rapid catheter clearance with resolution in 40% of subjects within 5 min, 60% within 30 min, and 80% within 2 h. Additionally, urokinase prophylaxis decreased the incidence of catheter occlusions from 16–68% in the control group to 4–23% in the treatment group; in some studies, rates of catheter infections were also decreased in the urokinase group. Conclusions Thrombolytic agents successfully clear central venous catheter occlusions in most cases. Newer agents may act more rapidly and effectively than currently utilized therapies, but randomized studies with direct comparisons of these agents are needed to determine optimal management for catheter obstruction. PMID:22180420

  14. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion.

    PubMed

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kuhajda, Ivan; Andjelkovic, Dejan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the "central venous oxygen saturation"), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There are situations according to the drug administration or length of stay of the catheter that specific systems are indicated such as; a Hickman line, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line or a Port-a-Cath may be considered because of their smaller infection risk. Sterile technique is highly important here, as a line may serve as a port of entry for pathogenic organisms, and the line itself may become infected with organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci. In the current review we will present the complication of pneumothorax after CVC insertion.

  15. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion

    PubMed Central

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kuhajda, Ivan; Andjelkovic, Dejan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the “central venous oxygen saturation”), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There are situations according to the drug administration or length of stay of the catheter that specific systems are indicated such as; a Hickman line, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line or a Port-a-Cath may be considered because of their smaller infection risk. Sterile technique is highly important here, as a line may serve as a port of entry for pathogenic organisms, and the line itself may become infected with organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci. In the current review we will present the complication of pneumothorax after CVC insertion. PMID:25815301

  16. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  17. Serendipitous detection of an errant central venous catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Orzel, J.A.; Romdall, K.; Griep, R.

    1985-09-01

    The inappropriate placement of a patient's central venous catheter in the pleural space by the serendipitous injection of Tc-99m labeled red blood cells through the catheter during a GI bleeding study was discovered. Position and patency of central venous lines can be incidentally evaluated by using existing central venous catheters for administration of radiopharmaceuticals during radionuclide imaging studies.

  18. Prevention of central venous catheter bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Walz, J Matthias; Memtsoudis, Stavros G; Heard, Stephen O

    2010-01-01

    The majority of nosocomial bloodstream infections in critically ill patients originate from an infected central venous catheter (CVC). Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) cause significant morbidity and mortality and increase the cost of care. The most frequent causative organisms for CRBSI are coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNSs), Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, and Candida species. The path to infection frequently includes migration of skin organisms at the insertion site into the cutaneous catheter tract, resulting in microbial colonization of the catheter tip and formation of biofilm. Evidence-based strategies for the prevention of CRBSI include behavioral and educational interventions, effective skin antisepsis coupled with maximum barrier precautions, the use of antiseptic dressings, and the use of antiseptic or antibiotic impregnated catheters. Achieving and maintaining very low rates of CRBSI requires a multidisciplinary approach involving the entire health care team, the use of novel technologies in patients with the highest risk of CRBSI, and frequent reeducation of staff.

  19. [Medial venous catheter or midline (MVC)].

    PubMed

    Carrero Caballero, Ma Carmen; Montealegre Sanz, María; Cubero Pérez, Ma Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Current clinical practice is characterised for importance of the patient's quality of life and the need to reduce the costs of their treatment. We search intravenous therapy alternatives that meet the needs of the patient, reducing the complications associated with the use of venous catheters. Scientific evidence shows that there are midline venous catheters that offer patients and professionals the possibility of extending the duration of infusion therapy, using more venous compatibility materials, and with less risk of infection. The Midlines are becoming in a safe an efficient device for intravenous therapy, continuous and intermittent infusion, provided the necessary care by expert nurses. Midline catheters are peripheral venous access devices between 3 to 10 inches in length (8 to 25 cm). Midlines are usually placed in an upper arm vein, such as the brachial or cephalic, and the distal extreme ends below the level of the axillary line. Midlines catheters implanted in the cephalic or deep basilica veins get more blood flow. This large blood volume justifies the lower risk of mechanical or chemical phlebitis. Midlines are routinely used for two to six weeks. Due that the extrem of these catheters does not extend beyond the axillary line, there are limitations for its use: type of infused drugs, velocity of infusion, etc. In general, solutions that have pH 5 to 9, or an osmolarity less than 500 mOsm are appropriate for infusion through a Midline. Its use is recommended in case of treatments over 7 days with low irritant capacity fluids. According to the Infusion Nurses Society's standards of practice, Midline catheters are appropriate for all intravenous fluids that would normally be administered through a short peripheral IV Importantly, due that the catheter does not pass through the central veins, Midlines can be placed without a chest X-ray to confirm placement. For certain situations, Midlines are suitable for acute units and even for care home settings

  20. Use of femoral vein catheters for the assessment of perfusion parameters

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Yara Nishiyama; Machado, Flávia Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    The use of central venous oxygen saturation (SvcO2) and arterial lactate in the diagnosis of severe tissue hypoperfusion is well established, and the optimization of these parameters is currently under investigation, particularly in patients with severe sepsis/septic shock. However, the only place for deep venous puncture or the first choice for puncture is often the femoral vein. Although venous saturation obtained from blood sampling from this catheter, instead of SvcO2, has already been used in the diagnosis of severe tissue hypoperfusion, little is known about the accuracy of the results. The venous lactate in place of arterial puncture has also been used to guide therapeutic decisions. We conducted this literature review to seek evidence on the correlation and concordance of parameters obtained by collecting femoral venous blood gases in relation to SvcO2 and arterial lactate. Few studies in the literature have evaluated the use of femoral venous oxygen saturation (SvfO2) or venous lactate. The results obtained thus far demonstrate no adequate agreement between SvfO2 and SvcO2, which limits the clinical use of SvfO2. However, the apparent strong correlation between arterial and peripheral and central venous lactate values suggests that venous lactate obtained from the femoral vein could eventually be used instead of arterial lactate, although there is insufficient evidence on which to base this procedure at this time. PMID:23917983

  1. [Care bundle to reduce central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection: an integrative review].

    PubMed

    Brachine, Juliana Dane Pereira; Peterlini, Maria Angélica Sorgini; Pedreira, Mavilde da Luz Gonçalves

    2012-12-01

    This is an integrative review of literature aimed to identify evidence-based interventions which make up care bundles to reduce central venous catheter-related or associated bloodstream infections. To collect data in Brazilian and international databases were used the key word bundle and the descriptors catheter-related infection, infection control and central venous catheterization, resulting in fifteen articles, after inclusion criteria application. This work showed five interventions as those commonly employed in the bundles methods: hand hygiene, chlorhexidine gluconate for skin antisepsis, use of maximal sterile barrier precaution during the catheter insertion, avoid the femoral access and daily review of catheter necessity with prompt removal as no longer essential. The majority of the studies showed a significant reduction in bloodstream infection related to or associated with central venous catheters.

  2. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    ... flushing Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing Sterile technique Surgical wound care - open Review Date 9/17/2016 Updated by: Debra G. Wechter, MD, FACS, general surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, ...

  3. Combined endovascular and surgical recanalization after central venous catheter-related obstructions.

    PubMed

    de Buys Roessingh, Anthony S; Portier-Marret, Nathalie; Tercier, Stéphane; Qanadli, Salah D; Joseph, Jean-Marc

    2008-06-01

    Central venous occlusion in children is a challenging problem that can occur after a central venous catheter insertion. Long-term catheter-related complications include sepsis and venous thrombosis with consequent loss of central access. We describe 2 cases of children younger than 1 year who were dependent on a central venous catheter for total parenteral nutrition. They developed a chronic extensive obstruction of the right and left brachiocephalic veins with a superior vena cava syndrome. The patients' survival was dependent on the restoration of central venous access until the planned intestinal transplantation could be performed. Retrograde recanalization of the superior vena cava was successfully achieved using a pathway created under general anesthesia from the femoral vein to, respectively, the right thyroid vein and the right subclavian vein.

  4. [Femoral venous catheterization. Does it really need to be avoided?].

    PubMed

    Lorente, L; León, C

    2009-12-01

    The guidelines to prevent central venous catheter related bloodstream infections (CVCBSI) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of 2002, Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Crítica y Unidades Coronarias/ Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica (SEMICYUC/SEIMC) of 2004, and the recently published guidelines of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America/Infectious Diseases Society of America (SHEA(IDSA) of 2008 have recommended using the subclavian vein and avoiding the use of the femoral vein. They also recommend considering the use of antiseptic- or antimicrobial-impregnated CVCs for hospital units or groups of patients with a high incidence of CVCBSI. When implementing these guidelines, two questions could be asked: 1) Could the abuse of the subclavian vein and avoiding the use of the femoral vein imply a decrease in the incidence of CVCBSI, but an increase in the rate of mechanical complications as pneumothorax and/or hemothorax? 2) Couldn't antimicrobial-impregnated CVCs be used to prevent CVCBSI when the femoral venous access is used?

  5. Malfunctioning central venous catheters in children: a diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    Barnacle, Alex; Arthurs, Owen J.; Roebuck, Derek

    2007-01-01

    Central venous access is increasingly becoming the domain of the radiologist, both in terms of the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) and in the subsequent management of these lines. This article seeks to provide an overview of the CVC types available for paediatric patients and a more detailed explanation of the spectrum of complications that may lead to catheter malfunction. A standard catheter contrast study or ‘linogram’ technique is described. The normal appearances of such a study and a detailed pictorial review of abnormal catheter studies are provided, together with a brief overview of how information from catheter investigations can guide the management of catheter complications. PMID:17932667

  6. The Impact of Central Venous Catheters on Pediatric Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Jaffray, Julie; Bauman, Mary; Massicotte, Patti

    2017-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) in children is escalating, which is likely linked to the increased incidence of pediatric venous thromboembolism (VTE). In order to better understand the specific risk factors associated with CVC-VTE in children, as well as available prevention methods, a literature review was performed. The overall incidence of CVC-VTE was found to range from 0 to 74%, depending on the patient population, CVC type, imaging modality, and study design. Throughout the available literature, there was not a consistent determination regarding whether a particular type of central line (tunneled vs. non-tunneled vs. peripherally inserted vs. implanted), catheter material, insertion technique, or insertion location lead to an increased VTE risk. The patient populations who were found to be most at risk for CVC-VTE were those with cancer, congenital heart disease, gastrointestinal failure, systemic infection, intensive care unit admission, or involved in a trauma. Both mechanical and pharmacological prophylactic techniques have been shown to be successful in preventing VTE in adult patients, but studies in children have yet to be performed or are underpowered. In order to better determine true CVC-VTE risk factors and best preventative techniques, an increase in large, prospective pediatric trials needs to be performed. PMID:28168186

  7. The Impact of Central Venous Catheters on Pediatric Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Jaffray, Julie; Bauman, Mary; Massicotte, Patti

    2017-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) in children is escalating, which is likely linked to the increased incidence of pediatric venous thromboembolism (VTE). In order to better understand the specific risk factors associated with CVC-VTE in children, as well as available prevention methods, a literature review was performed. The overall incidence of CVC-VTE was found to range from 0 to 74%, depending on the patient population, CVC type, imaging modality, and study design. Throughout the available literature, there was not a consistent determination regarding whether a particular type of central line (tunneled vs. non-tunneled vs. peripherally inserted vs. implanted), catheter material, insertion technique, or insertion location lead to an increased VTE risk. The patient populations who were found to be most at risk for CVC-VTE were those with cancer, congenital heart disease, gastrointestinal failure, systemic infection, intensive care unit admission, or involved in a trauma. Both mechanical and pharmacological prophylactic techniques have been shown to be successful in preventing VTE in adult patients, but studies in children have yet to be performed or are underpowered. In order to better determine true CVC-VTE risk factors and best preventative techniques, an increase in large, prospective pediatric trials needs to be performed.

  8. Central venous catheter placement: where is the tip?

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, George M

    2012-09-01

    The insertion of central venous catheters is a common bedside procedure performed in intensive care units. Here, we present a case of an 82-year-old man who underwent insertion of a central venous catheter in the internal jugular vein without perceived complications. Postprocedural radiographs showed rostral migration of the catheter, and computed tomography performed coincidentally showed cannulation of the jugular bulb at the level of the jugular foramen. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document migration of a central venous catheter from the internal jugular vein into the dural sinuses, as confirmed by computed tomography. The case highlights the importance of acquiring postprocedural radiographs for all insertions of central venous catheters to confirm catheter placement.

  9. Intermittent back pain after central venous catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Rosa, U W; Foreman, M; Willsie-Ediger, S

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of inadvertent azygos placement of a central venous catheter. The patient experienced ill-defined back pain associated with total parenteral nutrition infusion. The catheter malposition remained unrecognized and resulted in extensive diagnostic work-up. Symptoms resolved after the catheter was withdrawn.

  10. Misplaced central venous catheter in the jugular venous arch exposed during dissection before sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Tae-Eun; Jee, Daelim

    2008-11-01

    Subclavian vein catheterization rarely results in misplacement of the central venous catheter (CVC) into the jugular venous arch (JVA). We present a case of misplacement of the CVC into the JVA during cardiac surgery.

  11. The stuck central venous catheter: a word of caution.

    PubMed

    Makhija, Neeti; Choudhury, Minati; Kiran, Usha; Chowdhury, Ujjwal

    2008-10-01

    The placement of central venous catheter (CVC) through internal jugular vein is not free from potential hazards. We report two cases of triple lumen central venous catheter, placed into right internal jugular vein, which got entrapped in patients who had undergone mitral valve replacement. The entrapment of catheter went unnoticed until the time of removal. Subsequent investigations, mechanism of entrapment, prevention, and removal is described. To conclude, we encountered an unusual cause of stuck central venous catheter, in the left atrial suture line. Removal of central venous catheter requires utmost care, and should never be done by forceful traction in the postoperative cardiac surgical patients, as it may lead to disruption of suture lines or rupture of vessels.

  12. We still go for the jugular: implications of the 3SITES central venous catheter study for nephrology.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Christina M; Vassalotti, Joseph A

    2016-03-01

    The 3SITES study randomly assigned a nontunneled central venous catheter site in over 3000 adults treated in intensive care units. The subclavian site was associated with a lower rate of short-term complications, including catheter-related bloodstream infection and deep venous thrombosis, compared to the femoral or internal jugular site. Nephrologists should be aware of this study and should continue to advocate for alternatives to subclavian vein catheter placement in patients with chronic kidney disease who are expected to require arteriovenous access for dialysis in the future.

  13. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl; Podrabsky, Petr; Werk, Michael; Haenninen, Enrique Lopez; Felix, Roland

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Materials and Methods. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5-F angiographic catheters (pigtail; Sos Omni), gooseneck snares, or combinations thereof. Results. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients port catheter malposition correction was not possible, because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. Conclusions. We conclude that in migrated catheter tips radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis port catheter correction is often more challenging.

  14. Pericardial effusion associated with an appropriately placed umbilical venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, A; Cook, V; Dunn, M

    2007-05-01

    Central venous catheterization is widely used in neonatal intensive care units to support tiny preterm babies. Pericardial effusion (PCE) and cardiac tamponade are uncommon but potentially fatal complications of percutaneous, umbilical and surgically placed central venous catheters related to intracardiac position or migration. This report describes a case of PCE arising from fluid infused via umbilical venous catheter. The case study highlights two important aspects: one, occurrence of PCE in a baby with satisfactory position of the umbilical catheter, and second, the life-saving application of basic echocardiography by bedside caregivers for the diagnosis and treatment of this critical condition.

  15. Placement of a port catheter through collateral veins in a patient with central venous occlusion.

    PubMed

    Teichgräber, Ulf Karl-Martin; Streitparth, Florian; Gebauer, Bernhard; Benter, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Long-term utilization of central venous catheters (CVCs) for parenteral nutrition has a high incidence of central venous complications including infections, occlusions, and stenosis. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with a malabsorption caused by short gut syndrome due to congenital aganglionic megacolon. The patient developed a chronic occlusion of all central neck and femoral veins due to long-term use of multiple CVCs over more than 20 years. In patients with central venous occlusion and venous transformation, the implantation of a totally implanted port system by accessing collateral veins is an option to continue long-term parenteral nutrition when required. A 0.014-in. Whisper guidewire (Terumo, Tokyo) with high flexibility and steerability was chosen to maneuver and pass through the collateral veins. We suggest this approach to avoid unfavorable translumbar or transhepatic central venous access and to conserve the anatomically limited number of percutaneous access sites.

  16. Placement of a Port Catheter Through Collateral Veins in a Patient with Central Venous Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl-Martin Streitparth, Florian; Gebauer, Bernhard; Benter, Thomas

    2010-04-15

    Long-term utilization of central venous catheters (CVCs) for parenteral nutrition has a high incidence of central venous complications including infections, occlusions, and stenosis. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman presenting with a malabsorption caused by short gut syndrome due to congenital aganglionic megacolon. The patient developed a chronic occlusion of all central neck and femoral veins due to long-term use of multiple CVCs over more than 20 years. In patients with central venous occlusion and venous transformation, the implantation of a totally implanted port system by accessing collateral veins is an option to continue long-term parenteral nutrition when required. A 0.014-in. Whisper guidewire (Terumo, Tokyo) with high flexibility and steerability was chosen to maneuver and pass through the collateral veins. We suggest this approach to avoid unfavorable translumbar or transhepatic central venous access and to conserve the anatomically limited number of percutaneous access sites.

  17. Expect the unexpected: malposition of a large-bore central venous catheter in the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Schummer, Wolfram; Schummer, Claudia; Gorse, Andrej; Becker, Udo; Marx, Christiane; Brauer, Martin

    2004-12-01

    We report the case of a femoral vein cannulation in a critically ill trauma patient with the malposition of a large-bore central venous catheter in the urinary bladder. Recognition of the malposition was hampered by bloody tamponade of the bladder in the context of blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma with kidney and liver laceration. A high index of clinical suspicion and the institution of adequate therapy were the key to achieving a successful clinical outcome. We discuss the anatomy of femoral veins, including their close relation to a distended bladder. The application of ultrasound even in emergency situations is stressed.

  18. [Venous thrombosis associated with central venous catheter use in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Iglesias Rey, Leticia; Fernández Pérez, Isaura; Barbagelata López, Cristina; Rivera Gallego, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters for various applications (administration of chemotherapy, blood products and others) in patients with cancer is increasingly frequent. The association between thrombosis and catheter use has been fully established but aspects such as its causes, diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment have not. We describe a case of thrombosis in a patient with cancer treated with chemotherapy who carried a central venous catheter. We also perform a review of the risk factors, the role of the prophylaxis and the treatment.

  19. Migration of Indwelling Central Venous Catheter and Fatal Hydrothorax

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Shagufta; Murtaza, Ghulam; Hanif, Muhammad Zubair; Morabito, Antonino; Khalil, Basem

    2013-01-01

    Central venous catheter complications can be related to insertion, indwelling, or extraction. Most of the times, immediate complications are anticipated and managed; whereas, delayed complications can go unnoticed. In the case discussed here, migration and dislodgement of catheter tip resulted in delayed hydrothorax and sudden death of a 9-month-old female infant. PMID:25755966

  20. Peripheral venous catheter fracture with embolism into the pulmonary artery

    PubMed Central

    Ammari, Chady; Campisi, Alessio; D’Andrea, Rocco

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral vein catheterization is generally considered a harmless procedure. Venous catheter rupture associated with pulmonary embolism is an unlikely but potentially serious complication. We report a case of a peripheral venous catheter (PVC) fracture with pulmonary artery embolization in the left lower lobe treated successfully by a surgical approach. The positioning of a PVC is not always a harmless procedure. Every time there are difficulties in positioning or in removal of a catheter device, it should be carefully inspected to verify integrity. The advisability of removal of these small foreign bodies is debated; percutaneous retrieval is preferred, while surgery should be discussed case by case. PMID:28149586

  1. Central venous catheter-related thrombosis in senile male patients: New risk factors and predictors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gao; Fu, Zhi-Qing; Zhu, Ping; Li, Shi-Jun

    2015-06-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC)-related venous thrombosis is a common but serious clinical complication, thus prevention and treatment on this problem should be extensively investigated. In this research, we aimed to investigate the incidence rate of CVC-related venous thrombosis in senile patients and give a further discussion on the related risk factors and predictors. A total of 324 hospitalized senile male patients subjected to CVC were selected. Retrospective investigation and analysis were conducted on age, underlying diseases, clinical medications, catheterization position and side, catheter retention time, and incidence of CVC-related venous thrombosis complications. Basic laboratory test results during catheterization and thrombogenesis were also collected and analyzed. Among the 324 patients, 20 cases (6.17%) of CVC-related venous thrombosis were diagnoseds. The incidence rate of CVC-related venous thrombosis in subclavian vein catheterization was significantly lower than that in femoral vein catheterization (P<0.01) and that in internal jugular vein catheterization (P<0.05). No statistically significant difference was found between femoral vein catheterization and internal jugular vein catheterization (P<0.05). Previous venous thrombosis history (P<0.01), high lactate dehydrogenase level (P<0.01), low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) level (P<0.05), and low albumin level (P<0.05) were found as risk factors or predictors of CVC-related venous thrombosis in senile male patients. Subclavian vein catheterization was the most appropriate choice among senile patients to decrease the incidence of CVC-related venous thrombosis. Previous venous thrombosis history, high lactate dehydrogenase level, low HDL level, and low albumin level were important risk factors in predicting CVC-related venous thrombosis.

  2. Imaging of the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Amerasekera, S S H; Jones, C M; Patel, R; Cleasby, M J

    2009-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are widely used to provide central venous access, often in chronically ill patients with long-term intravenous access requirements. There are a number of significant complications related to both insertion and maintenance of PICC lines, including catheter malposition, migration, venous thrombosis, and line fracture. The incidence of these complications is likely to rise as the number of patients undergoing intravenous outpatient therapy increases, with a corresponding rise in radiologist input. This paper provides an overview of the relevant peripheral and central venous anatomy, including anatomical variations, and outlines the complications of PICC lines. Imaging examples demonstrate the range of radiological findings seen in these complications.

  3. Effectiveness of different central venous catheters for catheter-related infections: a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Huang, T; Jing, J; Jin, J; Wang, P; Yang, M; Cui, W; Zheng, Y; Shen, H

    2010-09-01

    We aimed to compare the effectiveness of various catheters for prevention of catheter-related infection and to evaluate whether specific catheters are superior to others for reducing catheter-related infections. We identified randomised, controlled trials that compared different types of central venous catheter (CVC), evaluating catheter-related infections in a systematic search of articles published from January 1996 to November 2009 via Medline, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Network meta-analysis with a mixed treatment comparison method using Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation was used to combine direct within-trial, between-treatment comparisons with indirect trial evidence. Forty-eight clinical trials (12 828 CVCs) investigating 10 intervention catheters contributed to the analyses. For prevention of CVC colonisation, adjusted silver iontophoretic catheters (odds ratio: 0.58; 95% confidence interval: 0.33-0.95), chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine catheters (0.49; 0.36-0.64), chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine blue plus catheters (0.37; 0.17-0.69), minocycline-rifampicin catheters (0.28; 0.17-0.43) and miconazole-rifampicin catheters (0.11; 0.02-0.33) were associated with a significantly lower rate of catheter colonisation compared with standard catheters. For prevention of CRBSI, adjusted heparin-bonded catheters (0.20; 0.06-0.44) and minocycline-rifampicin catheters (0.18; 0.08-0.34) were associated with a significantly lower rate of CRBSI with standard catheters. Rifampicin-based impregnated catheters seem to be better for prevention of catheter-related infection compared with the other catheters.

  4. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Guo, Lancia L. Q.; Tan, Kong T.; Simons, Martin E.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Kachura, John R.; Beecroft, John R.; Rajan, Dheeraj K.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  5. [Injuries to blood vessels near the heart caused by central venous catheters].

    PubMed

    Abram, J; Klocker, J; Innerhofer-Pompernigg, N; Mittermayr, M; Freund, M C; Gravenstein, N; Wenzel, V

    2016-11-01

    Injuries to blood vessels near the heart can quickly become life-threatening and include arterial injuries during central venous puncture, which can lead to hemorrhagic shock. We report 6 patients in whom injury to the subclavian artery and vein led to life-threatening complications. Central venous catheters are associated with a multitude of risks, such as venous thrombosis, air embolism, systemic or local infections, paresthesia, hemothorax, pneumothorax, and cervical hematoma, which are not always immediately discernible. The subclavian catheter is at a somewhat lower risk of catheter-associated sepsis and symptomatic venous thrombosis than approaches via the internal jugular and femoral veins. Indeed, access via the subclavian vein carries a substantial risk of pneumo- and hemothorax. Damage to the subclavian vein or artery can also occur during deliberate and inadvertent punctures and result in life-threatening complications. Therefore, careful consideration of the access route is required in relation to the patient and the clinical situation, to keep the incidence of complications as low as possible. For catheterization of the subclavian vein, puncture of the axillary vein in the infraclavicular fossa is a good alternative, because ultrasound imaging of the target vessel is easier than in the subclavian vein and the puncture can be performed much further from the lung.

  6. Preventing central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Charlotte

    2015-01-13

    Nurses should be able to apply evidence-based practice in a way that is appropriate for the individual patient. This article discusses one area, the incidence of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection in acute care, to examine the available evidence and identify ways in which this evidence can be applied to practice. Research indicates that implementing best practice at the time of insertion is a principal determinant in minimising the risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection.

  7. [Placement of central venous catheters and patient safety].

    PubMed

    de Jonge, E

    2007-01-27

    Placement of a central venous catheter is one of the most common invasive procedures and is associated with septic and mechanical complications, such as bleeding and pneumothorax. Up to 30% of attempts to cannulate the central vein fail. Correct positioning of the patient can help to maximise the success rate. For placement of catheters in the subclavian vein, patients should be in the Trendelenburg position without the use of a shoulder roll to retract the shoulders. Traditionally, central venous catheters are placed using a 'blind' technique that relies on external anatomical reference marks to localise the vein. However, unnoticed anatomical variations or central venous thrombosis may contribute to cannulation failure with this technique. The use of ultrasound has been shown to increase the success rate and avoid mechanical complications when placing a catheter in the internal jugular vein. It may also increase the success rate in subclavian vein catheterisation. To increase patient safety, the use of ultrasound when placing a central venous catheter should be embraced and become the standard of care.

  8. Cardiac tamponade caused by central venous catheter in two newborns.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Andrey José; Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Barbosa, Rodrigo; Méier, Milton

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade secondary to the use of central venous catheter is a rare complication; however, it is potentially reversible when it is caught in time. We report two cases of cardiac tamponade that was diagnosed using a transthoracic echocardiography, followed by urgent pericardiocentesis and surgical pericardial drainage as a complication from umbilical venous catheterization. In one case, the tip of the catheter was properly placed, and in the other case, it was not. In both cases, a hyperosmolar solution was being injected. Although it may be an uncommon situation, it should be always considered as a possibility in a newborn who develops cardiogenic shock without an apparent cause.

  9. Evaluation of antiseptic-impregnated central venous catheters for prevention of catheter-related infection in intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Sheng, W H; Ko, W J; Wang, J T; Chang, S C; Hsueh, P R; Luh, K T

    2000-09-01

    Central venous catheterization represents a significant medical advancement, particularly in the treatment of critical ill. However, there is a high risk of central venous catheters-related infection. A novel antiseptic central venous catheter, made of polyurethane and impregnated with chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine, was developed to reduce the risk of catheters-related infection. In this study, we did a randomized clinical study to determine the efficacy by using antiseptic catheters for the prevention of central venous catheters-related infection in the intensive care units. A total of 204 patients with 235 central venous catheters were studied at the surgical intensive care units at National Taiwan University Hospital between November 1998 and June 1999. Participants received either a standard triple-lumen polyurethane catheter or an antiseptic catheter (Arrow International, Reading, Pennsylvania, USA). Both were indistinguishable from each other. Compared to standard polyurethane catheters, antiseptic catheters were less likely to be colonized by microorganisms when they were cultured at the removal (8.0 versus 20.0 colonized catheters per 100 catheters; relative risk 0.34 [95% CI, 0.15 to 0.74]; p<0.01). There was no significant differences between both groups in catheter-related infections (0.9 versus 4.9 infections per 100 catheters; relative risk 0.17 [95% CI, 0.03 to 1.15]; p = 0.07). Gram-positive cocci and fungi were more likely to colonize in the standard polyurethane catheters (p = 0.06 and 0.04, compared to antiseptic catheters respectively). Two of our cases in the control group died directly due to catheter-related candidemia. No adverse reactions such as hypersensitivity or leukopenia were found in the antiseptic catheter group. Our study showed that central venous catheters with antiseptic coating were safe and had less risk of colonization of bacteria and fungi than standard catheters in the critically ill patients.

  10. Central venous access for haemodialysis using the Hickman catheter.

    PubMed

    Cappello, M; De Pauw, L; Bastin, G; Prospert, F; Delcour, C; Thaysse, C; Dhaene, M; Vanherweghem, J L; Kinnaert, P

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and seven Hickman catheters for haemodialysis were inserted in 90 end-stage chronic renal failure patients, and were used for 1-448 days (median 45 days). Sixty-nine per cent of the patients were treated without any problem for 1-165 days (median 34 days). Clinically evident complications occurred in 44 catheters inserted in 28 patients, and included outflow obstruction (16.8% of the catheters) and thrombosis (13.1% of the catheters). However, many episodes of clotting or insufficient flow could be corrected by simple manoeuvres. Other less frequent complications were recorded: sepsis, mainly in patients with increased risk factors (4.1% of the catheters), laceration of the catheter (3.7%) and occasional cases of jugular-vein phlebitis, transient palsy of a vocal cord, haematoma of the wound, and bleeding of the cutaneous orifice. No clinical sign of subclavian or innominate-vein thrombosis was observed. Nevertheless, a prospective study conducted in 50 asymptomatic patients demonstrated a 12% rate of anomalies of the venous system, although two-thirds of these alterations were mild and had no consequence. When the present series is compared to the results obtained with currently available percutaneous haemodialysis catheters, it is concluded that the Hickman catheter is a safe, comfortable and efficient vascular access device.

  11. Hemodialysis catheter-associated central venous stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yevzlin, Alexander S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the pathophysiology, epidemiology, and interventional treatment of central vein stenosis (CVS) that may result from central vein catheter (CVC) placement. The precise mechanism of CVC-associated CVS remains largely undefined, though anatomic considerations appear to play a prominent pathologic role. The impact of CVC-associated CVS on arteriovenous fistula outcomes is reviewed. The percutaneous treatment of CVS, observation, angioplasty, or angioplasty with stent placement is reviewed, along with potential surgical treatment options. As the treatment outcomes of CVC-associated CVS have been disappointing, catheter avoidance remains the best strategy.

  12. An Endovascular Approach to the Entrapped Central Venous Catheter After Cardiac Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Shamit S.; Konanur, Meghana; Foltz, Gretchen; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Resnick, Scott

    2016-03-15

    PurposeEntrapment of central venous catheters (CVC) at the superior vena cava (SVC) cardiopulmonary bypass cannulation site by closing purse-string sutures is a rare complication of cardiac surgery. Historically, resternotomy has been required for suture release. An endovascular catheter release approach was developed.Materials and MethodsFour cases of CVC tethering against the SVC wall and associated resistance to removal, suggestive of entrapment, were encountered. In each case, catheter removal was achieved using a reverse catheter fluoroscopically guided over the suture fixation point between catheter and SVC wall, followed by the placement of a guidewire through the catheter. The guidewire was snared and externalized to create a through-and-through access with the apex of the loop around the suture. A snare placed from the femoral venous access provided concurrent downward traction on the distal CVC during suture release maneuvers.ResultsIn the initial attempt, gentle traction freed the CVC, which fractured and was removed in two sections. In the subsequent three cases, traction alone did not release the CVC. Therefore, a cutting balloon was introduced over the guidewire and inflated. Gentle back-and-forth motion of the cutting balloon atherotomes successfully incised the suture in all three attempts. No significant postprocedural complications were encountered. During all cases, a cardiovascular surgeon was present in the interventional suite and prepared for emergent resternotomy, if necessary.ConclusionAn endovascular algorithm to the “entrapped CVC” is proposed, which likely reduces risks posed by resternotomy to cardiac surgery patients in the post-operative period.

  13. Central Venous Catheter Intravascular Malpositioning: Causes, Prevention, Diagnosis, and Correction.

    PubMed

    Roldan, Carlos J; Paniagua, Linda

    2015-09-01

    Despite the level of skill of the operator and the use of ultrasound guidance, central venous catheter (CVC) placement can result in CVC malpositioning, an unintended placement of the catheter tip in an inadequate vessel. CVC malpositioning is not a complication of central line insertion; however, undiagnosed CVC malpositioning can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The objectives of this review were to describe factors associated with intravascular malpositioning of CVCs inserted via the neck and chest and to offer ways of preventing, identifying, and correcting such malpositioning. A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and MD Consult was performed in June 2014. By searching for "Central line malposition" and then for "Central venous catheters intravascular malposition," we found 178 articles written in English. Of those, we found that 39 were relevant to our objectives and included them in our review. According to those articles, intravascular CVC malpositioning is associated with the presence of congenital and acquired anatomical variants, catheter insertion in left thoracic venous system, inappropriate bevel orientation upon needle insertion, and patient's body habitus variants. Although plain chest radiography is the standard imaging modality for confirming catheter tip location, signs and symptoms of CVC malpositioning even in presence of normal or inconclusive conventional radiography findings should prompt the use of additional diagnostic methods to confirm or rule out CVC malpositioning. With very few exceptions, the recommendation in cases of intravascular CVC malpositioning is to remove and relocate the catheter. Knowing the mechanisms of CVC malpositioning and how to prevent, identify, and correct CVC malpositioning could decrease harm to patients with this condition.

  14. Using central venous catheter for suprapubic catheterization in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Bilehjani, Eissa; Fakhari, Solmaz

    2017-01-01

    Suprapubic catheterization is an alternative method for urinary drainage that is used when transurethral catheterization fails. Traditionally, inserted large-bore suprapubic catheters may cause fatal complications. During the past decade, we used a small central venous catheter (CVC) suprapubicly in 16 male patients for the purpose of urinary drainage, when transurethral catheterization failed. The procedure is performed in no more than 10 minutes. Success rate was 100% and this approach did not lead to any complications. In conclusion, placing a CVC for suprapubic drainage is a safe method with a high success rate and we recommend it in patients with failed transurethral catheterization after a few attempts (2-3 attempts).

  15. The Ultrasound-Only Central Venous Catheter Placement and Confirmation Procedure.

    PubMed

    Saul, Turandot; Doctor, Michael; Kaban, Nicole L; Avitabile, Nicholas C; Siadecki, Sebastian D; Lewiss, Resa E

    2015-07-01

    The placement of a central venous catheter remains an important intervention in the care of critically ill patients in the emergency department. We propose an ultrasound-first protocol for 3 aspects of central venous catheter placement above the diaphragm: dynamic procedural guidance, evaluation for pneumothorax, and confirmation of the catheter tip location.

  16. Misplaced central venous catheters: applied anatomy and practical management.

    PubMed

    Gibson, F; Bodenham, A

    2013-03-01

    Large numbers of central venous catheters (CVCs) are placed each year and misplacement occurs frequently. This review outlines the normal and abnormal anatomy of the central veins in relation to the placement of CVCs. An understanding of normal and variant anatomy enables identification of congenital and acquired abnormalities. Embryological variations such as a persistent left-sided superior vena cava are often diagnosed incidentally only after placement of a CVC, which is seen to take an abnormal course on X-ray. Acquired abnormalities such as stenosis or thrombosis of the central veins can be problematic and can present as a failure to pass a guidewire or catheter or complications after such attempts. Catheters can also be misplaced outside veins in a patient with otherwise normal anatomy with potentially disastrous consequences. We discuss the possible management options for these patients including the various imaging techniques used to verify correct or incorrect catheter placement and the limitations of each. If the course of a misplaced catheter can be correctly identified as not lying within a vulnerable structure then it can be safely removed. If the misplaced catheter is lying within or traversing large and incompressible arteries or veins, it should not be removed before consideration of what is likely to happen when it is removed. Advice and further imaging should be sought, typically in conjunction with interventional radiology or vascular surgery. With regard to misplaced CVCs, in the short term, a useful aide memoir is: 'if in doubt, don't take it out'.

  17. The Malposition of Central Venous Catheters in Children

    PubMed Central

    Dzierzega, Maria; Ossowska, Magdalena; Chmiel, Dariusz; Wieczorek, Aleksandra; Balwierz, Walentyna

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Contemporary medical care, especially in the field of pediatrics often requires central venous line (CVC – Central Venous Catheter) implantation for carrying out treatment. Some conditions are treated intravenously for several months, other require long-term venous access due to periodical administration of medications or daily nutritional supplementation. Material/Methods A total number of 309 CVCs were implanted at Children’s University Hospital in Cracow between January 2011 and December 2012 (24 months). Malposition of the CVC is not common. The target of our article was to present two rare cases of malposition of catheters and two displacements of catheter due to chest tumors, and to enhance the importance of differential diagnostic imaging when difficulties occur. Results CVC malposition was detected with different imaging modalities followed by appropriate medical procedures. Conclusions In case of any difficulties with central lines, it is necessary to investigate the underlying cause. The central line team at hospital cooperating with other specialists is needed to detect complications and to prevent them. PMID:25177409

  18. Ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access for therapeutic apheresis procedures reduces need for central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Eric; Garcia, Salvador; Miguel, Robin; Segura, Francisco J; Ipe, Tina S; Leveque, Christopher

    2016-08-10

    Therapeutic and donor apheresis requires adequate vascular access to achieve inlet flow rates of ∼50-100 mL/min. While central dialysis-type venous catheters can usually provide such access, their use includes several associated risks. Some of these risks can be avoided or diminished if adequate peripheral venous access can be established. Some patients have adequate peripheral veins for apheresis that cannot be readily identified visually or by palpation. We hypothesized that ultrasound-guided peripheral venous access would benefit such patients and would lead to placement of fewer central venous catheters. The technique of ultrasound-guided peripheral access for apheresis has been in use at Houston Methodist Hospital since 2012. We performed a prospective review of patients undergoing inpatient and outpatient apheresis at Houston Methodist Hospital from July 1, 2015 to September 30, 2015, to assess its benefit. During this time, we performed 831 procedures on 186 patients, including 787 therapeutic plasma exchanges, three red blood cell exchanges, 41 peripheral stem cell collections. Ultrasound-guided vascular access was used for 68 procedures (8% of all procedures), including 62 therapeutic plasma exchanges, 4 peripheral stem cell collections, and 2 red blood cell changes. Use of ultrasound-guided peripheral access prevented the placement of central venous catheters in 37 (20%) patients, demonstrating its utility in a busy transfusion service.

  19. Heparin Leakage in Central Venous Catheters by Hemodynamic Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michael; McGah, Patrick; Gow, Kenneth; Aliseda, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs), placed in the superior vena cava for hemodialysis, are routinely filled with heparin, an anticoagulant, while not in use to maintain patency and prevent thrombus formation at the catheter tip. However, the heparin-lock procedure places the patient at risk for systemic bleeding incidences, as heparin is known to leak into the blood stream. We propose that the driving mechanism behind heparin leakage is advective-diffusive transport due to the pulsatile blood flow surrounding the catheter tip. This novel hypothesis is based on Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of heparin transport from a CVC placed inside an in vitro pulsatile flow loop and validated with CFD simulations. The results show an initial, fast (<10s), advection-dominated phase that rapidly depletes the concentration of heparin at the CVC tip, followed by a slow, diffusion-limited phase inside the catheter lumen, where concentration is still high, that is insufficient at replenishing the lost heparin at the tip. These results, which estimate leakage rates consistent with published in vivo data, predict that the concentration of heparin at the catheter tip is effectively zero for the majority of the interdialytic phase, rendering the heparin lock ineffective.

  20. Daptomycin Antibiotic Lock Therapy in a Rat Model of Staphylococcal Central Venous Catheter Biofilm Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Van Praagh, Andrew D. G.; Li, Tongchuan; Zhang, Shuxin; Arya, Anu; Chen, Liping; Zhang, Xi-Xian; Bertolami, Shellie; Mortin, Lawrence I.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic lock therapy (ALT) is an adjunctive procedure to prevent or treat central venous catheter infections, ensuing catheter-related bacteremia, and catheter-related metastatic infections. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide that is rapidly bactericidal against methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The efficacies of daptomycin against central venous catheter biofilms, catheter-related bacteremia, and catheter-related metastatic infections were evaluated by adapting a previously reported central venous catheter biofilm model in rats. Combined daptomycin ALT and systemic dosing resulted in the clearance of an established in vivo S. aureus central venous catheter biofilm after just two daily ALT treatments (30 min with daptomycin at 5 mg/ml) with concurrent systemic daptomycin dosing (40 mg/kg of body weight/day subcutaneously [s.c.]; equivalent exposure of 6 mg/kg/day in people). Daptomycin ALT solutions formulated in either saline or lactated Ringer's solution were equally fast in eradicating established in vivo methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) central venous catheter biofilms. However, the lactated Ringer's formulation was superior to that of saline in sustaining the bacterial clearance of treated central venous catheters (83% versus 50%). In MRSE-infected central venous catheter studies, 3 days of daptomycin or vancomycin ALT (18 h at 5 mg/ml) with systemic s.c. dosing (40 mg/kg/day daptomycin or 100 mg/kg/day vancomycin) was equally effective 1 week posttherapy in maintaining cleared central venous catheters (90% [n = 10] versus 100% [n = 8]). These results suggest that daptomycin ALT, along with systemic dosing, could be an effective treatment option for the prevention or eradication of staphylococcal central venous catheter biofilm infections, thereby reducing the occurrence of catheter-related bacteremia or catheter-related metastatic infections. PMID:21709082

  1. Malposition of a Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter in the Graft Hepatic Vein.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Zeynep; Araz, Coşkun; Taşkın, Duygu; Moray, Gökhan; Torgay, Adnan

    2015-11-01

    Central venous catheters are used for delivering medications and parenteral nutrition, measuring hemodynamic variations, and providing long-term intravenous access. In our clinic, during liver transection using a living-liver donor, peripherally inserted central venous catheters are generally preferred because they involve a less invasive technique with a lower risk of complications. In this report, we present the case of a 36-year-old male liver donor into whom we peripherally inserted a central venous catheter from his left basilic vein. After transecting the hepatic vein, the surgeon found foreign material inside the venous lumen, which turned out to be the distal segment of the catheter.

  2. In situ management of confirmed central venous catheter-related bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Flynn, P M; Shenep, J L; Stokes, D C; Barrett, F F

    1987-08-01

    Thirty-one patients with suspected central venous catheter-related bacteremia were evaluated with comparative quantitative cultures of central venous and peripheral blood specimens. Using criteria developed from studies in bacteremic animals, 19 patients were confirmed to have catheter-related bacteremia. Antibiotic therapy was administered through the catheter (in situ therapy) in 17 of those patients to evaluate the feasibility of treating patients with true central venous catheter-related bacteremias without catheter removal. Bacteremia was successfully eradicated in 11 of 17 patients (65%), allowing 7 patients to retain their catheter a median of 157 days. This study validates the use of comparative quantitative blood cultures in the diagnosis of catheter-related bacteremia and indicates that in situ therapy is a rational alternative to catheter removal in patients with catheter-related bacteremia.

  3. JUGULAR CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER PLACEMENT THROUGH A MODIFIED SELDINGER TECHNIQUE FOR LONG-TERM VENOUS ACCESS IN CHELONIANS.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Mariana A; Divers, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Long-term or repeated venous access in chelonians is difficult to obtain and manage, but can be critically important for administration of medications and blood sampling in hospitalized patients. Jugular catheterization provides the most rapid and secure route for vascular access, but catheters can be difficult to place, and maintaining catheter patency may be challenging. Long multilumen polyurethane catheters provide flexibility and sampling access, and minimize difficulties, such as catheter displacement, that have been encountered with traditional over-the-needle catheters. We describe placement of 4 Fr. 13-cm polyurethane catheters in three chelonians with the use of a modified Seldinger technique. Venous access was obtained with the use of an over-the-needle catheter, which allowed placement of a 0.018-in.-diameter wire, over which the polyurethane catheter was placed. Indwelling time has ranged between 1 and 4 mo currently. All tortoises were sedated for this procedure. Polyurethane central catheters provide safe, long-term venous access that allows clinicians to perform serial blood sampling as well as intravenous administration of medications, anesthetic agents, and fluids. A jugular catheter can also allow central venous pressure measurement. Utilization of central line catheters was associated with improvements in diagnostic efficiency and therapeutic case management, with minimal risks and complications.

  4. Central venous catheters in neonates: from simple monolumen to port catheter.

    PubMed

    Caruselli, Marco; Carboni, Laura; Franco, Federica; Torino, Giovanni; Camilletti, Gianfranco; Piattellini, Gianmarco; Giretti, Roberto; Pagni, Raffaella

    2011-01-01

    The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) represents an important step in the management of the surgical, onco-hematology and critically ill patients. CVCs in neonates, like in adult patients, are mainly used to infuse hyperosmolar solutions, to take blood samples and for hemodynamic monitoring. The need for CVCs is higher in neonates than in adults. Poor peripheral access and the high demand for IV access and blood samples are already valuable indications for a CVC.

  5. Higher arterial catheter-related infection rates in femoral than in dorsalis pedis access.

    PubMed

    Lorente, L; Jiménez, A; Jiménez, J J; Iribarren, J L; Martínez, J; Naranjo, C; Santacreu, R; Martín, M M; Mora, M L

    2010-04-01

    Although there are many studies on arterial catheter-related infection (ACRI) there is little information on the relative risks associated with different catheter access sites. In previous studies we have shown a higher incidence of ACRI in femoral than in radial access sites. This prospective observational study was designed to compare the incidence of ACRI in patients on an intensive care unit with femoral versus dorsalis pedis access sites. We compared 1085 femoral arterial catheters inserted for a cumulative 6497 days with 174 dorsalis pedis catheters inserted for a cumulative 1050 days. We detected 33 cases of ACRI in the femoral access group (11 with bacteraemia and 22 with line site infection; 5.08 infections per 1000 catheter-days) but none in the dorsalis pedis access group. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding age, sex, Acute Physiological Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, diagnosis, previous arterial catheter insertion, use of mechanical ventilation, use of antimicrobials or catheter duration. Regression analysis showed a higher incidence of ACRI for femoral than for dorsalis pedis access sites (odds ratio: 7.6; 95% confidence interval: 1.37-infinite; P=0.01). These results suggest that dorsalis pedis arterial access should be used in preference to femoral arterial access in order to reduce the risk of ACRI.

  6. Hemodynamics of Central Venous Catheters: experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michael; McGah, Patrick; Clark, Alicia; Ng, Chin Hei; Gow, Kenneth; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are used to provide vascular access during hemodialysis in patients with end-stage kidney disease. Despite several advantages and widespread use, CVCs have a high incidence rate of clot formation during the interdialytic phase (48 hrs). In an attempt the prevent clot formation, hospitals routinely administer heparin, an anticoagulant, into the catheter after a dialysis session. It has been reported, however, that up to 40% of the heparin solution will leak into the blood stream during the interdialytic phase, placing the patient at risk for systemic bleeding incidences. The aim of this study is to determine the role that advective-diffusive transport plays in the heparin leaking process. Numerical simulations of heparin convective mass transfer have been conducted, showing that while advective losses may be significant at the tip, previous studies may be overestimating the total amount of heparin leakage. To validate the quantitative prediction from the simulations, P.L.I.F. is used to experimentally measure heparin transport from CVCs placed in an idealized Superior Vena Cava with physically accurate pulsatile flow conditions. Improved understanding of flow near the catheter tip is applied to improve catheter design and heparin locking procedures.

  7. Prevention of central venous catheter-related infection: update.

    PubMed

    Casey, Anna L; Elliott, Tom S J

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are an essential part of modern-day healthcare, but infections associated with these devices continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality. There are many approaches for the prevention of CVC-related infection and these are outlined in national guidelines. The Department of Health Saving Lives campaign has developed a care-bundle for the prevention of CVC-related infections that focuses on the fundamental actions to be undertaken during the catheter insertion process and ongoing care. If the rate of catheter-related infection remains high despite the implementation of these infection prevention strategies, the use of novel antimicrobial technologies and practices may be considered. These include CVCs that contain antimicrobial agents, such as antiseptics or antibiotics, needleless intravenous (IV) access devices coated with silver and/or chlorhexidine, IV dressings incorporating chlorhexidine, and the use of antimicrobial catheter lock solutions, such as antibiotics, chelators or ethanol. This article outlines the different types of CVCs available, the risk of infection associated with their use and established and novel measures for prevention of these infections.

  8. [Neonatology nurses' knowledge about Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter].

    PubMed

    Belo, Marcela Patricia Macêdo; Silva, Roberta Albuquerque Mello de Castro; Nogueira, Isis Larissa Maia; Mizoguti, Daniele Pereira; Ventura, Claudiane Maria Urbano

    2012-01-01

    The Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) has been used as a safe venous access for infants at risk. The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge and practice of nurses from the five public Neonatal Intensive Care Units, of Recife-PE, Brazil, about the use of the PICC. The sample was comprised by 52 nurses; data were collected from January to February/2010. It was found that 64,8% of nurses did not have license for insertion of the PICC. Only two units routinely used the PICC. About the indication of the access, the accuracy was above 70%. In unit B only 8,3% of nurses reported adequate initial location of the catheter tip. It was concluded that is necessary greater incentives to train nurses to use the PICC.

  9. Using central venous catheter for suprapubic catheterization in cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bilehjani, Eissa; Fakhari, Solmaz

    2017-01-01

    Suprapubic catheterization is an alternative method for urinary drainage that is used when transurethral catheterization fails. Traditionally, inserted large-bore suprapubic catheters may cause fatal complications. During the past decade, we used a small central venous catheter (CVC) suprapubicly in 16 male patients for the purpose of urinary drainage, when transurethral catheterization failed. The procedure is performed in no more than 10 minutes. Success rate was 100% and this approach did not lead to any complications. In conclusion, placing a CVC for suprapubic drainage is a safe method with a high success rate and we recommend it in patients with failed transurethral catheterization after a few attempts (2–3 attempts). PMID:28116283

  10. Adjacent central venous catheters can result in immediate aspiration of infused drugs during renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kam, K Y R; Mari, J M; Wigmore, T J

    2012-02-01

    Dual-lumen haemodiafiltration catheters enable continuous renal replacement therapy in the critically ill and are often co-located with central venous catheters used to infuse drugs. The extent to which infusions are immediately aspirated by an adjacent haemodiafiltration catheter remains unknown. A bench model was constructed to evaluate this effect. A central venous catheter and a haemodiafiltration catheter were inserted into a simulated central vein and flow generated using centrifugal pumps within the simulated vein and haemodiafiltration circuit. Ink was used as a visual tracer and creatinine solution as a quantifiable tracer. Tracers were completely aspirated by the haemodiafiltration catheter unless the infusion was at least 1 cm downstream to the arterial port. No tracer was aspirated from catheters infusing at least 2 cm downstream. Orientation of side ports did not affect tracer elimination. Co-location of central venous and haemodiafiltration catheters may lead to complete aspiration of infusions into the haemodiafilter with resultant drug under-dosing.

  11. Risk factors for venous thrombosis associated with peripherally inserted central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Pan, Longfang; Zhao, Qianru; Yang, Xiangmei

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the risk factors associated with an increased risk of symptomatic peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC)-related venous thrombosis. Retrospective analyses identified 2313 patients who received PICCs from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2013. All 11 patients with symptomatic PICC-related venous thrombosis (thrombosis group) and 148 who did not have thromboses (non-thrombosis group) were selected randomly. The medical information of 159 patients (age, body mass index (BMI), diagnosis, smoking history, nutritional risk score, platelet count, leucocyte count as well as levels of D-dimer, fibrinogen, and degradation products of fibrin) were collected. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to determine the risk factors for thrombosis. Of 2313 patients, 11 (0.47%) were found to have symptomatic PICC-related venous thrombosis by color Doppler ultrasound. Being bedridden for a long time (odds ratio [(OR]), 17.774; P=0.0017), D-dimer >5 mg/L (36.651; 0.0025) and suffering from one comorbidity (8.39; 0.0265) or more comorbidities (13.705; 0.0083) were the major risk factors for PICC-catheter related venous thrombosis by stepwise logistic regression analysis. Among 159 patients, the prevalence of PICC-associated venous thrombosis in those with ≥1 risk factor was 10.34% (12/116), in those with ≥2 risk factors was 20.41% (10/49), and in those with >3 risk factors was 26.67% (4/15). Being bedridden >72 h, having increased levels of D-dimer (>5 mg/L) and suffering from comorbidities were independent risk factors of PICC-related venous thrombosis.

  12. Accidental subclavian artery catheterization during attempted internal jugular central venous catheter placement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, Bharat; Kamal, Manoj; Purohit, Anamika; Rana, Kirti; Chouhan, Dilip Singh

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheter placement has been routinely employed for anesthetic and intensive care management. Despite proper technique used and expertise complications do occur; some of which are related to catheter misplacements. We report a case in which subclavian artery was accidently catheterized during attempted internal jugular venous cannulation.

  13. The development of a validated checklist for femoral venous catheterization: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Riesenberg, Lee Ann; Berg, Katherine; Berg, Dale; Davis, Joshua; Schaeffer, Arielle; Justice, Ellen M; Tinkoff, Glen

    2014-01-01

    Femoral venous catheterization is a common, invasive procedure, which may lead to serious complications. Validated checklists are central to teaching and assessing procedural skills and may result in improved health care quality. The results of the first step of the validation of a femoral venous catheterization checklist are described. A comprehensive literature review of articles published on femoral venous catheterization did not yield a checklist validated by the Delphi method. A modified Delphi technique, involving a panel of 8 interdisciplinary, interinstitutional experts, was used to develop a femoral venous catheterization checklist. The internal consistency coefficient using Cronbach α was .99. Developing a 29-item checklist for teaching and assessing femoral venous catheterization is the first step in the validation process. For this checklist to become further validated, it should be implemented and studied in the simulation and clinical environments.

  14. Stenting of the superior vena cava and left brachiocephalic vein with preserving the central venous catheter in situ.

    PubMed

    Isfort, Peter; Penzkofer, Tobias; Goerg, Fabian; Mahnken, Andreas H

    2011-01-01

    Stenting of the central veins is well established for treating localized venous stenosis. The techniques regarding catheter preservation for central venous catheters in the superior vena cava have been described. We describe here a method for stent implantation in the superior vena cava and the left brachiocephalic vein, and principally via a single jugular venous puncture, while saving a left sided jugular central venous catheter in a patient suffering from central venous stenosis of the superior vena cava and the left brachiocephalic vein.

  15. The incidence and risk of central venous catheter malpositioning: a prospective cohort study in 1619 patients.

    PubMed

    Pikwer, A; Bååth, L; Davidson, B; Perstoft, I; Akeson, J

    2008-01-01

    Central venous catheters are used in various hospital wards. An anterior-posterior chest X-ray is usually obtained soon after cannulation to assess the location of the catheter tip. This prospective clinical study was designed to determine the radiographic catheter tip position after central venous cannulation by various routes, to identify clinical problems possibly associated with the use of malpositioned catheters and to make a cost-benefit analysis of routine chest X-ray with respect to catheter malposition. A total 1619 central venous cannulations were recorded during a three-year period with respect to patient data, information about the cannulation procedures, the radiographic catheter positions and complications during clinical use. The total incidence of radiographic catheter tip malposition, defined as extrathoracic or ventricular positioning, was 3.3% (confidence interval 25 to 4.3%). Cannulation by the right subclavian vein was associated with the highest risk of malposition, 9.1%, compared with 1.4% by the right internal jugular vein. Six of the 53 malpositioned catheters were removed or adjusted. No case of malposition was associated with vascular perforation, local venous thrombosis or cerebral symptoms. We conclude that the radiographic incidence of central venous catheter malpositioning is low and that clinical use of malpositioned catheters is associated with few complications. However, determination of the catheter position by chest X-ray should be considered when mechanical complications cannot be excluded, aspiration of venous blood is not possible, or the catheter is intended for central venous pressure monitoring, high flow use or infusion of local irritant drugs.

  16. Central venous catheter infection with Bacillus pumilus in an immunocompetent child: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bentur, HN; Dalzell, AM; Riordan, FAI

    2007-01-01

    Background Bacillus organisms are common laboratory contaminants. The majority of Bacillus bacteraemias are transient and not clinically significant. Clinically significant infection due to Bacillus species is rare and mostly due to Bacillus cereus infections in immuno-compromised hosts. Case presentation We report a case of central venous catheter infection with Bacillus pumilus in an immunocompetent child with tufting enteropathy on long-term parenteral nutrition (PN). There were three episodes of central venous catheter infection with Bacillus pumilus in three months. Despite adequate and appropriate use of intravenous antibiotics, the infection failed to clear resulting in the need for removal of the catheter for complete cure. Conclusion Bacillus species can cause clinically significant central venous catheter infection, even in an immunocompetent host. Despite adequate antibiotic treatment, the central venous catheter may need removal for complete cure. PMID:17967173

  17. Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections: improving post-insertion catheter care.

    PubMed

    Shapey, I M; Foster, M A; Whitehouse, T; Jumaa, P; Bion, J F

    2009-02-01

    Patients with central venous catheters (CVCs) are at increased risk of bloodstream infections and sepsis-related death. CVC-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are costly and account for a significant proportion of hospital-acquired infections. The aim of this audit was to assess current practice and staff knowledge of CVC post-insertion care and therefore identify aspects of CVC care with potential for improvement. We conducted a prospective audit over 28 consecutive days at a university teaching hospital investigating current practice of CVC post-insertion care in wards with high CVC usage. A multiple choice questionnaire on best practice of CVC insertion and care was distributed among clinical staff. Rates of breaches in catheter care and CRBSIs were calculated and statistical significance assumed when P<0.05. Data was recorded from 151 CVCs in 106 patients giving a total of 721 catheter days. In all, 323 breaches in care were identified giving a failure rate of 44.8%, with significant differences between intensive care unit (ICU) and non-ICU wards (P<0.001). Dressings (not intact) and caps and taps (incorrectly placed) were identified as the major lapses in CVC care with 158 and 156 breaches per 1000 catheter days, respectively. During the study period four CRBSIs were identified, producing a CRBSI rate of 5.5 per 1000 catheter days (95% confidence interval: 0.12-10.97). There are several opportunities to improve CVC post-insertion care. Future interventions to improve reliability of care should focus on implementing best practice rather than further education.

  18. Thrombus on Indwelling Central Venous Catheters: The Histopathology of 'Fibrin Sheaths'

    SciTech Connect

    Suojanen, James Norman; Brophy, David Paul; Nasser, Imad

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: Central venous catheters (CVC) may fail for many reasons, though 'fibrin sheaths' blocking catheter ports are usually implicated. We examined the sheaths removed from dialysis catheters to determine their histopathology.Methods: Ten catheter strippings were performed and the removed material was studied grossly and microscopically.Results: The histologic specimens showed thrombus both with and without a proteinaceous sheath.Conclusion: Dialysis catheters fail because of thrombus formation. This can occur in either the absence or presence of a protein coating on the catheter, the so-called 'fibrin sheath.'.

  19. Evaluation of the elastic behaviour of central venous PVC, polyurethane and silicone catheters.

    PubMed

    Cervera, M; Dolz, M; Herraez, J V; Belda, R

    1989-02-01

    Eighty used and 20 new silicone, polyurethane and polyvinylchloride central venous catheters were tested to establish the Young's modulus and the bending stiffness of the catheters and their introducers. The catheters were subjected to longitudinal traction forces and their lengthening measured. Young's modulus and the geometric moment of inertia were then calculated. It is shown that polyurethane catheters show least variation in their elastic characteristics, and that silicone catheters offer least resistance to bending and do not change their elastic properties after use. All catheters were equally unlikely to cause thrombus production if this is related to excessive bending stiffness.

  20. [Advantages and disadvantages in the use of central venous catheters in children with malignant diseases].

    PubMed

    Sporisević, L; Hasanbegović, E; Hadzihasanović, E; Bajraktarević, A; Khatib, H; Hamamdzić, M

    1999-01-01

    The authors report the problem of central venous catheter appliance to the children with malignant diseases, employed for the first time in Bosnia and Herzegovina with the aim of pediatric oncologic patients treatment. During 1997 central venous catheter type Hickman was used in nine children between two and half to eleven years old (average six years and one months). The average time of catheter placement was six months, in two cases catheter were eliminated after two and three months respectively since application (spontaneous elimination and repeated septic attacks, caused bu resistant bacterial strains). Gram-positive bacteria have been isolated with eight children (Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis), and gram-negative enterobacteriaceae (Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella oxytocia and pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Salmonella group C and Enterococcus faecalis) in samples taken from the catheter and hemoculture. The central venous catheter is useful in treating oncological patients, but may cause serious consequences, like local infections or septicaemia.

  1. Central Venous Catheter-Related Tachycardia in the Newborn: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Aya; Broadbent, Roland S.; Edmonds, Liza

    2016-01-01

    Central venous access is an important aspect of neonatal intensive care management. Malpositioned central catheters have been reported to induce cardiac tachyarrhythmia in adult populations and there are case reports within the neonatal population. We present a case of a preterm neonate with a preexisting umbilical venous catheter (UVC), who then developed a supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). This was initially treated with intravenous adenosine with transient reversion. Catheter migration was subsequently detected, with the UVC tip located within the heart. Upon withdrawal of the UVC and a final dose of adenosine, the arrhythmia permanently resolved. Our literature review confirms that tachyarrhythmia is a rare but recognised neonatal complication of malpositioned central venous catheters. We recommend the immediate investigation of central catheter position when managing neonatal tachyarrhythmia, as catheter repositioning is an essential aspect of management. PMID:28058050

  2. Aberrant positioning of a central venous dialysis catheter to reveal a left-sided partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection

    PubMed Central

    Chintu, Manohar R; Chinnappa, Shammikumar; Bhandari, Sunil

    2008-01-01

    We describe the identification of a rare, left-sided, partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection during routine central venous catheterization. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature to describe this anomaly in a hemodialysis patient. A young man had anomalous connection of the veins draining the upper lobe of the left lung and left innominate vein. Our case demonstrates the importance of routine fluoroscopy during insertion of central venous catheters to detect these anomalies and minimize complications. PMID:19183765

  3. Aberrant positioning of a central venous dialysis catheter to reveal a left-sided partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection.

    PubMed

    Chintu, Manohar R; Chinnappa, Shammikumar; Bhandari, Sunil

    2008-01-01

    We describe the identification of a rare, left-sided, partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection during routine central venous catheterization. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature to describe this anomaly in a hemodialysis patient. A young man had anomalous connection of the veins draining the upper lobe of the left lung and left innominate vein. Our case demonstrates the importance of routine fluoroscopy during insertion of central venous catheters to detect these anomalies and minimize complications.

  4. Usefulness of Groshong catheters for central venous access via the external jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Mitsuru; Nagata, Hitoshi; Takagi, Kazutoshi; Horie, Toru; Sawada, Tokihiko; Kubota, Keiichi

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of central venous access via the external jugular vein (EJV) employing Groshong catheters, and to compare the complications with those of conventional internal jugular venous catheterization. Central venous access was achieved by insertion of a single-lumen 4.0 Fr Groshong catheter via the EJV or internal jugular vein (IJV) with a single puncture. Complications associated with insertion and central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection (CVC-RBSI) were evaluated from the database. Two hundred and twenty-five patients received 400 catheters for a total period of 5377 catheter-days. Ninety-six patients underwent 201 internal jugular venous catheter (IJV-C) procedures for 2381 catheter-days, and 129 patients underwent 199 external jugular venous catheter (EJV-C) procedures for 2996 catheter-days. Use of EJV-C was associated with a longer catheter insertion length (p < .01) and period (p < .01), a larger number of operations (p < .01), and more frequent use of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) (p < .01) and less frequent use of chemotherapy (p < .01) than for IJV-C. However, there were no significant differences (NS) in complications associated with insertion and CVC-RBSI between IJV-C and EJV-C. There were no significant differences such complications as malposition, oozing or hematoma formation of insertion site, arterial bleeding, nerve damage, pneumothorax, and phlebitis between IJV-C and EJV-C. Moreover, EJV-C was not associated with morbidities such as pneumothorax, arterial bleeding, and nerve damage. Thus the study concluded that EJV-C using Groshong catheters has no severe complications and has the same rates of CVC-RBSI as conventional IJV-C for central venous access.

  5. Pilot study evaluating the safety of a combined central venous catheter and inferior vena cava filter in critically ill patients at high risk of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Cadavid, Carlos A; Gil, Bladimir; Restrepo, Alvaro; Alvarez, Sergio; Echeverry, Santiago; Angel, Luis F; Tapson, Victor; Kaufman, John

    2013-04-01

    The objectives of this pilot trial were to assess the safety of a new device for pulmonary embolism (PE) prophylaxis. The device, the Angel Catheter, was placed in eight patients who were in the intensive care unit and were at high risk of PE. The device was inserted at the bedside without fluoroscopic guidance via a femoral venous approach. All eight devices were inserted and subsequently retrieved without complications (follow-up, 33-36 d). One filter trapped a large clot.

  6. Comparison of three techniques for ultrasound-guided femoral nerve catheter insertion: A randomized, blinded trial

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Ehab; Atim, Abdulkadir; Ghosh, Raktim; Bauer, Maria; Sreenivasalu, Thilak; Kot, Michael; Kurz, Andrea; Dalton, Jarrod E.; Mascha, Edward J.; Mounir-Soliman, Loran; Zaky, Sherif; Esa, Wael Ali Sakr; Udeh, Belinda L.; Barsoum, Wael; Sessler, Daniel I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Ultrasound guidance for continuous femoral perineural catheters may be supplemented by electrical stimulation through a needle or through a stimulating catheter. We tested the primary hypothesis that ultrasound guidance alone is noninferior on both postoperative pain scores and opioid requirement and superior on at least one of the two. Secondarily, we compared all interventions on insertion time and incremental cost. Methods Patients having knee arthroplasty with femoral nerve catheters were randomly assigned to catheter insertion guided by: 1) ultrasound alone (n=147); 2) ultrasound and electrical stimulation through the needle (n=152); or, 3) ultrasound and electrical stimulation through both the needle and catheter (n=138). Noninferiority between any two interventions was defined for pain as no more than 0.5 points worse on a 0–10 Verbal Response Scale (VRS) scale and for opioid consumption as no more than 25% greater than the mean. Results The stimulating needle group was significantly noninferior to the stimulating catheter (difference (95% CI) in mean VRS pain score [stimulating needle versus stimulating catheter] of −0.16 (−0.61, 0.29), P<0.001; percent difference in mean IV morphine equivalent dose of −5% (−25%, 21%), P=0.002) and to ultrasound only (difference in mean VRS pain score of −0.28 (−0.72, 0.16), P<0.001; percent difference in mean IV morphine equivalent dose of −2% (−22%, 25%), P=0.006). In addition, the use of ultrasound alone for femoral nerve catheter insertion was faster and cheaper than the other two methods. Conclusion Ultrasound guidance alone without adding either stimulating needle or needle/catheter combination thus appears to be the best approach to femoral perineural catheters. PMID:24758775

  7. [Right ventricular perforation and cardiac tamponade caused by a central venous catheter].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, H; Kasuda, H; Shimizu, R

    1993-02-01

    A 5 year old girl with ASD was scheduled for open heart surgery. A central venous catheter was placed via the right infraclavicular vein after induction of anesthesia. Thirty minutes after insertion of the catheter, a decrease in arterial pressure and pulse pressure, an increase in heart rate and central venous pressure were observed. Cardiac tamponade was revealed by rapid opening of the chest. Gushing blood out of a hole in the right ventricular free wall was confirmed by pericardiotomy. The hemodynamics were stabilized by blood transfusion and surgical closure of the hole on the ventricle. This perforation was thought to be caused by careless insertion of a relatively stiff central venous catheter.

  8. The supraclavicular fossa ultrasound view for central venous catheter placement and catheter change over guidewire.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Chan; Klebach, Christian; Heinze, Ingo; Hoeft, Andreas; Baumgarten, Georg; Weber, Stefan

    2014-12-23

    The supraclavicular fossa ultrasound view can be useful for central venous catheter (CVC) placement. Venipuncture of the internal jugular veins (IJV) or subclavian veins is performed with a micro-convex ultrasound probe, using a neonatal abdominal preset with a probe frequency of 10 Mhz at a depth of 10-12 cm. Following insertion of the guidewire into the vein, the probe is shifted to the right supraclavicular fossa to obtain a view of the superior vena cava (SVC), right pulmonary artery and ascending aorta. Under real-time ultrasound view, the guidewire and its J-tip is visualized and pushed forward to the lower SVC. Insertion depth is read from guidewire marks using central venous catheter. CVC is then inserted following skin and venous dilation. The supraclavicular fossa view is most suitable for right IJV CVC insertion. If other insertion sites are chosen the right supraclavicular fossa should be within the sterile field. Scanning of the IJVs, brachiocephalic veins and SVC can reveal significant thrombosis before venipuncture. Misplaced CVCs can be corrected with a change over guidewire technique under real-time ultrasound guidance. In conjunction with a diagnostic lung ultrasound scan, this technique has a potential to replace chest radiograph for confirmation of CVC tip position and exclusion of pneumothorax. Moreover, this view is of advantage in patients with a non-p-wave cardiac rhythm were an intra-cardiac electrocardiography (ECG) is not feasible for CVC tip position confirmation. Limitations of the method are lack of availability of a micro-convex probe and the need for training.

  9. A rare malposition of the thoracic venous catheter introduced via the left internal jugular vein

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Supradip; Dewan, Himanshu; Bhattacharyya, Sandip

    2008-01-01

    A rare malposition of central venous catheter in the left superior intercostal vein is described. The diagnostic features and the possible ways to prevent this complication are discussed. PMID:19742265

  10. Closure Using a Surgical Closure Device of Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Punctures During Central Venous Catheter Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Berlet, Matthew H.; Steffen, Diana; Shaughness, George; Hanner, James

    2001-03-15

    Severe complications can and do occur when central venous catheters are inadvertently placed into subclavian arteries. Two cases are discussed that describe how these inadvertent arterial punctures can be closed using the Perclose device (Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA, USA)

  11. Contralateral effusions secondary to subclavian venous catheters. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ciment, L M; Rotbart, A; Galbut, R N

    1983-06-01

    Two cases of contralateral pleural effusions due to indwelling central venous catheters are presented. Radiographic contrast studies were performed to elucidate diagnosis and to define the mechanism of this complication; mediastinal leakage was documented in one case.

  12. Extravasation from venous catheter: a serious complication potentially missed by lung imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, K.M.; Gordon, L.

    1983-11-01

    Three patients were referred for lung ventiliation and perfusion (V/Q) imaging with symptoms strongly suggestive of pulmonary embolus (PE). Chest roentgenograms and xenon ventilation studies on all three were normal, save for prominent mediastinal silhouettes and effusions. Technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin(Tc-99m MAA), when injected through the central venous catheter (CVP), revealed mediastinal localization, whereas antecubital injections showed normal pulmonary perfusion. Contrast fluoroscopy introduced through the venous catheter in the first patient defined the extravasation. For patients under strong suspicion of PE, with a venous catheter whose distal tip is seen about the level of the heart on chest radiograph, the authors recommend administering the perfusion agent slowly through the central catheter to exclude catheter-induced complications. When extravasation is detected, injection of Tc-99m MAA by peripheral vein should be used to exclude PE.

  13. To reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections: is the subclavian route better than the jugular route for central venous catheterization?

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Goro; Kikuchi, Toshiki; Tsuyuzaki, Hitomi; Kawano, Rumiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Kazumi; Ugajin, Kazuhisa

    2006-12-01

    The most important targets of hospital-acquired infection control are to reduce the incidence of surgical-site, catheter-related, and ventilator-associated infections. In this report, we address previously presented infection-control strategies for central venous (CV) line catheterization, using a CV catheter-related infection surveillance system. Data concerning CV catheter insertion were collected from all facilities in our 650-bed hospital, excluding the operating and hemodialysis wards. Collected data included the insertion method, purpose, length of catheter inserted, duration of catheterization, infection rate, and complication rate. Catheter-related infection was diagnosed based on bacteriological examinations from blood cultures. The total number of catheterizations was 806 a year, and average duration of catheterization was 9.8 days. The purpose of catheterization was nutritional support in 210 cases, hemodialysis in 96 cases, cardiac support in 174 cases, and other treatments in 260 cases. In 66 cases, the purpose of CV catheter was not specified. The rate of positive cultures was 7.1%, and complications other than infection occurred in 0.5%. The main causative organisms were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in 38.6%, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis (CNS) in 33.3%, and S. aureus in 12.3% of infections. Infection rates were 3.8 per 1000 catheter-days in subclavian, 6.1 in jugular, and 15.7 in femoral vein catheterization. In high-risk departments (intensive care unit [ICU] and emergency departments) the infection rate was 5.4 for subclavian and 10.2 for jugular catheterization, whereas it was 3.6 for subclavian and 4.6 for jugular catheterization in noncritical-care departments. Considering complications such as pneumothorax, CV catheterization of the jugular vein is recommended in certain situations.

  14. Percutaneous Retrieval of a Central Venous Catheter Sutured to the Wall of the Right Atrium

    SciTech Connect

    Neuerburg, Joerg-M.; Guenther, Rolf W.; Chalabi, Khaled; Hunter, David

    1999-01-15

    A transjugular central venous catheter was inadvertently sutured to the wall of the right atrium in a 63-year-old female during coronary bypass surgery. Using two nitinol Goose Neck snares via a transfemoral and a transjugular approach the catheter was severed into two pieces and retrieved percutaneously.

  15. Predicting Central Venous Pressure by Measuring Femoral Venous Diameter Using Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Akram; Akhtar, Aftab; Mansoor, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this exploratory study was to find out the correlation of femoral vein diameter (FVD) to central venous pressure (CVP) measurements and to derive a prediction equation to help ascertain the fluid volume status in a critical patient. Patients and methods This was a single-centered prospective cohort study designed and conducted by the critical care department of Shifa International hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan. Patients were enrolled from the medical and surgical intensive care units. The inclusion criteria consisted of patients > 18 years of age, and an intrathoracic central venous catheterization (CVC) in place for producing CVP waveform through the transducer. Patients having contraindications to CVP placement and those unable to lie supine were excluded from the study. Critical Care fellows with sufficient training in performing venous ultrasonography measured the FVD. They were blinded to the CVP values of the same patients. Results The study included 108 patients. Among these 70/108 (64.8%) were males. Mean age was 53.85 (SD=16.74). The CVP and femoral vein diameter were measured in all patients. Mean CVP was 9.89 cmH2O (SD=3.46) and mean femoral vein diameter was 0.92 cm (SD=0.27). Multiple regression was used to generate a prediction model. FVD, age and sex of the patient were used as predictor variables to predict CVP diameter. The model was statistically significant with a p-value of < 0.000 and an F-value of 104.806. R-squared value for this model came out to be 0.744, thus the model was able to explain about 74.4% of the variance in the values observed for CVP. When controlled for age and sex, FVD was found highly correlated with CVP diameter with a p-value of < 0.000. A regression equation was derived that can be used to generate predicted values of CVP in millimeters of mercury with an R-square of 0.745 if FVD in centimeters is provided; CVP (cmH2O) = -0.039 + 10.718* FVD. Conclusions FVD was found highly correlated to

  16. An unusual complication of femoral vein catheterisation: pneumoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Yildizdas, D; Tepe, T; Parlak, M; Akcali, M

    2007-12-01

    A 2-month-old girl with severe pneumonia required a central venous line. Femoral vein catheterisation was attempted but insertion was difficult. Pneumoperitoneum developed, which is a rare complication of femoral vein catheterisation. It is important when undertaking femoral vein catheterisation to use the correct landmarks in the femoral triangle below the inguinal ligament and an appropriate size of catheter.

  17. Double-lumen, silicone rubber, indwelling venous catheters. A new modality for angioaccess.

    PubMed

    Schanzer, H; Kaplan, S; Bosch, J; Glabman, S; Burrows, L

    1986-02-01

    This report presents our experience using double-lumen, silicone rubber, indwelling central venous catheters with a subcutaneous Dacron cuff as access for hemodialysis. Twenty-seven catheters were placed in 27 patients through venous cutdowns. A 10-cm subcutaneous tunnel was created leaving the Dacron cuff 2 cm from the external exit. Sixteen Raaf catheters (lumen diameter [LD], 1 mm), three double-lumen Hickman catheters (LD, 1.6 mm) and eight HemoCath catheters (LD, 2 mm) were used. The tip of the catheter was positioned fluoroscopically in either the superior vena cava or the right atrium. One hundred fifty-nine treatments were done with the Raaf catheters (mean blood flow [MBF], 188.1 +/- 26.4 mL/min); two of these catheters became obstructed and could not be used further. Three double-lumen Hickman catheters were used in 12 hemodialysis treatments (MBF, 216.3 +/- 27.1 mL/min). One hundred fifty-five treatments were done using the HemoCath catheters (MBF, 236.7 +/- 5.5 mL/min). The degree of recirculation of these catheters was 8.56% +/- 4.34%. The major advantages of this modality include simplicity of introduction, lack of serious complications, no sacrifice of major arteries, no need for venipuncture, and potential use in either short- or long-term hemodialysis.

  18. An effective and biocompatible antibiofilm coating for central venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Silva Paes Leme, Annelisa Farah; Ferreira, Aline Siqueira; Alves, Fernanda Aparecida Oliveira; de Azevedo, Bruna Martinho; de Bretas, Liza Porcaro; Farias, Rogerio Estevam; Oliveira, Murilo Gomes; Raposo, Nádia Rezende Barbosa

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo efficacy and the tissue reaction of an antibiofilm coating composed of xylitol, triclosan, and polyhexamethylene biguanide. The antimicrobial activity was analyzed by a turbidimetric method. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the antiadherent property of central venous catheter (CVC) fragments impregnated with an antibiofilm coating (I-CVC) in comparison with noncoated CVC (NC-CVC) fragments. Two in vivo assays using subcutaneous implantation of NC-CVC and I-CVC fragments in the dorsal area of rats were performed. The first assay comprised hematological and microbiological analysis. The second assay evaluated tissue response by examining the inflammatory reactions after 7 and 21 days. The formulation displayed antimicrobial activity against all tested strains. A biofilm disaggregation with significant reduction of microorganism's adherence in I-CVC fragments was observed. In vivo antiadherence results demonstrated a reduction of early biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, mainly in an external surface of the I-CVC, in comparison with the NC-CVC. All animals displayed negative hemoculture. No significant tissue reaction was observed, indicating that the antibiofilm formulation could be considered biocompatible. The use of I-CVC could decrease the probability of development of localized or systemic infections.

  19. [Procedure adverse events: nursing care in central venous catheter fracture].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Juan, Eva; Maqueda-Palau, Mònica; Romero-Grilo, Cristina; Muñoz-Moles, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    In a intensive care unit (ICU) there are many factors that can lead to the occurrence of adverse events. A high percentage of these events are associated with the administration of drugs. Diagnostic tests, such as computed tomography, is common in critically ill patients and technique can be performed with injection of contrast agent to enhance the visualization of soft tissue. The contrast is a medication and the nurse is responsible for its proper administration. The management of the critically ill patient is complex. ICU team and radiology shares responsibility for the care and safety of the patient safety during the transfer and performing tests with contrast. The World Health Organisation patient safety strategies, recommends analysing errors and learning from them. Therefore, it was decided to investigate the causes of the category E severity adverse events that occurred in a patient who was admitted to the ICU for septic shock of abdominal origin. An abdominal computed tomography was performed with contrast which was injected through a central venous catheter. The contrast did not appear in the image. What happened? Causal analysis helped to understand what triggered the event. A care plan and an algorithm were drafted to prevent it from happening again, with the following objectives: improving knowledge, skills and promoting positive attitudes towards patient safety, working at primary, secondary and tertiary care levels.

  20. Monitoring Central Venous Catheter Resistance to Predict Imminent Occlusion: A Prospective Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Joshua; Tang, Li; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Brennan, Rachel C.; Shook, David R.; Stokes, Dennis C.; Monagle, Paul; Curtis, Nigel; Worth, Leon J.; Allison, Kim; Sun, Yilun; Flynn, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term central venous catheters are essential for the management of chronic medical conditions, including childhood cancer. Catheter occlusion is associated with an increased risk of subsequent complications, including bloodstream infection, venous thrombosis, and catheter fracture. Therefore, predicting and pre-emptively treating occlusions should prevent complications, but no method for predicting such occlusions has been developed. Methods We conducted a prospective trial to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of catheter-resistance monitoring, a novel approach to predicting central venous catheter occlusion in pediatric patients. Participants who had tunneled catheters and were receiving treatment for cancer or undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation underwent weekly catheter-resistance monitoring for up to 12 weeks. Resistance was assessed by measuring the inline pressure at multiple flow-rates via a syringe pump system fitted with a pressure-sensing transducer. When turbulent flow through the device was evident, resistance was not estimated, and the result was noted as “non-laminar.” Results Ten patients attended 113 catheter-resistance monitoring visits. Elevated catheter resistance (>8.8% increase) was strongly associated with the subsequent development of acute catheter occlusion within 10 days (odds ratio = 6.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8–21.5; p <0.01; sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 67%). A combined prediction model comprising either change in resistance greater than 8.8% or a non-laminar result predicted subsequent occlusion (odds ratio = 6.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.0–22.8; p = 0.002; sensitivity, 80%; specificity, 63%). Participants rated catheter-resistance monitoring as highly acceptable. Conclusions In this pediatric hematology and oncology population, catheter-resistance monitoring is feasible, acceptable, and predicts imminent catheter occlusion. Larger studies are required to validate

  1. [Cardiac tamponade associated with umbilical venous catheter (UVC) placed in inappropriate position].

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Cancino, Franco; de la Luz Sánchez-Tirado, María

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical venous catheter (UVC) is widely used in neonatal intensive care units. Pericardial effusion is an uncommon but life-threatening complication; and tamponade have been reported in 3% of neonates having such catheters. We present a case of cardiac tamponade as a complication of venous catheter in a neonate. The patient was diagnosed at the appropriate time by echocardiography and the pericardiocentesis was performed, and after removal of the complete pericardial effusion,an improvement of the critical condition was achieved. It is important to document the optimal positioning of UVC before the start of infusions.

  2. Comparison of NHSN-defined central venous catheter day counts with a method that accounts for concurrent catheters.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Thomas R; Johnson, James G; Anders, Theodore; Hayes, Rachel M

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) day definitions do not consider concurrent CVCs. We examined traditional CVC day counts and resultant central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates with a CVC day definition that included concurrent CVCs. Accounting for concurrent CVCs increased device day counts by 8.5% but only mildly impacted CLABSI rates.

  3. Fracture and migration of implantable venous access port catheters: Cause analysis and management of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shu-ping; Xiong, Bin; Chu, Jun; Li, Xiao-fang; Yao, Qi; Zheng, Chuan-sheng

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the causes and managements of the fractures and migrations of the implantable venous access port catheter (IVAPC). The fracture or migration of IVAPC occurred in 4 patients who were treated between May 2012 and January 2014 in Union Hospital, Wuhan, China. The port catheter leakage was found in 2 cases during drug infusion. Catheters that dislodged to the superior vena cava and right atrium were confirmed by port angiogram. The two dislodged catheters were successfully retrieved by interventional procedures. Catheter fracture occurred in two cases during port removal. One catheter was eventually removed from the subclavian vein through right clavicle osteotomy and subclavian venotomy, and the other removed by external jugular venotomy. Flushing the port in high pressure and injury of the totally implantable venous access port (TIVP) during implantation are usually responsible for catheter displacement. Interventional retrieval procedure can be used if the catheter dislodges to the vena cava and right atrium. Catheter fracture may occur during removal if clipping syndrome occurs or the catheter is sutured very tight during implantation.

  4. Catheter fracture: a rare complication of totally implantable subclavian venous access devices.

    PubMed

    Klotz, H P; Schöpke, W; Kohler, A; Pestalozzi, B; Largiadèr, F

    1996-07-01

    Catheter fracture represents a rare problem among non-infectious complications following the insertion of totally implantable long-term central venous access systems for the application of chemotherapeutic agents. A literature survey revealed a total incidence of catheter fractures of 0-2.1%. Imminent catheter fracture can be identified radiologically, using different degrees of catheter narrowing between the clavicle and the first rib, called pinch-off sign. Two cases of catheter fracture are described and potential causes are discussed. Recommendations to avoid the pinch-off sign with the subsequent risk of catheter fracture and migration include a more lateral and direct puncture of the subclavian vein. In case of catheter narrowing in the clavicular-first rib angle, patients should be followed carefully by chest X-rays every 4 weeks. Whenever possible, the system should be removed within 6 months following insertion.

  5. Catheter-based treatment of ilio-femoral deep vein thrombosis - an update on current evidence.

    PubMed

    Fahrni, Jennifer; Engelberger, Rolf Peter; Kucher, Nils; Willenberg, Torsten; Baumgartner, Iris

    2013-05-01

    Ilio-femoral deep vein thrombosis (DVT) has a high rate of long-term morbidity in the form of the postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). Therefore, management of acute thrombosis should not only focus on the prevention of acute complications such as propagation or embolisation of the initial clot but also on preventing PTS and recurrent thrombosis. Contemporary catheter-based treatments of deep vein thrombosis have proven to be safe and effective in selected patients. Current guidelines recommend medical therapy with anticoagulation alone for all but the most severe, limb-threatening thrombosis. They additionally allow for consideration of catheter-based treatment in patients with acute DVT and low risk of bleeding complications to prevent PTS. Recent studies favoring interventional therapy have not been included in these guidelines. Data on long-term outcome is expected to be published soon, clarifying and very likely strengthening the role of catheter-based treatments in the management of acute ilio-femoral DVT.

  6. Pulmonary artery catheter insertion in a patient of dextrocardia with anomalous venous connections.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Mukesh; Kumar, Naresh; Singh, Prabhat K

    2004-08-01

    In a young adult patient having situs solitus with dextrocardia the attempted pulmonary artery catheter placement for emergency mitral valve replacement required an unduly long length (50cm) of catheter insertion to get into right ventricle and then into pulmonary artery. Although catheter coiling was suspected initially, chest x-ray taken after successfully placement revealed an uncommon congenital anomalous venous connection i.e. right internal jugular opening into left sided superior vena cava then into inferior vena cava after running all along the left border of the heart. With the result, it required to pass 50cm of PA catheter to get into right ventricle in our patient. This emphasizes the need to look for abnormal venous connections during echocardiography and x-ray screening in congenital heart disease. Fluoroscopy is recommended when an unusual length of pulmonary artery catheter insertion is required to enter the pulmonary artery.

  7. Hickman to central venous catheter: A case of difficult venous access in a child suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Agrawal, Sanjit; Datta, Taniya; Mitra, Suparna; Khemka, Rakhi

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy in children suffering from cancer usually requires placement of an indwelling central venous catheter (CVC). A child may need to undergo repeated procedures because of infection and occlusion of previous access devices. We present a case of CVC insertion in a child suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia where an innovative technique was employed. PMID:27695218

  8. Accidental carotid artery catheterization during attempted central venous catheter placement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maietta, Pauline Marie

    2012-08-01

    More than 2.1 million central venous catheters are placed annually. While carotid artery cannulation is rare, its effects can be devastating. Anesthesia providers frequently work with central venous catheters in the perioperative setting. Therefore, it is imperative that they be able to identify and react appropriately to carotid artery injury both in preexisting central lines and those that they have placed. This case report details a case of accidental carotid artery catheterization during attempted right internal jugular vein catheterization and the steps taken to treat the patient following its recognition. A discussion of technique for central venous catheterization, indications for suspicion of arterial puncture, methods for confirming venous or arterial placement, appropriate methods for management of carotid artery cannulation, and the benefit of ultrasound in central venous cannulation follow. Through the appropriate use of equipment, early detection and management of carotid artery injury, and proper training, patient outcomes may be improved.

  9. A technique for re-utilizing catheter insertion sites in children with difficult central venous access.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S M; Garnett, G M; Woo, R K

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance of central venous access in patients with chronic medical conditions such as short bowel syndrome demands forethought and ingenuity. We describe an innovative technique for re-utilizing central venous access sites in patients who have chronic central venous access needs. Records of patients undergoing this technique were reviewed between August 2012 and December 2015. The technique involves "cutting-down" to the sterile fibrous tunnel that naturally forms around tunneled catheters. The fibrous sheath is then isolated and controlled much as would be done for a venous "cut-down." A separate exit site is then created for the new catheter and it is tunneled to the "cut-down" site per routine. The non-functioning catheter is then removed from the surgical field. The proximal fibrous sheath is finally cannulated either directly with the new catheter or with a wire/dilator system. This technique effectively re-uses the same venous access point while allowing for a complete change of the physical line and external site. Twenty attempts at this technique were made in twelve patients; six patients underwent the site re-utilization procedure multiple times. Re-using the fibrous tunnel to re-cycle the internal catheter site was successful in seventeen of twenty attempts. All patients had chronic conditions leading to difficult long-term central venous access [short bowel syndrome (6), hemophilia (2), cystic fibrosis (1), chronic need for central IV access (3)]. Indications for catheter replacement included catheter occlusion/mechanical failure/breakage (9), dislodgement (6), infection (1), and inadequate catheter length due to patient growth (4). Broviac/Hickman catheter sites were most commonly re-used (13; one failure); re-using a portcath site was successful in 5 of 7 attempts. There were no short term infections or mechanical complications. We describe a novel technique for salvaging tunneled central venous catheter access sites. This technique is well suited

  10. Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Harsha V.; Patil, Virendra C.; Ramteerthkar, M. N.; Kulkarni, R. D.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Aims: This study was conducted to determine the incidence of central venous catheter-related infections (CRIs) and to identify the factors influencing it. So far, there are very few studies that have been conducted on CRBSI in the intensive care unit in India. Settings and Design: This was a prospective, observational study carried out in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) over a period of 1 year from January to December 2004. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 patients with indwelling central venous catheters of age group between 20 and 75 years were included. The catheters were cultured using the standard semiquantitative culture (SQC) method. Statistical analysis used SPSS-10 version statistical software. Results: A total of 54 CVC catheters with 319 catheter days were included in this study. Of 54 patients with CVCs studied for bacteriology, 39 (72.22%) catheters showed negative SQCs and also negative blood cultures. A total of 15 (27.77%) catheters were positive on SQC, of which 10 (18.52%) were with catheter-associated infection and four (7.41%) were with catheter-associated bacteremia; the remaining one was a probable catheter-associated bacteremia. CRIs were high among catheters that were kept in situ for more than 3 days and emergency procedures where two or more attempts were required for catheterization (P < 0.05). In multivariate analysis of covariance duration of catheter in situ for >3 days, inexperienced venupucturist, more number of attempts and emergency CVC were associated with more incidence of CVCBSIs, with P <0.02. The duration of catheter in situ was negatively correlated (-0.53) and number of attempts required to put CVC was positively correlated (+0.39) with incidence of CVCBSIs. Sixty-five percent of the isolates belonged to the CONS group (13/20). Staphylococcus epidermidis showed

  11. Implementation of a children’s hospital-wide central venous catheter insertion and maintenance bundle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections in children are an increasingly recognized serious safety problem worldwide, but are often preventable. Central venous catheter bundles have proved effective to prevent such infections. Successful implementation requires changes in the hospital system as well as in healthcare professionals’ behaviour. The aim of the study is to evaluate process and outcome of implementation of a state-of-the-art central venous catheter insertion and maintenance bundle in a large university children’s hospital. Methods/design An interrupted time series design will be used; the study will encompass all children who need a central venous catheter. New state-of-the-art central venous catheter bundles will be developed. The Pronovost-model will guide the implementation process. We developed a tailored multifaceted implementation strategy consisting of reminders, feedback, management support, local opinion leaders, and education. Primary outcome measure is the number of catheter-associated infections per 1000 line-days. The process outcome is degree of adherence to use of these central venous catheter bundles is the secondary outcome. A cost-effectiveness analysis is part of the study. Outcomes will be monitored during three periods: baseline, pre-intervention, and post-intervention for over 48 months. Discussion This model-based implementation strategy will reveal the challenges of implementing a hospital-wide safety program. This work will add to the body of knowledge in the field of implementation. We postulate that healthcare workers’ willingness to shift from providing habitual care to state-of-the-art care may reflect the need for consistent care improvement. Trial registration: Dutch trials registry, trial # 3635. Trial registration Dutch trials registry (http://www.trialregister.nl), trial # 3635 PMID:24125520

  12. Flushing and Locking of Venous Catheters: Available Evidence and Evidence Deficit

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Flushing and locking of intravenous catheters are thought to be essential in the prevention of occlusion. The clinical sign of an occlusion is catheter malfunction and flushing is strongly recommended to ensure a well-functioning catheter. Therefore fluid dynamics, flushing techniques, and sufficient flushing volumes are important matters in adequate flushing in all catheter types. If a catheter is not in use, it is locked. For years, it has been thought that the catheter has to be filled with an anticoagulant to prevent catheter occlusion. Heparin has played a key role in locking venous catheters. However, the high number of risks associated with heparin forces us to look for alternatives. A long time ago, 0.9% sodium chloride was already introduced as locking solution in peripheral cannulas. More recently, a 0.9% sodium chloride lock has also been investigated in other types of catheters. Thrombolytic agents have also been studied as a locking solution because their antithrombotic effect was suggested as superior to heparin. Other catheter lock solutions focus on the anti-infective properties of the locks such as antibiotics and chelating agents. Still, the most effective locking solution will depend on the catheter type and the patient's condition. PMID:26075094

  13. Bacterial infection of central venous catheters in short-term total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Chan, L; Ngeow, Y F; Parasakthi, N

    1998-03-01

    Fourteen severely ill ventilated patients in an intensive care unit, requiring short-term total parenteral nutrition, were examined for catheter-related infection. Microbiological analysis using Maki's SQ technique was carried out on catheter exit site, catheter hub, proximal subcutaneous segment of catheter and catheter up. Qualitative cultures were carried out on total parenteral nutrition and peripheral blood samples. Twenty six of 29 catheters removed (90%) were culture positive but only 7 catheters were related to positive blood cultures, giving a catheter-related bacteremia (CRB) rate of 24%. Haematogenous seeding was strongly implicated in 7/29 (24%) of catheters. Patients' skin flora appeared to be the main source of catheter-related infection. The organisms isolated for patients with CRB included coagulase-negative staphylococci, Acinetobacter and Klebsiella. It is suggested that to control infective complications of central venous catheters, emphasis should be focused on specialised intravenous therapy teams and the use of strict protocols for insertion and care of central lines.

  14. Supraclavicular approach to the subclavian/innominate vein for large-bore central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Muhm, M; Sunder-Plassmann, G; Apsner, R; Kritzinger, M; Hiesmayr, M; Druml, W

    1997-12-01

    Infraclavicular and internal jugular catheterization are commonly used techniques for hemodialysis access, but may at times be impeded in patients whose anatomy makes cannulation difficult. In an effort to enlarge the spectrum of alternative access sites, we evaluated the supraclavicular approach for large-bore catheters. During an 18-month period we prospectively collected data on success rate and major and minor complications of the supraclavicular access for conventional dialysis catheters as well as Dacron-cuffed tunneled devices in 175 adult patients admitted for various extracorporeal therapies and bone marrow transplantation. Two hundred eight large-bore catheters (99 conventional dialysis catheters, 63 semirigid tunneled Dacron-cuffed catheters, and 46 Hickman catheters) were successfully placed in 164 patients (success rate, 93.8%), 58 (33.1%) of whom had been previously catheterized. Complications included pneumothorax (one patient), arterial puncture (seven patients), and puncture of the thoracic duct (two patients) without sequelae. Postinsertional chest radiographs demonstrated impressive coaxial lie of most catheters. Catheter malpositions occurred only sporadically (1%). Difficulty of introducing the catheter via a placed sheath was rarely observed. There was no clinically significant evidence of catheter-induced venous thrombosis or stenosis. We conclude that the supraclavicular route is an easy and safe first approach for large-bore catheters, as well as a useful alternative to traditional puncture sites for precatheterized and anatomically problematic patients.

  15. Management of occlusion and thrombosis associated with long-term indwelling central venous catheters

    PubMed Central

    Baskin, Jacquelyn L.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Reiss, Ulrike; Wilimas, Judith A.; Metzger, Monika L.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Howard, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term central venous catheters (CVC) facilitate care for patients with chronic illnesses, but catheter occlusions and catheter-related thrombosis (CRT) are common complications. This review summarizes management of CVC and CRT. Mechanical CVC occlusions require cause-specific therapy; whereas, thrombotic occlusions usually resolve with thrombolytic therapy, such as alteplase. Prophylaxis with thrombolytic flushes may decrease CVC infections and CRT, but confirmatory studies and cost-effectiveness analysis are needed. Risk factors for CRT include previous catheter infections, malposition of the catheter tip, and prothrombotic states. CRT can lead to catheter infection, pulmonary embolism, and post-thrombotic syndrome. CRT is diagnosed primarily using Doppler ultrasound or venography and treated with anticoagulation for 6 weeks to a year, depending on the extent of the thrombus, response to initial therapy, and whether thrombophilic factors persist. Prevention of CRT includes proper positioning of the CVC and prevention of infections; anticoagulation prophylaxis is not recommended at present. PMID:19595350

  16. Abnormal origin of right coronary artery and use of Tiger catheter through femoral route

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Goutam; Rai, Durga Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Background Abnormal origin of right coronary artery (RCA) is not uncommon. The incidence is .25–.92%. Right Judkin catheter is used universally for engaging right coronary ostium from femoral route. We have tried Tiger catheter from femoral route in abnormal origin of RCA patients. We were successful in cannulating RCA ostium in most of the cases. Materials and methods We have studied about 5120 patients over 4 years. We have selected patients from November 2010 to November 2014. Our patients are from two institutions—I.P.G.M.E.R., Kolkata and Burdwan Medical College, West Bengal. Right Judkin 3.5 and 4 were used universally. We have used AL-1,2,3, AR1,2, multipurpose, different guide catheters for cannulating RCA ostium in those cases where we failed to engage by right Judkin catheter. We have used Tiger catheter as a last resort when all endeavor failed. Results and analysis Among 40 cases of left sinus origin Type A—9, Type B—14, Type C—6, Type D—3, and Type E—8 patients were observed. But 668 cases abnormal origin of RCA were from right coronary sinus only. High take-off origin were 422 cases (8%), low take-off were 132 cases (2.5%), and posterior origin were 114 cases (2%). We could engage right coronary ostium by Tiger catheter in 690 cases (97%). We failed in 23 cases (3%). Conclusion Tiger catheter can be used successfully in abnormal RCA origin cases. It is more effective but less risky in comparison to other catheters. PMID:26896276

  17. Knowledge Level on Administration of Chemotherapy through Peripheral and Central Venous Catheter among Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Kapucu, Sevgisun; Özkaraman, Ayşe Özaydın; Uysal, Neşe; Bagcivan, Gulcan; Şeref, Ferhan Çetin; Elöz, Aygül

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the knowledge levels of oncology nurses about peripheral and central venous catheter during their chemotherapy administration. Methods: Data collection of this descriptive study was started on April 15, 2015–July 15, 2015. The data presented in this summary belong to 165 nurses. Data were collected with data collection form including questions related to sociodemographic qualifications and knowledge levels of nurses. Data collection forms were E-mailed to the members of Turkish Oncology Nursing Society. Data presented with numbers, percentages, and mean ± standard deviation. Results: The mean age of nurses was 33.60 ± 7.34 years and mean duration for oncology nursing experience was 2.65 ± 0.91 years. Nurses had correct information about the importance of selecting peripheral venous catheter and choosing the placement area for chemotherapy administration (63.6%), control of catheter before the administration (93.9%), influence of chemotherapeutic agent on length of catheter (40.6%), and management of extravasation (75.7%). Nurses also had correct information about the first use of port catheter (67.3%) and checking the catheter whether it is working properly or not (75.8%). Conclusions: In General, nurses’ level of knowledge related to catheter is 50% and higher. It is recommended to increase the knowledge of nurses about evidence-based information for catheter care as a step to safe chemotherapy practice. PMID:28217732

  18. Update on Insertion and Complications of Central Venous Catheters for Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bream, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters are a popular choice for the initiation of hemodialysis or for bridging between different types of access. Despite this, they have many drawbacks including a high morbidity from thrombosis and infection. Advances in technology have allowed placement of these lines relatively safely, and national guidelines have been established to help prevent complications. There is an established algorithm for location and technique for placement that minimizes harm to the patient; however, there are significant short- and long-term complications that proceduralists who place catheters should be able to recognize and manage. This review covers insertion and complications of central venous catheters for hemodialysis, and the social and economic impact of the use of catheters for initiating dialysis is reviewed. PMID:27011425

  19. Clearance of Cellulosimicrobium cellulans Bacteremia in a Child without Central Venous Catheter Removal

    PubMed Central

    Rowlinson, Marie-Claire; Bruckner, David A.; Hinnebusch, Claudia; Nielsen, Karin; Deville, Jaime G.

    2006-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans (formerly known as Oerskovia xanthineolytica) rarely causes human infection. Infections have been reported in immunocompromised hosts or in patients with foreign bodies, such as catheters, where treatment has generally involved removal of the foreign body. We report on a case in which the organism was isolated in multiple blood cultures from a 13-year-old male. After initial therapy failed, treatment with vancomycin and rifampin resulted in infection clearance without removal of the central venous catheter. PMID:16825406

  20. Use of sodium hypochlorite for skin antisepsis before inserting a peripheral venous catheter: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Forni, Cristiana; Sabattini, Tania; D'Alessandro, Fabio; Fiorani, Ambra; Gamberini, Simonetta; Maso, Alessandra; Curci, Rosa; Zanotti, Enrichetta; Chiari, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Although it can be prevented, catheter-related bacteremia is common and dangerous. The antiseptics most widely used during insertion of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) include povidone iodine, alcohol, and chlorhexidine. Another widely used antiseptic is a solution of 0.057 g sodium hypochlorite. This pilot study explored the contamination rate of the PVC tip inserted after skin decontamination with sodium hypochlorite. Culture analysis of the tips of the PVCs inserted into the 42 participants showed 7 (16.7%) colonized catheters. The results of this pilot study suggest taking into serious consideration the assessment of this antiseptic in randomized experimental studies.

  1. The Relationship Between Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors and Central Venous Catheter Infections in the Acutely Ill Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    patient. Extrinsic factors include central venous catheter insertion variables such as type of catheter, experience of person who inserted catheter...contact, common-vehicle, airborne and vectorborne. Diseases or infections that are spread by contact require exposure to the source either directly ( person ...to- person ), indirectly (microorganism is passed to an intermediate object) or droplet spread (passage of infectious agent through air). Illnesses

  2. Transhepatic central venous catheter for long-term access in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Mortell, Alan; Said, Hanan; Doodnath, Reshma; Walsh, Kevin; Corbally, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Vascular access in paediatric patients with chronic and/or life-threatening illness is crucial to survival. Access is frequently lost in this group because of thrombosis, infection, or displacement, and vascular options can quickly be exhausted. The last resort access procedure is generally a direct atrial catheter inserted via a thoracotomy. A viable alternative is the percutaneous transhepatic Broviac catheter (Bard Access Systems, Salt Lake City, UT). We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 5 patients who underwent percutaneous transhepatic Broviac insertion for long-term access over a 4-year period in a single institution. Four of the patients (80%) had a significant cardiac abnormality, with 1 patient requiring long-term parenteral nutrition after complicated necrotizing enterocolitis. All patients had significant caval thrombosis, which precluded them having placement of a standard percutaneous or openly placed central catheter. Of the 5 patients, 2 (40%) died of cardiac-related illnesses. Of the 3 surviving patients, 2 had functioning catheters electively removed because they were no longer required. One catheter was removed at thoracotomy for right atrial perforation because of catheter erosion. Vascular access in paediatric patients with chronic and/or life-threatening illness is crucial to survival. Transhepatic central venous catheters are a feasible, reliable, and relatively easily placed form of central access in patients with multiple venous thromboses requiring long-term access. This route should be considered in paediatric patients requiring central access in preference to a thoracotomy.

  3. A comparative analysis of radiological and surgical placement of central venous catheters

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Kieran D.; Fisher, Ross; Warnock, Neil; Winfield, David A.; Reed, Malcolm W.; Gaines, Peter A.

    1997-01-15

    Purpose. To compare the differences in practice and outcome of all radiologically and surgically placed central venous catheters retrospectively over a 2-year period simultaneously, at a single institution. Methods.A total of 253 Hickman catheters were inserted in 209 patients; 120 were placed radiologically in 102 patients and 133 were placed surgically in 107 patients. The indication was chemotherapy in 76% of radiological and in 47% of surgical cases; the remainder were for total parenteral nutrition and venous access. Results. There were 6 (4.5%) primary surgical failures and a further 17 (13%) surgical cases requiring multiple placement attempts. Pneumothorax occurred once (0.8%) surgically and four times (3.3%) radiologically. There were no radiological primary misplacements but there were five (3.7%) surgical ones. Catheter or central vein thrombosis occurred in four (3.3%) radiological and five (3.7%) surgical cases. The rate of infection per 1000 catheter-days was 1.9 in radiologically placed catheters and 4.0 in surgically placed ones (p<0.001). Average catheter life-span was similar for the two placement methods (100{+-}23 days). Conclusion. Radiological placement is consistently more reliable than surgical placement. There are fewer placement complications and fewer catheter infections overall.

  4. Mini-review: Antimicrobial central venous catheters--recent advances and strategies.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cláudia; Henriques, Mariana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2011-07-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) nowadays constitute critical devices used in medical care, namely in intensive care units. However, CVCs also represent one of the indwelling medical devices with enhanced risk of nosocomial device-related infection. Catheter-related infections (CRIs) are a major cause of patient morbidity and mortality, often justifying premature catheter removal and an increase in costs and use of resources. Adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation on the surfaces of indwelling catheters is elemental to the onset of pathogenesis. Seeking the prevention of CVC colonisation and CRI, a variety of approaches have been studied, tested and, in some cases, already applied in clinical practice. This review looks at the current preventive strategies often used to decrease the risk of CRIs due to colonization and biofilm formation on catheter surfaces, as well as at the more recent approaches under investigation.

  5. Protocol for Detection of Biofilms on Needleless Connectors Attached to Central Venous Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Donlan, R. M.; Murga, R.; Bell, M.; Toscano, C. M.; Carr, J. H.; Novicki, T. J.; Zuckerman, C.; Corey, L. C.; Miller, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Central venous catheter needleless connectors (NCs) have been shown to develop microbial contamination. A protocol was developed for the collection, processing, and examination of NCs to detect and measure biofilms on these devices. Sixty-three percent of 24 NCs collected from a bone marrow transplant center contained biofilms comprised primarily of coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:11158143

  6. A simulation-based "just in time" and "just in place" central venous catheter education program.

    PubMed

    Lengetti, Evelyn; Monachino, Anne Marie; Scholtz, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe the Central Venous Catheter Dress Rehearsal simulation program. Teaching is conducted at the bedside, which is efficient and cost effective and allows nurses to practice in a safe environment with no harm to the patient. The educators' challenges and remediation strategies are shared. This simulation program has demonstrated improved consistency of practice and knowledge among pediatric nurses.

  7. The insertion of chronic indwelling central venous catheters (Hickman lines) in interventional radiology suites.

    PubMed

    Page, A C; Evans, R A; Kaczmarski, R; Mufti, G J; Gishen, P

    1990-08-01

    The insertion of Hickman central venous catheters for chronic venous access is a procedure usually conducted in the operating theatre under local or general anaesthesia. In a prospective study over a one year period we have assessed the feasibility of radiologists inserting central venous catheters for long term access. A subclavicular approach to the subclavian vein with prior digital subtraction angiography or video imaging of the vein was the technique of choice. Thirty-one Hickman catheters were inserted in 21 patients. All but two patients had a haematological malignancy. Ages ranged from 19 to 77 years. The mean time for insertion was 43 min (range 20-80 min). The catheters remained in situ for between 2 days and 242 days with a mean of 86 days. There was one documented line infection; nine patients had episodes of septicaemia with identified organisms, and a further six had pyrexias of unknown origin during the line indwelling period. There were four documented line and or ipsilateral subclavian vein thromboses, and one death occurred within 36 hours of the procedure. We conclude that radiological placement is an excellent alternative to 'blind' surgical placement. Screening during insertion provides immediate facilities for correction of malposition and monitoring of immediate complications. The time taken for catheter insertion did not impede the usual patient throughout in the interventional radiology suite.

  8. Prevention of central venous catheter-related infections: what works other than impregnated or coated catheters?

    PubMed

    Mermel, Leonard A

    2007-06-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) are a significant cause of morbidity and excess hospital cost. Data from prospective, randomized trials demonstrate that the risk of these infections can be minimized by simple interventions. Changing the behaviour of healthcare workers who insert and care for intravascular catheters is imperative. Creating a culture of patient safety and assuring easy access to the products necessary to maintain strict asepsis during catheter insertion, dressing changes, and when manipulating catheter hubs, will enhance adherence to optimal practice and will reduce the risk posed to the millions of patients in need of such devices.

  9. Successful Retrieval of a Dismembered Central Venous Catheter Stuck to the Right Pulmonary Artery Using a Stepwise Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Hidekimi; Isomura, Daichi; Sugiura, Ryo; Oka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in anticancer chemotherapy have resulted in an increase in the number of patients requiring a central venous port catheter, and the incidence of catheter pinch-off syndrome has been increasing. Catheter pinch-off syndrome is a rare and unusual complication. It is difficult to retrieve dislodged catheters from the pulmonary artery, especially if the catheter is stuck to the peripheral pulmonary artery. We herein describe the successful removal of a catheter stuck in the pulmonary artery with a stepwise approach. First, a pigtail catheter was used to tug the dislodged catheter in order to free the unilateral end. Then, a gooseneck snare was used to catch and pull the catheter out of the patient. The key to success is to free the end of the catheter. PMID:27668096

  10. Prevention and treatment of thrombosis associated with central venous catheters in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jasti, Nagamallika; Streiff, Michael B

    2014-10-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) play an essential role in the management of cancer patients. Venous thrombosis is a common complication of CVC. The incidence of CVC-associated venous thromboembolism (CVC-VTE) is 1.7 per 1000 catheter days. Risk factors for CVC-VTE include the patient's underlying cancer, a history of previous thrombotic events and the location and type of CVC. Anticoagulant prophylaxis is not effective for CVC-VTE. Anticoagulation alone is the preferred initial treatment for CVC-VTE. CVC removal may be considered in refractory cases or when anticoagulation is contraindicated. Thrombolytic therapy is reserved for patients with limb-threatening thrombosis or thrombosis unresponsive to conventional treatment. Anticoagulation should be continued for at least 3 months or as long as the CVC is present.

  11. Transhepatic Venous Approach for Balloon-assisted Cervical Collateral Venous Access

    SciTech Connect

    Eyheremendy, Eduardo P.; Malizia, Patricio; Sierre, Sergio

    2011-12-15

    Central venous catheter placement is indicated in many situations, and an increasing number of patients require temporary and long-term central catheters. Frequently, patients who have undergone multiple central veins catheterizations develop complete and diffuse venous occlusion, and this constitutes a difficult-to-manage clinical problem. We report a case of a 20-year-old patient who was referred to our department for central venous line placement who manifested bilateral femoral, jugular, and subclavian veins occlusion. A central venous catheter was implanted through a cervical collateral vein, targeting on and puncturing an angioplasty balloon, and advanced into the collateral vein through a transhepatic venous access.

  12. Transbrachial Access for Radiologic Manipulation of Problematic Central Venous Catheters in a Pediatric Population

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Sandeep Hogan, Mark J.

    2010-08-15

    A transfemoral venous approach is the current standard for accessing malpositioned and fractured central venous catheters (CVCs). The purpose of this study was (1) to describe a transbrachial approach for correction and (2) to assess the success and failure of this method in a pediatric population. A 12-year retrospective review of all patients referred for correction of malpositioned, retained, and fractured CVCs was conducted. Based on the performing interventionalist's preference, transbrachial or transfemoral venous sheaths where placed under ultrasonographic guidance. Diagnostic angiographic catheters and snares were used to manipulate the catheters. Patients who underwent the transfemoral approach received postprocedural monitoring for 4 hours, whereas patients who underwent the transbrachial approach were allowed unrestricted activity immediately after hemostasis was obtained. Technical success of malpositioned lines was defined (1) by final position in the superior vena cava or at the cavoatrial junction on postprocedural imaging or (2) by successful removal of retained catheter fragments, if present. Transbrachial approach was used for access in 11 patients. Problematic lines included malpositioned (n = 10) and retained (n = 1) lines. The ipsilateral arm was used for transbrachial entry in 7 patients. Initial use of angiographic catheters was attempted in 7 cases, of which 4 were successful. All 3 unsuccessful cases had tips positioned in the contralateral brachiocephalic vein, and these were successfully repositioned using snares. A combination of snares and angiographic catheters was used in 2 cases. Snares were used for all other cases. Technical success by way of the transbrachial approach was observed in all cases. Periprocedural follow-up demonstrated no immediate complications. We conclude that the transbrachial approach is a suitable alternative to the transfemoral approach for catheter tip position correction. Tip malposition in the contralateral

  13. Is venous blood drawn from femoral access adequate to estimate the central venous oxygen saturation and arterial lactate levels in critically ill patients?

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Yara Nishiyama; de Freitas, Flávio Geraldo Rezende; de Azevedo, Rodrigo Palácio; Leão, Milena; Bafi, Antônio Tonete; Machado, Flavia Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to test if venous blood drawn from femoral access can be used to estimate the central venous oxygen saturation and arterial lactate levels in critically ill patients. Methods Bland-Altman analysis and Spearman correlations were used to compare the femoral venous oxygen saturation and central venous oxygen saturation as well as arterial lactate levels and femoral lactate. A pre-specified subgroup analysis was conducted in patients with signs of hypoperfusion. In addition, the clinical agreement was also investigated. Results Blood samples were obtained in 26 patients. In 107 paired samples, there was a moderate correlation (r = 0.686, p < 0.0001) between the central venous oxygen saturation and femoral venous oxygen saturation with a bias of 8.24 ± 10.44 (95% limits of agreement: -12.23 to 28.70). In 102 paired samples, there was a strong correlation between the arterial lactate levels and femoral lactate levels (r = 0.972, p < 0.001) with a bias of -2.71 ± 9.86 (95% limits of agreement: -22.03 to 16.61). The presence of hypoperfusion did not significantly change these results. The clinical agreement for venous saturation was inadequate, with different therapeutic decisions in 22.4% of the situation; for lactate, this was the case only in 5.2% of the situations. Conclusion Femoral venous oxygen saturation should not be used as a surrogate of central venous oxygen saturation. However, femoral lactate levels can be used in clinical practice, albeit with caution. PMID:26761471

  14. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: central venous catheters (access, care, diagnosis and therapy of complications).

    PubMed

    Pittiruti, Mauro; Hamilton, Helen; Biffi, Roberto; MacFie, John; Pertkiewicz, Marek

    2009-08-01

    When planning parenteral nutrition (PN), the proper choice, insertion, and nursing of the venous access are of paramount importance. In hospitalized patients, PN can be delivered through short-term, non-tunneled central venous catheters, through peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC), or - for limited period of time and with limitation in the osmolarity and composition of the solution - through peripheral venous access devices (short cannulas and midline catheters). Home PN usually requires PICCs or - if planned for an extended or unlimited time - long-term venous access devices (tunneled catheters and totally implantable ports). The most appropriate site for central venous access will take into account many factors, including the patient's conditions and the relative risk of infective and non-infective complications associated with each site. Ultrasound-guided venepuncture is strongly recommended for access to all central veins. For parenteral nutrition, the ideal position of the catheter tip is between the lower third of the superior cava vein and the upper third of the right atrium; this should preferably be checked during the procedure. Catheter-related bloodstream infection is an important and still too common complication of parenteral nutrition. The risk of infection can be reduced by adopting cost-effective, evidence-based interventions such as proper education and specific training of the staff, an adequate hand washing policy, proper choices of the type of device and the site of insertion, use of maximal barrier protection during insertion, use of chlorhexidine as antiseptic prior to insertion and for disinfecting the exit site thereafter, appropriate policies for the dressing of the exit site, routine changes of administration sets, and removal of central lines as soon as they are no longer necessary. Most non-infective complications of central venous access devices can also be prevented by appropriate, standardized protocols for line insertion

  15. A patient with an uncommon complication from insertion of a central venous catheter: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Imran; Khalid, Tabindeh J; DiGiovine, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Background A 72 year old male was admitted to the medical intensive care unit with septic shock. Case presentation A left subclavian central venous catheter was inserted on the day of admission whose tip was pushing against the wall of the vessel lumen. The patient's condition improved with treatment, but three days later had a new episode of acute hypotension. CT scan of the chest showed that the catheter had eroded through the superior vena cava wall. Conclusion The catheter was pulled out and patient recovered from the complication with supportive therapy. Care should be taken that the tip of the catheter is in the center of the vessel lumen to avoid this rare, but potentially life threatening, complication. PMID:19036145

  16. Percutaneously inserted long-term central venous catheters in pigs of different sizes.

    PubMed

    Larsson, N; Claesson Lingehall, H; Al Zaidi, N; Claesson, J; Jensen-Waern, M; Lehtipalo, S

    2015-07-01

    Pigs are used for long-term biomedical experiments requiring repeated injections, infusions and collections of blood samples. Thus, it is necessary for vascular catheters to be indwelling to avoid undue stress to the animals and the use of restraints. We propose a refined model of percutaneous insertion of long-term central venous catheters to minimize the surgical trauma and postoperative complications associated with catheter insertion. Different sizes of needles (18 Ga versus 21 Ga) for initial puncture of the veins were compared. In conventional pigs weighing less than 30 kg, catheter insertion may be facilitated by using a microintroducer set with a 21 Ga needle. In pigs weighing 50 kg, a standard 18 Ga needle may be preferable.

  17. Neonatal atrial flutter after insertion of an intracardiac umbilical venous catheter

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Marcos Moura; Tavares, Wládia Gislaynne de Sousa; Furtado, Maria Mônica Alencar Araripe; Fontenele, Maria Marcia Farias Trajano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe a case of neonatal atrial flutter after the insertion of an intracardiac umbilical venous catheter, reporting the clinical presentation and reviewing the literature on this subject. Case description: A late-preterm newborn, born at 35 weeks of gestational age to a diabetic mother and large for gestational age, with respiratory distress and rule-out sepsis, required an umbilical venous access. After the insertion of the umbilical venous catheter, the patient presented with tachycardia. Chest radiography showed that the catheter was placed in the position that corresponds to the left atrium, and traction was applied. The patient persisted with tachycardia, and an electrocardiogram showed atrial flutter. As the patient was hemodynamically unstable, electric cardioversion was successfully applied. Comments: The association between atrial arrhythmias and misplaced umbilical catheters has been described in the literature, but in this case, it is noteworthy that the patient was an infant born to a diabetic mother, which consists in another risk factor for heart arrhythmias. Isolated atrial flutter is a rare tachyarrhythmia in the neonatal period and its identification is essential to establish early treatment and prevent systemic complications and even death. PMID:26525686

  18. Second-Generation central venous catheter in the prevention of bloodstream infection: a systematic review 1

    PubMed Central

    Stocco, Janislei Gislei Dorociaki; Hoers, Hellen; Pott, Franciele Soares; Crozeta, Karla; Barbosa, Dulce Aparecida; Meier, Marineli Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to evaluate the effectiveness and safety in the use of second-generation central venous catheters impregnated in clorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine when compared with other catheters, being them impregnated or not, in order to prevent the bloodstream infection prevention. Method: systematic review with meta-analysis. Databases searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS/SciELO, Cochrane CENTRAL; search in Congress Proceedings and records from Clinical Trials. Results: 1.235 studies were identified, 97 were pre-selected and 4 were included. In catheter-related bloodstream infection, there was no statistical significance between second-generation impregnated catheter compared with the non-impregnated ones, absolute relative risk 1,5% confidence interval 95% (3%-1%), relative risk 0,68 (confidence interval 95%, 0,40-1,15) and number needed to treat 66. In the sensitivity analysis, there was less bloodstream infection in impregnated catheters (relative risk 0,50, confidence interval 95%, 0,26-0,96). Lower colonization, absolute relative risk 9,6% (confidence interval 95%, 10% to 4%), relative risk 0,51 (confidence interval 95% from 0,38-0,85) and number needed to treat 5. Conclusion: the use of second-generation catheters was effective in reducing the catheter colonization and infection when a sensitivity analysis is performed. Future clinical trials are suggested to evaluate sepsis rates, mortality and adverse effects. PMID:27508901

  19. [Long-term central venous catheter-related infections].

    PubMed

    Lebeaux, David; Joly, Dominique; Zahar, Jean-Ralph

    2014-05-01

    Long-term intravenous catheters (LTIVC) are standard practice for patients with chronic diseases such as cancer, digestive disease requiring total parenteral nutrition or end-stage renal disease. Even if they greatly improved patients' care, the use of LTIVC is also associated with microbial contamination and subsequent infection. These catheter-related infections are associated with morbidity, mortality and increased health-care costs. As patients carrying these LTIVC stay at home for their treatment (home parenteral nutrition for instance) or between cycles of treatment (antineoplastic chemotherapy or dialysis), it is mandatory that general practitioner and nurses are aware of recent data on the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of LTIVC-related infections.

  20. Central venous catheter placement in the inferior vena cava via the direct translumbar approach.

    PubMed

    Elduayen, B; Martínez-Cuesta, A; Vivas, I; Delgado, C; Pueyo, J C; Bilbao, J I

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical aspects and efficacy of placing tunneled central venous access catheters (CVA) in the inferior vena cava (IVC) via a direct translumbar approach. Between August 1994 and July 1998, 50 CVA (Hickman 13.5 F) were placed in the IVC via a direct translumbar approach in 46 patients (10 males, 36 females) with a mean age of 39.9 years (age range 10-87 years). The indications were chemotherapy administration plus leukoaphoresis (n = 39), bone marrow transplantation (n = 2) and hemodialysis (n = 5). The reasons for placing the CVA in the IVC were cosmetic (n = 34), supradiaphragmatic venous thrombosis (n = 8), previous catheter infection (n = 2), and non-functioning arteriovenous fistula (n = 2). There were no immediate complications. The mean period of time the CVA was in place was 3 months (15 days to 15 months), during which the function was excellent. The commonest late complication was infection (4 local, 6 bacteremia). Others included: pain (n = 2), ureteric fistula (n = 1), pericatheter fibrin sheath formation (n = 6) and catheter-tip impaction (n = 2). Two catheters were damaged due to postprocedural inappropriate manipulations and two others fell off due to incorrect fixation. Due to these complications, it was necessary to remove ten catheters, replace an additional four and reposition two. Direct translumbar catheterization of the IVC is a safe and effective way of placing a long-term CVA with a moderate complication rate.

  1. An umbilical venous catheter complication presented as acute abdomen: case report.

    PubMed

    Oztan, Mustafa O; Ilhan, Ozkan; Abay, Elif; Koyluoglu, Gokhan

    2016-12-01

    Umbilical venous catheterization has become a widely accepted intravenous route for premature babies. These catheters allow administration of parenteral nutrition and medication and facilitate blood sampling. Besides these benefits, they also have significant potential complications like portal vein thrombosis, infection, vascular or hepatic injury, arrhythmia and sepsis. One of the rare but important complication is extravasation of the fluids due to misplacement of the catheter. The typical symptoms of this condition are sudden deterioration, hepatic enlargement, hematocrit drop, hypotension and abdominal distension. We herein present a premature newborn with unusual acute abdomen findings suggesting a surgical pathology after the extravasation of total parenteral nutrition into the abdomen.

  2. Coil Protruding into the Common Femoral Vein Following Pelvic Venous Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Petra Holdstock, Judith M.; Bacon, Jennifer L.; Lopez, Anthony J.; Whiteley, Mark S.; Price, Barrie A.

    2008-03-15

    Pelvic venous embolization is performed for pelvic congestion syndrome and prior to lower limb varicose vein surgery in females with associated pelvic venous insufficiency. The procedure is analogous to varicocele embolization in males, although refluxing internal iliac vein tributaries may also be embolized. We report a case of inadvertent coil placement in the common femoral vein while embolizing the obturator vein, during pelvic vein embolization for recurrent lower limb varicose veins. There were no clinical consequences and the coil was left in situ. We advise caution when embolizing internal iliac vein tributaries where there is clinically significant communication with veins of the lower limb.

  3. Vascular Access Tracking System: a Web-Based Clinical Tracking Tool for Identifying Catheter Related Blood Stream Infections in Interventional Radiology Placed Central Venous Catheters.

    PubMed

    Morrison, James; Kaufman, John

    2016-12-01

    Vascular access is invaluable in the treatment of hospitalized patients. Central venous catheters provide a durable and long-term solution while saving patients from repeated needle sticks for peripheral IVs and blood draws. The initial catheter placement procedure and long-term catheter usage place patients at risk for infection. The goal of this project was to develop a system to track and evaluate central line-associated blood stream infections related to interventional radiology placement of central venous catheters. A customized web-based clinical database was developed via open-source tools to provide a dashboard for data mining and analysis of the catheter placement and infection information. Preliminary results were gathered over a 4-month period confirming the utility of the system. The tools and methodology employed to develop the vascular access tracking system could be easily tailored to other clinical scenarios to assist in quality control and improvement programs.

  4. [Central venous access: our experience with Hickman and Broviac catheter in children].

    PubMed

    Milanović, D; Krstić, Z; Vukadinović, V

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of a 4-years-experience with Hickman-Broviac double lumen silicone catheters. The catheters were inserted in 51 dialysed and nondialysed children. Forty three catheters were placed for temporary or permanent dialysis access, 2 in patients for plasmapheresis, 4 in severely burnt patients, and 2 in neonates with the "short gut" syndrome. The youngest patient was 7 days old and the eldest 14.5 years (mean age 5.4 years). The catheters were implanted by open surgery into the right atrium through the right (92%) or left internal jugular vein (8%) in more than 80% of patients. Ten catheters were implanted in the femoral vein (three through the saphenous vein: in a patient with extensive burns in the thorax and neck area, and in seven patients with acute renal failure and high risk for anaesthesia). The complications, except the insufficient flow, were fewer and less dangerous than those reported in literature. Therefore, we strongly recommend insertion of these catheters as the method of choice for immediate vascular access in children in whom the creation of conventional vascular access is difficult or impossible, as well as in patients in whom provision of long- term intravenous nutrition or medication is essential.

  5. Catheter venography and endovascular treatment of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Mandato, Kenneth; Englander, Meridith; Keating, Lawrence; Vachon, Jason; Siskin, Gary P

    2012-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disorder characterized by damage to the myelin sheath insulation of nerve cells of the brain and spinal cord affecting nerve impulses which can lead to numerous physical and cognitive disabilities. The disease, which affects over 500,000 people in the United States alone, is widely believed to be an autoimmune condition potentially triggered by an antecedant event such as a viral infection, environmental factors, a genetic defect or a combination of each. Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) is a condition characterized by abnormal venous drainage from the central nervous system that has been theorized to have a possible role in the pathogenesis and symptomatology of MS (1). A significant amount of attention has been given to this theory as a possible explanation for the etiology of symptoms related to MS patients suffering from this disease. The work of Dr. Zamboni, et al, who reported that treating the venous stenoses causing CCSVI with angioplasty resulting in significant improvement in the symptoms and quality of life of patients with MS (2) has led to further interest in this theory and potential treatment. The article presented describes endovascular techniques employed to diagnose and treat patients with MS and CCSVI.

  6. Complications of Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheters: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Jose Amo-Setién, Francisco; Herrero-Montes, Manuel; Olavarría-Beivíde, Encarnación; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mercedes; Torres-Manrique, Blanca; Rodríguez-de la Vega, Carlos; Caso-Álvarez, Vanesa; González-Parralo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim The use of venous catheters is a widespread practice, especially in oncological and oncohematological units. The objective of this study was to evaluate the complications associated with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in a cohort of patients. Materials and Methods In this retrospective cohort study, we included all patient carrying PICCs (n = 603) inserted at our institute between October 2010 and December 2013. The main variables collected were medical diagnosis, catheter care, location, duration of catheterization, reasons for catheter removal, complications, and nursing care. Complications were classified as infection, thrombosis, phlebitis, migration, edema, and/or ecchymosis. Results All patients were treated according to the same “nursing care” protocol. The incidence rate of complications was two cases per 1000 days of catheter duration. The most relevant complications were infection and thrombosis, both with an incidence of 0.17 cases per 1000 days of the total catheterization period. The total average duration of catheterization was 170 days [SD 6.06]. Additionally to “end of treatment” (48.42%) and “exitus”, (22.53%) the most frequent cause of removal was migration (displacement towards the exterior) of the catheter (5.80%). Conclusions PICCs are safe devices that allow the administration of long-term treatment and preserve the integrity of the venous system of the patient. Proper care of the catheter is very important to improve the quality life of patients with oncologic and hematologic conditions. Therefore, correct training of professionals and patients as well as following the latest scientific recommendations are particularly relevant. PMID:27588946

  7. Risk factors, management and primary prevention of thrombotic complications related to the use of central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2012-09-01

    An adequate vascular access is of importance for the treatment of patients with cancer and complex illnesses in the intensive, perioperative or palliative care setting. Deep vein thrombosis and thrombotic occlusion are the most common complications attributed to central venous catheters in short-term and, especially, in long-term use. In this review we will focus on the risk factors, management and prevention strategies of catheter-related thrombosis and occlusion. Due to the lack of randomised controlled trials, there is still controversy about the optimal treatment of catheter-related thrombotic complications, and therapy has been widely adopted using the evidence concerning lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. Given the increasing use of central venous catheters in patients that require long-term intravenous therapy, the problem of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis can be expected to increase in the future. We provide data for establishing a more uniform strategy for preventing, diagnosing and treating catheter-related thrombotic complications.

  8. Complications Related to Insertion and Use of Central Venous Catheters (CVC)

    PubMed Central

    Hodzic, Samir; Golic, Darko; Smajic, Jasmina; Sijercic, Selma; Umihanic, Sekib; Umihanic, Sefika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Central Venous Catheters (CVC) are essential in everyday medical practice, especially in treating patients in intensive care units (ICU). The application of these catheters is accompanied with the risk of complications, such as the complications caused during the CVC insertion, infections at the location of the insertion, and complications during the use of the catheter, sepsis and other metastatic infections. Patients and methods: This study is a retrospective-prospective and it was implemented in the period 1st January 2011- 31st December 2012. It included 108 examinees with CVC placed for more than 7 days. Results: The most common complications occurring in more than 2 attempts of CVC applications are: hearth arrhythmias in both groups in 12 cases, 7 in multi-lumen (12.72%) and 5 in mono-lumen ones (9.43%). Artery puncture occurs in both groups in 7 cases, 5 in multi-lumen (9.09%) and 2 in mono-lumen ones (3.77%). Hematoma occurred in both groups in 4 cases, 3 in multi-lumen CVCs (5.45%) and 1 in mono-lumen ones (1.88%). The most common complication in multi-lumen catheters was heart arrhythmia, in 20 cases (36.37%). The most common complications in mono-lumen CVCs was hearth arrhythmias, in 20 cases as extrasystoles and they were registered in 16 catheter insertions (30.18%). Out of total number of catheters of both groups, out of 108 catheters the complications during insertion occurred in 49 catheters (45.40%). The most common complications in both groups were heart arrhythmias, artery punctures and hematomas at the place of catheter insertion. PMID:25568558

  9. Infectious complications associated with the use of central venous catheters in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Gláucia Helena; Romanelli, Roberta M C; Teixeira, Gustavo Machado; Macedo, Antonio V; Chaia, Juliana M C; Nobre, Vandack

    2013-07-01

    In this prospective, observational study, we sought to investigate the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of central venous catheter-associated infection in 56 patients admitted for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In multivariate analysis, we found a 7-fold higher risk of central line-associated bloodstream infection with central venous catheter insertion in the internal jugular vein as compared with the subclavian access. Patients with central line-associated bloodstream infection had a higher incidence of acute renal failure.

  10. Extravasation of parenteral alimentation fluid into the renal pelvis--a complication of central venous catheter in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Nadroo, A M; al-Sowailem, A M

    2001-01-01

    Many complications of central venous catheters, which include perforation of the vessel walls and extravasation of the infusate into pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities, have been reported. We report an infant with a central venous catheter in inferior vena cava who experienced extravasation of parenteral alimentation fluid into the right renal pelvis secondary to perforation of the renal vein. To our knowledge, this rare complication has not been reported earlier.

  11. Catheter malplacement during central venous cannulation through arm veins in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Arvind; Bithal, Parmod K; Dash, Harihar; Chauhan, Rajendra S; Mohanty, Bibekanand

    2003-07-01

    For successful catheter placement, central venous cannulation (CVC) through internal jugular vein and subclavian vein has been recommended in both adult and pediatric patients. But it carries a risk of serious complications, such as pneumothorax, carotid, or subclavian artery puncture, which can be life-threatening, particularly in critically ill children. So a prospective study was carried out to determine the success rate of correct catheter tip placement during CVC through antecubital veins in pediatric neurosurgical patients. A total of 200 pediatric patients (age 1-15 years) of either sex were studied. Basilic or cephalic veins of either arm were selected. All the patients were cannulated in the operation room under general anesthesia. Single lumen, proper size catheters (with stillete) were used for cannulation. The catheter was inserted in supine position with the arm abducted at right angle to the body and neck turned ipsilaterally. The length of insertion was determined from cubital fossa to the right second intercostal space. The exact position of the tip of the catheter was confirmed radiologically in ICU. Correct catheter tip placement was achieved in 98 (49%) patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of data shows that there was no statistically significant difference among correct and incorrect catheter tip placement in relation to factors including sex, side of cannulation (left or right), and type of vein (basilic or cephalic). The analysis of correct catheter tip placement in relation to age showed that the highest success rate was achieved in children of age group 6 to 10 years (60.2%) followed by 30.6% in the 11 to 15 year group. The lowest success rate of tip placement of only 9.2% was observed in younger children of age 1 to 5 years, which is statistically significant (P = 0.001). Of 102 incorrect placements reported, 37% were in 1 to 5 year age group versus 9.2% correct tip placements. The most common unsatisfactory placements were

  12. Three mixed venous saturation catheters in patients with circulatory shock and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Rouby, J J; Poète, P; Bodin, L; Bourgeois, J L; Arthaud, M; Viars, P

    1990-10-01

    Thirty-one critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure and circulatory shock were divided into three groups. Group 1 included 11 patients with an inserted mixed venous saturation (SvO2) catheter using three-reference wavelengths and characterized by one transmitting and one detecting fiberoptic filament (Oximetrix opticath catheter); group 2 included eight patients with an inserted SvO2 catheter using two-reference wavelengths and characterized by one transmitting and one detecting fiberoptic filament; (Edwards sat-one catheter); group 3 included 12 patients with an inserted SvO2 catheter using two-reference wavelengths and characterized by one transmitting and two detecting fiberoptic filaments. Once calibration procedures were performed, SvO2 measured by the catheter and by an hemoximeter OSM 3 (reference value) were compared following each therapeutic intervention. Over a period of 1.5 to 6 hours during which the hematocrit value remained unchanged, 119 measurements were obtained in group 1, 91 in group 2 and 181 in group 3. The dispersion of SvO2 values was much more pronounced with the two-reference wavelength systems using either one or two detecting fiber optic filaments, and the correlation coefficient was significantly higher with the three-reference wavelength system (r = 0.970 for the Oximetrix catheter vs r = 0.855 for the Edwards catheter and r = 0.826 for the Spectramed catheter, p less than 0.001). After 24 hours, the spontaneous drifts in the two-reference wavelength systems, using either one or two detecting fiber optic filaments (expressed as the SvO2 value measured by the catheter minus the reference SvO2 value) were significantly higher than the spontaneous drift in the three-reference wavelength system (9.3 +/- 7 percent for the Edwards catheter and +/- 6 +/- 4.1 percent for the Spectramed catheter vs 3.3 +/- 3.1 percent for the Oximetrix catheter, p less than 0.05). This study shows that a three-wavelength system is more accurate

  13. Tunneled central venous catheter exchange: techniques to improve prevention of air embolism.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Umberto G; Torcia, Pierluca; Rigamonti, Paolo; Colombo, Francesca; Giordano, Antonino; Gallieni, Maurizio; Cariati, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Malfunctioning tunneled hemodialysis central venous catheters (CVCs), because of thrombotic or infectious complications, are frequently exchanged. During the CVC exchanging procedure, there are several possible technical complications, as in first insertion, including air embolism. Prevention remains the key to the management of air embolism. Herein, we emphasize the technical tricks capable of reducing the risk of air embolism in long-term CVC exchange. In particular, adoption of a 5 to 10 degrees Trendelenburg position, direct puncture of the previous CVC venous lumen for guide-wire insertion, as opposed to guide-wire introduction after cutting the CVC, a light manual compression of the internal jugular vein venotomy site after catheter removal. The Valsalva maneuvre in collaborating patients, valved introducers, and correction of hypovolemia are also useful precautions. Principles of air embolism diagnosis and treatment are also outlined in the article.

  14. Lights, camera and action in the implementation of central venous catheter dressing1

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Maria Verônica Ferrareze; de Godoy, Simone; de Góes, Fernanda dos Santos Nogueira; Rossini, Fernanda de Paula; de Andrade, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to develop and validate an educational digital video on changing the dressing of short-term, non-cuffed, non-tunneled central venous catheters in hospitalized adult patients. Method: this is a descriptive, methodological study based on Paulo Freire's assumptions. The development of the script and video storyboard were based on scientific evidence, on the researchers' experience, and that of nurse experts, as well as on a virtual learning environment. Results: the items related to the script were approved by 97.2% of the nurses and the video was approved by 96.1%. Conclusion: the educational instrument was considered to be appropriate and we believe it will contribute to professional training in the nursing field, the updating of human resources, focusing on the educational process, including distance education. We believe it will consequently improve the quality of care provided to patients with central venous catheters. PMID:26626011

  15. Risk factors for central venous catheter-related thrombosis in children: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Agarwal, Arnav; Tassone, Maria Cristina; Shahjahan, Nadia; Walton, Mark; Chan, Anthony; Mondal, Tapas

    2016-06-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) placement is associated with increased risk of thrombosis in the paediatric population, particularly in relation to the type of catheter and the manner of its insertion. Here, we investigate risk factors associated with CVC-related thrombosis in children, with particular emphasis on positioning of the catheter tip. Patients aged 0-18 who underwent at least one CVC placement from 2008 to 2013 at a single centre with a subsequent follow-up echocardiogram were included for a total of 104 patients and 147 lines. Data on clinical and catheter-related risk factors were collected from patient charts. Statistical analysis using Pearson's χ tests, independent samples t-test, and odds ratios were used to assess potential risk factors for thrombosis. Neither insertion site (subclavian vein or otherwise), left- vs. right-sided insertion, nor catheter type were significant risk factors for thrombosis. There were no thrombotic events reported at the superior vena cava (SVC)-right atrium junction and no significant differences in thrombotic risk with initial tip placement in the SVC-right atrium junction vs. the SVC, right atrium, or inferior vena cava. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was a major clinical risk factor for thrombosis. Tip movement was common and may have been an important factor in the development of CVC-related thrombi. Prospective studies can yield insight into the role of follow-up imaging in the prevention of catheter-related thrombosis in children.

  16. Prospective monocentric study of non-tunnelled central venous catheter-related complications in hematological patients.

    PubMed

    Nosari, Anna Maria; Nador, Guido; De Gasperi, Andrea; Ortisi, Giuseppe; Volonterio, Alberto; Cantoni, Silvia; Nichelatti, Michele; Marbello, Laura; Mazza, Ernestina; Mancini, Valentina; Ravelli, Erica; Ricci, Francesca; Ciapanna, Denis; Garrone, Federica; Gesu, Giovanni; Morra, Enrica

    2008-11-01

    Indwelling central venous catheters (CVCs) are used in the management of hematologic patients. However, insertion and maintenance of CVCs are susceptible to complications. Study design and methods data concerning 388 consecutive catheterisations, performed in oncohematologic patients between April 2003 and December 2004, were prospectively collected. At insertion thrombocytopenia was present in 109 cases (28.1%) and neutropenia in 67 (17.3%). Hemorrhage after CVC insertion occurred in five thrombocytopenic patients (1.3%). The median duration of catheterisation was 18.8 days (range 1-89), longer in the 7-French CVCs utilised in leukemic patients (24.3 days) and shorter in 12-French CVCs (11 days), used for PBSC harvesting. Deep venous thrombosis was diagnosed in 13 cases (3.3%). Ninety-two catheterisations (12.6/1000 days-catheter) were complicated by infections: 19 local infections (4.8%) and 73 (18.8%) bacteraemias of which 45 (11.6%) were catheter-related, mainly due to Gram positive germs (32/45, 71.1%). The frequency of catheter-related bacteraemia was 7.2 events/1000 days-catheter. Thirteen CVCs were removed due to thrombosis, 15 due to infections, 20 due to malfunction, the remaining 333 at patients discharge. At univariate analysis high-dose chemotherapy (p = 0.013), 7-Fr lumen (p = 0.023), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (p = 0.001), duration of neutropenia >10 days and length of catheterisation were significantly correlated to infection. Multivariate analysis confirmed the duration of catheterisation, AML and high-dose chemotherapy as risk factors. Even though hematological in-patients are at increased risk for bleeding and infections, non-tunnelled CVCs offer a safe venous access also in patients affected by severe thrombocytopenia and prolonged neutropenia.

  17. Simplified point-of-care ultrasound protocol to confirm central venous catheter placement: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sean P.; Assaf, Samer; Lahham, Shadi; Subeh, Mohammad; Chiem, Alan; Anderson, Craig; Shwe, Samantha; Nguyen, Ryan; Fox, John C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current standard for confirmation of correct supra-diaphragmatic central venous catheter (CVC) placement is with plain film chest radiography (CXR). We hypothesized that a simple point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) protocol could effectively confirm placement and reduce time to confirmation. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled a convenience sample of patients in the emergency department and intensive care unit who required CVC placement. Correct positioning was considered if turbulent flow was visualized in the right atrium on sub-xiphoid, parasternal or apical cardiac ultrasound after injecting 5 cc of sterile, non-agitated, normal saline through the CVC. RESULTS: Seventy-eight patients were enrolled. POCUS had a sensitivity of 86.8% (95%CI 77.1%–93.5%) and specificity of 100% (95%CI 15.8%–100.0%) for identifying correct central venous catheter placement. Median POCUS and CXR completion were 16 minutes (IQR 10–29) and 32 minutes (IQR 19–45), respectively. CONCLUSION: Ultrasound may be an effective tool to confirm central venous catheter placement in instances where there is a delay in obtaining a confirmatory CXR. PMID:28123616

  18. Infective Endocarditis in a Patient with Celiac Disease after Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Suryanarayan; Arobelidze, Salome; Gundelly, Parveen; Changarath Vijayan, Anil Kumar

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of infective endocarditis secondary to central venous catheters, which is termed as 'healthcare-associated infective endocarditis'. There is an increased risk of getting infective endocarditis in conditions with malnutrition and also if the tip of the central venous catheter is deep in the right atrium close to the tricuspid valve. We present a case of 31-year-old female who had all these risk factors. She was admitted to the hospital for the work up of the weight loss and was diagnosed with celiac disease. Central venous access was obtained because of poor peripheral intravenous access via the peripherally inserted central catheter which was complicated by thrombosis and removed after three days of insertion, and she was started on anticoagulation. Two weeks after being discharged, she presented to the emergency department with fever, shortness of breath, and had signs of congestive heart failure. A computed tomography of the chest for pulmonary embolism was taken and showed small clot burden pulmonary embolism and two cavitary lesions in the right lung. A transthoracic echocardiogram was taken and showed vegetation on the tricuspid valve and blood cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. Hence, a diagnosis of infective endocarditis was made, and she was treated with intravenous antibiotics for a total of six weeks after a long and complicated hospital stay. PMID:28348945

  19. Assessing nursing students' knowledge and skills in performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Ahlin, C; Klang-Söderkvist, B; Johansson, E; Björkholm, M; Löfmark, A

    2017-01-27

    Venepuncture and the insertion of peripheral venous catheters are common tasks in health care, and training in these procedures is included in nursing programmes. Evidence of nursing students' knowledge and skills in these procedures is limited. The main aim of this study was to assess nursing students' knowledge and skills when performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters. Potential associations between level of knowledge and skills, self-training, self-efficacy, and demographic characteristics were also investigated. The assessment was performed by lecturers at a university college in Sweden using the two previously tested instruments "Assess Venepuncture" and "Assess Peripheral Venous Catheter Insertion". Between 81% and 100% of steps were carried out correctly by the students. The step with the highest rating was "Uses gloves", and lowest rating was 'Informs the patients about the possibility of obtaining local anaesthesia'. Significant correlations between degree of self-training and correct performance were found in the group of students who registered their self-training. No associations between demographic characteristics and correct performances were found. Assessing that students have achieved adequate levels of knowledge and skills in these procedures at different levels of the nursing education is of importance to prevent complications and support patient safety.

  20. [Failure to Remove Long-Term Indwelling Central Venous Catheters in Two Patients].

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Kazuya; Kato, Kenichi; Suzuki, Michiko; Nakayama, Manabu; Tamura, Akio; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Ryouichi; Tomabechi, Makiko; Matsuo, Mikaru; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru

    2015-09-01

    The use ofa central venous(CV)port system has become common for the treatment of patients with tumors. We report on the failure to remove CV catheters in 2 patients. The first patient was a 50 years woman with acute myeloid leukemia. She underwent CV port implantation via the left brachial approach 11 years previously. The second patient was an 80 years man with a lower gingival carcinoma. He underwent CV port implantation via the left brachial approach 6 years previously. CV catheter removal was attempted in both patients, but was unsuccessful because of strong adhesion to the vessel wall. Based on our experience, if catheter removal is impossible, its retention is more suitable.

  1. Central Venous Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection with Kocuria kristinae in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Eichiro; Yaoita, Hisao; Ichinoi, Natsuko; Sakamoto, Osamu; Kure, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    Kocuria kristinae is a catalase-positive, coagulase-negative, Gram-positive coccus found in the environment and in normal skin and mucosa in humans; however, it is rarely isolated from clinical specimens and is considered a nonpathogenic bacterium. We describe a case of catheter-related bacteremia due to K. kristinae in a young adult with propionic acidemia undergoing periodic hemodialysis. The patient had a central venous catheter implanted for total parenteral nutrition approximately 6 months prior to the onset of symptoms because of repeated acute pancreatitis. K. kristinae was isolated from two sets of blood cultures collected from the catheter. Vancomycin followed by cefazolin for 16 days and 5-day ethanol lock therapy successfully eradicated the K. kristinae bacteremia. Although human infections with this organism appear to be rare and are sometimes considered to result from contamination, physicians should not underestimate its significance when it is isolated in clinical specimens. PMID:28194286

  2. Diagnosis of thrombosis by catheter phlebography after prolonged central venous catheterization.

    PubMed Central

    Brismar, B; Hårdstedt, C; Jacobson, S

    1981-01-01

    Sixty central venous catheterizations in 53 patients were prospectively studied with respect to phlebographic findings after prolonged parenteral nutrition. Phlebography was performed by a special technique on completion of the intravenous therapy. Under fluoroscopic control, the central venous catheter was slowly removed, while simultaneously contrast medium was continuously injected through it. Two types of thrombosis were demonstrated--sleeve thrombosis, on 25 occasions (42%), and mural veno-occlusive thrombosis, on five occasions (8%). On removal of the catheter the sleeve thrombosis peeled off the catheter and in several cases it was noticed that parts of the sleeve thrombus or the entire sleeve became detached and were carried away with the blood flow. Although the sleeve thrombus seldom gave rise to any symptoms, this type of thrombosis is of great importance in view of the risk of pulmonary embolism, especially in connection with removal of the catheter. With use of the described phlebographic technique thrombi of this type can be visualized. Images Fig. 1A. Fig. 1B. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:7305496

  3. Double-lumen central venous catheters impregnated with chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine to prevent catheter colonisation in the intensive care unit setting: a prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Camargo, L F A; Marra, A R; Büchele, G L; Sogayar, A M C; Cal, R G R; de Sousa, J M A; Silva, E; Knobel, E; Edmond, M B

    2009-07-01

    Antimicrobial- and antiseptic-impregnated catheters are strategies recommended to prevent central venous catheter (CVC) colonisation. Few data regarding chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters in intensive care unit (ICU) patients have been reported. We performed a prospective, randomised study comparing the colonisation rates of chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated CVCs (group 1) against standard CVCs (group 2). In order to assess catheter colonisation rates, a 4cm segment from the tips of aseptically removed catheters was cultured by the roll-plate method. In all, 109 patients were enrolled with successful catheter insertion, 51 of them in group 1 and 58 in group 2. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups with regards to age, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, ICU admission diagnosis, infection risk, catheter insertion sites or catheter length of stay. The colonisation rates were 29.4% (15 catheters) for group 1 and 34.5% (20 catheters) for group 2 (P=0.50). Double-lumen CVCs impregnated with chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine were not effective in reducing the incidence of catheter colonisation in ICU patients.

  4. Outcome of venous stenting following catheter directed thrombolysis for acute proximal lower limb venous thrombosis: a prospective study with venous Doppler follow-up at 1-year.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, B C; Patra, Soumya; Reddy, Babu; Nagesh, C M; Agarwal, Naveen; Manjunath, C N

    2015-10-01

    Functional outcome of venous stent placement for the management of acute iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis (DVT) following catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT), remain undefined. The purpose of this study was to assess immediate and intermediate term outcomes among patients treated with venous stenting following CDT in patients with proximal lower limb DVT. Thirty consecutive patients aged between 20-70 years with proximal lower limb DVT formed the study group. The mean duration of CDT done with streptokinase was 4.5 ± 1.3 days. Patients with residual venous obstruction and/or large clot burden were treated further with venous angioplasty and/or stenting. Primary endpoint was to evaluate the safety, efficacy and patency of venous stenting in the management of incomplete result following CDT. After 12 months, post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) was assessed clinically using Villalta scale and deep venous patency was assessed through duplex ultrasound. We studied 8 (5 female and 3 male) patients with 9 (3 left and 6 right) limb involvement and 13 stent (4 balloon expandable and 9 self expandable) placement. All patients improved clinically immediately following venous stenting. Technical success was achieved in all patients. One patient developed pulmonary embolism during course of hospital stay. One patient had stent thrombosis and PTS and another patient died due to carcinoma breast during follow-up. Deep venous stenting is an effective mode of treatment in proximal acute lower limb DVT with high late patency rate up to 1-year.

  5. Experience of Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter in Patients with Hematologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yoshinori; Fukuta, Takanori; Maruyama, Junko; Omura, Hiromi; Tanaka, Takayuki

    2017-01-01

    Objective Although use of the peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) has become increasingly common, there are few reports of PICCs used for patients with hematologic diseases. In this study, we analyzed the safety of PICC placement in patients with hematologic diseases where PICCs had been placed to perform blood collection, blood transfusion, drug administration, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods This study included 142 PICCs placed in 95 patients managed at our department from November 2013 to December 2015. The PICCs used were the GroshongⓇ Catheter (NXT single-lumen; BARD Inc.). Results A total of 95 patients underwent the placement of 142 PICCs. The mean patient age was 65.5 years. The total duration of catheterization was 8,089 days, with a mean duration of 57.0 days. Chemotherapy was administered through 107 catheters. Stem cells were injected through 12 catheters. Although a fever was observed in association with 103 catheters, it was generally controlled by antimicrobial therapy. There were 18 catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) cases, an incidence equivalent to 2.1 cases per 1,000 catheter-days. Conclusion The present study demonstrated a low CRBSI incidence rate and found no evidence of serious complications with PICC placement. PICCs can be used for blood collection, blood transfusion, drug administration, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without problems. Thus, PICC placement appears to be a safe procedure for patients with hematologic diseases. Safe catheters are therefore urgently needed for these patients. We expect that PICCs will be widely adopted in Japan in the near future. PMID:28202859

  6. An enlarged intramuscular venous malformation in the femoral region successfully treated with complete resection

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takuo; Ogata, Dai; Miyano, Kyohei; Tsuchida, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intramuscular venous malformations have been previously described as intramuscular hemangiomas, and various therapies have been applied for their treatment. This condition is relatively rare, and therefore, physicians often struggle to determine the appropriate therapy. We presented a case of an enlarged intramuscular venous malformation relapsed after surgery successfully treated with complete resection. Presentation of case We presented a case of an enlarged intramuscular venous malformation with postoperative recurrence successfully treated with complete resection. A 63-year-old woman presented with a subcutaneous mass in the right distal thigh. She experienced swelling in the right thigh 19 years previously and was diagnosed with a venous aneurysm. Three-dimensional CT angiography confirmed the presence of an irregular vessel assumed to be the feeding vessel, which was dendritically branched from the deep femoral artery. We performed surgical complete resection. Her pain and gait disturbance improved after surgery, and she has not experienced recurrence of the mass for the past 2 years. Discussion Conservative therapy is initially used for venous malformations. Sclerotherapy, laser therapy, or surgical resection is considered after low-dose aspirin therapy, in combination with the use of compressive garments. Surgical resection is indicated for completely resectable lesions and is appropriate for large lesions in terms of cosmetic benefit. However, partial resection may result in excessive bleeding or postoperative recurrence. Conclusion The therapy for venous malformations should be decided based on the degree of disability in daily living, adjacent tissue damage, and cosmetic concerns after appropriate differential diagnostic investigations and biopsy. PMID:26945489

  7. Complications of central venous catheter in patients transplanted with hematopoietic stem cells in a specialized service

    PubMed Central

    Barretta, Lidiane Miotto; Beccaria, Lúcia Marinilza; Cesarino, Cláudia Bernardi; Pinto, Maria Helena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the model, average length of stay on site and complications of central venous catheter in patients undergoing transplant of hematopoietic stem cells and verify the corresponding relationship between the variables: age, gender, medical diagnosis, type of transplant, implanted catheter and insertion site. Method: a retrospective and quantitative study with a sample of 188 patients transplanted records between 2007 and 2011. Results: the majority of patients used Hickman catheter with an average length of stay on site of 47.6 days. The complication fever/bacteremia was significant in young males with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma undergoing autologous transplant, which remained with the device for a long period in the subclavian vein. Conclusion: nurses should plan with their team the minimum waiting time, recommended between the catheter insertion and start of the conditioning regimen, as well as not to extend the length of time that catheter should be on site and undertake their continuing education, focusing on the prevention of complications. PMID:27276021

  8. Venous thromboembolism in colorectal cancer patients with central venous catheters for 5-FU infusion-based pharmacokinetic modulating chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Reigetsu; Yanagi, Hidenori; Noda, Masafumi; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Nakano, Hiroki; Gega, Makoto; Tsukamoto, Kiyoshi; Oshima, Tsutomu; Inoue, Takashi; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Shoji, Yasutsugu; Sakaki, Takatoshi; Higasa, Satoshi; Hashimoto-Tamaoki, Tomoko; Yamamura, Takehira

    2005-04-01

    Colorectal cancer patients with central venous catheters (CVC) for pharmacokinetic modulating chemotherapy (PMC) have a substantial risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). PMC, designed as a hybrid of lower metronomic and higher shorter plasma 5-FU concentrations, has been clinically successful. To determine the effectiveness and safety of D-dimer tests and multidetector-row CT (MDCT) for diagnosis in cancer patients with suspected VTE, we carried out a clinical outcome study on PMC outpatients. Patients received a D-dimer test before and after commencing the PMC regimen. MDCT was performed additionally if the D-dimer test appeared positive or showed signs of VTE. When CT results were positive for thromboembolism, anticoagulation was started. The overall prevalence of VTE in PMC patients was 2.0% (7 of 350 patients). In this study, 34 out of 102 colorectal cancer patients gave a positive D-dimer test (33.3%). CT identified venous thrombi in 2 of the 102 patients (2.0%), mural thrombosis on catheterized veins in another 3 patients (2.9%), and endothelial hyperplasia on catheterized veins in 8 patients (7.8%). The catheters of these patients did not show any significant abnormalities. Patients with negative D-dimer tests showed no signs or symptoms of VTE. In colorectal cancer patients receiving continuous 5-FU infusion via CVC, a D-dimer test can be safely used as the primary diagnostic test for ruling out VTE. We suggest 7.0 microg/ml as the D-dimer cut-off value. Thromboprophylaxis should be considered in the patients showing values >7.0 microg/ml.

  9. The power peripherally inserted central catheter is superior to a central venous catheter in management of patients with esophageal variceal bleeding undergoing devascularization.

    PubMed

    Jing, Wen; Rong, He; Li, Jiang; Xia, Zhang Hai; Yu, Zhang Hong; Ke, Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Peripherally-inserted central catheters (PICC) have a greater retention time and less complications compared to central venous catheters (CVC). The study was conducted from From January of 2014 to December 2015 at Beijing DiTan Hospital, Beijing, China, and comprised 70 patients undergoing devascularisation. Of the total, 36(51.4%) patients underwent placement of PICC (Group A), while 34(48.6%) underwent had CVC (Group B). Venous catheterisation was successful in all patients. The median duration of venous catheterization in Group A was greater than that in Group B (p=0.002). Catheter-associated complications did not differ between the groups (p=0.46). The level of blood platelet (PLT) count, Prothrombin activity (PTA) and white blood cell (WBC) count before venous catheterisation were independent risk factors for bleeding at the puncture site and catheter-related infections. A Power PICC may be a better choice than a CVC in patients undergoing devascularisation requiring catheterisation. For patients with a lower PLT count, a decreased PTA, or a decreased WBC, venous catheterisation should be performed with caution.

  10. Systemic anticoagulation related to heparin locking of non-tunnelled venous dialysis catheters in intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Bong, Y C; Walsham, J

    2016-07-01

    Heparin locking of venous dialysis catheters is routinely performed in intensive care to maintain catheter patency when the catheters are not being used. Leakage of heparin into the circulation can potentially cause systemic anticoagulation and may present a risk to intensive care patients. To assess the effect of 5000 units per millilitre heparin locking of non-tunnelled dialysis catheters on systemic anticoagulation, we performed a prospective observational study of ten intensive care patients receiving heparin locking of dialysis catheters in an adult tertiary intensive care unit between July and September 2015. Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) was measured prior to, and three minutes after, heparin locking of catheter lumens with the manufacturer's recommended locking volume to assess the effect on systemic anticoagulation. Heparin locking of venous dialysis catheters resulted in a significant rise in APTT (P=0.002). The median rise was by 56 seconds (interquartile range 30-166.5). Following heparin locking, 80% of patients had APTT values within or above the range associated with therapeutic anticoagulation. Heparin locking of non-tunnelled venous dialysis catheters can cause systemic anticoagulation in intensive care patients and therefore poses a potential risk to patient safety.

  11. Intensivist supervision of resident-placed central venous catheters decreases the incidence of catheter-related blood stream infections.

    PubMed

    Papadimos, Thomas J; Hensely, Sandra J; Duggan, Joan M; Hofmann, James P; Khuder, Sadik A; Borst, Marilyn J; Fath, John J

    2008-04-30

    Catheter-related blood stream infections (CRBSI) cause significant morbidity and mortality. A retrospective study of a performance improvement project in our teaching hospital's surgical intensive care unit (SICU) showed that intensivist supervision was important in reinforcing maximal sterile barriers (MSB) use during the placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) in the prevention of CRBSI. A historical control period, 1 January 2001-31 December 2003, was established for comparison. From 1 January 2003-31 December 2007, MSB use for central venous line placement was mandated for all operators. However, in 2003 there was no intensivist supervision of CVC placements in the SICU. The use of MSB alone did not cause a significant change in the CRBSI rate in the first year of the project, but close supervision by an intensivist in years 2004-2007, in conjunction with MSB use, demonstrated a significant drop in the CRBSI rate when compared to the years before intensivist supervision (2001-2003), p < .0001. A time series analysis comparing monthly rates of CRBSI (2001-2007) also revealed a significant downward trend, p = .028. Additionally, in the first year of the mandated MSB use (2003), 85 independently observed resident-placed CVCs demonstrated that breaks in sterile technique (34/85), as compared those placements that had no breaks in technique (51/85), had more CRBSI, 6/34 (17.6%) vs. 1/51 (1.9%), p < .01. Interventions to reduce CRBSI in our SICU needed emphasis on adequate supervision of trainees in CVC placement, in addition to use of MSB, to effect lower CRBSI rates.

  12. Multi-purpose silastic dual-lumen central venous catheters for both collection and transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, H M; Trehan, S; Miller, R; Fox, R M; Creger, R J; Raaf, J H

    2000-04-01

    Autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplantation frequently requires sequential placement and use of two separate central venous catheters: (1) a short-term, large-bore, stiff device inserted for leukapheresis, and after removal of that device, (2) a long-term, multi-lumen, flexible, Silastic catheter for administration of high-dose chemotherapy, re-infusion of hematopoietic cells, and intensive supportive care. We reviewed our recent experience with two dual-lumen, large-bore, Silastic multi-purpose ('hybrid') catheters, each of which can be used as a single device for both leukapheresis and long-term supportive care throughout the transplant process. Quinton-Raaf PermCath and Bard-Hickman hemodialysis/apheresis dual-lumen catheters were used as the sole venous access device in 112 consecutive patients who underwent autologous PBPC collection and transplantation. The catheter exit site was monitored three times a week, and lumen patency was assessed using clinical and radiologic techniques. Catheters were removed prematurely for persistent thrombus, positive blood cultures despite appropriate antibiotics, or mechanical dysfunction. There were no intra-operative or immediate post-operative complications relating to insertion. Thirty-two patients experienced catheter occlusion necessitating urokinase instillation. Persistent occlusive problems were noted in 16 patients, and in 10 patients the catheter had to be removed. Two exit site infections and 17 bacteremias occurred. Catheters had to be removed for persistent infection in two subjects and for mechanical problems in five others. Cost analysis comparing the hybrid catheters alone vs conventional devices revealed a charge of $4230 in patients with hybrid catheters vs. $7530 in those requiring a temporary non-Silastic dialysis catheter in addition to a flexible, long-term Silastic catheter. Hybrid, Silastic, dual-lumen, large-bore central venous catheters are safe, cost-effective and convenient

  13. How long should umbilical venous catheters remain in place in neonates who require long-term (≥5-7 days) central venous access?

    PubMed

    Keir, Amy; Giesinger, Regan; Dunn, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In this evidenced-based review, we examine the current available literature to help answer the question 'In neonates requiring long-term central access [patient], does removal of the umbilical venous catheter (UVC) on days 5-7 and replacement with a peripherally inserted central catheter line [intervention] compared with leaving the UVC in situ [comparison] reduce rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections [outcome]?'

  14. Are central venous catheter tip cultures reliable after 6-day refrigeration?

    PubMed

    Bouza, Emilio; Guembe, Maria; Gómez, Haydee; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Rivera, Marisa; Alcalá, Luis

    2009-07-01

    Present guidelines recommend culturing only central venous catheter (CVC) tips from patients with suspected catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI). However, a high proportion of these suspicions are not confirmed. Moreover, CVC tip culture increases laboratory workload, and reports of colonization may be meaningless or misleading for the clinician. Our working hypothesis was that CVC tips should be refrigerated and cultured only in patients with positive blood cultures. We evaluated the effect of 6-day refrigeration of 215 CVC tips. We selected all the catheters with a significant count according to the Maki's roll-plate technique and randomly assigned them to 2 groups. In group A, the catheters were recultured after 24 h of refrigeration, and in group B, the catheters were recultured after 6 days more of refrigeration, so that the refrigeration time evaluated would be of 6 days. The yield of refrigerated CVC tips that grow significant colony counts of primary culture in group B was compared with the yield of refrigerated catheter tips in group A. The difference showed that 6-day refrigeration reduced the number of significant CVCs by 15.2%. Only 61 CVCs were obtained from patients with CR-BSI, and in most of them, blood cultures were already positive before CVC culture, so only 0.91% of the CR-BSI episodes would have been misdiagnosed as culture negative after refrigeration. Refrigeration of CVC tips sent for culture and culturing only those from patients with positive blood cultures reduce the workload in the microbiology laboratory without misdiagnosing CR-BSI.

  15. Ultrasound for Localization of Central Venous Catheter: A Good Alternative to Chest X-Ray?

    PubMed Central

    Kamalipour, Hamid; Ahmadi, Sedigheh; Kamali, Karmella; Moaref, Alireza; Shafa, Masih; Kamalipour, Parsa

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest radiography after central venous catheter (CVC) insertion is the main method of verifying the catheter location. Despite the widespread use of radiography for detecting catheter position, x-ray may not always be readily available, especially in the operating room. Objectives We aimed to compare contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and chest radiography for detecting the correct location of CVCs. Methods One hundred sixteen consecutive patients with indications for CVC before cardiac surgery were enrolled in this observational study. After catheter insertion, CEUS was performed. Portable radiography was obtained postoperatively in the intensive care unit. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were determined by comparing the ultrasonography results with radiographic findings as a reference standard. Results Chest radiography revealed 16 CVC misplacements: two cases of intravascular and 14 cases of right atrium (RA) misplacement. CEUS detected 11 true catheter malpositionings in the RA, while it could not recognize seven catheter placements correctly. CEUS showed two false RA misplacements and five falsely correct CVC positions. A sensitivity of 98% and specificity of 69% were achieved for CEUS in detecting CVC misplacements. Positive and negative predictive values were 95% and 85%, respectively. The interrater agreement (kappa) between CEUS and radiography was 0.72 (P < 0.001). Conclusions Despite close concordance between ultrasonography and chest radiography, CEUS is not a suitable alternative for standard chest radiography in detecting CVC location; however, considering its high sensitivity and acceptable specificity in our study, its usefulness as a triage method for detecting CVC location on a real-time basis in the operating room cannot be ignored. PMID:27847699

  16. Prevention of central venous catheter-related infection in the neonatal unit: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jacqueline E; McDonald, Susan J; Tan, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Central venous catheter infections are the leading cause of healthcare-associated bloodstream infections and contribute significantly to mortality and morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Moreover, infection poses significant economic consequence which increased hospital costs and increased length of hospital stay. Prevention strategies are detailed in guidelines published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States; nevertheless, recent surveys in neonatal units in the United States, and Australia and New Zealand demonstrate these are not always followed. This review discusses the numerous evidence-based strategies to prevent catheter infections including hand hygiene, maximal sterile barriers during insertion, skin disinfection, selection of insertion site, dressings, aseptic non-touch technique, disinfection of catheter hubs/ports, administration set management, prompt removal of catheter, antibiotic locks, systemic antibiotic prophylaxis and chlorhexidine bathing. Furthermore, it will describe different strategies that can be implemented into clinical practice to reduce infection rates. These include the use of care bundles including checklists, education and the use of CVC teams.

  17. Management of complications related to central venous catheters in cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit

    2014-04-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are important for the treatment of patients with cancer, especially in the perioperative and palliative care settings. These devices not only allow for the administration of chemotherapy, parenteral nutrition, and other intravenous therapies, but they may also improve the patients' quality of life by reducing the need for repeated peripheral venipunctures. Thrombotic and infectious complications are common, especially in the long-term use of CVCs. There are different types of thrombotic complications associated with CVCs, that is, a thrombotic occlusion of the catheter, a mural thrombus at the catheter tip and classical deep vein thrombosis, which occurs most frequently in the upper extremity where the majority of long-term catheters are inserted. Infections are common complications associated with CVCs. Patients with cancer who receive intensive chemotherapy and those patients who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have a markedly increased risk for insertion site and bloodstream infections. In this review, the epidemiology and risk factors that predispose patients to CVC-related thrombosis and infection are discussed. The diagnostic and therapeutic options according to the published data and the current guidelines are summarized and data for establishing primary and secondary preventative strategies are provided.

  18. Low Cardiac Output Secondary to a Malpositioned Umbilical Venous Catheter: Value of Targeted Neonatal Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Dany E.; Poon, Wei Bing; James, Andrew; McNamara, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic hypotension is common in very low birthweight preterm infants but the nature of the precipitating cause may be unclear. Targeted neonatal echocardiography (TnEcho) is being increasingly used to support hemodynamic decisions in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), including identifying impairments in the transitional circulation of preterm infants, providing timely re-evaluation after institution of therapies and evaluating the placement of indwelling catheters. We present a case of a preterm infant with systemic hypotension and low cardiac output secondary to a large transatrial shunt induced by a malpositioned umbilical venous catheter. Repositioning of the line led to resolution of the hemodynamic disturbance and clinical instability, highlighting the utility of TnEcho in the NICU. PMID:25032055

  19. Three-Dimensional Imaging of a Central Venous Dialysis Catheter Related Infected Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Diana Yuan Yng; Green, Darren; Kalra, Philip A.; Abidin, Nik

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography is becoming widely available and with novel applications. We report an interesting case of a 68-year-old lady with a central venous thrombosis coincident with both a dialysis catheter infection and a recent pacemaker insertion. Two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography was unable to delineate whether the thrombosis was involved with the pacemaker wire or due to the tunneled catheter infection. The use of 3D echocardiography was able to produce distinct images aiding diagnosis. This circumvented the need for invasive investigations and inappropriate, high-risk removal of the pacing wire. This case highlights the emerging application of 3D echocardiography in routine nephrology practice. PMID:26688761

  20. A Rare Complication of Central Venous Catheter Extravasation in a Preterm Neonate: Hemidiaphragmatic Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, C.; Dubillot, D.; Lardy, H.; Sirinelli, D.; Saliba, E.; Lopez, E.

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of a preterm neonate born at 26 weeks' of gestation diagnosed with unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. This paralysis was a consequence of a phrenic nerve injury due to extravasation of hyperosmolar parenteral nutrition fluid in the upper thorax. Chest X-rays and ultrasonography confirmed the diagnosis. The neonate was treated with prolonged respiratory support and did not require surgical treatment. This report describes a case of hemidiaphragmatic paralysis as a complication of central venous catheter insertion. In neonates, spontaneous recovery of diaphragmatic paralysis is possible. This study concludes that recovery of extravasation injury-induced phrenic nerve palsy in the context of conservative management is possible.

  1. Improving Patient Safety with a Mobile Application for Patients with Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheters (PICC).

    PubMed

    Nüssli, Stephan; Schnyder, Florian; Zenhäusern, Raphael; Bosshart, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are of growing interest because they allow intravenous therapies up to several months. The appropriate management of the PICCs is crucial to minimize complications and largely depends on the right information for everyone who cares for the patient. To reach this goal we develop the mobile application "PICC App" to provide the necessary information for all involved persons in the outpatient setting. We expect to be able to report about the PICC App and the results of the usability evaluation with pilot users.

  2. Risk factors for central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection: a 1073-patient study.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Junichi; Ishimaru, Toshiyuki; Fujimoto, Michiko; Hirata, Noriko; Matsubara, Nobuo; Koyanagi, Nobuhiro

    2008-12-01

    We intended to evaluate the risk factors for catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI) with central venous (CV) catheters. For the hub of the CV line, we used three-way stopcocks in the first year of the study and closed needleless connectors (NCs) in the second year. Background factors included the age and sex of patients; the ward; the specialty service; the CV catheter and its days of placement; and the staff compounding the intravenous infusion, i.e., either nurses, who disinfect hands-free, or pharmacists using clean benches. Outcome factors included positive culture from the blood-related samples and the body temperature estimate. Of a total of 29 221 device-days in 1073 patients, positive cultures showed an overall incidence of 2.26 per 1000 device-days. Multivariate analysis showed a higher odds ratio of positive cultures for the ICU (odds ratio [OR], 4.415; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.054-9.490]) and for CV catheter placement for more than 30 days (OR, 7.529; 95% CI, 4.279-13.247), but no significance for male sex (OR, 1.752; 95% CI, 0.984-3.119) or for pharmacists' compounding (OR, 2.150; 95% CI, 0.974-4.749). Univariate analysis showed no significance for the following factors: age more than 70 years (OR, 0.968; 95% CI 0.561-1.641), the surgery service (OR, 1.029; 95% CI, 0.582-1.818), double-lumen CV catheters (OR, 0.841; 95% CI, 0.465-1.521), or the NC (1.107; 95% CI, 0.673-1.821). We conclude that the theoretical benefit of the NC, the abolished dead space in the hub, contributed little to the outcomes of blood-related culture. The hands-free disinfection may have resulted in comparable odds ratios for the nurses and the pharmacists compounding the infusions.

  3. Incidence and risk factors for central venous catheter-related thrombosis in hematological patients.

    PubMed

    Joks, Monika; Czyż, Anna; Popławski, Dariusz; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2014-01-01

    Catheter-related thrombosis (CRT) is a serious complication in hematological patients, but the risk factors for its occurrence are not well established. The study objectives were to estimate the incidence of CRT and to identify the risk factors for developing CRT in hematological patients. In a prospective setting, 104 consecutive patients with 200 insertions of central venous catheters were enrolled into the study. The patients were screened for CRT by compression Doppler ultrasound every 10-14 days. Additionally, ultrasonography was performed in the case of clinical symptoms suggesting CRT. Over the course of 6,098 catheter days of follow-up, the incidence of CRT was 13.5 %. In 18/27 cases (66.6 %), radiological evidence of CRT was preceded by clinical symptoms. However, in 9/27 (33.3 %), CRT was clinically asymptomatic. The median times to symptomatic and asymptomatic CRT were 17 (range 1-49) and 8 (range 1-16) catheter days, respectively. In univariate analysis, the risk factors for CRT were exit-site infection (ESI) (P < 0.001), two or more prior chemotherapy lines (P = 0.015), catheter-related blood stream infection (P < 0.001), and Coagulase-negative staphylococci infection (P = 0.002). In multivariate analysis, ESI (OR 5.0; 95 % CI 1.6-6.3; P = 0.006) and two or more prior chemotherapy lines (OR 3.57; 95 % CI 1.27-10.11; P = 0.015) remained significantly associated with the risk of CRT. The results of our study provide information regarding the characteristic features of the patients who are at high risk of thrombosis, for whom Doppler ultrasound screening should be considered.

  4. Guidelines for the prevention of central venous catheter-related blood stream infections with prostanoid therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Doran, A K; Ivy, D D; Barst, R J; Hill, N; Murali, S; Benza, R L

    2008-07-01

    Intravenous prostanoids are the backbone of therapy for advanced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and have improved long-term outcome and quality of life. Currently, two prostanoids are approved by the US Food and Drug administration for parenteral administration: epoprostenol (Flolan) and treprostinil (Remodulin). Chronic intravenous therapy presents considerable challenges for patients and caregivers who must learn sterile preparation of the medication, operation of the pump, and care of the central venous catheter. Patients are routinely counseled and advised regarding the risks of CR-BSIs and catheter care before central line insertion. Central line infections as well as bacteremia are well documented risks of chronic intravenous therapy and may significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality. Recent reports have suggested a possible increase in CR-BSI; therefore, the Scientific Leadership Council of the Pulmonary Hypertension Association decided to provide guidelines for good clinical practice regarding catheter care. Although data exits regarding patients with central venous catheters and the risk of blood stream infections in patients with cancer or other disorders, there is little data regarding the special needs of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension requiring central venous access. These guidelines are extrapolated from the diverse body of literature regarding central venous catheter care.

  5. [Abnormal catheter mobility in a totally implantable venous access depending on the upright or supine position in an obese patient].

    PubMed

    Bernard, P; Vrignaud, S; Letessier, E; Denimal, F; Le Néel, J C

    2001-10-01

    The authors advise on an exceptional complication in a totally implantable venous access and give recommendations on how to avoid this problem. In an obese person, one week after the implantation of a totally implantable venous access, a chest X-ray showed that the catheter was too short. In the operative room, at the time of the second intervention, the radioscopy did not find this anomaly. The subcutaneous injection port was positioned too low. When the patient was in a supine position, the subcutaneous injection port was in the correct position but when she was in an upright position, the breast descended and pulled down the subcutaneous injection port and the catheter.

  6. [Significance of ultrasonics in the placement of a central venous catheter].

    PubMed

    Sauer, W; Luft, D; Risler, T; Renn, W; Eggstein, M

    1988-09-16

    An ultrasound investigation was undertaken of the neck region of 42 patients with normal neck anatomy in order to determine whether the results of ultrasound-gained topographical data provided pointers to the choice of entry site to the internal jugular vein (IJV). In addition, the IJV was punctured under ultrasound control in 23 patients in an intensive care unit in whom there was a problem of increased bleeding tendency, anatomical difficulty or previously failed "blind" puncture. In all of them a central venous catheter was placed without complication by the Seldinger technique via the primary chosen point for puncture. An approach through the sternocleidomastoid muscle, between the cricoid level and the "central" place of puncture between the two bellies of the sternocleidomastoid muscle proved to be the most satisfactory compromise between easy application of the ultrasound head, large vein diameter and reduction of any risk of mistakenly puncturing artery or pleura. This approach has to be varied according to the ultrasound findings. It is concluded from this experience that ultrasound is suitable for the placement of central venous catheters. But since the equipment is bulky it cannot be used in an emergency.

  7. Peripherally inserted central venous catheter safety in burn care: a single-center retrospective cohort review.

    PubMed

    Austin, Ryan E; Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Bolourani, Siavash; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    The use of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line for central venous access in thermally injured patients has increased in recent years despite a lack of evidence regarding safety in this patient population. A recent survey of invasive catheter practices among 44 burn centers in the United States found that 37% of burn units use PICC lines as part of their treatment protocol. The goal of this study was to compare PICC-associated complication rates with the existing literature in both the critical care and burn settings. The methodology involved is a single institution retrospective cohort review of patients who received a PICC line during admission to a regional burn unit between 2008 and 2013. Fifty-three patients were identified with a total of seventy-three PICC lines. The primary outcome measurement for this study was indication for PICC line discontinuation. The most common reason for PICC line discontinuation was that the line was no longer indicated (45.2%). Four cases of symptomatic upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (5.5%) and three cases of central line-associated bloodstream infection (4.3%, 2.72 infections per 1000 line days) were identified. PICC lines were in situ an average of 15 days (range 1 to 49 days). We suggest that PICC line-associated complication rates are similar to those published in the critical care literature. Though these rates are higher than those published in the burn literature, they are similar to central venous catheter-associated complication rates. While PICC lines can be a useful resource in the treatment of the thermally injured patient, they are associated with significant and potentially fatal risks.

  8. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis via Small Saphenous Veins for Treating Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Xu, Xiao-dong; Gao, Peng; Yu, Ji-Xiang; Li, Yu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Meng, Ran-ran

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little data comparing catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) via small saphenous veins vs. systematic thrombolysis on complications and efficacy in acute deep venous thrombosis patients. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy and safety of CDT via the small saphenous veins with systematic thrombolysis for patients with acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Material/Methods Sixty-six patients with acute DVT admitted from June 2012 to December 2013 were divided into 2 groups: 27 patients received systemic thrombolysis (ST group) and 39 patients received CDT via the small saphenous veins (CDT group). The thrombolysis efficiency, limb circumference differences, and complications such as post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) in the 2 groups were recorded. Results The angiograms demonstrated that all or part of the fresh thrombus was dissolved. There was a significant difference regarding thrombolysis efficiency between the CDT group and ST group (71.26% vs. 48.26%, P=0.001). In both groups the postoperative limb circumference changes were higher compared to the preoperative values. The differences between postoperative limb circumferences on postoperative days 7 and 14 were significantly higher in the CDT group than in the ST group (all P<0.05). The incidence of postoperative PTS in the CDT group (17.9%) was significantly lower in comparison to the ST group (51.85%) during the follow-up (P=0.007). Conclusions Catheter-directed thrombolysis via the small saphenous veins is an effective, safe, and feasible approach for treating acute deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27552357

  9. One step behind to step ahead - femoral approach to stabilize and to extract functional pacing lead to regain venous access.

    PubMed

    Maciąg, Aleksander; Syska, Paweł; Kuśmierski, Krzysztof; Broy, Beata; Sterliński, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Transvenous lead extraction can be a method to regain venous access. We present the case of a man, aged 67, with indications to upgrade an ICD to a resynchronization therapy device. Since innominate vein occlusion was diagnosed and extraction of an abandoned ventricular pacing lead did not provide lumen regain, a functional atrial lead was extracted with the femoral approach to stabilization and venous access was regained. Asymptomatic vein wall damage but no other complications were recorded. The simultaneous application of different techniques to regain venous access may allow success of the final procedure in system upgrading.

  10. Hospital-wide multidisciplinary, multimodal intervention programme to reduce central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Zingg, Walter; Cartier, Vanessa; Inan, Cigdem; Touveneau, Sylvie; Theriault, Michel; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Clergue, François; Pittet, Didier; Walder, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) is the major complication of central venous catheters (CVC). The aim of the study was to test the effectiveness of a hospital-wide strategy on CLABSI reduction. Between 2008 and 2011, all CVCs were observed individually and hospital-wide at a large university-affiliated, tertiary care hospital. CVC insertion training started from the 3rd quarter and a total of 146 physicians employed or newly entering the hospital were trained in simulator workshops. CVC care started from quarter 7 and a total of 1274 nurses were trained by their supervisors using a web-based, modular, e-learning programme. The study included 3952 patients with 6353 CVCs accumulating 61,366 catheter-days. Hospital-wide, 106 patients had 114 CLABSIs with a cumulative incidence of 1.79 infections per 100 catheters. We observed a significant quarterly reduction of the incidence density (incidence rate ratios [95% confidence interval]: 0.92 [0.88-0.96]; P<0.001) after adjusting for multiple confounders. The incidence densities (n/1000 catheter-days) in the first and last study year were 2.3/1000 and 0.7/1000 hospital-wide, 1.7/1000 and 0.4/1000 in the intensive care units, and 2.7/1000 and 0.9/1000 in non-intensive care settings, respectively. Median time-to-infection was 15 days (Interquartile range, 8-22). Our findings suggest that clinically relevant reduction of hospital-wide CLABSI was reached with a comprehensive, multidisciplinary and multimodal quality improvement programme including aspects of behavioural change and key principles of good implementation practice. This is one of the first multimodal, multidisciplinary, hospital-wide training strategies successfully reducing CLABSI.

  11. Computed Tomography-Guided Central Venous Catheter Placement in a Patient with Superior Vena Cava and Inferior Vena Cava Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rivero, Maria A.; Shaw, Dennis W.W.; Schaller, Robert T. Jr.

    1999-01-15

    An 18-year-old man with a gastrointestinal hypomotility syndrome required lifelong parenteral nutrition. Both the superior and inferior vena cava were occluded. Computed tomography guidance was used to place a long-term central venous catheter via a large tributary to the azygos vein.

  12. Duration and Adverse Events of Non-cuffed Catheter in Patients With Hemodialysis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-09

    Renal Failure Chronic Requiring Hemodialysis; Central Venous Catheterization; Inadequate Hemodialysis Blood Flow; Venous Stenosis; Venous Thrombosis; Infection Due to Central Venous Catheter; Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis

  13. [Two Cases of Retained Guide Wires after Placement of a Central Venous Catheter via the Internal Jugular Vein].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Masumori, Yasushi; Tanigawa, Saori; Miyakawa, Hidetoshi; Sakamoto, Miki; Tateda, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    We report two cases of a retained guide wire after perioperative placement of a central venous catheter during a six-month period. Case 1: A 73-year-old male was scheduled for an open cholecystectomy and hepatectomy. After induction of anesthesia, a central venous (CV) catheter was inserted via the right internal jugular vein using an ultrasound guide. Chest radiographs showed a retained guide wire in the inferior vena cava immediately after surgery, which was removed by interventional radiologist before the patient emerged from anesthesia. Case 2: A 77-year-old male was scheduled for colostomy closure. The surgeon inserted a CV catheter in the right internal jugular vein 4 days before the colostomy. Chest radiographs revealed a retained guide wire in the inferior vena cava, which was removed by interventional radiologists before the patient emerged from anesthesia. Although a retained guide wire is a rare complication, awareness of this mishap is necessary to prevent it from happening.

  14. Prophylaxis with urokinase in pediatric oncology patients with central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Kalmanti, Maria; Germanakis, John; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Syfridaki, Cathrin; Christidou, Athanasia; Tsetis, Dimitris; Vardas, Panagiotis; Charisis, George

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of urokinase in the prevention of central venous catheter (CVC)-related complications in children with malignancy. Fifteen patients with 16 CVCs (study group A) received an intraluminal application of urokinase (10,000 IU in each catheter lumen for 4 h) once a week. They were monitored prospectively with quantitative blood cultures and ultrasonography (color Doppler ultrasound of the great veins and echocardiography). The rate of complications was compared with that of 15 children with 19 CVCs without thromboprophylaxis, treated the previous significantly lower incidence of CVC dysfunction year (control group B). The authors found a wer incidence of CVC dysfunction (3/16 versus 13/19), no major thrombosis, fewer CVC-related bacteremias (2/16 versus 8/19), and a higher salvage of CVCs (1/16 versus 5/19 CVC removals due to persistent bacteremia) in the thromboprophylaxis group. Asymptomatic thrombosis rate was also lower (7/16 cases in group A versus 9/11 in group B when sonography was performed). No hemorrhagic complications were noted. Thromboprophylaxis with urokinase seems a safe and effective measure for reducing the rate of CVC-related complications.

  15. Standardizing central venous catheter care by using observations from patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Weingart, Saul N; Hsieh, Candace; Lane, Sharon; Cleary, Angela M

    2014-06-01

    To understand the vulnerability of patients with cancer to central line-associated bloodstream infections related to tunneled central venous catheters (CVCs), patients were asked to describe their line care at home and in clinic and to characterize their knowledge and experience managing CVCs. Forty-five adult patients with cancer were recruited to participate. Patients were interviewed about the type of line, duration of use, and observations of variations in line care. They also were asked about differences between line care at home and in the clinic, precautions taken when bathing, and their education regarding line care. Demographic information and primary cancer diagnosis were taken from the patients' medical records. Patients with hematologic and gastrointestinal malignancies were heavily represented. The majority had tunneled catheters with subcutaneous implanted ports. Participants identified variations in practice among nurses who cared for them. Although many participants expressed confidence in their knowledge of line care, some were uncertain about what to do if the dressing became loose or wet, or how to recognize an infection. Patients seemed to be astute observers of their own care and offered insights into practice variation. Their observations show that CVC care practices should be standardized, and educational interventions should be created to address patients' knowledge deficits.

  16. Characterizing the in vitro biofilm phenotype of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Van Kerckhoven, Marian; Hotterbeekx, An; Lanckacker, Ellen; Moons, Pieter; Lammens, Christine; Kerstens, Monique; Ieven, Margareta; Delputte, Peter; Jorens, Philippe G; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Goossens, Herman; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC)-related infections are commonly caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis that is able to form a biofilm on the catheter surface. Many studies involving biofilm formation by Staphylococcus have been published each adopting an own in vitro model. Since the capacity to form a biofilm depends on multiple environmental factors, direct comparison of results obtained in different studies remains challenging. This study characterized the phenotype (strong versus weak biofilm-producers) of S. epidermidis from CVCs in four different in vitro biofilm models, covering differences in material type (glass versus polymer) and nutrient presentation (static versus continuous flow). A good correlation in phenotype was obtained between glass and polymeric surfaces independent of nutrient flow, with 85% correspondence under static growth conditions and 80% under dynamic conditions. A 80% correspondence between static and dynamic conditions on polymeric surfaces could be demonstrated as well. Incubation time had a significant influence on the biofilm phenotype with only 55% correspondence between the dynamic models at different incubation times (48h versus 17h). Screening for the presence of biofilm-related genes only revealed that ica A was correlated with biofilm formation under static but not under dynamic conditions. In conclusion, this study highlights that a high level of standardization is necessary to interpret and compare results of different in vitro biofilm models.

  17. Inserting central venous catheter in emergency conditions in coagulopathic patients in comparison to noncoagulopathic patients

    PubMed Central

    Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad; Kolahdouzan, Mohsen; Mousavi, Seyed Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: The current study was designed to compare the complications and adverse effects of central venous catheter (CVC) insertion under ultrasound guidance in patients with and without coagulopathy. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 59 patients who needed CVC for various reasons were enrolled. Patients were divided into two groups of those with and without coagulopathy based on complete blood count, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, and international normalized ratio test results, and then, CVC was inserted with ultrasound guidance in both groups. The CVC inserting site was examined for hematoma and hemorrhage in four stages at different times. Results: There was no significant difference in the terms of demographic features, catheter lumen size (P = 0.43), and number of attempting for CVC placement (odds ratio [OR] =2.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.36–15.3, P = 0.39) between two groups. Seven out of 59 patients suffered from complications (11.9%) that the complications in coagulopathic patients were oozing (5.7%) and superficial hematoma (8.6%) while in noncoagulopathic patients were 4.2% for both complications (OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.09–3.07, P = 0.767). Conclusion: According to our results, it can be concluded that inserting CVC with ultrasound guidance under emergency conditions causes no serious and life-threatening complications in coagulopathic patients. PMID:28255328

  18. Going with the flow or swimming against the tide: should children with central venous catheters swim?

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica; Dalton, Meghan K; Duggan, Christopher; Lam, Shirley; Iglesias, Julie; Jaksic, Tom; Gura, Kathleen M

    2014-02-01

    Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) have central venous catheters (CVCs) in place to allow the safe and effective infusion of life-sustaining fluids and nutrition. Many consider recreational swimming to be a common part of childhood, but for some, the risk may outweigh the benefit. Children with CVCs may be at increased risk of exit site, tunnel, and catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) if these catheters are immersed in water. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current literature regarding the risk of infection for patients with CVCs who swim and determine if there is consensus among home PN (HPN) programs on this controversial issue. A total 45 articles were reviewed and 16 pediatric HPN programs were surveyed regarding swimming and CVCs. Due to the limited data available, a firm recommendation cannot be made. Recreational water associated outbreaks are well documented in the general public, as is the presence of human pathogens even in chlorinated swimming pools. As a medical team, practitioners can provide information and education regarding the potential risk, but ultimately the decision lies with the parents. If the parents decide swimming is worth the risk, they are encouraged to use products designed for this use and to change their child's dressing immediately after swimming. Due to our experience with a fatal event immediately after swimming, we continue to strongly discourage patients with CVCs from swimming. Further large and well-designed studies regarding the risk of swimming with a CVC are needed to make a strong, evidence-based recommendation.

  19. A Missing Guide Wire After Placement of Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Kashif, Muhammad; Hashmi, Hafiz; Jadhav, Preeti; Khaja, Misbahuddin

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 50 Final Diagnosis: Retained guidewire removal by interventional radiology Symptoms: Swelling Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Fluoroscopic retrieval of the guidewire Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual setting of medical care Background: Central venous catheterization is a common tool used in critically ill patients to monitor central venous pressure and administer fluids and medications such as vasopressors. Here we present a case of a missing guide wire after placement of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC), which was incidentally picked up by bedside ultrasound in the intensive care unit. Case Report: A 50-year-old Hispanic male was admitted to the intensive care unit for alcohol intoxication. He was managed for septic shock and required placement of a peripherally inserted central line in his left upper extremity for antibiotics and vasopressor administration. A bedside ultrasound performed by the intensivist to evaluate upper extremity swelling revealed a foreign body in the left arm. Percutaneous procedure by Interventional radiologist was required for retrieval of the guidewire. Conclusions: Guide wire related complications are rarely reported, but are significantly associated with mortality and morbidity. The use of ultrasound guidance placement of PICC lines decreases the risk of complications, provides better optimal vein selection, and enhances success. PMID:27920421

  20. OUTBACK catheter for treatment of superficial femoral and iliac artery chronic total occlusion: Experience from two centers

    PubMed Central

    Husainy, Mohammad Ali; Suresh, Balla; Fang, Cheng; Ammar, Thoraya; Botchu, Rajesh; Thava, V

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The OUTBACK® catheter is a reentry device that enables reentry into a vessel lumen from the subintimal space during subintimal angioplasty. It is reserved for cases where reentry has not been possible using conventional wire and catheter techniques. We report a two-center experience in recanalization of the chronic total occlusions of the common iliac (CIA) and the superficial femoral artery (SFA) using the OUTBACK® catheter in cases where other techniques were unsuccessful. Material and Methods: All cases where recanalization was performed using the OUTBACK® reentry catheter between January 2010 to January 2015 were retrospectively identified and included in this study. 21 patients were identified. The indication for intervention in these cases included claudication and critical leg ischemia. In all cases, conventional recanalization could not be successfully achieved. Results: The OUTBACK® catheter was used to recanalize 10 SFA occlusion and 9 CIA occlusions. In 19 patients (90%), reentry into true arterial lumen was successfully achieved. 17 patients had their recanalization through the transfemoral approach whereas 2 patients had a transpopliteal artery approach. In 2 patients, reentry into the true lumen could not be achieved using the OUTBACK® catheter due to patient's intolerability for the procedure and severe atherosclerotic calcified plaques. There was 100% patency of the vessel intervened on Duplex ultrasound at 24 months of follow up. 16 patients (84%) remained asymptomatic and 2 patients (10.5%) reported worsening of their symptoms due to the development of new lesions within the arterial system. Conclusion: The OUTBACK® catheter is an effective and safe technique for reentry into the vessel lumen when conventional techniques fail. PMID:27413275

  1. Common femoral endovenectomy in conjunction with iliac vein stenting to improve venous inflow in severe post-thrombotic obstruction.

    PubMed

    Verma, Himanshu; Tripathi, Ramesh K

    2017-01-01

    Post-thrombotic syndrome secondary to iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis is a significant contributor to advanced chronic venous insufficiency. Iliac vein stenting is a standard procedure to treat iliocaval obstruction. In cases with obstruction extending across the groin, venous inflow for an iliac vein stent may be poor and compromise results of iliac vein stenting. Treatment options include extension of stents across the inguinal ligament that may have limitations in improving inflow only from only one vessel. Endovenectomy in this scenario becomes an attractive option with or without iliac vein stenting to provide outflow to the profunda vein, which otherwise is "axially transformed" in chronic iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis. We describe a technique of endovenectomy in combination with iliac vein stenting to establish a patent outflow tract for profunda and femoral veins. Accompanying also is a video demonstration of endovenectomy that will help viewers understand more technical aspects of the procedure.

  2. Evaluating safety of tunneled small bore central venous catheters in chronic kidney disease population: A quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Gauri; El Ters, Mireille; Kremers, Walter K; Klunder, Joe L; Taler, Sandra J; Williams, Amy W; Stockland, Andrew H; Hogan, Marie C

    2016-09-20

    Introduction Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) may adversely impact future successful arteriovenous fistulae (AVF). As part of a quality improvement project, the performance of tunneled small bore tunneled central venous catheters (TSB-CVCs), as alternatives to PICCs, was evaluated. Methods A retrospective observational study, involving individuals ≥18 years of age who underwent TSB-CVC placement by Interventional Radiology at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN between 1/1/2010 and 8/30/2013. Findings The study cohort included 92 patients with a median age of 55 (46-67) years, who underwent 108 TSB-CVC placements. Baseline renal disease was present in 71% (77/108). Most TSB-CVCs were placed in hospitalized patients (94%; 102/108); five French in diameter (61%; 66/108) and located in an internal jugular vein (84%; 91/108). Median catheter indwelling time was 20 (11-43) days (n = 84). TSB-CVC-related bloodstream infection, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and superficial venous thrombosis (SpVT) rates per line were 0.009 (1/108), 0.018 (2/108), and 0.009 (1/108), respectively. Venous outcomes in a subgroup of 54 patients, who had documented PICC placements (n = 161) in addition to TSB-CVC (n = 58) were compared. TSB-CVC-DVT rate was lower than the PICC-DVT rate (0.017 [1/58] vs. 0.106 per line [17/161]; P = 0.04). The TSB-CVC-SpVT rate was not different from the PICC-SpVT rate (0 [0/58] vs. 0.037 [6/161] per line; P = 0.14). Discussion TSB-CVCs demonstrated an excellent safety profile in our study. These catheters should be preferentially utilized for arm vein preservation in advanced kidney disease. Their impact on future AVF success needs further evaluation.

  3. Comparing the Effect of 3 Kinds of Different Materials on the Hemostasis of the Central Venous Catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Ming; Liang, Zhen-Zhen; Song, Chun-Lei

    2016-05-01

    To compare the effect of 3 kinds of different materials on the hemostasis of puncture site after central venous catheterization. Method: A selection of 120 patients with peripheral central venous catheter chemotherapy in the Affiliated Hospital of our university from January 2014 to April 2015, Randomly divided into 3 groups, using the same specification (3.5cm × 2cm) alginate gelatin sponge and gauze dressing, 3 kinds of material compression puncture point, 3 groups of patients after puncture 24 h within the puncture point of local blood and the catheter after the catheter 72 h within the catheter maintenance costs. Result: (1) The local infiltration of the puncture point in the 24 h tube: The use of alginate dressing and gelatin sponge hemostatic effect is better than that of compression gauze. The difference was statistically significant (P <0.05). Compared with gelatin sponge and alginate dressing hemostatic effect, The difference was not statistically significant. (2) Tube maintenance cost: Puncture point using gelatin sponge, The local maintenance costs of the catheter within 72 h after insertion of the tube are lowest, compared with alginate dressing and gauze was significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: The choice of compression hemostasis material for the puncture site after PICC implantation, using gelatin sponge and gauze dressing is more effective and economic.

  4. Transient neurological deficit due to a misplacement of central venous catheter despite ultrasound guidance and ultrasound assistance.

    PubMed

    Idialisoa, Rado; Jouffroy, Romain; Saint Martin, Laure Castres; Lamhaut, Lionel; Baud, Frédéric; Philippe, Pascal; Carli, Pierre; Vivien, Benoît

    2015-10-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are frequently used in intensive care units (ICU), with a low incidence of complications, most of them being of mechanical origin and occurring during the insertion of the catheter. To avoid such complications, "ultrasound guidance" and "ultrasound assistance" are recommended. Nevertheless, even with trained and experienced physicians, mechanical complications of IJV access such as carotid punctures are still reported. We report the case of a 75-year-old woman, admitted into the ICU for CVC insertion due to impossibility of peripheral venous access. About 12 hours after the procedure, the patient presented a neurological deficit. The cervical and thoracic CT scan showed a transfixing path of the catheter from the left IJV into the left common carotid artery, with distal extremity of the catheter localized in the ascending aorta. The catheter was removed, and thereafter the neurological deficit immediately and definitely disappeared. Onset of a neurological deficit after CVC insertion into the IJV, regardless the time of occurrence after the procedure, should suggest complication due to the CVC insertion, even if procedure was uneventful and chest radiography confirmed the apparent accurate position of CVC.

  5. Catheter-based antegrade intracoronary viral gene delivery with coronary venous blockade

    PubMed Central

    Hayase, Motoya; Monte, Federica del; Kawase, Yoshiaki; MacNeill, Briain D.; McGregor, Jennifer; Yoneyama, Ryuichi; Hoshino, Kozo; Tsuji, Tsuyoshi; De Grand, Alec M.; Gwathmey, Judith K.; Frangioni, John V.; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2005-01-01

    Hayase, Motoya, Federica del Monte, Yoshiaki Kawase, Brian D. MacNeill, Jennifer McGregor, Ryuichi Yoneyama, Kozo Hoshino, Tsuyoshi Tsuji, Alec M. De Grand, Judith K. Gwathmey, John V. Frangioni, and Roger J. Hajjar. Catheter-based antegrade intracoronary viral gene delivery with coronary venous blockade. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 288: H2995–H3000, 2005; doi:10.1152/ajpheart.00703.2004.—The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous antegrade myocardial gene transfer (PAMGT). A consistent and safe technique for in vivo gene transfer is required for clinical application of myocardial gene therapy. PAMGT with concomitant coronary venous blockade was performed in 12 swine. The myocardium was preconditioned with 1 min of occlusion of the left anterior descending and left circumflex arteries. The anterior interventricular vein was occluded during left anterior descending artery delivery, and the great cardiac vein at the entrance of the middle cardiac vein was occluded during left circumflex artery delivery. With arterial and venous balloons inflated (3 min) and after adenosine (25 μg) injection, PAMGT was performed by antegrade injection of an adenoviral solution (1 ml of 1011 plaque-forming units in each coronary artery) carrying β-galactosidase or saline through the center lumen of the angioplasty balloon. In one set of animals, PAMGT was performed with selective coronary vein blockade (n = 9); in another set of animals, PAMGT was performed without coronary vein blockade (n = 5). At 1 wk after gene delivery, the animals were killed. Quantitative β-galactosidase analysis was performed in the left and right ventricular walls. PAMGT was successfully performed in all animals with and without concomitant occlusion of the coronary veins. Quantitative β-galactosidase analysis showed that PAMGT with coronary blockade was superior to PAMGT without coronary blockade. β-Galactosidase activity increased significantly in the

  6. Use of a peripherally inserted central catheter as a conduit for central venous access across thrombosed great veins.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Prasad Guntur; Chakraverty, Sam; Zealley, Ian

    2010-02-01

    This report describes a technique of inserting an implantable venous access port (portacath) through a thrombosed and occluded vein employing a pre-existing peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) as the route of access. The PICC was used as a conduit for venous access in a way that has not been described previously in the literature. This procedure was performed in a young patient with cystic fibrosis in an effort to prevent the use of his virgin contralateral veins, which might be used in the future.

  7. Use of a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter as a Conduit for Central Venous Access Across Thrombosed Great Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Guntur Ramkumar, Prasad Chakraverty, Sam Zealley, Ian

    2010-02-15

    This report describes a technique of inserting an implantable venous access port (portacath) through a thrombosed and occluded vein employing a pre-existing peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) as the route of access. The PICC was used as a conduit for venous access in a way that has not been described previously in the literature. This procedure was performed in a young patient with cystic fibrosis in an effort to prevent the use of his virgin contralateral veins, which might be used in the future.

  8. Adverse events and technical complaints related to central venous catheters marketed in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Luciene de Oliveira; Friedrich, Karen; Melchior, Stela Candioto; Silva, Michele Feitoza; Gemal, Andre Luis; Delgado, Isabella Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Aim The objective of this study was to critically analyze data of the National Notification System for Adverse Events and Technical Complaints (Notivisa) related to central venous catheters, through an evaluation of the description of notifications recorded between 2006 and 2009. Methods Notifications were categorized and evaluated to: (i) determine the number of adverse events and technical complaints, (ii) verify compliance with the classification criteria defined by the legislation, (iii) reclassify notifications, when necessary, in order for them to fit in with the legal definitions, (iv) verify registered companies in Brazil, (v) quantify the notifications according to the registered company and product lot, and (vi) identify the country of original of the notified product. Microsoft Excel(r) 2010 was used to categorize and systematize the data. Results Some conceptual errors and incomplete records were found. Altogether, 228 notifications of technical complaints and 119 of adverse events were identified. Some notifications on guidewires and broken catheters were reported which led to the necessity of duplicating some medical procedures and to the occurrence of lesions/lacerations of vessels and tissue injury. Forty-seven percent of companies presented at least one notification in Notivisa and in all, 38 product lots had more than one notification. Conclusion These data support a necessity for cooperation between all entities of the National Health Surveillance System to check compliance of this type of product and to properly report adverse events and technical complaints. It is also important to incorporate minimum standards for the management of technologies in health services, including in the acquisition of products and training of staff. PMID:23904810

  9. Port central venous catheters-associated bloodstream infection during outpatient-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mauri, Davide; Roumbkou, Sofia; Michalopoulou, Stella; Tsali, Lamprini; Spiliopoulou, Anastasia; Panou, Charalampos; Valachis, Antonis; Panagopoulos, Angelos; Polyzos, Nikolaos P

    2010-12-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used for the administration of intravenous chemotherapy in outpatient setting. Nevertheless, outbreaks of catheter-associated bloodstream infections had been reported from oncology centers. We describe a large outbreak of CVCs-associated Klebsiella oxytoca bloodstream infection, occurring in an oncology chemotherapy outpatient unit of northern Greece between October 2006 and May 2007. The outbreak involved approximately 10% of the patients with CVCs who were receiving home-based chemotherapy, and it represents the second larger outbreak of CVCs-associated BSIs due to Klebsiella oxytoca in oncology outpatient centers. We retrospectively analyzed the chain of investigations and prophylactic/diagnostic measures taken to eradicate the infection: (1) patients' chart audit, (2) estimation of the infection among asymptomatic patients, (3) implementation of the level of awareness of medical and paramedical personnel, (4) collection of samples from environment, medications and infusion materials, (5) critical appraisal of chemotherapeutical schemes and (6) cooperation with peripheral institutions. The isolation of Klebsiella oxytoca in a chemotherapy solution (infusional 5-FU in dextrose 5% solution within a 48 h pump) from a peripheral General Hospital and the prompt transmission of the data to the chemotherapy center played a key role for the management of the infection cluster. This is the first report that evidenced the detection of Klebsiella oxytoca within a chemotherapeutical preparation. Data transmission from peripheral hospitals to the central institution resulted in an important feedback that allowed a better estimation of the infection cluster and more tailored actions for the eradication of the infection.

  10. Management of traumatic hemothorax by closed thoracic drainage using a central venous catheter

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jian-hua; Liu, Hua-bo; Zhang, Mao; Wu, Jun-song; Yang, Jian-xin; Chen, Jin-ming; Xu, Shan-xiang; Wang, Jian-an

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the treatment of traumatic hemothorax by closed pleural drainage using a central venous catheter (CVC), compared with using a conventional chest tube. Methods: A prospective controlled study with the Ethics Committee approval was undertaken. A total of 407 patients with traumatic hemothorax were involved and they were randomly assigned to undergo closed pleural drainage with CVCs (n=214) or conventional chest tubes (n=193). The Seldinger technique was used for drainage by CVC, and the conventional technique for drainage by chest tube. If the residual volume of the hemothorax was less than 200 ml after the daily volume of drainage decreased to below 100 ml for two consecutive days, the treatment was considered successful. The correlative data of efficacy and safety between the two groups were analyzed using t or chi-squared tests with SPSS 13.0. A P value of less than 0.05 was taken as indicating statistical significance. Results: Compared with the chest tube group, the operation time, fraction of analgesic treatment, time of surgical wound healing, and infection rate of surgical wounds were significantly decreased (P<0.05) in the CVC group. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the success rate of treatment and the incidence of serious complications (P>0.05), or in the mean catheter/tube indwelling time and mean medical costs of patients treated successfully (P>0.05). Conclusions: Management of medium or large traumatic hemothoraxes by closed thoracic drainage using CVC is minimally invasive and as effective as using a conventional large-bore chest tube. Its complications can be prevented and it has the potential to replace the large-bore chest tube. PMID:22205619

  11. Convective Leakage Makes Heparin Locking of Central Venous Catheters Ineffective within Seconds: Experimental Measurements in a Model Superior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Michael C.; McGah, Patrick M.; Ng, Chin H.; Clark, Alicia; Gow, Kenneth W.; Aliseda, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs), placed in the Superior Vena Cava (SVC) for hemodialysis or chemotherapy, are routinely filled while not in use with heparin, an anticoagulant, to maintain patency and prevent thrombus formation at the catheter tip. The heparin-locking procedure, however, places the patient at risk for systemic bleeding, as heparin is known to leak from the catheter into the blood stream. We provide evidence from detailed in-vitro experiments that shows the driving mechanism behind heparin leakage to be convective-diffusive transport due to the pulsatile flow surrounding the catheter. This novel mechanism is supported by experimental planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow velocity and heparin transport from a CVC placed inside a model SVC inside a pulsatile flow loop. The results predict an initial, fast (< 10s), convection-dominated phase that rapidly depletes the concentration of heparin in the near-tip region, the region of the catheter with side holes. This is followed by a slow, diffusion-limited phase inside the catheter lumen, where the concentration is still high, that is insufficient at replenishing the lost heparin concentration in the near-tip region. The results presented here, which are consistent with previous in vivo estimates of 24-hour leakage rates, predict that the concentration of heparin in the near-tip region is essentially zero for the majority of the interdialytic phase, rendering the heparin locking procedure ineffective. PMID:26418203

  12. Mechanic and surface properties of central-venous port catheters after removal: A comparison of polyurethane and silicon rubber materials.

    PubMed

    Braun, Ulrike; Lorenz, Edelgard; Weimann, Christiane; Sturm, Heinz; Karimov, Ilham; Ettl, Johannes; Meier, Reinhard; Wohlgemuth, Walter A; Berger, Hermann; Wildgruber, Moritz

    2016-12-01

    Central venous port devices made of two different polymeric materials, thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and silicone rubber (SiR), were compared due their material properties. Both naïve catheters as well as catheters after removal from patients were investigated. In lab experiments the influence of various chemo-therapeutic solutions on material properties was investigated, whereas the samples after removal were compared according to the implanted time in patient. The macroscopic, mechanical performance was assessed with dynamic, specially adapted tests for elasticity. The degradation status of the materials was determined with common tools of polymer characterisation, such as infrared spectroscopy, molecular weight measurements and various methods of thermal analysis. The surface morphology was analysed using scanning electron microscopy. A correlation between material properties and clinical performance was proposed. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the polyurethane catheter materials can potentially result in increased susceptibility of the catheter to bloodstream infections and thrombotic complications. The higher mechanic failure, especially with increasing implantation time of the silicone catheters is related to the lower mechanical performance compared to the polyurethane material as well as loss of barium sulphate filler particles near the surface of the catheter. This results in preformed microscopic notches, which act as predetermined sites of fracture.

  13. Echocardiographic diagnosis of air embolism associated with central venous catheter placement: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Maddukuri, Prasad; Downey, Brian C; Blander, Jessica A; Pandian, Natesa G; Patel, Ayan R

    2006-04-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is a valuable tool in the evaluation of patients with suspected air embolism. This report describes the presentation and evaluation of a critically ill woman with spontaneous air embolism occurring during a central venous catheter replacement. Bedside TTE established the diagnosis of air embolism, allowing prompt initiation of appropriate therapy. This case report highlights this uncommon but potentially life-threatening complication of central line placement and the utility of echocardiography in its evaluation.

  14. Successful use of central venous catheter as permanent hemodialysis access: 84-month follow-Up in lucania.

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, B; Lopez, T; Procida, M; Marino, P; Valente, V; Iannuzziello, F; Bombini, A; Bellizzi, V; Terracciano, V; Bagnato, C; Casino, F; Gaudiano, V; Mostacci, D; Santarsia, G; Biscione, R; Caputo, A; Ferlan, G; Lauria, M A; Marinaro, G; Molinari, R; Sanicandro, D; Lotito, M A; Plastino, G; Carretta, P

    2001-01-01

    Cuffed tunneled venous access catheters are commonly used for temporary and permanent access in hemodialysis (HD) patients. These catheters serve an essential role in providing permanent access in subjects in whom all other access options have been exhausted. The predominant complications are catheter thrombosis, catheter fibrin sheating and infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term survival and complications of permanent venous catheters (PVC) placed for the purpose of HD during the period from January 1992 to December 1998, at the Dialysis Units of Lucania (a southern Italian region). A total of 98 PVC were placed in 88 patients during this period. The catheters used were of three types: (a) 72 VasCath Soft Cell catheters (Bard Instrument Company, Toronto, Ont., Canada); (b) 22 PermCath catheters (Quinton Instrument Company, Seattle, Wash., USA), and (c) 4 Tesio catheters (Bellco SpA, Mirandola, Italy). Survival curves of catheters were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit estimator. The patient survival was 60% at the 78th month. Actually, 52 patients (27 males, 25 females) are still alive: 15 (26.9%) of these patients have diabetes mellitus and 1 has been transplanted. The actuarial survival rate of PVC was 89% in the whole population studied and 82% in subjects alive after 84 months. Twenty-five patients (28.4%) had PVC as the first reliable vascular access. Long-term complications occurred 27 times (1 episode every 44.81 month/patient) as: breakage (3.1%); thrombosis (10.2%); displacement (2.0%); subcutaneous tunnel bleeding (3.1%); inadequate blood flow (7.1%), and infection (10.2%). In conclusion, our data confirm that PVC might represent an effective long-term blood access route for HD. Again, PVC are getting the access of choice for selected patients (i.e., older subjects with cardiovascular diseases and cancer patients) and are enjoying a dramatic increase in use for subjects who are terrified of repetitive venopuncture.

  15. Long-Term Central Venous Catheter Use and Risk of Infection in Older Adults With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison; Sepkowitz, Kent A.; Elkin, Elena B.; Pinheiro, Laura C.; Sima, Camelia S.; Son, Crystal H.; Atoria, Coral L.; Bach, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Long-term central venous catheters (CVCs) are often used in patients with cancer to facilitate venous access to administer intravenous fluids and chemotherapy. CVCs can also be a source of bloodstream infections, although this risk is not well understood. We examined the impact of long-term CVC use on infection risk, independent of other risk factors such as chemotherapy, in a population-based cohort of patients with cancer. Patients and Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis using SEER-Medicare data for patients age > 65 years diagnosed from 2005 to 2007 with invasive colorectal, head and neck, lung, or pancreatic cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or invasive or noninvasive breast cancer. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the relationship between CVC use and infections, with CVC exposure as a time-dependent predictor. We used multivariable analysis and propensity score methods to control for patient characteristics. Results CVC exposure was associated with a significantly elevated infection risk, adjusting for demographic and disease characteristics. For patients with pancreatic cancer, risk of infections during the exposure period was three-fold greater (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 2.93; 95% CI, 2.58 to 3.33); for those with breast cancer, it was six-fold greater (AHR, 6.19; 95% CI, 5.42 to 7.07). Findings were similar when we accounted for propensity to receive a CVC and limited the cohort to individuals at high risk of infections. Conclusion Long-term CVC use was associated with an increased risk of infections for older adults with cancer. Careful assessment of the need for long-term CVCs and targeted strategies for reducing infections are critical to improving cancer care quality. PMID:24982458

  16. Use of cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques to assess contamination of central venous catheters: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Mette KS; Thomsen, Trine R; Moser, Claus; Høiby, Niels; Nielsen, Per H

    2008-01-01

    Background Catheters are the most common cause of nosocomial infections and are associated with increased risk of mortality, length of hospital stay and cost. Prevention of infections and fast and correct diagnosis is highly important. Methods In this study traditional semiquantitative culture-dependent methods for diagnosis of bacteria involved in central venous catheter-related infections as described by Maki were compared with the following culture-independent molecular biological methods: Clone libraries, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis, phylogeny and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results In accordance with previous studies, the cultivation of central venous catheters from 18 patients revealed that S. epidermidis and other coagulase-negative staphylococci were most abundant and that a few other microorganisms such as P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae occasionally were found on the catheters. The molecular analysis using clone libraries and sequencing, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing provided several important results. The species found by cultivation were confirmed by molecular methods. However, many other bacteria belonging to the phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were also found, stressing that only a minor portion of the species present were found by cultivation. Some of these bacteria are known to be pathogens, some have not before been described in relation to human health, and some were not closely related to known pathogens and may represent new pathogenic species. Furthermore, there was a clear difference between the bacterial species found in biofilm on the external (exluminal) and internal (luminal) side of the central venous catheter, which can not be detected by Maki's method. Polymicrobial biofilms were observed on most of the catheters and were much more common than the cultivation-dependent methods indicated. Conclusion The results show that diagnosis based on molecular methods

  17. Factors affecting survival in pediatric cardiac tamponade caused by central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric central venous catheter (CVC) placement is useful but associated with complications such as cardiac tamponade. We aimed to identify risk factors for death in cardiac tamponade. Published articles on pediatric CVC-associated cardiac tamponade were obtained by searching PubMed and Google and retrospectively reviewed to analyze risk factors for death. Factors examined for their effect on mortality risk included patient age, weight, CVC size, days from CVC insertion to tamponade occurrence, substances administered, insertion site, treatment, CVC material, and initial CVC tip position. Of 110 patients reported in 62 articles, 69 survived and 41 died. Among survivors, 55 of 69 patients were treated; among deaths, only 7 of 38 (OR 537.9, 95% CI 29.3-9,877, p < 0.0001). Multiple regression analysis in 44 cases showed that treatment (p < 0.0001) and initial CVC tip position (p = 0.020) were independent predictive factors related to improved cardiac tamponade survival. Past studies have mainly discussed how to avoid pediatric cardiac tamponade; by contrast, the present study focused on how to avoid deaths. The findings of this review suggest that cardiac tamponade survival is better when tamponade is detected early and treated promptly and might be affected by initial CVC tip position.

  18. Position-Dependent Ventricular Tachycardia Related to Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Paulino; Schurmann, Paul; Smith, Melanie; Valderrábano, Miguel; Lin, C. Huie

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 51-year-old male who developed frequent nonsustained episodes of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia after being diagnosed with bioprosthetic aortic valve endocarditis and treated with intravenous antibiotics. A peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) had been placed without complication less than 24 hours prior to the episodes. Ventricular tachycardia (VT) occurred during the night, while sleeping, when he assumed a right lateral decubitus position with abduction of the right arm and placement of the forearm under his head. VT occurred repeatedly when such position was assumed again upon request, and it would terminate immediately when sitting upright. The PICC was repositioned in the superior vena cava without further VT. He was discharged home the same day and underwent successful aortic valve replacement 2 months later. Position-dependent VT related to PICC requires careful history taking and PICC repositioning to make the diagnosis. X-ray in different patient positions during PICC placement can be considered to evaluate for ventricular migration. PMID:27826374

  19. The Effect of Interdisciplinary Team Rounds on Urinary Catheter and Central Venous Catheter Days and Rates of Infection.

    PubMed

    Arora, Navneet; Patel, Killol; Engell, Christian A; LaRosa, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary team (IDT) rounds were initiated in the intensive care unit (ICU) in June 2010. All catheters were identified by location, duration, and indication. Catheters with no indication were removed. Data were collected retrospectively on catheter days and associated infections in a 20-month period before and after intervention with an aggregate of 19 207 ICU days before and 23 576 ICU days after institution of rounds. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in the number of indwelling urinary catheter (IUC) days (5304 vs 4541 days, P = .05) and catheter-associated urinary tract infection rates (4.71 vs 1.98 infections/1000 ICU days, P < .05). Central line days statistically increased after IDT rounds (3986 vs 4305 days, P < .05) but the catheter-related bloodstream infection rate trended down (3.5 vs 1.6 infections/1000 ICU days, P = .62). This analysis suggests that IDT rounds may have an impact on reducing the number of IUC days and associated infections.

  20. A Rare Case of Jejunal Arterio-Venous Fistula: Treatment with Superselective Catheter Embolization with a Tracker-18 Catheter and Microcoils

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Martin J. Anderson, Suzanne E.; Lourens, Steven; Triller, Juergen

    2004-11-15

    Arterio-venous fistulas may develop spontaneously, following trauma or infection, or be iatrogenic in nature. We present a rare case of a jejunal arterio- venous fistula in a 35-year-old man with a history of pancreatic head resection that had been performed two years previously because of chronic pancreatitis. The patient was admitted with acute upper abdominal pain, vomiting and an abdominal machinery-type bruit. The diagnosis of a jejunal arterio-venous fistula was established by MR imaging. Transfemoral angiography was performed to assess the possibility of catheter embolization. The angiographic study revealed a small aneurysm of the third jejunal artery, abnormal early filling of dilated jejunal veins and marked filling of the slightly dilated portal vein (13-14 mm). We considered the presence of segmental portal hypertension. The patient was treated with coil embolization in the same angiographic session. This case report demonstrates the importance of auscultation of the abdomen in the initial clinical examination. MR imaging and color Doppler ultrasound are excellent noninvasive tools in establishing the diagnosis. The role of interventional radiological techniques in the treatment of early portal hypertension secondary to jejunal arterio-venous fistula is discussed at a time when this condition is still asymptomatic. A review of the current literature is included.

  1. Fluid mechanics and clinical success of central venous catheters for dialysis--answers to simple but persisting problems.

    PubMed

    Ash, Stephen R

    2007-01-01

    Over 60% of patients initiating chronic hemodialysis in the United States have a chronic central venous catheter (CVC) as their first blood access device. Although it would be better if these patients started dialysis with fistulas, the CVC is used because it is a reliable and relatively safe method for obtaining blood access over a period of months. Drawing blood from a vein at 300-400 ml/minute is a relatively delicate and somewhat unpredictable process, and there is always a tendency for the vein wall to draw over the arterial tip and obstruct flow. Several methods have been employed to minimize this problem and maximize blood flow, and differing catheter designs have resulted. With all of the different catheter designs now on the market, it is natural to ask what is the logic of different designs. Moreover, in the absence of many direct comparative studies it is natural to ask whether one design is really better than another. There is some misinformation regarding catheter design and function. The following is a list of 10 frequently asked questions In this review, the hydraulic features of CVC are discussed and explained, and logical answers are provided for the following questions: 1. Why do ''D'' catheters flow better than concentric or side by side catheters? 2. Why are all catheters about the same diameter? Does making them bigger really decrease the resistance to flow? 3. Why might a split tip catheter flow better than a solid body catheter? 4. What happens to injections of lock solution at catheter volume? 5. What's better-numerous side holes or none? 6. Why does blood rise into some internal jugular catheters over time, displacing the lock solution? 7. How can a little kink (or stenosis) decrease flow so much? 8. Where should the tips be placed-superior vena cava or right atrium? 9. Which is really better, splitsheath or over-the-wire placement? 10. Which dialysis access has a lower complication rate--CVC or arteriovenous (AV) graft? There remain

  2. Occluded Tunneled Venous Catheter in Hemodialysis Patients: Risk Factors and Efficacy of Alteplase.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Daniela; Mendes, Marcela; Silva, Tricya; Oliveira, Rogerio

    2015-09-01

    Thrombosis of tunneled central venous catheters (CVC) in hemodialysis (HD) patients is common and it can lead to the elimination of vascular sites. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of thrombotic obstruction of tunneled CVC in HD patients and the efficacy of occlusion treatment with alteplase use, and identify factors associated with thrombotic occlusion. It was a prospective cohort study performed in two centers which evaluated the diagnosis and treatment of thrombotic occlusion of CVC in HD patients for 24 consecutive months. The catheter occlusion was defined as the difficulty infusing or withdrawing fluid from their paths. Alteplase dose was infused to fill the lumen of the occluded catheter and remained for 50 min. As there was no obstruction of the catheter, the procedure was repeated. Three hundred and thirty-nine CVC in 247 patients were evaluated and followed, totalling 67,244 CVC-days. One hundred fifty-seven patients had only one CVC, 88 patients had two CVC during the study, and two patients had three CVC. The median age was 58 (47-66) years, patients were predominantly men (54%), with diabetic nephropathy as the main cause of chronic kidney disease (44%), the internal jugular vein as the main site of implantation (82%), and duration of dialysis before CVC implantation of 119 (41.5 to 585.5) days. Eight hundred and fifteen occlusion episodes were diagnosed (12 episodes/1000 CVC-days), with primary success with alteplase in 596 episodes (77%) and secondary in 81 cases (10%). In 99 episodes (13%), success was not achieved after the second dose of alteplase. Two hundred and thirty CVC were removed during the study and the removal causes were arteriovenous fistula use in 88 patients (38.3%), infectious and mechanical complications in 89 (38.7%) and 21 (9.1%), respectively, and others (transplantation, transfer, or death) in 32 patients (13.9%). Adverse effects were also not observed. In the multivariate analysis, we identified the greatest number

  3. Evaluation of routine postoperative chest roentgenogram for determination of the correct position of permanent central venous catheters tip

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Fereshteh; Hekmatnia, Ali; Shahabi, Javad; Keshavarzian, Amir; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Jazi, Amir Hosein Davarpanah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proper placement of central venous catheter (CVC) tip could reduce early and late catheter-related complications. Although the live fluoroscopy is standard of care for placement of the catheter, it is not available in many centers. Therefore, the present study evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of bedside chest X-ray (CXR) for proper positioning of the catheter tip. Materials and Methods: A total of 82 adult patients undergoing elective placement of tunneled CVC were enrolled in this study during 2010-2012. The catheter tip position was evaluated by postoperative bedside chest radiographs as well as trans-thoracic echocardiogram as definite diagnostic tool. The catheter position was considered correct if the tip was positioned in the right atrium both in CXR or echocardiography. Finally, CXRs interpreted by expert radiologist. Thus findings were compared by echocardiography. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive, and negative predictive values were calculated. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL), and P < 0.05 considered as significant. Results: The patients were 57.37 ± 18.91 years of age, weighed 65.79 ± 15.58 kg and were 166.36 ± 9.91 cm tall. Sensitivity and specificity of CXR for proper catheter tip position were 74.3% and 58.3%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 91.2% and 28%. In addition accuracy, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio were 71.9%, 1.78, and 2.27 respectively. Conclusion: Bedside CXR alone does not reliably predict malpositioning after CVC placement. PMID:25767527

  4. Recurrent bacteraemia by 2 different Bacillus cereus strains related to 2 distinct central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Koch, Andrea; Arvand, Mardjan

    2005-01-01

    A 14-y-old girl with osteosarcoma developed 3 episodes of catheter-related bacteraemia by Bacillus cereus. After removal of the first and insertion of a second Hickman catheter, further episodes of B. cereus bacteraemia occurred. PFGE analysis revealed that bacteraemic episodes related to each catheter were caused by a distinct B. cereus strain.

  5. On-demand antimicrobial release from a temperature-sensitive polymer - comparison with ad libitum release from central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Sjollema, Jelmer; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Abeln, Caroline; van der Mei, Henny C; van Asseldonk, Dirk; Busscher, Henk J

    2014-08-28

    Antimicrobial releasing biomaterial coatings have found application for instance in the fixation of orthopedic joint prostheses and central venous catheters. Most frequently, the release kinetics is such that antimicrobially-effective concentrations are only reached within the first days to weeks after implantation, leaving no local antimicrobial release available when a biomaterial-associated infection occurs later. Here we compare the ad libitum release of chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine from a central venous catheter with their release from a new, on-demand release coating consisting of a temperature-sensitive copolymer of styrene and n-butyl (meth)acrylate. The copolymer can be loaded with an antimicrobial, which is released when the temperature is raised above its glass transition temperature. Ad libitum release of chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine from a commercially-purchased catheter and associated antimicrobial efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus was limited to 16days. Consecutive temperature-triggers of our on-demand coating yielded little or no antimicrobial efficacy of silver-acetate release, but antimicrobially-effective chlorhexidine concentrations were observed over a time period of 60-80days. This attests to the clear advantage of on-demand coatings above ad libitum releasing coatings, that may have released their antimicrobial content before it is actually needed. Importantly, glass transition temperature of chlorhexidine loaded copolymers was lower (48°C) than of silver loaded ones (61°C), facilitating their clinical use.

  6. Spinal Infections Among Patients With Long-Term Central Venous Catheters for Home Parenteral Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Topan, Rabia; Ambrose, Tim; Small, Mia; Lightman, Elewys; Nightingale, Jeremy; Gabe, Simon M

    2017-02-01

    Spinal infections are a rare yet serious metastatic complication of bacteremia among patients with long-term central venous catheters (CVCs) for which clinicians must remain vigilant. We performed a retrospective review of all cases of spinal infection occurring in the context of a CVC for long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) managed in our department between January 2010 and October 2013, a cohort of 310 patients over this time period. Six patients were identified (mean age, 65 years; 5 male). One hundred percent of patients presented with spinal pain (5/6 cervical, 1/6 thoracic). Organisms were cultured from the CVC in 5 of 6 patients. In all cases, the white blood cell count was normal, and in 5 of 6, C-reactive protein was normal. All diagnoses were confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and in 3 of 6 cases, an MRI was repeated (on the advice of neurosurgical colleagues) to confirm resolution of changes after a period of antimicrobial therapy. There was no clear correlation between duration of PN or number of days following CVC insertion and onset of infection. The CVC was replaced in 4 of 6 patients at the time of diagnosis, delayed removal in 1 of 6, and salvaged in the remaining case. Although rare, a high index of suspicion is needed in patients receiving long-term PN who present with spinal pain. Peripheral inflammatory markers may not be elevated. MRI should be performed and patients should be treated with antibiotics alongside involvement of local microbiology and neurosurgical teams. Multidisciplinary discussion on CVC salvage in these cases is important, especially in cases of challenging vascular anatomy.

  7. Successful percutaneous transcatheter patent foramen ovale closure through the right internal jugular vein using a steerable catheter.

    PubMed

    Hascoet, Sebastien; Fraisse, Alain; Elbaz, Meyer

    2013-10-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) remains challenging when femoral venous approach is not available. We describe the successful closure of a PFO using the right internal jugular venous approach and a deflectable catheter delivery system in a patient with a PFO, recurrent stroke, and an inferior vena cava filter.

  8. A new approach of extracting embolized venous catheters using a large-diameter steerable sheath under biplane fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Strohmer, Bernhard; Altenberger, Johann; Pichler, Maximilian

    2012-01-01

    To report the efficacy of a new percutaneous technique for extraction of embolized catheters, five female patients (62 ± 14 years) referred to our institution were analyzed. With the combination of a large-diameter steerable sheath with a sizeable snare system, three dislodged Port-A-Cath tubes and two ventriculoatrial shunts were retrieved successfully. Mean procedure time was 51 ± 23 min, biplane fluoroscopy time was 22 ± 21 min, and dose area product was 1188 ± 992 dGy cm(2). Percutaneous extraction of embolized venous catheters is highly effective with the help of this novel, self-assembled system. The presented technique provides major advantages with respect to three-dimensional steerability and should be considered for complex cases.

  9. Calcified Thrombus in Right Atrium: Rare but Treatable Complication of Long-term Indwelling Central Venous Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Fabi, Marianna; Gesuete, Valentina; Testa, Gabriella; Balducci, Anna; Picchio, Fernando Maria; Gargiulo, Gaetano

    2011-01-01

    Catheter-related central thrombosis is a rare complication of long-term central line. We describe the case of an asymptomatic boy who was diagnosed a calcified thrombus in right atrium eight years after the removal of a long-term central venous device. Although the most appropriate therapeutic approach for managing floating right heart thrombi remains to be determined, surgical removal is an effective and safe procedure for calcified long-standing thrombus and it is to be preferred in elective conditions especially in young asymptomatic patients without hemodynamic involvement, that are at low risk of surgery-related morbidity and mortality.

  10. New challenges in the diagnosis, management, and prevention of central venous catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Timsit, Jean-François; Dubois, Yohann; Minet, Clémence; Bonadona, Agnès; Lugosi, Maxime; Ara-Somohano, Claire; Hamidfar-Roy, Rebecca; Schwebel, Carole

    2011-04-01

    Catheters are the leading source of bloodstream infections in critically ill patients. Because the clinical signs of infection are nonspecific, such infections are overly suspected, which results in unnecessary removal of catheters. A conservative approach might be attempted in mild infections, whereas catheters should always be removed in cases of severe sepsis or septic shock. Nowadays, comprehensive unit-based improvement programs are effective to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs). Rates of CR-BSI higher than 2 per 1000 catheter-days are no longer acceptable. A locally adapted checklist of preventive measures should include cutaneous antisepsis with alcoholic preparation, maximal barrier precaution, strict policy of catheter maintenance, and ablation of useless catheters. Antiseptic dressings and, to a lesser extent, antimicrobial-coated catheters, might be added to the prevention strategies if the level of infections remains high despite implementation of a prevention program. In the case of CR-BSI in intensive care units (ICUs), the catheter should be removed. In the case of persistence of fever or positive blood cultures after 3 days, inadequate antibiotic therapy, endocarditis, or thrombophlebitis should be ruled out.

  11. [Temporary vascular access for extra-renal detoxification: utilization of tunneled silicone double-lumen catheters by the percutaneous route].

    PubMed

    Jean, G; Chazot, C; Vanel, T

    1994-01-01

    Femoral or subclavian central venous catheters are commonly used for temporary vascular access in haemodialysis. We used 36 tunnelized siliconed double lumen catheter (Quinton Permcath or Hickman Bard), most of them in right internal jugular percutaneously. Indication for this catheter were acute or chronic renal failure, plasma exchange, rescue of arterio venous fistula or peritoneal dialysis. Insertion incidents were minors (local haematoma), mean functional time was 51 days. Catheters were changed in 5 cases of infection, 3 cases of obstruction and in 2 accidental remove. Insertion facility, low morbidity, potentially long time use, high blood flow rate with low recirculation argue for this expensive material.

  12. Late onset of clinically apparent central vein stenosis due to previous central venous catheter in a patient with inherited thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Pissas, Georgios; Leivaditis, Konstantinos; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2014-04-01

    We describe a case of a patient with a functional kidney transplant who was admitted to our department with clinically evident central vein stenosis (CVS) 7 years after the removal of a central venous catheter (CVC) from the right internal jugular vein. The catheter was used as a hemodialysis access for a 2-month period. In the interval before his last admission, the patient suffered two episodes of deep vein thrombosis. Investigation revealed heterozygosity for factor V Leiden, the most common inherited thrombophilia encountered in 5% of Caucasians, and anticoagulation treatment was started. Magnetic resonance angiography showed stenosis just after the convergence of the right subclavian vein with the internal jugular vein to the innominate vein. Transluminal angioplasty restored venous patency and right upper arm edema resolved. Coexistence of CVS, accompanied by hemodynamic changes and endothelial dysfunction, with thrombophilia fulfill all the elements of the Virchow's triad. Therefore, the patient was at great risk for central vein thrombosis, from which he was possibly protected by the early administration of anticoagulant treatment. This case indicates that CVS can be asymptomatic for several years after CVC removal and also raises the question if thrombophilia workup and investigation for CVS may be beneficial in every patient with CVC placement in order to avoid any harmful outcomes.

  13. Nek2 siRNA therapy using a portal venous port-catheter system for liver metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kokuryo, Toshio; Hibino, Shigeru; Suzuki, Kazushi; Watanabe, Katsutaka; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Nagino, Masato; Senga, Takeshi; Hamaguchi, Michinari

    2016-09-01

    Nek2 (NIMA-related kinase 2) is a serine-threonine kinase and human homolog of the mitotic regulator NIMA of Aspergillus nidulan. We reported the efficiency of Nek2 siRNA in several cancer xenograft models using cholangiocarcinoma, breast cancer and colorectal cancer. Pancreatic cancer is difficult to treat due to its rapid progression and resistance to chemotherapy. Novel treatments are urgently required to improve survival in pancreatic cancer, and siRNA are a promising therapeutic option. However, finding an in vivo drug delivery system of siRNA remains a major problem for clinical application. In this study, the overexpression of Nek2 was identified in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Nek2 siRNA inhibited tumor growth in a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model of pancreatic cancer, prolonged the survival time in an intraperitoneal xenograft mouse model and efficiently prevented the progression of liver metastasis using a portal venous port-catheter system. Taken together, Nek2 is an effective therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. An adequate delivery system is considered important in treating advanced pancreatic cancer, such as peritoneal dissemination and liver metastasis. Further investigations are required on the safety and side effects of the portal venous port-catheter system. We hope that Nek2 siRNA will be a novel therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis and peritoneal dissemination.

  14. Efficacy and safety of using L-cysteine as a catheter-clearing agent for nonthrombotic occlusions of central venous catheters in children.

    PubMed

    Pai, Vinita B; Plogsted, Steven

    2014-10-01

    Critically ill pediatric patients, especially in the intensive care unit, receive multiple medications and have a higher risk of central venous catheter (CVC) occlusion. If an occlusion occurs immediately after the administration of multiple medications or incompatible medications, either an acidic solution such as 0.1 N hydrochloric acid (HCl) or a basic solution of 1 mEq/mL sodium bicarbonate or 0.1 N sodium hydroxide can be used. However, compounding and storing of 0.1 N HCl has become more complex due to USP <797> guidelines for sterile compounding, and an alternative is needed. We report a series of cases in which L-cysteine was used instead of HCl to clear CVCs occluded due to administration of multiple medications. L-cysteine is a commercially available, sterile solution with a pH of 1–2.5. CVC occlusion was resolved in 10 of the 16 episodes in 13 patients. Two of the 16 occlusions were phenytoin related and would not have responded. An L-cysteine dose of 50 mg was used during 10 of the 16 episodes, 100 mg during 5 episodes, and 25 mg during 1 episode. A correlation between catheter clearance and dose was not observed. Occlusion resolution due to L-cysteine was not correlated to the prior use of tissue plasminogen activator. Metabolic acidosis, adverse effects, or damage to the catheters due to L-cysteine were not observed. On the basis of this limited experience, we propose L-cysteine as an effective alternative to 0.1 N HCl for clearing CVC occlusions caused by drugs with an acidic pKa.

  15. Complications Associated With Use of Long-Term Central Venous Catheters Among Commercially Insured Women With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison; Ma, Qinli; Pollack, Michael F.; Barron, John; Elkin, Elena B.; Bach, Peter B.; Malin, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Despite some advantages to their use, long-term central venous catheters (CVCs) are associated with complications for patients who require chemotherapy. Understanding of these risks in commercially insured populations is limited. This information can inform medical policies that ensure the appropriate use of venous access devices. This study's objectives were to assess the extent of variation in use of long-term CVCs in a cohort of commercially insured women with breast cancer, and to assess risks of associated complications. Methods: Retrospective cohort analysis was conducted using health insurance claims between January 2006 and October 2013. The cohort included commercially insured women age ≥ 18 years diagnosed with breast cancer who received infusion chemotherapy (N = 31,047). We conducted matched and case-mix adjusted Cox proportional hazard modeling to assess differences in bloodstream infections and thrombovascular complications between patients using long-term CVCs and those using temporary intravenous catheters. Results: Approximately two thirds of the cohort had a long-term CVC, although rates varied across regions (57% to 75%), health plans (65% to 70%), and insurance coverage (63% to 68%). After propensity score matching, the adjusted hazard ratio for infection was 2.70 (95% CI, 2.31 to 3.16) and thrombovascular complications, 2.61 (95% CI, 2.33 to 2.93) in patients with long-term CVCs compared with those with temporary intravenous catheters. Conclusion: Although long-term CVCs may have benefits, they are associated with increased morbidity. Regional and health plan variation in long-term CVC insertion suggests that some of their use reflects provider- or institution-driven variation in practice. Evidence-based guidelines and tools may help decrease discretionary use of long-term CVCs. PMID:26265170

  16. One step behind to step ahead – femoral approach to stabilize and to extract functional pacing lead to regain venous access

    PubMed Central

    Maciąg, Aleksander; Syska, Paweł; Kuśmierski, Krzysztof; Broy, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Transvenous lead extraction can be a method to regain venous access. We present the case of a man, aged 67, with indications to upgrade an ICD to a resynchronization therapy device. Since innominate vein occlusion was diagnosed and extraction of an abandoned ventricular pacing lead did not provide lumen regain, a functional atrial lead was extracted with the femoral approach to stabilization and venous access was regained. Asymptomatic vein wall damage but no other complications were recorded. The simultaneous application of different techniques to regain venous access may allow success of the final procedure in system upgrading. PMID:24570742

  17. Recanalization of Acute and Subacute Venous and Synthetic Bypass-Graft Occlusions With a Mechanical Rotational Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Wissgott, Christian Kamusella, Peter; Andresen, Reimer

    2013-08-01

    PurposePercutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) is now established as an alternative treatment of acute arterial occlusions in addition to fibrinolysis and surgical thrombectomy. The objective of this retrospective study was the investigation of a rotational atherothrombectomy catheter in terms of safety and efficacy in the treatment of acute and subacute femoropopliteal bypass occlusions.Materials and MethodsForty-two patients (average age 65.8 {+-} 9.1 years) with acute (<14 days [n = 31]) and subacute (14-42 days [n = 11]) femoropopliteal bypass occlusions were treated consecutively with a rotational debulking and removal catheter (Straub Rotarex). The average occlusion length was 28.4 {+-} 2.9 (24-34) cm. Thirty-four (81 %) patients underwent venous bypass, and 8 (19 %) patients underwent polytetrafluoroethylene bypass.ResultsThe technical success rate was 97.6 % (41 of 42). In 1 patient, blood flow could not be restored despite the use of the atherothrombectomy system. The average catheter intervention time was 6.9 {+-} 2.1 (4-9) min. Ankle-brachial index increased from 0.39 {+-} 0.13 to 0.83 {+-} 0.11 at discharge and to 0.82 {+-} 0.17 after 1 month (p < 0.05). There were a total of 2 (4.8 %) peri-interventional complications: One patient developed a distal embolism, which was successfully treated with local lysis, and another patient had a small perforation at the distal anastomosis, which was successfully treated with a stent.ConclusionPMT with the Rotarex atherothrombectomy catheter represents a safe and effective option in the treatment of acute and subacute femoropopliteal bypass occlusions because it can quickly restore blood flow.

  18. Effect of Ultrasound-Guided Placement of Difficult-to-Place Peripheral Venous Catheters: A Prospective Study of a Training Program for Nurse Anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Partovi-Deilami, Kohyar; Nielsen, Jesper K; Moller, Ann M; Nesheim, Sara-Sophie S; Jorgensen, Vibeke L

    2016-04-01

    Patients with difficult intravenous access (DIVA) often experience discomfort because of failed attempts to place peripheral venous catheters (PVCs); however, ultrasound guidance may improve this problem with catheter placement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of ultrasound when operated by nurse anesthetists for these patients. This prospective observational study with a pre/post design focused on inpatients with DIVA referred for PVC placement, a service provided by nurse anesthetists in most Scandinavian hospitals. The rate of success, procedure time, number of skin punctures, discomfort, catheter size, location, and incidence of central venous catheter placement are reported before and after implementation of a training program and a mobile service using ultrasound to place difficult-to-place PVCs. The success rate increased from 0% (0 of 33 patients) to 83% (58 of 70 patients) with ultrasound. Procedure time was reduced from 20 to 10 minutes, discomfort was unchanged, and the median number of skin punctures decreased from 3 to 2. The incidence of central venous catheter placement dropped from 34% to 7%. Implementation of a training program and a mobile service in which nurse anesthetists performed ultrasound-guided PVC placement improved the success rate and quality of care in patients with DIVA.

  19. Heparin for clearance of peripherally inserted central venous catheter in newborns: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Balaminut, Talita; Venturini, Danielle; da Silva, Valéria Costa Evangelista; Rossetto, Edilaine Giovanini; Zani, Adriana Valongo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of two concentrations of heparin to clear the lumen of in vitro clotted neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Methods: This is an in vitro, experimental quantitative study of 76 neonatal 2.0-Fr PICCs coagulated in vitro. The catheters were divided into two groups of 38 PICCs each. In both groups an infusion of low molecular weight heparin was administered with a dose of 25IU/mL for Group 1 and 50IU/mL for Group 2. The negative pressure technique was applied to the catheters of both groups at 5, 15 and 30min and at 4h to test their permeability. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to verify the outcome of the groups according to time intervals. Results: The comparison between both groups in the first 5min showed that more catheters from Group 2 were cleared compared to Group 1 (57.9 vs. 21.1%, respectively). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that less time was needed to clear catheters treated with 50IU/mL of heparin (p<0.001). Conclusions: The use of low molecular weight heparin at a concentration of 50IU/mL was more effective in restoring the permeability of neonatal PICCs occluded in vitro by a clot, and the use of this concentration is within the safety margin indicated by scientific literature. PMID:26116325

  20. Evaluation of cost-effectiveness from the funding body's point of view of ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared with the conventional technique

    PubMed Central

    Noritomi, Danilo Teixeira; Zigaib, Rogério; Ranzani, Otavio T.; Teich, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cost-effectiveness, from the funding body's point of view, of real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion compared to the traditional method, which is based on the external anatomical landmark technique. Methods A theoretical simulation based on international literature data was applied to the Brazilian context, i.e., the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS). A decision tree was constructed that showed the two central venous catheter insertion techniques: real-time ultrasonography versus external anatomical landmarks. The probabilities of failure and complications were extracted from a search on the PubMed and Embase databases, and values associated with the procedure and with complications were taken from market research and the Department of Information Technology of the Unified Health System (DATASUS). Each central venous catheter insertion alternative had a cost that could be calculated by following each of the possible paths on the decision tree. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated by dividing the mean incremental cost of real-time ultrasound compared to the external anatomical landmark technique by the mean incremental benefit, in terms of avoided complications. Results When considering the incorporation of real-time ultrasound and the concomitant lower cost due to the reduced number of complications, the decision tree revealed a final mean cost for the external anatomical landmark technique of 262.27 Brazilian reals (R$) and for real-time ultrasound of R$187.94. The final incremental cost of the real-time ultrasound-guided technique was -R$74.33 per central venous catheter. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was -R$2,494.34 due to the pneumothorax avoided. Conclusion Real-time ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion was associated with decreased failure and complication rates and hypothetically reduced costs from the view of the funding body, which in this

  1. Implantation and Maintenance of Chronic Jugular Venous Catheters in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-05

    ventilation. The vest was closed in back with a zipper, which was routinely secured with a safety pin . A drawstring at the waistallowed adjustable fit to the...Laboratories, Pearl River, NY). Routine flushing procedure was then resumed. Between flushings, the exposed end of the catheter was tied to a safety pin attached

  2. Brachial insertion of fully implantable venous catheters for chemotherapy: complications and quality of life assessment in 35 patients

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Igor Yoshio Imagawa; Krutman, Mariana; Nishinari, Kenji; Yazbek, Guilherme; Teivelis, Marcelo Passos; Bomfim, Guilherme André Zottele; Cavalcante, Rafael Noronha; Wolosker, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To prospectively evaluate the perioperative safety, early complications and satisfaction of patients who underwent the implantation of central catheters peripherally inserted via basilic vein. Methods Thirty-five consecutive patients with active oncologic disease requiring chemotherapy were prospectively followed up after undergoing peripheral implantation of indwelling venous catheters, between November 2013 and June 2014. The procedures were performed in the operating room by the same team of three vascular surgeons. The primary endpoints assessed were early postoperative complications, occurring within 30 days after implantation. The evaluation of patient satisfaction was based on a specific questionnaire used in previous studies. Results In all cases, ultrasound-guided puncture of the basilic vein was feasible and the procedure successfully completed. Early complications included one case of basilic vein thrombophlebitis and one case of pocket infection that did not require device removal. Out of 35 patients interviewed, 33 (94.3%) would recommend the device to other patients. Conclusion Implanting brachial ports is a feasible option, with low intraoperative risk and similar rates of early postoperative complications when compared to the existing data of the conventional technique. The patients studied were satisfied with the device and would recommend the procedure to others. PMID:28076593

  3. Vancomycin stability in heparin and total parenteral nutrition solutions: novel approach to therapy of central venous catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Yao, J D; Arkin, C F; Karchmer, A W

    1992-01-01

    To facilitate therapy of central venous catheter-related Gram-positive bacterial infection in patients who require total parenteral nutrition (TPN) therapy, we studied the stability of vancomycin in a commonly used TPN solution (V-TPN) at final concentrations of 0.5 mg/mL and 1.0 mg/mL and in heparin (100 U/mL in 0.9% NaCl) at 25 micrograms/mL (V-H). Vancomycin concentrations in V-TPN and V-H after storage at 4 degrees C over 35 and 14 days, respectively, were stable (within 10% of the prestorage vancomycin concentration). After 14 days at 4 degrees C heparin activity in V-H solution was 100 +/- 4% of that noted initially. Vancomycin remained stable (100 +/- 6% of the original vancomycin concentration) when the previously refrigerated V-TPN was held for an additional 24 hours at 22 degrees C. When the previously refrigerated V-H was held for an additional 24 hours at 37 degrees C, vancomycin concentrations decreased to 78 +/- 9% of the baseline concentrations (p less than .001). The stability of vancomycin in this TPN solution allows the daily dose of vancomycin to be mixed with the solution and then infused over 10 hours. As shown with pharmacokinetic modeling, this form of therapy will achieve serum vancomycin concentrations within the therapeutic range throughout a 24-hour period. The relative stability of vancomycin in a heparin line-flush solution allows vancomycin concentration in the lumen of the catheter to be maintained at greater than or equal to 15 micrograms/mL during the interval between catheter flushing and the subsequent TPN infusion. A simplified method of administering vancomycin to patients receiving concurrent TPN is possible.

  4. Pulmonary Artery Versus Central Venous Catheter Monitoring in the Outcome of Patients Undergoing Bilateral Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    YaDeau, Jacques T.; Urban, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    Bilateral total knee replacement (BTKR) has been associated with a higher incidence of fat embolism (FES) compared to single knee replacement. Consequently, intraoperative monitoring with a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) has been recommended. This study compares clinical outcome in BTKR patients monitored with central venous pressure versus PAC. A retrospective chart review of 249 consecutive patients undergoing BTKR, 132 of whom had PAC insertion versus 117 who had central line insertion, over a 1-year period were included in the study. Their medical records were reviewed for co-morbidities, baseline characteristics, and type of intraoperative monitoring. Need and duration for postoperative monitoring in the postoperative care, length of hospital stay (LOHS), signs of fat embolism, development of arrhythmias, and respiratory failure were all outcome measures. A total of four patients (1.6%) had FES as per Schonfeld criteria. One of these patients died within 48 h of surgery. They all had PAC monitoring intraoperatively. Pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) remained unchanged during surgery which raises doubt as to the clinical utility and advisability of the use of PAC’s in this setting. There was no statistically significant difference in cardiac or pulmonary complications, or LOHS between the two groups. Central venous pressure monitoring appears to be sufficient in patients undergoing BTKR. PMID:19002531

  5. Large-volume leukapheresis using femoral venous access for harvesting peripheral blood stem cells with the Fenwal CS 3000 Plus from normal healthy donors: predictors of CD34+ cell yield and collection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sang Kyun; Kim, Jong Gwang; Chae, Yeo Soo; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Nan Young; Suh, Jang Soo; Lee, Kyu Bo

    2003-01-01

    The current paper reports on the predicting factors associated with satisfactory peripheral blood stem cell collection and the efficacy of large-volume leukapheresis (LVL) using femoral vein catheterization to harvest PBSCs with Fenwal CS 3000 Plus from normal healthy donors for allogeneic transplantation. A total of 113 apheresis procedures in 57 patients were performed. The median number of MNCs, CD3+ cells, and CD34+ cells harvested per apheresis was 5.3 x 10(8)/kg (range, 0.3-11.0 x 10(8)/kg), 3.0 x 10(8)/kg (range, 0.2-6.6 x 10(8)/kg), and 7.9 x 10(6)/kg (range, 0.1-188.9 x 10(6)/kg), respectively. The median collection efficiency of MNCs and CD34+ cells was 49.8% and 49.7%, respectively. A highly significant correlation was found between the collected CD34+ cell counts and the pre-apheresis WBC counts in the donors (P = 0.013), and between the collected CD34+ cell counts and the pre-apheresis peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cell counts (P<0.001). Harvesting at least >4 x 10(6)/kg CD34+ cells from the 1st LVL was achieved in 44 (77.2%) out of 57 donors and in 19 (90.5%) out of 21 donors with a PB-CD34+ cell count of >40/microl. There was no significant difference in the harvested MNC and CD34+ cell counts between the 1st and 2nd apheresis. The catheter-related complications included catheter obstruction (n = 2) and hematoma at the insertion site (n = 3). Accordingly, LVL using femoral venous access for allogeneic PBSC collection from normal healthy donors would appear to be safe and effective.

  6. Sonographically guided placement of intravenous catheters in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Pinkernelle, Jens; Raschzok, Nathanael; Teichgräber, Ulf K M

    2009-07-01

    Many procedures in minipigs require establishment of reliable deep venous access with a large-bore catheter. In animal experiments, such catheters are typically implanted surgically. In clinical settings, however, ultrasound imaging is routinely used to facilitate safe, minimally invasive puncture of deep vessels. The authors describe a technique for using ultrasound guidance to puncture and cannulate the minipig femoral vein. They carried out the procedure in six minipigs for the purpose of injecting contrast agents for subsequent imaging scans. The procedure was ultimately successful in all pigs, took 10 min on average and resulted in no physiological complications. In one minipig, however, a 10-cm-long catheter became dislodged from the femoral vein; use of a longer (25-cm-long) catheter was optimal for establishing reliable intravenous access.

  7. Implementation of central venous catheter bundle in an intensive care unit in Kuwait: Effect on central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Salama, Mona F; Jamal, Wafaa; Al Mousa, Haifa; Rotimi, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSIs) is an important healthcare-associated infection in the critical care units. It causes substantial morbidity, mortality and incurs high costs. The use of central venous line (CVL) insertion bundle has been shown to decrease the incidence of CLABSIs. Our aim was to study the impact of CVL insertion bundle on incidence of CLABSI and study the causative microbial agents in an intensive care unit in Kuwait. Surveillance for CLABSI was conducted by trained infection control team using National Health Safety Network (NHSN) case definitions and device days measurement methods. During the intervention period, nursing staff used central line care bundle consisting of (1) hand hygiene by inserter (2) maximal barrier precautions upon insertion by the physician inserting the catheter and sterile drape from head to toe to the patient (3) use of a 2% chlorohexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% ethanol scrub for the insertion site (4) optimum catheter site selection. (5) Examination of the daily necessity of the central line. During the pre-intervention period, there were 5367 documented catheter-days and 80 CLABSIs, for an incidence density of 14.9 CLABSIs per 1000 catheter-days. After implementation of the interventions, there were 5052 catheter-days and 56 CLABSIs, for an incidence density of 11.08 per 1000 catheter-days. The reduction in the CLABSI/1000 catheter days was not statistically significant (P=0.0859). This study demonstrates that implementation of a central venous catheter post-insertion care bundle was associated with a reduction in CLABSI in an intensive care area setting.

  8. [A standardized technique for ultrasound controlled placement of a central venous catheter].

    PubMed

    Mergelsberg, M

    1991-12-01

    To reduce the rate of complications and failures in central venous catheterisation a technique for ultrasonically controlled puncture of the internal jugular vein was standardised. The puncture procedure, including the application of local anaesthesia, is continuously observed and guided by real-time ultrasound. Imaging, control and practising of the puncture are described and discussed.

  9. [Impact of clinical practice guidelines on the incidence of bloodstream infections related to peripherally inserted central venous catheter in preterm infants].

    PubMed

    Boutaric, E; Gilardi, M; Cécile, W; Fléchelles, O

    2013-02-01

    In our neonatal intensive care unit, the incidence density of infections related to central catheters, assessed retrospectively over 2 years, exceeded that described in the literature. To reduce this incidence density, clinical practice guidelines were implemented for the insertion and maintenance of central lines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the protocol on the incidence density and the incidence rate of nosocomial bloodborne infections. This was a prospective study in a neonatal intensive care unit of the Fort-de-France University Hospital over 17 months, which included all premature infants with a central line. We studied the adherence to the protocol, possible complications related to the protocol, the characteristics of the population, the incidence rate, and the density of specific central catheter-related infections. There were 111 children, 122 catheters, and 2575 catheter days during period 1 and 101 children, 125 catheters, and 1631 catheter days during period 2. Gestational age and birth weight were significantly lower in period 2 (29.6±2.3 GW vs 27.3±1.9, P=0.001; 1239±379g vs 915±175g, P<0.001) and the catheterization duration differed between the 2 periods (20±11 days vs 13±6 days, P<0.0001). A trend for a lower incidence density of infection was observed in the second period (16 per 1000 catheter days vs 10 per 1000 catheter days, P=0.06). Although the 2 groups' baseline characteristics were different, this study suggests a positive impact of clinical practice guidelines for the insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters on the incidence of nosocomial infections related to central catheters.

  10. The management of central venous catheters and infection control: is it time to change our approach?

    PubMed

    Langton, H

    2014-06-01

    Catheter related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) can lead to a number of serious conditions for the patient, including death. There is much recent evidence both in the UK and abroad which identifies the sources of CR-BSIs, yet they continue to occur. This article seeks to review some of the current evidence in relation to the prevention of CR-BSIs at insertion point.

  11. Successful Salvage of Central Venous Catheters in Patients with Catheter-Related or Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections by Using a Catheter Lock Solution Consisting of Minocycline, EDTA, and 25% Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Raad, Issam; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Zakhour, Ramia; Jordan, Mary; Al Hamal, Zanaib; Jiang, Ying; Yousif, Ammar; Garoge, Kumait; Mulanovich, Victor; Viola, George M; Kanj, Soha; Pravinkumar, Egbert; Rosenblatt, Joel; Hachem, Ray

    2016-06-01

    In cancer patients with long-term central venous catheters (CVC), removal and reinsertion of a new CVC at a different site might be difficult because of the unavailability of accessible vascular sites. In vitro and animal studies showed that a minocycline-EDTA-ethanol (M-EDTA-EtOH) lock solution may eradicate microbial organisms in biofilms, hence enabling the treatment of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) while retaining the catheter in situ Between April 2013 and July 2014, we enrolled 30 patients with CLABSI in a prospective study and compared them to a historical group of 60 patients with CLABSI who had their CVC removed and a new CVC inserted. Each catheter lumen was locked with an M-EDTA-EtOH solution for 2 h administered once daily, for a total of 7 doses. Patients who received locks had clinical characteristics that were comparable to those of the control group. The times to fever resolution and microbiological eradication were similar in the two groups. Patients with the lock intervention received a shorter duration of systemic antibiotic therapy than that of the control patients (median, 11 days versus 16 days, respectively; P < 0.0001), and they were able to retain their CVCs for a median of 74 days after the onset of bacteremia. The M-EDTA-EtOH lock was associated with a significantly decreased rate of mechanical and infectious complications compared to that of the CVC removal/reinsertion group, who received a longer duration of systemic antimicrobial therapy. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01539343.).

  12. Epidemiology and mortality of candidemia both related and unrelated to the central venous catheter: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Arias, S; Denis, O; Montesinos, I; Cherifi, S; Miendje Deyi, V Y; Zech, F

    2017-03-01

    Our objective was to compare mortality, epidemiology, and morbidity in hospitalized patients with candidemia which was both related and unrelated to the central venous catheter (CVC). This was a monocentric, retrospective cohort study of candidemia. The sample consisted of 103 patients with laboratory-confirmed nosocomial candidemia hospitalized between 2006 and 2013 in a tertiary care public hospital. We included 65 (63.1 %) patients (24 in the CVC-positive group, 41 in the CVC-negative group). Demographic data and risk factors were recorded using a structured case report form. In the group of candidemia associated to the CVC, survival at day 50 was 58.6 ± 11.9 %, compared to 26.5 ± 8.9 % for the CVC-negative group (p-value = 0.012); the hazard ratio of death was 0.38 (95 % confidence interval 0.17-0.85, p-value = 0.019). Compared with the CVC-positive patients, CVC-negative patients were often colonized with yeast (41.5 % vs. 16.7 %, p-value = 0.041), had a shorter previous in-hospital stay (20 days vs. 34 days, p-value = 0.023), and were more severely ill (severe sepsis 85.4 % vs. 58.3 %, p-value = 0.016). In this study, when the origin of candidemia was not the CVC, patients were more seriously ill, had a higher mortality rate, and the removal of the catheter seemed to lead to disappointing results. It would be useful to explore the impact of retention of the CVC on survival in the CVC-negative patients, where the CVCs are essential to treating these patients.

  13. Peripheral Venous Catheter-Related Adverse Events: Evaluation from a Multicentre Epidemiological Study in France (the CATHEVAL Project)

    PubMed Central

    Miliani, Katiuska; Taravella, Raphaël; Thillard, Denis; Chauvin, Valérie; Martin, Emmanuelle; Edouard, Stéphanie; Astagneau, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral venous catheters (PVC) are medical devices most frequently used during hospital care. Although the frequency of specific PVC-related adverse events (PVCAEs) has been reported, the global risk related to the insertion of this device is poorly estimated. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of PVCAEs during the indwell time, after catheter removal, and to identify practice-mirroring risk factors. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted as a part of a research project, called CATHEVAL, in one surgery ward and four medicine wards from three public general tertiary care hospitals in Northern France that were invited to participate between June-2013 and June-2014. Each participating ward included during a two-month study period all patients older than 15 years carrying a PVC. All inserted PVCs were monitored from insertion of PVC to up to 48 hours after removal. Monitored data included several practice-mirroring items, as well as the occurrence of at least one PVCAE. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, based on a marginal risk approach, was used to identify factors associated with the occurrence of at least one PVCAE. Results Data were analysed for 815 PVCs (1964 PVC-days) in 573 patients. The incidence of PVCAE was 52.3/100 PVCs (21.9/100 PVC-days). PVCAEs were mainly clinical: phlebitis (20.1/100 PVCs), haematoma (17.7/100 PVCs) and liquid/blood escape (13.1/100 PVCs). Infections accounted for only 0.4/100 PVCs. The most frequent mechanical PVCAEs, was obstruction/occlusion of PVC (12.4/100 PVCs). The incidence of post-removal PVCAEs was 21.7/100 PVCs. Unstable PVC and unclean dressing were the two main risk factors. Conclusion Limitation of breaches in healthcare quality including post-removal monitoring should be reinforced to prevent PVC-related adverse events in hospital settings. PMID:28045921

  14. Prevention of central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections: A questionnaire evaluating the knowledge of the selected 11 evidence-based guidelines by Polish nurses.

    PubMed

    Dedunska, Karina; Dyk, Danuta

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the questionnaire testing nurses' knowledge about the maintenance of a central venous catheter (CVC) and assessed it with regard to age, work experience, type of ward, frequency of trainings, and postgraduate education. There were 1,180 questionnaires (N = 784; 66.4% of the total sample) distributed in several regions of Poland for a period of 7 months. The difficulty level for each question ranged from 0.22-0.88.

  15. Entrapment of J-tip guidewires by Venatech and stainless-steel Greenfield vena cava filters during central venous catheter placement: percutaneous management in four patients.

    PubMed

    Andrews, R T; Geschwind, J F; Savader, S J; Venbrux, A C

    1998-01-01

    We present four patients in whom bedside placement of a central venous catheter was complicated by entrapment of a J-tip guidewire by a previously placed vena cava (VC) filter. Two Venatech filters were fragmented and displaced into the superior VC or brachiocephalic vein during attempted withdrawal of the entrapped wire. Two stainless-steel Greenfield filters remained in place and intact. Fluoroscopically guided extraction of both wires entrapped by Greenfield filters was successfully performed in the angiography suite.

  16. Unintentional embolization of a guide wire in the inferior vena cava during central venous catheter insertion successfully retrieved percutaneously 9 months later.

    PubMed

    Trabattoni, Daniela; Andreini, Daniele; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheters are routinely positioned for hemodynamic monitoring and fluid administration in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, and many well-known complications associated with this manoeuver have been described. Metalic guide wire embolization is a rare complication potentially associated with nonmechanical and mechanical adverse events. The case we report is peculiar as an almost fully endothelialized guide wire was successfully retrieved 9 months after its unintentional embolization in the inferior vena cava.

  17. Haemodialysis catheters in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Huriaux, Laetitia; Costille, Paul; Quintard, Hervé; Journois, Didier; Kellum, John A; Rimmelé, Thomas

    2016-11-29

    Ten to 15% of critically ill patients need renal replacement therapy (RRT) for severe acute kidney injury. The dialysis catheter is critical for RRT quality and efficiency. Catheters have several properties that must be optimized to promote RRT success. The distal tip has to be located in a high blood flow location, which means central venous territory. Therefore, catheters are mostly inserted into the right internal jugular vein or in femoral veins. External diameter should vary from 12 to 16 Fr in order to ensure adequate blood flow inside the catheter. Lumen shapes are theoretically designed to limit thrombotic risk with low turbulences and frictional forces against the internal wall. With low aspiration pressure, distal tip shape has to deliver sufficient blood flow, while limiting recirculation rate. Catheter material should be biocompatible. Despite in vitro data, no strong evidence supports the use of coated catheters in the ICU in order to reduce infectious risk. Antibiotic "lock" solutions are not routinely recommended. Ultrasound guidance for catheterization significantly decreases mechanical complications. Clinicians should select the optimal catheter according to patient body habitus, catheter intrinsic properties and RRT modality to be used.

  18. Performance, pain, and quality of life on use of central venous catheter for management of pericardial effusions in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ghods, Kamran; Razavi, Mohammad Reza; Forozeshfard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Different pericardial catheters have been suggested as an effective alternative method for drainage of pericardial effusion. The aim of this study was to determine the performance, pain, and quality of life on use of central venous catheter (CVC) for drainage of pericardial effusion in patients undergoing open heart surgery. Fifty-five patients who had developed pericardial effusion after an open heart surgery (2012–2015) were prospectively assessed. Triple-lumen central catheters were inserted under echocardiographic guidance. Clinical, procedural, complication, and outcome details were analyzed. Intensity of pain and quality of life of patients were assessed using the numerical rating scale and Short-Form Health Survey. CVC was inserted for 36 males and 19 females, all of whom had a mean age of 58.5±15 years, and the mean duration of the open heart surgery was 8±3.5 hours. The mean central venous pressure catheter life span was 14.6 days. No cases of recurrent effusion and complication were reported. The technical success rate of procedure was 100%. Intensity of pain and quality of life of patients had improved during follow-up. CVC insertion is a safe and effective technique for the management of pericardial effusion in patients after open heart surgery. PMID:27826210

  19. Central venous catheter-related blood stream infections in patients receiving intravenous iloprost for pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sammut, D; Elliot, C A; Kiely, D G; Armstrong, I J; Martin, L; Wilkinson, J; Sephton, P; Jones, J; Hamilton, N; Hurdman, J; McLellan, E; Sabroe, I; Condliffe, R

    2013-07-01

    Catheter-related blood stream infection (CR-BSI) in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) receiving intravenous iloprost via an indwelling central line has previously not been fully described. Recent studies have suggested a link between the pH of prostanoid infusions and the rate and nature of CR-BSI. We have investigated CR-BSI in patients receiving intravenous iloprost at our unit. Databases and hospital records were interrogated for all patients receiving intravenous iloprost between September 2007 and June 2012. Fifty-nine patients received intravenous iloprost via an indwelling central catheter with a total of 23,072 treatment days. There were 15 episodes of CR-BSI, identified using a systematic screening protocol, involving 11 patients giving an overall CR-BSI rate of 0.65/1,000 treatment days. CR-BSI rate for Gram-positive organisms was 0.26/1,000 treatment-days and for Gram-negative organisms was 0.39/1,000 treatment-days. The pH of iloprost in typical dosing regimens was comparable to the pH used in standard-diluent treprostinil and dissimilar to alkaline epoprostenol infusions. The proportion of Gram-negative CR-BSI was similar to that reported for standard-diluent treprostinil. CRP was normal on admission in 33 % of cases of confirmed CR-BSI and remained normal in 13 % of cases. CR-BSI rates with intravenous iloprost are comparable to those observed for other prostanoids. The high proportion of Gram-negative organisms observed and the neutral pH of iloprost infusions support the previously hypothesised link between pH and antimicrobial activity. Although usually elevated during a CR-BSI, CRP may be normal in early infection and a normal result cannot completely exclude infection.

  20. Concentrations of cocaine and benzoylecgonine in femoral blood from cocaine-related deaths compared with venous blood from impaired drivers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alan Wayne; Holmgren, Anita

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations of cocaine and its major metabolite benzoylecgonine (BZE) were determined in femoral blood from 132 cocaine-related deaths and compared with venous blood from 988 apprehended drivers. Cocaine and BZE were determined by solid-phase extraction and isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with limits of quantitation of 0.02 mg/L for both substances. Significantly more men (95-98%) than women (2-5%) abused cocaine, although their mean age was about the same (29-30 years). Mean age (±SD) of cocaine-related deaths was 29 ± 7 years, which was not significantly different from 30 ± 8 years in traffic cases (P > 0.05). The median concentration of cocaine in blood in 61 fatalities was 0.10 mg/L compared with 0.06 mg/L in traffic cases (P < 0.001). In drug intoxication deaths, the median concentration of cocaine was 0.13 mg/L (N = 25), which was not significantly different from 0.09 mg/L (N = 36) in other causes of death. Cocaine-related deaths mostly involved mixed drug intoxications including co-ingestion of heroin, cannabis, amphetamines as well as legal drugs, such as benzodiazepines and/or ethanol. The concentrations of cocaine in blood from living and deceased persons overlapped, which makes it infeasible to predict toxicity from the analytical toxicology results alone.

  1. Microbial Biofilms on Needleless Connectors for Central Venous Catheters: Comparison of Standard and Silver-Coated Devices Collected from Patients in an Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T.; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P.; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P = 0.11). There were no significant associations (P > 0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P = 0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P = 0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination. PMID:24371233

  2. Microbial biofilms on needleless connectors for central venous catheters: comparison of standard and silver-coated devices collected from patients in an acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Perez, Elizabeth; Williams, Margaret; Jacob, Jesse T; Reyes, Mary Dent; Chernetsky Tejedor, Sheri; Steinberg, James P; Rowe, Lori; Ganakammal, Satishkumar Ranganathan; Changayil, Shankar; Weil, M Ryan; Donlan, Rodney M

    2014-03-01

    Microorganisms may colonize needleless connectors (NCs) on intravascular catheters, forming biofilms and predisposing patients to catheter-associated infection (CAI). Standard and silver-coated NCs were collected from catheterized intensive care unit patients to characterize biofilm formation using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods and to investigate the associations between NC usage and biofilm characteristics. Viable microorganisms were detected by plate counts from 46% of standard NCs and 59% of silver-coated NCs (P=0.11). There were no significant associations (P>0.05, chi-square test) between catheter type, side of catheter placement, number of catheter lumens, site of catheter placement, or NC placement duration and positive NC findings. There was an association (P=0.04, chi-square test) between infusion type and positive findings for standard NCs. Viable microorganisms exhibiting intracellular esterase activity were detected on >90% of both NC types (P=0.751), suggesting that a large percentage of organisms were not culturable using the conditions provided in this study. Amplification of the 16S rRNA gene from selected NCs provided a substantially larger number of operational taxonomic units per NC than did plate counts (26 to 43 versus 1 to 4 operational taxonomic units/NC, respectively), suggesting that culture-dependent methods may substantially underestimate microbial diversity on NCs. NC bacterial communities were clustered by patient and venous access type and may reflect the composition of the patient's local microbiome but also may contain organisms from the health care environment. NCs provide a portal of entry for a wide diversity of opportunistic pathogens to colonize the catheter lumen, forming a biofilm and increasing the potential for CAI, highlighting the importance of catheter maintenance practices to reduce microbial contamination.

  3. Anatomic considerations for central venous cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Michael P; Heller, Stephanie F; Rivera, Mariela

    2011-01-01

    Central venous cannulation is a commonly performed procedure which facilitates resuscitation, nutritional support, and long-term vascular access. Mechanical complications most often occur during insertion and are intimately related to the anatomic relationship of the central veins. Working knowledge of surface and deep anatomy minimizes complications. Use of surface anatomic landmarks to orient the deep course of cannulating needle tracts appropriately comprises the crux of complication avoidance. The authors describe use of surface landmarks to facilitate safe placement of internal jugular, subclavian, and femoral venous catheters. The role of real-time sonography as a safety-enhancing adjunct is reviewed. PMID:22312225

  4. Establishment of rat model of central venous catheter (CVC): associated infection and evaluation of the virulence of bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lian-Hua; Huang, Yun-Chao; Guo, Feng-Li; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Guang-Qiang; Duan, Lin-Can; Jin, Cong-Guo

    2014-09-01

    In this study, a central venous catheter (CVC)-associated infection model was established in rats to investigate and evaluate the effect of biofilms on the virulence of the pathogens. Twenty-four adult SD rats were randomly divided into biofilm positive (BF+) and biofilm negative (BF-) groups to be challenged with strains of S.epidermidis. Serum levels of inflammatory cytokines were measured and the infection rate and counts of bacteria cells were studied. Compared to rats of BF- group, the serum level of TNF and IL-6 significantly increased in rats of BF+ group (P < 0.01) and the level of IL-10 and IFN-γ significantly decreased (P < 0.01), striking the balance of pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokines. The infection rate and bacterial counts in tissues and blood of rats of BF + group were significantly higher than those of rats of BF- group (P < 0.05).Inflammatory cell infiltration in vital organs (heart, lung, liver and kidneys) was more significant in rats of BF+ group than that of rats of BF- group. CVC-associated infection model can be successfully reproduced in rats by injecting 5 × 10(6) CFU of S.epidermidis. Biofilm formation can significantly enhance the virulence of the bacteria, leading to uncontrolled infection. The serum level of inflammatory cytokines, infection rate and the extent of inflammatory cell infiltration are important markers for evaluating the virulence of biofilm.

  5. Human serum potentiates the expression of genes associated with antifungal drug resistance in C. albicans biofilms on central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, L P; Anil, S; Hashem, M; Vellappally, S; Cheung, B P K

    2015-04-01

    Candida albicans is a major agent of fungaemias and frequently causes systemic disease through seeded, blood stream dissemination. These infections, particularly common in hospitalized patients with central venous catheters (CVCs), appear to persevere due to biofilm reservoirs of the yeast that tend to develop on the device. Although it is known that candidal biofilms are intrinsically resistant to antifungals compared with their planktonic counterparts, there is a paucity of data on the expression of antifungal drug resistance genes (DRGs) in candidal biofilms in CVC reservoirs. Furthermore, notwithstanding the fact that CVCs are constantly bathed in human serum, there are no studies on the effect of the latter on the DRG expression in candidal biofilms. Hence, we developed in vitro biofilms of three different C. albicans strains on silicone CVC discs immersed in human serum and evaluated the temporal expression of nine antifungal DRGs. In an attempt to evaluate the effect of hyphal elements on DRG expression, we incorporated a hyphal mutant (HM) and its wild-type (WT) counterpart, as well as a fresh clinical isolate in the studies. Human serum significantly up-regulated DRG transcripts in Candida biofilms on CVCs, at different stages of biofilm growth, while the WT strain over-expressed more DRGs than the HM strain. Here, we report, for the first time, that both human serum and the hyphal elements of the yeast have a profound modulatory effect on DRG expression in C. albicans biofilms on CVCs.

  6. "Scrub the hub": cleaning duration and reduction in bacterial load on central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Sarah; Bryson, Celestina; Porter, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study on the effect of alcohol disinfection duration on bacterial load on catheter hubs. Three different levels of disinfection (3, 10, and 15 seconds) were analyzed as well as a positive and negative control. All hubs with the exception of the negative controls were contaminated with a 10 bacterial solution and allowed to dry for 24 hours. Through each hub, 1 mL of sterile saline was flushed; a 10-μL calibrated loop was used to plate the flush onto blood agar. Colony counts were performed on the plates after a 24-hour incubation period. Results revealed that the 3 different levels of disinfection duration were not found to differ significantly in reduction in bacterial load. The duration of disinfection did not significantly change the bacterial load on the hub. However, any disinfection duration significantly decreased the bacterial load as compared to the positive control. A larger study would likely detect a significant result among the disinfections.

  7. Tunnelled Central Venous Catheter-Related Problems in the Early Phase of Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Effects on Transplant Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yeral, Mahmut; Boğa, Can; Oğuzkurt, Levent; Alışkan, Hikmet Eda; Özdoğu, Hakan; Demiroğlu, Yusuf Ziya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Haematopoietic stem cell recipients need central venous catheters (CVCs) for easy administration of intravenous fluid, medications, apheresis, or dialysis procedures. However, CVCs may lead to infectious or non-infectious complications such as thrombosis. The effect of these complications on transplantation outcome is not clear. This manuscript presents the complication rates of double-lumen tunnelled CVCs and their effect on transplantation outcome. Materials and Methods: Data from 111 consecutive patients, of whom 75 received autologous and 36 received allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantations, were collected retrospectively. The data were validated by the Record Inspection Group of the related JACIE-accredited transplantation centre. Results: Thrombosis developed in 2.7% of recipients (0.9 per 1000 catheter days). Catheter-related infection was identified in 14 (12.6%) patients (3.6 per 1000 catheter days). Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most common causative agent. Engraftment time, rate of 100-day mortality, and development of grade II-IV graft-versus-host disease were not found to be associated with catheter-related complications. Conclusion: These results indicate that adverse events related with tunnelled CVCs are manageable and have no negative effects on transplant outcome. PMID:25805675

  8. Cessation of In-line Filters in Central Venous Catheters Does Not Significantly Influence the Incidence of Bloodstream Infections and Mortality in a Hospital Hematological Ward.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Ambiru, Satoshi; Kawaguchi, Takeharu; Sugita, Yasumasa; Kawajiri, Chika; Nagao, Yuhei; Shimura, Takenori

    2016-01-01

    Objective The use of intravenous in-line filters is effective for the mechanical removal of large particles, precipitates, bacteria, fungi, large lipid globules, and air. However, the routine use of in-line filters remains controversial. Many patients with hematological diseases frequently suffer from bloodstream infections (BSIs) with fatal outcomes. Methods The year before cessation of an in-line filter was defined as the "filter period" and the year after its cessation was defined as the "non-filter period." The number of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), which are defined through surveillance, the catheter utilization rate, the number of patient deaths within 7 days after removal of the central venous catheters (CVCs), and the overall survival rate following CVC insertion were measured. Results During both periods, 84 patients had a total of 140 CVCs with a total number of catheter days of 3,407. There were 10 CVCs with CLABSIs, and the overall CLABSI rate was 2.9/1,000 catheter days, including 4 CVCs with CLABSIs (2.5/1,000 catheter days) during the filter period and 6 CVCs with CLABSIs (3.3/1,000 catheter days) during the non-filter period. The CLABSI rate, catheter utilization rate, and mortality did not differ significantly between the two periods. The only independent variable that was found to be significantly associated with the development of CLABSIs was a neutrophil count of <500×10(6)/L (p<0.05). Conclusion Our study revealed that the cessation of in-line filters from CVCs does not significantly influence the incidence of BSIs and mortality in patients with hematological disease. To confirm our results, however, a large-scale randomized controlled study is warranted.

  9. Central venous catheter tip migration due to tracheal extubation: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Struck, Manuel F; Jünemann, Theresa; Reinhart, Konrad; Schummer, Wolfram

    2016-07-28

    Considerable numbers of patients undergo central venous catheterization (CVC) under mechanical ventilation. We hypothesized that the return of spontaneous breathing and tracheal extubation could be associated with distal CVC tip migration towards intracardiac positions due to decreasing intrathoracic pressures and subsequent readjustment of mediastinal organs. Patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were randomized for right or left internal jugular vein (IJV) CVC placement under general anesthesia and mechanical ventilation. CVC tips were positioned at the cavoatrial junction and measured at the time of placement, postoperatively under mechanical ventilation, and after tracheal extubation until 48 h after surgery. Measurement methods included intravascular electrocardiography (ECG) P-wave amplitude, transesophageal echocardiography, and chest radiography (CXR). Out of 70 patients, 60 were eligible for final statistical analysis (31 right and 29 left IJV CVC). According to ECG interpretation, CVC tip positions remained below the pericardiac reflection point in the distal superior vena cava over the course of the three measurement intervals. The ECG revealed significant proximal migration of CVC tips from the time of placement to the time of tracheal extubation (1.19 ± 0.55 vs. 0.62 ± 0.31 mV; P < 0.001). A CXR using CVC tip to carina distances revealed no significant tip migrations in the time between postoperative assessment and following tracheal extubation (5.1 ± 1.7 vs. 5.3 ± 1.5 cm; P = 0.196). In patients with CVCs positioned at the cavoatrial junction, tracheal extubation was not associated with significant postoperative CVC tip malposition, but tended to undergo proximal migration. This trend should be considered particularly in left-sided thoracocervical puncture approaches to avoid unfavorable CVC tip positions.

  10. Efficacy of 1.0% chlorhexidine-gluconate ethanol compared with 10% povidone-iodine for long-term central venous catheter care in hematology departments: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Natsuo; Kimura, Hideo; Misao, Hanako; Matsumoto, Hayato; Imafuku, Yuji; Watanabe, Akemi; Mori, Hiroko; Yoshida, Akiko; Miura, Saori; Abe, Yoshinobu; Toba, Mamoru; Suzuki, Hiromi; Ogawa, Kazuei; Kanemitsu, Keiji

    2014-05-01

    The efficacy of 1% chlorhexidine-gluconate ethanol and 10% povidone-iodine for skin antisepsis of central venous catheter (CVC) sites were compared among hematology patients. The CVC site colonization rates of those groups were 11.9% and 29.2%, respectively, and the catheter-associated blood stream infections were 0.75 and 3.62 per 1,000 catheter-days, respectively. One percent chlorhexidine-gluconate ethanol was superior to povidone-iodine to reduce skin colonizers at CVC sites even when catheters were used for long duration.

  11. Wound healing and catheter thrombosis after implantable venous access device placement in 266 breast cancers treated with bevacizumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Irène; Cottu, Paul H; Fourchotte, Virginie; Sanchez, Sebastian; Fromantin, Isabelle; Kirov, Krassen; Guillaume, Alain; Pelloquin, Anne; Esteve, Marc; Salmon, Remy J

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, in a population with metastatic breast cancer treated with bevacizumab therapy, the incidence of wound dehiscence after placement of an implantable venous access device (VAD) and to study the risk of catheter thrombosis. This study enrolled all VADs placed by 14 anesthetists between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2009: 273 VADs in patients treated with bevacizumab therapy and 4196 VADs in patients not treated with bevacizumab therapy. In the bevacizumab therapy group, 13 cases of wound dehiscence occurred in 12 patients requiring removal of the VAD (4.76%). All cases of dehiscence occurred when bevacizumab therapy was initiated less than 7 days after VAD placement. Bevacizumab therapy was initiated less than 7 days after VAD placement in 150 cases (13 of 150: 8.6%). The risk of dehiscence was the same from 0 to 7 days. In parallel, the VAD wound dehiscence rate in patients not receiving bevacizumab therapy was eight of 4197 cases (0.19%) (Fisher's test significant, P<0.001). No risk factors of dehiscence were identified: anesthetists, learning curves, and irradiated patients. VAD thrombosis occurred in four patients (1.5%). In parallel, VAD thrombosis occurred in 51 of 4197 patients (1.2%) not receiving bevacizumab therapy (Fisher's test not significant; P=0.43). Bevacizumab therapy was permanently discontinued in five patients related to wound dehiscence and in one patient due to extensive skin necrosis. These data suggest the need to observe an interval of at least 7 days between VAD placement and initiation of bevacizumab therapy to avoid the risk of a wound dehiscence requiring chest wall port explant. The risk of VAD thrombosis does not require any particular primary prevention.

  12. Transhepatic Guidance of Translumbar Hemodialysis Catheter Placement in the Setting of Chronic Infrarenal IVC Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Jonathan M. Regalado, Sidney; Navuluri, Rakesh Zangan, Steven; Thuong Van Ha; Funaki, Brian

    2010-06-15

    When patients with end-stage renal disease have exhausted both conventional and unconventional venous access options, creative solutions must be sought for hemodialysis catheter placement in order to ensure survival. This case describes a patient in urgent need of a dialysis catheter despite total occlusion of the jugular, subclavian, and femoral veins. Occlusion of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and right renal vein resulted in failed attempts at translumbar catheter placement. A gooseneck snare was temporarily advanced through the liver to the IVC for use as a fluoroscopic target to facilitate successful single-puncture, translumbar catheterization.

  13. Successful removal of an entrapped and kinked catheter during right transradial cardiac catheterization by snaring and unwinding the catheter via femoral access.

    PubMed

    Khoubyari, Rostam; Arsanjani, Reza; Habibzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Echeverri, Jose; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Since its introduction by Campeau in 1989, the transradial approach for coronary angiography has gained significant popularity among interventional cardiologists due to its lower access site complication rates, cost-effectiveness, and shorter hospital course. Although the transradial approach is much safer than the transfemoral approach, it has its own inherent rare complications including radial artery occlusion, thrombosis, nonocclusive radial artery injury, vasospasm, and compartment syndrome. Herein, we present an unusual case of entrapment and kinking of a catheter in the radial artery, which was successfully removed by using a gooseneck snare via the transfemoral route. The distal and proximal tips were then simultaneously rotated in opposite directions, allowing for the unkinking and removal of the catheter. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this rare complication.

  14. A prospective randomised trial comparing insertion success rate and incidence of catheterisation-related complications for subclavian venous catheterisation using a thin-walled introducer needle or a catheter-over-needle technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Kim, B G; Lim, Y J; Jeon, Y T; Hwang, J W; Kim, H C; Choi, Y H; Park, H P

    2016-09-01

    In clinical practice, both a thin-walled introducer needle and catheter-over-needle technique can be used to allow insertion of a guidewire during central venous catheterisation using the Seldinger technique. We compared the incidence of catheterisation-related complications (arterial puncture, haemothorax, pneumothorax, haematoma and catheter tip malposition) and insertion success rate for these two techniques in patients requiring right-sided subclavian central venous catheterisation. A total of 414 patients requiring infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterisation were randomly allocated to either a thin-walled introducer needle (needle group, n = 208) or catheter-over-needle technique (catheter group, n = 206). The catheterisation-related complication rate was lower in the needle group compared with the catheter group (5.8% vs. 15.5%; p = 0.001). Overall insertion success rates were similar (97.1% and 92.7% in the needle and catheter groups respectively; p = 0.046), although the first-pass success rate was higher in the needle group (62.0% vs. 35.4%; p < 0.001). We recommend the use of a thin-walled introducer needle technique for right-sided infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterisation.

  15. Prevention and treatment of implanted central venous catheter (CVC) - related sepsis: a report after six years of home parenteral nutrition (HPN).

    PubMed

    Santarpia, Lidia; Pasanisi, Fabrizio; Alfonsi, Lucia; Violante, Gerardo; Tiseo, Domenico; De Simone, Gianni; Contaldo, Franco

    2002-06-01

    Catheter-related sepsis is a serious and common complication in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). Prevention measures, prevalence of infections, types of agents and implanted central venous catheters (CVC), effectiveness of antibiotic therapy have been evaluated in 221 patients consecutively followed in our unit from January 1995 to December 2000. The clinical diagnosis of catheter-related infection was made using well-defined criteria. Patients were divided into two groups: A and B, receiving instructions with different modalities: standard (A) and detailed (B), respectively. Sixty CVC-related sepsis occurred in 32 (14%) patients. A multivariate analysis showed that the duration of HPN (P<0.001; OR=0.9), type of catheter (P=0.009; OR=0.12) and type of disease (P=0.033; OR=4.92) significantly influence catheter infection. The type of implanted CVC (159 port-a-cath in 153 patients and 71 tunnelled in 68) seems to affect the infection rate, this being lower in tunnelled (P=0.03). Infection rate was lower in B vs A group (P<0.001) with all types of catheters, suggesting the preventive role of very careful training. In particular, the incidence of CVC-related sepsis was 6/1000 days of HPN (i.e. 6/1000 days of catheterization) in Group A and 3/1000 in Group B. Systemic and antibiotic lock therapy was performed with an 83% successful rate. Gram-positive bacteria were the most frequent CVC infection agents, which are usually eradicated by antibiotic therapy lasting 7 days.

  16. The effectiveness of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine impregnated central venous catheters in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Maaskant, J M; De Boer, J P; Dalesio, O; Holtkamp, M J; Lucas, C

    2009-09-01

    Immuno-compromised patients are at high risk for all kind of infections. Unfortunately, they need central venous catheters (CVCs), which are associated with infectious complications. In this study we examined the effectiveness of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine impregnated CVCs to prevent catheter-related infections in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral stem cell transplantation. This historical cohort study evaluated 139 patients of whom 70 patients were provided with non-impregnated CVCs and 69 patients with impregnated CVCs. Patients were treated for different diagnoses. The median number of days a CVC stayed in situ was 18 in the non-impregnated group and 16 in the impregnated group. The median duration of neutropenia of patients with non-impregnated CVCs was 9 days compared with 7 days of patients with impregnated CVCs. We found less catheter colonization (CC) in patients with chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine CVCs (RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.41-0.96; P = 0.03). Catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSI) were also diminished, but this result was not statistically significant (RR 0.15, 95% CI 0.02-1.15; P = 0.06). The reduction in CC and CR-BSI did not diminish the incidence of fever. We conclude that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine impregnated CVCs provide an important improvement in the attempt to reduce CC and CR-BSI.

  17. [A retrospective study of the relationship between bacterial numbers from central venous catheter tip cultures and blood cultures for evaluating central line-associated bloodstream infections].

    PubMed

    Ohtaki, Hirofumi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Nakayama, Asami; Yonetamari, Jun; Ando, Kohei; Miyazaki, Takashi; Ohta, Hirotoshi; Furuta, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Tamayo; Ito, Hiroyasu; Murakami, Nobuo; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is an infectious disease requiring special attention. It is a common cause of nosocomial infections; catheter insertion into the central veins particularly increases the risk of infection (CLA-BSI: central line-associated bloodstream infection). We examined the relationship between the number of bacterial colonies cultured from shredded central venous catheter (CVC) tips and from blood cultures in our hospital from 2011 to 2012. Coagulase-negative staphylococci topped the list of microbe isolated from the CVC tip culture, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida spp. S. aureus and Candida spp., with growth of over 15 colony-forming units in the CVC tip culture, were also detected at high rates in the blood culture. However, gramnegative bacilli (Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa) did not show a similar increase in colony number in the CVC tip culture. Because microbes adhering to shredded catheter tips are readily detected by culture, this method is useful as a routine diagnostic test. In addition, prompt clinical reporting of the bacterial number of serious CLA-BSI-causing S. aureus and Candida spp. isolated from CVC tips could contribute to earlier CLA-BSI diagnosis.

  18. Emergency central venous catheterization during trauma resuscitation: a safety analysis by site.

    PubMed

    Choron, Rachel L; Wang, Andrew; Van Orden, Kathryn; Capano-Wehrle, Lisa; Seamon, Mark J

    2015-05-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC) is often necessary during initial trauma resuscitations, but may cause complications including catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI), deep venous thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary emboli (PE), arterial injury, or pneumothoraces. Our primary objective compared subclavian versus femoral CVC complications during initial trauma resuscitations. A retrospective review (2010-2011) at an urban, Level-I Trauma Center reviewed CVCs during initial trauma resuscitations. Demographics, clinical characteristics, and complications including: CRBSIs, DVTs, arterial injuries, pneumothoraces, and PEs were analyzed. Fisher's exact test and Student's t test were used; P ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Overall, 504 CVCs were placed (subclavian, n = 259; femoral, n = 245). No difference in age (47 ± 22 vs 45 ± 23 years) or body mass index (28 ± 6 vs 29 ± 16 kg/m(2)) was detected (P > 0.05) in subclavian vs femoral CVC, but subclavian CVCs had more blunt injuries (81% vs 69%), greater systolic blood pressure (95 ± 55 vs 83 ± 43 mmHg), greater Glasgow Coma Scale (10 ± 5 vs 9 ± 5), and less introducers (49% vs 73%) than femoral CVCs (all P < 0.05). Catheter related arterial injuries, PEs, and CRBSIs were similar in subclavian and femoral groups (3% vs 2%, 0% vs 1%, and 3% vs 3%; all P > 0.05). Catheter-related DVTs occurred in 2 per cent of subclavian and 9 per cent of femoral CVCs (P < 0.001). There was a 3 per cent occurrence of pneumothorax in the subclavian CVC population. In conclusion, both subclavian and femoral CVCs caused significant complications. Subclavian catheter-related pneumothoraces occurred more commonly and femoral CRBSIs less commonly than expected compared with prior literature in nonemergent scenarios. This suggests that femoral CVC may be safer than subclavian CVC during initial trauma resuscitations.

  19. Heparin Saline Versus Normal Saline for Flushing and Locking Peripheral Venous Catheters in Decompensated Liver Cirrhosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Zhang, Ming-Guang; Luo, Ou; He, Liu; Li, Jia-Xin; Tang, Yun-Jing; Luo, Yan-Li; Zhou, Min; Tang, Li; Zhang, Zong-Xia; Wu, Hao; Chen, Xin-Zu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A prospective randomized, controlled, single-blinded trial to compare the effectiveness and safety of heparin saline (HS) to those of normal saline (NS) as flushing and locking solutions for peripheral venous catheter (PVC) in decompensated liver cirrhosis (DLC) patients. Patients with DLC at our institution between April 2012 and March 2013 were enrolled after obtaining informed consent. The patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups: the NS group received preservative-free 0.9% sodium chloride as the flushing and locking solution, while the HS group received HS (50 U/mL). PVC-related events and the duration of PVC maintenance were compared between the 2 groups. Moreover, the preinfusion and postinfusion levels of prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and platelet (PLT) were also compared. A total of 32 and 36 DLC patients in the NS (125 PVCs) and HS (65 PVCs) groups, respectively, were analyzed. Baseline characteristics, including gender, age, Child–Pugh grade, PVC type and administration of anticoagulant, and irritant agents, were comparable between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). The maintenance times of the HS and NS groups were 80.27 ± 26.47 and 84.19 ± 29.32 hours, respectively (P = 0.397). Removal of PVC for abnormal reasons occurred in 30.7% and 22.4% of patients in the HS and NS groups (P = 0.208). The PVC occlusion rates were 6.2% and 5.6% in the HS and NS groups, respectively (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 0.31–3.92). The PT, APTT, and PLT levels were comparable between the 2 groups both before and after infusion (P > 0.05). Incremental analyses showed that Child–Pugh grade C might be a risk factor for the suppression of PLT in the HS group. We consider NS to be as effective as and safer than conventional HS for flushing and locking PVC in decompensated liver cirrhosis patients. PMID:26252305

  20. Utilization Patterns and Outcomes Associated with the Central Venous Catheter in Septic Shock: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Walkey, Allan J.; Soylemez-Wiener, Renda; Lindenauer, Peter K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In 2001 a randomized trial showed decreased mortality with early, goal-directed therapy in septic shock, a strategy later recommended by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. Placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) is necessary to administer goal-directed therapy. We sought to evaluate nationwide trends in: 1) CVC utilization and 2) the association between early CVC insertion and mortality in patients with septic shock. Design We retrospectively analyzed the proportion of septic shock cases receiving an early (day of admission) CVC and the odds of hospital mortality associated with receiving early CVC from years 1998-2001 compared with 2002-2009. Setting Non-federal acute care hospitalizations from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 1998-2009. Interventions None Patients 203,481 (population estimate: 999,545) cases admitted through an emergency department with principal diagnosis of septicemia and secondary diagnosis of shock. Measurements and Main Results From 1998-2009 population-adjusted rates of septic shock increased from 12.6 cases per 100,000 US adults to 78 cases per 100,000. During this time age-adjusted hospital mortality associated with septic shock declined from 40.4% to 31.4%. Early CVC insertion increased from 5.7% (95% CI 5.1-6.3%) to 19.2% (95% CI 18.7-19.5%) cases with septic shock, with an increased rate of early CVC placement identified after 2007. The rate of decline in age-adjusted hospital mortality was significantly greater for patients who received an early CVC (-4.2% per year, 95% CI -3.2, -4.2%) as compared with no CVC (-2.9% per year, 95% CI -2.3, -3.5%), p=0.016. Hospital mortality associated with early CVC insertion significantly decreased from a multivariable-adjusted odds ratio of 1.29 (95% CI 1.14-1.45) prior to 2001 to an adjusted odds ratio of 0.87 (95% CI 0.84-0.90) after 2001. Conclusions Placement of a CVC early in septic shock has increased 3-fold since 1998. The mortality associated with early CVC insertion decreased

  1. Effects of starting hemodialysis with an arteriovenous fistula or central venous catheter compared with peritoneal dialysis: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although several studies have demonstrated early survival advantages with peritoneal dialysis (PD) over hemodialysis (HD), the reason for the excess mortality observed among incident HD patients remains to be established, to our knowledge. This study explores the relationship between mortality and dialysis modality, focusing on the role of HD vascular access type at the time of dialysis initiation. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed among local adult chronic kidney disease patients who consecutively initiated PD and HD with a tunneled cuffed venous catheter (HD-TCC) or a functional arteriovenous fistula (HD-AVF) in our institution in the year 2008. A total of 152 patients were included in the final analysis (HD-AVF, n = 59; HD-TCC, n = 51; PD, n = 42). All cause and dialysis access-related morbidity/mortality were evaluated at one year. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to compare the survival of PD patients with those who initiated HD with an AVF or with a TCC. Results Compared with PD patients, both HD-AVF and HD-TCC patients were more likely to be older (p<0.001) and to have a higher frequency of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.017) and cardiovascular disease (p = 0.020). Overall, HD-TCC patients were more likely to have clinical visits (p = 0.069), emergency room visits (p<0.001) and hospital admissions (p<0.001). At the end of follow-up, HD-TCC patients had a higher rate of dialysis access-related complications (1.53 vs. 0.93 vs. 0.64, per patient-year; p<0.001) and hospitalizations (0.47 vs. 0.07 vs. 0.14, per patient-year; p = 0.034) than HD-AVF and PD patients, respectively. The survival rates at one year were 96.6%, 74.5% and 97.6% for HD-AVF, HD-TCC and PD groups, respectively (p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, HD-TCC use at the time of dialysis initiation was the important factor associated with death (HR 16.128, 95%CI [1.431-181.778], p = 0.024). Conclusion Our results suggest that HD

  2. [Central venous catheterization--experiences in neonatal intensive medicine based on scanning electron microscopy study of Silastic catheters].

    PubMed

    Kerstan, J; Lenz, W; el-Hamid, S

    1985-01-01

    This article deals with the use of 56 silastic-catheters in the intensive care of premature and new-born with mean weights of 1550 g according to the Shaw-method. The clinical use with regard to early and late complications was studied by means of scanning electron microscopy of 11 catheters. The results were compared with the complications associated with PVC-catheters. The silastic-catheters has the following advantages: over a longer period it does not lose its mechanical properties, it is athrombogenic and has only few complications regarding infection and thrombosis. Local reactions cannot, however be eliminated. We can extend the use of silastic-catheters by giving blood, drugs and by taking blood samples, by this way intensive care of the new-born is less stressful.

  3. Early thrombosis of the superior vena cava in a patient with a central venous catheter and carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Robert; Shah, Malay; Suydam, Erin; Gucwa, Angela; Bowden, Talmadge; Holsten, Steven B

    2008-12-01

    Superior vena cava syndrome results from obstruction of flow through the vessel either by external compression or thrombosis. External compression by intrathoracic neoplasms is the most common etiology. Thrombosis of the vessel most often occurs in the setting of indwelling catheters or pacemakers. The diagnosis is suggested by the clinical manifestations of facial and upper extremity swelling, dyspnea, and cough. It is confirmed by CT scan showing the development of collateral flow around the lesion. In this report, we present a patient who developed superior vena cava thrombosis after undergoing a short period of central venous catheterization and a Whipple procedure for adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. The endothelial damage caused by the catheter, the low-flow state induced by the large fluid shifts during the operation, and the hypercoagulable state induced by malignancy fulfill Virchow's triad for venous thrombosis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of superior vena cava syndrome after the Whipple procedure with symptoms appearing after a shorter period of catheterization than previously reported in the adult literature.

  4. Percutaneous Thrombin Injection of a Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm with Simultaneous Venous Balloon Occlusion of a Communicating Arteriovenous Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Mittleider, Derek Cicuto, Kenneth; Dykes, Thomas

    2008-07-15

    An 82-year-old woman developed acute occlusion of her right coronary artery. She underwent percutaneous coronary stent placement and aortic balloon pump installation. In the postprocedural period, she developed a common femoral artery pseudoaneurysm (PSA) that communicated with the common femoral vein via an arteriovenous fistula (AVF). After unsuccessful ultrasound-guided compression, ultrasound-guided thrombin injection of the PSA was performed, with simultaneous balloon occlusion of the common femoral vein at the level of the AVF. There was complete thrombosis of the PSA and AVF.

  5. A comparative study of two techniques (electrocardiogram- and landmark-guided) for correct depth of the central venous catheter placement in paediatric patients undergoing elective cardiovascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Barnwal, Neeraj Kumar; Dave, Sona T; Dias, Raylene

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The complications of central venous catheterisation can be minimized by ensuring catheter tip placement just above the superior vena cava-right atrium junction. We aimed to compare two methods, using an electrocardiogram (ECG) or landmark as guides, for assessing correct depth of central venous catheter (CVC) placement. Methods: In a prospective randomised study of sixty patients of <12 years of age, thirty patients each were allotted randomly to two groups (ECG and landmark). After induction, central venous catheterisation was performed by either of the two techniques and position of CVC tip was compared in post-operative chest X-ray with respect to carina. Unpaired t-test was used for quantitative data and Chi-square test was used for qualitative data. Results: In ECG group, positions of CVC tip were above carina in 12, at carina in 9 and below carina in 9 patients. In landmark group, the positions of CVC tips were above carina in 10, at carina in 4 and below carina in 16 patients. Mean distance of CVC tip in ECG group was 0.34 ± 0.23 cm and 0.66 ± 0.35 cm in landmark group (P = 0.0001). Complications occurred in one patient in ECG group and in nine patients in landmark group (P = 0.0056). Conclusion: Overall, landmark-guided technique was comparable with ECG technique. ECG-guided technique was more precise for CVC tip placement closer to carina. The incidence of complications was more in the landmark group. PMID:27512162

  6. Development of X-ray micro-focus computed tomography to image and quantify biofilms in central venous catheter models in vitro.

    PubMed

    Niehaus, Wilmari L; Howlin, Robert P; Johnston, David A; Bull, Daniel J; Jones, Gareth L; Calton, Elizabeth; Mavrogordato, Mark N; Clarke, Stuart C; Thurner, Philipp J; Faust, Saul N; Stoodley, Paul

    2016-12-30

    Bacterial infections of central venous catheters (CVCs) cause much morbidity and mortality, and are usually diagnosed by concordant culture of blood and catheter tip. However, studies suggest that culture often fails to detect biofilm bacteria. This study optimizes X-ray micro-focus computed tomography (X-ray µCT) for the quantification and determination of distribution and heterogeneity of biofilms in in vitro CVC model systems. Bacterial culture and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to detect Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 35984 biofilms grown on catheters in vitro in both flow and static biofilm models. Alongside this, X-ray µCT techniques were developed in order to detect biofilms inside CVCs. Various contrast agent stains were evaluated using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to further optimize these methods. Catheter material and biofilm were segmented using a semi-automated matlab script and quantified using the Avizo Fire software package. X-ray µCT was capable of distinguishing between the degree of biofilm formation across different segments of a CVC flow model. EDS screening of single- and dual-compound contrast stains identified 10 nm gold and silver nitrate as the optimum contrast agent for X-ray µCT. This optimized method was then demonstrated to be capable of quantifying biofilms in an in vitro static biofilm formation model, with a strong correlation between biofilm detection via SEM and culture. X-ray µCT has good potential as a direct, non-invasive, non-destructive technology to image biofilms in CVCs, as well as other in vivo medical components in which biofilms accumulate in concealed areas.

  7. Development of X-ray micro-focus computed tomography to image and quantify biofilms in central venous catheter models in vitro.

    PubMed

    Niehaus, Wilmari L; Howlin, Robert P; Johnston, David A; Bull, Daniel J; Jones, Gareth L; Calton, Elizabeth; Mavrogordato, Mark N; Clarke, Stuart C; Thurner, Philipp J; Faust, Saul N; Stoodley, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial infections of central venous catheters (CVCs) cause much morbidity and mortality, and are usually diagnosed by concordant culture of blood and catheter tip. However, studies suggest that culture often fails to detect biofilm bacteria. This study optimizes X-ray micro-focus computed tomography (X-ray µCT) for the quantification and determination of distribution and heterogeneity of biofilms in in vitro CVC model systems.Bacterial culture and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to detect Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 35984 biofilms grown on catheters in vitro in both flow and static biofilm models. Alongside this, X-ray µCT techniques were developed in order to detect biofilms inside CVCs. Various contrast agent stains were evaluated using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to further optimize these methods. Catheter material and biofilm were segmented using a semi-automated matlab script and quantified using the Avizo Fire software package. X-ray µCT was capable of distinguishing between the degree of biofilm formation across different segments of a CVC flow model. EDS screening of single- and dual-compound contrast stains identified 10 nm gold and silver nitrate as the optimum contrast agent for X-ray µCT. This optimized method was then demonstrated to be capable of quantifying biofilms in an in vitro static biofilm formation model, with a strong correlation between biofilm detection via SEM and culture. X-ray µCT has good potential as a direct, non-invasive, non-destructive technology to image biofilms in CVCs, as well as other in vivo medical components in which biofilms accumulate in concealed areas.

  8. Pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade caused by a central venous catheter in a very low birth weight infant.

    PubMed

    Chioukh, Fatma-Zohra; Ameur, Karim Ben; Hmida, Hayet Ben; Monastiri, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    With more and more extreme premature and very low-birth weight babies being resuscitated, umbilical central venous catheterisation is now being used more frequently in neonatal intensive care. One of the life-threatening complications is pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade; however, it is potentially reversible when it is caught in time. The authors present a case of cardiac tamponade following umbilical venous catheterisation in a neonate. The patient was diagnosed at the appropriate time by echocardiography and urgent pericardiocentesis proved lifesaving.

  9. Percutaneous retrieval of centrally embolized fragments of central venous access devices or knotted Swan-Ganz catheters. Clinical report of 14 retrievals with detailed angiographic analysis and review of procedural aspects

    PubMed Central

    Chmielak, Zbigniew; Dębski, Artur; Kępka, Cezary; Rudziński, Piotr N.; Bujak, Sebastian; Skwarek, Mirosław; Kurowski, Andrzej; Dzielińska, Zofia; Demkow, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Totally implantable venous access systems (TIVAS), Swan-Ganz (SG) and central venous catheters (CVC) allow easy and repetitive entry to the central cardiovascular system. Fragments of them may be released inadvertently into the cardiovascular system during their insertion or as a result of mechanical complications encountered during long-term utilization. Aim To present results of percutaneous retrieval of embolized fragments of central venous devices or knotted SG and review the procedural aspects with a series of detailed angiographies. Material and methods Between January 2003 and December 2012 there were 14 (~0.025%) successful retrievals in 13 patients (44 ±16 years, 15% females) of embolized fragments of TIVAS (n = 10) or CVC (n = 1) or of dislodged guide-wires (n = 2) or knotted SG (n = 1). Results Foreign bodies with the forward end located in the right ventricle (RV), as well as those found in the pulmonary artery (PA), often required repositioning with a pigtail catheter as compared to those catheter fragments which were located in the right atrium (RA) and/or great vein and possessed an accessible free end allowing their direct ensnarement with the loop snare (57.0% (4/7) vs. 66.7% (2/3) vs. 0.0% (0/3); p = 0.074 respectively). Procedure duration was 2–3 times longer among catheters retrieved from the PA than among those with the forward edge located in the RV or RA (30 (18–68) vs. 13.5 (11–37) vs. 8 min (8–13); p = 0.054 respectively). The SG catheter knotted in the vena cava superior (VCS) was encircled with the loop snare introduced transfemorally, subsequently cut at its skin entrance and then pulled down inside the 14 Fr vascular sheath. Conclusions By using the pigtail catheter and the loop snare, it is feasible to retrieve centrally embolized fragments or knotted central venous access devices. PMID:27279874

  10. Epidemiology and impact of a multifaceted approach in controlling central venous catheter associated blood stream infections outside the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Outside ICUs, CVC-ABSIs epidemiology and the results of strategies for their prevention are not well known. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology and the impact of a multifaceted “bundle” approach in controlling CVC-ABSIs outside ICU. Methods From 1991 we performed prevalence studies of device and parenteral nutrition use, and prospective surveillance of all episodes of CVC-ABSIs in a 350-bed teaching hospital. CVC-ABSIs incidence/1,000 inpatient-days was calculated. An estimated CVC-ABSIs incidence/1,000 catheter-days was calculated based on the prevalence rates of catheter use and the total number of inpatient-days in each year. On november 2008, an education programme was instituted for care of catheter lines: reinforcing instructions in aseptic insertion technique, after care and hand-washing; in order to assess the adherence to these measures the quantity of alcohol-based hand-rub consumption/1,000 patient-days was quoted in litres. From January 2009, a checklist intervention for CVC insertion in ICU was started: hand hygiene, using full barrier precautions, cleaning the skin with alcoholic chlorhexidine, avoiding femoral access and removing unnecessary catheters. Compliance with the central line insertion checklist was measured by real-time audits and was achieved in 80% of cases. Results Prevalence of use of CVC and parenteral nutrition was similar throughout the study. We followed-up 309 CVC-ABSIs cases. Estimated CVC-ABSIs rate progressively increased to 15.1/1,000 catheter-days in 2008 (0.36/1,000 inpatient-days). After the intervention, the alcohol-based hand-rub consumption increased slightly and estimated CVC-ABSIs rate fell to 10.1 /1,000 catheter-days in last three years (0.19/1,000 inpatient-days), showing a 32.9% decrease. The infection rates achieved were lower in Internal Medicine wards: decreased from 14.1/1,000 catheter-days (0.17/patient-days) in 2008 to 5.2/1,000 catheter-days (0.05/1,000 inpatient-days) in

  11. Perforation of the superior vena cava 5 days after insertion of a central venous catheter through the left internal jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Kurabe, Miyuki; Watanabe, Tatsunori; Kohno, Tatsuro

    2016-06-01

    We describe a very rare case of an indwelling central venous catheter (CVC) through the left internal jugular vein that perforated the superior vena cava (SVC) wall postoperatively, although the CVC was placed in the appropriate position preoperatively. Three days after CVC insertion, a chest radiograph showed that the CVC tip had moved from the lower SVC to the upper SVC. Five days after the insertion, computed tomography showed SVC perforation and the resulting hydrothorax. In cases of CVC insertion through the left side, the CVC tip should not be placed in the upper SVC (zone B). Considering individual clinical factors and the indwelling period for the CVC, the left innominate vein (zone C) may be a suitable site for the left-sided CVC tip to reduce the risk of SVC perforation.

  12. Incidence of catheter-associated bloodstream infection after introduction of minocycline and rifampin antimicrobial-coated catheters in a pediatric burn population.

    PubMed

    Weber, Joan M; Sheridan, Robert L; Fagan, Shawn; Ryan, Colleen M; Pasternack, Mark S; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections suggest that antimicrobial-coated catheters can decrease the risk of developing catheter-related bloodstream infection in a variety of adult patient populations. There are limited data on their efficacy in the pediatric population, particularly among children with burn injuries. A study was conducted at Shriners Hospitals for Children®, Boston, to determine whether minocycline/rifampin (MR)-coated catheters could decrease the incidence of catheter-associated bloodstream infection (CABSI) in a pediatric burn population. A historical control group included all patients with double- or triple-lumen catheters inserted in the 18-month period from January 2006 to June 2007. The study group included all patients with MR antimicrobial double- or triple-lumen catheters inserted in the subsequent 18-month period, July 2007 to December 2008. Data collected included name, age, date of burn/injury, date of admission, percent TBSA area burn injury or other diagnosis, catheter site (subclavian, internal jugular, or femoral), method of insertion (new percutaneous stick or guidewire), type of catheter (double or triple lumen), date inserted, duration of catheter placement (days), and positive blood cultures recovered while the central venous catheter was in place. CABSI was defined using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition of laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection. There were a total of 66 patients with 252 catheters (1780 catheter days) in the control group and 75 patients with 263 catheters (1633 catheter days) in the study group. Age, percent burn injury, catheter site, and method of insertion were not statistically different between the two groups. The percentage of infected catheters and the rate of infection were significantly different for the two groups, with the MR antimicrobial catheters only half as likely to become infected. In

  13. Phase I Study of Hepatic Arterial Melphalan Infusion and Hepatic Venous Hemofiltration Using Percutaneously Placed Catheters in Patients With Unresectable Hepatic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pingpank, James F.; Libutti, Steven K.; Chang, Richard; Wood, Bradford J.; Neeman, Ziv; Kam, Anthony W.; Figg, William D.; Zhai, Souping; Beresneva, Tatiana; Seidel, Geoffrey D.; Alexander, H. Richard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a phase I study of a 30-minute hepatic artery infusion of melphalan via a percutaneously placed catheter and hepatic venous hemofiltration using a double balloon catheter positioned in the retrohepatic inferior vena cava to shunt hepatic venous effluent through an activated charcoal filter and then to the systemic circulation. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate feasibility in an initial cohort and subsequently determine the maximum tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicity of melphalan. Patients and Methods The initial cohort (n = 12) was treated with 2.0 mg/kg of melphalan before dose escalation to 3.5 mg/kg (n = 16). Total hepatic drug delivery, systemic levels, and percent filter efficiency were determined. Patients were assessed for hepatic and systemic toxicity and response. Results A total of 74 treatments were administered to 28 patients. Twelve patients with primary and metastatic hepatic tumors received 30 treatments (mean, 2.5 per patient) at an initial melphalan dose of 2.0 mg/kg. At 3.5 mg/kg, a dose-limiting toxicity (neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia) was observed in two of six patients. Transient grade 3/4 hepatic and systemic toxicity was seen after 19% and 66% of treatments, respectively. An overall radiographic response rate of 30% was observed in treated patients. In the 10 patients with ocular melanoma, a 50% overall response rate was observed, including two complete responses. Conclusion Delivery of melphalan via this system is feasible, with limited, manageable toxicity and evidence of substantial antitumor activity; 3 mg/kg is the maximum safe tolerated dose of melphalan administered via this technique. PMID:15908655

  14. C-arm Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Needle Path Overlay for Fluoroscopic-Guided Placement of Translumbar Central Venous Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Alda; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Rohm, Esther; Wallace, Michael J.

    2009-07-15

    C-arm cone beam computed tomography is an advanced 3D imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat-panel-based angiography systems. The overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real-time fluoroscopy. This overlay technology was used to guide the placement of three percutaneous translumbar inferior vena cava catheters.

  15. Pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade caused by a central venous catheter in a very low birth weight infant

    PubMed Central

    Chioukh, Fatma-Zohra; Ameur, Karim Ben; Hmida, Hayet Ben; Monastiri, Kamel

    2016-01-01

    With more and more extreme premature and very low-birth weight babies being resuscitated, umbilical central venous catheterisation is now being used more frequently in neonatal intensive care. One of the life-threatening complications is pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade; however, it is potentially reversible when it is caught in time. The authors present a case of cardiac tamponade following umbilical venous catheterisation in a neonate. The patient was diagnosed at the appropriate time by echocardiography and urgent pericardiocentesis proved lifesaving. PMID:28154705

  16. Intraluminal Release of an Antifungal β-Peptide Enhances the Antifungal and Anti-Biofilm Activities of Multilayer-Coated Catheters in a Rat Model of Venous Catheter Infection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent cause of hospital-acquired fungal infections and forms biofilms on indwelling medical devices that are notoriously difficult to treat or remove. We recently demonstrated that the colonization of C. albicans on the surfaces of catheter tube segments can be reduced in vitro by coating them with polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) that release a potent antifungal β-peptide. Here, we report on the impact of polymer structure and film composition on both the inherent and β-peptide-mediated ability of PEM-coated catheters to prevent or reduce the formation of C. albicans biofilms in vitro and in vivo using a rat model of central venous catheter infection. Coatings fabricated using polysaccharide-based components [hyaluronic acid (HA) and chitosan (CH)] and coatings fabricated using polypeptide-based components [poly-l-lysine (PLL) and poly-l-glutamic acid (PGA)] both served as reservoirs for the loading and sustained release of β-peptide, but differed substantially in loading and release profiles and in their inherent antifungal properties (e.g., the ability to prevent colonization and biofilm growth in the absence of β-peptide). In particular, CH/HA films exhibited inherent antifungal and antibiofilm behaviors in vitro and in vivo, a result we attribute to the incorporation of CH, a weak polycation demonstrated to exhibit antimicrobial properties in other contexts. The antifungal properties of both types of films were improved substantially when β-peptide was incorporated. Catheter segments coated with β-peptide-loaded CH/HA and PLL/PGA films were both strongly antifungal against planktonic C. albicans and the formation of surface-associated biofilms in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that PEM coatings provide a useful platform for the design of new antifungal materials, and suggest opportunities to design multifunctional or dual-action platforms to prevent or reduce the severity of fungal infections in applied

  17. Validation of the Accuracy and Reliability of Culturing Intravascular Catheter Segments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-24

    catheters located in central veins of adult surgical and medical intensive care patients were cultured. Any type of central venous catheter was accepted for...20 to 92 years). All catheters were central venous catheters, including 76 triple lumen catheters, 60 Swan-Ganz pulmonary artery catheters, 54 Cordis...RT, Kruse JA, Thill-Baharozian MC, Carlson RW. Triple-vs. Single-Lumen Central Venous Catheters: A prospective study in a critically ill population

  18. Fibrin sheaths in central venous port catheters: treatment with low-dose, single injection of urokinase on an outpatient basis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, De-Hua; Mammadov, Kamal; Hickethier, Tilman; Borggrefe, Jan; Hellmich, Martin; Maintz, David; Kabbasch, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Evaluation of the efficacy of single-shot, low-dose urokinase administration for the treatment of port catheter-associated fibrin sheaths. Methods Forty-six patients were retrospectively evaluated for 54 episodes of port catheter dysfunction. The presence of a fibrin sheath was detected by angiographic contrast examinations. On an outpatient basis, patients subsequently received thrombolysis consisting of a single injection of urokinase (15.000 IU in 1.5 mL normal saline) through the port system. A second attempt was made in cases of treatment failure. Patients were followed up for technical success, complications and long-term outcome. Results Port dysfunction occurred at a median of 117 days after implantation (range: 7–825 days). The technical success after first port dysfunction by thrombolysis was 87% (40/46); thereof, initial thrombolysis was effective in 78% (36/46). Nine patients (20%) received a second dose of urokinase after previous treatment failure. Follow-up was available for 26 of 40 patients after successful thrombolysis. In 8 of these, rethrombosis occurred after a median of 98 days (range: 21–354 days), whereby rethrombolysis was effective in 5 of 7 (63%) patients. The overall success of all thrombolyses performed was 70% (45/64). No procedure-related technical or clinical complications occurred. After first favorable thrombolysis, a Kaplan–Meier analysis yielded a 30-, 90- and 180-day probability of patency of 96%, 87% and 81%. Conclusion Thrombolytic therapy on an outpatient basis appears to be a safe and efficient. Three-month patency rates are comparable to more invasive treatment options, including catheter exchange over a guide wire and percutaneous fibrin sheath stripping. PMID:28182117

  19. Displacement of the inferior vena cava as a factor limiting catheter performance in long-term hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Fabbian, F; Malacarne, F; Russo, G; Galeotti, R; Gresta, E; Cantelli, S; Catizone, L

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of a lady affected by autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease who had been on hemodialyis for 24 years. She has exhausted all options for arterious-venous fistula. The presence of an acquired anatomical abnormality was an obstacle in order to get appropriate blood flow from standard tunnelled femoral catheters. The enlarged right kidney was pushing the inferior vena cava to the left side of the abdomen, and the abnormality was demonstrated by phlebography. Only after placing a cuffed catheter 53 cm long in her left femoral vein we could dialyze efficiently. Venography is mandatory before placing a cuffed catheter especially in uremic patients with long history of access failure, because it saves costs.

  20. Prediction of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) in patients with haematologic malignancies using a modified Infection Probability Score (mIPS).

    PubMed

    Schalk, Enrico; Hanus, Lynn; Färber, Jacqueline; Fischer, Thomas; Heidel, Florian H

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the probability of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) in patients with haematologic malignancies using a modified version of the Infection Probability Score (mIPS). In order to perform a prospective, mono-centric surveillance of complications in clinical routine due to short-term central venous catheters (CVCs) in consecutive patients receiving chemotherapy from March 2013 to September 2014, IPS was calculated at CVC insertion and removal (mIPSin and mIPSex, respectively). We used the 2012 Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society of Haematology and Medical Oncology (AGIHO/DGHO) criteria to define CRBSI. In total, 143 patients (mean 59.5 years, 61.4 % male) with 267 triple-lumen CVCs (4044 CVC days; mean 15.1 days, range 1-60 days) were analysed. CVCs were inserted for therapy of acute leukaemia (53.2 %), multiple myeloma (24.3 %) or lymphoma (11.2 %), and 93.6 % were inserted in the jugular vein. A total of 66 CRBSI cases (24.7 %) were documented (12 definite/13 probable/41 possible). The incidence was 16.3/1000 CVC days (2.9/3.1/10.1 per 1000 CVC days for definite/probable/possible CRBSI, respectively). In CRBSI cases, the mIPSex was higher as compared to cases without CRBSI (13.1 vs. 7.1; p < 0.001). The best mIPSex cutoff for CRBSI prediction was 8 points (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.77; sensitivity = 84.9 %, specificity = 60.7 %, negative predictive value = 92.4 %). For patients with an mIPSex ≥8, the risk for a CRBSI was high (odds ratio [OR] = 5.9; p < 0.001) and even increased if, additionally, CVC had been in use for about 10 days (OR = 9.8; p < 0.001). In case other causes of infection are excluded, a mIPSex ≥8 and duration of CVC use of about 10 days predict a very high risk of CRBSI. Patients with a mIPSex <8 have a low risk of CRBSI of 8 %.

  1. CT venography for deep venous thrombosis: can it predict catheter-directed thrombolysis prognosis in patients with iliac vein compression syndrome?

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Woo; Jae, Hwan Jun; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Min, Sang-Il; Min, Seung-Kee; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of CT venography for catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) in iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS) patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived informed consent. Among the 201 consecutive patients treated in our interventional suite for DVT from January 2001 to June 2013, 48 IVCS patients (12 men, 36 women) who underwent pre-procedural CT venography, CDT with stenting, and follow-up imaging were analyzed. To identify possible determinants of 6-month patency, CT venography was evaluated with Fisher's exact test and logistic regression analyses. Based on the analyses, image-based criteria were established and compared to the current symptom duration-based approach by receiver-operating-characteristic curve analyses and the McNemar test. Recoiling of external iliac vein (EIV) diameter (<120 %) [hazard ratio (HR) 28.652, p = .007] and severe rim enhancement (HR 20.545, p = .016) were significant risk factors for venous occlusion within 6 months of CDT. The dual-parameter image-based criteria were significantly superior to the current symptom duration-based approach in terms of area under the curve value (p = .010) and predictive accuracy (p = .031). With a 2-point cut-off, the proposed criteria demonstrated a 66.7 % sensitivity, 100.0 % specificity, and 92.9 % predictive accuracy for identifying non-responders of CDT. CT venography may be useful in assessing CDT prognoses in IVCS patients, particularly to identify non-responders who demonstrate recoiling of EIV diameter and rim enhancement on CT venography.

  2. Deep venous thrombosis of the neck and pulmonary embolism in patients with a central venous catheter admitted to cardiac rehabilitation after cardiac surgery: a prospective study of 815 patients.

    PubMed

    Frizzelli, Rino; Tortelli, Ornella; Di Comite, Vincenzo; Ghirardi, Redenta; Pinzi, Claudio; Scarduelli, Cleante

    2008-12-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are widely used for therapeutic purposes and to measure hemodynamic variables that cannot be recorded from a peripheral vein. However, the method can involve complications. In cardiac surgery, CVCs are electively placed in the right internal jugular vein but there is little information on deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in catheterized veins (CVC-related DVT) or on secondary pulmonary embolism (PE). The impact of CVC-related DVT and PE in cardiac surgery and measures to prevent PE were assessed. We used ultrasonography (US) to check the point of insertion of CVC in 815 patients in the intensive cardiac rehabilitation unit after heart surgery. In this series, 386 patients (48%) had CVC-related DVT; those already receiving anticoagulant, and considered at low risk, continued that therapy, while those taking an antiplatelet agent (aspirin 100 mg daily) but deemed at high risk of PE from the US findings were given an anticoagulant instead. Only patients with CVC-related DVT at low risk of PE continued taking aspirin. At 3 months, there were no cases of PE among patients receiving an anticoagulant, but six on antiplatelet had non-fatal PE. The prevalence of PE in the whole series of 815 patients was 0.7%. CVC-related DVT is a frequent complication of heart surgery. Anticoagulant therapy started early does not prevent thrombus formation but probably prevents PE, whereas antiplatelet gives no such protection. Sonographic screening of the CVC removal in intensive care unit may be useful for avoiding PE after CVC-related DVT.

  3. Catheter-directed thrombolysis in management of postpartum lower limb deep venous thrombosis – A case series

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, B.C.; Patra, Soumya; Nagesh, C.M.; Reddy, Babu; Manjunath, C.N.

    2015-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a major health problem in pregnancy and postpartum period. Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is safe and effective in the management of symptomatic DVT. Value of CDT in postpartum DVT is not fully evaluated. We describe five patients presenting with acute iliofemoral DVT in their early postpartum period who were treated with mechanical thromboaspiration and CDT. The CDT was done using streptokinase infusion and unfractionated heparin. Percutaneous angioplasty was done in patients with symptomatic residual lesion following thrombolysis. Patients were discharged with oral anticoagulant and compression stockings. This approach was successful in all five cases. Percutaneous endovascular therapy using CDT, mechanical thromboaspiration, and balloon angioplasty is safe and effective in iliofemoral DVT in postpartum period. PMID:26995437

  4. Sustained Nitric Oxide-Releasing Nanoparticles Interfere with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion and Biofilm Formation in a Rat Central Venous Catheter Model.

    PubMed

    Mihu, Mircea Radu; Cabral, Vitor; Pattabhi, Rodney; Tar, Moses T; Davies, Kelvin P; Friedman, Adam J; Martinez, Luis R; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is frequently isolated in the setting of infections of indwelling medical devices, which are mediated by the microbe's ability to form biofilms on a variety of surfaces. Biofilm-embedded bacteria are more resistant to antimicrobial agents than their planktonic counterparts and often cause chronic infections and sepsis, particularly in patients with prolonged hospitalizations. In this study, we demonstrate that sustained nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles (NO-np) interfere with S. aureus adhesion and prevent biofilm formation on a rat central venous catheter (CVC) model of infection. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy showed that NO-np-treated staphylococcal biofilms displayed considerably reduced thicknesses and bacterial numbers compared to those of control biofilms in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Although both phenotypes, planktonic and biofilm-associated staphylococci, of multiple clinical strains were susceptible to NO-np, bacteria within biofilms were more resistant to killing than their planktonic counterparts. Furthermore, chitosan, a biopolymer found in the exoskeleton of crustaceans and structurally integrated into the nanoparticles, seems to add considerable antimicrobial activity to the technology. Our findings suggest promising development and translational potential of NO-np for use as a prophylactic or therapeutic against bacterial biofilms on CVCs and other medical devices.

  5. Dealing with the venous congestion of free flaps: venous catheterization.

    PubMed

    Gürsoy, Koray; Kankaya, Yüksel; Uysal, Afşin; Koçer, Uğur

    2008-11-01

    For head and neck reconstruction after tumor ablation surgery, free flaps are mostly the chosen treatment modality for most of the centers. Coping with venous insufficiency and increasing venous outflow of the flap during this process increases the success rate. To increase venous outflow, triple-lumen central venous catheter is inserted to one of the donor veins of the flap that has venous insufficiency and one intact vein anastomosis.

  6. Analysis of different genetic traits and their association with biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from central venous catheter infections.

    PubMed

    Petrelli, D; Zampaloni, C; D'Ercole, S; Prenna, M; Ballarini, P; Ripa, S; Vitali, L A

    2006-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis, one of the bacterial species most often implicated in foreign-body-associated infections, for their ability to form biofilms and for the presence of mecA and IS256 element. Sixty-seven Staphylococcus epidermidis clinical isolates, obtained from implantable medical devices, were investigated. Overall, 70% of the strains were positive for ica operon genes, 85% possessed atlE, and 46% contained aap. In 89% of the population, the Congo red agar test confirmed the correlation between the presence of ica genes and slime expression. Almost all of the strains could be classified as biofilm producers by both the crystal violet assay and microscopy. The bacterial population studied showed a very high frequency of strains positive for mecA as well as for the IS256 element. Although well-structured biofilms have been previously observed only in those strains possessing genes belonging to the ica operon, this study demonstrates that strains lacking specific biofilm-formation determinants can be isolated from catheters and can form a biofilm in vitro. Hence, different and yet-to-be identified factors may work together in the formation and organization of complex staphylococcal microbial communities and sustain infections associated with implanted medical devices.

  7. Blood Samples of Peripheral Venous Catheter or The Usual Way: Do Infusion Fluid Alters the Biochemical Test Results?

    PubMed Central

    Taghizadeganzadeh, Mahboobeh; Yazdankhahfard, Mohammadreza; Farzaneh, Mohammadreza; Mirzaei, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most blood tests require venous blood samples. Puncturing the vein also causes pain, infection, or damage to the blood, and lymph flow, or long-term healing. This study aimed to determine and compare the biochemical laboratory value of the blood samples that were provided through: peripheral vein infusion (PVI) receiving continuous intravenous fluid; and the usual method of blood sampling. Methods: This is an interventional, quasi-experimental, and controlled study. The selected study sample included 60 patients, who were hospitalized during 2014, in the Internal Medicine, part of Martyrs of Persian Gulf, teaching hospital at Bushehr. Three blood samples were taken from each patient that were provided through PVI line (5 ml blood collected at beginning of IVC and then another 5 cc), and another case was prepared by common blood sampling (control). All the samples were analyzed in terms of sodium, potassium, urea and creatinine using SPSS Ver.19 software, by paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation coefficients. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the amount of sodium and potassium in the first blood samples taken from the intravenous infusion line and vein puncture. However, no significant differences were found among the biochemical amount in the second blood samples taken from the intravenous infusion line and vein puncture. Conclusions: We can use blood samples taken from peripheral intravenous infusion lines after 5cc discarding from the first part of the sample for measuring the value of sodium, potassium, urea and creatinine. PMID:26925892

  8. Impact of bypass flow rate and catheter position in veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation on gas exchange in vivo.

    PubMed

    Togo, Konomi; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Katagiri, Nobumasa; Fujii, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Satoru; Date, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Yuji; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2015-06-01

    The clinical use of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VVECMO) in adult patients with respiratory failure is rapidly increasing. However, recirculation of blood oxygenated by ECMO back into the circuit may occur in VVECMO, resulting in insufficient oxygenation. The cannula position and bypass flow rate are two major factors influencing recirculation, but the relationship and ideal configuration of these factors are not fully understood. In the present study, we attempted to clarify these parameters for effective gas exchange. VVECMO was performed in eight adult goats under general anesthesia. The position of the drainage cannula was fixed in the inferior vena cava (IVC), but the return cannula position was varied between the IVC, right atrium (RA), and superior vena cava (SVC). At each position, the recirculation rates calculated, and the adequacy of oxygen delivery by ECMO in supplying systemic oxygen demand was assessed by measuring the arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and pressure (PaO2). Although the recirculation rates increased as the bypass flow rates increased, SaO2 and PaO2 also increased in any position of return cannula. The recirculation rates and PaO2 were 27 ± 2% and 162 ± 16 mmHg, 36 ± 6% and 139 ± 11 mmHg, and 63 ± 6% and 77 ± 9 mmHg in the SVC, RA and IVC position at 4 L/min respectively. In conclusion, the best return cannula position was the SVC, and a high bypass flow rate was advantageous for effective oxygenation. Both the bypass flow rates and cannula position must be considered to achieve effective oxygenation.

  9. Eliminating guidewire retention during ultrasound guided central venous catheter insertion via an educational program, a modified CVC set, and a drape with reminder stickers.

    PubMed

    Peh, Wee Ming; Loh, Wann Jia; Phua, Ghee Chee; Loo, Chian Min

    2016-01-01

    Guidewire retention is a severe but preventable complication from central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. There were three cases of guidewire retention during CVC insertion in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) in Singapore General Hospital, in the period between December 2011 and February 2012. The primary objective of this quality improvement project was to eliminate future incidences of guidewire retention during CVC insertion in the MICU and medical intermediate care area (MICA) via a structured educational program and a cost effective modified CVC set. The secondary objective was to perform a cost analysis and comparison between the use of the conventional hospital CVC set and drape with our newly modified CVC dressing kit. Root cause analysis of the three cases identified major factors leading to guidewire retention. Interventions were planned and tested using PDSA cycles. Internal medicine trainees rotating through MICU and MICA during the period between February 2012 and June 2013 underwent a multi-modal structured CVC insertion training program with hands on simulation. They also used a newly modified CVC dressing kit and drape. The CVC dressing kit was modified (CVC PLUS) to include a sterile drape with reminder stickers stating "REMOVE the GUIDEWIRE," as well as a sterile ultrasound sleeve. The total number of CVC insertions performed and guidewire retentions were monitored. During the period of study there were 320 CVC insertions in the MICU and MICA. Since this quality improvement project was initiated, and up to the submission of this article, there have not been any further cases of guidewire retention in the MICU and MICA. The total cost reduction per use of CVC PLUS was S$29.26 (Singaporean Dollars). A multi-modal structured training program, integrated with a modified, pre-packed CVC set, and drapes with reminder stickers (all included in CVC PLUS) were cost effective, and improved patient safety by eliminating guidewire retention during CVC

  10. Central venous access.

    PubMed

    Ganeshan, Arul; Warakaulle, Dinuke R; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-01-01

    Central venous access plays an important role in the management of an ever-increasing population of patients ranging from those that are critically ill to patients with difficult clinical access. Interventional radiologists are key in delivering this service and should be familiar with the wide range of techniques and catheters now available to them. A comprehensive description of these catheters with regard to indications, technical aspects of catheterization, success rates, and associated early and late complications, as well as a review of various published guidelines on central venous catheter insertion are given in this article.

  11. Peripherally inserted central catheter - insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... nontunneled central venous catheters. In: Mauro MA, Murphy KPJ, Thomson KR, et al., eds. Image-Guided Interventions . ... by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is ...

  12. Catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Tracie A

    2009-06-01

    Tunneled, cuffed, double-lumen catheters are commonly used for long-term venous access in hemodialysis patients. Complications of these catheters, including catheter-related infection, are a major cause of morbidity and resource utilization in the hemodialysis population. Treatment of catheter-related bloodstream infections includes the use of antibiotics and evaluation of the need for catheter removal or exchange. Measures to prevent catheter-related infections include use of an aseptic technique and antiseptic cleaning solution, elimination of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage, topical exit site application of antibiotics, use of antibiotic lock solutions, and use of catheters and cuffs coated or impregnated with antimicrobial or antiseptic agents. This review article will provide an update on the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of catheter-related infections in the hemodialysis population.

  13. Central venous catheter-related infection due to Candida membranaefaciens, a new opportunistic azole-resistant yeast in a cancer patient: a case report and a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Fanci, Rosa; Pecile, Patrizia

    2005-09-01

    An unusual central venous catheter (CVC)-related infection caused by Candida membranaefaciens in a patient with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is described. Clinical signs and microbiological results observed in this case may support the hypothesis of an emerging CVC-related fungaemia, because of new azole-resistant yeast, successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B. To date C. membranaefaciens (the teleomorph of Pichia membranaefaciens) has traditionally been considered non-pathogenic and this report seems to be the first case of systemic fungal infection. We believe that another fungus can be added to the list of opportunistic strains.

  14. Reduction in catheter-related infections after switching from povidone-iodine to chlorhexidine for the exit-site care of tunneled central venous catheters in children on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Paglialonga, Fabio; Consolo, Silvia; Biasuzzi, Antonietta; Assomou, Jolanda; Gattarello, Elisabetta; Patricelli, Maria Grazia; Giannini, Alberto; Chidini, Giovanna; Napolitano, Luisa; Edefonti, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    Only a few studies have investigated the optimal exit site management of tunneled central venous catheters (CVCs) in pediatric patients on chronic hemodialysis (HD). The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of chlorhexidine solutions and a 5% povidone-iodine solution on the incidence of CVC-related infections in children on HD. The incidence of exit-site infection (ESI), tunnel infection (TI), and bloodstream infection (BSI) was assessed in two groups of tunneled CVCs. The iodopovidone group consisted of 14 CVCs used between 1 January 2011 and 30 June 2012 in 10 children, whose median age at the time of CVC placement was 11.8 years (range 1.2-19.2): 5% povidone-iodine was used for CVC exit-site care. From 1 August 2012 to 31 January 2014, 0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate/70% isopropyl alcohol was used for the exit site, and 2% chlorhexidine gluconate/70% isopropyl alcohol spray for the hub in 13 CVCs was used in 10 patients (chlorhexidine group), whose median age at the time of CVC placement was 10 years (range 1.2-19.2). Ten episodes of ESI were diagnosed in the iodopovidone group (incidence 3.4/1000 CVC days), and only one in the chlorhexidine group (incidence 0.36/1000 CVC days, P = 0.008). One TI was observed in the iodopovidone group (0.34/1000 CVC days), and none in the chlorhexidine group. The incidence of BSIs decreased from 1.7/1000 CVC days (5 cases) to 0.36/1000 CVC days (1 case, P = 0.06) after switching to chlorhexidine. Two CVCs were lost due to CVC-related infections in the iodopovidone group, whereas no CVC was lost due to infections in the chlorhexidine group. In comparison with 5% povidone-iodine, the use of chlorhexidine gluconate was associated with a reduction in the incidence of ESI, TI, and BSI in children on HD.

  15. The Use of a Low-Concentration Heparin Solution to Extend the Life of Central Venous Catheters in the African Green Monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-28

    animal immediately before moving it into the surgery suite. A final surgical scrub and rinse with povidone -iodine solution and 70% alcohol was...maintenance significantly increased the mean patency time, compared with a saline-only catheter flush solution. Adding a low-concentration heparin...catheter maintenance resulted in a significant increase in mean patency time compared to a saline-only catheter flush solution. Adding a low-concentration

  16. Candida utilis catheter-related bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Donato, Concetta; De Carolis, Elena; Vella, Antonietta; Vaccaro, Luisa; La Greca, Antonio; Fantoni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Central venous catheter-related fungemia are increasing in the last years, also due to rare fungi. We report the case of a Candida utilis catheter-related bloodstream infection in a patient with metastatic carcinoma of the bladder and a long term totally implanted venous catheter. The diagnosis was done by paired blood cultures and differential time to positivity. The Candida species was rapidly identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The patient was successfully treated with anidulafungine. PMID:25473600

  17. Hemodialysis Tunneled Catheter-Related Infections

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa M.; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; MacRae, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections, exit-site infections, and tunnel infections are common complications related to hemodialysis central venous catheter use. The various definitions of catheter-related infections are reviewed, and various preventive strategies are discussed. Treatment options, for both empiric and definitive infections, including antibiotic locks and systemic antibiotics, are reviewed. PMID:28270921

  18. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider's office. An indwelling catheter has a small balloon inflated on the end of it. This prevents ... When the catheter needs to be removed, the balloon is deflated. CONDOM CATHETERS Condom catheters can be ...

  19. A comprehensive approach to the prevention of central venous catheter complications: results of 10-year prospective surveillance in pediatric hematology-oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; Cavaliere, Mara; Pegoraro, Anna; Gamba, Piergiorgio; Zadra, Nicola; Tridello, Gloria

    2016-04-01

    We report our decennial experience with 1161 newly-placed long-term central venous catheters inserted in 919 hematology-oncology patients for a total of 413,901 CVC-days of observation. Most of the CVCs were partially-implanted, open-ended, Broviac-Hickman type of CVC (95 %). One thousand and twenty-four complications were recorded equal to 2.47 per 1000 CVC-days. The frequency of complications per CVC, the rate of episodes per 1000 CVC-days, and removal rate were malfunction/occlusion 42 %, 1.18/1000, and 2.3 %; mechanical (dislodgement/rupture/kinking) 18.3 %, 0.51/1000, and 77.4 %; bacteremia 14.8 %, 0.42/1000, and 18.6 %; exit-site/tunnel infection 11.5 %, 0.32/1000, and 9.7 %; thrombosis 0.86 %, 0.02/1000, and 30 %; pneumothorax 0.52 %, 0.01/1000, and 0. In multivariate analysis, the risk factors were for mechanical complications, a younger age <6.1 years at CVC insertion (HR 1.8, p = 0.0006); for bacteremia, a double lumen CVC (HR 3.1, p < 0.0001) and the surgical modality of CVC insertion (HR 1.5, p = 0.03); for exit-site/tunnel infection, a double lumen CVC (HR 2.1, p = 0.0003) and a diagnosis of leukemia or lymphoma (HR 1.8, p = 0.01); for malfunction/occlusion, an age <6.1 years (HR 1.6, p = 0.0003), the diagnosis of leukemia or lymphoma (HR 1.9, p < 0.0001) and double lumen CVC (HR 1.33, p = 0.023). The cumulative incidence of premature CVC removal was 29.2 % and the risk factors associated with this event were the surgical modality of CVC insertion (HR 1.4, p = 0.0153) and an age at CVC positioning less than 6.1 years (HR 1.6, p = 0.0025). We conclude that a best-practice set of rules resulted in reduced CVC complications.

  20. ‘Matching Michigan’: a 2-year stepped interventional programme to minimise central venous catheter-blood stream infections in intensive care units in England

    PubMed Central

    Bion, Julian; Richardson, Annette; Hibbert, Peter; Beer, Jeanette; Abrusci, Tracy; McCutcheon, Martin; Cassidy, Jane; Eddleston, Jane; Gunning, Kevin; Bellingan, Geoff; Patten, Mark; Harrison, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections from central venous catheters (CVC-BSIs) increase morbidity and costs in intensive care units (ICUs). Substantial reductions in CVC-BSI rates have been reported using a combination of technical and non-technical interventions. Methods We conducted a 2-year, four-cluster, stepped non-randomised study of technical and non-technical (behavioural) interventions to prevent CVC-BSIs in adult and paediatric ICUs in England. Random-effects Poisson regression modelling was used to compare infection rates. A sample of ICUs participated in data verification. Results Of 223 ICUs in England, 215 (196 adult, 19 paediatric) submitted data on 2479 of 2787 possible months and 147 (66%) provided complete data. The exposure rate was 438 887 (404 252 adult and 34 635 paediatric) CVC-patient days. Over 20 months, 1092 CVC-BSIs were reported. Of these, 884 (81%) were ICU acquired. For adult ICUs, the mean CVC-BSI rate decreased over 20 months from 3.7 in the first cluster to 1.48 CVC-BSIs/1000 CVC-patient days (p<0.0001) for all clusters combined, and for paediatric ICUs from 5.65 to 2.89 (p=0.625). The trend for infection rate reduction did not accelerate following interventions training. CVC utilisation rates remained stable. Pre-ICU infections declined in parallel with ICU-acquired infections. Criterion-referenced case note review showed high agreement between adjudicators (κ 0.706) but wide variation in blood culture sampling rates and CVC utilisation. Generic infection control practices varied widely. Conclusions The marked reduction in CVC-BSI rates in English ICUs found in this study is likely part of a wider secular trend for a system-wide improvement in healthcare-associated infections. Opportunities exist for greater harmonisation of infection control practices. Future studies should investigate causal mechanisms and contextual factors influencing the impact of interventions directed at improving patient care. PMID:22996571

  1. Risk of infection due to medical interventions via central venous catheters or implantable venous access port systems at the middle port of a three-way cock: luer lock cap vs. luer access split septum system (Q-Syte)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many cancer patients receive a central venous catheter or port system prior to therapy to assure correct drug administration. Even appropriate hygienic intervention maintenance carries the risk of contaminating the middle port (C-port) of a three-way cock (TWC), a risk that increases with the number of medical interventions. Because of the complexity of the cleaning procedure with disconnection and reconnection of the standard luer lock cap (referred as “intervention”), we compared luer lock caps with a “closed access system” consisting of a luer access split septum system with regard to process optimization (work simplification, process time), efficiency (costs) and hygiene (patient safety). Methods For determination of process optimization the workflow of an intervention according to the usual practice and risks was depicted in a process diagram. For determining the actual process costs, we analyzed use of material and time parameters per intervention and used the process parameters for programming the process into a simulation run (n = 1000) to determine the process costs as well as their differences (ACTUAL vs. NOMINAL) within the framework of a discrete event simulation. Additionally cultures were carried out at the TWC C-ports to evaluate possible contamination. Results With the closed access system, the mean working time of 5.5 minutes could be reduced to 2.97 minutes. The results for average process costs (labour and material costs per use) were 3.92 € for luer lock caps and 2.55 € for the closed access system. The hypothesis test (2-sample t-test, CI 0.95, p-value<0.05) confirmed the significance of the result. In 50 reviewed samples (TWC’s), the contamination rate for the luer lock cap was 8% (4 out of 50 samples were positive), the contamination rate of the 50 samples with the closed access system was 0%. Possible hygienic risks (related to material, surroundings, staff handling) could be reduced by 65.38%. Conclusions In the

  2. Rupture of totally implantable central venous access devices (Intraports) in patients with cancer: report of four cases

    PubMed Central

    Filippou, Dimitrios K; Tsikkinis, Christoforos; Filippou, Georgios K; Nissiotis, Athanasios; Rizos, Spiros

    2004-01-01

    Background Totally implantable central venous access devices (intraports) are commonly used in cancer patients to administer chemotherapy or parenteral nutrition. Rupture of intraport is a rare complication. Patients and methods During 3 years period, a total of 245 intraports were placed in cancer patients for chemotherapy. Four of these cases (two colon cancer and one each of pancreas and breast cancer) had rupture of the intraport catheter, these forms the basis of present report. Results Mean time insitu for intraports was 164∀35 days. Median follow-up time was 290 days and total port time in situ was 40180 days. The incidence of port rupture was 1 per 10,000 port days. Three of the 4 cases were managed by successful removal of catheters. In two of these the catheter was removed under fluoroscopic control using femoral route, while in the third patient the catheter (partial rupture) was removed surgically. One of the catheters could not be removed and migrated to right ventricle on manipulations. Conclusion Port catheter rupture is a rare but dreaded complication associated with subcutaneous port catheter device placement for chemotherapy. In case of such an event the patient should be managed by an experienced vascular surgeon and interventional radiologist, as in most cases the ruptured catheter can be retrieved by non operative interventional measures. PMID:15494075

  3. Echinocandin and ethanol lock therapy treatment of fungal catheter infections.

    PubMed

    Pieroni, Kevin P; Nespor, Colleen; Poole, Robert L; Kerner, John A; Berquist, William E

    2013-03-01

    Ethanol lock therapy has been implemented to prevent infections of central venous catheters as well as to treat infections. Fungal catheter-associated blood stream infections are historically more difficult to treat and have required removal of central venous catheters. We report the largest case series to date, successfully treating 5 of 7 fungal catheter-associated blood stream infections with ethanol lock therapy and systemic echinocandin administration.

  4. Experience using central venous access for long-term hemodialysis. A new concept.

    PubMed

    McGonigle, D J; Schrock, L G; Hickman, R O

    1983-05-01

    Central venous access for acute renal failure has been used for a number of years. The femoral vein and, more recently, the subclavian vein have been the routes of access. This technique has many advantages, however, it also has some significant limitations. We have recently been using a catheter for long- as well as short-term hemodialysis. The catheter is placed by means of a short incision through an opening in the internal jugular vein, and maneuvered so that the tip lies in the superior portion of the right atrium. After dialysis, the catheter is filled with heparin. The catheter then requires no additional care between between hemodialysis sessions. We have reported an experience of 50 patients in whom this catheter has been used. The complications have been remarkably few, and none were serious or fatal. At present, the patient using the catheter for the longest period of time has had it in position for approximately 19 months. We believe this technique provides a significant new choice among the ways in which hemodialysis can be achieved for short- or long-term needs.

  5. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A peritoneo-venous shunt is an implanted device that consists of a catheter and a pressure activated one-way valve. The catheter is implanted with one end in the peritoneal cavity and the other in...

  6. Hepatic venous reconstruction using the superficial femoral vein in a right-lobe living donor liver transplant patient with interrupted inferior vena cava.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazushige; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Kawagishi, Naoki; Akamatsu, Yorihiro; Miyagi, Shigeto; Yamaya, Hideyuki; Takeda, Ikuo; Fukushima, Daizo; Sato, Akira; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Satomi, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    Anatomical abnormalities in patients with BA often include polysplenia, preduodenal portal vein, interrupted retrohepatic IVC, cardiac abnormalities, and situs inversus. In LDLT patients who had congenital vascular anomalies, additional surgical modifications for the reconstruction of hepatic venous branches are sometimes necessary to prevent venous parenchymal congestion. We report a 12-yr-old female with post-Kasai BA with interrupted retrohepatic IVC who underwent right-lobe LDLT because the left liver graft volume was insufficient. The donor right liver graft had three major hepatic branches, including the RHV, IRHV, and MHV tributary (V8). We performed hepatic venous reconstruction by creating a large, wide triple orifice consisting of the RHV and two SFVs, which were anastomosed to the V8 and IRHV using the donor's SFV as an interposition graft. In conclusion, the reconstruction of venous orifices for right-lobe LDLT patients with the absent retrohepatic IVC is can be carried out using an SFV graft derived from the living donor or the recipient.

  7. Feasibility of continuous, catheter-directed thrombolysis using low-dose urokinase in combination with low molecular-weight heparin for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis in patients at risk of bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoping; Shi, Wangyin; He, Xu; Lou, Wensheng; Chen, Liang; Gu, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the feasibility of catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) using continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase in combination with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis. This retrospective analysis included patients with symptomatic acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis who received CDT using continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase in combination with LMWH within the past four years. Urokinase was administered at 1×104 U/h and 2×104 U/h in patients at high-risk and low-risk of bleeding, respectively. Measurements included urokinase dosage, duration, clinical outcomes and CDT-related complications. A total of 46 patients were included (high-risk, n=17; low-risk, n=29). In the high-risk patients, 64.7% experienced dissolution of ≥50% thrombi after a median CDT duration of 8 days (range, 6–10 days) and median total urokinase dose of 1.92×106 units (range, 1.44–2.4×106 units). In the low-risk patients, 82.8% achieved dissolution of ≥50% thrombi after a median CDT duration of 7 days (range, 4–10 days) and a median total urokinase dose of 3.36×106 units (range, 1.92–4.80×106 units). Remission of clinical symptoms after CDT was achieved in 15 (88.2%) and 28 (96.6%) cases in high-risk and low-risk patients, respectively. No treatment-associated pulmonary embolism or major bleeding was observed. Three (6.5%) subjects (high-risk, n=1; low-risk, n=2) experienced minor bleeding. In conclusion, continuous infusion of low-dose urokinase via CDT in combination with LMWH is effective and safe for acute iliofemoral venous thrombosis in patients with one or more risk factor for bleeding. PMID:28352362

  8. Which is the easiest and safest technique for central venous access? A retrospective survey of more than 5,400 cases.

    PubMed

    Pittiruti, M; Malerba, M; Carriero, C; Tazza, L; Gui, D

    2000-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate on the technique for central venous catheterization associated with the lowest complication rate and the highest success rate. In an attempt to better define the easiest and safest venous approach, we have reviewed our 7-year experience with 5479 central venous percutaneous punctures (by Seldinger's technique) for the insertion of short-term (n=2109), medium/long-term (n=2627) catheters, as well as double-lumen, large-bore catheters for hemodialysis and/or hemapheresis (n=743). We have analyzed the incidence of the most frequent in-sertion-related complications by comparing seven different venous approaches: jugular vein, low lateral approach; jugular vein, high lateral approach; jugular vein, low axial approach; subclavian vein, infraclavicular approach; subclavian vein, supraclavicular approach; external jugular vein; femoral vein. The results of our retrospective study suggest that the 'low lateral' approach to the internal jugular vein, as described by Jernigan and modified according to our protocol, appears to be the easiest and safest technique for percutaneous insertion of central venous access, being characterized by the lowest incidence of accidental arte-rial puncture (1.2%) and malposition (0.8%), no pneumothorax, and an extremely low rate of repeated attempts (i.e. more than two punctures before successful cannulation) (3.3%). We advocate the 'low lateral' approach to the internal jugular vein as first-choice technique for venipuncture in both adults and children, for both short-term and long-term central venous percutaneous cannulation.

  9. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  13. [Central venous catheterization by using ultrasound guidance to patients with terminal stage malignant tumors].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masato; Ono, Akiko; Moriguchi, Kazuko; Kanemoto, Kazuo

    2008-11-01

    Central venous catheterization with ultrasound guidance was performed on 41 patients with terminal stage malignant tumors--112 consecutive insertions at our hospital. We performed a total of 112 consecutive insertions: 30 with the skin marking method and 82 with the real time echo guidance method. Catheter insertion was performed to the internal jugular vein in 24, the supra-clavicular approach of the subclavian vein in 4, the infra-clavicular approach of the subclavian vein in 37 and the femoral vein in 47. The success rate was 85.7% (96/112 insertions), and the mean insertion time was 2.2 minutes. The complication rate was 4.5%: arterial puncture for 3 insertions, and mal-position for 2 insertions. In this examination, it was confirmed that central venous catheterization with ultrasound guidance could be performed safely and briefly in such patients.

  14. Concurrent Angioplasty Balloon Placement for Stent Delivery through Jugular Venous Bulb for Treating Cerebral Venous Sinus Stenosis. Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Khan, Asif A.; Capistrant, Rachel; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Xie, Kevin; Suri, M. Fareed K.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To report upon technique of concurrent placement of angioplasty balloon at the internal jugular vein and sigmoid venous sinus junction to facilitate stent delivery in two patients in whom stent delivery past the jugular bulb was not possible. CLINICAL PRESENTATION A 21-year-old woman and a 41-year-old woman with worsening headaches, visual obscuration or diplopia were treated for pseudotumor cerebri associated with transverse venous stenosis. Both patients had undergone primary angioplasty, which resulted in improvement in clinical symptoms followed by the recurrence of symptoms with restenosis at the site of angioplasty. INTERVENTION After multiple attempts at stent delivery through jugular venous bulb were unsuccessful, a second guide catheter was placed in the ipsilateral internal jugular vein through contralateral femoral venous approach. A 6 mm × 20 mm (left) or 5 × 15 mm (right) angioplasty balloon was placed across the internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinus junction and partially inflated until the inflation and relative straightening of the junction was observed. In both patients, the internal jugular vein and sigmoid sinus junction was successfully traversed by the stent delivery system in a parallel alignment to inflated balloon. Balloon mounted stent was deployed at the site of restenosis with near complete resolution of lumen narrowing delivery and improvement in clinical symptoms. CONCLUSION We report a technique for realignment and diameter change with concurrent placement and partial inflation of angioplasty balloon at the jugular venous bulb to facilitate stent delivery into the sigmoid and transverse venous sinuses in circumstances where multiple attempts at stent delivery are unsuccessful. PMID:27829971

  15. A peripherally inserted central catheter line, inserted the day before surgery, decreases the time from induction to incision for spinal deformity surgery and safely provides central venous access during surgery: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Stuedemann, Anne E; Schwend, Richard M; Thomas, Valorie K; Leamon, Julia M; Lightner, Tammy S

    2017-02-24

    Pediatric patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity may benefit from central venous access to provide intraoperative monitoring and fluid resuscitation. For pediatric surgical patients requiring central access, we hypothesized that placing a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line preoperatively should decrease time from induction of anesthesia to incision and result in improved patient safety and decreased operating room charges. This was a retrospective, nonrandomized, and case comparison study. Clinical records of all children with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis or neuromuscular scoliosis treated surgically by the senior author between December 2007 and April 2012 were reviewed. Control group patients had a central venous catheter (CVC) placed by the anesthesiologist after induction of anesthesia. The trial group had a PICC placed under local anesthesia the day before surgery by an experienced vascular access team. The time from induction of anesthesia to the time for the surgical incision was determined for each study group. The CVC line placement charges were determined by the operating room time charges at $214/min. Charges saved were the mean time difference multiplied by the operating room time charge, less the charge for PICC line insertion ($1282). There were 29 neuromuscular patients, the mean age was 13 years (SD: 4 years). The mean time from induction to incision for the PICC group was 91 min [95% confidence interval (CI): 67-115 min] and for the CVC group 113 min (95% CI: 99-127 min, P=0.083). For this mean time difference of 22 min, the estimated cost savings would be $3426 per patient. There were 59 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, the mean age was 14 years (SD: 2 years). The mean time from induction to incision for the PICC group was 78 min (95% CI: 74-82 min) and for the CVC group 106 min (95% CI: 96-116  min, P≤0.001). For this mean time difference of 28 min, the estimated cost savings would

  16. Catheter-related bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Gahlot, Rupam; Nigam, Chaitanya; Kumar, Vikas; Yadav, Ghanshyam; Anupurba, Shampa

    2014-01-01

    Central-venous-catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are an important cause of hospital-acquired infection associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. Consequences depend on associated organisms, underlying pre-morbid conditions, timeliness, and appropriateness of the treatment/interventions received. We have summarized risk factors, pathogenesis, etiology, diagnosis, and management of CRBSI in this review. PMID:25024944

  17. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis Is a Safe and Alternative Therapeutic Approach in the Management of Postpartum Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, B C; Patra, Soumya; Nagesh, C M; Reddy, Babu; Manjunath, C N

    2015-12-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a major health problem in pregnancy and postpartum period. Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) is safe and effective in management of symptomatic DVT. Value of CDT in postpartum DVT is not fully evaluated. We describe five patients presenting with acute iliofemoral DVT in their early postpartum period who were treated with mechanical thromboaspiration and CDT. The CDT was done using streptokinase infusion and unfractionated heparin. Percutaneous angioplasty was done in patients with symptomatic residual lesion following thrombolysis. Patients were discharged with oral anticoagulant and compression stockings. This approach was successful in all four cases. Percutaneous endovascular therapy using CDT, mechanical thromboaspiration, and balloon angioplasty is safe and effective in iliofemoral DVT in postpartum period.

  18. [Umbilical and peripherally inserted venous central catheterization of the newborn].

    PubMed

    Bouissou, A; Rakza, T; Storme, L; Lafarghe, A; Fily, A; Diependaele, J-F; Dalmas, S

    2008-09-01

    Umbilical venous and peripherally inserted venous central catheters are widely used to perfuse low-weight preterm and term newborns in intensive care units. This catheter must be inserted carefully and monitored rigorously to prevent complications. This paper develops today's knowledge on the use and complications in the newborn population.

  19. Use of Peripheral Parenteral Nutrition Solutions as a Risk Factor for Bacillus cereus Peripheral Venous Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infection at a Japanese Tertiary Care Hospital: a Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Sakihama, Tomoko; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2016-11-22

    The risk factors are unclear for peripheral venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections (PVCBSIs) caused by Bacillus cereus. We aimed to examine for these risk factors in patients with B. cereus PVCBSI by conducting a 2-year case-control study in a large teaching hospital. We analyzed all adult cases of B. cereus PVCBSI (37 patients) and 180 controls who were randomly selected from among patients who had a PVC in place for at least 2 days. Multivariate analysis using a conditional logistic regression model indicated that independent risk factors were use of a peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN) solution with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 88.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 17.4-451.9), and steroid therapy (adjusted OR, 5.7 [95% CI, 1.3-24.4]). In conclusion, use of PPN solutions or steroids was an independent risk factor for B. cereus PVCBSI. Appropriate use of PPN solutions may help prevent B. cereus PVCBSI. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these results.

  20. A Rat Model of Central Venous Catheter to Study Establishment of Long-Term Bacterial Biofilm and Related Acute and Chronic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Ashwini; Lebeaux, David; Decante, Benoit; Kriegel, Irene; Escande, Marie-Christine; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Beloin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Formation of resilient biofilms on medical devices colonized by pathogenic microorganisms is a major cause of health-care associated infection. While in vitro biofilm analyses led to promising anti-biofilm approaches, little is known about their translation to in vivo situations and on host contribution to the in vivo dynamics of infections on medical devices. Here we have developed an in vivo model of long-term bacterial biofilm infections in a pediatric totally implantable venous access port (TIVAP) surgically placed in adult rats. Using non-invasive and quantitative bioluminescence, we studied TIVAP contamination by clinically relevant pathogens, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and we demonstrated that TIVAP bacterial populations display typical biofilm phenotypes. In our study, we showed that immunocompetent rats were able to control the colonization and clear the bloodstream infection except for up to 30% that suffered systemic infection and death whereas none of the immunosuppressed rats survived the infection. Besides, we mimicked some clinically relevant TIVAP associated complications such as port-pocket infection and hematogenous route of colonization. Finally, by assessing an optimized antibiotic lock therapy, we established that our in vivo model enables to assess innovative therapeutic strategies against bacterial biofilm infections. PMID:22615964

  1. Inhibitory effect of sustained perivascular delivery of paclitaxel on neointimal hyperplasia in the jugular vein after open cutdown central venous catheter placement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongyup; Kim, Younglim; Hwang, Ji Woong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Inhibitory effect of paclitaxel on neointimal hyperplasia after open cutdown has not been elucidated. Methods For the control group (n = 16), silicone 2.7-Fr catheters were placed via the right external jugular vein with the cutdown method. For the treatment group (n = 16), a mixture of 0.65 mg of paclitaxel and 1 mL of fibrin glue was infiltrated around the exposed vein after cutdown. After scheduled intervals (1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks), the vein segment was harvested and morphometric analysis was performed on cross-sections. Results Proliferation of smooth muscle cell (SMC) was strongly suppressed in the treatment group, and the ratio of neointima to vein wall was significantly reduced in the treatment group (8 weeks; 0.63 ± 0.08 vs. 0.2 ± 0.08, P < 0.05). Luminal patency was significantly more preserved in the treatment group, and the luminal area was significantly wider in the paclitaxel-treated group compared to the control group (8 weeks; 1.91 ± 0.43 mm2 vs. 5.1 ± 0.43 mm2, P < 0.05). Mean SMC counts measured at 1 and 2 weeks after cutdown were significantly lower in the treatment group (2 weeks; 115 ± 22 vs. 62 ± 22). Paclitaxel was undetectable in systemic circulation (<10 ng/mL). Conclusion Sustained perivascular delivery of paclitaxel with fibrin glue was effective in inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in rat jugular vein after open cutdown. PMID:28203557

  2. Principles of tunneled cuffed catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Heberlein, Wolf

    2011-12-01

    Tunneled cuffed catheters provide reliable and instant long-term intravenous access for a large variety of therapeutic purposes, including chemotherapy, parenteral nutrition, and apheresis. The most frequent application is for patients with renal failure as an access device for hemodialysis. In this capacity, the rate of catheter use has remained stable in the United States, despite the promotion of arteriovenous fistulas and arteriovenous grafts. The latter 2 procedures achieve superior longevity and much higher cost-efficiency. Tunneled catheters, however, serve as bridging devices during maturation of newly placed arteriovenous fistulas or as the final option in patients in whom fistulas and grafts have failed. High-quality vascular access is a hallmark of interventional radiology, and its significance for patient care and for our specialty cannot be overestimated. Familiarity with basic concepts of the device and procedural techniques are crucial to achieve successful long-term venous access. The following article demonstrates key concepts of tunneled venous catheter placement by means of dialysis, inasmuch as dialysis catheters represent the most commonly placed tunneled central venous catheters. The principles of placement and techniques utilized, however, are applicable to devices that are used for chemotherapy or parenteral nutrition, such as the Hickman, Broviac, Groshong, or tunneled peripherally inserted central catheters.

  3. [Transvenous extraction of venous katheter by Simmons-katheter (sidewinder I) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Poser, H; Yükseltan, J

    1977-12-01

    Report about successful extraction of cutoff embolised venous katheter from V. jugularis with help of a SIMMONS-catheter. Further possibilities of use of superselective arteriography catheters in this connection are mentioned.

  4. Cardiomegaly in a premature neonate after venous umbilical catheterization.

    PubMed

    Schlapbach, Luregn Jan; Pfammatter, Jean-Pierre; Nelle, Mathias; McDougall, Felicity Jane

    2009-01-01

    Umbilical venous catheters allow rapid central access in neonates, but may be associated with various complications. We present a case of a newborn with pericardial effusion following umbilical venous catheterization. An extremely low birth weight infant was intubated for respiratory distress syndrome and had umbilical venous and arterial lines in place. Massive cardiomegaly was noted on the subsequent chest X-ray. Echocardiography revealed a large pericardial effusion without signs of tamponade. After removing the catheter, the effusion gradually resolved. While pericardial effusion is a well-known complication of percutaneous long central lines, only a few case reports have documented sudden cardiovascular compromise associated with umbilical venous catheters. Pericardial effusion may be asymptomatic and should be suspected in infants with central catheters and progressive cardiomegaly. The prompt removal of catheters and, if signs of cardiac tamponade are present, emergency pericardiocentesis may prove to be life-saving.

  5. Catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fromer, M; Shenasa, M

    1991-02-01

    Catheter ablation is gaining increasing interest for the therapy of symptomatic, sustained arrhythmias of various origins. The scope of this review is to give an overview of the biophysical aspects and major characteristics of some of the most widely used energy sources in catheter ablation, e.g., the discharge of conventional defibrillators, modified defibrillators, laser light, and radiofrequency current application. Results from animal studies are considered to explain the basic mechanisms of catheter ablation. The recent achievements with the use of radiofrequency current to modify or ablate cardiac conduction properties are outlined in more detail.

  6. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-05-04

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it.

  7. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  8. [Central venous access by the Seldinger technic in neonatology].

    PubMed

    Goñi Orayen, C; Pérez Martínez, A; Ruiz Cano, R; Carrascosa Romero, M C; Vázquez García, M S; Martínez Gutiérrez, A

    1999-10-01

    Eighteen catheterizations were attempted in 17 patients catheters (Arrow 3ChFr and 4ChFr), between january of 1996 and december of 1997. The patients ranged in age from 3 to 148 days (mean of 43.3 and standard deviation of 47.5) and in weight from 1110 to 4000 grams (mean of 3182 grams and standard deviation 767.2 grams). Overall successful catheterization rate was 94.5%. Complications included a pneumothorax that needed pleural drainage, one self-limited femoral artery spasm and one stenosis of femoral vein that did not require any treatment. The mean catheterism time was 6.64 days (deviation of 3.84 days), and the causes of removal were end of treatment in 8 patients, accidental removal in 5, infectious suspicion in 2 and limb edema in 2. Seldinger technique may be a useful approach for central venous catheterization in neonates. Careful catheterization, extensive experience and appropriate selection of material, help to keep the risk of complications low.

  9. Catheter Migration of a Port-a-Cath System

    SciTech Connect

    Bruninx, Guy; Matte, Jean-Christophe; Wilder, Francoise van; Delcour, Christian

    1996-11-15

    A patient with axillary venous thrombosis caused by lymph node compression and the presence of a displaced catheter in the vascular lumen is presented. In this case, percutaneous interventional radiological procedures (balloon angioplasty and snare loop method) in conjunction with medical treatment were effective in limiting the post-thrombotic syndrome and restoring the proper positioning of the catheter, thereby saving the central venous access.

  10. Catheter Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you during the procedure. Machines will measure your heart’s activity. All types of ablation require cardiac catheterization to place flexible tubes, or catheters, inside your heart to make the scars. Your doctor will clean ...

  11. Catheter Embolization

    MedlinePlus

    ... the scrotum that may be a cause of infertility. Catheter embolization may be used alone or combined ... in patients with diabetes or other pre-existing kidney disease. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  12. Central vascular catheters and infections.

    PubMed

    Dioni, Elisabetta; Franceschini, Renata; Marzollo, Roberto; Oprandi, Daniela; Chirico, Gaetano

    2014-03-01

    Newborn infants in critical conditions require a permanent intra-venous line to allow for the administration of fluids, parenteral nutrition and drugs. The use of central venous catheters, however, is associated with an increased risk of infections, leading to prolongation of length of stay and higher hospitalization costs, particularly in extremely preterm infants. Dwell time is a significant factor for complications, with a predicted risk of catheter related infections of about 4 per 1000 catheter-days. To reduce the incidence of complications, several requirements must be met, including adequate staff and resources to provide education, training, and quality improvement programs, within a culture of communication and teamwork. Rigorous reporting schedule on line care and the implementation of unique bundle elements, the use of health care failure mode and effect analysis, the judicious use of antibiotics through an antimicrobial stewardship strategy, the application of specific antifungal prophylaxis are among the most effective interventions, while the addition of heparin to parenteral solution, or the use of antibiotic plus heparin lock therapy are under evaluation. Nursing assistance plays a fundamental role in managing central venous lines and in reducing or preventing the incidence of infection, by the application of several complex professional strategies.

  13. Urinary catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder catheter - infants; Foley catheter - infants; Urinary catheter - neonatal ... Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  14. Iliofemoral Venous Thrombosis Mainly Related to Iliofemoral Venous Obstruction by External Tumor Compression in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Tzu-Yao; Hsu, Hui-Ching; Wen, Min-Sheng; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Hung, Yu-Hsin; Liaw, Chuang-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Background To study iliofemoral venous thrombosis related to iliofemoral venous obstruction in cancer patients. Methods In this case series study, 829 cancer patients were surveyed for iliofemoral obstruction/thrombosis within 10 years. The criteria for inclusion were: (1) presence of unilateral lower-extremity swelling; (2) computed tomography (CT) scans showing a tumor with external compression of the iliac or femoral vein, and (3) duplex ultrasound scans showing venous thrombosis or venous flow insufficiency over a femoral vein or saphenous vein. Results Sixty-three patients (8%) developed an iliofemoral venous obstruction. The presence of iliofemoral venous thrombosis was detected in 21 of these patients (33%). The rate of iliofemoral venous thrombosis was significantly higher in patients with an invasion of the inguinal region, D-dimer levels >3,000 ng/ml, gastrointestinal cancer, or invasion of the inguinal lymph nodes. However, none of our patients with iliofemoral venous thrombosis had a detection of iliofemoral venous obstruction. Improved lower-extremity swelling was reported in 84% of the patients following combination therapy involving low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and systemic therapy. Conclusion Patients with an iliofemoral venous thrombosis mainly had iliofemoral venous obstruction by external tumor compression. Combination therapy with LMWH and systemic therapy were mandatory for these patients. PMID:27990113

  15. [Tunnelled central venous line-associated infections in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension treated with intravenous prostacyclin].

    PubMed

    Boucly, Athénaïs; O'Connell, Caroline; Savale, Laurent; O'Callaghan, Dermot S; Jaïs, Xavier; Montani, David; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous prostacyclins are a valuable treatment for patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension, leading to improved exercise capacity, haemodynamics, quality of life and survival. Unfortunately, due to the short half-life of these drugs, they need to be administered continuously through central venous catheters. Despite aseptic technique, regular dressing changes, tunneled central venous catheters and patient education, patients are exposed to central venous catheter associated infections. These infections cause significant morbidity and mortality. The clinical presentation, microbiology, consequences and management of these central venous catheter associated infections in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients treated with intravenous prostacyclins are discussed.

  16. [Cardiac tamponade after withdrawal of a peripheral access central catheter].

    PubMed

    García-Galiana, E; Sanchis-Gil, V; Martínez-Navarrete, M Á

    2015-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is a very common technique, although its complications can be multiple and sometimes fatal. A case is presented of cardiac tamponade by parenteral nutrition a few hours after moving a central venous catheter peripherally inserted a few days before. The diagnosis was made by echocardiography, and an emergency pericardiocentesis was performed, achieving complete recovery of the patient. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters are more likely to change their position secondary to the movements of the patient's arm, thus it is important to use soft catheters, make sure the tip lies above the carina to avoid perforation of the pericardial reflexion, and fix it well to the skin. Diagnosis must be made as soon as possible, given the high mortality rate of this complication, and the essential diagnostic tool is echocardiography. Elective treatment consists of early catheter withdrawal and emergency pericardiocentesis.

  17. Trauma patients warrant upper and lower extremity venous duplex ultrasound surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Alonso; Tyroch, Alan H.; McLean, Susan F.; Smith, Jody; Ramos, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Background: Due to the high incidence of thromboembolic events (deep venous thrombosis [DVT] and pulmonary embolus [PE]) after injury, many trauma centers perform lower extremity surveillance duplex ultrasounds. We hypothesize that trauma patients are at a higher risk of upper extremity DVTs (UEDVTs) than lower extremity DVTs (LEDVTs), and therefore, all extremities should be evaluated. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart and trauma registry review of Intensive Care Unit trauma patients with upper and LEDVTs detected on surveillance duplex ultrasound from January 2010 to December 2014 was carried out. Variables reviewed were age, gender, injury severity score, injury mechanism, clot location, day of clot detection, presence of central venous pressure catheter, presence of inferior vena cava filter, mechanical ventilation, and fracture. Results: A total of 136 patients had a DVT in a 5-year period: upper - 71 (52.2%), lower - 61 (44.9%), both upper and lower - 4 (2.9%). Overall, 75 (55.2%) patients had a UEDVT. Upper DVT vein: Brachial (62), axillary (26), subclavian (11), and internal jugular (10). Lower DVT vein: femoral (58), popliteal (14), below knee (4), and iliac (2). 10.3% had a PE: UEDVT - 5 (6.7%) and LEDVT - 9 (14.8%) P = 0.159. Conclusions: The majority of the DVTs in the study were in the upper extremities. For trauma centers that aggressively screen the lower extremities with venous duplex ultrasound, surveillance to include the upper extremities is warranted. PMID:28367009

  18. Venous oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane; Bloos, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Early detection and rapid treatment of tissue hypoxia are important goals. Venous oxygen saturation is an indirect index of global oxygen supply-to-demand ratio. Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) measurement has become a surrogate for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). ScvO2 is measured by a catheter placed in the superior vena cava. After results from a single-center study suggested that maintaining ScvO2 values >70% might improve survival rates in septic patients, international practice guidelines included this target in a bundle strategy to treat early sepsis. However, a recent multicenter study with >1500 patients found that the use of central hemodynamic and ScvO2 monitoring did not improve long-term survival when compared to the clinical assessment of the adequacy of circulation. It seems that if sepsis is recognized early, a rapid initiation of antibiotics and adequate fluid resuscitation are more important than measuring venous oxygen saturation.

  19. Experience of robotic catheter ablation in humans using a novel remotely steerable catheter sheath

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Daniel T.; Goldenberg, Alex S.; Peters, Nicholas S.; Davies, D. Wyn

    2008-01-01

    Background A novel remotely controlled steerable guide catheter has been developed to enable precise manipulation and stable positioning of any eight French (Fr) or smaller electrophysiological catheter within the heart for the purposes of mapping and ablation. Objective To report our initial experience using this system for remotely performing catheter ablation in humans. Methods Consecutive patients attending for routine ablation were recruited. Various conventional diagnostic catheters were inserted through the left femoral vein in preparation for treating an accessory pathway (n = 1), atrial flutter (n = 2) and atrial fibrillation (n = 7). The steerable guide catheter was inserted into the right femoral vein through which various irrigated and non-irrigated tip ablation catheters were used. Conventional endpoints of loss of pathway conduction, bidirectional cavotricuspid isthmus block and four pulmonary vein isolation were used to determine acute procedural success. Results Ten patients underwent remote catheter ablation using conventional and/or 3D non-fluoroscopic mapping technologies. All procedural endpoints were achieved using the robotic control system without manual manipulation of the ablation catheter. There was no major complication. A radiation dosimeter positioned next to the operator 2.7 m away from the X-ray source showed negligible exposure despite a mean cumulative dose area product of 7,281.4 cGycm2 for all ten ablation procedures. Conclusions Safe and clinically effective remote navigation of ablation catheters can be achieved using a novel remotely controlled steerable guide catheter in a variety of arrhythmias. The system is compatible with current mapping and ablation technologies Remote navigation substantially reduces radiation exposure to the operator. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10840-007-9184-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  20. Management of Dysfunctional Catheters and Tubes Inserted by Interventional Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steven Y.; Engstrom, Bjorn I.; Lungren, Matthew P.; Kim, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive percutaneous interventions are often used for enteral nutrition, biliary and urinary diversion, intra-abdominal fluid collection drainage, and central venous access. In most cases, radiologic and endoscopic placement of catheters and tubes has replaced the comparable surgical alternative. As experience with catheters and tubes grows, it becomes increasingly evident that the interventional radiologist needs to be an expert not only on device placement but also on device management. Tube dysfunction represents the most common complication requiring repeat intervention, which can be distressing for patients and other health care professionals. This manuscript addresses the etiologies and solutions to leaking and obstructed feeding tubes, percutaneous biliary drains, percutaneous catheter nephrostomies, and drainage catheters, including abscess drains. In addition, we will address the obstructed central venous catheter. PMID:26038615

  1. Endoluminal dilation technique to remove "stuck" tunneled hemodialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Stephen E; Hadziomerovic, Adnan; Aquino, Jose; Cunningham, Ian; O'Kelly, Kevin; Rasuli, Pasteur

    2012-08-01

    Most tunneled catheters can be easily removed after the retention cuff is dissected. Occasionally, these catheters can become resistant to removal even after application of potentially hazardous forceful traction. In addition, an infected catheter may cause life-threatening septicemia. Several methods have been described for their extraction, some of which may be available only in tertiary-care facilities. The present report describes the successful extraction of five such "stuck" catheters by using a recently described technique of endoluminal dilation. The technique appears safe and straightforward and can be performed in any interventional suite while allowing preservation of venous access.

  2. [Bases of central venous catheterization].

    PubMed

    Schmalz-Ott, Stéphane; Monti, Matteo; Vollenweider, Peter

    2008-10-29

    Central venous catheterization is a frequently performed procedure in internal medicine units. Residents in training frequently share the same questions, doubts and fears about this procedure : "Should I perform a subclavian catheterization in a patient with mild thrombopenia?"; "Which site has the lesser complication rate?"; "After how long does a catheter need to be replaced?". This mini-review of the current literature tries to answer this and other questions.

  3. Practical Aspects of Nontunneled and Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Edward; Kappel, Joanne; MacRae, Jennifer; Dipchand, Christine; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Lok, Charmaine; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; Miller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Nontunneled hemodialysis catheters (NTHCs) are typically used when vascular access is required for urgent renal replacement therapy. The preferred site for NTHC insertion in acute kidney injury is the right internal jugular vein followed by the femoral vein. When aided by real-time ultrasound, mechanical complications related to NTHC insertion are significantly reduced. The preferred site for tunneled hemodialysis catheters placement is the right internal jugular vein followed by the left internal jugular vein. Ideally, the catheter should be inserted on the opposite side of a maturing or planned fistula/graft. Several dual-lumen, large-diameter catheters are available with multiple catheter tip designs, but no one catheter has shown significant superior performance. PMID:28270920

  4. Practical Aspects of Nontunneled and Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters.

    PubMed

    Clark, Edward; Kappel, Joanne; MacRae, Jennifer; Dipchand, Christine; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Lok, Charmaine; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; Miller, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Nontunneled hemodialysis catheters (NTHCs) are typically used when vascular access is required for urgent renal replacement therapy. The preferred site for NTHC insertion in acute kidney injury is the right internal jugular vein followed by the femoral vein. When aided by real-time ultrasound, mechanical complications related to NTHC insertion are significantly reduced. The preferred site for tunneled hemodialysis catheters placement is the right internal jugular vein followed by the left internal jugular vein. Ideally, the catheter should be inserted on the opposite side of a maturing or planned fistula/graft. Several dual-lumen, large-diameter catheters are available with multiple catheter tip designs, but no one catheter has shown significant superior performance.

  5. [Suppurative thrombophlebitis central venous catheterization].

    PubMed

    Ramos Martínez, A; Sánchez Romero, I; Saura Lorente, P A; Parajón Díaz, A

    2008-06-01

    Suppurative thrombophlebitisis a very infrequent complication of the central venous catheterization. The majority of the cases are produced by species of staphylococci. A 22-year-old colombian-woman, student, without toxic habits was admitted because of temporary left astrocytoma (grade II). Nine days after implementing a catheter in the right subclavian vein she presented high fever (39.5 degrees C), shivers, progressive right side neck swelling and odinofagia. She had leukocytosis (26,300 cells/microl) and normal cerebrospinal fluid. After withdrawing the catheter, Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in the tip of the catheter and in four bottles of blood cultures. A neck CT demonstrated expansion and absence of contrast in the right internal jugular vein. The patient evolved satisfactorily with cloxacillin, gentamycin and low molecular weight heparin.

  6. Clinical guidelines on central venous catheterisation. Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Frykholm, P; Pikwer, A; Hammarskjöld, F; Larsson, A T; Lindgren, S; Lindwall, R; Taxbro, K; Oberg, F; Acosta, S; Akeson, J

    2014-05-01

    Safe and reliable venous access is mandatory in modern health care, but central venous catheters (CVCs) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, This paper describes current Swedish guidelines for clinical management of CVCs The guidelines supply updated recommendations that may be useful in other countries as well. Literature retrieval in the Cochrane and Pubmed databases, of papers written in English or Swedish and pertaining to CVC management, was done by members of a task force of the Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Consensus meetings were held throughout the review process to allow all parts of the guidelines to be embraced by all contributors. All of the content was carefully scored according to criteria by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. We aimed at producing useful and reliable guidelines on bleeding diathesis, vascular approach, ultrasonic guidance, catheter tip positioning, prevention and management of associated trauma and infection, and specific training and follow-up. A structured patient history focused on bleeding should be taken prior to insertion of a CVCs. The right internal jugular vein should primarily be chosen for insertion of a wide-bore CVC. Catheter tip positioning in the right atrium or lower third of the superior caval vein should be verified for long-term use. Ultrasonic guidance should be used for catheterisation by the internal jugular or femoral veins and may also be used for insertion via the subclavian veins or the veins of the upper limb. The operator inserting a CVC should wear cap, mask, and sterile gown and gloves. For long-term intravenous access, tunnelled CVC or subcutaneous venous ports are preferred. Intravenous position of the catheter tip should be verified by clinical or radiological methods after insertion and before each use. Simulator-assisted training of CVC insertion should precede bedside training in patients. Units inserting and managing CVC should

  7. Endoluminal dilatation for embedded hemodialysis catheters: A case-control study of factors associated with embedding and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Talreja, Hari; Ryan, Stephen Edward; Graham, Janet; Sood, Manish M.; Hadziomerovic, Adnan; Clark, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Background With the increasing frequency of tunneled hemodialysis catheter use there is a parallel increase in the need for removal and/or exchange. A small but significant minority of catheters become embedded or ‘stuck’ and cannot be removed by traditional means. Management of embedded catheters involves cutting the catheter, burying the retained fragment with a subsequent increased risk of infections and thrombosis. Endoluminal dilatation may provide a potential safe and effective technique for removing embedded catheters, however, to date, there is a paucity of data. Objectives 1) To determine factors associated with catheters becoming embedded and 2) to determine outcomes associated with endoluminal dilatation Methods All patients with endoluminal dilatation for embedded catheters at our institution since Jan. 2010 were included. Patients who had an embedded catheter were matched 1:3 with patients with uncomplicated catheter removal. Baseline patient and catheter characteristics were compared. Outcomes included procedural success and procedure-related infection. Logistic regression models were used to determine factors associated with embedded catheters. Results We matched 15 cases of embedded tunneled catheters with 45 controls. Among patients with embedded catheters, there were no complications with endoluminal dilatation. Factors independently associated with embedded catheters included catheter dwell time (> 2 years) and history of central venous stenosis. Conclusion Embedded catheters can be successfully managed by endoluminal dilatation with minimal complications and factors associated with embedding include dwell times > 2 years and/or with a history of central venous stenosis. PMID:28346468

  8. Recommendations for the use of long-term central venous catheter (CVC) in children with hemato-oncological disorders: management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis. On behalf of the coagulation defects working group and the supportive therapy working group of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP).

    PubMed

    Giordano, Paola; Saracco, Paola; Grassi, Massimo; Luciani, Matteo; Banov, Laura; Carraro, Francesca; Crocoli, Alessandro; Cesaro, Simone; Zanazzo, Giulio Andrea; Molinari, Angelo Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC), used for the management of children with hemato-oncological disorders, are burdened by a significant incidence of mechanical, infective, or thrombotic complications. These complications favor an increasing risk in prolongation of hospitalization, extra costs of care, and sometimes severe life-threatening events. No guidelines for the management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis are available for children. To this aim, members of the coagulation defects working group and the supportive therapy working group of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP) reviewed the pediatric and adult literature to propose the first recommendations for the management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis in children with hemato-oncological disorders.

  9. Value of Superficial Cultures for Prediction of Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection in Long-Term Catheters: a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Rabadán, P.; Echenagusia, A.; Camúñez, F.; Rodríguez-Rosales, G.; Simó, G.; Echenagusia, M.; Bouza, E.

    2013-01-01

    Cultures taken from the skin and from the hubs of short-term central venous catheters can help us to predict catheter-related bloodstream infections (C-RBSIs). The value of these cultures for such predictions has not been assessed in long-term catheters. Our objective was to assess the value of superficial cultures for the prediction of C-RBSI among patients with long-term catheters. Over a 2-year period, we prospectively obtained cultures from the skin overlying reservoir ports (group A) and from the skin insertion site and hubs of all tunneled catheters (group B). This routine was performed by vascular and interventional radiologists immediately before catheter removal (irrespective of the reason for withdrawal). Swabs were processed semiquantitatively. Catheter tips from both groups were cultured using Maki's semiquantitative technique and sonication. We also performed cultures of the reservoir ports at different sites. C-RBSI was defined as the isolation of the same species of microorganism(s) both in the colonized catheter and in at least 1 peripheral blood culture. We included 372 catheters (group A, 223; group B, 149) during the study period. The catheter colonization rate was 23.4% (87/372), and 28 patients had C-RBSI. Validity index values for the capacity of surface cultures to predict C-RBSI in groups A and B were, respectively, as follows: sensitivity, 23.5% and 45.5%; specificity, 59.7% and 63.0%; positive predictive value, 4.6% and 8.9%; and negative predictive value, 90.4% and 93.5%. Superficial cultures of patients with long-term catheters could help us to rule out the catheter as the portal of entry of bloodstream infections. Superficial cultures (from skin and hubs) proved to be a useful conservative diagnostic tool for ruling out C-RBSI among patients with long-term tunneled catheters and totally implantable venous access ports. PMID:23850957

  10. [Infection associated with hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis catheters].

    PubMed

    Fariñas, María Carmen; García-Palomo, José Daniel; Gutiérrez-Cuadra, Manuel

    2008-10-01

    Catheter-related infections in hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) are one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease. Staphylococcus aureus in HD patients and S. aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in PD patients are the most common causative organisms isolated. Currently, the diagnostic tests with highest yield in suspected catheter-related infection in HD patients have not been established, and tests used for central venous catheters (CVC) in general are applied. Management of the infected HD catheter and the use of antimicrobial therapy are similar to the measures used for other CVCs, with some specific recommendations. Peritonitis is the most severe complication in PD patients. Improving hygiene conditions in catheter insertion, treatment of S. aureus nasal carriers, regular treatment of the catheter's exit site, and antibiotic lock therapy have been associated with a reduction of infectious episodes in HD and PD patients.

  11. [Persistent left superior vena cava. Implications in central venous catheterisation].

    PubMed

    Lacuey Lecumberri, G; Ureña, M; Martínez Basterra, J; Basterra, N

    2009-01-01

    The placement of central catheters through the subclavian and jugular venous path can be complicated by the cannulation of an artery or an aberrant venous path. The most frequent anomaly of the embryological development of the caval vein is the persistence of the left superior vena cava (LSVC). The implantation of catheters in the LSVC can be suspected by its anomalous route in thorax radiography. Gasometry and the pressure curve of the vessel make it possible to rule out an arterial catheterisation. Diagnostic confirmation is obtained through angiography, echocardiography, computerised tomography or cardiac resonance. The doctor who regularly implants central venous catheters must be familiar with the anatomy of the venous system and its variants and anomalies, since their presence might influence the handling of the patient.

  12. Analysis of venous access for therapeutic plasma exchange in patients with neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Grishaber, J E; Cunningham, M C; Rohret, P A; Strauss, R G

    1992-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed our 2-year experience with venous access for 363 therapeutic plasma exchanges in 46 patients with neurological disease, including acute Guillain-Barré syndrome (N = 20), myasthenia gravis (N = 17), and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (N = 9). Twenty-three patients (50%) completed the planned course of therapy using only peripheral venous access, and 28 central venous catheters were placed in the remaining 23 patients. Patients utilizing central venous access did not undergo a greater number of procedures, but they were more likely to have acute Guillain-Barré syndrome (P < 0.02) or to be hospitalized in a medical intensive care unit (P < 0.01). Three types of central catheters were used, and although our experience was predominantly with 1 type, differences were noted. Only 3% of procedures (3 of 96) done with a Quinton-Mahurkar catheter were associated with a catheter failure, compared to 27% (4 of 15, P < 0.01) with a Hickman catheter and 67% (2 of 3) with a triple-lumen catheter. Life-threatening complications occurred with 3 of 28 (11%) central catheters. To optimize the success of therapeutic plasma exchange using central access, it is critical that hemapheresis personnel advise each patient's primary physician regarding the type of central venous catheter required. Currently, we recommend use of a Quinton-Mahurkar or other dual-lumen hemodialysis catheter.

  13. Complications of Peripheral Venous Access Devices: Prevention, Detection, and Recovery Strategies.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Elizabeth A

    2017-04-01

    Most hospitalized patients have placement of a peripheral venous access device, either a short peripheral catheter or a peripherally inserted central catheter. Compared with central venous catheters that are not peripherally inserted, the other 2 types are generally perceived by health care providers as safer and less complicated to manage, and less emphasis is placed on the prevention and management of complications. Expertise of nurses in inserting, managing, and removing these devices may reduce the likelihood of complications, and increased recognition of complications associated with use of the devices is important to ensure continued improvements in the safety, quality, and efficiency of health care. Complications associated with short peripheral catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters include tourniquet retention, tubing and catheter misconnections, phlebitis, air embolism, device fragment embolization, and inadvertent discharge with a retained peripheral venous access device. Integration of prevention, detection, and recovery strategies into personal nursing practice promotes the quality and safety of health care delivery.

  14. Venous Sampling

    MedlinePlus

    ... parts of the body, including: Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) , in which blood samples are taken from the ... for a few days before the procedure. For AVS, you will be asked to stop taking certain ...

  15. Venous Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Caprini, J.A.; Partsch, H.; Simman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Venous leg ulcers are the most frequent form of wounds seen in patients. This article presents an overview on some practical aspects concerning diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment. Duplex ultrasound investigations are essential to ascertain the diagnosis of the underlying venous pathology and to treat venous refluxes. Differential diagnosis includes mainly other vascular lesions (arterial, microcirculatory causes), hematologic and metabolic diseases, trauma, infection, malignancies. Patients with superficial venous incompetence may benefit from endovenous or surgical reflux abolition diagnosed by Duplex ultrasound. The most important basic component of the management is compression therapy, for which we prefer materials with low elasticity applied with high initial pressure (short-stretch bandages and Velcro-strap devices). Local treatment should be simple, absorbing and not sticky dressings keeping adequate moisture balance after debridement of necrotic tissue and biofilms are preferred. After the ulcer is healed compression therapy should be continued in order to prevent recurrence. PMID:26236636

  16. Hemodialysis Tunneled Catheter Noninfectious Complications

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa M.; MacRae, Jennifer M.; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Clark, Edward; Dipchand, Christine; Kappel, Joanne; Lok, Charmaine; Luscombe, Rick; Moist, Louise; Oliver, Matthew; Pike, Pamela; Hiremath, Swapnil

    2016-01-01

    Noninfectious hemodialysis catheter complications include catheter dysfunction, catheter-related thrombus, and central vein stenosis. The definitions, causes, and treatment strategies for catheter dysfunction are reviewed below. Catheter-related thrombus is a less common but serious complication of catheters, requiring catheter removal and systemic anticoagulation. In addition, the risk factors, clinical manifestation, and treatment options for central vein stenosis are outlined. PMID:28270922

  17. Nurses' guide to early detection of umbilical arterial catheter complications in infants.

    PubMed

    Furdon, Susan Arana; Horgan, Michael J; Bradshaw, Wanda Todd; Clark, David A

    2006-10-01

    Umbilical arterial catheters (UAC) are routinely used in the care of critically ill newborns. Complications related to UACs include vascular compromise, hemorrhage, complications related to malposition, severance of the catheter itself, and infection. This article is Part II in a series dedicated to assessing infants with an umbilical catheter. Part I focused on infants with umbilical venous catheters; this article will focus on the physical assessment relevant to infants with an UAC. Complications related to UACs can occur during any phase of treatment: insertion, while indwelling, or after discontinuing the catheter. Review of clinical signs of complications along with clinical photographs, will assist caregivers in promptly recognizing UAC-related complications.

  18. Prevention and management of catheter-related infection in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Lok, Charmaine E; Mokrzycki, Michele H

    2011-03-01

    Central venous catheter-related infections have been associated with high morbidity, mortality, and costs. Catheter use in chronic hemodialysis patients has been recognized as distinct from other patient populations who require central venous access, leading to recent adaptations in guidelines-recommended diagnosis for catheter-related bacteremia (CRB). This review will discuss the epidemiology and pathogenesis of hemodialysis CRB, in addition to a focus on interventions that have favorably affected CRB outcomes. These include: (1) the use of prophylactic topical antimicrobial ointments at the catheter exit site, (2) the use of prophylactic catheter locking solutions for the prevention of CRB, (3) strategies for management of the catheter in CRB, and (4) the use of vascular access managers and quality initiative programs.

  19. Total parenteral alimentation via indwelling umbilical catheters in the newborn period.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, R T; Rhodes, P G

    1976-01-01

    Total parenteral alimentation (TPA) was delivered to 80 infants via indwelling umbilical artery and to 9 via indwelling umbilical venous catheters. The primary indication for catheter placement and maintenance was monitoring of arterial blood gases (umbilical venous catheter tip in left atrium) in a group of sick neonates requiring increased inspired oxygen or assisted ventilation. Results were compared with those from 23 infants who had tunnelled jugular catheters for a variety of chronic medical and surgical problems preventing gastric or intestinal feeding. A mean weight gain was achieved in both groups. Mortality and morbidity rates were similar in both groups. The most common complications were infection and thrombotic phenomena. Metabolic complications were few. It is concluded that infusing TPA solutions via indwelling umbilical catheters presents no greater risk than infusion via tunnelled jugular catheters, and provides a method for supplying adequate caloric intake for growth during the acute stage of illness. PMID:827978

  20. Prevention and Treatment of Lower Limb Deep Vein Thrombosis after Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation: Results of a Prospective active controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan; Zhang, Bao-jian; Zhang, Bao-ku; Ma, Jun; Liu, Xu-zheng; Jiang, Shu-bin

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, single-center, active controlled study from July 2013 to January 2015, in Chinese patients with rapid ventricular arrhythmia who had received radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) treatment to determine formation of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (LDVT) post RFCA procedure, and evaluated the effect of rivaroxaban on LDVT. Patients with asymptomatic pulmonary thromboembolism who had not received any other anticoagulant and had received no more than 36 hours of treatment with unfractionated heparin were included. Post RFCA procedure, patients received either rivaroxaban (10 mg/d for 14 days beginning 2–3 hours post-operation; n = 86) or aspirin (100 mg/d for 3 months beginning 2–3 hours post-operation; n = 90). The primary outcome was a composite of LDVT occurrence, change in diameter of femoral veins, and safety outcomes that were analyzed based on major or minor bleeding events. In addition, blood flow velocity was determined. No complete occlusive thrombus or bleeding events were reported with either of the group. The lower incidence rate of non-occluded thrombus in rivaroxaban (5.8%) compared to the aspirin group (16.7%) indicates rivaroxaban may be administered post-RFCA to prevent and treat femoral venous thrombosis in a secure and effective way with a faster inset of action than standard aspirin therapy. PMID:27329582

  1. Structure of the jet from a generic catheter tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foust, J.; Rockwell, D.

    2006-10-01

    A generic feature of a wide variety of central venous catheters, which are typically located within the superior vena cava (SVC), is a jet from a side hole of the catheter tip. Particle image velocimetry is employed in conjunction with a scaled-up water facility, in order to characterize the structure of the jet as a function of dimensionless hole diameter and jet velocity ratio. Quantitative patterns in the radial and crossflow planes of the catheter-SVC system define the jet evolution. It has distinctive features, relative to the classical jet in a crossflow, which issues from a small opening in a planar surface into a region of large extent.

  2. Catheter-Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2010-01-01

    Intravascular catheters and urinary catheters are the 2 most commonly inserted medical devices in the United States, and they are likewise the two most common causes of nosocomially acquired bloodstream infection. Biofilm formation on the surfaces of indwelling catheters is central to the pathogenesis of infection of both types of catheters. The cornerstone to any preventive strategy of intravascular catheter infections is strict attention to infection control practices. Antimicrobial-impregnated intravascular catheters are a useful adjunction to infection control measures. Prevention of urinary catheter–associated infection is hindered by the numbers and types of organisms present in the periurethral area as well as by the typically longer duration of catheter placement. Antimicrobial agents in general have not been effective in preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infection in persons with long-term, indwelling urethral catheters. Preventive strategies that avoid the use of antimicrobial agents may be necessary in this population. PMID:15111369

  3. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  4. [Management of intravascular catheters for prevention of perioperative cross infections].

    PubMed

    Okubo, Takashi; Ohara, Eiko; Nakamura, Akishige; Takeyama, Hiromitsu; Manabe, Tadao

    2004-11-01

    Bloodstream infection derived from an intravascular catheter occupies an important position among the various types of nosocomial infection. It is therefore necessary to establish a system for preventing catheter infection not only as measures for each separate infection, but also for the entire hospital. Catheter infections are mainly caused by contamination of the connecting part of a transfusion line during the infusion of drug solution as well as by contamination of the part of the catheter inserted. Consequently, the greatest possible care should be taken in the preparation of aseptic transfusion and the prevention of contamination when connecting a transfusion line. In particular, there are problems with three-way stopcocks, management of hubs, frequency of transfusion line exchange, fat emulsion injection method, and blood preparation. It is most important to consider effective nutritional management methods that do not require the insertion of a central venous catheter.

  5. Paecilomyces lilacinus catheter-related fungemia in an immunocompromised pediatric patient.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, T Q; Ogden, A K; Tillman, J; Demmler, G J; Rinaldi, M G

    1992-01-01

    Paecilomyces lilacinus catheter-related fungemia in an immunocompromised child is reported. The presence of a central venous catheter and the patient's immunocompromised status were felt to be predisposing factors for this unusual infection. To our knowledge, this is the first description of P. lilacinus catheter-related fungemia, and our patient may be the youngest reported patient with this mycosis who was cured. Images PMID:1401021

  6. Complications of Permanent Hemodialysis Catheter Placement; Need for Better Pre-Implantation Algorithm?

    PubMed

    Premuzic, Vedran; Smiljanic, Ranko; Perkov, Drazen; Gavranic, Bruna Brunetta; Tomasevic, Boris; Jelakovic, Bojan

    2016-08-01

    There is a correlation between central venous cannulation and the development of central venous stenosis. Minor retrosternal vein lesions can be easily missed. Computerized tomographic (CT) venography is the diagnostic procedure of choice. The aim of this study was to examine the complications after catheter implantation in patients with prior permanent catheter placement and to evaluate present diagnostic procedures performed prior to choosing permanent access site in order to reduce possible complications after catheter placement. Complications of permanent CVC insertion in our department were analyzed between October 2011 and February 2015. We have implanted the Tesio twin catheter system and the Hickman Bard dual lumen catheter. All patients with prior permanent dialysis catheter were evaluated with color doppler, while patients with suspected central venous stenosis (CVS) or thrombosis were evaluated with phlebography or CT venography prior to catheter placement. One hundred and ninety-eight permanent dialysis catheters were placed (173 Tesio [87.4%] and 25 Hickman [12.6%]) in 163 patients. There were 125 patients (76.7%) with prior temporary catheter and 61 (48.8%) of them had more than one prior permanent catheter (1.92 catheter per person).There were 4/61 (6.5%) patients with catheter-related complications without prior phlebography and CT venography. Phlebography and CT venography were performed in 30 (24.0%) patients with suspected CVS/thrombosis and with dialysis vintage of 76.23 months (52.78-98.28). Phlebography and CT venography were more sensitive than color doppler in the detection of CVS/thrombosis in patients with prior permanent catheter placements (P < 0.001). Since this diagnostic algorithm was introduced prior to catheter placement there were no catheter insertion-related complications or dysfunctions (P < 0.001). All our procedures on patients with prior permanent catheters followed preliminary color doppler diagnostics. Nevertheless

  7. Venous thromboembolism in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Clifford M

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is increasing in the pediatric population. Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have an increased risk of thrombosis due to central venous catheters (CVCs), as well as acquired thrombophilia secondary to inflammation, or deficiencies of anticoagulant proteins due to vitamin K deficiency and/or liver dysfunction. CVC-associated thrombosis commonly results in line occlusion, but may develop into serious life-threatening conditions such as deep venous thrombosis (DVT), superior vena cava syndrome or pulmonary embolism (PE). Post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) may be a long complication. Local occlusion of the catheter tip may be managed with instillation of thrombolytics (such as tPA) within the lumen of the catheter; however, CVC-associated thrombosis involving the proximal veins is most often is treated with systemic anticoagulation. Initial treatment with heparin is a standard approach, but thrombolytic therapy, which may carry higher bleeding risks, should be considered for life and limb threatening episodes of VTE. Recommended duration of anticoagulation with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or warfarin ranges from 3 to 6 months for major removable thrombotic risks; longer anticoagulation is considered for recurrent thrombosis, major persistent thrombophilia, or the continued presence of a major risk factor such as a CVC. While CVCs are the most common risk for development of VTE in children, studies have not demonstrated a clear benefit with routine use of systemic thromboprophylaxis. The incidence and risk factors of VTE in CF patients will be reviewed and principles of diagnosis and management will be summarized.

  8. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000972.htm Slipped capital femoral epiphysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a separation of the ball ...

  9. Deep venous thrombosis of the upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Stephens, M B

    1997-02-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the upper extremity is a relatively uncommon but important cause of morbidity, especially in young active persons. The causes of upper extremity DVT may be categorized as catheter-related, spontaneous (effort-related) and miscellaneous (e.g., trauma, intravenous drug use). Diagnosis is based on clinical history and confirmed by either duplex ultrasonography or contrast venography. Significant controversy surrounds the optimal management of upper extremity DVT. Treatment options include conservative therapy, anticoagulation, catheter-directed thrombolysis and surgical intervention to remove intravascular clot or revise the anatomy of the costoclavicular space. Early aggressive treatment of active young patients may decrease long-term morbidity.

  10. Malfunction of dialysis catheters: management of fibrin sheath and related problems.

    PubMed

    Faintuch, Salao; Salazar, G M M

    2008-09-01

    Suitable central venous access for hemodialysis is frequently required in patients with end-stage renal disease, whenever an arteriovenous fistula or peritoneal dialysis fails or is not a possibility. Ultimately, long-term dialysis via central access may result in dysfunctional catheter with problems such as malpositioning of catheter tip, fibrin sheath formation, thrombosis, infection, and bleeding. The role of interventional radiology is to deliver appropriate treatment to maintain patent and functional access, while minimizing the risk of venous occlusive disease. This article aims at describing different techniques and approaches for management of fibrin sheath associated with malfunctioning tunneled dialysis catheters, as well as to provide scientific evidence from the current literature.

  11. Compatibility of electrolytically produced sodium hypochlorite solutions on long- term implanted dialysis catheters.

    PubMed

    Mishkin, G J

    2007-01-01

    More than 20% of the world's population use a catheter for dialysis, despite guidelines limiting their use. Although the structure and design of the catheters differ by manufacturer, the material used in central venous catheters and peritoneal dialysis catheters are the same across manufacturers. Given the long-term use of these catheters in the dialysis population, the good compatibility of the antiseptics and disinfectants used on the catheters is imperative to prevent failure and cracking of the catheter material. Tensile strengths of commercially available catheters were measured after exposure to commonly used disinfectants. The tensile strength was then compared between the catheters by analyzing the displacement vs. force (N) curves produced during the evaluation. A total of 44 catheter lumens were evaluated. The electrolytically produced sodium hypochlorite solution, Alcavis 50/ExSept Plus, was the only solution shown to be compatible with all three catheter materials resulting in a deviation of less than 10% for each of the different catheter types. Electrolytically produced sodium hypochlorite solutions were the only solutions in this study that did not alter the physical properties of any of the catheters after long-term exposure.

  12. Right atrial thrombus associated with subclavian catheter developed due to total parenteral nutrition application

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Nursel; Basarici, Ibrahim; Erbasan, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheterization as a frequent routine clinical procedure may have significant complications. Mechanical complications may occur during catheter placement, whereas thromboembolic and infectious complications can be seen during follow-up. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) associated central venous catheterizations may result in early mechanical complications and thrombotic and infectious complications in the long term. This paper describes a patient diagnosed as mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy requiring long-term central venous catheterization for TPN implementation, who had an infected thrombus on the catheter tip resected by cardiac surgery. PMID:27212985

  13. Ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization: A review of the relevant anatomy, technique, complications, and anatomical variations.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Taryn; Du Plessis, Maira; Prekupec, Matthew P; Gielecki, Jerzy; Zurada, Anna; Shane Tubbs, R; Loukas, Marios

    2017-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is a commonly used and important intervention. Despite its regular use it is still associated with a high incidence of complications especially infection and catheter tip embolization. Addition of ultrasound guidance to the technique has shown great improvement to the time and number of attempts for successful catheterization. The preference of vein depends greatly on the situation; subclavian vein is the preferred method overall but internal jugular vein is preferred in patients undergoing cardiac or thoracic surgery. This is especially true for pediatric patients in whom femoral vein catheterization is still preferred despite it carrying a higher risk than other locales. Addition of ultrasound guidance greatly reduces the incidence of arterial puncture and subsequent hematoma formation regardless of location. This is because it allows for visualization of anatomical variation prior to intervention and continual visualization of the needle during the placement. It is noteworthy however, that addition of ultrasound does not prevent complications such as catheter tip embolization as this may occur even with perfect placement. The value of ultrasound usage is undisputable since all studies assessing the difference between it and landmark based methods showed preferable outcome. Reduction of time and number of attempts is sufficient argument to make ultrasound guidance standard practice. Clin. Anat. 30:237-250, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A Series of Cerebral Venous Sinus Thromboses Treated with Intra-Arterial tPA infused over Ten Hours with a 0.027-inch Catheter and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ziu, Endrit; Haley, O'Hara; Ibrahimi, Muhammad; Simon, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) can have devastating results, with mortality reported in 44% of cases. No randomized trials exist in order to define what qualifies as failure of conservative therapy, and there is no specific intervention to date which is considered safe and effective. Case series suggest that thrombolysis infusion is safer than thrombectomy, but methods of administration, dose, and duration of therapy tend to vary widely. We present three consecutive CVST patients treated with heparin who suffered both clinical and radiographic deterioration, and went on to have endovascular therapy. Each patient was successfully recanalized by placing a 0.027-inch microcatheter at the proximal portion of the thrombus and infusing 20 mg of alteplase dissolved in 1 liter of normal saline infused at 100 ml per hour for an infusion of 2 mg of alteplase per hour for ten hours.  PMID:27462480

  15. Lower extremity venous reflux

    PubMed Central

    Baliyan, Vinit; Tajmir, Shahein; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Venous incompetence in the lower extremity is a common clinical problem. Basic understanding of venous anatomy, pathophysiologic mechanisms of venous reflux is essential for choosing the appropriate treatment strategy. The complex interplay of venous pressure, abdominal pressure, venous valvular function and gravitational force determine the venous incompetence. This review is intended to provide a succinct review of the pathophysiology of venous incompetence and the current role of imaging in its management. PMID:28123974

  16. Femoral Vessel Blood Flow Is Preserved Throughout Direct Anterior Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Louis S; Gilliland, Jeremy M; Odum, Susan M; Mason, J Bohannon

    2015-06-01

    Posterolateral and anterolateral approach THA disrupts femoral vessel blood flow, however, this has not been established for the direct anterior (DA) approach. Ten patients undergoing primary DA THA had peak vascular flow rates for the femoral artery and vein calculated via Doppler ultrasound at specified points: incision, acetabular preparation, femoral preparation and final reduction. Peak femoral arterial and venous flow decreased over baseline, but not significantly, during acetabular preparation (P=0.88, P=0.98) and femoral preparation (P=0.97, P=0.97). At final reduction, arterial peak flow was restored (P=1) with an increase in venous flow (P=0.55). Although there were alterations to peak flow, no vessel occlusion occurred at any point during DA THA.

  17. Venous obstruction in permanent pacemaker patients: an isotopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Pauletti, M.; Di Ricco, G.; Solfanelli, S.; Marini, C.; Contini, C.; Giuntini, C.

    1981-01-01

    Isotope venography was used to study the venous circulation proximal to the superior vena cava in two groups of pacemaker patients, one with a single endocavitary electrode and the other with multiple pacing catheters. A control group of patients without pacemakers was also studied. Numerous abnormalities were found, especially in the group with multiple electrodes. These findings suggest that venous obstruction is a common complication of endocardial pacing.

  18. Prevention and management of long-term catheter related infections in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hachem, Ray; Raad, Issam

    2002-01-01

    Long-term central venous catheters (CVC) are necessary in the care of cancer patients. However, catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is commonly associated with serious complications resulting in considerable morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of CRBSI frequently requires catheter removal to confirm the diagnosis by either quantitative or semiquantitative catheter culture method. Differential time to positivity, whereby a nonquantitative blood culture drawn from the CVC that becomes positive at least 2 hr earlier than the peripheral blood culture, is a new method for the diagnosis of CRBSI without removing the catheter. Prevention of CRBSI may be accomplished with the use of strict infection control measures, antimicrobial-impregnated catheters; and antibiotic-lock technique, as well as other methods. Once infection develops, management of long-term CRBSI is dictated by the type of organism, the severity of the infection, and availability of other venous access sites. If the infection is caused by Staphylococcus aureus, gram-negative bacilli, or Candida, the catheter should be removed and systemic antimicrobial therapy given for 10-14 days or longer in cases of complicated or deep-seated infection. In some cases, where there is no other venous access site, the catheter can remain in place, but a combination of systemic antimicrobials and antibiotic-lock therapy should be used.

  19. Iatrogenic Femoral Pseudoaneurysm and Secondary Ipsilateral Deep Vein Thrombosis: An Indication for Early Surgical Exploration.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Marios; Zirngibl, Hubert; Floros, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    Pseudoaneurysm formation often complicates transfemoral interventional procedures. Nonsurgical treatment consists of femoral compression and thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance. We report a 74-year-old man who was diagnosed with a pseudoaneurysm, following coronary angiography. Duplex ultrasound revealed deep vein thrombosis of the ipsilateral common femoral vein. Ultrasound-guided thrombin injection was unsuccessfully performed, and the patient subsequently underwent surgical exploration for repair of the pseudoaneurysm and release of the venous compression. The increased local inflammation, because of the thrombosis, added in surgical difficulties. We conclude that early surgical intervention should be considered as a primary strategy in patients with femoral pseudoaneurysms and deep vein thrombosis secondary to femoral compression.

  20. Safety and functionality of transhepatic hemodialysis catheters in chronic hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Şanal, Bekir; Nas, Ömer Fatih; Doğan, Nurullah; Korkmaz, Mehmet; Hacıkurt, Kadir; Yıldız, Abdulmecid; Aytaç, İrem İris Kan; Hakyemez, Bahattin; Erdoğan, Cüneyt

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to investigate the safety and functionality of tunneled transhepatic hemodialysis catheters in chronic hemodialysis patients. METHODS Thirty-eight patients (20 women aged 56±10 years and 18 men aged 61±11 years) with transhepatic tunneled hemodialysis catheters were evaluated. The date of the first transhepatic catheterization, indications, procedure details, functional time periods of catheters, reasons for the removal or revision of catheters, catheter-related complications, and current conditions of patients were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS A total of 69 catheters were properly placed in all patients (100% technical success) under imaging guidance during the 91-month follow-up period. The functionality of 35 catheters could not be evaluated: five catheters were removed because of noncomplication related reasons (surgical fistulas were opened in two cases [2/35, 5.7%], transplantation was performed in three cases [3/35, 8.6%]), 18 patients died while their catheters were functional (18/35, 51.4%), and 12 catheters were still functional at the time of the study (12/35, 34.3%). The functionality of catheters was evaluated the remaining 34 catheters that necessitated revision because of complications. Furthermore, only half of the catheters were functional on day 136 when evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The four main complications were thrombosis (16/34, 47%; complication rate of 0.37 days in 100 catheters), infection (8/34, 23.5%; 0.18 days in 100 catheters), migration (8/34, 23.5%; 0.18 days in 100 catheters), and kinking (2/34, 6%; 0.04 days in 100 catheters). CONCLUSION Transhepatic venous catheterization is a safe and functional alternative route in chronic hemodialysis patients without an accessible central venou route. The procedure can be performed with high technical success and low complication rates under imaging guidance. PMID:27601303

  1. Femoral bowing plane adaptation to femoral anteversion

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Alp; Demirkan, Fahir; Sabir, Nuran; Oto, Murat; Yorukoglu, Cagdas; Kiter, Esat

    2017-01-01

    Background: Femoral bowing plane (FBP) is the unattended subject in the literature. More over the femoral shaft with its bowing is neglected in established anteversion determination methods. There is limited information about the relationship between FBP and anteversion. Thus we focused on this subject and hypothesized that there could be an adaptation of FBP to anteversion. Materials and Methods: FBP is determined on three-dimensional solid models derived from the left femoral computerized tomography data of 47 patients which were taken before for another reason and comparatively evaluated with anteversion. There were 20 women and 27 men. The mean age of patients was 56 years (range 21–84 years). Results: The anteversion values were found as the angle between a distal condylar axis (DCA) and femoral neck anteversion axis (FNAA) along an imaginary longitudinal femoral axis (LFA) in the true cranio-caudal view. The FBP was determined as a plane that passes through the centre-points of three pre-determinated sections on the femoral shaft. The angles between DCA, FNAA and FBP were comparatively evaluated. The independent samples t-test was used for statistical analysis. At the end, it was found that FBP lies nearly perpendicular to the anteversion axis for the mean of our sample which is around 89° in females and 93° in males (range 78–102°). On the other hand, FBP does not lie close to the sagittal femoral plane (SFP); instead, there is an average 12.5° external rotation relative to the SFP. FBP is correlated well with anteversion in terms of FBP inclination from SFP and femoral torsion (i.e., angle between FBP and femoral neck anteversion axis (P < 0.001; r = 0.680 and r = −0.682, respectively). Combined correlation is perfect (R2 = 1) as the FBP, SFP, and posterior femoral plane forms a triangle in the cranio-caudal view. Conclusions: We found that FBP adapts to anteversion. As FBP lies close to perpendicularity for the mean, femoral component positioning

  2. Conversion of tunneled hemodialysis catheter into HeRO device can provide immediate access for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Julio C; DeLaRosa, Jacob; Rahim, Fahim; Rahim, Naeem

    2010-11-01

    Patients with central venous occlusion who are ''tunneled catheter dependent'' are a challenge for hemodialysis access. A relatively new option for them is the hemodialysis reliable outflow (HeRO) device that can be totally implanted subcutaneously. However, patients still require a tunneled hemodialysis catheter that is used until the HeRO device is mature, 4 to 6 weeks later. Here, we describe a conversion of an existing tunneled hemodialysis catheter into a HeRO device, which was combined with a ''self-sealing'' Flixene graft. This allowed almost immediate use of the HeRO device without the need for placement of a catheter.

  3. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coude catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coude catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  5. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coude catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  6. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coudé catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  7. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... generic type of device includes radiopaque urological catheters, ureteral catheters, urethral catheters, coudé catheters, balloon retention type catheters, straight catheters, upper urinary tract...

  8. Case report of a cervical intraspinal misplacement of a central venous line.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Martin B; von Bruchhausen, Carla; Müller-Forell, Wibke; Klein, Klaus U; Oertel, Joachim

    2011-12-01

    A case of cervical spinal misplacement of a central venous line via the right jugular vein is reported. A review of the literature resulted in eight similar cases. Only two further adults are described. Children and patients suffering from malnutrition seem to have a higher risk for intraspinal malpositioning of central venous catheters.

  9. In Vitro Activity and Durability of a Combination of an Antibiofilm and an Antibiotic against Vascular Catheter Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Richard A.; Stager, Charles E.; Cadle, Richard M.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2013-01-01

    Catheter-associated infections can cause severe complications and even death. Effective antimicrobial modification of catheters that can prevent device colonization has the potential of preventing clinical infection. We studied in vitro the antimicrobial activities of central venous catheters impregnated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antibiofilm agent, and a broad-spectrum antibiotic against a range of important clinical pathogens. NAC-levofloxacin-impregnated (NACLEV) catheters were also evaluated for their antiadherence activity. NACLEV catheters produced the most active and durable antimicrobial effect against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates and significantly reduced colonization (P < 0.0001) by all tested pathogens compared to control catheters. These in vitro results suggest that this antimicrobial combination can potentially be used to combat catheter colonization and catheter-associated infection. PMID:23114776

  10. Femoral impaction grafting

    PubMed Central

    Scanelli, John A; Brown, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Femoral impaction grafting is a reconstruction option applicable to both simple and complex femoral component revisions. It is one of the preferred techniques for reconstructing large femoral defects when the isthmus is non-supportive. The available level of evidence is primarily derived from case series, which shows a mean survivorship of 90.5%, with revision or re-operation as the end-point, with an average follow-up of 11 years. The rate of femoral fracture requiring re-operation or revision of the component varies between several large case series, ranging from 2.5% to 9%, with an average of 5.4%. PMID:23362469

  11. Urgent peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis catheter dialysis.

    PubMed

    Lok, Charmaine E

    2016-03-01

    Worldwide, there is a steady incident rate of patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) who require renal replacement therapy. Of these patients, approximately one-third have an "unplanned" or "urgent" start to dialysis. This can be a very challenging situation where patients have either not had adequate time for education and decision making regarding dialysis modality and appropriate dialysis access, or a decision was made and plans were altered due to unforeseen circumstances. Despite such unplanned starts, clinicians must still consider the patient's ESKD "life-plan", which includes the best initial dialysis modality and access to suit the patient's individual goals and their medical, social, logistic, and facility circumstances. This paper will discuss the considerations of peritoneal dialysis and a peritoneal dialysis catheter access and hemodialysis and central venous catheter access in patients who require an urgent start to dialysis.

  12. Internal jugular versus subclavian vein catheterization for central venous catheterization in orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Torgay, A; Pirat, A; Candan, S; Zeyneloglu, P; Arslan, G; Haberal, M

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare incidence rates of mechanical and infectious complications associated with central venous catheterization via the internal jugular vein (IJV) versus the subclavian vein (SV) among 45 consecutive patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) between January 2000 and June 2004. The subjects were divided into two groups according to the site of central venous catheterization (IJV or SV). We recorded each patient's physical characteristics, international normalized ratio (INR), partial thromboplastin time, platelet levels, number of puncture attempts, success/failure of central venous catheterization, duration of catheter placement, occurrence of catheter tip misplacement, arterial puncture, incidence of hematoma or pneumothorax, catheter-related infection, or bacterial colonization of the catheter. Senior staff anesthesiologists performed 22 SV and 23 IJV catheterizations for the 45 OLT procedures. The SV and IVJ groups both had minor coagulation abnormalities with slightly increased INR values at the time of catheterization. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to success of central venous catheterization (100% for both), numbers of attempted punctures, duration of catheter placement, and incidence rates of mechanical and infectious complications. Both groups showed high frequencies of catheter tip misplacement, with right atrium as the site of misplacement in all cases. Two patients in the IJV group (8.7%) developed hematomas after accidental carotid artery puncture. The results suggest that, when performed by experienced anesthesiologists, central venous catheterization via the SV is an acceptable alternative to IJV catheterization for patients undergoing OLT.

  13. Percutaneous closure of iatrogenic femoral arteriovenous fistula using a covered coronary stent.

    PubMed

    Rama-Merchan, Juan Carlos; Cruz-González, Ignacio; Martín-Moreiras, Javier; Diego-Nieto, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Collado, Javier; Sánchez, Pedro Luis

    2017-02-25

    We present the case of a patient with a high-output fistula between the right superficial femoral artery and femoral vein after left atrial appendage closure successfully treated with a PK-Papyrus covered coronary stent using a 6F guiding catheter. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time a PK-Papyrus coronary stent has been used in this setting.

  14. A multicentre snapshot study of the incidence of serious procedural complications secondary to central venous catheterisation.

    PubMed

    Lathey, R K; Jackson, R E; Bodenham, A; Harper, D; Patle, V

    2017-03-01

    Despite the high number of central venous access devices inserted annually, there are limited data on the incidence of the associated procedural complications, many of which carry substantial clinical risk. This point was highlighted in the recently published Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland 'Safe vascular access 2016' guidelines. This trainee-led snapshot study aimed to identify the number of central venous catheter insertions and the incidence of serious complications across multiple hospital sites within a fixed two-week period. Secondary aims were to identify the availability of resources and infrastructure to facilitate safe central venous catheter insertion and management of potential complications. Fifteen hospital sites participated, completing an initial resource survey and daily identification of all adult central venous catheter insertions, with subsequent review of any complications detected. A total of 487 central venous catheter insertions were identified, of which 15 (3.1%) were associated with a significant procedural complication. The most common complication was failure of insertion, which occurred in seven (1.4%) cases. Facilities to enable safer central venous catheter insertion and manage complications varied widely between hospitals, with little evidence of standardisation of guidelines or protocols.

  15. Venous Access Ports: Indications, Implantation Technique, Follow-Up, and Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Walser, Eric M.

    2012-08-15

    The subcutaneous venous access device (SVAD or 'port') is a critical component in the care of patients with chronic disease. The modern SVAD provides reliable access for blood withdrawal and medication administration with minimal disruption to a patient's lifestyle. Because of improved materials and catheter technology, today's ports are lighter and stronger and capable of high-pressure injections of contrast for cross-sectional imaging. The majority of SVAD placement occurs in interventional radiology departments due to their ability to provide this service at lower costs, lower, complication rates, and greater volumes. Port-insertion techniques vary depending on the operator, but all consist of catheter placement in the central venous circulation followed by subcutaneous pocket creation and port attachment to the catheter with fixation and closure of the pocket. Venous access challenges occasionally occur in patients with central vein occlusions, necessitating catheterization of collateral veins or port placement in alternate locations. Complications of SVADs include those associated with the procedure as well as short- (<30 days) and long-term problems. Procedural and early complications are quite rare due to the near-universal use of real-time ultrasound guidance for vein puncture, but they can include hematoma, catheter malposition, arrhythmias, and pneumothorax. Late problems include both thrombotic complications (native venous or port-catheter thrombosis) and infections (tunnel or pocket infections or catheter-associated bloodstream infections). Most guidelines suggest that 0.3 infections/1000 catheter days is an appropriate upper threshold for the insertion of SVADs.

  16. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. A peritoneo-venous shunt is an implanted device that consists of a catheter and a pressure... for the treatment of intractable ascites. (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls for this...) Backflow specification and testing to prevent reflux of blood into the shunt....

  17. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. A peritoneo-venous shunt is an implanted device that consists of a catheter and a pressure... for the treatment of intractable ascites. (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls for this...) Backflow specification and testing to prevent reflux of blood into the shunt....

  18. 21 CFR 876.5955 - Peritoneo-venous shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A peritoneo-venous shunt is an implanted device that consists of a catheter and a pressure... for the treatment of intractable ascites. (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls for this...) Backflow specification and testing to prevent reflux of blood into the shunt....

  19. [Diagnosing venous and venous/arterial ulcers].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Géraldine

    2012-01-01

    A venous ulcer can be diagnosed on the basis of elements arising from the questioning and the clinical examination of the patient. A venous Doppler ultrasound can specify the type of reverse flow (superficial and/or deep). Measuring the ankle brachial pressure index helps to eliminate or confirm any arterial involvement. Depending on the systolic pressure index, the ulcer will be considered as purely venous, mixed (arterial-venous) or predominantly arterial.

  20. Femoral approach: an exceptional alternative for permanent pacemaker implantation.

    PubMed

    Tereno Valente, Bruno; Conceição, José M; Nogueira da Silva, Manuel; M Oliveira, Mário; S Cunha, Pedro; Lousinha, Ana; Galrinho, Ana; C Ferreira, Rui

    2014-05-01

    The classic transvenous implantation of a permanent pacemaker in a pectoral location may be precluded by obstruction of venous access through the superior vena cava or recent infection at the implant site. When these barriers to the procedure are bilateral and there are also contraindications or technical difficulties to performing a thoracotomy for an epicardial approach, the femoral vein, although rarely used, can be a viable alternative. We describe the case of a patient with occlusion of both subclavian veins and a high risk for mini-thoracotomy or videothoracoscopy, who underwent implantation of a permanent single-chamber pacemaker via the right femoral vein.

  1. Management of Cavoatrial Deep Venous Thrombosis: Incorporating New Strategies.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Mohamed A; De Silva, Gayan S; Ramaswamy, Raja S; Sanchez, Luis A

    2017-03-01

    Cavoatrial deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is diagnosed with increasing prevalence. It can be managed medically with anticoagulation or with directed interventions aimed to efficiently reduce the thrombus burden within the target venous segment. The type of management chosen depends greatly on the etiology and chronicity of the thrombosis, existing patient comorbidities, and the patient's tolerance to anticoagulants and thrombolytic agents. In addition to traditional percutaneous catheter-based pharmacomechanical thrombolysis, other catheter-based suction thrombectomy techniques have emerged in recent years. Each therapeutic modality requires operator expertise and a coordinated care paradigm to facilitate successful outcomes. Open surgical thrombectomy is alternatively reserved for specific patient conditions, including intolerance of anticoagulation, failed catheter-based interventions, or acute emergencies.

  2. Body surface infrared thermometry in patients with central venous cateter-related infections

    PubMed Central

    Silvah, José Henrique; de Lima, Cristiane Maria Mártires; de Unamuno, Maria do Rosário Del Lama; Schetino, Marco Antônio Alves; Schetino, Luana Pereira Leite; Fassini, Priscila Giácomo; Brandão, Camila Fernanda Costa e Cunha Moraes; Basile, Anibal; da Cunha, Selma Freire Carvalho; Marchini, Julio Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if body surface temperature close to the central venous catheter insertion area is different when patients develop catheter-related bloodstream infections. Methods Observational cross-sectional study. Using a non-contact infrared thermometer, 3 consecutive measurements of body surface temperature were collected from 39 patients with central venous catheter on the following sites: nearby the catheter insertion area or totally implantable catheter reservoir, the equivalent contralateral region (without catheter), and forehead of the same subject. Results A total of 323 observations were collected. Respectively, both in male and female patients, disregarding the occurrence of infection, the mean temperature on the catheter area minus that on the contralateral region (mean ± standard deviation: -0.3±0.6°C versus -0.2±0.5ºC; p=0.36), and the mean temperature on the catheter area minus that on the forehead (mean ± standard deviation: -0.2±0.5°C versus -0.1±0.5ºC; p=0.3) resulted in negative values. Moreover, in infected patients, higher values were obtained on the catheter area (95%CI: 36.6-37.5ºC versus 36.3-36.5ºC; p<0.01) and by temperature subtractions: catheter area minus contralateral region (95%CI: -0.17 - +0.33ºC versus -0.33 - -0.20ºC; p=0.02) and catheter area minus forehead (95%CI: -0.02 - +0.55ºC versus -0.22 - -0.10ºC; p<0.01). Conclusion Using a non-contact infrared thermometer, patients with catheter-related bloodstream infections had higher temperature values both around catheter insertion area and in the subtraction of the temperatures on the contralateral and forehead regions from those on the catheter area. PMID:26466058

  3. [The bladder catheter].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, D M

    1996-09-01

    The benefit of the transurethral catheter to protect or measure renal function is well accepted. Urethral stricture and infection of the lower urinary tract as the complications should lead to a cautious use of catheters. A careful placement, the choice of the best material and a correct management help to avoid complications. Alternatives are discussed.

  4. New tools in diagnosing catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Blot, F; Nitenberg, G; Brun-Buisson, C

    2000-07-01

    Clinical criteria alone are insufficient to allow a diagnosis of intravascular catheter-related sepsis (CRS). A definite diagnosis of CRS usually requires removal of the catheter for quantitative catheter tip culture. However, only about 15-25% of central venous catheters (CVC) removed because infection is suspected actually prove to be infected, and the diagnosis is always retrospective. Other diagnostic tests, such as differential quantitative blood cultures from samples taken simultaneously from the catheter and a peripheral vein, have been proposed to avoid unjustified removal of the catheter and the potential risks associated with the placement of a new catheter at a new site: a central-to-peripheral blood culture colony count ratio of 5:1 to 10:1 is considered indicative of CRS. Despite its high specificity, the latter diagnostic technique is not routinely used in clinical practice because of its complexity and cost. The measurement of the differential time to positivity between hub blood (taken from the catheter port) and peripheral blood cultures might be a reliable tool facilitating the diagnosis of CRS in situ. In an in vitro study, we found a strong relationship between the inoculum size of various microorganisms and the time to positivity of cultures. When the times to positivity of cultures of blood taken simultaneously from central and peripheral veins in patients with and without CRS were examined, we found that earlier positivity of central vs peripheral vein blood cultures was highly correlated with CRS. Using a cut-off value of +120 min, the "differential time to positivity" of the paired blood samples, defined as time to positivity of the peripheral blood minus that of the hub blood culture, had 91% specificity and 94% sensitivity for the diagnosis of CRS. This method may be coupled with other techniques that have high negative predictive value, such as skin cultures at the catheter exit site. This diagnostic test can be proposed for routine

  5. Catheter directed interventions for acute deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kohlbrenner, Ryan; Kolli, Kanti P.; Lehrman, Evan; Taylor, Andrew G.; Fidelman, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an extremely common form of vascular disease and impacts a great number of patients worldwide. Acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a subset of VTE and is traditionally been treated with anticoagulation. There is good quality data which suggests the use of catheter directed interventions for the treatment of acute DVT with the aim of reducing post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). The present review will discuss the various therapies available for acute DVT, focusing on catheter directed interventions, ranging from traditional anticoagulation to the most novel forms of aspiration thrombectomy. PMID:28123980

  6. Occurrence and Management Strategies for Catheter Entrapment with Onyx Liquid Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Mian, Nidaullah; Siddiqi, Harris; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Malik, Adil M; Rauf Afzal, Mohammad; Khan, Asif A.; Suri, M. Fareed K.

    2015-01-01

    In June 2012, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning about the risk of catheter entrapment associated with Onyx embolization. We used our experience, literature review, and FDA Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) data review to identify five strategies to address catheter entrapment: 1/. Surgical resection of vessel at point of entrapment of catheter and retraction from exterior portion at the femoral region; 2/. Advancing and closing the loop of snare over the entrapped catheter followed by retraction; 3/. Advancing the distal access catheter over the entrapped catheter and retraction with forward movement of the distal access catheters; 4/. Inflation of balloon catheter coaxial to the entrapped catheter with subsequent retraction; and 5/. Intravascular retention and internalization of microcatheter. In the MAUDE data, there were 77 reports of catheter entrapment with Onyx embolization; microcatheter was retracted by surgical excision in 15, endovascular snare or other retriever devices in 5, deliberately entrapped inside the vessel using stent in 1, and left without intervention within intravascular compartment in 27 patients. PMID:26301030

  7. [First experience with hybrid operations for chronic obstruction of iliac-femoral segment veins in patients with post-thrombotic disease].

    PubMed

    Pokrovskiĭ, A V; Ignat'ev, I M; Volodiukhin, M Iu; Gradusov, E G

    The present study was aimed at assessing initial results of hybrid operations in obstructive lesions of the iliac-femoral veins in patients with post-thrombotic disease (PTD). Hybrid operations [open endovenectomy from the common femoral vein (CFV) with creation of an arteriovenous fistula + stenting of iliac veins] were performed carried out in a total of eleven patients with PTD. Of these, there were 7 men and 4 women aged from 34 to 52 years (mean age - 42.8±7 years). All patients had severe-degree chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). The distribution of patients according to the CEAP classification was as follows: C4a - 2 patients, C4b - 4 patients, C5 - 4 subjects, C6 - 1 patient. The time having elapsed since a newly onset episode of acute iliac-femoral venous thrombosis varied from 2 to 12 years (averagely - 7.1±3.3 years). The degree of manifestation of PTD was determined by means of the Villalta-Pradoni scale before and 6 months after the operation. Instrumental methods of study included ultrasound duplex scanning (USDS), magnetic resonance and/or multispiral computed venography, and contrast-enhanced X-ray venography. The technical success of the procedure amounted to 91%. In one patient with occlusion of the common and external iliac veins we failed to perform recanalization and stenting. A further one patient developed in-stent and CFV thrombosis on the second postoperative day. An attempt of catheter thrombolysis turned out unsuccessful. There were no wound complications in the postoperative period. Neither was pulmonary artery thromboembolism registered. The dynamic control was carried out by means of USDS before discharge from hospital and at 1, 3 and 6 months after the intervention. The outcomes of hybrid operations after 6 months were followed up in five patients. Secondary patency rate of the stented iliac veins amounted to 100%. No relapses of trophic ulcers were observed. According to the Villalta-Prandoni scale the value of the median of the

  8. Thrombotic complications of implanted central venous access devices: prospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Labourey, Jean-Luc; Lacroix, Philippe; Genet, Dominique; Gobeaux, François; Martin, Jean; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Lavau-Denes, Sandrine; Maubon, Antoine; Tubiana-Mathieu, Nicole

    2004-05-01

    Implanted venous access devices (IVAD) are routinely used in oncologic patients. Thrombotic complication is a source of morbidity. During one year 246 patients with different solid neoplastic diseases received IVAD for chemotherapy administration. Two hundred forty-nine IVAD were placed percutaneously or by surgical cutdown. IVAD were flushed immediately after implantation with 3-5 mL of heparinized saline (100 U/mL). No monthly flush was required. A prospective evaluation of thrombotic complications was realised. in event of catheter dysfunction and/or clinical symptoms of phlebitis, a catheter opacification and/or a Doppler ultrasonography were performed. Twenty-three catheter dysfunctions were noted, corresponding to 13 catheter occlusions. Twelve patients presented clinical symptoms of phlebitis. Eleven venous thrombosis were diagnosed in this group; 10 by echo-Doppler and one by scanography. A unvaried statistic analysis using Fisher's test was performed to detect risk factors. Two factors were identified: the position of catheter tip above T4 (p < 0.001) and mediastinal or cervical lymph nodes larger than 6 cm (p < 0.001). The first increased the risk of catheter occlusion and the second increased the risk of phlebitis.

  9. Placement of Hemodialysis Catheters Through Stenotic or Occluded Central Thoracic Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Claude Deglise, Sebastien; Saucy, Francois; Mathieu, Claudine; Haesler, Erik; Doenz, Francesco; Corpataux, Jean Marc; Qanadli, Salah Dine

    2009-07-15

    A method for hemodialysis catheter placement in patients with central thoracic venous stenosis or occlusion is described and initial results are analyzed. Twelve patients, with a mean age of 63.2 years (42-80 years), with central venous stenosis or occlusion, and who required a hemodialysis catheter were reviewed. All lesions were confirmed by helical CT or phlebography. Five patients had stenosis while seven patients were diagnosed with an occlusion of thoracic central veins. All patients were asymptomatic, without sign of superior vena cava syndrome. After percutaneous transstenotic catheterization or guidewire-based recannalization in occlusions, a balloon dilatation was performed and a stent was placed, when necessary, prior to catheter placement. Technical success was 92%. Three patients had angioplasty alone and nine patients had angioplasty with stent placement. Dialysis catheters were successfully inserted through all recannalized accesses. No immediate complication occurred, nor did any patient develop superior vena cava syndrome after the procedure. The mean follow-up was 21.8 months (range, 8-48 months). Three patients developed a catheter dysfunction with fibrin sheath formation (at 7, 11, and 12 months after catheter placement, respectively). Two were successfully managed by percutaneous endovascular approach and one catheter was removed. In conclusion, for patients with central venous stenosis or occlusion and those who need a hemodialysis catheter, catheter insertion can be reliably achieved immediately after endovascular recannalization with acceptable technical and long-term success rates. This technique should be considered as an alternative procedure for placing a new hemodialysis catheter through a patent vein.

  10. Rhodococcus Bacteremia in Cancer Patients Is Mostly Catheter Related and Associated with Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Al Akhrass, Fadi; Al Wohoush, Iba; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Reitzel, Ruth; Jiang, Ying; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Tarrand, Jeffrey; Hachem, Ray; Raad, Issam

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94%) central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%). Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated. PMID:22427914

  11. Is it feasible to diagnose catheter-related candidemia without catheter withdrawal?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cruz, Ana; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Suárez-Salas, Marisol; Rojas-Wettig, Loreto; Pérez, María Jesús; Guinea, Jesús; Guembe, María; Peláez, Teresa; Sánchez-Carrillo, Carlos; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Many bloodstream infections (BSI) in patients with central venous catheters (CVC) are not catheter-related (CR). Assessment of catheter involvement without catheter withdrawal has not been studied in candidemia. We assessed the value of conservative techniques to evaluate catheters as the origin of candidemia in patients with CVC in a prospective cohort study (superficial Gram stain and culture, Kite technique (Gram stain and culture of the first 1 cm blood drawn from the CVC), proportion of positive blood cultures (PPBCs), differential time to positivity (DTP), and minimal time to positivity (MTP)). All catheters were cultured at withdrawal. From June 2008 to January 2012, 22 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria. CR-candidemia (CRC) was confirmed in 10. Validity values for predicting CRC were: superficial Gram stain (S, 30%; Sp, 81.83%; PPV, 60%; NPV, 56.3%; Ac, 57.1%), superficial cultures (S, 40%; Sp, 75%; PPV, 57.1%; NPV, 60%; Ac, 59.1%), Kite Gram stain (S, 33.3%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 50%; NPV, 50%; Ac, 50%), Kite culture (S, 80%; Sp, 66.7%; PPV, 66.7%; NPV, 80%; Ac, 72.7%), PPBC (S, 50%; Sp, 41.7%; PPV, 41.7%; NPV, 50.0%; Ac, 45.5%), DTP (S, 100%; Sp, 33.3%; PPV, 55.6%; NPV, 100%; Ac, 63.6%), and MTTP (S, 70%; Sp, 58.3%; PPV, 58.3%; NPV, 70%; Ac, 63.6%). While combinations of two tests improved sensitivity and NPV, more than two tests did not improve validity values. Classic tests to assess CR-BSI caused by bacteria cannot be reliably used to diagnose CRC. Combinations of tests could be useful, but more and larger studies are required.

  12. Peripheral Venous Access Ports: Outcomes Analysis in 109 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bodner, Leonard J.; Nosher, John L.; Patel, Kaushik M.; Siegel, Randall L.; Biswal, Rajiv; Gribbin, Christopher E.; Tokarz, Robert

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective outcomes analysis of central venous catheters with peripheral venous access ports, with comparison to published data.Methods: One hundred and twelve central venous catheters with peripherally placed access ports were placed under sonographic guidance in 109 patients over a 4-year period. Ports were placed for the administration of chemotherapy, hyperalimentation, long-term antibiotic therapy, gamma-globulin therapy, and frequent blood sampling. A vein in the upper arm was accessed in each case and the catheter was passed to the superior vena cava or right atrium. Povidone iodine skin preparation was used in the first 65 port insertions. A combination of Iodophor solution and povidone iodine solution was used in the last 47 port insertions. Forty patients received low-dose (1 mg) warfarin sodium beginning the day after port insertion. Three patients received higher doses of warfarin sodium for preexistent venous thrombosis. Catheter performance and complications were assessed and compared with published data.Results: Access into the basilic or brachial veins was obtained in all cases. Ports remained functional for a total of 28,936 patient days. The port functioned in 50% of patients until completion of therapy, or the patient's expiration. Ports were removed prior to completion of therapy in 18% of patients. Eleven patients (9.9% of ports placed) suffered an infectious complication (0.38 per thousand catheter-days)-in nine, at the port implantation site, in two along the catheter. In all 11 instances the port was removed. Port pocket infection in the early postoperative period occurred in three patients (4.7%) receiving a Betadine prep vs two patients (4.2%) receiving a standard O.R. prep. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.9). Venous thrombosis occurred in three patients (6.8%) receiving warfarin sodium and in two patients (3%) not receiving warfarin sodium. This difference was not statistically significant

  13. Persistent bloodstream infection with Kocuria rhizophila related to a damaged central catheter.

    PubMed

    Moissenet, Didier; Becker, Karsten; Mérens, Audrey; Ferroni, Agnès; Dubern, Béatrice; Vu-Thien, Hoang

    2012-04-01

    A case of persistent bloodstream infection with Kocuria rhizophila related to a damaged central venous catheter in a 3-year-old girl with Hirschsprung's disease is reported. The strain was identified as K. rhizophila by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Arbitrarily primed PCR analysis showed a clonal strain. The repeated septic episodes were resolved with the catheter repair.

  14. Ultrasound guidance for distal insertion of ventriculo-atrial shunt catheters: technical note.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Sameer A; McGirt, Matthew; Woodworth, Graeme; Wang, Paul; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2009-04-01

    Ventriculo-atrial (VA) shunts are often used for CSF diversion in situations involving abdominal pathology that preclude the use of ventriculo-peritoneal shunts. Distal (venous) catheters of VA shunts have historically been inserted using a cut-down on the internal jugular vein (IJV). Less invasive placement of atrial catheters may minimize operative times and attenuate post-operative incisional discomfort. We describe a method for atrial catheter placement using ultrasound guidance to visualize the IJV and facilitate percutaneous venous puncture in 17 adult patients (23 total insertions) undergoing treatment for hydrocephalus or pseudotumor cerebri. The IJV and carotid artery were visualized by ultrasound in 23 (100%) cases. Venous penetration and successful atrial catheter placement was achieved on the first attempt in 23 (100%) cases. Pneumothorax, carotid artery puncture or need for venous cut-down occurred in no cases. The utilization of ultrasound guidance for distal VA shunt catheter insertion may increase comfort with this procedure and ultimately decrease complication rate and operative time.

  15. Improved method for the detection of catheter colonization and catheter-related bacteremia in newborns.

    PubMed

    Martín-Rabadán, P; Pérez-García, F; Zamora Flores, E; Nisa, E S; Guembe, M; Bouza, E

    2017-04-01

    Accurate diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is mandatory for hospital infection control. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are widely used in intensive care units, but studies about procedures for detection of colonization are scarce in neonates. We sequentially processed 372 PICCs by 2 methods, first by the standard roll-plate (RP) technique and then by rubbing catheters on a blood agar plate after being longitudinally split (LS). With both techniques, we detected 133 colonized PICCs. Ninety-four events of CRBSI were diagnosed. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for detection of CRBSI were 58.5%, 92.8%, 73.3%, and 86.9%, respectively, for RP technique and 96.8%, 88.5%, 74.0%, and 98.8%, respectively, for LS technique. The LS technique increased the proportion of detected CRBSI by 38.3%. Neonatal PICC tips should be cultured after cutting them open. This technique is simple and sensitive to detect catheter colonization and also to diagnose CRBSI.

  16. Care and management of patients with skin-tunnelled catheters.

    PubMed

    Green, Julie

    Central venous access devices (CVADs) are used in secondary and, increasingly, primary care settings to provide access to the central circulation. Skin-tunnelled catheters (STCs) are frequently used as the vascular access device of choice, particularly for patients receiving chemotherapy and for those who require long-term access for repeated transfusions. Despite the increased use of STCs, practice varies between trusts and community teams. This article provides an overview of the care and management of patients with STCs.

  17. Pantaloon femoral vein graft as "neoaorta" in infected aortic disease.

    PubMed

    Verma, Himanshu; Mohan, Satish; Tripathi, Ramesh K

    2015-10-01

    Infected abdominal aortic disease and graft infections pose a significant challenge for the vascular surgeon. Thorough radical débridement, either preceded by extra-anatomic bypass or followed by in situ aortic replacement, is the mainstay of treatment. The role of endovascular repair by stent grafts is being increasingly described but is limited to relatively less virulent mycotic aneurysms or as a "bridging" option in sick patients with florid sepsis that necessitates eventual delayed definitive surgical management. Autologous femoral vein has been an excellent conduit for aortic bifurcation reconstruction in this setting. Although various configurations of femoral vein conduit have been described for aortobi-iliac reconstruction, an in-depth knowledge of the venous anatomy, physiology, mechanisms of "profundization," and techniques of harvest and graft preparation is essential for efficient conduct of the operation and its optimal outcomes. We review in detail these aspects of "pantaloon" femoral vein graft creation as a "neoaorta".

  18. Hemodialysis catheter insertion: is increased PO2 a sign of arterial cannulation? A case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ultrasound-guided Central Venous Catheterization (CVC) for temporary vascular access, preferably using the right internal jugular vein, is widely accepted by nephrologists. However CVC is associated with numerous potential complications, including death. We describe the finding of a rare left-sided partial anomalous pulmonary vein connection during central venous catheterization for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Case presentation Ultrasound-guided cannulation of a large bore temporary dual-lumen Quinton-Mahurkar catheter into the left internal jugular vein was performed for CRRT initiation in a 66 year old African-American with sepsis-related oliguric acute kidney injury. The post-procedure chest X-ray suggested inadvertent left carotid artery cannulation. Blood gases obtained from the catheter showed high partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) of 140 mmHg and low partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) of 22 mmHg, suggestive of arterial cannulation. However, the pressure-transduced wave forms appeared venous and Computed Tomography Angiography located the catheter in the left internal jugular vein, but demonstrated that the tip of the catheter was lying over a left pulmonary vein which was abnormally draining into the left brachiocephalic (innominate) vein rather than into the left atrium. Conclusion Although several mechanical complications of dialysis catheters have been described, ours is one of the few cases of malposition into an anomalous pulmonary vein, and highlights a sequential approach to properly identify the catheter location in this uncommon clinical scenario. PMID:25073708

  19. Catheter-Related Mortality among ESRD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wasse, Haimanot

    2010-01-01

    Hemodialysis access-related complications remain one of the most important sources of morbidity and cost among persons with end-stage renal disease, with total annual costs exceeding $1 billion annually. In this context, the creation and maintenance of an effective hemodialysis vascular access is essential for safe and adequate hemodialysis therapy. Multiple reports have documented the type of vascular access used for dialysis and associated risk of infection and mortality. Undoubtedly, the central venous catheter (CVC) is associated with the greatest risk of infection-related and all-cause mortality compared with the autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or synthetic graft (AVG). The AVF has the lowest risk of infection, longer patency rates, greater quality of life, and lower all-cause mortality compared with the AVG or CVC. It is for these reasons that the National Kidney Foundation’s Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Access recommend the early placement and use of the AVF among at least 50% of incident hemodialysis patients. This report presents catheter-related mortality and calls for heightened awareness of catheter-related complications. PMID:19000119

  20. Sinuplasty (Balloon Catheter Dilation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the balloon dilating catheter and its adaptation to sinus surgery. In the 1980s, the field ... used in endoscopic sinus surgery. It is the adaptation or application of minimally-invasive balloon technology to ...

  1. Indwelling catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin care part of your daily routine. Avoid physical activity for a week or two after your catheter is placed in your bladder. Cleaning Your Skin You will need these supplies for cleaning your ...

  2. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient.

  3. Use of a Trellis Device for Endovascular Treatment of Venous Thrombosis Involving a Duplicated Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Saettele, Megan R.; Morelli, John N.; Chesis, Paul; Wible, Brandt C.

    2013-12-15

    Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava (IVC) are increasingly recognized with CT and venography techniques. Although many patients with IVC anomalies are asymptomatic, recent studies have suggested an association with venous thromboembolism. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with extensive venous clot involving the infrarenal segment of a duplicated left IVC who underwent pharmacomechanical thrombectomy and tissue plasminogen activator catheter-directed thrombolysis with complete deep venous thrombosis resolution. To our knowledge this is the first reported case in the English literature of the use of a Trellis thrombectomy catheter in the setting of duplicated IVC.

  4. [Venous thrombosis of atypical location in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Campos Balea, Begoña; Sáenz de Miera Rodríguez, Andrea; Antolín Novoa, Silvia; Quindós Varela, María; Barón Duarte, Francisco; López López, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a complication that frequently occurs in patients with neoplastic diseases. Several models have therefore been developed to identify patient subgroups diagnosed with cancer who are at increased risk of developing VTE. The most common forms of thromboembolic episodes are deep vein thrombosis in the lower limbs and pulmonary thromboembolism. However, venous thrombosis is also diagnosed in atypical locations. There are few revisions of unusual cases of venous thrombosis. In most cases, VTE occurs in the upper limbs and in the presence of central venous catheters, pacemakers and defibrillators. We present the case of a patient diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy who developed a thrombosis in the upper limbs (brachial and axillary).

  5. Peritoneal catheters and related infections.

    PubMed

    Thodis, Elias; Passadakis, Ploumis; Lyrantzopooulos, Nikolaos; Panagoutsos, Stelios; Vargemezis, Vassilis; Oreopoulos, Dimitrios

    2005-01-01

    Catheter related infectious complications (exit-site infections, tunnel infections, and peritonitis) remain the major reasons for technique failure during the three decades since, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) treatment has been first established. Despite improvements in catheter's survival rates, catheter related complications result in an increase in the cumulative patients' morbidity and often leading to the catheter removal. The ideal catheter provides reliable and rapid dialysate flow rates without leaks or infections. Among several types, the double-cuff straight Tenckhoff catheter, developed in 1968, is still the most widely used, although its use is decreasing in favour of swanneck catheters. Although there are only few well-designed trials comparing catheters and catheters related infectious complications, controlling for all other important variables, no difference in these complications among the main types of catheters was seen. The single cuff catheters have been associated with a shorter survival rate and time to the first peritonitis episode than the double-cuff catheters. Also exit-site infections were found to be more frequent and significantly more resistant to treatment with single-cuff compared to double-cuff ones. Finally, better results have been reported with the latest developed presternal peritoneal dialysis catheter both regarding survival rates and exit-site infection and peritonitis rates. Recently a renewed interest in continuous flow peritoneal dialysis stimulated inventions of imaginative, double-lumen catheters since a suitable peritoneal access is a sine qua non condition for the development of this new technique of peritoneal dialysis.

  6. Care and cost-utility indicators for high-flow PICC catheters: a study.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Paloma Ruiz; López, Juan Luis González; Martín, Juliana González; Eguía, Beatriz Rivas

    Intravenous therapy teams (IVTT) provide care, education and supervision of the patient with a central line, and his/her family. This article discusses the creation of an IVTT in the Hospital Clínico San Carlos of Madrid, Spain, demonstrating its effectiveness using cost-utility analysis and outcomes indicators. In 2009 the IVTT began using a high-flow peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) with its target population of chronic patients dependent on central venous catheters or prolonged IV treatment. The team designed activity, welfare, educational and economic indicators. Of the 98 catheters placed, 80% of patients achieved a positive response; 42% of catheters were removed after death and 30% by the end of treatment. Four percent were removed due to infection. The average implantation duration was 45 days. The economic study showed an increasing cost saving compared to peripheral catheters after 90 days of implantation, and after 77 days compared to central venous catheters. This translated into an immediate saving of 161 euros (£133.70) and 303.83 euros (£252.31) per catheter over Hickman lines and ports, as well as reduced risks, length of hospital stays and costs. The study shows PICC to be cost-effective with reported benefits to patients, professionals and organizations. The creation of the IVTT has resulted in improvements to care and the management of resources.

  7. Clinical review: new technologies for prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Cicalini, Stefania; Palmieri, Fabrizio; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2004-06-01

    Intravascular catheters have become essential devices for the management of critically and chronically ill patients. However, their use is often associated with serious infectious complications, mostly catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), resulting in significant morbidity, increased duration of hospitalization, and additional medical costs. The majority of CRBSIs are associated with central venous catheters (CVCs), and the relative risk for CRBSI is significantly greater with CVCs than with peripheral venous catheters. However, most CVC-related infections are preventable, and different measures have been implemented to reduce the risk for CRBSI, including maximal barrier precautions during catheter insertion, catheter site maintenance, and hub handling. The focus of the present review is on new technologies for preventing infections that are directed at CVCs. New preventive strategies that have been shown to be effective in reducing risk for CRBSI, including the use of catheters and dressings impregnated with antiseptics or antibiotics, the use of new hub models, and the use of antibiotic lock solutions, are briefly described.

  8. The removal of a stuck catheter: an alternative to Hong's technique.

    PubMed

    Lodi, Massimo; Ebrahimi, Reza Far; Pezzotti, Piera; Carbonari, Luciano

    2016-11-02

    The use of the tunneled central venous catheter (CVC) is steadily increasing worldwide as a means of vascular access for hemodialysis. The increased use of these devices, which often outlive the patients, and the extended time they are used are associated with more frequent complications. Among these, one of the emerging complications is that of the "embedded" or stuck catheter. This term refers to when the catheter cannot be removed after detaching the retention cuff. In medical literature, experiences with the removal of stuck catheters are described with the use of several different methods. Currently the most commonly used technique also considered the safest is "endoluminal dilation" also known as Hong's Technique, recently modified by Quaretti and Galli. Below, a new technique using a Vollmar ring is described for removing a stuck catheter as an alternative to Hong's technique, or after a failed attempt at using Hong's technique.

  9. Umbilical venous catheterization gone wrong: Hepatic complications

    PubMed Central

    Sherwani, Poonam; Vire, Adweta; Anand, Rama; Jajoo, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic complications of malposition of umbilical venous catheter (UVC) are uncommon and occur due to extravasation of hypertonic fluids and the blood products in the liver tissue. Various hepatic complications include thrombosis of hepatic vessels, hepatic necrosis, hepatic fluid collections, and hematoma, with the intraparenchymal liver lesions seen along the course of ductus venosus. Radiologists must be aware of these complications and their imaging findings, as the timely recognition and immediate management can prevent the fatal outcome. Here, we present a rare case of intraparenchymal liver lesions associated with malposition of UVC in a preterm baby. PMID:27081222

  10. Maintenance of blood flow rate on dialysis with self-centering CentrosFLO catheter: A multicenter prospective study.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil K; Ash, Stephen R

    2016-10-01

    Introduction Chronic central venous catheters (CVC) for dialysis lose patency and deliver lower blood flow over time, often due to fibrous sheathing that covers the lumen tips. The CentrosFLO central venous catheter has a shape that directs the arterial and venous tips away from the walls of the vena cava and right atrium, making sheathing of the tips less likely. Methods A prospective, multicenter, single arm, non-controlled, observational study was conducted at eight sites in the United States. All consenting dialysis patients receiving CentrosFLO catheters through the right or left internal jugular veins were accepted in the study, as long as the catheter was expected to be used for 45 days and was not an over-the-wire replacement for a previous CVC. Data were automatically collected on initial and average dialysis blood flow rate and initial arterial and venous pressures, for up to 26 weeks of dialysis therapy. Findings 75 patients were enrolled. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that 87% of patients maintained blood flow rate over 300 mL/min throughout 26 weeks of follow-up. There was no decline in average dialysis blood flow rate and no significant change in hydraulic resistance of the arterial or venous lumens of the catheters during the study. Discussion The CentrosFLO catheter demonstrates long term patency with good flow rates on dialysis, which, by comparison with previous studies, shows a clinically significant improvement in blood flow rate vs. other catheters. Stable hydraulic resistance of the catheter lumens showed no evidence of tip encroachment by fibrous sheaths.

  11. MR-Guided Percutaneous Angioplasty: Assessment of Tracking Safety, Catheter Handling and Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Wildermuth, Simon; Dumoulin, Charles L.; Pfammatter, Thomas; Maier, Stephan E.; Hofmann, Eugen; Debatin, Joerg F.

    1998-09-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR)-guided percutaneous vascular interventions have evolved to a practical possibility with the advent of open-configuration MR systems and real-time tracking techniques. The purpose of this study was to assess an MR-tracking percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) catheter with regard to its safety profile and functionality. Methods: Real-time, biplanar tracking of the PTA catheter was made possible by incorporating a small radiofrequency (RF) coil in the catheter tip and connecting it to a coaxial cable embedded in the catheter wall. To evaluate potentially hazardous thermal effects due to the incorporation of the coil, temperature measurements were performed within and around the coil under various scanning and tracking conditions at 1.5 Tesla (T). Catheter force transmission and balloon-burst pressure of the MR-tracking PTA catheter were compared with those of a standard PTA catheter. The dilatative capability of the angioplasty balloon was assessed in vitro as well as in vivo, in an isolated femoral artery segment in a swine. Results: The degree of heating at the RF coil was directly proportional to the power of the RF pulses. Heating was negligible with MR tracking, conventional spin-echo and low-flip gradient-echo sequences. Sequences with higher duty cycles, such as fast spin echo, produced harmful heating effects. Force transmission of the MR-tracking PTA catheter was slightly inferior to that of the standard PTA catheter, while balloon-burst pressures were similar to those of conventional catheters. The MR-tracking PTA catheter functioned well both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: The in vivo use of an MR-tracking PTA catheter is safe under most scanning conditions.

  12. Semi-automated location identification of catheters in digital chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Yankelevitz, David F.

    2007-03-01

    Localization of catheter tips is the most common task in intensive care unit imaging. In this work, catheters appearing in digital chest radiographs acquired by portable chest x-rays were tracked using a semi-automatic method. Due to the fact that catheters are synthetic objects, its profile does not vary drastically over its length. Therefore, we use forward looking registration with normalized cross-correlation in order to take advantage of a priori information of the catheter profile. The registration is accomplished with a two-dimensional template representative of the catheter to be tracked generated using two seed points given by the user. To validate catheter tracking with this method, we look at two metrics: accuracy and precision. The algorithms results are compared to a ground truth established by catheter midlines marked by expert radiologists. Using 12 objects of interest comprised of naso-gastric, endo-tracheal tubes, and chest tubes, and PICC and central venous catheters, we find that our algorithm can fully track 75% of the objects of interest, with a average tracking accuracy and precision of 85.0%, 93.6% respectively using the above metrics. Such a technique would be useful for physicians wishing to verify the positioning of catheter tips using chest radiographs.

  13. [Early goal-directed therapy (EDGT) using continuous central venous oxygen saturation monitoring in a patient with septic shock].

    PubMed

    Oyama, Yoshimasa; Goto, Koji; Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Kusaka, Jyunya; Hidaka, Seigo; Shingu, Chihiro; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2008-04-01

    Septic shock is an adverse clinical condition resulting in multiple organ failure from global tissue hypoxia. The importance of initial treatment is widely recognized. Thus, guidelines for septic shock recommend early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) during the first six hours of treatment. Central venous oxygen saturation monitoring is useful to maintain adequate tissue oxygen delivery. A newly developed central venous oximetry catheter (PreSep Oximetery Catheter, Edwards Lifesciences) allows continuous and easy monitoring of central venous oxygen saturation. This report shows the usefulness of this catheter in a patient who developed septic shock during an emergency operation for perforated bowel. By using EGDT perioperatively with continuous central venous oximetry, multiple organ failure might be successfully avoided.

  14. [Superficial venous thrombosis. A state of art].

    PubMed

    Sándor, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    For a long time superficial thrombophlebitis has been thought to be a rather benign condition. Recently, when duplex ultrasound technique is used for the diagnosis more and more often, the disease is proved to be more dangerous than anticipated. Thrombosis propagates to the deep veins in 6-44% and pulmonary embolism was observed on the patients in 1,5-33%. We can calculate venous thromboembolic complications on every fourth patient. Diagnosis is clinical, but duplex ultrasound examination is mandatory, for estimation of the thrombus extent, for exclusion of the deep venous thrombosis and for follow up. Both legs should be checked with ultrasound, because simultaneous deep venous thrombosis can develop on the contralateral limb. Two different forms can be distinguished: superficial venous thrombosis with, or without varicose veins. In cases of spontaneous, non varicous form, especially when the process is migrating or recurrent, a careful clinical examination is necessery for exclusion of malignant diseases and thrombophilia. The treatment options are summarised on the basis of recent international consensus statements. The American and German guidelines are similar. Compression and mobilisation are cornerstones of the therapy. For a short segment thrombosis non steroidal antiinflammatory drugs are effective. For longer segments low molecular-weight heparins are preferred. Information on the effect of the novel oral anticoagulants for the therapy is lacking but they may appear to be effective in the future for this indication. When thrombus is close to the sapheno-femoral or sapheno-popliteal junction crossectomy (high ligation), or low molecular-weight heparin in therapeutic doses are indicated. The term superficial thrombophlebitis should be discouraged, because inflammation and infection is not the primary pathology. It should be called correctly superficial venous thrombosis in order to avoid the unnecessary administration of antibiotics and the misconception

  15. Association Between Disruption of Fibrin Sheaths Using Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty Balloons and Late Onset of Central Venous Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Nina Mojibian, Hamid; Pollak, Jeffrey; Tal, Michael

    2011-02-15

    To compare the rates of central venous stenosis in patients undergoing hemodialysis who underwent disruption of fibrin sheath with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloons and those who underwent over-the-wire catheter exchange. This study is a retrospective review of 209 percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon disruption and 1304 over-the-wire catheter exchange procedures performed in 753 patients. Approval from the Human Investigations Committee was obtained for this study. Up to 10-year follow-up was performed. A {chi}{sup 2} test was used to compare the rates of central venous stenosis after balloon disruption versus catheter exchange. A t-test was used to compare time to central venous stenosis development. Of the 753 patients in the study, 127 patients underwent balloon disruption of fibrin sheath and 626 had catheter exchange. Within the balloon disruption group, 18 (14.2%) of 127 patients subsequently developed central venous stenosis, compared with 44 (7.0%) of 626 in the catheter exchange group (P < 0.01, {chi}{sup 2} test). Time to central venous stenosis development was approximately 3 years in both groups and not significantly different (1371 and 1010 days, P = 0.20). A total of 25.2% of patients in the balloon disruption group had four or more subsequent catheter exchanges, versus 12.6% in the catheter exchange group (P < 0.01, {chi}{sup 2} test). In conclusions, there is a possible association between percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon disruption of fibrin sheath and late-onset central venous stenosis. Because venography was not routinely performed in catheter exchange patients, future randomized studies are necessary to confirm these findings.

  16. Arterialized Venous Bone Flaps: An Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Borumandi, Farzad; Higgins, James P.; Buerger, Heinz; Vasilyeva, Anna; Benlidayi, Memmet Emre; Sencar, Leman; Gaggl, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In arterialized venous flaps (AVFs) the venous network is used to revascularize the flap. While the feasibility of AVFs in soft tissues has been reported there is no study on osseous AVFs. In this study we aim to assess the flap survival of osseous AVFs in a pig model. Medial femoral condyle flaps were elevated in 18 pigs. Three groups were created: AVF (n = 6), conventional arterial flap (cAF, n = 6) and bone graft (BG, n = 6). The AVFs were created by anastomosis of genicular artery with one vena comitans while leaving one efferent vein for drainage. After 6 months the specimens were harvested. The histology and histomorphometry of of the bone in cAF and AVF was significantly superior to bone grafts with a higher bone volume in AVFs (p = 0.01). This study demonstrates that osseous free flaps may be supported and survive using the technique of arterialization of the venous network. The concept of AVFs in osseous flaps may be feasible for revascularization of free flaps with an inadequate artery but well developed veins. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to assess the feasibility of clinical use of arterialized venous bone flaps. PMID:27558705

  17. [Slipped capital femoral epiphysis].

    PubMed

    Klein, C; Haraux, E; Leroux, J; Gouron, R

    2017-03-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SFCE) is a disorder of the hip, characterized by a displacement of the capital femoral epiphysis from the metaphysic through the femoral growth plate. The epiphysis slips posteriorly and inferiorly. SCFE occurs during puberty and metabolic and epidemiologic risk factors, such as obesity are frequently found. Most chronic slips are diagnosed late. Sagittal hip X-rays show epiphysis slip. In case of untreated SCFE, a slip progression arises with an acute slip risk. Treatment is indicated to prevent slip worsening. The clinical and radiological classification is useful to guide treatment and it is predictive of the prognosis. In situ fixation of stable and moderately displaced SCFE with cannulated screws gives excellent results. Major complications are chondrolysis and osteonecrosis and the major sequelae are femoroacetabular impingement and early arthritis.

  18. [Survival and complication rate of central venous catheters in newborns].

    PubMed

    García, Heladia Josefa; Torres-Yáñez, Héctor Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: los catéteres venosos centrales (CVC) son de gran utilidad en la práctica médica actual; sin embargo, no están exentos de riesgos, lo que incrementa la morbilidad y mortalidad, especialmente en los recién nacidos (RN). El objetivo fue registrar la frecuencia de complicaciones de los CVC y su duración en RN en una unidad de cuidados intensivos neonatales (UCIN) de tercer nivel. Métodos: se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo, prolectivo en la UCIN del Hospital de Pediatría del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI. Se registraron variables demográficas, perinatales y del CVC. Resultados: se incluyeron 123 RN a quienes se les colocaron 152 CVC. La técnica más usada para la inserción del CVC fue la punción (percutánea o subclavia) en 56.6 % (n = 86). En 48.7 % (n = 74) de los CVC se presentó alguna complicación. Las más frecuentes fueron colonización en 32.4 % (n = 24) y bacteriemia relacionada con CVC en 27 % (n = 20). La probabilidad de duración de los CVC libres de complicaciones fue de 93.4 % a los 10 días y de 91.4 % a los 17 días. Los catéteres venosos no centrales tuvieron menor probabilidad de duración. Conclusión: la mayoría de las complicaciones de los CVC se presentaron en las primeras dos semanas de haber sido instalados. Las complicaciones infecciosas fueron las más frecuentes.

  19. Multiple venous thrombosis complicating central venous cannulation in a non cancer patient - a case report.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ce; Menkiti, Id; Desalu, I; Thomas, Mo

    2013-01-01

    Central venous catheterization is a common procedure for critically ill patients. Like all procedures, it has its complications, one of which is thrombosis. Reports of thrombosis are commoner among cancer patients. We present a 37 year old non cancer patient who developed thrombi in both right and left internal jugular veins, 10 and 13 days respectively after insertion of central venous catheter. This was detected by ultrasound scans of the neck while attempting re-cannulation for parenteral feeding. She also had left lower limb deep venous thrombosis, confirmed by doppler scan, which was managed with low molecular weight heparin and warfarin. The patient was subsequently treated with streptokinase. A repeat scan of the internal jugular veins 4 days after thrombolysis revealed a reduction in size of the thrombi. Symptoms of deep venous thrombosis improved and she was transferred to the wards where she made remarkable improvement. This case illustrates the potential usefulness of ultrasound guided-central line insertion in patients who have had central venous lines inserted previously in order to detect thrombi.

  20. Venous Thromboembolism in Children with Cancer and Blood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Richard H.; Thornburg, Courtney D.

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) in children is multifactorial and most often related to a combination of inherited and acquired thrombophilias. Children with cancer and blood disorders are often at risk for VTE due to disease-related factors such as inflammation and abnormal blood flow and treatment-related factors such as central venous catheters and surgery. We will review risk factors for VTE in children with leukemia, lymphoma, and solid tumors. We will also review risk factors for VTE in children with blood disorders with specific focus on sickle cell anemia and hemophilia. We will present the available evidence and clinical guidelines for prevention and treatment of VTE in these populations. PMID:28220143

  1. Continuous blood gas monitoring in femoral arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlain, Les A.; Spar, Steven M.; Dellinger, Bart

    1995-05-01

    Continuous intra-arterial blood gas monitoring is a potentially valuable tool in the surgical and intensive care arenas. Patient oxygenation and acid base status can change rapidly and without warning. The ability to monitor pHa, PaCO2 and PaO2 in arterial blood will be a major medical advance for the anesthesiologist and intensivist. Intra-arterial blood gas sensors are typically placed in radial arteries. In certain patient populations accurate monitoring is not possible in radial arteries due to arterial environmental factors such as hypotension, vasoconstriction and atherosclerotic disease. These same factors can make radial cannulation difficult resulting in traumatic catheter insertion, thereby further compromising flow conditions. In situations where radial artery flow is expected to be compromised, selecting a large vessel for sensor placement is desirable. We report an initial feasibility study of our blood gas monitoring system using the femoral artery as the sensing site. Clinical results are presented as well as potential advantages and disadvantages associated with monitoring in the femoral artery.

  2. Endovascular Treatment Options in the Management of Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, Sarfraz Ahmed Ganeshan, Arul; Nazir, Sheraz; Uberoi, Raman

    2009-09-15

    Lower limb deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Systemic anticoagulation therapy is the mainstay of conventional treatment instituted by most physicians for the management of DVT. This has proven efficacy in the prevention of thrombus extension and reduction in the incidence of pulmonary embolism and rethrombosis. Unfortunately, especially in patients with severe and extensive iliofemoral DVT, standard treatment may not be entirely adequate. This is because a considerable proportion of these patients eventually develops postthrombotic syndrome. This is characterized by chronic extremity pain and trophic skin changes, edema, ulceration, and venous claudication. Recent interest in endovascular technologies has led to the development of an assortment of minimally invasive, catheter-based strategies to deal with venous thrombus. These comprise catheter-directed thrombolysis, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy devices, adjuvant venous angioplasty and stenting, and inferior vena cava filters. This article reviews these technologies and discusses their current role as percutaneous treatment strategies for venous thrombotic conditions.

  3. Balloon Catheter Prevents Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higginson, Gregory A.; Bouffard, Marc R.; Hoehicke, Beth S.; King, Bradley D.; Peterson, Sandra L.

    1994-01-01

    Balloon catheter similar to that used in such medical procedures as angioplasty and heart surgery protects small orifices against contamination and blockage by chips generated in machining operations. Includes small, inflatable balloon at end of thin, flexible tube. Contains additional features adapting it to anticontamination service: balloon larger to fit wider channel it must block; made of polyurethane (rather than latex), which does not fragment if bursts; material made thicker to resist abrasion better; and kink-resistant axial wire helps catheter negotiate tight bends.

  4. Mobility therapy and central or peripheral catheter-related adverse events in an ICU in Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Natália Pontes; da Silva, Gregório Marques Cardim; Park, Marcelo; Pires-Neto, Ruy Camargo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether mobility therapy is associated with central or peripheral catheter-related adverse events in critically ill patients in an ICU in Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the daily medical records of patients admitted to the Clinical Emergency ICU of the University of São Paulo School of Medicine Hospital das Clínicas Central Institute between December of 2009 and April of 2011. In addition to the demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, we collected data related to central venous catheters (CVCs), hemodialysis (HD) catheters and indwelling arterial catheters (IACs): insertion site; number of catheter days; and types of adverse events. We also characterized the mobility therapy provided. RESULTS: Among the 275 patients evaluated, CVCs were used in 49%, HD catheters were used in 26%, and IACs were used in 29%. A total of 1,268 mobility therapy sessions were provided to patients while they had a catheter in place. Catheter-related adverse events occurred in 20 patients (a total of 22 adverse events): 32%, infection; 32%, obstruction; and 32%, accidental dislodgement. We found that mobility therapy was not significantly associated with any catheter-related adverse event, regardless of the type of catheter employed: CVC-OR = 0.8; 95% CI: 0.7-1.0; p = 0.14; HD catheter-OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.89-1.21; p = 0.56; or IAC-OR = 1.74; 95% CI: 0.94-3.23; p = 0.07. CONCLUSIONS: In critically ill patients, mobility therapy is not associated with the incidence of adverse events involving CVCs, HD catheters, or IACs. PMID:26176520

  5. Intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by Abiotrophia defectiva in a neutropenic child.

    PubMed

    Phulpin-Weibel, A; Gaspar, N; Emirian, A; Chachaty, E; Valteau-Couanet, D; Gachot, B

    2013-05-01

    Bacteraemia and endocarditis are the most frequently reported clinical infections due to Abiotrophia defectiva species. This species has been rarely implicated in infections in neutropenic patients. We report a rare case of long-term venous catheter-related infection caused by A. defectiva that occurred in a febrile child who had neutropenia and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis.

  6. Safety and effectiveness of central venous catheterization in patients with cancer: prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Yun, Jina; Kim, Han Jo; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Bae, Sang Byung; Kim, Chan Kyu; Lee, Nam Su; Lee, Kyu Taek; Park, Seong Kyu; Won, Jong-Ho; Park, Hee Sook; Hong, Dae Sik

    2010-12-01

    This study investigated the safety and effectiveness of each type of central venous catheters (CVC) in patients with cancer. We prospectively enrolled patients with cancer who underwent catheterization involving a subclavian venous catheter (SVC), peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC), or chemo-port (CP) in our department. From March 2007 to March 2009, 116 patients underwent 179 episodes of catheterization. A SVC was inserted most frequently (46.4%). Fifty-four complications occurred (30.1%): infection in 23 cases, malpositioning or migration of the tip in 18 cases, thrombosis in eight cases, and bleeding in five cases. Malpositioning or migration of the tip occurred more frequently with a PICC (P<0.001); infection occurred more often with a tunneled catheter (P=0.028) and was observed more often in young patients (P=0.023). The catheter life span was longer for patients with solid cancer (P=0.002) than for those with hematologic cancer, with a CP (P<0.001) than a PICC or SVC, and for an indwelling catheter with image guidance (P=0.014) than a blind procedure. In conclusion, CP is an effective tool for long term use and the fixation of tip is important for the management of PICC.

  7. Delayed pneumothorax after central venous access: a potential hazard.

    PubMed

    Tyburski, J G; Joseph, A L; Thomas, G A; Saxe, J M; Lucas, C E

    1993-09-01

    Percutaneous central venous catheter access is common-place in surgical patients. Though several major complications of this procedure have been described, pneumothorax is the most common. Pneumothorax is routinely assessed by a chest X-ray within 2 hours after catheter placement. During a recent 6-month interval, the authors identified five patients with delayed onset and diagnosis of pneumothorax following percutaneous central venous access. All immediate post-insertion chest X-rays were normal; however, subsequent chest X-ray showed evidence of pneumothoraxes. The pneumothorax contributed to the death of one patient on positive pressure ventilation. A review of the literature revealed a total of 18 patients in the English literature with this complication. Although the incidence of delayed pneumothorax is low, it is, in some instances, life threatening, particularly in patients on positive pressure ventilation. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnosis and treat this reversible condition.

  8. Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma arising in the femoral vein: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oike, Naoki; Ogose, Akira; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Umezu, Hajime; Inagawa, Shoichi

    2014-10-01

    Soft tissue tumors arising in deep veins of the extremities are uncommon, although a few cases of synovial sarcoma or leiomyosarcoma arising in the femoral vein have been documented. However, to the best of our knowledge, an extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) arising in the femoral vein has not been reported in the English literature. We report a case of EMC arising in the femoral vein of a 70-year-old man who presented with right leg edema and was diagnosed with a deep venous thrombosis (DVT) by computed tomography (CT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass in the right proximal thigh that was diagnosed as myxomatous sarcoma by aspiration cytology, and anticoagulant therapy was initiated. The mass was surgically resected en bloc, including the femoral vein and surrounding soft tissue, and the femoral artery was preserved. The femoral vein was not reconstructed. The histologic diagnosis was an extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. The patient received postoperative local radiation treatment, with a total dose of 60 Gy, and is currently doing well with no evidence of local recurrence or metastasis at 8 months after surgery. In summary, this case report shows that EMC can arise in the femoral vein, and that reconstruction of the femoral vein is not always necessary during surgery for soft tissue tumors.

  9. Effect of the high femoral osteotomy upon the vascularity and blood supply of the hip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Day, B.; Shim, S.S.; Leung, G.

    1984-05-01

    This investigation was done to study the effects of high femoral osteotomy upon the vascularity and blood supply of the hip and to further our knowledge of its physiologic basis. We have used established methods of study, including bone scans, microangiography, isotope clearance and perosseous venography, and based upon the results of these studies, we have reached certain conclusions. First, high femoral osteotomy increases the blood flow and vascularity in the hip joint, the femoral head and neck and the great trochanter. Second, bone scanning techniques using /sup 99m/Tc labeled diphosphonate have shown increased uptake in the femoral head and neck after high femoral osteotomy. The localization was done using a Digital Gamma III computer, and the activity on the osteotomy side at two weeks was 3.5 times as great as on the control side. By 16 weeks postoperatively, there was still two times as much activity on the osteotomy side. Third, microangiography showed increased vascularity both at the osteotomy site and in the femoral head and neck and the greater trochanter on that side. Such an increase in vascularity first became evident two weeks after osteotomy and persisted during the four month period studied. Fourth, the results of the /sup 99m/Tc diphosphonate clearance study showed a 25 per cent increase in femoral head blood flow on the operative side. Fifth, perosseous venography of the femoral head and neck showed a marked increase in venous drainage through the osteotomy site in the immediate postosteotomy stage.

  10. Catheter-associated UTI

    MedlinePlus

    ... UTI; Health care-associated UTI; Catheter-associated bacteriuria; Hospital acquired-UTI Images Bladder catheterization, female Bladder catheterization, male References Calfee DP. Prevention and control of health care-associated infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  11. Suprapubic catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... area around your catheter every day with mild soap and water. Gently pat it dry. Showers are fine. Ask your providers about bathtubs, swimming pools, and hot tubs. DO NOT use creams, powders, or sprays near the site. Apply bandages around ...

  12. Case report: central venous catheterization via internal jugular vein with associated formation of perioperative venous thrombosis during surgery in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Minami, Kimito; Mimami, Kimito; Iida, Miki; Iida, Hiroki

    2012-06-01

    An unusual case of central venous catheter (CVC)-related thrombosis during supine surgery in the prone position is presented. A 76-year-old woman was scheduled for elective surgery to repair a broken lumbar instrument. A single-lumen CVC was inserted via the right internal jugular vein. Surgery was performed in the prone position, with the patient's face directed downward in the standard median position (i.e., no rotation), but with slight forward flexion at the neck. After the surgery, the external jugular vein was dilated, and a postoperative X-ray revealed an infiltrative shadow in the right thoracic cavity. Because cervical echography showed dilated cervical veins with a "moyamoya-type" echo, possibly indicating a thrombus, contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed, revealing a venous thrombus in the right internal jugular vein. An internal jugular venous-velocity measurement suggested that her slightly flexed neck position and her prone position during surgery may have kinked the internal jugular vein, causing engorgement with venous blood. The presence of the internal jugular venous catheter may have created thrombogenic conditions. A patient's position during surgery can reduce deep venous-flow velocity, and venous blood may stagnate, contributing greatly to thrombogenicity. We should consider a patient's position during surgery as a risk factor for thrombus formation, and a careful preoperative evaluation should be made as to which route should be chosen for CVC.

  13. Recanalization of a Heavily Calcified Chronic Total Occlusion in a Femoropopliteal Artery Using a Wingman Crossing Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Naoto; Tanaka, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    We present a 77-year-old female with heavily calcified chronic total occlusions (CTO) in a superficial femoral artery treated by endovascular therapy using a Wingman crossing catheter, which is an over-the-wire catheter with a metallic blade, controlled manually. The blade could probe and track the calcified cap of CTO, wherein any hydrophilic guidewires or looped wires could not penetrate. Moreover, the Wingman could proceed through the occlusion and introduce a guidewire into distal intramedial lumen as a support catheter. Finally, wire crossing was achieved using a bi-directional approach. The Wingman can be a simple solution for crossing calcified peripheral CTO. PMID:27375810

  14. Guidelines for the management of intravascular catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Mermel, L A; Farr, B M; Sherertz, R J; Raad, I I; O'Grady, N; Harris, J S; Craven, D E

    2001-01-01

    These guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American College of Critical Care Medicine (for the Society of Critical Care Medicine), and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America contain recommendations for the management of adults and children with, and diagnosis of infections related to, peripheral and nontunneled central venous catheters (CVCs), pulmonary artery catheters, tunneled central catheters, and implantable devices. The guidelines, written for clinicians, contain IDSA evidence-based recommendations for assessment of the quality and strength of the data. Recommendations are presented according to the type of catheter, the infecting organism, and the associated complications. Intravascular catheter-related infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, aerobic gram-negative bacilli, and Candida albicans most commonly cause catheter-related bloodstream infection. Management of catheter-related infection varies according to the type of catheter involved. After appropriate cultures of blood and catheter samples are done, empirical i.v. antimicrobial therapy should be initiated on the basis of clinical clues, the severity of the patient's acute illness, underlying disease, and the potential pathogen(s) involved. In most cases of nontunneled CVC-related bacteremia and fungemia, the CVC should be removed. For management of bacteremia and fungemia from a tunneled catheter or implantable device, such as a port, the decision to remove the catheter or device should be based on the severity of the patient's illness, documentation that the vascular-access device is infected, assessment of the specific pathogen involved, and presence of complications, such as endocarditis, septic thrombosis, tunnel infection, or metastatic seeding. When a catheter-related infection is documented and a specific pathogen is identified, systemic antimicrobial

  15. Non-insertion-related complications of central venous catheterization--temporary vascular access for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Bevc, Sebastjan; Pecovnik-Balon, Breda; Ekart, Robert; Hojs, Radovan

    2007-01-01

    The authors analyzed 309 central venous catheters (CVC) inserted in 147 hemodialysis patients before the maturation of the first or new arteriovenous fistula. One clinical manifestations of sepsis after CVC insertion was found. In all, 33.7% of the catheters were removed because of early minor complications: CVC occlusion, inadequate blood flow in CVC, shattered suture and malposition of CVC, fever, signs of infection at the site of CVC insertion, and bleeding at the site of CVC insertion. The most frequently isolated pathogenic bacteria at the tips of the catheters were coagulase-negative staphylococci highly sensitive to vancomycin and gentamicin.

  16. Vascular catheter-associated fungemia in patients with cancer: analysis of 155 episodes.

    PubMed

    Lecciones, J A; Lee, J W; Navarro, E E; Witebsky, F G; Marshall, D; Steinberg, S M; Pizzo, P A; Walsh, T J

    1992-04-01

    We reviewed all 155 episodes of central venous catheter-associated fungemia among inpatients at the National Cancer Institute during a 10-year period. Candida species accounted for 98% of episodes. Fungemia was documented by culture of blood drawn through catheters in 50% of cases and by culture of both catheter-drawn and peripheral blood in 39%; mortality and the rate of dissemination were similar for these two groups. Four management strategies were used: catheter removal, antifungal therapy (with amphotericin B), both, or neither; indications for the use of both modes of treatment included fever, neutropenia, long-term indwelling catheterization, positive cultures of both catheter-drawn and peripheral blood, isolation of Candida tropicalis, and fungal isolation from two or more blood cultures. Disseminated fungal infection was documented in 82% of cases with these features but also in 35% of the less severe cases treated only with catheter removal. In addition, nine (82%) of 11 cases managed only with antifungal therapy had a negative outcome (either death from disseminated infection or the recurrence of fevers and/or fungemia), a finding suggesting that intravascular catheters should be removed in fungemia. Virtually all cases of catheter-associated fungemia in patients with cancer are clinically significant and require prompt therapy with amphotericin B.

  17. Intrajugular balloon catheter reduces air embolism in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Eckle, V. S.; Neumann, B.; Greiner, T. O.; Wendel, H. P.; Grasshoff, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Neurosurgical procedures requiring a sitting position may put the patient at risk of a potentially life-threatening air embolism. Transient manual jugular venous compression limits further air entry in this situation. This study presents an alternative technique aimed at reducing the risk of air embolism. Methods In an in vitro model, an intrajugular balloon catheter was inserted to demonstrate that this device prevents air embolism. In an in vivo study, this device was bilaterally placed into jugular vessels in pigs. Using an ultrasound technique, blood flow was monitored and jugular venous pressure was recorded before and during cuff inflation. Air was applied proximally to the inflated cuffs to test the hypothesis that this novel device blocks air passage. Results In vitro, the intrajugular balloon catheter reliably prevented further air entry (n=10). Additionally, accumulated air could be aspirated from an orifice of the catheter (n=10). In vivo, inflation of the catheter balloon completely obstructed venous blood flow (n=8). Bilateral inflation of the cuff significantly increased the proximal jugular venous pressure from 9.8 (2.4) mm Hg to 14.5 (2.5) mm Hg (n=8, P<0.05). Under conditions mimicking an air embolism, air passage across the inflated cuffs was prevented and 78 (20%) (n=6) of the air dose could be aspirated by the proximal orifice of the catheter. Conclusions These findings may serve as a starting point for the development of intrajugular balloon catheters designed to reduce the risk of air embolism in patients undergoing neurosurgery in a sitting position. PMID:25835025

  18. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed Central

    Coon, W W

    1977-01-01

    This review of the epidemiology of venous thromboembolism includes estimates of incidence and prevalence of venous thrombosis and its sequelae, a discussion geographical, annual and seasonal variations and data concerning possible risk factors. Selection of patients at increased risk for development of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism for specific diagnostic screening or for prophylactic therapy with low-dose heparin may be a more effective approach to lowering morbidity and mortality from this disease. PMID:329779

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Complications of Femoral Arterial Access

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetis, Dimitrios

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular repair of femoral arterial access complications is nowadays the treatment of choice in a group of patients who cannot tolerate vascular reconstruction and bleeding due to advanced cardiovascular disease. Endovascular procedures can be performed under local anesthesia, are well tolerated by the patient, and are associated with a short hospitalization time. Ninitinol stent technology allows for safe stent and stent-graft extension at the common femoral artery (CFA) level, due to increased resistance to external compression and bending stress. Active pelvic bleeding can be insidious, and prompt placement of a stent-graft at the site of leakage is a lifesaving procedure. Percutaneous thrombin injection under US guidance is the treatment of choice for femoral pseudoaneurysms (PAs); this can theoretically be safer with simultaneous balloon occlusion across the entry site of a PA without a neck or with a short and wide neck. In a few cases with thrombin failure due to a large arterial defect or accompanying arteriovenous fistula (AVF), a stent-graft can be deployed. The vast majority of catheter-induced AVFs can be treated effectively with stent-graft implantation even if they are located very close to the femoral bifurcation. Obstructive dissection flaps localized in the CFA are usually treated with prolonged balloon inflation; however, in more extensive dissections involving iliac arteries, self-expanding stents should be deployed. Iliofemoral thrombosis can be treated effectively with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) followed by prolonged balloon inflation or stent placement. Balloon angioplasty and CDT can occasionally be used to treat stenoses and occlusions complicating the use of percutaneous closure devices.

  20. Endovascular Treatment of Superior Vena Cava Syndrome via Balloon-in-Balloon Catheter Technique with a Palmaz Stent

    PubMed Central

    Almanfi, Abdelkader; Massumi, Mehran; Dougherty, Kathryn G.; Parekh, Dhaval R.; Strickman, Neil E.

    2016-01-01

    Superior vena cava syndrome is a well-known disease entity that carries substantial rates of morbidity and mortality. Although most cases of superior vena cava syndrome are secondary to a malignant process, additional causes (such as mediastinal fibrosis, pacemaker lead implantation, or central venous catheter placement) have been reported. Multiple treatment options include percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, stent implantation, thrombolysis, mechanical thrombectomy, and venous grafting. We present a case of superior vena cava syndrome in a symptomatic 30-year-old woman who obtained complete relief of obstruction and marked symptomatic improvement through venoplasty and stenting, aided by our use of a balloon-in-balloon catheter system. PMID:28100973

  1. Chronic deep venous obstruction: definition, prevalence, diagnosis, management.

    PubMed

    Neglén, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Ilio-caval venous obstruction has an important role in the expression of symptomatic chronic venous disease regardless of aetiology. The presence of obstruction has been more or less previously ignored and emphasis placed on reflux alone. Stenting of the ilio-femoral veins guided by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) can now be performed with low morbidity and mortality using appropriate technique. Current diagnostic modalities do not allow a definitive assessment of haemodynamically critical venous obstruction, which hampers selection of limbs for treatment. The diagnosis must be based on morphological studies (preferably IVUS) in patient selected with specific history, signs and symptoms. A high index of suspicion and generous use of morphological investigations are critical in the initial recognition of venous outflow obstruction. Stenting of the ilio-femoral vein appears to be durable with a substantial improvement in limb pain and swelling, high rate of ulcer healing, enhanced quality of life and decreased disability. The beneficial clinical outcome occurs regardless of the presence of remaining reflux, adjunct saphenous procedures or aetiology of obstruction.

  2. [Definition, classification and diagnosis of chronic venous insufficiency - part II].

    PubMed

    Kasperczak, Jarosław; Ropacka-Lesiak, Mariola; Breborowicz, H Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    medium is injected into the bottom of the uterus and its flow is observed, is a very rare test. A similar method is used in a selective phlebography of the ovarian vein and internal iliac vein. This examination is performed when there is a suspicion of connections between varicose veins of the inferior extremities and the pelvis, in case of the occluded iliac and femoral veins. However these tests are highly invasive, causing a lot of discomfort and are connected with numerous complications, particularly the development of venous thromboembolism. An invasive study but not exposing to the emission of ionizing radiation, is a measurement of the marching pressure (known also as ambulatory venous pressure - AVP). Ultrasound Doppler is the "gold standard" in the diagnosis of venous system. Color Doppler technique is irreplaceable due to its non-invasiveness, availability constantly improving of the ultrasound machines and is the method of choice in pregnancy Unfortunately clinical correlation of Doppler ultrasound and thrombosis is bad. Invasive methods, which include various types of phlebographies, have been reserved only for cases of very high diagnostic doubt.

  3. Fecal Impaction Causing Pelvic Venous Compression and Edema

    PubMed Central

    Naramore, Sara; Aziz, Faisal; Alexander, Chandran Paul; Methratta, Sosamma; Cilley, Robert; Rocourt, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Chronic constipation is a common condition which may result in fecal impaction. A 13-year-old male with chronic constipation and encopresis presented with fecal impaction for three weeks. The impaction caused abdominal pain, distension, encopresis, and decreased oral intake. He was found in severe distress with non-pitting edema of his feet and ankles along with perineal edema. The pedal edema worsened after receiving a fluid bolus, so concern arose for venous compression or a thrombus. A Duplex Ultrasound demonstrated changes in the venous waveforms of the bilateral external iliac and common femoral veins without thrombosis. Manual disimpaction and polyethylene glycol 3350 with electrolytes resolved the pedal and perineal edema. Four months later, he had soft bowel movements without recurrence of the edema. A repeat Duplex Ultrasound was normal. We present a child in whom severe fecal impaction caused pelvic venous compression resulting in bilateral pedal and perineal edema. PMID:26500749

  4. A Rare Case of Femoral Neuropathy Associated with Ilio-Psoas Bursitis After 10 Years of Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek; Shon, Won Yong; Lakhotia, Devendra; Kim, Jong Hoon; Kim, Tae Wan

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of femoral nerve palsy caused due to non-infective large iliopsoas bursitis after 10 years of cementless ceramic-on-metal THA. Bursectomy and exploration of femoral nerve were done to relieve the compressive symptoms of femoral nerve. Patient neurological symptoms were recovered within six months. Iliopsoas bursitis after THA can lead to anterior hip pain, lump in inguinal area or abdomen, limb swelling due to venous compression or more rarely neurovascular compressive symptoms depending on size and extension. Treating physician should be aware of this rare condition after THA in the absence of any radiographic findings so that prompt diagnosis and treatment can be carried out.

  5. Recanalization of Aged Venous Thrombotic Occlusions with the Aid of a Rheolytic System: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vicol, Calin; Dalichau, Harald

    1996-04-15

    Purpose: The suitability of a rheolytic system for recanalization of aged venous thrombotic occlusions was tested in an animal experiment. Methods: The system consists of a flush-suction catheter and a high-pressure liquid pump. Thrombosis was experimentally induced in 13 venous segments of 10 adult goats. Results: After a mean period of 12 days, a complete thrombectomy using the flush-suction system was achieved in 12 cases. No complications such as perforation or dissection were observed. Conclusion: This system seems to be an appropriate device for percutaneous transluminal venous thrombectomy, even in older occlusions.

  6. Peripheral Insertion of a Central Venous Access Device Under Fluoroscopic Guidance Using a Peripherally Accessed System (PAS) Port in the Forearm

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Yasuhiro; Morita, Sojiro; Morita, Yoshitaka; Awatani, Toshihide; Takasaki, Motohiro; Horimi, Tadashi; Ozawa, Zen

    1998-05-15

    Purpose: We describe the technique, efficacy, and complications of fluoroscopy-guided implantation of a central venous access device using a peripherally accessed system (PAS) port via the forearm. Methods: Beginning in July 1994, 105 central venous access devices were implanted in 104 patients for the long-term infusion of antibiotics or antineoplasmic agents, blood products, or parenteral nutrition. The devices was inserted under fluoroscopic guidance with real-time venography from a peripheral route. Results: All ports were successfully implanted. There were no procedure-related complications. No thrombosis or local infection was observed; however, in six patients catheter-related phlebitis occurred. Conclusion: Fluoroscopy-guided implantation of a central venous access device using a PAS port via the forearm is safe and efficacious, and injection of contrast medium through a peripheral IV catheter before introduction of the catheter helps to avoid catheter-related phlebitis.

  7. Prospective evaluation of femoral head viability following femoral neck fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, B.; Kroop, S.A.; Nepola, I.V.; Grantham, A.S.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-01-01

    The bone scans of 33 patients (pts) with recent subcapital fractures (fx) of the femur were evaluated prospectively to determine their value in predicting femoral head visability. Each of the 33 pts (ll men, 22 women, age range 30-92) had a pre-operative bone scan within 72 hrs of the fx (23 pts within 24 hrs). Anterior and posterior planar views of both hips and pinhole views (50% of pts) were obtained 2 hrs after administration of Tc-99m HDP. The femoral head was classified as perfused if it showed the same activity as the opposite normal side or if it showed only slightly decreased activity. Femoral heads showing absent activity were classified as nonperfused. Overall, 20 of the 33 pts showed a photopenic femoral head on the side of the fx. Only 2 pts showed increased activity at hte site of the fx. Internal fixation of the fx was performed in 23 pts, 12 of whom had one or more follow-up scans. Five of these 12 pts showed absent femoral head activity on their initial scan, but 2 showed later reperfusion. The other 7 pts showed good perfusion initially, with only 1 later showing decreased femoral head activity. The other 10 pts (7 of whom had absent femoral head activity) had immediate resection of the femoral head and insertion of a Cathcart prosthesis. The results suggest that femoral head activity seen on a bone scan in the immediate post-fx period is not always a reliable indicator of femoral head viability. Decreased femoral head activity may reflect, in part, compromised perfusion secondary to post-traumatic edema, with or without anatomic disruption of the blood supply.

  8. Laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia is mini-invasive and has confirmed effects. Femoral hernia could be repaired through the laparoscopic procedures for inguinal hernia. These procedures have clear anatomic view in the operation and preoperatively undiagnosed femoral hernia could be confirmed and treated. Lower recurrence ratio was reported in laparoscopic procedures compared with open procedures for repair of femoral hernia. The technical details of laparoscopic repair of femoral hernia, especially the differences to laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia are discussed in this article. PMID:27826574

  9. [Rotational stability of angiography catheters].

    PubMed

    Schröder, J; Weber, M

    1992-10-01

    Rotatory stability is a parameter that reflects the ability of a catheter to transmit a rotation applied at the outer end to the catheter tip for the purpose of selective probing. A method for measuring the rotatory stability is described, and the results of rotatory stability measurements of 70 different commercially available catheters are reported. There is an almost linear correlation between the rotatory stability and the difference between the respective fourth power of the external and internal diameter or, approximately, to the fourth power of the external diameter for catheters without wire reinforcement. With the same cross-sectional dimensions, the rotatory stability of teflon, polyethylene, and nylon catheters has an approximate ratio of 1:2:4. Wire reinforcement increases rotatory stability by an average factor of about 3. For catheters of calibers 5 F and 6 F, a correlation between the rotatory stability and the weight of the reinforcing wire mesh is apparent.

  10. Veno-Venous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (V V ECMO): Indications, Preprocedural Considerations, and Technique.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Aisha; Tanaka, Daizo; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C; Hirose, Hitoshi

    2016-04-01

    Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V V ECMO) has been used for refractory respiratory failure. We describe the indications, technical aspects, and outcomes of placing V V ECMO in adults using a dual-lumen, single-cannula catheter.

  11. [Thrombosis of the right atrium after umbilical venous catheterization. Favourable outcome after early thrombectomy].

    PubMed

    Paupe, A; Lenclen, R; Blanc, P; Chassevent, J; Hoenn, E; Molho, M; Zannier, D; Olivier-Martin, M

    1992-02-01

    A case of right atrial thrombosis after venous umbilical catheterization in a 21 day-old premature newborn is reported. The initiating factors of such an accident and its clinical signs are evocated. The authors emphasize the value of a systematic ultrasonographic supervision of newborns with central catheters for a long period of time and the value of surgical thrombectomy.

  12. [Prevalence of stenosis and thrombosis of central veins in hemodialysis after a tunneled jugular catheter].

    PubMed

    Jean, G; Vanel, T; Chazot, C; Charra, B; Terrat, J C; Hurot, J M

    2001-01-01

    Central venous stenosis (ST) and thrombosis (TB) related to catheter (KT) had been reported mostly for the subclavian vein. We performed a systematic cavographic study to evaluate the prevalence of these complications in 51 hemodialysis patients with present or previous history of tunneled internal jugular catheter. Each of them had used one or several KT (1.8 +/- 1.4 KT) for a mean 28 +/- 26 month cumulative time (i.e. 43,584 days total exposure time). Fifty percent of the KT were PermCath Quinton and 50% were Twincath (uncuffed) or CS 100 (cuffed) Medcomp. Twenty-seven had no ST (53%, group I), 24 had one or several significant ST (47%, group II) of superior Vena Cava (SVC, n = 4), inferior Vena Cava (IVC, n = 1), Brachio-cephalic Vein (BCV, n = 5) and subclavian vein (SC, n = 10), or a TB of SVC (n = 1), IVC (n = 3), BCV (n = 3), SC (n = 2). This accounts for an incidence of 0.55 ST or TB/1000 patient-days. Five of the twelve subclavian ST and TB had no history of previous subclavian catheter. Comparison between the two groups showed no differences according to age, time on dialysis, diabetes, hematocrit, CRP, cumulative time with catheter, catheter-related infections, type of catheter and anticoagulant treatment. IVC catheter tip's position is an important risk factor for TB and ST (4/6). Twelve group II patients had ST or TB-related symptoms, with a functional AV fistula in 9 cases. Eleven patients underwent repeated percutaneous angioplasty with 4 additional Wallstents and in 2 cases an AV fistula need to be closed. Central venous ST and TB after a jugular KT is extremely frequent, mostly without any symptoms. Consequences on peripheral or central vascular access, cost and poor long-term patency rate of angioplasty are of major importance. These results incite us to further reduce the catheter use in dialysis patients.

  13. Injection From Side Holes on a Generic Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foust, Jason; Rockwell, Donald

    2006-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC), typically positioned within the superior vena cava (SVC), play an important role in the process of hemodialysis. Simultaneous extraction and injection of blood typically occur through one or more side holes at the catheter tip. High-image-density particle image velocimetry is employed, in conjunction with a scaled-up water facility, to characterize the structure of single and multiple jets. The injection jets that penetrate the steady crossflow generate complex, but deterministic, flow patterns. Significant interaction between multiple jets generates flow features that are more pronounced than those of a single jet, including increased jet penetration and elevated levels of turbulent shear stresses. In addition, the effects of a pulsatile throughflow on the structure of an isolated, single jet are determined as a function of phase of the systole-diastole cycle, corresponding to actual blood flow in a normal adult.

  14. Central venous catheterization: a prospective, randomized, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Mer, Mervyn; Duse, Adriano Gianmaria; Galpin, Jacqueline Suzanne; Richards, Guy Antony

    2009-02-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are extensively used worldwide. Mechanical, infectious and thrombotic complications are well described with their use and may be associated with prolonged hospitalization, increased medical costs and mortality. CVCs account for an estimated 90% of all catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) and a host of risk factors for CVC-related infections have been documented. The duration of use of CVCs remains controversial and the length of time such devices can safely be left in place has not been fully and objectively addressed in the critically ill patient. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters have been introduced in an attempt to limit catheter-related infection (CRI) and increase the time that CVCs can safely be left in situ. Recent meta-analyses concluded that antimicrobial-impregnated CVCs appear to be effective in reducing CRI. The authors conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind study at Johannesburg Hospital over a 4-year period. The study entailed a comparison of standard triple-lumen versus antimicrobial impregnated CVCs on the rate of CRI. Our aim was to determine whether we could safely increase the duration of catheter insertion time from our standard practice of seven days to 14 days, to assess the influence of the antimicrobial impregnated catheter on the incidence of CRI, and to elucidate the epidemiology and risks of CRI. One hundred and eighteen critically ill patients were included in the study which spanned 34 951.5 catheter hours (3.99 catheter years). It was found that antimicrobial catheters did not provide any significant benefit over standard catheters, which the authors feel can safely be left in place for up to 14 days with appropriate infection control measures. The most common source of CRI was the skin. The administration of parenteral nutrition and the site of catheter insertion (internal jugular vein vs subclavian vein) were not noted to be risk factors for CRI. There was no clinical evidence

  15. Effect of External Pressure and Catheter Gauge on Flow Rate, Kinetic Energy, and Endothelial Injury During Intravenous Fluid Administration in a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mei-Hua; Chan, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yao-Chang; Cherng, Chen-Hwan; Lin, Chih-Kung; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Chou, Yu-Ching; Huang, Go-Shine

    2016-01-01

    The effects of intravenous (IV) catheter gauge and pressurization of IV fluid (IVF) bags on fluid flow rate have been studied. However, the pressure needed to achieve a flow rate equivalent to that of a 16 gauge (G) catheter through smaller G catheters and the potential for endothelial damage from the increased kinetic energy produced by higher pressurization are unclear. Constant pressure on an IVF bag was maintained by an automatic adjustable pneumatic pressure regulator of our own design. Fluids running through 16 G, 18 G, 20 G, and 22 G catheters were assessed while using IV bag pressurization to achieve the flow rate equivalent to that of a 16 G catheter. We assessed flow rates, kinetic energy, and flow injury to rabbit inferior vena cava endothelium. By applying sufficient external constant pressure to an IVF bag, all fluids could be run through smaller (G) catheters at the flow rate in a 16 G catheter. However, the kinetic energy increased significantly as the catheter G increased. Damage to the venous endothelium was negligible or minimal/patchy cell loss. We designed a new rapid infusion system, which provides a constant pressure that compresses the fluid volume until it is free from visible residual fluid. When large-bore venous access cannot be obtained, multiple smaller catheters, external pressure, or both should be considered. However, caution should be exercised when fluid pressurized to reach a flow rate equivalent to that in a 16 G catheter is run through a smaller G catheter because of the profound increase in kinetic energy that can lead to venous endothelium injury.

  16. Effect of Catheter Dwell Time on Risk of Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Rachel G.; Cochran, Keith M.; Smith, P. Brian; Edson, Barbara S.; Schulman, Joseph; Lee, Henry C.; Govindaswami, Balaji; Pantoja, Alfonso; Hardy, Doug; Curran, John; Lin, Della; Kuo, Sheree; Noguchi, Akihiko; Ittmann, Patricia; Duncan, Scott; Gupta, Munish; Picarillo, Alan; Karna, Padmani; Cohen, Morris; Giuliano, Michael; Carroll, Sheri; Page, Brandi; Guzman-Cottrill, Judith; Walker, M. Whit; Garland, Jeff; Ancona, Janice K.; Ellsbury, Dan L.; Laughon, Matthew M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Central venous catheters in the NICU are associated with significant morbidity and mortality because of the risk of central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of catheter dwell time on risk of CLABSI. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of 13 327 infants with 15 567 catheters (93% peripherally inserted central catheters [PICCs], 7% tunneled catheters) and 256 088 catheter days cared for in 141 NICUs. CLABSI was defined using National Health Surveillance Network criteria. We defined dwell time as the number of days from line insertion until either line removal or day of CLABSI. We generated survival curves for each week of dwell time and estimated hazard ratios for CLABSI at each week by using a Cox proportional hazards frailty model. We controlled for postmenstrual age and year, included facility as a random effect, and generated separate models by line type. RESULTS: Median postmenstrual age was 29 weeks (interquartile range 26–33). The overall incidence of CLABSI was 0.93 per 1000 catheter days. Increased dwell time was not associated with increased risk of CLABSI for PICCs. For tunneled catheters, infection incidence was significantly higher in weeks 7 and 9 compared with week 1. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should not routinely replace uninfected PICCs for fear of infection but should consider removing tunneled catheters before week 7 if no longer needed. Additional studies are needed to determine what daily maintenance practices may be associated with decreased risk of infection, especially for tunneled catheters. PMID:26574587

  17. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks

  18. Crossing professional boundaries: nurse-led catheter insertion.

    PubMed

    Linda, Kelly

    2009-10-01

    The steady expansion of nursing roles is enabling staff to perform tasks traditionally undertaken by doctors. This change is perceived as being in the interests of patients, particularly because it can reduce waiting times, but it can also increase job satisfaction and enhance opportunities for the recruitment and retention of staff. This article describes the establishment of a nurse-led service for tunnelled central venous catheter insertion for renal dialysis. The result of a retrospective audit describes what impact this service has had.

  19. Selection of empiric therapy in patients with catheter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Baño, J

    2002-05-01

    Catheter-related infections (CRI) are frequent and manifest in a wide range of clinical situations. A rational approach is necessary for the adequate management of these infections. Whenever a CRI is suspected, two main questions have to be addressed: whether to remove the catheter and whether to initiate empiric antimicrobial treatment. As the clinical diagnosis of CRI has a low specificity, the catheter should be removed only in circumstances such as severe or ongoing sepsis, persistent bacteremia, pulmonary or peripheral embolization, endocarditis, signs of tunnel infection, when the catheters or when the CRI is caused by fungi, Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa are easy to replace among others. Exchanging the catheter through a guidewire is a frequent practice but is not recommended by some authors. Empiric antimicrobial treatment should be administered in any of the following situations: when the catheter is not removed, in the case of central venous or surgically implanted catheters and prosthetic implants, in the presence of severe sepsis, neutropenia or other immunodepressed status, suppurative phlebitis, embolization and acute endocarditis. Empriic antimicrobial treatment should include a glycopeptide (vancomycin or teicoplanin) as staphylococci are the most frequent cause of CRI. Adding an antipseudomonal agent, such as amikacin, aztreonam, ceftazidime, cefepime, piperacillin/tazobactam, or a carbapenem (depending on the local antimicrobial susceptibility data or antibiotic policy) is necessary in cases of neutropenia, burn patients, severe sepsis, or suspicion of contaminated infusate. Empiric treatment against Candida is not initially necessary in most cases. Empiric treatment should be replaced by specific therapy whenever possible.

  20. Indwelling catheters and medical implants with FXIIIa inhibitors: A novel approach to the treatment of catheter and medical device-related infections.

    PubMed

    Daneshpour, Nooshin; Collighan, Russell; Perrie, Yvonne; Lambert, Peter; Rathbone, Dan; Lowry, Deborah; Griffin, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are being utilized with increasing frequency in intensive care and general medical wards. In spite of the extensive experience gained in their application, CVCs are related to the long-term risks of catheter sheath formation, infection, and thrombosis (of the catheter or vessel itself) during catheterization. Such CVC-related-complications are associated with increased morbidity, mortality, duration of hospitalization, and medical care cost [1]. The present study incorporates a novel group of Factor XIIIa (FXIIIa, plasma transglutaminase) inhibitors into a lubricious silicone elastomer in order to generate an optimized drug delivery system whereby a secondary sustained drug release profile occurs following an initial burst release for catheters and other medical devices. We propose that the incorporation of FXIIIa inhibitors into catheters, stents, and other medical implant devices would reduce the incidence of catheter sheath formation, thrombotic occlusion, and associated staphylococcal infection. This technique could be used as a local delivery system for extended release with an immediate onset of action for other poorly aqueous soluble compounds.