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Sample records for femoroacetabular impingement arthroscopic

  1. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Polesello, Giancarlo C.; Queiroz, Marcelo C.; Ono, Nelson K.; Honda, Emerson K.; Guimarāes, Rodrigo P; Junior, Walter Ricioli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the short-term follow-up results of arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Our hypothesis is that arthroscopic treatment results are favorable. Methods: Between August 2003 and August 2007, 28 hips had femoroacetabular impingement treated by hip arthroscopy. The mean age was 34 years, with mean follow-up period of 27 months. Clinical results were graded with the modified Harris hip score, which was measured pre- and postoperatively. Patients had also their internal rotation analyzed. These parameters were calculated by using Wilcoxon's t test for analysis of nonparametric paired samples performed. Results: The mean preoperative Harris Hip Score was 54.2, improving to 94.8 postoperatively (p<0,001). The mean increase was 37.5 points. We had 4 good results (15%) and 24 excellent results (85%). Preoperatively, the patients had a mean internal rotation of 17°, and, postoperatively, 36°. The average internal rotation increase was 19° (p<0,001). Conclusions: The arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement presents satisfactory results. PMID:27004177

  2. Arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement: early outcomes.

    PubMed

    Polat, Gökhan; Dikmen, Göksel; Erdil, Mehmet; Aşık, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the early outcomes of the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Forty-two femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) patients (mean age: 35.1 years, range: 16 to 52 years) treated arthroscopically between 2006 and 2011 in our clinic were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-five patients had Cam, 6 Pincer and 11 combined femoroacetabular impingement. Mean follow-up time was 28.2 (range: 10 to 72) months. Patients were assessed clinically and functionally using the Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS), modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Oxford Hip Score, WOMAC score, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain scores preoperatively and at the final follow-up. In clinical and functional assessments, there were increases of 24.8 points in mean NAHS, 23.3 in mHHS, 20.6 in WOMAC score and 9.6 in Oxford Hip Score. VAS pain score decreased by 4.9 points in comparison to the preoperative scores. There were no major complications. However, transient pudendal nerve neuropraxia was present in two patients, transient lateral femoral cutaneous nerve neuropraxia in one and asymptomatic heterotopic ossification in one patient. Short-term clinical results of the arthroscopic treatment of the FAI appear to be satisfactory.

  3. Rehabilitation after arthroscopic decompression for femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Enseki, Keelan R; Martin, Robroy; Kelly, Bryan T

    2010-04-01

    The use of arthroscopic technology to address pathologic conditions of the hip joint has become a topic of growing interest in the orthopedic community. Addressing femoroacetabular impingement through this method has generated additional attention. As surgical options evolve, rehabilitation protocols must meet the challenge of providing a safe avenue of recovery, yet meeting the goal of returning to high levels of functioning. Current rehabilitation concepts should be based on the growing body of evidence, knowledge of tissue healing properties, and clinical experience. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Open and Arthroscopic Surgical Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Frank, Rachel M.; Pulido, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common cause of hip pain, and when indicated, can be successfully managed through open surgery or hip arthroscopy. The goal of this review is to describe the different approaches to the surgical treatment of FAI. We present the indications, surgical technique, rehabilitation, and complications associated with (1) open hip dislocation, (2) reverse periacetabular osteotomy, (3) the direct anterior “mini-open” approach, and (4) arthroscopic surgery for FAI. PMID:26697431

  5. The pathoanatomy and arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    Tibor, L. M.; Leunig, M.

    2012-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) causes pain and chondrolabral damage via mechanical overload during movement of the hip. It is caused by many different types of pathoanatomy, including the cam ‘bump’, decreased head–neck offset, acetabular retroversion, global acetabular overcoverage, prominent anterior–inferior iliac spine, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, and the sequelae of childhood Perthes’ disease. Both evolutionary and developmental factors may cause FAI. Prevalence studies show that anatomic variations that cause FAI are common in the asymptomatic population. Young athletes may be predisposed to FAI because of the stress on the physis during development. Other factors, including the soft tissues, may also influence symptoms and chondrolabral damage. FAI and the resultant chondrolabral pathology are often treated arthroscopically. Although the results are favourable, morphologies can be complex, patient expectations are high and the surgery is challenging. The long-term outcomes of hip arthroscopy are still forthcoming and it is unknown if treatment of FAI will prevent arthrosis. PMID:23610655

  6. Femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Volpon, José Batista

    2016-01-01

    The femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is as condition recently characterized that results from the abnormal anatomic and functional relation between the proximal femur and the acetabular border, associated with repetitive movements, which lead labrum and acetabular cartilage injuries. Such alterations result from anatomical variations such as acetabular retroversion or decrease of the femoroacetabular offset. In addition, FAI may result from acquired conditions as malunited femoral neck fractures, or retroverted acetabulum after pelvic osteotomies. These anomalies lead to pathological femoroacetabular contact, which in turn create impact and shear forces during hip movements. As a result, there is early labrum injury and acetabulum cartilage degeneration. The diagnosis is based on the typical clinical findings and images. Treatment is based on the correction of the anatomic anomalies, labrum debridement or repair, and degenerate articular cartilage removal. However, the natural evolution of the condition, as well as the outcome from long-term treatment, demand a better understanding, mainly in the asymptomatic individuals.

  7. Femur-mounted navigation system for the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. H.; Hwang, D. S.; Yoon, Y. S.

    2013-07-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement stems from an abnormal shape of the acetabulum and proximal femur. It is treated by resection of damaged soft tissue and by the shaping of bone to resemble normal features. The arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement has many advantages, including minimal incisions, rapid recovery, and less pain. However, in some cases, revision is needed owing to the insufficient resection of damaged bone from a misreading of the surgical site. The limited view of arthroscopy is the major reason for the complications. In this research, a navigation method for the arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement is developed. The proposed navigation system consists of femur attachable measurement device and user interface. The bone mounted measurement devices measure points on head-neck junction for registration and position of surgical instrument. User interface shows the three-dimensional model of patient's femur and surgical instrument position that is tracked by measurement device. Surgeon can know the three-dimensional anatomical structure of hip joint and surgical instrument position on surgical site using navigation system. Surface registration was used to obtain relation between patient's coordinate at the surgical site and coordinate of three-dimensional model of femur. In this research, we evaluated the proposed navigation system using plastic model bone. It is expected that the surgical tool tracking position accuracy will be less than 1 mm.

  8. Creating and Closing the T-Capsulotomy for Improved Visualization During Arthroscopic Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Reardon, Patrick J.; Levy, Bruce A.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of femoroacetabular impingement through an arthroscopic approach has gained widespread popularity in recent years. Although outcomes are generally favorable, one of the most common reasons for failure is incomplete resection of cam lesions of the femoral neck. As a result, the T-capsulotomy has been introduced as a method for improving access to the femoral head-neck junction, which is not always visible through a standard interportal capsulotomy. The T-capsulotomy has the benefits of improving arthroscopic visualization of the femoral neck, reducing overall fluoroscopy exposure for the patient and surgeon, and facilitating capsular plication. We present a reliable and efficient method for creating and repairing the T-capsulotomy. We routinely perform this technique in patients with cam lesions that are too large or too distal to safely visualize and decompress through an interportal capsulotomy. PMID:26870654

  9. Femoroacetabular Impingement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    or pincer type impingement. On conventional radiographs, prominence of the anterolateral femoral head-neck junction, a “pistol grip deformity,” and...morphologic abnormalities of the hip. There are two types of FAI, termed cam impingement and pincer impingement, which have distinct imaging...to several different morphologic abnormalities of the hip. There are two types of FAI, termed cam impingement and pincer impingement. Though each

  10. Hip impingement: beyond femoroacetabular

    PubMed Central

    Bardakos, Nikolaos V.

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, femoroacetabular impingement has been at the forefront of clinical practice as a cause of hip pain in young adults. As arthroscopic techniques for the hip continue to evolve, the possible presence of a new group of conditions creating mechanical conflict in and around the hip joint (ischiofemoral, subspine and iliopsoas impingement) has recently been elucidated whilst interest in already known ‘impingement’ syndromes (pelvic-trochanteric and pectineofoveal impingement) is now revived. This article attempts to increase awareness of these relatively uncommon clinical entities by describing their pathomorphology, contact mechanics, treatment and published results available to present. It is hoped that such knowledge will diversify therapeutic options for the clinician, thereby improving outcomes in a small but not negligible portion of patients with previously unexplained persistent symptoms. PMID:27011843

  11. Improved Squat and Gait Biomechanics 6-Months Post-Arthroscopic Surgery for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Cvetanovich, Gregory; Farkas, Gary Jordan; Rajan, Kumar; Espinoza, Alejandro; Nho, Shane Jay

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess gait and squat biomechanics 6-months following arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement. Methods: Symptomatic patients with clinical and radiographic diagnosis of FAI who had failed non-operative treatment underwent gait and squat analysis preoperatively and at 6-months postoperatively following arthroscopic surgery for FAI. Age- and BMI-matched controls without radiographic FAI or other lumbar or lower extremity pathology underwent a single analysis for comparison. Comparisons between preoperative and 6-month postoperative gait and squat parameters as well as comparison to the control group were performed using paired and independent sample t-tests. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Results: Fifteen FAI patients and 9 controls were analyzed. Age for the patients vs. controls was 28.7±9.6 y vs. 27.8±6.5 y (p>0.05), respectively; while BMI was 23.5±5.1 kg/m2 vs. 22.8±3.5 kg/m2 (p>0.05). All gait parameters were unchanged between preoperative and 6-month postoperative testing (p>0.05), with a trend toward significance for hip external rotation moment (p=0.056) (Table 1). Squat testing revealed that FAI arthroscopic surgery increased maximum hip extension (p=0.011), with a trend toward significance for hip adduction moment (p=0.059). All other squat parameters did not differ from preoperative to 6-month follow-up (p>0.05). Compared to the control group, preoperative FAI patients had reduced hip external rotation moment during gait (p=0.024), with a trend toward significance for hip abduction moment (p=0.082). No other gait or squat differences were detected between FAI patients preoperatively or 6-months postoperatively compared to controls (p>0.05). Conclusion: Biomechanical gait and squat analysis at 6-month follow-up from arthroscopic FAI surgery revealed a tendency to improve external hip rotation during gait and maximum hip extension and hip adduction during squat. Arthroscopic surgery for FAI may

  12. Gluteus maximus contraction velocity assessed by tensiomyography improves following arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Seijas, Roberto; Marín, Miguel; Rivera, Eila; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Barastegui, David; Álvarez-Díaz, Pedro; Cugat, Ramón

    2017-05-13

    Muscular impairment, particularly for the gluteus maximus (GM), has been observed in femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensiomyographic changes of the GM, rectus femoris (RF) and adductor longus (AL) before and after arthroscopic surgery for FAI. It was hypothesized that arthroscopic treatment of FAI would improve the preoperative muscular impairment. All patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of FAI between January and July 2015 were approached for eligibility. Patients included had a tensiomyography (TMG) evaluation including maximal displacement (Dm) and contraction time (Tc) of these muscles in both lower extremities. TMG values between the injured and healthy sides were compared at the preoperative and post-operative (3, 6 and 12 months after surgery) periods. There were no significant differences for the RF and AL, and Dm of the GM for any of the comparisons (n.s.). However, GM Tc was significantly lower at 3 (p = 0.016), 6 (p = 0.008), and 12 (p = 0.049) months after surgery in the injured side compared to preoperatively. GM Tc of the healthy side was significantly lower than the injured side at the preoperative period (p = 0.004) and at 3 (p = 0.024) and 6 (p = 0.028) months after surgery, but these significant differences were no longer observed at 12 months after surgery (n.s.). There was a significant reduction of pain in the GM area at 1 year after surgery compared to preoperatively (p < 0.0001). Arthroscopic treatment of FAI and the subsequent rehabilitation improves contraction velocity of the GM of the injured side. Despite Tc is elevated in the GM of the injured compared to the healthy side preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months after surgery, differences in Tc between both sides are no longer significant at 12 months. Athletes with FAI participating in sports with great involvement of GM may benefit from arthroscopic treatment and its subsequent rehabilitation. TMG can be used as

  13. Return-to-play rates following arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement in competitive baseball players.

    PubMed

    Degen, Ryan M; Fields, Kara G; Wentzel, C Sally; Bartscherer, Bethanne; Ranawat, Anil S; Coleman, Struan H; Kelly, Bryan T

    2016-11-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has been increasingly recognized in cutting sports including soccer, hockey and football. More recently, the prevalence among overhead athletes has also been recognized. The purpose of this study was to review impingement patterns, return-to-play rates and clinical outcome following arthroscopic treatment of FAI among high-level baseball players. Between 2010 and 2014, 70 competitive baseball players (86 hips; age 22.4 ± 4.5 years) were identified. Demographics and return-to-play rates were recorded. Patient-reported outcome scores, including the Modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), the Hip Outcome Score-Activity of Daily Living (HOS-ADL), the Sport-specific Subscale (HOS-SSS), and the International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-33), were collected pre-operatively at 6 months and 1year (n = 34, 49% of cohort). The cohort included professional (27.1%), college (57.1%), high-school (8.6%) and club-team athletes (7.1%). Infielder (37.5%), pitcher (22.9%) and catcher (16.7%) were the most common positions. Average follow-up was 16.8 months (range 12.1-34.2). There was no relationship between playing position and impingement pattern (p ≥ 0.459), or between symptom laterality and handedness, batting position or playing position (p ≥ 0.179). One patient required revision surgery (infection). Return to sport rate was 88%, at a mean of 8.6 ± 4.2 months, with 97.7% returning at/above their pre-injury level of play. There was significant improvement in all outcome measures: mHHS (60.1 ± 11.9 to 93 ± 9.5), HOS-ADL (71.3 ± 16.7 to 96.3 ± 3.6), HOS-SSS (51.3 ± 24.8 to 92.3 ± 8.2) and iHOT-33 (40.7 ± 19.9 to 85.9 ± 14) (p < 0.001). Arthroscopic treatment of FAI in competitive baseball players resulted in high return-to-play rates at short-term follow-up, with significant improvements in clinical outcome scores.

  14. Factors associated with the failure of arthroscopic surgery treatment in patients with femoroacetabular impingement: A cohort study.

    PubMed

    Martínez, D; Gómez-Hoyos, J; Márquez, W; Gallo, J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of the anatomical and functional characteristics with therapeutic failure in patients with femoroacetabular impingement, who underwent hip arthroscopy. A cohort study was performed on 179 patients with femoroacetabular impingement who underwent hip arthroscopy between 2004 and 2012. The demographic, anatomical, functional, and clinical information were recorded. A logistic regression model and ANCOVA were used in order to compare the described characteristics with the treatment outcomes of the hip arthroscopy. The median time of follow-up for symptoms was 13 months (8-30), and the mean time of follow-up after surgery was 23.83 ± 9.8 months. At the end of the follow-up 3.91% of the patients were considered as a therapeutic failure. The WOMAC score in pain and functional branches, as well as the total WOMAC score, showed significant differences (P<.05). The mean WOMAC score was higher (0 to 100 with 0 being a perfect score) in the group of patients who failed after surgery as compared with the group who meet the requirements for a successful treatment, 65.9 vs 48.8, respectively (mean difference 17.0; 95% CI; 1.3-32.6; P=.033). The poor functional state prior to arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement, mainly due to preoperative pain, assessed using the WOMAC scale, is associated with a higher therapeutic failure rate. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Arthroscopic treatment of femoroacetabular impingement in patients older than 60 years

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Via, Alessio Giai; Rivera, Alvaro; Tomic, Alexander; Somarriva, Marcelo; Wainer, Mauricio; Camacho, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The indications of hip arthroscopy increased over the past decade. Although mostly recommended for treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in young patients, well-selected older patients (> 60 years old) may benefit from this surgery. However, the role of hip arthroscopy for the management of older patients is controversial. The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical outcomes of a series of patients aged 60 years and older who underwent hip arthroscopy for FAI at mid-term follow-up. Materials and methods Sixty-year-old patients and older, with a joint space greater than 2 mm, and a grade I and II hip osteoarthrosis (OA) according Tönnis scale were included into the study. Twenty-three patients (28 hips) met the inclusion criteria. The T-Student test was used to detect for differences between variables (p<0.05). Results The mean age of the patients was 63.4 years, and the mean follow-up was 4.4 years (2–9 years). We found an improvement in mHHS and VAS score from the baseline to the final follow-up in 87% of patients (p<0.05). Three patients (13%) were submitted to a THA at a mean of 12 months, while the survivorship rate at the final follow-up was 75%. No major complications have been reported. Conclusion Arthroscopic treatment of FAI in patients over 60 years old, with no signs of advanced osteoarthrosis, showed a significant improvement of functional score and pain in most of cases, and it can be consider a reasonable option in well selected patients. Level of evidence: IV case series. PMID:28066746

  16. New perspectives on femoroacetabular impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khan, Moin; Bedi, Asheesh; Fu, Freddie; Karlsson, Jon; Ayeni, Olufemi R; Bhandari, Mohit

    2016-05-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is characterized by an abnormality in the shape of the femoral head-neck or acetabulum that results in impingement between these two structures. Arthroscopic treatment has become the preferred method of management of FAI owing to its minimally invasive approach. Surgical correction involves resection of impinging osseous structures as well as concurrent management of the associated chondral and labral pathology. Research from the past 5 years has shown that repair of the labrum results in a better anatomic correction and improved outcomes compared with labral debridement. Research is underway to improve cartilage assessment by using innovative imaging techniques and biochemical tests to inform predictions of prognosis. Several ongoing randomized controlled trials, including the Femoroacetabular Impingement Trial (FAIT) and the Femoroacetabular Impingement Randomized Controlled Trial (FIRST), will provide critical information regarding the diagnosis, management and prognosis of patients undergoing arthroscopic management of FAI.

  17. Arthroscopic treatment of pincer-type femoroacetabular impingement performing acetabuloplasty without labral detachment

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Fernando; Slullitel, Pablo; Bronenberg, Pedro; Buttaro, Martin; Zanotti, Gerardo; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: In order to access and resect the acetabular rim, arthroscopic acetabuloplasty was described with labral detachment. However, when the chondrolabral junction remains intact, acetabuloplasty and labral refixation can be performed maintaining an unharmed labrum. We aimed to evaluate the outcome of a group of patients treated with arthroscopic acetabuloplasty without labral detachment. Methods: During the study period, we retrospectively analyzed 44 patients with pincer-type o combined impingement and an intact chondroblabral junction, with an average followup of 32 months (range: 27-38). We excluded patients with CAM-type impingement and previous hip pathology. Radiographs were analyzed to define impingement and classify grade of osteoarthritis. Clinical evaluation consisted of preoperative and postoperative modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) and WOMAC as well as postoperative Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) of pain and satisfaction. Reoperations were considered surgical failures for purposes of survival analysis.. Results: Mean preoperative anterior and lateral center-edge angles were 35º and 29º, respectively. Mean preoperative alfa angle was 52º. Crossover sign was found in 82% of cases. mHHS changed from 51.06 (SD 4.81) preoperatively to 84.97 (SD 12.79) postoperatively. Preoperative WOMAC was 29.18 (SD 8) and postoperative, 13.10 (SD 11). Postoperative VAS was 7.5 and 2.27 for satisfaction and pain, respectively. When comparing patients with Tönnis 0 to those with Tönnis 1, the former showed better results regarding postoperative mHHS (89.9s vs 77.85, p=0.03), pain VAS (1.5 vs 6.3, p=0.03) and satisfaction VAS (8.2 vs 6.3, p=0.01). Postoperative WOMAC was slightly better for Tönnis 0 patients (8.31 vs 19.3, p=0.05). No differences were found in preoperative WOMAC and mHHS. Three of 44 patients required a second surgical procedure and were considered failures. Survival was 100% at 24 months and 76% at 40 months (95%CI: 35%-98%). Conclusion

  18. Efficacy of a physiotherapy rehabilitation program for individuals undergoing arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement – the FAIR trial: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Femoroacetabular impingement is a common cause of hip/groin symptoms and impaired functional performance in younger sporting populations and results from morphological abnormalities of the hip in which the proximal femur abuts against the acetabular rim. Many people with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement undergo arthroscopic hip surgery to correct the bony abnormalities. While many case series over the past decade have reported favourable surgical outcomes, it is not known whether formal rehabilitation is needed as part of the management of patients undergoing this surgical procedure. This randomised controlled trial will investigate the efficacy of a progressive physiotherapist-supervised rehabilitation program (Takla-O’Donnell Protocol) in improving health-related quality of life, physical function and symptoms in individuals undergoing arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement. Methods/design 100 people aged 16–35 years undergoing hip arthroscopy for symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement will be recruited from surgical practices in Melbourne, Australia and randomly allocated to either a physiotherapy or control group. Both groups will receive written information and one standardised post-operative physiotherapy visit whilst in hospital as per usual care. Those in the physiotherapy group will also receive seven individual 30-minute physiotherapy sessions, including one pre-operative visit (within 2 weeks of surgery) and six post-operative visits at fortnightly intervals (commencing two weeks after surgery). The physiotherapy intervention will incorporate education and advice, manual techniques and prescription of a progressive rehabilitation program including home, aquatic and gym exercises. The control group will not receive additional physiotherapy management. Measurements will be taken at baseline (2 weeks pre-operatively) and at 14 and 24 weeks post-surgery. Primary outcomes are the International Hip Outcome Tool and

  19. The Horsens-Aarhus Femoro Acetabular Impingement (HAFAI) cohort: outcome of arthroscopic treatment for femoroacetabular impingement. Protocol for a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kierkegaard, Signe; Lund, Bent; Dalgas, Ulrik; Sørensen, Henrik; Søballe, Kjeld; Mechlenburg, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Introduction During the past decade, it has become increasingly more common to offer hip arthroscopic surgery when treating people with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Nevertheless, the latest reviews conclude that it still remains to be properly investigated how surgery affects the patients. Specifically, detailed information on the functional, muscular and mechanical impact of surgery in larger groups is lacking. Furthermore, the long-term outcome of the surgery is still to be investigated. Methods and analysis In this prospective cohort study, a total of 60 patients with FAI scheduled for arthroscopic surgery will be followed and tested preoperatively, and again after 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Assessment includes isokinetic dynamometry evaluating hip flexion and extension; evaluation of functional capacity in a three-dimensional motion laboratory; pain assessment; self-reported function, quality of life, expectation and satisfaction with the surgery; recording of previous and present sporting activities and accelerometry. In addition, data on surgical procedure, rehabilitation progress, adverse events and failure will be recorded. Patients will be compared with an age-matched and gender-matched reference group of 30 persons with no hip, knee, ankle or back problems. Long-term follow-up of this cohort may evaluate possible reoperations and development of hip osteoarthritis. Furthermore, analysis on how subgroups respond to the treatment could be performed together with identification of possible “non-responders”. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Central Denmark Region Committee on Biomedical Research Ethics (Journal No 1-10-72-239-14). The results from this study will be presented at national and international congresses and published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number NCT02306525. PMID:26346877

  20. The Horsens-Aarhus Femoro Acetabular Impingement (HAFAI) cohort: outcome of arthroscopic treatment for femoroacetabular impingement. Protocol for a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, Signe; Lund, Bent; Dalgas, Ulrik; Sørensen, Henrik; Søballe, Kjeld; Mechlenburg, Inger

    2015-09-07

    During the past decade, it has become increasingly more common to offer hip arthroscopic surgery when treating people with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Nevertheless, the latest reviews conclude that it still remains to be properly investigated how surgery affects the patients. Specifically, detailed information on the functional, muscular and mechanical impact of surgery in larger groups is lacking. Furthermore, the long-term outcome of the surgery is still to be investigated. In this prospective cohort study, a total of 60 patients with FAI scheduled for arthroscopic surgery will be followed and tested preoperatively, and again after 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Assessment includes isokinetic dynamometry evaluating hip flexion and extension; evaluation of functional capacity in a three-dimensional motion laboratory; pain assessment; self-reported function, quality of life, expectation and satisfaction with the surgery; recording of previous and present sporting activities and accelerometry. In addition, data on surgical procedure, rehabilitation progress, adverse events and failure will be recorded. Patients will be compared with an age-matched and gender-matched reference group of 30 persons with no hip, knee, ankle or back problems. Long-term follow-up of this cohort may evaluate possible reoperations and development of hip osteoarthritis. Furthermore, analysis on how subgroups respond to the treatment could be performed together with identification of possible "non-responders". The study is approved by the Central Denmark Region Committee on Biomedical Research Ethics (Journal No 1-10-72-239-14). The results from this study will be presented at national and international congresses and published in peer-reviewed journals. NCT02306525. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAI. Because athletically active people may work the hip joint more vigorously, they may begin to experience pain ... the impingement can prevent future damage to the hip joint. However, not all of the damage can be ...

  2. Protocol for a multicentre, parallel-arm, 12-month, randomised, controlled trial of arthroscopic surgery versus conservative care for femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FASHIoN)

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, D R; Dickenson, E J; Wall, P D H; Donovan, J L; Foster, N E; Hutchinson, C E; Parsons, N; Petrou, S; Realpe, A; Achten, J; Achana, F; Adams, A; Costa, M L; Griffin, J; Hobson, R; Smith, J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome is a recognised cause of young adult hip pain. There has been a large increase in the number of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for FAI; however, a recent Cochrane review highlighted that there are no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating treatment effectiveness. We aim to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic surgery versus best conservative care for patients with FAI syndrome. Methods We will conduct a multicentre, pragmatic, assessor-blinded, two parallel arm, RCT comparing arthroscopic surgery to physiotherapy-led best conservative care. 24 hospitals treating NHS patients will recruit 344 patients over a 26-month recruitment period. Symptomatic adults with radiographic signs of FAI morphology who are considered suitable for arthroscopic surgery by their surgeon will be eligible. Patients will be excluded if they have radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis, previous significant hip pathology or previous shape changing surgery. Participants will be allocated in a ratio of 1:1 to receive arthroscopic surgery or conservative care. Recruitment will be monitored and supported by qualitative intervention to optimise informed consent and recruitment. The primary outcome will be pain and function assessed by the international hip outcome tool 33 (iHOT-33) measured 1-year following randomisation. Secondary outcomes include general health (short form 12), quality of life (EQ5D-5L) and patient satisfaction. The primary analysis will compare change in pain and function (iHOT-33) at 12 months between the treatment groups, on an intention-to-treat basis, presented as the mean difference between the trial groups with 95% CIs. The study is funded by the Health Technology Assessment Programme (13/103/02). Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is granted by the Edgbaston Research Ethics committee (14/WM/0124). The results will be disseminated through open access peer

  3. Treatment of pincer-type femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    SABETTA, ETTORE; SCARAVELLA, EDOARDO

    2015-01-01

    Pincer femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) consists of pathological contact between the acetabular labrum and rim and the femoral head-neck junction. Manifold conditions underlie pincer FAI: anatomical abnormalities, malorientation of the acetabulum, torsional abnormalities of the neck and femoral shaft (these defects can be constitutional, post-traumatic or post-surgical), and involvement in sports characterized by repeated and sudden maximum joint excursions. In a high percentage of cases, pincer FAI is associated with cam FAI. The aims of surgical treatment of pincer FAI are to eliminate the cause of the contact and repair the joint damage; the surgery may be open or arthroscopic, performed with an articular or extra-articular approach. Recently, arthroscopic treatment of FAI had a rapid and widespread diffusion due to the advantages it offers compared with the open technique. Arthroscopic treatment can repair the joint damage and in some cases, characterized by minor deformity, compensate for extra-articular defects. The acetabular labrum must always be preserved and sutured; only in extreme cases can it be sacrificed. Post-operative mobilization must respect the healing time of the labral repair. PMID:26605255

  4. Protocol for a multicentre, parallel-arm, 12-month, randomised, controlled trial of arthroscopic surgery versus conservative care for femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FASHIoN).

    PubMed

    Griffin, D R; Dickenson, E J; Wall, P D H; Donovan, J L; Foster, N E; Hutchinson, C E; Parsons, N; Petrou, S; Realpe, A; Achten, J; Achana, F; Adams, A; Costa, M L; Griffin, J; Hobson, R; Smith, J

    2016-08-31

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome is a recognised cause of young adult hip pain. There has been a large increase in the number of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for FAI; however, a recent Cochrane review highlighted that there are no randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating treatment effectiveness. We aim to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic surgery versus best conservative care for patients with FAI syndrome. We will conduct a multicentre, pragmatic, assessor-blinded, two parallel arm, RCT comparing arthroscopic surgery to physiotherapy-led best conservative care. 24 hospitals treating NHS patients will recruit 344 patients over a 26-month recruitment period. Symptomatic adults with radiographic signs of FAI morphology who are considered suitable for arthroscopic surgery by their surgeon will be eligible. Patients will be excluded if they have radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis, previous significant hip pathology or previous shape changing surgery. Participants will be allocated in a ratio of 1:1 to receive arthroscopic surgery or conservative care. Recruitment will be monitored and supported by qualitative intervention to optimise informed consent and recruitment. The primary outcome will be pain and function assessed by the international hip outcome tool 33 (iHOT-33) measured 1-year following randomisation. Secondary outcomes include general health (short form 12), quality of life (EQ5D-5L) and patient satisfaction. The primary analysis will compare change in pain and function (iHOT-33) at 12 months between the treatment groups, on an intention-to-treat basis, presented as the mean difference between the trial groups with 95% CIs. The study is funded by the Health Technology Assessment Programme (13/103/02). Ethical approval is granted by the Edgbaston Research Ethics committee (14/WM/0124). The results will be disseminated through open access peer-reviewed publications, including Health Technology

  5. [Femoroacetabular impingement: frequently missed in patients with chronic groin pain].

    PubMed

    Röling, Maarten A; Pilot, Peter; Krekel, Peter R; Bloem, Rolf M

    2012-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement is a diagnosis that is often missed in patients with chronic groin pain. The condition often appears in young athletes. An anatomic deformity of the femoral head and the acetabular ridge causes an impingement that damages the subchondral tissue. This damage can result in sharp pain in the groin during specific hip movements and the acetabular labrum may also be ruptured. Diagnosing femoroacetabular impingement and a labral tear can be a challenge. We present the case of a 19-year-old male who twisted his right hip joint during a game of football. Physiotherapy only aggravated the pain. Further diagnostics showed femoroacetabular impingement and a labral tear. Arthroscopic intervention in the hip joint by an orthopedic surgeon lead to immediate pain relief, and two years after surgery the patient is still free of pain and has returned playing sport at his previous level. Femoroacetabular impingement can be a cause of chronic groin pain in young athletes. Hip arthroscopy is a safe and effective treatment, enabling the patient to return to playing sport at their previous level.

  6. Treatment of cam-type femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    FIORENTINO, GENNARO; FONTANAROSA, ALBERTO; CEPPARULO, RICCARDO; GUARDOLI, ALBERTO; BERNI, LUCA; COVIELLO, GIANLUCA; GUARDOLI, ALDO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to evaluate preliminary clinical and radiographic results of arthroscopic treatment of cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Methods thirty-eight patients underwent hip arthroscopy for cam-type FAI between 2009 and 2012. Preoperative assessment was based on clinical examination, modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) and radiographic examination with anteroposterior pelvis, frog-leg and Lequesne views. The patients’ clinical conditions at follow-up were assessed using the mHHS administered as a telephone survey. Radiographic outcome measurements evaluated pre and postoperatively were the alpha angle and femoral head-neck offset. Results the patients were clinically evaluated at a mean follow-up of 36 months. Radiographic follow-up was performed at an average of 12.7 months. Thirty of the 38 patients (79%) were satisfied with the results of the arthroscopic procedure. A total of nine patients subsequently underwent a total hip replacement. All 30 patients who declared themselves satisfied recorded an mHHS increase; in particular, the mHHS increased from a mean of 52.9 preoperatively (range: 27.5–82.5) to a mean of 85.6 postoperatively (range: 45.1–100.1). Three significant differences between the two groups of patients (satisfied and not satisfied) were recorded: mean age, alpha angle and BMI were all significantly greater in the patients who were not satisfied with the treatment. Conclusions a crucial aspect in order to obtain good clinical outcomes of arthroscopic treatment of cam-type impingement is correct selection of patients who are likely to benefit from this kind of surgery. Hip arthroscopy should be avoided in patients aged over 50 years with risk factors for early osteoarthritis (high BMI and a significantly increased alpha angle). Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:26605253

  7. Do Patients With Borderline Dysplasia Have Inferior Outcomes After Hip Arthroscopic Surgery for Femoroacetabular Impingement Compared With Patients With Normal Acetabular Coverage?

    PubMed

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Levy, David M; Weber, Alexander E; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Mather, Richard C; Salata, Michael J; Nho, Shane J

    2017-07-01

    The literature contains conflicting reports regarding whether outcomes of hip arthroscopic surgery for patients with borderline dysplasia are inferior to outcomes in patients with normal acetabular coverage. To assess differences in the outcomes of hip arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in groups of patients with borderline dysplasia and normal coverage. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A registry of consecutive patients who had undergone primary hip arthroscopic surgery with capsular plication for FAI between January 2012 and January 2014 were divided based on the preoperative lateral center-edge angle (LCEA) into 2 distinct groups: (1) borderline dysplasia (LCEA 18°-25°) and (2) normal acetabular coverage (LCEA 25.1°-40°). There were 36 patients in the borderline dysplastic group and 312 patients in the normal coverage group. The primary outcome measure was the Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included the HOS-Sports and modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS). The mean preoperative LCEA differed significantly between groups (23.4° ± 1.5° for borderline dysplastic, 32.5° ± 3.8° for normal coverage; P < .001). The borderline dysplastic group had a higher percentage of female patients than the normal coverage group (27/36 [75%] vs 177/312 [57%], respectively; P = .048). There were no differences in other preoperative demographics and radiographic parameters. At a minimum 2 years after hip arthroscopic surgery (mean follow-up, 2.6 ± 0.6 years), both groups demonstrated significant improvements in all patient-reported outcome scores ( P < .001 in all cases). There were no significant differences between the borderline dysplastic and normal coverage groups in final outcome scores, score improvements, or percentage of patients experiencing clinically significant improvements. One patient in the borderline dysplastic group (3%) underwent revision hip

  8. Arthroscopic release of iliopsoas tendon in patients with femoro-acetabular impingement: clinical results at mid-term follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Via, Alessio Giai; Tomic, Alexander; Rodriguez, Claudio; Salineros, Matias; Somarriva, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The iliopsoas tendon is a recognized cause of extra-articular hip pain, and tenotomy has been described as an effective treatment in patients who do not respond to conservative treatments. Endoscopic release showed higher success rate, lower recurrence, fewer complications compared to open surgery. The aim of the study is to report the results at a mean of 4 years follow-up of a series of patients affected by femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and an associated iliopsoas tendinopathy, treated with hip arthroscopy and transcapsular tendon release. Methods Fifteen patients were retrospectively reviewed. Assessment of radiographic signs of FAI was performed, the alpha angle, the femoral head-neck offset and the lateral center edge angle (LCEA) were collected. Osteoarthritis was assessed from the AP pelvic and graded according to the Tönnis classification. Modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), VAIL score and VAS score were administered to all patients before surgery, at follow-up at 1 year (T1) and final follow-up (T2). Results We found a statistical significant improvement in functional scores (mHHS and VAIL score) from the baseline to T2. According to VAS score, a statistical significant improvement was also found from T0 to T2, from a median of 5.5 (range 3–7) to 0 (range 0–5) (P<0.001). Two patients referred a recurrence of pain one year after surgery who were treated conservatively. No other complications have been reported. Conclusion Iliopsoas tendinopathy can be associated to FAI in some patients, and failure in diagnosing and treating may be the reason of poor results and a revision surgery. Arthroscopic iliopsoas tendon release seems to produce good clinical outcome, reducing pain and the rate of a revision surgeries. Level of evidence: IV case series. PMID:28066744

  9. Hip arthroscopy for challenging deformities: global pincer femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Gupta, Nikhil; Hanami, Dylan

    2014-04-01

    Pincer femoroacetabular impingement occurs in focal or global forms, the latter having more generalized and typically more extreme acetabular overcoverage. Severe global deformities are often treated with open surgical dislocation of the hip. Arthroscopic technical challenges relate to difficulties with hip distraction; central-compartment access; and instrument navigation, acetabuloplasty, and chondrolabral surgery of the posterior acetabulum. Techniques addressing these challenges are introduced permitting dual-portal hip arthroscopy with central-compartment access, subtotal acetabuloplasty, and circumferential chondrolabral surgery. The modified midanterior portal in combination with a zone-specific sequence of acetabular rim reduction monitored with fluoroscopic templating enables precision subtotal acetabuloplasty. Guidelines for acetabular rim reduction include the following suggested radiographic endpoints: postoperative center-edge angle of 35°, a neutral posterior wall sign, and an anterior margin ratio of 0.5. Arthroscopic zone-specific chondrophobic rim preparation and circumferential labral reparative and reconstructive techniques and tools permit the arthroscopic treatment of these challenging deformities.

  10. Femoroacetabular impingement syndrome management: arthroscopy or open surgery?

    PubMed

    Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Franceschi, Francesco; Marinozzi, Andrea; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-05-01

    This review explores the scientific evidence for clinical, functional and imaging outcomes after surgical management of Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) syndrome, and assesses the methodological quality of the published literature reporting this issue. The medical literature databases of Pubmed, Medline, Ovid, Google Scholar and Embase were searched for articles published in English, Spanish, French and Italian, using a combination of the keywords 'femoro-acetabular impingement syndrome', 'postoperative outcomes', 'open surgery', and 'arthroscopic management'. To address three main questions, we extracted data on demographic features, operative techniques, postoperative rehabilitation regimens, imaging features, pre and postoperative hip scores. Complications and conversion to arthroplasty were also investigated. Thirty-one studies published have reported clinical, functional and imaging outcomes after open and arthroscopic management of FAI syndrome. The modified Coleman methodology score (CMS) averaged 56.2 (range, 30-81). From extracted data, it was shown that arthroscopy, open surgery and arthroscopic surgery followed by mini open surgery are comparable for functional results, biomechanics, and return to sport. Progression of OA and conversion to hip arthroplasty are dependent on preoperative status of cartilage and osteoarthritis and type of management. Debridement and osteoplasty provide better results than debridement only. Significantly improved outcomes have been recorded in patients undergoing labral refixation than resection. The Coleman methodology score showed great heterogeneity in terms of study design and outcome assessment, and generally low methodological quality. Although open and minimally invasive procedures allow athletes to return to professional sports activity, they are contraindicated in patients with severe osteoarthritis and cartilage degeneration.

  11. Femoroacetabular impingement and osteoarthritis of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Charlie; Li, Linda; Forster, Bruce B.; Kopec, Jacek A.; Ratzlaff, Charles; Halai, Lalji; Cibere, Jolanda; Esdaile, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To outline the clinical presentation, physical examination findings, diagnostic criteria, and management options of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Sources of information PubMed was searched for relevant articles regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of FAI. Main message In recent years, FAI has been increasingly recognized as a potential precursor and an important contributor to hip pain in the adult population and idiopathic hip osteoarthritis later in life. Femoroacetabular impingement is a collection of bony morphologic abnormalities of the hip joint that result in abnormal contact during motion. Cam-type FAI relates to a non-spherical osseous prominence of the proximal femoral neck or head-neck junction. Pincer-type FAI relates to excessive acetabular coverage over the femoral head, which can occur owing to several morphologic variants. Patients with FAI present with chronic, deep, or aching anterior groin pain most commonly in the sitting position, or during or after activity. Patients might also experience occasional sharp pains during activity. A thorough history should be taken that includes incidence of trauma and exercise frequency. A physical examination should be performed that includes a full hip, low back, and abdominal examination to assess for alternate causes of anterior groin pain. Diagnosis of FAI should be confirmed with radiography. Femoroacetabular impingement can be managed conservatively with rest, modification of activities, medications, and physiotherapy, or it can be treated surgically. Conclusion Femoroacetabular impingement is an important cause of anterior groin pain. Early recognition and intervention by the primary care provider might be critical to alleviating morbidity and preventing FAI progression. PMID:26668284

  12. Femoroacetabular impingement and osteoarthritis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Charlie; Li, Linda; Forster, Bruce B; Kopec, Jacek A; Ratzlaff, Charles; Halai, Lalji; Cibere, Jolanda; Esdaile, John M

    2015-12-01

    To outline the clinical presentation, physical examination findings, diagnostic criteria, and management options of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). PubMed was searched for relevant articles regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of FAI. In recent years, FAI has been increasingly recognized as a potential precursor and an important contributor to hip pain in the adult population and idiopathic hip osteoarthritis later in life. Femoroacetabular impingement is a collection of bony morphologic abnormalities of the hip joint that result in abnormal contact during motion. Cam-type FAI relates to a non-spherical osseous prominence of the proximal femoral neck or head-neck junction. Pincer-type FAI relates to excessive acetabular coverage over the femoral head, which can occur owing to several morphologic variants. Patients with FAI present with chronic, deep, or aching anterior groin pain most commonly in the sitting position, or during or after activity. Patients might also experience occasional sharp pains during activity. A thorough history should be taken that includes incidence of trauma and exercise frequency. A physical examination should be performed that includes a full hip, low back, and abdominal examination to assess for alternate causes of anterior groin pain. Diagnosis of FAI should be confirmed with radiography. Femoroacetabular impingement can be managed conservatively with rest, modification of activities, medications, and physiotherapy, or it can be treated surgically. Femoroacetabular impingement is an important cause of anterior groin pain. Early recognition and intervention by the primary care provider might be critical to alleviating morbidity and preventing FAI progression. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  13. Closed Intramedullary Derotational Osteotomy and Hip Arthroscopy for Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement From Femoral Retroversion

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Gupta, Nikhil; Martin, Hal D.

    2014-01-01

    Femoral retroversion is an uncommon cause of cam femoroacetabular impingement that may require surgical treatment beyond arthroscopic or open femoroplasty. We present the case of a young adult with bilateral severe femoral retroversion in whom such treatment failed. We discuss the rationale, surgical technique, and outcome of this patient, who underwent bilateral closed intramedullary derotational proximal femoral osteotomies and interlocked nailing with adjunctive pre- and post-osteotomy hip arthroscopies. Clinical improvement with normal foot progression angles, radiographic union, and resolution of bilateral cam femoroacetabular impingement from femoral retroversion was achieved. This surgery permits rapid institution of weight-bearing ambulation and an early rehabilitative program. Femoral retroversion may be an underappreciated and insufficiently treated cause of cam femoroacetabular impingement that may be readily detected and successfully remedied with this less invasive procedure. PMID:24749047

  14. Surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement following slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    PubMed Central

    Oduwole, K. O.; de SA, D.; Kay, J.; Findakli, F.; Duong, A.; Simunovic, N.; Yen, Y-M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the existing literature from 2005 to 2016 reporting on the efficacy of surgical management of patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) secondary to slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). Methods The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PubMed were searched and screened in duplicate. Data such as patient demographics, surgical technique, surgical outcomes and complications were retrieved from eligible studies. Results Fifteen eligible level IV studies were included in this review comprising 261 patients (266 hips). Treatment groups included arthroscopic osteochondroplasty, surgical hip dislocation, and traditional open osteotomy. The mean alpha angle corrections were 32.14° (standard deviation (sd) 7.02°), 41.45° (sd 10.5°) and 6.0° (sd 5.21°), for arthroscopy, surgical hip dislocation, and open osteotomy groups, respectively (p < 0.05). Each group demonstrated satisfactory clinical outcomes across their respective scoring systems. Major complication rates were 1.6%, 10.7%, and 6.7%, for arthroscopy, surgical dislocation and osteotomy treatments, respectively. Conclusion In the context of SCFE-related FAI, surgical hip dislocation demonstrated improved correction of the alpha angle, albeit at higher complication and revision rates than both arthroscopic and open osteotomy treatments. Further investigation, including high-quality trials with standardised radiological and clinical outcome measures for young patients, is warranted to clarify treatment approaches and safety. Cite this article: K. O. Oduwole, D. de Sa, J. Kay, F. Findakli, A. Duong, N. Simunovic, Y. Yi-Meng, O. R. Ayeni. Surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement following slipped capital femoral epiphysis: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:472–480. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.68.BJR-2017-0018.R1. PMID:28790036

  15. The Natural History of Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Weber, Alexander E.; Levy, David M.; Wuerz, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a clinical syndrome resulting from abnormal hip joint morphology and is a common cause of hip pain in young adults. FAI has been posited as a precursor to hip osteoarthritis (OA); however, conflicting evidence exists and the true natural history of the disease is unclear. The purpose of this article is to review the current understanding of how FAI damages the hip joint by highlighting its pathomechanics and etiology. We then review the current evidence relating FAI to OA. Lastly, we will discuss the potential of hip preservation surgery to alter the natural history of FAI, reduce the risk of developing OA and the need for future arthroplasty. PMID:26636088

  16. Statistical Shape Modeling of Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Michael D.; Dater, Manasi; Whitaker, Ross; Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Peters, Christopher L.; Anderson, Andrew E.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, statistical shape modeling (SSM) was used to quantify three-dimensional (3D) variation and morphologic differences between femurs with and without cam femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). 3D surfaces were generated from CT scans of femurs from 41 controls and 30 cam FAI patients. SSM correspondence particles were optimally positioned on each surface using a gradient descent energy function. Mean shapes for control and patient groups were defined from the resulting particle configurations. Morphological differences between group mean shapes and between the control mean and individual patients were calculated. Principal component analysis was used to describe anatomical variation present in both groups. The first 6 modes (or principal components) captured statistically significant shape variations, which comprised 84% of cumulative variation among the femurs. Shape variation was greatest in femoral offset, greater trochanter height, and the head-neck junction. The mean cam femur shape protruded above the control mean by a maximum of 3.3 mm with sustained protrusions of 2.5-3.0 mm along the anterolateral head-neck junction and distally along the anterior neck, corresponding well with reported cam lesion locations and soft-tissue damage. This study provides initial evidence that SSM can describe variations in femoral morphology in both controls and cam FAI patients and may be useful for developing new measurements of pathological anatomy. SSM may also be applied to characterize cam FAI severity and provide templates to guide patient-specific surgical resection of bone.

  17. Femoroacetabular impingement and its implications on range of motion: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Femoroacetabular impingement leads to limited hip motion, pain and progressive damage to the labrum. Assessment of the amount and location of excessive ossification can be difficult, and removal does not always lead to pain relief and an increase of function. One of the challenges ahead is to discover why certain cases have poor outcomes. Case presentation The technical and clinical results of two consecutive arthroscopic shavings of an osseous cam protrusion are described in our patient, a 50-year-old Caucasian man with complaints of femoroacetabular impingement. At 12 weeks after the first arthroscopic shaving, our patient still experienced pain. Using a range of motion simulation system based on computed tomography images the kinematics of his hip joint were analyzed. Bone that limited range of motion was removed in a second arthroscopic procedure. At six months post-operatively our patient is almost pain free and has regained a range of motion to a functional level. Conclusion This case demonstrates the relevance of range of motion simulation when the outcome of primary arthroscopic management is unsatisfactory. Such simulations may aid clinicians in determining the gain of a second operation. This claim is supported by the correlation of the simulations with clinical outcome, as shown in this case report. PMID:21477363

  18. MRI Evaluation of Femoroacetabular Impingement After Hip Preservation Surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Angela E; Jawetz, Shari T; Greditzer, Harry G; Burge, Alissa J; Nawabi, Danyal H; Potter, Hollis G

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews the surgical treatment options for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), including labral repair and osteochondroplasty, and the expected postoperative appearance on MRI. Complications, including residual osseous deformities, chondral injury, adhesions, femoral neck stress fractures, osteonecrosis, instability, malpositioned suture anchors, and infection, will also be discussed. Knowledge of the surgical treatment of FAI can assist in improving our understanding of the expected postoperative MRI appearance and in evaluating surgical complications.

  19. Surgical hip dislocation for treatment of cam femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Milind M; Chaudhary, Ishani M; Vikas, KN; KoKo, Aung; Zaw, Than; Siddhartha, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cam femoroacetabular impingement is caused by a misshapen femoral head with a reduced head neck offset, commonly in the anterolateral quadrant. Friction in flexion, adduction and internal rotation causes limitation of the hip movements and pain progressively leading to labral and chondral damage and osteoarthritis. Surgical hip dislocation described by Ganz permits full exposure of the hip without damaging its blood supply. An osteochondroplasty removes the bump at the femoral head neck junction to recreate the offset for impingement free movement. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients underwent surgery with surgical hip dislocation for the treatment of cam femoroacetabular impingement by open osteochondroplasty over last 6 years. Eight patients suffered from sequelae of avascular necrosis (AVN). Three had a painful dysplastic hip. Two had sequelae of Perthes disease. Three had combined cam and pincer impingement caused by retroversion of acetabulum. All patients were operated by the trochanteric flip osteotomy with attachments of gluteus medius and vastus lateralis, dissection was between the piriformis and gluteus minimus preserving the external rotators. Z-shaped capsular incision and dislocation of the hip was done in external rotation. Three cases also had subtrochanteric osteotomy. Two cases of AVN also had an intraarticular femoral head reshaping osteotomy. Results: Goals of treatment were achieved in all patients. No AVN was detected after a 6 month followup. There were no trochanteric nonunions. Hip range of motion improved in all and Harris hip score improved significantly in 15 of 16 cases. Mean alpha angle reduced from 86.13° (range 66°–108°) to 46.35° (range 39°–58°). Conclusion: Cam femoroacetabular Impingement causing pain and limitation of hip movements was treated by open osteochondroplasty after surgical hip dislocation. This reduced pain, improved hip motion and gave good to excellent results in the short term. PMID

  20. Effect of warmed irrigation solution on core body temperature during hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Dante; Valderrama, Juanjosé; Tobar, Carlos; Besomi, Javier; López, Jaime; Lara, Joaquín; Ilic, Juan Pablo

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of warming arthroscopic irrigation solution on core body temperature during hip arthroscopic surgery in patients with femoroacetabular impingement. An analytical, prospective, observational study was performed in a cohort of 166 consecutive patients. All patients underwent hip arthroscopy for treatment of femoroacetabular impingement. Two groups were studied: patients operated on with arthroscopic irrigation solution warmed up to 32°C ± 2°C (89.6°F ± 3.6°F) and a control group comprising patients operated on with irrigation solution used at room temperature. Relevant information was collected regarding the patients (age, sex, body mass index, and blood pressure) and the procedure (volume and temperature of saline solution, pressure of fluid pump, surgery time, and room temperature). Corresponding statistical analysis was performed with STATA 11.0 (StataCorp, College Station, TX), by use of descriptive statistics, parametric and nonparametric tests, and a generalized estimating equation model for repeated measurements. Both groups were comparable in terms of age, sex, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, volume of irrigation solution used, and room temperature. The mean age of the cohort was 33 years (range, 14 to 60 years); mean body mass index, 23.7 kg/m(2) (range, 17.2 to 34 kg/m(2)); mean volume of irrigation solution, 26 L (range, 12 to 39 L); mean systolic blood pressure, 97 mm Hg; mean diastolic blood pressure, 51 mm Hg; and mean surgical time, 110 minutes. A decrease in core body temperature by 0.5°C (0.9°F) or greater occurred during the course of surgery in 66% of patients in the control group versus 28% in the warmed-solution group (P < .001). At least 1 core body temperature measurement of less than 36°C (96.8°F) was recorded in 48% of patients in the control group versus 14% in the warmed-solution group (P < .001). The trend toward a decrease in core body temperature was 4 times greater in the control

  1. Advanced hip joint degeneration associated with femoroacetabular impingement in a retired chiropractor

    PubMed Central

    Emary, Peter C.; Taylor, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement is a relatively new clinical entity only recently described in the orthopedic literature. In this report, we document a severe case of hip joint osteoarthritis associated with cam-type impingement in a retired chiropractor. PMID:27713583

  2. Open surgical dislocation for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Peters, Christopher L; Stronach, Benjamin M; Pelt, Christopher E; Erickson, Jill A

    2012-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement results from a lack of clearance between the femoral neck and the acetabulum. This condition is most commonly seen in the young adult presenting with hip pain after activity. There have been rapid advancements in the understanding of femoroacetabular impingement to include diagnostic, imaging, and treatment options. An open surgical dislocation approach has been developed that offers a safe and effective method to dislocate the hip and allow direct visualization and full access to treat the often complex intra-articular pathologies of femoroacetabular impingement. The ultimate goal of treatment in carefully selected patients is relief of hip pain and preservation of the hip joint.

  3. Editorial Commentary: Ligamentum Teres Tears and Femoroacetabular Impingement: Complex Coexistence of Impingement and Instability.

    PubMed

    Larson, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    In a large Level IV case series of 2,213 hip arthroscopies with the diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement, the intraoperative status of the ligamentum teres (LT) was recorded as normal in 11%, frayed and/or partially torn in 88%, and completely torn in 1.5% of hips. Although specific physical examination maneuvers for detecting LT tears were not available early in the study period, thus limiting a detailed assessment of such tests, the authors identified that female gender, a lower lateral center edge angle, a higher Tonnis angle, and capsular laxity were all associated with complete LT tears. This study further supports the complex coexistence of impingement and instability.

  4. The etiology of primary femoroacetabular impingement: genetics or acquired deformity?

    PubMed

    Packer, Jonathan D; Safran, Marc R

    2015-10-01

    The etiology of primary femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) remains controversial. Both genetic and acquired causes have been postulated and studied. While recent studies suggest that genetic factors may have a role in the development of FAI, there is no conclusive evidence that FAI is transmitted genetically. Currently, the most popular theory for the development of cam-type deformities is that a repetitive injury to the proximal femoral physis occurs during a critical period of development. There is a correlation between a high volume of impact activities during adolescence and the development of cam-type deformities. Multiple studies have found a high prevalence of FAI in elite football, ice hockey, basketball and soccer players. In this article, we review the current literature relating to the etiology of primary FAI.

  5. MRI for the preoperative evaluation of femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Li, Angela E; Jawetz, Shari T; Greditzer, Harry G; Burge, Alissa J; Nawabi, Danyal H; Potter, Hollis G

    2016-04-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) refers to a condition characterized by impingement of the femoral head-neck junction against the acetabular rim, often due to underlying osseous and/or soft tissue morphological abnormalities. It is a common cause of hip pain and limited range of motion in young and middle-aged adults. Hip preservation surgery aims to correct the morphological variants seen in FAI, thereby relieving pain and improving function, and potentially preventing early osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article is to review the mechanisms of chondral and labral injury in FAI to facilitate an understanding of patterns of chondrolabral injury seen on MRI. Preoperative MRI evaluation of FAI should include assessment of osseous morphologic abnormalities, labral tears, cartilage status, and other associated compensatory injuries of the pelvis. As advanced chondral wear is the major relative contraindication for hip preservation surgery, MRI is useful in the selection of patients likely to benefit from surgery. Teaching points • The most common anatomical osseous abnormalities predisposing to FAI include cam and pincer lesions. • Morphological abnormalities, labral lesions, and cartilage status should be assessed. • In cam impingement, chondral wear most commonly occurs anterosuperiorly.• Pre-existing advanced osteoarthritis is the strongest predictor of poor outcomes after FAI surgery. • Injury to muscles and tendons or other pelvic structures can coexist with FAI.

  6. Computed tomography assessment of hip joints in asymptomatic individuals in relation to femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Kang, Alan C L; Gooding, Andrew J; Coates, Mark H; Goh, Tony D; Armour, Paul; Rietveld, John

    2010-06-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement has become a well-recognized entity predisposing to acetabular labral tears and chondral damage, and subsequently development of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. In the authors' experience, it is common to see bony abnormalities predisposing to femoroacetabular impingement in the contralateral asymptomatic hips in patients with unilateral femoroacetabular impingement. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of bony abnormalities predisposing to femoroacetabular impingement in asymptomatic individuals without exposing study participants to unnecessary radiation. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 4. Fifty individuals (100 hip joints), ranging from 15 to 40 years of age, who were seen at a local hospital between March and August 2008 with abdominal trauma or nonspecific abdominal pain in whom abdominal computed tomography was performed to aid diagnosis were prospectively studied. These patients were not known to have any history of hip-related problems. Raw data from the abdominal computed tomography scan, performed on a 64-slice multidetector computed tomography scanner, were reformatted using bone algorithm into several different planes. Several measurements and observations of the hip joints were made in relation to femoroacetabular impingement. The 100 hip joints from 50 patients with no history of hip problems demonstrated that 39% of the joints (31% of female, 48% of male joints) have at least 1 morphologic aspect predisposing to femoroacetabular impingement. The majority (66% to 100% ) of the findings were bilateral; 33% of female and 52% of male asymptomatic participants in our study had at least 1 predisposing factor for femoroacetabular impingement in 1 or both of their hip joints. Based on the data collected from this study, the acetabular crossover sign had a 71% sensitivity and 88% specificity for detecting acetabular retroversion. Nonquantitative assessment of the femoral head at the anterior

  7. Validity of magnetic resonance arthrography as a diagnostic tool in femoroacetabular impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    González Gil, A B; Llombart Blanco, R; Díaz de Rada, P

    2015-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is one of the main causes of hip pain in young adult and a contributory factor for development of early primary osteoarthritis. An accurate clinical diagnosis, supported by imaging studies, is important to determine the best treatment for the patient. The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic correlation between direct magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) arthrography and the arthroscopic findings. A review was performed on a series of 36 patients diagnosed with FAI, and who underwent hip arthroscopy surgery between 2009 and 2012. All of them had a direct MRI arthrography performed in our hospital. The presence of labral lesions, CAM deformity, and acetabular and femoral cartilage damage, were evaluated in both imaging techniques. After analysing the results and taking the hip arthroscopy as 'gold standard', a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 77% were obtained, with a PPV of 87% for the diagnosis of labral lesions by direct MR arthrography. The specificity for CAM deformity was 100%, with a sensitivity of 79% and PPV of 100%. For chondral disorders lower values were found for both acetabulum and femoral head. For acetabular lesions the sensitivity was 78.5%, and specificity was 82% with a PPV of 73% and NPV of 80%. For femoral lesions, there was a sensitivity of 71.5%, a specificity of 73%, with a PPV of 62.5% and NPV of 80%. Due to the high sensitivity for the detection of labral lesions and the high specificity to detect CAM deformity, hip MR arthrography is a useful diagnostic tool for femoroacetabular impingement. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular Characterization of Articular Cartilage from Young Adults with Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shingo; Rai, Muhammad Farooq; Gill, Corey S.; Zhang, Zhiqi; Sandell, Linda J.; Clohisy, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Femoroacetabular impingement is a frequent cause of hip pain and may lead to secondary osteoarthritis, yet little is known about the molecular events linking mechanical hip impingement and articular cartilage degeneration. The first goal of this study was to quantify the expression of inflammatory cytokine and chemokine, matrix-degrading, and extracellular matrix genes in articular cartilage harvested from control hips and hips with femoroacetabular impingement and end-stage osteoarthritis. The second goal was to analyze the relative expression of these genes in articular cartilage harvested at various stages of osteoarthritis. Methods: Cartilage samples were obtained from thirty-two hips undergoing hip preservation surgery for femoroacetabular impingement or hip arthroplasty. Three control cartilage samples were also analyzed. Specimens were graded intraoperatively with regard to the severity of cartilage damage, the radiographic osteoarthritis grade was recorded, and quantitative RT-PCR (real-time polymerase chain reaction) was performed to determine relative gene expression. Results: Except for interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and CXCL2, the mRNA (messenger RNA) expression of all other chemokine (IL-8, CXCL1, CXCL3, CXCL6, CCL3, and CCL3L1), matrix-degrading (matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-13 and ADAMTS-4), and structural matrix (COL2A1 [collagen, type II, alpha] and ACAN [aggregan]) genes was higher overall in cartilage from hips with femoroacetabular impingement compared with hips with osteoarthritis and normal controls. The differences reached significance (p ≤ 0.05) for seven of these ten quantified genes, with CXCL3, CXCL6, and COL2A1 being elevated in the femoroacetabular impingement group compared with only the control group and IL-8, CCL3L1, ADAMTS-4, and ACAN being elevated compared with both the osteoarthritis and control groups. When samples were grouped according to the stage of the degenerative cascade, mRNA expression was relatively higher in

  9. Management of a Large Acetabular Chondrolabral Injury in a Young Patient With Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Thomas I.; Marcel, John J.; Postma, William

    2014-01-01

    Patients with mixed-type femoroacetabular impingement syndrome often have concomitant chondrolabral pathology in addition to the characteristic cam and pincer lesions. Unfortunately, these patients are typically young, and the pathology is localized to the weight-bearing dome of the acetabulum. Complete preoperative characterization of labral and cartilage lesions is often not possible even with advanced imaging techniques, and the full extent of the injury may not be appreciated without direct arthroscopic visualization. Thus management decisions regarding intra-articular pathology may not be possible until the time of surgery. Often, the cartilage and labral pathology in these young patients is part of a contiguous complex of tissue that separates from the underlying subchondral bone. We present an arthroscopic management technique for young patients with this pattern of injury. This includes limited debridement of loose labral and chondral tissue, labral repair to restore the suction-seal effect, microfracture to promote reparative tissue formation, and takedown of the underlying pathoanatomic cam and pincer lesions. PMID:25685678

  10. BRAZILIAN ORTHOPEDISTS' OPINIONS AND PERCEPTIONS ON FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Khan, Moin; Ayeni, Olufemi Rolland; Bhandari, Mohit; Miyahara, Helder de Souza; Vicente, Jose Ricardo Negreiros

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess the opinion of Brazilian orthopedists surgeons on the diagnosis and treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Methods: A questionnaire was sent to several orthopedic societies around the world, including the Sociedade Brasileira de Ortopedia e Traumatologia (SBOT). This questionnaire was sent electronically and included questions on many topics related to FAI. Results: 253 Brazilian orthopedists responded the questionnaire. Sixty-eight point nine percent worked in private practice and 23.1% in academic institutions. Pain during hip rotation was the most important finding in the clinical history according to 81.8% of the respondents and the anterior impingement sign was the most important finding in the physical examination according to 88.2%. Initial treatment was physiotherapy according to 86.2%. Surgical treatment was hip arthroscopy according to 38.8%, and via surgical hip dislocation for 14.7%. Conclusion: Brazilian orthopedists' opinions on FAI are similar to their international colleagues. There is considerable discrepancy in the answers provided, demonstrating a need for future investigation on FAI, in order to institute proper treatment and diagnosis protocols. Level of Evidence V. Expert Opinion. PMID:28924359

  11. BRAZILIAN ORTHOPEDISTS' OPINIONS AND PERCEPTIONS ON FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Khan, Moin; Ayeni, Olufemi Rolland; Bhandari, Mohit; Miyahara, Helder de Souza; Vicente, Jose Ricardo Negreiros

    2016-01-01

    To assess the opinion of Brazilian orthopedists surgeons on the diagnosis and treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). A questionnaire was sent to several orthopedic societies around the world, including the Sociedade Brasileira de Ortopedia e Traumatologia (SBOT). This questionnaire was sent electronically and included questions on many topics related to FAI. 253 Brazilian orthopedists responded the questionnaire. Sixty-eight point nine percent worked in private practice and 23.1% in academic institutions. Pain during hip rotation was the most important finding in the clinical history according to 81.8% of the respondents and the anterior impingement sign was the most important finding in the physical examination according to 88.2%. Initial treatment was physiotherapy according to 86.2%. Surgical treatment was hip arthroscopy according to 38.8%, and via surgical hip dislocation for 14.7%. Brazilian orthopedists' opinions on FAI are similar to their international colleagues. There is considerable discrepancy in the answers provided, demonstrating a need for future investigation on FAI, in order to institute proper treatment and diagnosis protocols. Level of Evidence V. Expert Opinion.

  12. Sources and quality of literature addressing femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Ayeni, Olufemi R; Chan, Kevin; Al-Asiri, Jamal; Chien, Teresa; Sprague, Sheila; Liew, Susan; Bhandari, Mohit

    2013-02-01

    In the last 5 years, there has been an increasing interest in the concepts, pathoanatomy, and management of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). The aim of this study was to determine the trends in FAI literature with specific emphasis on the quality and source of publications in the literature. A systematic review of two electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE) was conducted to identify FAI-related publications from 2005 to 2010. Studies were included if they were published in peer-review journals and were written in English. Abstracted data included year of publication, study design, type of study, level of evidence, number of patients and hips, gender, weighted mean age of patients, and type of journal. There were 298 relevant studies. Between 2005 and 2010, there was an approximate fivefold increase in the number of FAI-related publications. Most of these studies came from the orthopaedic literature (197 articles or 66 %), while the remainder arose from other medical specialties. The majority of publications consisted of level 4 and 5 studies (248 articles). There were no level 1 studies identified. Between 2005 and 2010, there has been a dramatic increase in FAI-related publications, but high-quality studies are still lacking. IV.

  13. Advanced Imaging in Femoroacetabular Impingement: Current State and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S; Hesper, Tobias; Tiderius, Carl Johan; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is now a known precursor of early osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. In terms of clinical intervention, the decision between joint preservation and joint replacement hinges on the severity of articular cartilage degeneration. The exact threshold during the course of disease progression when the cartilage damage is irreparable remains elusive. The intention behind radiographic imaging is to accurately identify the morphology of osseous structural abnormalities and to accurately characterize the chondrolabral damage as much as possible. However, both plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are insensitive for articular cartilage anatomy and pathology. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques include magnetic resonance arthrography and biochemically sensitive techniques of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), T1rho (T1ρ), T2/T2* mapping, and several others. The diagnostic performance of these techniques to evaluate cartilage degeneration could improve the ability to predict an individual patient-specific outcome with non-surgical and surgical care. This review discusses the facts and current applications of biochemical MRI for hip joint cartilage assessment covering the roles of dGEMRIC, T2/T2*, and T1ρ mapping. The basics of each technique and their specific role in FAI assessment are outlined. Current limitations and potential pitfalls as well as future directions of biochemical imaging are also outlined.

  14. Advanced Imaging in Femoroacetabular Impingement: Current State and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S.; Hesper, Tobias; Tiderius, Carl Johan; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is now a known precursor of early osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. In terms of clinical intervention, the decision between joint preservation and joint replacement hinges on the severity of articular cartilage degeneration. The exact threshold during the course of disease progression when the cartilage damage is irreparable remains elusive. The intention behind radiographic imaging is to accurately identify the morphology of osseous structural abnormalities and to accurately characterize the chondrolabral damage as much as possible. However, both plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are insensitive for articular cartilage anatomy and pathology. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques include magnetic resonance arthrography and biochemically sensitive techniques of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), T1rho (T1ρ), T2/T2* mapping, and several others. The diagnostic performance of these techniques to evaluate cartilage degeneration could improve the ability to predict an individual patient-specific outcome with non-surgical and surgical care. This review discusses the facts and current applications of biochemical MRI for hip joint cartilage assessment covering the roles of dGEMRIC, T2/T2*, and T1ρ mapping. The basics of each technique and their specific role in FAI assessment are outlined. Current limitations and potential pitfalls as well as future directions of biochemical imaging are also outlined. PMID:26258129

  15. Fifty Most Cited Articles for Femoroacetabular Impingement and Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Simon; Shin, Jason; Haro, Marc; Khair, Michael; Riboh, Jonathan C.; Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    Growing awareness of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and recent innovations in management have resulted in hip arthroscopy becoming one of the fastest-growing orthopedic subspecialties. The purpose of this study was to identify the 50 most cited articles related to the topic of FAI and hip arthroscopy and to analyze their characteristics. The overall number of citations within these articles ranged from 99 to 820. Citation density ranged from 4.41 to 74.55. Seven countries produced these articles with the majority attributed to the United States (n = 26) and Switzerland (n = 18). Clinical studies made up more than half of the top articles (n = 27). The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery level of evidence most commonly encountered was level IV (n = 24), while the remaining articles were level III (n = 3). No randomized controlled trials or non-randomized controlled trials were encountered in this search. The level of evidence was not significantly correlated with the overall number of citations, publication year, or citation density. The current top 50 list provides orthopedic surgeons interested in hip arthroscopy with an up-to-date core list of the most cited articles in the scientific literature and represents a foundation to use to develop their knowledge regarding hip arthroscopy and FAI. PMID:26347872

  16. Symptomatic sacroiliac joint disease and radiographic evidence of femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Patrick M; Anderson, Anthony W; Swiontkowski, Marc F

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic sacroiliac (SI) joint disease is poorly understood. The literature provides no clear aetiology for SI joint pathology, making evaluation and diagnosis challenging. We hypothesised that patients with documented sacroiliac pain might provide insight into the aetiology of these symptoms. Specifically, we questioned whether SI joint symptoms might be associated with abnormal hip radiographs. We reviewed the pelvic and hip radiographs of a prospectively collected cohort of 30 consecutive patients with SI joint pathology. This database included 33 hips from 30 patients. Radiographic analysis included measurements of the lateral centre edge angle, Tönnis angle, and the triangular index, of the ipsilateral hip. Evidence for retrotorsion of the hemipelvis was recorded. Hips were graded on the Tönnis grading system for hip arthrosis. In this cohort 14/33 (42%) of hips had evidence of significant osteoarthrosis indicated by Tönnis grade 2 or greater and 15/33 (45%) displayed subchondral cyst formation around the hip or head neck junction. In assessing acetabular anatomy, 21% (7/33) had retroversion, 12% (4/33) had a lateral centre edge angle >40° with 3% (1/33) >45°. Tönnis angle was <0° in 27% (9/33). Coxa profunda and acetabuli protrusio were present in 47% (17/33) and 3% (1/33), respectively. When femoral head morphology was assessed, 33% (11/33) showed evidence of cam impingement. Overall, 76% (25/33) had at least one abnormality on their hip radiograph. A significant number of patients meeting strict diagnostic criteria for SI joint pain had radiographic evidence of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and hip arthrosis. The clinician should maintain FAI in the differential diagnosis when investigating patients with buttock pain.

  17. Sports hernia and femoroacetabular impingement in athletes: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Munegato, Daniele; Bigoni, Marco; Gridavilla, Giulia; Olmi, Stefano; Cesana, Giovanni; Zatti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between sports hernias and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in athletes. METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and Google Scholar databases were electronically searched for articles relating to sports hernia, athletic pubalgia, groin pain, long-standing adductor-related groin pain, Gilmore groin, adductor pain syndrome, and FAI. The initial search identified 196 studies, of which only articles reporting on the association of sports hernia and FAI or laparoscopic treatment of sports hernia were selected for systematic review. Finally, 24 studies were reviewed to evaluate the prevalence of FAI in cases of sports hernia and examine treatment outcomes and evidence for a common underlying pathogenic mechanism. RESULTS: FAI has been reported in as few as 12% to as high as 94% of patients with sports hernias, athletic pubalgia or adductor-related groin pain. Cam-type impingement is proposed to lead to increased symphyseal motion with overload on the surrounding extra-articular structures and muscle, which can result in the development of sports hernia and athletic pubalgia. Laparoscopic repair of sports hernias, via either the transabdominal preperitoneal or extraperitoneal approach, has a high success rate and earlier recovery of full sports activity compared to open surgery or conservative treatment. For patients with FAI and sports hernia, the surgical management of both pathologies is more effective than sports pubalgia treatment or hip arthroscopy alone (89% vs 33% of cases). As sports hernias and FAI are typically treated by general and orthopedic surgeons, respectively, a multidisciplinary approach for diagnosis and treatment is recommended for optimal treatment of patients with these injuries. CONCLUSION: The restriction in range of motion due to FAI likely contributes to sports hernias; therefore, surgical treatment of both pathologies represents an optimal therapy. PMID:26380829

  18. Trunk and lower limb biomechanics during stair climbing in people with and without symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Connor A; Hatfield, Gillian L; Gilbart, Michael K; Garland, S Jayne; Hunt, Michael A

    2017-02-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement is a pathomechanical hip condition leading to pain and impaired physical function. It has been shown that those with femoroacetabular impingement exhibit altered gait characteristics during level walking and stair climbing, and decreased muscle force production during isometric muscle contractions. However, no studies to-date have looked at trunk kinematics or muscle activation during dynamic movements such as stair climbing in this patient population. The purpose of this study was to compare biomechanical outcomes (trunk and lower limb kinematics as well as lower limb kinetics and muscle activation) during stair climbing in those with and without symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement. Trunk, hip, knee and ankle kinematics, as well as hip, knee and ankle kinetics and muscle activity of nine lower limb muscles were collected during stair climbing for 20 people with clinical and radiographic femoroacetabular impingement and compared to 20 age- and sex-matched pain-free individuals. Those with femoroacetabular impingement ascended the stairs slower (effect size=0.82), had significantly increased peak trunk forward flexion angles (effect size=0.99) and external hip flexion moments (effect size=0.94) and had decreased peak external knee flexion moments (effect size=0.90) compared to the control group. Findings from this study indicate that while those with and without femoroacetabular impingement exhibit many biomechanical similarities when ascending stairs, differences in trunk forward flexion and joint kinetics indicate some important differences. Further longitudinal research is required to elucidate the cause of these differences as well as the clinical relevance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Descriptive Epidemiology of Symptomatic Femoroacetabular Impingement in Young Athlete: Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo-Yong; Kang, Chan; Jeon, Je-Hyung; Zheng, Long

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in athletic patients. Materials and Methods From July 2003 to May 2013, 388 patients (422 hips) who underwent arthroscopic surgery for FAI were evaluated demographic characteristics. The patients' age, gender, diagnosis, and type of sports were analyzed using medical records and radiography. Results Among 422 hips in 388 patients, 156 hips were involved with sports. Among the 156 hips, 86, 43, and 27 hips were categorized as cam, pincer, and mixed type, respectively. Types of sports were soccer, baseball and taekwondo which showed 44, 36 and 35 hips, respectively. Also, cases related to sports according to age were 63 hips for twenties and 12 hips for teenagers in which the two showed highest association to FAI. The kinds of sports that showed high association were 28 hips of soccer and 20 cases of martial arts such as taekwondo and judo for twenties and 9 hips of martial arts for teenagers which was the highest. Conclusion FAI usually occurs in young adults and is highly related to sports activity. Most of the FAI type related to sports activity was cam type, and soccer and martial arts such as taekwondo were the most common cause of it. PMID:27536641

  20. Vibratory sense deficits in patients with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, G.J.; Shakoor, N.; Cvetanovich, G.L.; Fogg, L.F.; Orías, A.A. Espinoza; Nho, S.J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Sensory deficits, measured through vibratory perception threshold (VPT), have been recognized in hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA), but have not been evaluated in femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), thought to be a pre-OA condition. This study aimed to assess VPT in symptomatic FAI pre- and 6-months post-arthroscopy vs. controls. Methods: FAI patients and controls were assessed for VPT at the first metatarsophalangeal joint. Pain was assessed using a visual analog pain scale. FAI participants were evaluated again 6-months after surgery for FAI. Differences between groups and pre- and post- surgery were evaluated with independent and paired sample t-tests, respectively. Secondary analysis was performed using repeated-measures ANOVA to evaluate the effect of pain and time since surgery on VPT pre- and post-operatively. Results: No differences in age and BMI were seen between groups (p>0.05). Reduced VPT (higher value is worse) was evident in the pre- (8.0±3.9V, t=2.81, p=0.009) and post-operative (6.8±2.8V, t=2.34, p=0.027) patients compared to controls (4.7±1.3V). After hip arthroscopy, there was a trend toward improved VPT (t=1.97, p=0.068). Preoperative and 6-months postoperative pain and time since surgery were not found to influence VPT (F-ratio≥0.00, p≥0.427). Conclusion: Sensory deficits were observed in FAI patients both before and 6-months after hip arthroscopy. PMID:26944822

  1. Evaluating the quality of Internet information for femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Simon; Shin, Jason J; Haro, Marc S; Song, Sang H; Nho, Shane J

    2014-10-01

    The Internet has become a ubiquitous source of medical information for both the patient and the physician. However, the quality of this information is highly variable. We evaluated the quality of Internet information available for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Four popular search engines were used to collect 100 Web sites containing information on FAI. Web sites were evaluated based on authorship, various content criteria, and the presence of Health On the Net Code of Conduct (HONcode) certification. By use of a novel evaluation system for quality, Web sites were also classified as excellent, high, moderate, poor, or inadequate and were subsequently analyzed. Web sites were evaluated as a group, followed by authorship type, by HONcode certification, and by quality level. Of the Web sites, 73 offered the ability to contact the author, 91 offered a considerable explanation of FAI, 54 provided surgical treatment options, 58 offered nonsurgical treatment options, 27 discussed possible complications, 11 discussed eligibility criteria, 31 discussed rehabilitation, 67 discussed a differential diagnosis, and 48 included peer-reviewed citations. We categorized 40 Web sites as academic, 33 as private, 9 as industry, 9 as public education, and 9 as blogs. Our novel quality evaluation system classified 16 Web sites as excellent, 18 as high, 17 as moderate, 18 as poor, and 31 as inadequate. Only 8% of all evaluated Web sites contained HONcode certification. We found that the quality of information available on the Internet about FAI was dramatically variable. A significantly large proportion of Web sites were from academic sources, but this did not necessarily indicate higher quality. Sites with HONcode certification showed as much variability in quality as noncertified sites. This study increases clinician competence in the available Internet information about FAI and helps them to confidently guide patients to formulate appropriate medical decisions based on high

  2. Reliability of hip examination tests for femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Ratzlaff, Charles; Simatovic, Jacqueline; Wong, Hubert; Li, Linda; Ezzat, Allison; Langford, Dolores; Esdaile, John M; Kennedy, Carol; Embley, Patrick; Caves, Darryl; Hopkins, Trish; Cibere, Jolanda

    2013-10-01

    To assess the interrater reliability of hip examination tests used to assess femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) among clinicians from different disciplines. Twelve subjects were examined by 9 clinicians using 12 hip tests drawn from a review of the literature and consultation with experts in hip pain and FAI. Examiners assessed both hips of each subject and were blinded to subject history. The order in which subjects were seen, the order of tests, and order of examination of the 2 hips within each subject were all randomized. Interrater reliability (IRR) for the 10 categorical tests was summarized using overall raw agreement (ORA), positive agreement (agreement on abnormal findings), and negative agreement (agreement on normal findings). An ORA of >0.75 was considered to indicate adequate reliability. For the 2 range of motion (ROM) outcomes, IRR was summarized using the median of the absolute difference (MAD) in measurements obtained by any 2 examiners on any patient. MAD reflects the "typical" difference (in degrees) between 2 raters. Adequate reliability (ORA >0.75) was achieved for 6 of the 10 hip examination tests with categorical outcomes. Positive agreement ranged from 0.35 to 0.84, while negative agreement ranged from 0.62 to 0.99. For the ROM outcomes, examiners were, on average, within 5° of each other for flexion and 7° for internal rotation. The results provide evidence that the most common hip examination tests would likely be sufficiently reliable to allow agreement between examiners when discriminating between painful FAI and normal hips in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Radiographic Evidence of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Athletes With Athletic Pubalgia

    PubMed Central

    Economopoulos, Kostas J.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Hanks, John B.; Hart, Joseph M.; Diduch, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Two of the most common causes of groin pain in athletes are femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and athletic pubalgia. An association between the 2 is apparent, but the prevalence of radiographic signs of FAI in patients undergoing athletic pubalgia surgery remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of radiologic signs of FAI in patients with athletic pubalgia. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that patients with athletic pubalgia would have a high prevalence of underlying FAI. Study Design: Case series. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: A retrospective review of all patients evaluated at our institution with athletic pubalgia who underwent surgical treatment (ie, for sports hernia) from 1999 to 2011 was performed. The radiographs of patients with athletic pubalgia were reviewed for radiographic signs of FAI. Alpha angles were measured using frog-leg lateral radiographs. Pincer lesions were identified by measuring the lateral center-edge angle and identifying the presence of a “crossover” sign on anteroposterior radiographs. Phone follow-up was performed 2 years or more after the initial sports hernia surgery to evaluate recurrent symptoms. Results: Forty-three patients underwent 56 athletic pubalgia surgeries. Radiographic evidence of FAI was identified in at least 1 hip in 37 of 43 patients (86%). Cam lesions were identified in 83.7% of the population; the alpha angle averaged 66.7° ± 17.9° for all hips. Pincer lesions were present in 28% of the hips. Eight patients had recurrent groin pain, 3 patients had revision athletic pubalgia surgery, and 1 had hip arthroscopy. Conclusion: The study demonstrates a high prevalence of radiographic FAI in patients with athletic pubalgia. Clinical Relevance: Underlying FAI may be a cause of continued groin pain after athletic pubalgia surgery. Patients with athletic pubalgia should be evaluated closely for FAI. PMID:24587869

  4. Methodological quality of systematic reviews addressing femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Kowalczuk, Marcin; Adamich, John; Simunovic, Nicole; Farrokhyar, Forough; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2015-09-01

    As the body of literature on femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) continues to grow, clinicians turn to systematic reviews to remain current with the best available evidence. The quality of systematic reviews in the FAI literature is currently unknown. The goal of this study was to assess the quality of the reporting of systematic reviews addressing FAI over the last 11 years (2003-2014) and to identify the specific methodological shortcomings and strengths. A search of the electronic databases, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed, was performed to identify relevant systematic reviews. Methodological quality was assessed by two reviewers using the revised assessment of multiple systematic reviews (R-AMSTAR) scoring tool. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) was used to determine agreement between reviewers on R-AMSTAR quality scores. A total of 22 systematic reviews were assessed for methodological quality. The mean consensus R-AMSTAR score across all studies was 26.7 out of 40.0, indicating fair methodological quality. An ICC of 0.931, 95 % CI 0.843-0.971 indicated excellent agreement between reviewers during the scoring process. The systematic reviews addressing FAI are generally of fair methodological quality. Use of tools such as the R-AMSTAR score or PRISMA guidelines while designing future systematic reviews can assist in eliminating methodological shortcomings identified in this review. These shortcomings need to be kept in mind by clinicians when applying the current literature to their patient populations and making treatment decisions. Systematic reviews of highest methodological quality should be used by clinicians when possible to answer clinical questions.

  5. Impaired hip muscle strength in patients with femoroacetabular impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, Signe; Mechlenburg, Inger; Lund, Bent; Søballe, Kjeld; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2017-05-25

    Patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) experience hip pain as well as decreased function and lowered quality of life. The aim was to compare maximal isometric and isokinetic muscle strength (MVC) during hip flexion and extension and rate of force development (RFD) during extension between patients with FAI and a matched reference group. Secondary, the aim was to compare patient hips and subgroups defined by gender and age as well as to investigate associations between hip muscle strength and self-reported outcomes. Design Cross-sectional, comparative study Methods Sixty patients (36±9 years, 63% females) and 30 age and gender matched reference persons underwent MVC tests in an isokinetic dynamometer. During hip flexion and extension, patients' affected hip showed a strength deficit of 15-21% (p<0.001) and 10-25% (p<0.03) compared with reference MVC, respectively. The affected hip of the patients was significantly weaker than their contralateral hip. RFD was significantly decreased for both patient hips compared to the reference group (p<0.05). While age had less effect on MVC, female patients were more affected than male patients. Self-reported measures were associated with isometric hip muscle strength. Patients with FAI demonstrate decreased hip flexion and extension strength when compared to (1) reference persons and (2) their contralateral hip. There seems to be a gender specific affection which should be investigated further and addressed when planning training protocols. Furthermore, self-reported measures were associated with isometric muscle strength, which underlines the clinical importance of the reduced muscle strength. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. On-Ice Functional Assessment of an Elite Ice Hockey Goaltender After Treatment for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Tramer, Joseph S.; Deneweth, Jessica M.; Whiteside, David; Ross, James R.; Bedi, Asheesh; Goulet, Grant C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a major cause of performance inhibition in elite-level athletes. The condition is characterized by pain, osseous abnormalities such as an increased alpha angle, and decreased range of motion at the affected hip joint. Arthroscopic surgical decompression is useful in reshaping the joint to alleviate symptoms. Functional kinematic outcomes of sport-specific movements after surgery, however, are presently unknown. Hypothesis: The ability of an ice hockey goaltender to execute sport-specific movements would improve after arthroscopic surgery. Study Design: Clinical research. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Methods: An ice hockey goaltender was evaluated after arthroscopic correction of FAI on the symptomatic hip. Passive range of motion and radiographic parameters were assessed from a computed tomography–derived 3-dimensional model. An on-ice motion capture system was also used to determine peak femoral shock and concurrent hip joint postures during the butterfly and braking movements. Results: Maximum alpha angles were 47° in the surgical and 61° in the nonsurgical hip. Internal rotation range of motion was, on average, 23° greater in the surgically corrected hip compared with contralateral. Peak shock was lower in the surgical hip by 1.39 g and 0.86 g during butterfly and braking, respectively. At peak shock, the surgical hip demonstrated increased flexion, adduction, and internal rotation for both tasks (butterfly, 6.1°, 12.3°, and 30.8°; braking, 14.8°, 19.2°, and 41.4°). Conclusion: On-ice motion capture revealed performance differences between hips after arthroscopic surgery in a hockey goaltender. Range of motion and the patient’s subjective assessment of hip function were improved in the surgical hip. While presenting as asymptomatic, it was discovered that the contralateral hip displayed measurements consistent with FAI. Therefore, consideration of preemptive treatment in a presently painless hip may

  7. Good Results After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement in Top-Level Athletes.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Mikael; Ahldén, Mattias; Jonasson, Pall; Thomeé, Christoffer; Swärd, Leif; Baranto, Adad; Karlsson, Jón; Thomeé, Roland

    2015-02-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common cause of hip pain and dysfunction among athletes. Although arthroscopic surgery is an established treatment option for FAI, there are few studies reporting detailed outcomes using validated outcome measurements specifically designed for young and active athletes. To report outcomes 1 year after arthroscopic treatment of FAI in top-level athletes using validated outcome measurements adapted for a young and active population. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 85 top-level athletes (68 males, 17 females) with a mean (±SD) age of 25 ± 5 years underwent arthroscopic surgery for FAI. All athletes who reported Hip Sports Activity Scale (HSAS) levels 7 or 8 (range, 0-8) prior to symptom onset were included. The cohort was prospectively evaluated using online web-based validated health-related patient-reported outcomes measures (HR-PROMs), including the short version of the International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-12), the Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS; 6 subscales), the EuroQOL 5 dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D; 2 subscales), the Hip Sports Activity Scale (HSAS) for physical activity level, and a visual analog scale (VAS) for overall hip function. Furthermore, patients reported their overall satisfaction with treatment. The mean follow-up time was 12.3 ± 0.6 months. Preoperative scores compared with those obtained at the 12-month follow-up revealed statistically and clinically significant improvements (P < .0001) for all measured outcomes: iHOT-12 (42 vs 73), VAS for global hip function (52 vs 77), HSAS (4.3 vs 5.7), EQ-5D index (0.60 vs 0.83), EQ-VAS (68 vs 82), and HAGOS subscales (60 vs 83, 50 vs 73, 66 vs 86, 39 vs 75, 27 vs 70, and 34 vs 67). At the 12-month follow-up, 79 athletes (93%) reported that they were satisfied with the outcome of surgery. At follow-up, 62 athletes (73%) had returned to competitive sports (HSAS levels 5-8) and 44 (52%) to their previous HSAS level of activity (HSAS

  8. Hip joint biomechanics during gait in people with and without symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Laura E; Wrigley, Tim V; Bennell, Kim L; Hinman, Rana S; O'Donnell, John; Hodges, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a morphological hip condition that can cause hip/groin pain and impaired function in younger active adults, and may lead to stiffness, muscle weakness, structural damage, and hip osteoarthritis. Understanding the impairments associated with FAI is crucial to guide treatment and rehabilitation strategies. Evidence is limited and conflicting about whether hip biomechanics are impaired during walking in people with symptomatic FAI. The objective of this study was to determine whether kinematics and kinetics during gait differ between people with symptomatic FAI and control participants. Fifteen participants diagnosed with symptomatic cam-type or combined (cam plus pincer) FAI who were scheduled for arthroscopic surgery and 14 age-, and sex-matched disease-free controls underwent three-dimensional gait analysis. Tri-planar hip kinematics and kinetics were compared between the two groups. There were limited significant between-group differences with respect to spatiotemporal variables. Participants with FAI walked with less range of motion in the sagittal plane during a gait cycle, but did not exhibit any significant kinematic differences in the frontal or transverse planes. There were no systematic differences in kinetics between the groups in any plane. Findings suggest that individuals with symptomatic FAI have minimal impairments in gait biomechanics. Although these individuals demonstrate reduced hip joint motion in the sagittal plane, the size of the difference is small and its significance for symptoms and function is unclear. More pronounced deficits in hip kinetics and kinematics may be evident during functional tasks that challenge the hip towards the position of impingement.

  9. The Warwick Agreement on femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAI syndrome): an international consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Griffin, D R; Dickenson, E J; O'Donnell, J; Agricola, R; Awan, T; Beck, M; Clohisy, J C; Dijkstra, H P; Falvey, E; Gimpel, M; Hinman, R S; Hölmich, P; Kassarjian, A; Martin, H D; Martin, R; Mather, R C; Philippon, M J; Reiman, M P; Takla, A; Thorborg, K; Walker, S; Weir, A; Bennell, K L

    2016-10-01

    The 2016 Warwick Agreement on femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome was convened to build an international, multidisciplinary consensus on the diagnosis and management of patients with FAI syndrome. 22 panel members and 1 patient from 9 countries and 5 different specialties participated in a 1-day consensus meeting on 29 June 2016. Prior to the meeting, 6 questions were agreed on, and recent relevant systematic reviews and seminal literature were circulated. Panel members gave presentations on the topics of the agreed questions at Sports Hip 2016, an open meeting held in the UK on 27-29 June. Presentations were followed by open discussion. At the 1-day consensus meeting, panel members developed statements in response to each question through open discussion; members then scored their level of agreement with each response on a scale of 0-10. Substantial agreement (range 9.5-10) was reached for each of the 6 consensus questions, and the associated terminology was agreed on. The term 'femoroacetabular impingement syndrome' was introduced to reflect the central role of patients' symptoms in the disorder. To reach a diagnosis, patients should have appropriate symptoms, positive clinical signs and imaging findings. Suitable treatments are conservative care, rehabilitation, and arthroscopic or open surgery. Current understanding of prognosis and topics for future research were discussed. The 2016 Warwick Agreement on FAI syndrome is an international multidisciplinary agreement on the diagnosis, treatment principles and key terminology relating to FAI syndrome.Author note The Warwick Agreement on femoroacetabular impingement syndrome has been endorsed by the following 25 clinical societies: American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM), Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sports and Exercise Medicine (ACPSEM), Australasian College of Sports and Exercise Physicians (ACSEP), Austian Sports Physiotherapists, British Association of Sports and Exercise

  10. Hip Arthroscopy in athletes with Femoroacetabular Impingement: functional outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Magi, Gonzalo; Carucci, Juan Pablo; Berro, Manuel; Bergues, Sebastián

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Hip pathology is being recognized with more frequency as source of disability and functional limitation in athletes. It has been stated that the overload made with certain positions during some sports activities can develop condral damage. Moreover, the sum of bone deformity and repetitive movements of the hip requiered in sports may increase the risk of causing injuries. These can be treated with hip arthroscopy. Despite of this, there is a lack of evidence about the time taken to return to sports activity and the level reached afterwards by those patients treated with this procedure. Objective: Describe the clinical evolution, the time taken to return to sports activity and the level reached a year after the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) with hip arthroscopy in 23 athletes. Method: 23 athletes were included in the study, defined as those patients with a minimum of 6 hours a week of sports practice, who were treated for FAI with hip arthroscopy between 2010 and 2015 by the same surgeon at our institution. The diagnosis was clinical (positive impingement test, hip pain and functional limitation of the hip), radiological (cam and pincer) and with magnetic nuclear resonance (labral tears). Preoperative modified Harris hip score was registered in all cases. Tonnis radiographic score was used. All patients had type 0 or 1 Tonnis hips. After 3 months of ineffective non operative treatment the arthroscopy was performed. Patients were treated in dorsal decubitus with orthopedic table. Labral reconstruction with anchors and femoral and acetabular osteoplasty was made. After surgery, patients were able to walk with support for 4 weeks and began physiotherapy. A year after surgery, all patients were questioned about the time taken to return to sports activity and the level of activity reached at that time compared to the one they had before symptoms appeared. The modified Harris hip score was also registered. Results: Ten patients played

  11. A Qualitative Assessment of Return to Sport After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Tjong, Vehniah K.; Cogan, Charles J.; Riederman, Brett D.; Terry, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is known to produce excellent outcomes, yet some patients do not return to their preinjury level of sport participation. Much literature on return to sport has revolved around anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and even shoulder instability, but none to date have used qualitative, semistructured patient interviews on patients with hip labral tears. Purpose: To understand the factors influencing the decision to return to sport after arthroscopic hip surgery for FAI. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: An experienced interviewer conducted qualitative, semistructured interviews of patients aged 18 to 60 years who had arthroscopic hip surgery for FAI. All had preinjury participation in sport and a minimum 2-year follow-up with no revision surgery. Qualitative analysis was then performed to derive codes, categories, and themes. An assessment of preinjury and current sports participation by type, level of competition, and frequency along with patient-reported hip function was also obtained. In addition, current modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), international Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-12), Hip Outcome Score–sports-specific subscale (HOS-SSS), and a coping mechanism evaluation (Brief COPE) were also recorded. Results: A total of 23 patients were interviewed to reveal the overarching themes of internal motivation, external encouragement, and resetting expectations as the predominant factors influencing a patient’s decision to return to preinjury sport. Subjective outcome measurements (mHHS, iHOT-12, patient satisfaction) showed significant differences between patients who did and did not return to sport. Interestingly, the adaptive and maladaptive coping mechanisms matched and supported our themes in those patients who described fear and self-motivation as defining features influencing their cessation of or return to play, respectively. Conclusion: Self-motivation, aging, pain

  12. Arthroscopic Resection of a Large Bony Exostosis Arising from the Anterior Inferior Iliac Spine Causing Extra-articular Hip Impingement: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Carton, Patrick; Filan, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Abnormal morphology of the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) is a rarely recognized but important source of extra-articular hip impingement. Chronic progressive symptoms of stiffness and limitation of hip motion with persistent groin pain may place significant restriction on activity. Concomitant femoroacetabular impingement is often present but recognition and effective treatment of the uncommon extra-articular component is important for successful outcome. Case Report: Three cases of symptomatic extra-articular hip impingement secondary to AIIS deformity and in conjunction with mild underlying femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) are presented. They include two athletic Caucasian males aged 27 and 35-years old with a history of prior rectus tendon injury and secondary bony exostosis formation and a 53-year-old Caucasian male with a nontraumatic, developmental AIIS deformity. In all cases, an excellent clinical outcome with a full return to pain free activity was achieved postoperation. Their clinical presentation, diagnosis and post-operative outcome at 1.5-2 years (mean 1.7 years) following arthroscopic AIIS resection are discussed. Conclusion: Arthroscopic management of AIIS extra-articular hip impingement has been rarely reported and the longer-term outcome is unknown. We report the successful clinical outcome in a case series of three patients up to 2 years following arthroscopic AIIS resection. This case series demonstrates the sustainable benefits of arthroscopic correction of AIIS bony exostosis as a cause of extra-articular FAI. PMID:27299135

  13. Hip kinematics and kinetics in persons with and without cam femoroacetabular impingement during a deep squat task.

    PubMed

    Bagwell, Jennifer J; Snibbe, Jason; Gerhardt, Michael; Powers, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that hip and pelvis kinematics may be altered during functional tasks in persons with femoroacetabular impingement. The purpose of this study was to compare hip and pelvis kinematics and kinetics during a deep squat task between persons with cam femoroacetabular impingement and pain-free controls. Fifteen persons with cam femoroacetabular impingement and 15 persons without cam femoroacetabular impingement performed a deep squat task. Peak hip flexion, abduction, and internal rotation, and mean hip extensor, adductor, and external rotator moments were quantified. Independent t-tests (α<0.05) were used to evaluate between group differences. Compared to the control group, persons with cam femoroacetabular impingement demonstrated decreased peak hip internal rotation (15.2° (SD 9.5°) vs. 9.4° (SD 7.8°); P=0.041) and decreased mean hip extensor moments (0.56 (SD 0.12) Nm/kg vs. 0.45 (SD 0.15) Nm/kg; P=0.018). In addition persons in the cam femoroacetabular impingement group demonstrated decreased posterior pelvis tilt during squat descent compared to the control group, resulting in a more anteriorly tilted pelvis at the time peak hip flexion (12.5° (SD 17.1°) vs. 23.0° (SD 12.4°); P=0.024). The decreased hip internal rotation observed in persons with cam femoroacetabular impingement may be the result of bony impingement. Furthermore, the decrease in posterior pelvis tilt may contribute to impingement by further approximating the femoral head-neck junction with the acetabulum. Additionally, decreased hip extensor moments suggest that diminished hip extensor muscle activity may contribute to decreased posterior pelvis tilt. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of Radiographic Parameters Predisposing to Femoroacetabular Impingement in Young Asymptomatic Chinese and White Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Van Houcke, Jan; Yau, Wan Pan; Yan, Chun Hoi; Huysse, Wouter; Dechamps, Hannes; Lau, Wing Hang; Wong, Chun Sing; Pattyn, Christophe; Audenaert, Emmanuel Albert

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis of the hip is five to ten times more common in white people than in Chinese people. Little is known about the true prevalence of femoroacetabular impingement or its role in the development of osteoarthritis in the Chinese population. A cross-sectional study of both white and Chinese asymptomatic individuals was conducted to compare the prevalences of radiographic features posing a risk for femoroacetabular impingement in the two groups. It was hypothesized that that there would be proportional differences in hip anatomy between the white and Asian populations. Methods: Pelvic computed tomography scans of 201 subjects (ninety-nine white Belgians and 102 Chinese; 105 men and ninety-six women) without hip pain who were eighteen to forty years of age were assessed. The original axial images were reformatted to three-dimensional pelvic models simulating standardized radiographic views. Ten radiographic parameters predisposing to femoroacetabular impingement were measured: alpha angle, anterior offset ratio, and caput-collum-diaphyseal angle on the femoral side and crossover sign, ischial spine projection, acetabular anteversion angle, center-edge angle, acetabular angle of Sharp, Tönnis angle, and anterior acetabular head index on the acetabular side. Results: The white subjects had a less spherical femoral head than the Chinese subjects (average alpha angle, 56° compared with 50°; p < 0.001). The Chinese subjects had less lateral acetabular coverage than the white subjects, with average center-edge angles of 35° and 39° (p < 0.001) and acetabular angles of Sharp of 38° and 36° (p < 0.001), respectively. A shallower acetabular configuration was predominantly present in Chinese women. Conclusions: Significant differences in hip anatomy were demonstrated between young asymptomatic Chinese and white subjects. However, the absolute size of the observed differences appears to contrast with the reported low prevalence of femoroacetabular

  15. [Hip arthroscopy in males younger than 40 with femoroacetabular impingement: short-term outcomes].

    PubMed

    Más Martínez, J; Morales-Santías, M; Bustamante Suarez Suarez de Puga, D; Sanz-Reig, J

    2014-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement is probably the most common mechanism that leads to the development of early cartilage and labral damage in the non-dysplastic hip. The objective was to evaluate the outcomes of hip arthroscopy as a treatment for femoroacetabular impingement in patients with high level of function. A prospective study was performed on 41 patients younger than 40 years old undergoing hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement. Modified Harris Hip Score and HOS and IHOT questionnaires were used for clinical assessment. Radiological evaluation was made for joint space and alpha angle. The mean age of patients was 32.7 years. Labrum injury was detected in 78%, and acetabular cartilage injury in 56% of cases. The average follow-up was 31.3 months. There was a significantly improvement in the mean score in the clinical questionnaires. Radiologically there was no change in the mean joint space, with significantly reduction to normal values of the alpha angle. All patients returned to sports at their pre-injury level of function. Hip arthroscopy resulted in improvement in hip functional outcomes with correction of the underlying osseous deformity and treatment of the associated labral and cartilage pathology, with the return of patients to their pre-injury sports. Further follow-up is essential to confirm the stability of the clinical and radiological outcomes. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Good Results After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement in Top-Level Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Mikael; Ahldén, Mattias; Jonasson, Pall; Thomeé, Christoffer; Swärd, Leif; Baranto, Adad; Karlsson, Jón; Thomeé, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Background: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common cause of hip pain and dysfunction among athletes. Although arthroscopic surgery is an established treatment option for FAI, there are few studies reporting detailed outcomes using validated outcome measurements specifically designed for young and active athletes. Purpose: To report outcomes 1 year after arthroscopic treatment of FAI in top-level athletes using validated outcome measurements adapted for a young and active population. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A total of 85 top-level athletes (68 males, 17 females) with a mean (±SD) age of 25 ± 5 years underwent arthroscopic surgery for FAI. All athletes who reported Hip Sports Activity Scale (HSAS) levels 7 or 8 (range, 0-8) prior to symptom onset were included. The cohort was prospectively evaluated using online web-based validated health-related patient-reported outcomes measures (HR-PROMs), including the short version of the International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-12), the Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS; 6 subscales), the EuroQOL 5 dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D; 2 subscales), the Hip Sports Activity Scale (HSAS) for physical activity level, and a visual analog scale (VAS) for overall hip function. Furthermore, patients reported their overall satisfaction with treatment. Results: The mean follow-up time was 12.3 ± 0.6 months. Preoperative scores compared with those obtained at the 12-month follow-up revealed statistically and clinically significant improvements (P < .0001) for all measured outcomes: iHOT-12 (42 vs 73), VAS for global hip function (52 vs 77), HSAS (4.3 vs 5.7), EQ-5D index (0.60 vs 0.83), EQ-VAS (68 vs 82), and HAGOS subscales (60 vs 83, 50 vs 73, 66 vs 86, 39 vs 75, 27 vs 70, and 34 vs 67). At the 12-month follow-up, 79 athletes (93%) reported that they were satisfied with the outcome of surgery. At follow-up, 62 athletes (73%) had returned to competitive sports (HSAS levels 5-8) and 44 (52

  17. Is the frog lateral plain radiograph a reliable predictor of the alpha angle in femoroacetabular impingement?

    PubMed

    Konan, S; Rayan, F; Haddad, F S

    2010-01-01

    The radiological evaluation of the anterolateral femoral head is an essential tool for the assessment of the cam type of femoroacetabular impingement. CT, MRI and frog lateral plain radiographs have all been suggested as imaging options for this type of lesion. The alpha angle is accepted as a reliable indicator of the cam type of impingement and may also be used as an assessment for the successful operative correction of the cam lesion. We studied the alpha angles of 32 consecutive patients with femoroacetabular impingement. The angle measured on frog lateral radiographs using templating tools was compared with that measured on CT scans in order to assess the reliability of the frog lateral view in analysing the alpha angle in cam impingement. A high interobserver reliability was noted for the assessment of the alpha angle on the frog lateral view with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.83. The mean alpha angle measured on the frog lateral view was 58.71 degrees (32 degrees to 83.3 degrees ) and that by CT was 65.11 degrees (30 degrees to 102 degrees ). A poor intraclass correlation coefficient (0.08) was noted between the measurements using the two systems. The frog lateral plain radiograph is not reliable for measuring the alpha angle. Various factors may be responsible for this such as the projection of the radiograph, the positioning of the patient and the quality of the image. CT may be necessary for accurate measurement of the alpha angle.

  18. Sex Differences in Patients With CAM Deformities With Femoroacetabular Impingement: 3-Dimensional Computed Tomographic Quantification.

    PubMed

    Yanke, Adam B; Khair, M Michael; Stanley, Robert; Walton, David; Lee, Simon; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro; Espinosa Orias, Alejandro A; Inoue, Nozomu; Nho, Shane J

    2015-12-01

    To determine if significant differences exist between male and female CAM deformities using quantitative 3-dimensional (3D) volume and location analysis. Retrospective analysis of preoperative computed tomographic (CT) scans for 138 femurs (69 from male patients and 69 from female patients) diagnosed with impingement from November 2009 to November 2011 was completed. Those patients who presented with hip complaints and had a history, physical examination (limited range of motion, positive impingement signs), plain radiographs (anteroposterior pelvis, 90° Dunn view, false profile view), and magnetic resonance images consistent with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and in whom a minimum of 6 months of conservative therapy (oral anti-inflammatory agents, physical therapy, and activity modification) had failed were indicated for arthroscopic surgery and had a preoperative CT scan. Scans were segmented, converted to point cloud data, and analyzed with a custom-written computer program. Analysis included mean CAM height and volume, head radius, and femoral version. Differences were analyzed using an unpaired t test with significance set at P < .05. Female patients had greater femoral anteversion compared with male patients (female patients, 15.5° ± 8.3°; male patients, 11.3° ± 9.0°; P = .06). Male femoral head radii were significantly larger than female femoral heads (female patients, 22.0 ± 1.3 mm; male patients, 25.4 ± 1.3 mm; P < .001). Male CAM height was significantly larger than that in female patients (female patients, 0.66 ± 0.61 mm; male patients, 1.51 ± 0.75 mm; P < .001). Male CAM volume was significantly larger as well (male patients, 433 ± 471 mm(3); female patients, 89 ± 124 mm(3); P < .001). These differences persisted after normalizing height (P < .001) and volume (P < .001) to femoral head radius. Average clock face distribution was from the 1:09 o'clock position ± the 2:51 o'clock position to the 3:28 o'clock position ± the 1:59 o

  19. A pre-operative approach of range of motion simulation and verification for femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ta-Cheng; Kang, Hyosig; Arata, Louis; Zhao, Weizhao

    2011-09-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is increasingly recognized as a potential cause of hip osteoarthritis. A system capable of pre-operatively simulating hip range of motion (ROM) by given surface models from either healthy or FAI diseased bone is desirable. An impingement detection system using bounding sphere hierarchies was first developed. Both precision and accuracy of the impingement detection system were verified by a custom-designed phantom to imitate ball-and-socket hip movement. The impingement detection system was then implemented into the hip ROM simulation system to simulate the ROM of (1) healthy pelvis and femur, and (2) healthy pelvis and pathologic femur. The ROM simulation system was also verified by manipulating sawbones under the navigation of an optical tracking system. The impingement detection system achieved a distance error of 0.53 ± 0.06 mm and an angular error of 0.28 ± 0.03°. The impingement detection accuracies were 100%, 100%, and 96% in three different phantom orientations, respectively. The mean errors between simulated and verified ROM were 0.10 ± 1.39° for the 'healthy pelvis and femur' group, and - 2.38 ± 3.49° for the 'healthy pelvis and pathologic femur' group. The present study demonstrates a pre-operative approach to virtually simulate and predict the functional hip ROM based on the given bone models. The impingement detection and ROM simulation systems developed may also be used for other orthopedic applications. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Femoro-acetabular impingement clinical research: is a composite outcome the answer?

    PubMed

    Ayeni, Olufemi R; Sansone, Mikael; de Sa, Darren; Simunovic, Nicole; Bedi, Asheesh; Kelly, Bryan T; Farrokhyar, Forough; Karlsson, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI) is increasingly recognized as an important cause of hip pain in the young adult. However, the methods of evaluating the efficacy of surgical intervention are often not validated and/or inconsistently reported. Important clinical, gait, radiographic and biomarker outcomes are discussed. This article (1) presents the rationale for considering a composite outcome for FAI patients; (2) examines a variety of important end points currently used to evaluate FAI surgery; (3) discusses a strategy to generate a composite outcome by combining these end points; and (4) highlights the challenges and current areas of controversy that such an approach to evaluating symptomatic FAI patients may present.

  1. The Role of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Core Muscle Injury/Athletic Pubalgia: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, David S.; Ellis, Thomas J.; Renton, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic groin pain in athletes represents a major diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in sports medicine. Two recognized causes of inguinal pain in the young adult athlete are core muscle injury/athletic pubalgia (CMI/AP) and femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). CMI/AP and FAI were previously considered to be two distinct entities; however, recent studies have suggested both entities to frequently coincide in the athlete with groin pain. This article briefly discusses the role of FAI in CMI/AP and the diagnosis and management of this complex disease. PMID:26904546

  2. Does Removal of Subchondral Cortical Bone Provide Sufficient Resection Depth for Treatment of Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement?

    PubMed

    Atkins, Penny R; Aoki, Stephen K; Whitaker, Ross T; Weiss, Jeffrey A; Peters, Christopher L; Anderson, Andrew E

    2017-08-01

    Residual impingement resulting from insufficient resection of bone during the index femoroplasty is the most-common reason for revision surgery in patients with cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Development of surgical resection guidelines therefore could reduce the number of patients with persistent pain and reduced ROM after femoroplasty. We asked whether removal of subchondral cortical bone in the region of the lesion in patients with cam FAI could restore femoral anatomy to that of screened control subjects. To evaluate this, we analyzed shape models between: (1) native cam and screened control femurs to observe the location of the cam lesion and establish baseline shape differences between groups, and (2) cam femurs with simulated resections and screened control femurs to evaluate the sufficiency of subchondral cortical bone thickness to guide resection depth. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions of the inner and outer cortical bone boundaries of the proximal femur were generated by segmenting CT images from 45 control subjects (29 males; 15 living subjects, 30 cadavers) with normal radiographic findings and 28 nonconsecutive patients (26 males) with a diagnosis of cam FAI based on radiographic measurements and clinical examinations. Correspondence particles were placed on each femur and statistical shape modeling (SSM) was used to create mean shapes for each cohort. The geometric difference between the mean shape of the patients with cam FAI and that of the screened controls was used to define a consistent region representing the cam lesion. Subchondral cortical bone in this region was removed from the 3-D reconstructions of each cam femur to create a simulated resection. SSM was repeated to determine if the resection produced femoral anatomy that better resembled that of control subjects. Correspondence particle locations were used to generate mean femur shapes and evaluate shape differences using principal component analysis. In the region of

  3. Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement as a Possible Explanation of Recalcitrant Anterior Knee Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Tey, Marc; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with chronic anterior knee pain (AKP) recalcitrant to conservative treatment who returned to our office for severe hip pain secondary to Cam femoroacetabular impingement (Cam FAI) at 10 months after the onset of knee pain. This case highlights the fact that the main problem is not in the patella but in the hip in some patients with AKP. We hypothesize that there is an external femoral rotation in order to avoid the impingement and therefore the hip pain in patients with Cam FAI. This functional femoral rotation could provoke a patellofemoral imbalance that may be, in theory, responsible for patellofemoral pain in this particular patient. In our case, Cam FAI resolution was related to the resolution of AKP. PMID:27247817

  4. Conservative management of an elite ice hockey goaltender with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI): a case report

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, Kyle; Gomes, Brendan; MacKenzie, Steven; D’Angelo, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To detail the presentation of an elite male ice hockey goaltender with cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and acetabular labral tears. This case will outline the prevalence, clinical presentation, imaging criteria, pathomechanics, and management of FAI, with specific emphasis on the ice hockey goaltender. Clinical Features: A 22-year old retired ice hockey goaltender presented to a chiropractor after being diagnosed by an orthopaedic surgeon with MRI confirmed left longitudinal and chondral flap acetabular labral tears and cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). As the patient was not a candidate for surgical intervention, a multimodal conservative treatment approach including manual therapy, electroacupuncture and rehabilitation exercises were implemented. Summary: FAI is prevalent in ice hockey players, particularly with goaltenders. Both skating and position-dependent hip joint mechanics involved in ice hockey may exacerbate or contribute to acquired and congenital forms of symptomatic FAI. As such, practitioners managing this population must address sport-specific demands in manual therapy, rehabilitation and physical training, to improve functional outcomes and prevent future injury. PMID:26816416

  5. Quantitative magnetic resonance arthrography in patients with femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Samaan, Michael A; Zhang, Alan L; Gallo, Matthew C; Schwaiger, Benedikt J; Link, Thomas M; Souza, Richard B; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative MRI (QMRI) of the hip with sequences such as T1ρ and T2 mapping has been utilized to detect early changes in cartilage matrix composition. However, QMRI has not been performed in the presence of intra-articular contrast. Thus the purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and use of QMRI during MR-arthrography (MRA) in femoracetabular impingement (FAI) patients. Using a 3 Tesla MR-scanner, 10 FAI patients underwent a unilateral MRA and standard MRI of the hip joint. Global and sub-regional T1ρ and T2 relaxation times of the acetabular and femoral articular cartilage were computed in the MRA and MRI assessments and agreement of these values were assessed using the Krippendorff's alpha (α) coefficient and linear regression (μ). T1ρ and T2 relaxation times between the MRA and MRI were compared using a repeated measures analysis of variance. Both global and sub-regional T1ρ and T2 relaxation times demonstrated strong agreement (α > 0.83; μ > 0.85) independent of intra-articular contrast. Also, global and sub-regional acetabular T1ρ (P = 0.72) and T2 (P = 0.94), as well as femoral T1ρ , relaxation times were similar between MRA and MRI (P = 0.73) yet femoral T2 relaxation times decreased when using intra-articular contrast (P = 0.04). This study demonstrated the feasibility of T1ρ and T2 mapping for use in hip MRA with FAI patients. The inclusion of QMRI in MRA provides a quantitative assessment of the effects of FAI on hip joint articular cartilage while allowing for detailed assessment of labral pathology with the use of intra-articular contrast. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1539-1545. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Diagnosis of lesions of the acetabular labrum, of the labral-chondral transition zone, and of the cartilage in femoroacetabular impingement: Correlation between direct magnetic resonance arthrography and hip arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Crespo Rodríguez, A M; de Lucas Villarrubia, J C; Pastrana Ledesma, M A; Millán Santos, I; Padrón, M

    2015-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity and accuracy of direct MR arthrography in the diagnosis of intra-articular lesions associated with femoroacetabular impingement. We used direct MR arthrography to study 51 patients with femoroacetabular impingement who underwent arthroscopic hip surgery. Surgery demonstrated 37 labral tears, 44 lesions in the labral-chondral transitional zone, and 40 lesions of the articular cartilage. We correlated the findings at preoperative direct MR arthrography with those of hip arthroscopy and calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and validity index for direct MR arthrography. The sensitivity and specificity of MR arthrography were 94.5% and 100%, respectively, for diagnosing labral tears, 100% and 87.5%, respectively, for diagnosing lesions of the labral-chondral transition zone, and 92.5% and 54.5%, respectively, for diagnosing lesions of the articular cartilage. The negative predictive value of MR arthrography for lesions of the labral-chondral transitional zone was 100%. MR arthrography accurately defined extensive lesions of the cartilage and the secondary osseous changes (the main factor in poor prognosis), although its diagnostic performance was not so good in small chondral lesions. In patients with femoroacetabular impingement, direct MR arthrography can adequately detect and characterize lesions of the acetabular labrum and of the labral-chondral transitional zone as well as extensive lesions of the articular cartilage and secondary osseous changes. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Surgical innovation and safety: femoroacetabular impingement and the IDEAL collaborative framework

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cara Beth

    2016-01-01

    Operative treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a relatively new, yet rapidly expanding surgical innovation. Although the practice of surgery is inherently innovative, there is no clear distinction between minor technical variation and true modification that warrants testing. This raises important questions about how new procedures should be evaluated before being broadly disseminated. The IDEAL Collaborative is a consortium that promotes safe and responsible translation of research into clinical practice. The collaborative has delineated the typical stages of evolution of new interventional technologies, and the type of study designs appropriate for each stage. This report examines the surgical treatment of FAI as a case study of the IDEAL framework and discusses both missed and future opportunities for critical assessment. PMID:27583143

  8. Atypical hip pain: coexistence of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and osteoid osteoma.

    PubMed

    Banga, Kamaljeet; Racano, Antonella; Ayeni, Olufemi R; Deheshi, Benjamin

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this article was to emphasize the importance of including less common causes of hip pain in a differential diagnosis, particularly when clinical and radiographic variables are atypical. This article presents the case of a 52-year-old patient with a history of progressive hip pain resulting from the coexistence of both a femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and an intraarticular osteoid osteoma. The intraarticular osteoid osteoma was initially overlooked due to its unremarkable features on radiographic and resonance imaging. Consequently, the patient was surgically treated for FAI with only partial relief. An osteolytic nidus characteristic of osteoid osteoma was discovered only 1.5 years following surgery. The patient was subsequently treated for osteoid osteoma with anti-inflammatories, after which his pain began to resolve. The patient was completely pain free after 7 months. Level of evidence V.

  9. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE HIP FOR THE EVALUATION OF FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT; PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Geoffrey M.; McWalter, Emily J.; Stevens, Kathryn J.; Safran, Marc R.; Lattanzi, Riccardo; Gold, Garry E.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has, in a relatively short time, come to the forefront of orthopedic imaging. In just a few short years MRI findings that were in the past ascribed to degenerative change, normal variation, or other pathologies must now be described and included in radiology reports, as they have been shown, or are suspected to be related to, FAI. Crucial questions have come up in this time, including: what is the relationship of bony morphology to subsequent cartilage and labral damage, and most importantly, how is this morphology related to the development of osteoarthritis? In this review we attempt to place a historical perspective on the controversy, provide guidelines for interpretation of MRI examinations of patients with suspected FAI, and offer a glimpse into the future of MRI of this complex condition. PMID:25155435

  10. In-vivo hip arthrokinematics during supine clinical exams: Application to the study of femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Kapron, Ashley L; Aoki, Stephen K; Peters, Christopher L; Anderson, Andrew E

    2015-08-20

    Visualization of hip articulation relative to the underlying anatomy (i.e., arthrokinematics) is required to understand hip dysfunction in femoroacetabular (FAI) patients. In this exploratory study, we quantified in-vivo arthrokinematics of a small cohort of asymptomatic volunteers and three symptomatic patients with varying FAI deformities during the passive impingement, FABER, and rotational profile exams using dual fluoroscopy and model-based tracking. Joint angles, joint translations, and relative pelvic angles were calculated. Compared to the 95% confidence interval of the asymptomatic cohort, FAI patients appeared to have decreased adduction and internal rotation during the impingement exam and greater flexion and less abduction/external rotation in the FABER exam. During the rotational profile, only the FAI patient with the most severe deformities demonstrated considerable rotation deficits. In all participants, contact between the labrum and femoral head/neck limited motion during the impingement exam, but not the rotational profile. Substantial pelvic motion was measured during the impingement exam and FABER test in all participants. Femoral translation along any given anatomical direction ranged between 0.69 and 4.1mm. These results suggest that hip articulation during clinical exams is complex in asymptomatic hips and hips with FAI, incorporating pelvic motion and femur translation. Range of motion appears to be governed by femur-labrum contact and other soft tissue constraints, suggesting that current computer simulations that rely on direct bone contact to predict impingement may be unrealistic. Additional research is necessary to confirm these preliminary results. Still, dual fluoroscopy data may serve to validate existing software platforms or create new programs that better-represent hip arthrokinematics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measuring hip muscle strength in patients with femoroacetabular impingement and other hip pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, E.; Memarzadeh, A.; Raut, P.; Arora, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature on measurement of muscle strength in patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and other pathologies and to suggest guidelines to standardise protocols for future research in the field. Methods The Cochrane and PubMed libraries were searched for any publications using the terms ‘hip’, ‘muscle’, ‘strength’, and ‘measurement’ in the ‘Title, Abstract, Keywords’ field. A further search was performed using the terms ‘femoroacetabular’ or ‘impingement’. The search was limited to recent literature only. Results A total of 29 articles were reviewed to obtain information on a number of variables. These comprised the type of device used for measurement, rater standardisation, the type of movements tested, body positioning and comparative studies of muscle strength in FAI versus normal controls. The studies found that hip muscle strength is lower in patients with FAI; this is also true for the asymptomatic hip in patients with FAI. Conclusions Current literature on this subject is limited and examines multiple variables. Our recommendations for achieving reproducible results include stabilising the patient, measuring isometric movements and maximising standardisation by using a single tester and familiarising the participants with the protocol. Further work must be done to demonstrate the reliability of any new testing method. Cite this article: E. Mayne, A. Memarzadeh, P. Raut, A. Arora, V. Khanduja. Measuring hip muscle strength in patients with femoroacetabular impingement and other hip pathologies: A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:66–72. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.61.BJR-2016-0081. PMID:28108483

  12. Preoperative physical examination and imaging of femoroacetabular impingement prior to hip arthroscopy—a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Haldane, Chloe E.; Ekhtiari, Seper; de SA, Darren; Simunovic, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this systematic review is to report current preoperative assessment for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) including physical examination and imaging modalities prior to hip arthroscopy, and report current imaging measures used in the diagnosis of FAI. The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed were searched and screened in duplicate for relevant studies. Data regarding patient demographics, non-operative treatment, preoperative assessment including physical examination and imaging prior to hip arthroscopy were abstracted. Study quality was assessed in duplicate using the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies criteria. Sixty-eight studies of fair quality evidence that involved a total of 5125 patients (5400 hips) were included. In total, 56% of all patients were male and mean age was 36 years (SD ± 10.0). Within physical examination, FADIR impingement testing was reported in 57% of patients. All included studies reported plain radiographic imaging as a component of preoperative assessment with anterior–posterior pelvis view being the most commonly reported view, followed by the cross-table lateral and Dunn views. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained for 52% of included patients and computed tomography for 26% of patients. The most commonly reported measure within imaging for the diagnosis of cam type impingement was alpha angle (66%), whereas for pincer type impingement, the cross-over sign (48%) was most reported. Preoperative assessment is underreported in the FAI literature. Improved reporting is warranted to develop a more consistent and validated diagnostic algorithm for FAI to enhance patient selection. Level of evidence: Level IV, Systematic Review of Level I–IV Studies. PMID:28948032

  13. Does high level youth sports participation increase the risk of femoroacetabular impingement? A review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    de Silva, Viran; Swain, Michael; Broderick, Carolyn; McKay, Damien

    2016-03-11

    Sports participation can be an integral part of adolescent development with numerous positive short and long-term effects. Despite these potential benefits very high levels of physical activity, during skeletal maturation, have been proposed as a possible cause of cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). The influence of physical activity on the developing physis has been previously described both in animal studies and epidemiological studies of adolescent athletes. It is therefore important to determine whether the development of FAI is secondary to excessive physical activity or a combination of a vulnerable physis and a set level of physical activity. A review of the current literature suggests that adolescent males participating in ice-hockey, basketball and soccer, training at least three times a week, are at greater risk than their non-athletic counterparts of developing the femoral head-neck deformity associated with femoroacetabular impingement.

  14. Comparative study of the femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) prevalence in male semiprofessional and amateur soccer players.

    PubMed

    Lahner, Matthias; Walter, Philipp Alexander; von Schulze Pellengahr, Christoph; Hagen, Marco; von Engelhardt, Lars Victor; Lukas, Carsten

    2014-08-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) represents a novel approach to the mechanical etiology of hip osteoarthritis. The cam-type femoroacetabular impingement deformity occurs frequently in young male athletes. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of FAI in male semiprofessional soccer players using clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), compared to amateur soccer players. In MRI, the α angle of Nötzli is determined for quantifying FAI. According to power analysis, a total of 22 asymptomatic semiprofessional soccer players with a median of 23.3 years of age (range 18-30 years) and 22 male amateur soccer players with a median of 22.5 years of age (control group, range 18-29 years) underwent an MRI to measure the hip α angle of Nötzli. The α angle of the kicking legs of the semiprofessional group and the amateur group were analyzed. The study group was moreover evaluated by the Hip Outcome Score (HOS) and a clinical hip examination including range of motion (ROM) and impingement tests. In the semiprofessional group, 19 soccer players had a right kicking leg and 1 soccer player had a left kicking leg. 2 soccer players kicked with two feet. In the semi-professional group, the mean value of the α angle of the kicking leg (57.3 ± 8.2°) was significantly higher than in the amateur group (51.7 ± 4.8°, P = 0.008). In the semi-professional group, 15 (62.5 %) of 24 kicking legs had an increased α angle >55°, while 5 (27.3 %) kicking legs of the amateur group had an α angle >55°. Five semi professional soccer players had findings in clinical examination, whereof 4 had an increased α angle >55°. No participant of the amateur group showed pathological results in the clinical examination (P = 0.0484). Overall, semiprofessional soccer players had a higher proportion of an increased α angle than the amateur group. Semiprofessional players have a higher prevalence of an increased α angle in the kicking leg than the amateur group at

  15. Description and mid-term results of the 'over the top' technique for the treatment of the pincer deformity in femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Ilizaliturri, Victor M; Joachin, Pedro; Acuna, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Pincer impingement is often treated by surgical labral separation from the acetabular rim and rim reduction. A more recent technique the so-called 'over the top' involves reduction of the bony acetabular rim without separation of the labrum. Our purpose is to report mid-term results of the 'over the top' technique. Between January 2006 and January 2013 a consecutive series of patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) diagnosis, treated with the 'over the top' technique were included, using the lateral approach. The Western Ontario and MacMaster (WOMAC) scores were evaluated. Fifty patients (20 males and 30 females) from the Hip and Knee Joint Reconstructive and hip arthroscopy division were included. The average age was 30.5 years old and the average follow-up was 48 months (range 70-90). Preoperative WOMAC average was 42. Post-operative WOMAC was 81.3 (P = 0.01). One patient required an arthroscopic revision due to adherences, but had a full recovery after the revision surgery. The 'over the top' technique is an excellent choice for the treatment of the pincer deformity in the FAI avoiding the injury of the chondrolabral union.

  16. Combined hip arthroscopy and limited open osteochondroplasty for anterior femoroacetabular impingement: early patient reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sreebala C M; Hosny, Hazem A H; Williams, Mark R

    2013-01-01

    Many surgical techniques have been described for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) surgery to help with improvement of pain and function in symptomatic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate early patient reported outcomes and complications using combined hip arthroscopy and limited open osteochondroplasty technique. We retrospectively analysed 27 hips in 26 patients. Outcomes were assessed using the nonarthritic hip score (NAHS), UCLA score and Visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score. The average age of patients was 31.3 years and they were followed up for an average of 22.3 months. Average improvement of NAHS score was 39.55 points (p<.0001), 18 patients (72%) had at least 30 points increase in NAHS. There was 3 points average improvement in UCLA score (p<.0001). 17 patients (68%) had UCLA activity level of 6 and above. The average improvement of VAS pain score was 27.5 points (p<.0001). Minor complications included neuropraxia of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve in three patients who recovered at three months with no sequelae, while one patient developed asymptomatic heterotopic ossification Brooker grade I. One patient had neuropraxia of the sciatic nerve which recovered completely within six months. One patient had a conversion to THR at 12 months. This is an effective technique to treat FAI for reducing pain and improving function at short term follow-up and has a low complication rate without appearing to have a significant learning curve. The failure rate can be reduced if proper case selection is done.

  17. Femoroacetabular Impingement: A Retrospective Case Study With 8-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Stobert, Julia R.; Emary, Peter C.; Taylor, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) who was initially misdiagnosed and treated for a hip flexor strain. Clinical Features A 36-year-old male patient presented with insidious onset of progressive anterior right hip and groin pain of 7 years' duration. He was diagnosed with a right-sided hip flexor muscle strain and was discharged from care 1 month later. The patient then returned to the office 8 years later for treatment of unrelated lower back pain. This time, the doctor of chiropractic learned that the patient was misdiagnosed years before. The patient's past radiographs in fact revealed FAI, including severe hip joint osteoarthritis on the right and mild osteoarthritis on the left. As a result, the patient had undergone right hip joint replacement surgery. Recent radiographs also revealed FAI in the contralateral hip. Intervention and Outcome After investigating for FAI, the doctor of chiropractic was able to identify through symptomatology, history, physical examination, and radiographs the presence of FAI in the patient's left hip. An “active surveillance” approach is being taken. Conclusion This case illustrates the importance of an increasing awareness of FAI, as doctors of chiropractic are frequently the primary contact for patients with this condition. PMID:26793042

  18. Incidence of symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement in the general population: a prospective registration study

    PubMed Central

    Röling, Maarten A.; Mathijssen, Nina M.C.; Bloem, Rolf M.

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is a frequent cause of discomfort in patients and highly prevalent in active patients. One of the diagnoses causing groin pain is femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). However, the incidence of FAI in the general population is unknown. This study aimed to identify the incidence of groin pain suggestive of FAI in a cohort of 31 451 patients in the Netherlands during 1 year. A cooperation of 16 general practitioners (GPs) participated in this prospective registry. All GPs were educated in the clinical manifestation of FAI and the physical examination for FAI. Patients of all ages were registered when presenting with ‘groin pain’. Between July 2013 and July 2014, 84 patients aged between 15 and 60 years of age presented with groin pain, reflecting an incidence of 0.44%. Of these patients, 17% (14 patients) were radiologically diagnosed with FAI. Another 30% of these patients had a high clinical suspicion for FAI. This is the first report on the incidence of groin pain suggestive of FAI in a general population diagnosed by GPs. Of all 84 patients presenting with groin pain, 17% were diagnosed with FAI. Creating awareness of FAI in GPs helps identifying patients that might benefit from FAI treatment. PMID:27583159

  19. Disease severity classification using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data of cartilage in femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Henn, Lisa L; Hughes, John; Iisakka, Eleena; Ellermann, Jutta; Mortazavi, Shabnam; Ziegler, Connor; Nissi, Mikko J; Morgan, Patrick

    2017-04-30

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a condition in which subtle deformities of the femoral head and acetabulum (hip socket) result in pathological abutment during hip motion. FAI is a common cause of hip pain and can lead to acetabular cartilage damage and osteoarthritis. For some patients with FAI, surgical intervention is indicated, and it can improve quality of life and potentially delay the onset of osteoarthritis. For other patients, however, surgery is contraindicated because significant cartilage damage has already occurred. Unfortunately, current imaging modalities (X-rays and conventional MRI) are subjective and lack the sensitivity to distinguish these two groups reliably. In this paper, we describe the pairing of T2* mapping data (an investigational, objective MRI sequence) and a spatial proportional odds model for surgically obtained ordinal outcomes (Beck's scale of cartilage damage). Each hip in the study is assigned its own spatial dependence parameter, and a Dirichlet process prior distribution permits clustering of said parameters. Using the fitted model, we produce a six-color, patient-specific predictive map of the entire acetabular cartilage. Such maps will facilitate patient education and clinical decision making. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. The demographic characteristics of high-level and recreational athletes undergoing hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement: a sports-specific analysis.

    PubMed

    Nawabi, Danyal H; Bedi, Asheesh; Tibor, Lisa M; Magennis, Erin; Kelly, Bryan T

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine differences in age, gender, and the need for bilateral surgery between high-level athletes grouped by sports with similar mechanical demands on the hip and recreational athletes undergoing hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). By use of a hip-preservation center registry, a retrospective review of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy for FAI between March 2010 and April 2012 was performed. Athletes were categorized as high level (high school, collegiate, or professional) or recreational. We performed a subgroup analysis for high-level athletes, looking at differences among contact, cutting, impingement, overhead/asymmetric, endurance, and flexibility sports. The study included 288 high-level athletes and 334 recreational athletes. Being a high-level athlete was associated with a younger age (mean age, 20.2 years v 33.0 years; odds ratio, 0.69; P < .001) and male gender (61.5% v 53.6%; odds ratio, 1.75; P = .03). The percentage of high-level athletes undergoing bilateral surgery was higher than that of recreational athletes (28.4% v 15.9%); however, this association was found to be confounded by age on multivariate analysis. The most common sports for high-level athletes were soccer, hockey, and football. Athletes participating in cutting sports were significantly younger than athletes participating flexibility, contact, or impingement sports. When compared with recreational athletes undergoing arthroscopic treatment for FAI, high-level athletes are more likely to be younger, to be male, and to undergo bilateral surgery. When high-level athletes are grouped by the mechanical demands placed on the hip by their sport, athletes participating in cutting sports are more likely to be younger than those in the other groups. Level IV, case series. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. How Often Does Femoroacetabular Impingement Occur After an Innominate Osteotomy for Acetabular Dysplasia?

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Pablo; Vidal-Ruiz, Carlos; Méndez, Alfonso; Salazar, Diego Pérez; Torres, Armando

    2016-05-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement is increasingly recognized as a cause of hip pain but its incidence after an innominate osteotomy for the correction of acetabular dysplasia has not been determined. This information would be essential for the orthopaedic surgeon because it has the potential to produce a poor outcome in the long term when trying to balance acetabular instability and overcorrection. The purposes of our study were (1) to determine the frequency with which clinically relevant femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) occurs after an innominate osteotomy for the treatment of acetabular dysplasia; (2) to determine risk factors for the development of FAI; and (3) to compare postoperative radiographic and clinical outcomes in patients having undergone an innominate osteotomy for the correction of acetabular dysplasia both with and without FAI. This was a retrospective review of 154 hips (132 patients) that had undergone an innominate osteotomy for acetabular dysplasia and were evaluated at a minimum followup of 10 years (mean = 12 years). Mean age at the time of surgery was 3 years, 114 hips had a concomitant open reduction, and 54 hips also had femoral shortening. One hundred eight hips had a Salter osteotomy and 46 had a Pemberton osteotomy. Radiographs were analyzed to determine the lateral center-edge angle (CE angle) and the presence of a crossover sign. The diagnosis of FAI was established when the CE angle was greater than 40°, there was a positive crossover sign, and the patient had groin pain when flexing the hip less than 90°. Comparisons between nonparametric variables were performed with a Mann-Whitney's U test. Categorical variables were compared with a chi-square test. Change in acetabular index (correction) was dichotomized considering 20° of correction as the cutoff point. Association is presented as odds ratio (95% confidence interval), and logistic regression was performed. According to our criteria, 18 of 154 hips had FAI (12%). Of the 18

  2. Surgical approaches for cam femoroacetabular impingement: the use of multicriteria decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Ledezma, Claudio; Parvizi, Javad

    2013-08-01

    Currently, three surgical approaches are available for the treatment of cam femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), namely surgical hip dislocation (SHD), hip arthroscopy (HA), and the miniopen anterior approach of the hip (MO). Although previous systematic reviews have compared these different approaches, an overall assessment of their performance is not available. We therefore executed a multidimensional structured comparison considering the benefits, opportunities, costs, and risk (BOCR) of the different approaches using multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA). A MCDA using analytic hierarchical process (AHP) was conducted to compare SHD, HA, and MO in terms of BOCR on the basis of available evidence, institutional experience, costs, and our understanding of pathophysiology of FAI. A preclinical decision-making model was created for cam FAI to establish the surgical approach that better accomplishes our objectives regarding the surgical treatment. A total score of an alternative's utility and sensitivity analysis was established using commercially available AHP software. The AHP model based on BOCR showed that MO is the best surgical approach for cam FAI (normalized score: 0.38) followed by HA (normalized score: 0.36) and SHD (normalized score: 0.25). The sensitivity analysis showed that HA would turn into the best alternative if the variable risks account for more than 61.8% of the priority during decision-making. In any other decision-making scenario, MO remains as the best alternative. Using a recognized method for decision-making, this study provides supportive data for the use of MO approach as our preferred surgical approach for cam FAI. The latter is predominantly derived from the lower cost of this approach. Our data may be considered a proxy performance measurement for surgical approaches in cam FAI.

  3. Pelvic Rotation in Femoroacetabular Impingement Is Decreased Compared to Other Symptomatic Hip Conditions.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Daniel Camara; Paiva, Edson Barreto; Lopes, Alexia Moura Abuhid; Santos, Henrique de Oliveira; Carneiro, Ricardo Luiz; Rodrigues, André Soares; de Andrade, Marco Antonio Percope; Novais, Eduardo N; Van Dillen, Linda R

    2016-11-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional, case-control design. Background Pelvic movement has been considered a possible discriminating parameter associated with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) symptom onset. Decreased pelvic rotation has been found during squatting in people with FAI when compared to people with healthy hips. However, it is possible that changes in pelvic movement may occur in other hip conditions because of pain and may not be specific to FAI. Objectives To compare sagittal pelvic rotation during hip flexion and in sitting between people with FAI and people with other symptomatic hip conditions. Methods Thirty people with symptomatic FAI, 30 people with other symptomatic hip conditions, and 20 people with healthy hips participated in the study. Sagittal pelvic rotation was calculated based on measures of pelvic alignment in standing, hip flexion to 45° and 90°, and sitting. Results There were significant differences in sagittal pelvic rotation among the 3 groups in all conditions (P<.05). Post hoc analyses revealed that participants in the symptomatic FAI group had less pelvic rotation during hip flexion to 45° and 90° compared to participants in the other symptomatic hip conditions group and the hip-healthy group (mean difference, 1.2°-1.9°). In sitting, participants in the other symptomatic hip conditions group had less posterior pelvic rotation compared to those in the hip-healthy group (mean difference, 3.9°). Conclusion People with symptomatic FAI have less posterior pelvic rotation during hip flexion when compared to people with other symptomatic hip conditions and those with healthy hips. Level of Evidence Diagnosis, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(11):957-964. Epub 29 Sep 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6713.

  4. Herniation pits in the femoral neck: a radiographic indicator of femoroacetabular impingement?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Ah; Park, Ji Seon; Jin, Wook; Ryu, Kyungnam

    2011-02-01

    The purpose was to assess the significance of herniation pits in the femoral neck for radiographic diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Eighty hips in 62 patients (bilateral in 18) with neutral pelvic orientation were enrolled. Herniation pits were diagnosed when they were located at the anterosuperior femoral neck, close to the physis, and with a diameter of >3 mm. The five radiographic signs of FAI were used: lateral center edge angle (LCE) >39°, acetabular index (AI) ≤0, extrusion index (EI) <25%, acetabular retroversion, and pistol-grip deformity. Patients with radiographs suggesting FAI were retrospectively correlated with their clinical symptoms. Positive radiographic signs were observed in 7 hips with LCE, 7 with AI, and 80 with EI criteria. Only 3 hips out of 80 (3.8%) showed all of the signs. The acetabular retroversion and pistol-grip deformity were seen in 12/80 and 3/80 hips, respectively. The total number of hips that met radiographic criteria for FAI, including pincer type and cam type, was 18 (23%). However, none of these hips were clinically diagnosed with FAI. All symptomatic hips (11/80) presented only with nonspecific pain, and 2 hips out of 11 showed radiographic signs of FAI. The low frequency of positive radiographic signs suggesting FAI with related symptoms among patients with herniation pits suggests that herniation pits have limited significance in the diagnosis of FAI. Therefore it can be concluded that an incidental finding of herniation pits does not necessarily imply a correlation with FAI.

  5. Isometric and isokinetic hip strength and agonist/antagonist ratios in symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Laura E; Wrigley, Tim V; Hinman, Rana S; Hodges, Paul W; O'Donnell, John; Takla, Amir; Bennell, Kim L

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated isometric and isokinetic hip strength in individuals with and without symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). The specific aims were to: (i) determine whether differences exist in isometric and isokinetic hip strength measures between groups; (ii) compare hip strength agonist/antagonist ratios between groups; and (iii) examine relationships between hip strength and self-reported measures of either hip pain or function in those with FAI. Cross-sectional. Fifteen individuals (11 males; 25±5 years) with symptomatic FAI (clinical examination and imaging (alpha angle >55° (cam FAI), and lateral centre edge angle >39° and/or positive crossover sign (combined FAI))) and 14 age- and sex-matched disease-free controls (no morphological FAI on magnetic resonance imaging) underwent strength testing. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction strength of hip muscle groups and isokinetic hip internal (IR) and external rotation (ER) strength (20°/s) were measured. Groups were compared with independent t-tests and Mann-Whitney U tests. Participants with FAI had 20% lower isometric abduction strength than controls (p=0.04). There were no significant differences in isometric strength for other muscle groups or peak isokinetic ER or IR strength. The ratio of isometric, but not isokinetic, ER/IR strength was significantly higher in the FAI group (p=0.01). There were no differences in ratios for other muscle groups. Angle of peak IR torque was the only feature correlated with symptoms. Individuals with symptomatic FAI demonstrate isometric hip abductor muscle weakness and strength imbalance in the hip rotators. Strength measurement, including agonist/antagonist ratios, may be relevant for clinical management of FAI. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Differences in Athletic Performance Between Sportsmen With Symptomatic Femoroacetabular Impingement and Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Karen; Hanlon, Michael; Carton, Patrick

    2017-06-22

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a commonly recognized condition in athletes characterized by activity-related hip pain and stiffness, which if left untreated can progress to hip osteoarthritis. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of symptomatic FAI on performance in young athletes based on the hypothesis that athletes with FAI would show deficits in performance compared with healthy controls. The functional performance of a cohort of preoperative, competitive sportsmen with symptomatic FAI (FAI group, n = 54), was compared with that of a group of age, sex and activity-level matched controls (n = 66). Participants performed functional tests including a 10-m sprint, a modified agility T-test, a maximal deep squat test and a single-leg drop jump (reactive strength index). Hip range of motion was assessed by measuring maximal hip flexion, abduction, and internal rotation (at 90 degree hip flexion). The FAI group was significantly slower during the 10-m sprint (3%, P = 0.002) and agility T-test (8%, P < 0.001); flexion, abduction, and internal rotation values for the FAI group were reduced compared with controls (P < 0.001). No significant differences between groups were identified for squat depth or reactive strength index. The FAI group also reported higher levels of anterior groin pain during the 10-m sprint, modified agility T-test, and while squatting. Many sportsmen with confirmed FAI continue sports participation up to and after diagnosis, despite issues with activity-related pain and stiffness. This study highlights the functional limitations in speed, agility, and flexibility that are likely to be present in this group of FAI patients.

  7. Gluteus maximus impairment in femoroacetabular impingement: a tensiomyographic evaluation of a clinical fact.

    PubMed

    Seijas, Roberto; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Álvarez-Díaz, Pedro; Marín, Miguel; Ares, Oscar; Sallent, Andrea; Cuscó, Xavier; Cugat, Ramón

    2016-06-01

    the aim of the present study is to evaluate the mechanical and contractile properties of the gluteus maximus (GM) muscle in patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Our hypothesis is that the clinical observation of GM pain would be evidenced by tensiomyographic impairment in muscle function. A prospective, cross-sectional, intra-group comparative study was conducted to assess the neuromuscular changes of lower extremity muscles in patients with FAI. Fifty-one patients with clinical and radiographic diagnosis of FAI for at least 3 months were included. The rectus femoris (RF), adductor magnus (AM), and GM of both lower extremities of all patients were evaluated with tensiomyography (TMG). The values of TMG of the affected lower extremity were compared to those of the healthy contralateral side. The parameters obtained in this study were maximal displacement (Dm), and contraction time (Tc). The Tc of the injured GM was significantly higher compared to the healthy side (p = 0.01). There were no significant side-to-side differences in the Dm of the GM (p = 0.13), either in the Tc and Dm of the RF (p = 0.15 and p = 0.8, respectively) and AM (p = 0.25 and p = 0.75, respectively). FAI is associated with impairment of contraction time in the GM of the injured compared to the healthy side. Impairment of the GM may be monitored to evaluate response to conservative or surgical treatment.

  8. Personalised Hip Therapy: development of a non-operative protocol to treat femoroacetabular impingement syndrome in the FASHIoN randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Peter DH; Dickenson, Edward J; Robinson, David; Hughes, Ivor; Realpe, Alba; Hobson, Rachel; Griffin, Damian R; Foster, Nadine E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome is increasingly recognised as a cause of hip pain. As part of the design of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of arthroscopic surgery for FAI syndrome, we developed a protocol for non-operative care and evaluated its feasibility. Methods In phase one, we developed a protocol for non-operative care for FAI in the UK National Health Service (NHS), through a process of systematic review and consensus gathering. In phase two, the protocol was tested in an internal pilot RCT for protocol adherence and adverse events. Results The final protocol, called Personalised Hip Therapy (PHT), consists of four core components led by physiotherapists: detailed patient assessment, education and advice, help with pain relief and an exercise-based programme that is individualised, supervised and progressed over time. PHT is delivered over 12–26 weeks in 6–10 physiotherapist-patient contacts, supplemented by a home exercise programme. In the pilot RCT, 42 patients were recruited and 21 randomised to PHT. Review of treatment case report forms, completed by physiotherapists, showed that 13 patients (62%) received treatment that had closely followed the PHT protocol. 13 patients reported some muscle soreness at 6 weeks, but there were no serious adverse events. Conclusion PHT provides a structure for the non-operative care of FAI and offers guidance to clinicians and researchers in an evolving area with limited evidence. PHT was deliverable within the National Health Service, is safe, and now forms the comparator to arthroscopic surgery in the UK FASHIoN trial (ISRCTN64081839). Trial registration number ISRCTN 09754699. PMID:27629405

  9. Personalised Hip Therapy: development of a non-operative protocol to treat femoroacetabular impingement syndrome in the FASHIoN randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wall, Peter Dh; Dickenson, Edward J; Robinson, David; Hughes, Ivor; Realpe, Alba; Hobson, Rachel; Griffin, Damian R; Foster, Nadine E

    2016-10-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome is increasingly recognised as a cause of hip pain. As part of the design of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of arthroscopic surgery for FAI syndrome, we developed a protocol for non-operative care and evaluated its feasibility. In phase one, we developed a protocol for non-operative care for FAI in the UK National Health Service (NHS), through a process of systematic review and consensus gathering. In phase two, the protocol was tested in an internal pilot RCT for protocol adherence and adverse events. The final protocol, called Personalised Hip Therapy (PHT), consists of four core components led by physiotherapists: detailed patient assessment, education and advice, help with pain relief and an exercise-based programme that is individualised, supervised and progressed over time. PHT is delivered over 12-26 weeks in 6-10 physiotherapist-patient contacts, supplemented by a home exercise programme. In the pilot RCT, 42 patients were recruited and 21 randomised to PHT. Review of treatment case report forms, completed by physiotherapists, showed that 13 patients (62%) received treatment that had closely followed the PHT protocol. 13 patients reported some muscle soreness at 6 weeks, but there were no serious adverse events. PHT provides a structure for the non-operative care of FAI and offers guidance to clinicians and researchers in an evolving area with limited evidence. PHT was deliverable within the National Health Service, is safe, and now forms the comparator to arthroscopic surgery in the UK FASHIoN trial (ISRCTN64081839). ISRCTN 09754699. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement: the changing nature and severity of associated complications over time.

    PubMed

    Park, Myung-Sik; Yoon, Sun-Jung; Kim, Yong-Jin; Chung, Woo-Chul

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess complications related to arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and how these complications have changed as we have gained more experience with this procedure. The authors reviewed 200 hips (197 patients). The average patient age was 44.64 years and the mean follow-up time was 28.2 months. All patients underwent hip arthroscopy in the supine position. Clinically, Modified Harris Hip Scores (MHHS) and patient satisfaction with outcome were used. We divided complications into 3 groups: Group 1 related to traction, group 2 related to surgical technique or implant failure, and group 3 related to outcomes. Clinically, the MHHS improved from 69.96 (±6.10) to 80.45 (±7.00), and patient satisfaction with the achieved outcome increased to 8.87 (±0.76). The overall complication rate was 15% (30 of 200 hips). Group 1 consisted of 4 patients with pudendal neuropraxia and 2 patients with ankle joint pain (P = .013). Group 2 consisted of 2 patients with lateral femoral cutaneous neuropraxia, 2 patients with iatrogenic labral perforations, one patient with a labral tear, and 4 patients with femoral head scuffs. There were 4 incidents of instrument breakage. Furthermore, 3 suture anchors failed, a second-degree burn occurred in one patient, and there was incomplete reshaping in 5 hips (P = .045). Group 3 included one patient with a snapping sound and heterotopic ossification. Second-look arthroscopy was performed for 5 hips. All the complications outlined in groups 1 and 2 are related to the learning curve and have statistical significance (P < .05). Complications relating to hip arthroscopy took different forms during the early learning period, but overall complication rates decreased along the learning curve. Surgical technique-related complications such as problems with suture anchors and the reshaping of cam impingements were also considered during the later stage. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2014

  11. Are “normal hips” being labeled as femoroacetabular impingement due to EE angle?

    PubMed Central

    You, Tian; Yang, Bei; Zhang, Xin-tao; Jiang, Xiao-cheng; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Wen-tao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC) is a clinical syndrome characterized by gait abnormality and limb dysfunction, as well as secondary deformities of pelvis and femur. Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) typically could be diagnosed on the basis of computed tomography (CT) such as the equatorial-edge angle (EE angle), but it did not work well in GMC patients. In this study, we retrospected all image data and found small EE angles in GMCs, which meant retroverted acetabulum; however, none of them showed no symptoms and signs of FAI. Therefore, we had reasons to think that, some normal hips with unbalanced hip myodynamia as same as GMCs, may be incorrectly diagnosed as FAI through measuring EE angle only. In consequence, the paper was designed to assess the use of the EE angle in the assessment of FAI in the diagnosis, as described by Werner. Twenty-three patients (46 hips) were collected and calculated with the “equatorial-edge angle” (EE angle) by CT scans. All of them were excluded from FAI. Review of the hips showed a mean EE angle was 12.93°, with a minimum of -3.42° and a maximum of 24.08°. The mean value for males and females were 13.52° and 12.40°, respectively, without statistical significance, although the mean value of left hips and right sides reached 13.32° and 12.54° individually, not having statistical differences neither. There were not any symptoms or signs of FAI in all patients. Thus, the reduced EE angle could suggest the local excessive coverage of the femoral head by the anterior acetabular edge, but might not be a reasonably good predictor of FAI. GMC patient's acetabular deformity mainly manifests as increased retroversion, which may be the anatomical basis for FAI and lead to high risks of the acetabular impingement. However, all patients in this study showed no symptoms and signs of FAI, suggesting that the measurement of EE angle can only be applied to assessing those people with normal hip myodynamia, and the bone

  12. Quantitative MRI Evaluation of Articular Cartilage Using T2 Mapping Following Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Wagner, Naomi; Fields, Kara G.; Wentzel, Catherine; Burge, Alissa; Potter, Hollis G.; Lyman, Stephen; Kelly, Bryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) causes a shearing and delamination injury to the acetabular articular cartilage due to a mismatch between the size of the femoral head and the acetabulum. This mechanism is thought to lead to early osteoarthritis in this population. Cam decompression has been advocated to eliminate impingement, with the ultimate goal of halting the progression of articular cartilage delamination. Although outcomes following this procedure in the young adult population have been favorable at short and medium term follow up, it is not known whether the articular cartilage itself is protected from further injury by changing the biomechanics of the joint with decompression of the cam morphology. The purpose of this study is to compare the pre- and post-operative integrity of the acetabular articular cartilage using T2 mapping to determine if hip arthroscopy is protective of the articular cartilage at short- to medium term follow up. Methods: Males between 18 and 35 years of age who had pre-operative T2 mapping MRIs, underwent hip arthroscopy for cam or mixed-type FAI with an alpha angle greater than 50°, and had at least 2 year follow-up were identified. Post-operative MRIs were performed and T2 relaxation times in the transition zone and weight bearing articular cartilage in the anterosuperior acetabulum at deep and superficial chondral layers were recorded at nine points on three sagittal sequences on pre and post-operative MRIs. A paired t-test was used to compare T2 relaxation values between pre-operative and post-operative scans. Results: Eleven hips were evaluated. Mean age was 26.3 years (range 21 - 35). Mean follow up time to post-operative T2 mapping MRI was 2.6 years (range 2.4 - 2.7). The change in T2 relaxation time was not significantly different between pre- and post-operative MRI scans for any of the nine regions in the deep zone of the acetabular cartilage (p=0.065 - 0.969) or the superficial zone of the

  13. Are "normal hips" being labeled as femoroacetabular impingement due to EE angle?

    PubMed

    You, Tian; Yang, Bei; Zhang, Xin-Tao; Jiang, Xiao-Cheng; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Wen-Tao

    2017-03-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC) is a clinical syndrome characterized by gait abnormality and limb dysfunction, as well as secondary deformities of pelvis and femur. Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) typically could be diagnosed on the basis of computed tomography (CT) such as the equatorial-edge angle (EE angle), but it did not work well in GMC patients. In this study, we retrospected all image data and found small EE angles in GMCs, which meant retroverted acetabulum; however, none of them showed no symptoms and signs of FAI. Therefore, we had reasons to think that, some normal hips with unbalanced hip myodynamia as same as GMCs, may be incorrectly diagnosed as FAI through measuring EE angle only.In consequence, the paper was designed to assess the use of the EE angle in the assessment of FAI in the diagnosis, as described by Werner.Twenty-three patients (46 hips) were collected and calculated with the "equatorial-edge angle" (EE angle) by CT scans. All of them were excluded from FAI.Review of the hips showed a mean EE angle was 12.93°, with a minimum of -3.42° and a maximum of 24.08°. The mean value for males and females were 13.52° and 12.40°, respectively, without statistical significance, although the mean value of left hips and right sides reached 13.32° and 12.54° individually, not having statistical differences neither. There were not any symptoms or signs of FAI in all patients. Thus, the reduced EE angle could suggest the local excessive coverage of the femoral head by the anterior acetabular edge, but might not be a reasonably good predictor of FAI.GMC patient's acetabular deformity mainly manifests as increased retroversion, which may be the anatomical basis for FAI and lead to high risks of the acetabular impingement. However, all patients in this study showed no symptoms and signs of FAI, suggesting that the measurement of EE angle can only be applied to assessing those people with normal hip myodynamia, and the bone deformity and the

  14. Prevalence of radiological findings related to femoroacetabular impingement in professional baseball players in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kensuke; Takahira, Naonobu; Imai, Sousuke; Yamazaki, Tetsuya; Kenmoku, Tomonori; Uchiyama, Katsufumi; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-11-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a known patho-mechanism that causes hip pain and osteoarthritis (OA) and is considered uncommon in Japan, while secondary OA due to hip dysplasia is considered common. However, no studies have specifically targeted athletes in Japan and/or Asia. This study aimed to determine FAI prevalence using radiological findings among baseball players playing on a professional, Japanese team. We retrospectively assessed 63 plain anteroposterior (AP) hip radiographs (126 hips from 47 [74.6%] Asian players and 16 [25.3%] non-Asian players) obtained for medical evaluations. Radiographs were used to measure lateral center-edge (LCE) angle; acetabular roof obliquity (ARO); and the presence of crossover sign (COS), posterior wall sign (PWS), coxa profunda, pistol grip deformity, herniation pits, and labral ossification. Further, the prevalence of radiographic indicators related to FAI was compared between Asian and non-Asian players. In the 126 hips examined, 10 hips (7.94%) were classified as having hip dysplasia (LCE angles < 20°). Of the remaining 116 hips, eight (6.9%) had LCE angles > 40°, and 24 hips (20.7%) had AROs of <0°, indicating acetabular over-coverage. In Asian players, COS was identified in 47 hips (54.0%), positive PWS in 38 hips (43.7%), positive coxa profunda in 8 hips (9.2%), and pistol grip deformity in 37 hips (42.5%). Further, herniation pits and positive labral ossification were identified in 25 (28.7%) and 11 (12.6%) hips, respectively. A comparative review of COS prevalence (Asians vs. non-Asians) revealed that COS was significantly higher in Asian players. No differences were observed in the mean LCE angle, mean ARO, or other radiographic indicators. Radiological indicators related to FAI were identified in 76.6% (72/94 hips) of the Asian professional baseball players; this prevalence was considerably higher than that reported for general Asian populations. We consider that elite Asian athletes may frequently

  15. Prevalence of radiological femoroacetabular impingement in Japanese hip joints: detailed investigation with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Taku; Itakura, Shin; Hirata, Tomohiro; Fuzikawa, Hitomi; Mori, Kanji; Imai, Shinji

    2015-07-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has been highlighted as a new etiology for osteoarthritis of the hip, and its prevalence has been reported in the past decade. In the present study, we performed a detailed investigation of the anatomical parameters related to FAI and calculated the prevalence of FAI-related findings in asymptomatic Japanese hip joints using computed tomography. We evaluated high-resolution reconstructed multislice computed tomography images in patients who had undergone computed tomography imaging in our institution for conditions unrelated to hip disorders. The examined parameters were as follows: center-edge (CE) angle; acetabular index; acetabular anteversion (five slices in the axial plane); and asphericity angle of the femoral head (AAFH) (six slices in multiple radial planes). The AAFH in the oblique axial slice through the center of the femoral neck is the so-called α-angle. We then examined the accurate prevalence of FAI-related findings in Japan. We investigated a total of 103 hips. The mean age of the subjects was 59.4 years. The mean CE angle was 31.1° and the mean acetabular index was 7.0°. The mean acetabular anteversion was 20.3° at the level of the hip center, and decreased as the slice level neared the superior margin of the femoral head. The mean AAFH ranged from 40.6° to 49.2° in the radial planes. The AAFH was largest at 60° rotated slice from the oblique axial slice through the center of the femoral neck. The prevalence of FAI-related findings in these Japanese hip joints was assessed as follows. An AAFH of >50° in any slice was detected in 51.5 % of the hips, and acetabular anteversion was negative for all images in 16.5 % of the hips, meaning that a total of 56.3 % of the images met the criteria for radiological FAI. With consideration of our results, we emphasize that "anatomical or radiological FAI" is not uncommon in Japanese hips. Therefore, the diagnosis of FAI should be performed with the clinical findings

  16. Sonographic prevalence of groin hernias and adductor tendinopathy in patients with femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Naal, Florian D; Dalla Riva, Francesco; Wuerz, Thomas H; Dubs, Beat; Leunig, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common debilitating condition that is associated with groin pain and limitation in young and active patients. Besides FAI, various disorders such as hernias, adductor tendinopathy, athletic pubalgia, lumbar spine affections, and others can cause similar symptoms. To determine the prevalence of inguinal and/or femoral herniation and adductor insertion tendinopathy using dynamic ultrasound in a cohort of patients with radiographic evidence of FAI. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. This retrospective study consisted of 74 patients (36 female and 38 male; mean age, 29 years; 83 symptomatic hips) with groin pain and radiographic evidence of FAI. In addition to the usual diagnostic algorithm, all patients underwent a dynamic ultrasound examination for signs of groin herniation and tendinopathy of the proximal insertion of the adductors. Evidence of groin herniation was found in 34 hips (41%). There were 27 inguinal (6 female, 21 male) and 10 femoral (9 female, 1 male) hernias. In 3 cases, inguinal and femoral herniation was coexistent. Overall, 5 patients underwent subsequent hernia repair. Patients with groin herniation were significantly older than those without (33 vs 27 years, respectively; P = .01). There were no significant differences for any of the radiographic or clinical parameters. Tendinopathy of the proximal adductor insertion was detected in 19 cases (23%; 11 female, 8 male). Tendinopathy was coexistent with groin herniation in 8 of the 19 cases. There were no significant differences for any of the radiographic or clinical parameters between patients with or without tendinopathy. Patients with a negative diagnostic hip injection result were more likely to have a concomitant groin hernia than those with a positive injection result (80% vs 27%, respectively). Overall, 38 hips underwent FAI surgery with satisfactory outcomes in terms of score values and subjective improvement. The results demonstrate that groin

  17. The Distribution of Impingement Region in Cam-Type Femoroacetabular Impingement and Borderline Dysplasia of the Hip With or Without Cam Deformity: A Computer Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naomi; Inaba, Yutaka; Kubota, So; Nakamura, So; Tezuka, Taro; Yukizawa, Yohei; Choe, Hyonmin; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2017-02-01

    To identify the distribution of the impingement region in cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) or patients with borderline developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) using computer simulation analysis. A total of 51 painful hip joints from 42 consecutive cases diagnosed as cam-type FAI (center edge [CE] angle ≥ 25°, alpha angle ≥ 55°) or borderline DDH (CE angle ≥ 20° and < 25°) with or without a cam deformity (alpha angle ≥ 55° or < 55°) were enrolled. ZedHip (Lexi, Tokyo, Japan) 3-dimensional computer simulation was used to identify impingement points. Computed tomography data were used for 3-dimensional modeling and impingement simulation. The maximum flexion angle and maximum internal rotation angle at 90° were evaluated. The impingement point was identified at a position of maximum internal rotation and 90° of flexion. Six impingement regions were defined. Differences in the distribution of the impingement region were evaluated between groups. There were significant differences in range of motion at maximum flexion and internal rotation among the 3 groups (P < .0001). There was no significant difference in the distribution of the impingement point in the cam-type FAI group (P = .71); similarly, there was no significant difference in the borderline DDH with a cam deformity group (P = .071). On the other hand, in terms of proximal or distal sites, there was a significant difference between the borderline DDH with and without a cam deformity group (P < .001). The impingement region in cases of cam-type FAI was variable. The coexistence of a cam deformity affected the distribution of the impingement region in cases of borderline DDH; the region tended to be distributed across proximal rather than distal regions. The site of cam osteochondroplasty should be based on the identified impingement point, particularly in cases of cam-type FAI and borderline DDH with a cam deformity. Level IV, case control study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy

  18. Bernese Periacetabular Osteotomy in Males: Is There an Increased Risk of Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) After Bernese Periacetabular Osteotomy?

    PubMed Central

    Ziebarth, K.; Balakumar, J.; Domayer, S.; Kim, Y. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a popular option for treating symptomatic acetabular dysplasia. We noted symptomatic impingement after PAO in several male patients. Questions/purposes We therefore determined (1) the incidence of clinical signs of FAI after PAO in the male population; and (2) whether any factors were associated with the positive impingement signs after PAO in males. Patients and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 38 males who underwent 46 periacetabular osteotomies (PAO) between 2000 and 2007. Clinical and radiographic data were analyzed with the focus on pre- and postoperative incidence of femoroacetabular impingement. Minimum followup was 12 months (average, 43 months; range, 12–90 months). Results We found a positive impingement sign in 19 of the 46 hips during the preoperative examination compared to 22 (47.8%) hips postoperatively. The ROM (flexion and internal rotation) decreased postoperatively compared to preoperatively. Radiographic parameters of coverage LCE-, ACE- and Tönnis angle improved into the normal range. Twenty hips had postoperative heterotopic ossification to varying degrees, mostly minor. WOMAC scores improved in the function and pain domains postoperatively. Conclusions Despite normalization of coverage we found a high postoperative rate of clinical signs of FAI after PAO in males. Level of Evidence Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:20848246

  19. Bernese periacetabular osteotomy in males: is there an increased risk of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) after Bernese periacetabular osteotomy?

    PubMed

    Ziebarth, K; Balakumar, J; Domayer, S; Kim, Y J; Millis, M B

    2011-02-01

    The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a popular option for treating symptomatic acetabular dysplasia. We noted symptomatic impingement after PAO in several male patients. We therefore determined (1) the incidence of clinical signs of FAI after PAO in the male population; and (2) whether any factors were associated with the positive impingement signs after PAO in males. We retrospectively reviewed 38 males who underwent 46 periacetabular osteotomies (PAO) between 2000 and 2007. Clinical and radiographic data were analyzed with the focus on pre- and postoperative incidence of femoroacetabular impingement. Minimum followup was 12 months (average, 43 months; range, 12-90 months). We found a positive impingement sign in 19 of the 46 hips during the preoperative examination compared to 22 (47.8%) hips postoperatively. The ROM (flexion and internal rotation) decreased postoperatively compared to preoperatively. Radiographic parameters of coverage LCE-, ACE- and Tönnis angle improved into the normal range. Twenty hips had postoperative heterotopic ossification to varying degrees, mostly minor. WOMAC scores improved in the function and pain domains postoperatively. Despite normalization of coverage we found a high postoperative rate of clinical signs of FAI after PAO in males. Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  20. A quantitative non-invasive assessment of femoroacetabular impingement with CT-based dynamic simulation--cadaveric validation study.

    PubMed

    Röling, Maarten A; Visser, Monique I; Oei, Edwin H G; Pilot, Peter; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan; Bloem, Rolf M

    2015-03-11

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is caused by an anatomic deviation of the acetabular rim or proximal femur, which causes chronic groin pain. Radiological identification of FAI can be challenging. Advances in imaging techniques with the use of computed tomography (CT) scan enable 3D simulation of FAI. We made an experimental cadaveric validation study to validate the 3D simulation imaging software. The range of motion (ROM) of five cadaveric hips was measured using an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS). Specific marked spots in the femur and pelvis were created as reproducible EMTS registration points. Reproducible motions were measured. Hips were subsequently imaged using high-resolution CT after introduction of artificial cam deformities. A proprietary software tool was used, Articulis (Clinical Graphics) to simulate the ROM during the presence and absence of the induced cam deformities. According to the EMTS, 13 of the 30 measured ROM end-points were restricted by > 5° due to the induced cam deformities. Using Articulis, with the same 5° threshold, we correctly detected 12 of these 13 end point limitations and detected no false positives. The median error of the measured limitations was 1.9° (interquartile range 1.1° - 4.4°). The maximum absolute error was 5.4°. The use of this dynamic simulation software to determine the presence of motion limiting deformities of the femoroacetabular is validated. The simulation software is able to non-invasively detect a reduction in achievable ROM, caused by a cam type deformity.

  1. The Patient Acceptable Symptomatic State for the Modified Harris Hip Score and Hip Outcome Score Among Patients Undergoing Surgical Treatment for Femoroacetabular Impingement.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Jaskarndip; Van Thiel, Geoffrey S; Mather, Richard C; Lee, Simon; Song, Sang Hoon; Davis, Aileen M; Salata, Michael; Nho, Shane J

    2015-08-01

    There is minimal information available on the threshold at which patients consider themselves to be well for patient-reported outcome measures used in patients treated with hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). To determine the patient acceptable symptomatic state (PASS) for the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) and the Hip Outcome Score (HOS) in patients with FAI treated with arthroscopic hip surgery. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. A consecutive series of patients at a single institution with FAI who were treated with arthroscopic labral surgery, acetabular rim trimming, and femoral osteochondroplasty were eligible. The mHHS (score range, 0-100) and the HOS (score range, 0-100) were administered at baseline and at 12 months postoperatively. An external anchor question at 1 year postoperatively was utilized to determine PASS values: "Taking into account all the activities you have during your daily life, your level of pain, and also your functional impairment, do you consider that your current state is satisfactory?" There were 130 patients (mean ± SD age, 35.6 ± 11.7 years), and 42.3% were male. Based on a receiver operator curve analysis, the PASS values-at which patients considered their status to be satisfactory-at 1 year after surgery were 74 (mHHS), 87 (HOS-activities of daily living subscale), and 75 (HOS-sports subscale). The PASS threshold was not affected by baseline scores across different instruments. However, patients with higher baseline scores were more likely to achieve the PASS (odds ratios: 3.36 [mHHS], 3.83 [HOS-activities of daily living], 3.38 [HOS-sports]). Age and sex were not significantly related to the odds of achieving the PASS for the mHHS or the HOS. This is the first study to determine the PASS for 2 commonly used hip joint patient-reported outcome measures in patients undergoing surgery for FAI. The study findings can allow researchers to determine if interventions related to FAI are meaningful to

  2. Radiographic prevalence of CAM-type femoroacetabular impingement after open reduction and internal fixation of femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Mathew, G; Kowalczuk, M; Hetaimish, B; Bedi, A; Philippon, M J; Bhandari, M; Simunovic, N; Crouch, S; Ayeni, O R

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the radiographic prevalence of CAM-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in elderly patients (≥ 50 years) who have undergone internal fixation for femoral neck fracture. A total of 187 frog-leg lateral radiographs of elderly patients who underwent internal fixation for a femoral neck fracture were reviewed by two independent reviewers. The alpha angle, beta angle, and femoral head-neck offset ratio were calculated. The presence of two abnormal radiographic parameters was deemed to be diagnostic of radiographic CAM-type impingement. Radiographic CAM-type FAI was identified in 157 out of 187 (84 %) patients who underwent internal fixation for fractures of the femoral neck. Moderate-to-good inter-observer reliability was achieved in the measurement of radiographic parameters. With reference to fracture subtypes and prevalence of radiographic features of CAM-type morphology, 97 (72 %) out of 134 patients were positive for CAM in Garden subtypes I and II, whereas 49 (85.9 %) out of 57 patients had radiographic CAM in Garden III and IV subtypes. There was a high prevalence of CAM-type FAI in patients that underwent surgical fixation of femoral neck fractures. This is significantly higher than the reported prevalence in non-fracture patient populations. The high prevalence of CAM morphology could be related to several factors, including age, fracture morphology, quality of reduction, type of fixation, and fracture healing.

  3. Radiographic Prevalence of Femoroacetabular Impingement in a Young Population with Hip Complaints Is High

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-27

    impingement (abnormal alpha angle or pistol grip deformity only), whereas 16 patients (18%) had signs of pure pincer -type impingement (abnormal center-edge or...care and orthopaedic clinics. Radiographs were analyzed for signs of FAI (herniation pits, pistol grip deformity, center-edge angle, alpha angle, and...11, 12]. Two types of FAI have been described: cam and pincer . In cam-type impingement, the abnormally shaped femoral head-neck junction abuts the

  4. Planar dGEMRIC Maps May Aid Imaging Assessment of Cartilage Damage in Femoroacetabular Impingement.

    PubMed

    Bulat, Evgeny; Bixby, Sarah D; Siversson, Carl; Kalish, Leslie A; Warfield, Simon K; Kim, Young-Jo

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) helps quantify biochemical changes in articular cartilage that correlate with early-stage osteoarthritis. However, dGEMRIC analysis is performed slice by slice, limiting the potential of 3-D data to give an overall impression of cartilage biochemistry. We previously developed a computational algorithm to produce unfolded, or "planar," dGEMRIC maps of acetabular cartilage, but have neither assessed their application nor determined whether MRI-based grading of cartilage damage or dGEMRIC measurements predict intraoperative findings in hips with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). (1) Does imaging-based assessment of acetabular cartilage damage correlate with intraoperative findings in hips with symptomatic FAI? (2) Does the planar dGEMRIC map improve this correlation? (3) Does the planar map improve the correlation between the dGEMRIC index and MRI-based grading of cartilage damage in hips with symptomatic FAI? (4) Does the planar map improve imaging-based evaluation time for hips with symptomatic FAI? We retrospectively studied 47 hips of 45 patients with symptomatic FAI who underwent hip surgery between 2009 and 2013 and had a 1.5-T 3-D dGEMRIC scan within 6 months preoperatively. Our cohort included 25 males and 20 females with a mean ± SD age at surgery of 29 ± 11 years. Planar dGEMRIC maps were generated from isotropic, sagittal oblique TrueFISP and T1 sequences. A pediatric musculoskeletal radiologist with experience in hip MRI evaluated studies using radially reformatted sequences. For six acetabular subregions (anterior-peripheral [AP]; anterior-central [AC]; superior-peripheral [SP]; superior-central [SC]; posterior-peripheral [PP]; posterior-central [PC]), modified Outerbridge cartilage damage grades were recorded and region-of-interest T1 averages (the dGEMRIC index) were measured. Beck's intraoperative cartilage damage grades were compared with the Outerbridge

  5. Augmented home exercise program for a 37-year-old female with a clinical presentation of femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alexis A; Hegedus, Eric J

    2012-08-01

    Previous researchers have reported on the use of augmented home exercise programs with potential carry-over effects from manual therapy treatment. While there is no direct evidence to support augmented manual therapy, tangential evidence demonstrates that specific, supervised, and adherent exercises result in improved outcomes. The purpose of this case report is to describe an augmented home program simulating the manual techniques provided by the therapist. A 37-year-old female presented with symptoms and signs consistent with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Grade III lateral and inferior femoral glides decreased reported pain from 5/10 to 0/10. Given the immediate response to hip mobilizations, the patient was prescribed standing lateral glides and supine inferior glides of the hip with the use of a belt. During this time, the patient's Lower Extremity Functional Scale score improved from 74 to 78 and she reported increased ability to self-manage her symptoms. The immediate report of decreased pain helped determine the specific home program selected for this individual patient. This case highlights the importance of a specific augmented home exercise program unique to the individual patient resulting in self-management of pain associated with FAI.

  6. The direct environmental impact of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement: a surgical waste audit of five cases

    PubMed Central

    de SA, Darren; Stephens, Kellee; Kuang, Michelle; Simunovic, Nicole; Karlsson, Jon; Ayeni, Olufemi R.

    2016-01-01

    Health care facilities produce significant waste (2200 kg/bed/year) creating 2% of greenhouse gas emissions and 1% total solid waste nationwide, with 20–70% of waste coming from operating rooms. We performed a waste audit of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) to understand its environmental impact and identify areas for greening practices. A waste audit of five hip arthroscopy procedures for FAI was performed. All waste was collected and separated into six waste streams in real time: (i) normal/landfill waste; (ii) recyclable cardboards and plastics; (iii) biohazard waste; (iv) sharp items; (v) linens and (vi) sterile wrapping. The surgical waste (except laundered linens) from five FAI surgeries totaled 47.4 kg, including 21.7 kg (45.7%) of biohazard waste, 11.7 kg (24.6%) of sterile wrap, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of normal/landfill waste, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of recyclable plastics and 1.2 kg (2.6%) of sharp items. An average of 9.4 kg (excluding laundered linens) of waste was produced per procedure. Given the considerable biohazard waste produced by FAI procedures, additional recycling programs, continued adherence to proper waste segregation and an emphasis on ‘green outcomes’ is encouraged to demonstrate environmental responsibility and effectively manage and allocate finite resources. PMID:27583149

  7. The direct environmental impact of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement: a surgical waste audit of five cases.

    PubMed

    de Sa, Darren; Stephens, Kellee; Kuang, Michelle; Simunovic, Nicole; Karlsson, Jon; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2016-07-01

    Health care facilities produce significant waste (2200 kg/bed/year) creating 2% of greenhouse gas emissions and 1% total solid waste nationwide, with 20-70% of waste coming from operating rooms. We performed a waste audit of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) to understand its environmental impact and identify areas for greening practices. A waste audit of five hip arthroscopy procedures for FAI was performed. All waste was collected and separated into six waste streams in real time: (i) normal/landfill waste; (ii) recyclable cardboards and plastics; (iii) biohazard waste; (iv) sharp items; (v) linens and (vi) sterile wrapping. The surgical waste (except laundered linens) from five FAI surgeries totaled 47.4 kg, including 21.7 kg (45.7%) of biohazard waste, 11.7 kg (24.6%) of sterile wrap, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of normal/landfill waste, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of recyclable plastics and 1.2 kg (2.6%) of sharp items. An average of 9.4 kg (excluding laundered linens) of waste was produced per procedure. Given the considerable biohazard waste produced by FAI procedures, additional recycling programs, continued adherence to proper waste segregation and an emphasis on 'green outcomes' is encouraged to demonstrate environmental responsibility and effectively manage and allocate finite resources.

  8. Relationship between the alpha and beta angles in diagnosing CAM-type femoroacetabular impingement on frog-leg lateral radiographs.

    PubMed

    Khan, Moin; Ranawat, Anil; Williams, Dale; Gandhi, Rajiv; Choudur, Hema; Parasu, Naveen; Simunovic, Nicole; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2015-09-01

    Alpha and beta angles are commonly used radiographic measures to assess the sphericity of the proximal femur and distance between the pathologic head-neck junction and the acetabular rim, respectively. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between these two measurements on frog-leg lateral hip radiographs. Fifty frog-leg lateral hip radiographs were evaluated by two orthopaedic surgeons and two radiologists. Each reviewer measured the alpha and beta angles on two separate occasions to determine the relationship between positive alpha and beta angles and the inter- and intra-observer reliability of these measurements. There was no significant association between positive alpha and beta angles, [kappa range -0.043 (95 % CI -0.17 to 0.086) to 0.54 (95 % CI 0.33-0.75)]. Intra-observer reliability was high [alpha angle intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) range 0.74 (95 % CI 0.58-0.84) to 0.99 (95 % CI 0.98-0.99) and beta angle ICC range 0.86 (95 % CI 0.76-0.92) to 0.97 (95 % CI 0.95-0.98)]. There is no statistical or functional relationship between readings of positive alpha and beta angles. The radiographic measurements resulted in high intra-observer and fair-to-moderate inter-observer reliability. Results of this study suggest that the presence of a CAM lesion on lateral radiographs as suggested by a positive alpha angle does not necessitate a decrease in clearance between the femoral head and acetabular rim as measured by the beta angle and thus may not be the best measure of functional impingement. Understanding the relationship between these two aspects of femoroacetabular impingement improves a surgeon's ability to anticipate potential operative management.

  9. Impingement syndrome of the ankle following supination external rotation trauma: MR imaging findings with arthroscopic correlation.

    PubMed

    Schaffler, Gottfried J; Tirman, Phillip F J; Stoller, David W; Genant, Harry K; Ceballos, Cecar; Dillingham, Michael F

    2003-06-01

    Our objective was to identify MR imaging findings in patients with syndesmotic soft tissue impingement of the ankle and to investigate the reliability of these imaging characteristics to predict syndesmotic soft tissue impingement syndromes of the ankle. Twenty-one ankles with chronic pain ultimately proven to have anterior soft tissue impingement syndrome were examined by MR imaging during January 1996 to June 2001. The MR imaging protocol included sagittal and coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), sagittal T1-weighted spin echo, axial and coronal proton-density, and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences. Nineteen ankles that underwent MR imaging during the same period of time and that had arthroscopically proven diagnosis different than impingement syndrome served as a control group. Fibrovascular scar formations distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments possibly related to syndesmotic soft tissue impingement were recorded. Arthroscopy was performed subsequently in all patients and was considered the gold standard. The statistical analysis revealed an overall frequency of scarred syndesmotic ligaments of 70% in the group with ankle impingement. Fibrovascular scar formations distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments presented with low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and remained low to intermediate in signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. Compared with arthroscopy, MR imaging revealed a sensitivity of 89%, a specificity of 100%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 93% for scarred syndesmotic ligaments. The frequency of scar formation distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments in patients with impingement syndrome of the ankle was not statistically significantly higher than in the control group. In contrast to that, anterior tibial osteophytes and talar osteophytes were statistically significantly higher in the group with anterior impingement than in the control group. Conventional MR imaging was found to be insensitive for the diagnosis of syndesmotic soft tissue

  10. Physical examination tests for the diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Carrillo, Aitana; Medina-Porqueres, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Numerous clinical tests have been proposed to diagnose FAI, but little is known about their diagnostic accuracy. To summarize and evaluate research on the accuracy of physical examination tests for diagnosis of FAI. A search of the PubMed, SPORTDiscus and CINAHL databases was performed. Studies were considered eligible if they compared the results of physical examination tests to those of a reference standard. Methodological quality and internal validity assessment was performed by two independent reviewers using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) tool. The systematic search strategy revealed 298 potential articles, five of which articles met the inclusion criteria. After assessment using the QUADAS score, four of the five articles were of high quality. Clinical tests included were Impingement sign, IROP test (Internal Rotation Over Pressure), FABER test (Flexion-Abduction-External Rotation), Stinchfield/RSRL (Resisted Straight Leg Raise) test, Scour test, Maximal squat test, and the Anterior Impingement test. IROP test, impingement sign, and FABER test showed the most sensitive values to identify FAI. The diagnostic accuracy of physical examination tests to assess FAI is limited due to its heterogenecity. There is a strong need for sound research of high methodological quality in this area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Arthroscopic Management of Posteromedial Ankle Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Posteromedial ankle impingement is a rare clinical entity. It usually follows an inversion injury, with compression of the posterior tibiotalar ligament between the medial malleolus and talus. This can be treated by posterior ankle endoscopy through the posteromedial and posterolateral portals. The flexor hallucis longus tendon can be examined for any tenosynovitis or tendinopathy. The posteromedial corner of the ankle joint is reached with the instruments staying on the lateral side of the flexor hallucis longus tendon. The inflamed synovium, scar tissue, and fibrillated cartilage are debrided. PMID:26697299

  12. Arthroscopic Management of Posteromedial Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Posteromedial ankle impingement is a rare clinical entity. It usually follows an inversion injury, with compression of the posterior tibiotalar ligament between the medial malleolus and talus. This can be treated by posterior ankle endoscopy through the posteromedial and posterolateral portals. The flexor hallucis longus tendon can be examined for any tenosynovitis or tendinopathy. The posteromedial corner of the ankle joint is reached with the instruments staying on the lateral side of the flexor hallucis longus tendon. The inflamed synovium, scar tissue, and fibrillated cartilage are debrided.

  13. Characterization of ossification of the posterior rim of acetabulum in the developing hip and its impact on the assessment of femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Morris, William Z; Chen, Jason Y; Cooperman, Daniel R; Liu, Raymond W

    2015-02-04

    Many radiographic indices that are used to assess adolescents for femoroacetabular impingement rely on an ossified posterior acetabular wall. A recent study identified a secondary ossification center in the posterior rim of the acetabulum, the ossification of which may affect perceived acetabular coverage. The purpose of this study was to characterize ossification of the posterior rim of the acetabulum with use of a longitudinal radiographic study and quantify its impact on the radiographic assessment of femoroacetabular impingement. In this study, we utilized a historical collection of annual radiographs made in a population of healthy adolescents. Six hundred and twelve anteroposterior radiographs of the left hip of ninety-eight patients were reviewed to identify the appearance, duration, and fusion of the secondary ossification center in the posterior rim of the acetabulum. The center-edge angle was then measured before appearance and after fusion of the secondary ossification center in a subset of ten patients who had <5° of rotation on all radiographs. The secondary ossification center in the posterior rim was identified in seventy-three of the ninety-eight subjects, with no significant difference between the sexes. The mean patient age at the time of radiographic appearance of this secondary ossification center was fourteen years for males and twelve years for females. The mean duration of radiographic appearance was ten months for both sexes. Serial center-edge angles were measured in a subset of ten patients, and they increased during posterior rim ossification by a mean of 4.1°. The secondary ossification center in the posterior rim of the acetabulum (the posterior rim sign) is a common radiographic finding that reliably appears for ten months around the time of triradiate closure. Posterior rim ossification led to a mean increase of 4° of perceived acetabular coverage through the center-edge angle. Given the narrow margin between normal coverage (33

  14. Hip Joint Stresses Due to Cam-Type Femoroacetabular Impingement: A Systematic Review of Finite Element Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ng, K. C. Geoffrey; Lamontagne, Mario; Labrosse, Michel R.; Beaulé, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The cam deformity causes the anterosuperior femoral head to obstruct with the acetabulum, resulting in femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and elevated risks of early osteoarthritis. Several finite element models have simulated adverse loading conditions due to cam FAI, to better understand the relationship between mechanical stresses and cartilage degeneration. Our purpose was to conduct a systematic review and examine the previous finite element models and simulations that examined hip joint stresses due to cam FAI. Methods The systematic review was conducted to identify those finite element studies of cam-type FAI. The review conformed to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines and studies that reported hip joint contact pressures or stresses were included in the quantitative synthesis. Results Nine articles studied FAI morphologies using finite element methods and were included in the qualitative synthesis. Four articles specifically examined contact pressures and stresses due to cam FAI and were included in the quantitative synthesis. The studies demonstrated that cam FAI resulted in substantially elevated contact pressures (median = 10.4 MPa, range = 8.5–12.2 MPa) and von Mises stresses (median 15.5 MPa, range = 15.0–16.0 MPa) at the acetabular cartilage; and elevated maximum-shear stress on the bone (median = 15.2 MPa, range = 14.3–16.0 MPa), in comparison with control hips, during large amplitudes of hip motions. Many studies implemented or adapted idealized, ball-and-cup, parametric models to predict stresses, along with homogeneous bone material properties and in vivo instrumented prostheses loading data. Conclusion The formulation of a robust subject-specific FE model, to delineate the pathomechanisms of FAI, remains an ongoing challenge. The available literature provides clear insight into the estimated stresses due to the cam deformity and provides an assessment of its risks leading to early

  15. Correlations between the Alpha Angle and Femoral Head Asphericity: Implications and Recommendations for the Diagnosis of Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Michael D.; Kapron, Ashley L.; Peters, Christopher L.; Anderson, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the strength of common radiographic and radial CT views for measuring true femoral head asphericity. Patients and Methods In 15 patients with cam femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and 15 controls, alpha angles were measured by two observers using radial CT (0°, 30°, 60°, 90°) and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) for the: anterior-posterior (AP), standing frog-leg lateral, 45° Dunn with neutral rotation, 45° Dunn with 40°external rotation, and cross-table lateral views. A DRR validation study was performed. Alpha angles were compared between groups. Maximum deviation from a sphere of each subject was obtained from a previous study. Alpha angles from each view were correlated with maximum deviation. Results There were no significant differences between alpha angles measured on radiographs and the corresponding DRRs (p = 0.72). Alpha angles were significantly greater in patients for all views (p ≤0.002). Alpha angles from the 45° Dunn with 40° external rotation, cross-table lateral, and 60° radial views had the strongest correlations with maximum deviation (r = 0.831; r = 0.823; r=0.808, respectively). The AP view had the weakest correlation (r = 0.358). Conclusion DRRs were a validated means to simulate hip radiographs. The 45° Dunn with 40° external rotation, cross-table lateral, and 60° radial views best visualized femoral asphericity. Although commonly used, the AP view did not visualize cam deformities well. Overall, the magnitude of the alpha angle may not be indicative of the size of the deformity. Thus, 3D reconstructions and measurements of asphericity could improve the diagnosis of cam FAI. PMID:24613175

  16. Incidence of greater trochanteric pain syndrome in patients suspected for femoroacetabular impingement evaluated using magnetic resonance arthrography of the hip.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Grazia; Lanza, Ezio; Parra, Cleber Garcia; Merli, Ilaria; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Zerbi, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the incidence of greater trochanter pain syndrome (GTPS) in patients who underwent magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the hip for a suspected femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome. Hip MRA performed at our institution (3/2012-1/2014) were reviewed. The absence/presence of FAI (cam, pincer, and mixed) was noted. GTPS diagnosis was based on gluteus medius/minimus tendinopathy/tears, trochanteric bursitis, fascia lata thickening, and trochanter bone oedema/erosion. Subgroup analysis for age (under/over 40 years) and FAI type (cam, pincer, and mixed) was also performed. N = 189 patients were included (n = 125 males; age 39 ± 12 years). FAI was diagnosed in n = 133 (70, 4%): cam type, n = 85 (63, 9%); pincer type, n = 22 (16, 6%); and mixed type, n = 26 (19, 5%). N = 72 patients (38.1%) had tendinopathy, n = 14 (7.4%) had trochanter erosion, n = 31 (16.4%) had bursitis, n = 4 had bone oedema (2.1%), and n = 3 (1.6%) had fascia lata thickening, resulting in GTPS diagnosis in n = 74 patients (39.2%). The association of normal hip morphology/GTPS was significantly higher (P = 0.023) than that of FAI/GTPS. Under 40 years, GTPS incidence was higher in patients with normal hip and pincer-type FAI (P = 0.028). Over 40 years, no difference between patients with/without FAI (P = 0.119) was seen. GTPS was more frequently observed in patients with normal hip morphology than in patients with FAI, particularly in patients under 40.

  17. Hip Joint Stresses Due to Cam-Type Femoroacetabular Impingement: A Systematic Review of Finite Element Simulations.

    PubMed

    Ng, K C Geoffrey; Lamontagne, Mario; Labrosse, Michel R; Beaulé, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    The cam deformity causes the anterosuperior femoral head to obstruct with the acetabulum, resulting in femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and elevated risks of early osteoarthritis. Several finite element models have simulated adverse loading conditions due to cam FAI, to better understand the relationship between mechanical stresses and cartilage degeneration. Our purpose was to conduct a systematic review and examine the previous finite element models and simulations that examined hip joint stresses due to cam FAI. The systematic review was conducted to identify those finite element studies of cam-type FAI. The review conformed to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines and studies that reported hip joint contact pressures or stresses were included in the quantitative synthesis. Nine articles studied FAI morphologies using finite element methods and were included in the qualitative synthesis. Four articles specifically examined contact pressures and stresses due to cam FAI and were included in the quantitative synthesis. The studies demonstrated that cam FAI resulted in substantially elevated contact pressures (median = 10.4 MPa, range = 8.5-12.2 MPa) and von Mises stresses (median 15.5 MPa, range = 15.0-16.0 MPa) at the acetabular cartilage; and elevated maximum-shear stress on the bone (median = 15.2 MPa, range = 14.3-16.0 MPa), in comparison with control hips, during large amplitudes of hip motions. Many studies implemented or adapted idealized, ball-and-cup, parametric models to predict stresses, along with homogeneous bone material properties and in vivo instrumented prostheses loading data. The formulation of a robust subject-specific FE model, to delineate the pathomechanisms of FAI, remains an ongoing challenge. The available literature provides clear insight into the estimated stresses due to the cam deformity and provides an assessment of its risks leading to early joint degeneration.

  18. Descriptive Epidemiology of Patients Undergoing Total Hip Arthroplasty in Korea with Focus on Incidence of Femoroacetabular Impingement: Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed the causes leading to total hip arthroplasty (THA), aimed to clarify the incidence of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) among the causes, and compared the incidence in Korea with those in other countries. From January 2000 to December 2014, 1,206 hips of 818 patients who underwent primary THA at our institute were reviewed retrospectively in terms of radiographs and electronic charts. The radiographs and radiographic parameters were reviewed and measured by 2 of the authors, who are orthopedic surgeons. Patients were categorized in terms of the causes leading to THA as primary osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), posttraumatic arthritis, post infectious arthritis, avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head, fracture of the femoral head or neck, ankylosing spondylitis (AS), developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD), FAI, and others. There were 32 patients (3.91%) in the primary OA group, 41 (5.01%) in the RA group, 84 (10.27%) in the posttraumatic arthritis group, 39 (4.77%) in the post infectious arthritis group, 365 (44.62%) in the AVN group, 39 (4.77%) in the fracture group, 21 (2.57%) in the AS group, 52 (6.36%) in the DDH group, 71 (8.68%) in the LCPD group, 52 (6.36%) in the FAI group, and 22 (2.69%) in the ‘other’ group. The causes leading to THA in Korea differ from those in Western countries. FAI could be causes of severe secondary OA that requires THA in Korea, therefore symptomatic FAI should not be neglected. PMID:28244282

  19. Open Surgical Treatment for Femoroacetabular Impingement in Patients over Thirty Years: Two Years Follow-up Results

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We report short term results of open surgical treatment for symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in patients over the age of 30 years. Materials and Methods Between May 2011 and June 2012, thirteen FAI hips (11 patients) with hip pain persisting longer than 6 months were treated by either surgical hip dislocation (SHD) or anterior mini-open. They were followed up for longer than 2 years. The 11 patients included 7 females and 4 males with a mean age of 45 (range, 33-60) years. They were clinically evaluated for modified Harris hip score (MHHS) and University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) activity level. Their lateral center-edge angle, acetabular index, and alpha angle were measured and compared. Results Acetabuloplasties were performed for seven cases. Femoral osteochondroplasty was performed for all thirteen cases. At minimum follow-up of two year (range, 24-29 months), all patients had substantial relief in preoperative pain with improvement in range of motion. The median MHHS was significantly (P<0.05) improved from 61 points preoperatively to 87 points at the last follow-up. The median UCLA activity level was 7 (range, 5-8) at last follow-up. Radiological indices improved. Two cases showed mild residual pain attributable to adhesion between capsule and reshaped femoral head-neck area. Conclusion Open surgical treatment of FAI was a reliable and effective treatment method in symptomatic FAIs for patients over the age of 30 years without advanced arthritic change of hip joint at short term follow-up. PMID:27536632

  20. Which is the most useful patient-reported outcome in femoroacetabular impingement? Test-retest reliability of six questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Hinman, Rana S; Dobson, Fiona; Takla, Amir; O'Donnell, John; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-03-01

    The most reliable patient-reported outcomes (PROs) for people with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is unknown because there have been no direct comparisons of questionnaires. Thus, the aim was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of six existing PROs in a single cohort of young active people with hip/groin pain consistent with a clinical diagnosis of FAI. Young adults with clinical FAI completed six PRO questionnaires on two occasions, 1-2 weeks apart. The PROs were modified Harris Hip Score, Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Score, Hip Outcome Score, Non-Arthritic Hip Score, International Hip Outcome Tool, Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score. 30 young adults (mean age 24 years, SD 4 years, range 18-30 years; 15 men) with stable symptoms participated. Intraclass correlation coefficient(3,1) values ranged from 0.73 to 0.93 (95% CI 0.38 to 0.98) indicating that most questionnaires reached minimal reliability benchmarks. Measurement error at the individual level was quite large for most questionnaires (minimal detectable change (MDC95) 12.4-35.6, 95% CI 8.7 to 54.0). In contrast, measurement error at the group level was quite small for most questionnaires (MDC95 2.2-7.3, 95% CI 1.6 to 11). The majority of the questionnaires were reliable and precise enough for use at the group level. Samples of only 23-30 individuals were required to achieve acceptable measurement variation at the group level. Further direct comparisons of these questionnaires are required to assess other measurement properties such as validity, responsiveness and meaningful change in young people with FAI.

  1. Femoro-acetabular impingement: can indirect MR arthrography be considered a valid method to detect endoarticular damage? A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Grazia; Stradiotti, Paola; Parra, Cleber Garcia; Zagra, Luigi; Sironi, Sandro; Zerbi, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of indirect Magnetic Resonance arthrography (i-MRa) in the detection of chondral and labral lesions related to femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI) a series of 21 hip joints in 17 patients with a clinical diagnosis of FAI were examined either with standard MR imaging, i-MRa and direct-MR arthrography (d-MRa). Sensitivity and accuracy of i-MRa in detecting chondral, labral and tardive lesions were calculated and compared with standard MR. The agreement in detecting endoarticular damage between i-MRa and d-MRa and the interobserver agreement was assessed by K statistic (p<0.05). Finally the presence of trocanteric bursitis was evaluated. I-MRa showed higher values of both sensivity and accuracy than standard MR in detecting chondral damage, with an increase to 92% for the first item and 95% for the second. The same was noticed in labrum evaluation with an increase to 88% and 90% respectively. The level of agreement between i-MRa and d-MRa in detection of chondral lesions was excellent, substantial for the labral damage and absolute for early osteoarthritic changes. An excellent interobserver agreement resulted in detection of both chondral and labral damages with i-MRa. In 6 hips (28,5%) we also found the presence of peri-trochanteric soft tissue inflammation that indicated the possibility of extrarticular involvement in FAI. Indirect-MRa can be considered a valid method of assessing endoarticular damage related to FAI, in comparison to d-MRa. It should be performed instead of standard MR if d-MRa is not available.

  2. Treatment of ischiofemoral impingement: results of diagnostic injections and arthroscopic resection of the lesser trochanter

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mark D.; Keene, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Ischiofemoral impingement (IFI) is an often unrecognized cause of hip pain caused by abnormal contact between the lesser trochanter and the ischium. To date, surgical treatment for those whose pain is not relieved by activity modification and steroid injections has not been defined. This study describes our imaging protocol and reports the results of arthroscopic, lesser trochanteric resections that were performed to treat this condition. Seven patients with symptomatic, MRI-documented IFI had ultrasound injections of ropivicaine and steroid into their ischiofemoral space. The injections provided complete but only transient relief of their groin and buttock pain and thus, all seven ultimately had an arthroscopic resection of their lesser trochanter. All hips were evaluated preoperatively and at 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively with Byrd’s modified Harris hip scoring system. Average age of the seven patients was 46 years and there were five females and one male. Preoperative scores averaged 43 points. After surgery, all patients used crutches for 4–6 weeks, and had 6-week scores that averaged 58 points. The patients and their scores continued to improve and at 6 and 12 months, their scores averaged 86 and 91 points, and none had chronic hip flexor weakness or recurrence of their hip pain or snapping. Arthroscopic iliopsoas tenotomies in combination with a resection of the lesser trochanter will provide complete relief of the painful snapping, groin and buttock pain caused by ischiofemoral impingement. PMID:27583151

  3. Patient-reported outcome instruments for femoroacetabular impingement and hip labral pathology: a systematic review of the clinimetric evidence.

    PubMed

    Lodhia, Parth; Slobogean, Gerard P; Noonan, Vanessa K; Gilbart, Michael K

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to systematically review the content and clinimetric evidence (rigor of rating scales and indexes for the description of clinical phenomena) of published patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments used to assess femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and labral hip pathology. We used Medical Subject Heading terms related to FAI and labrum/labral tears to search the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases for studies of FAI and labral hip pathology. Studies with hip-related PRO instruments, with any operative intervention except total hip arthroplasty, were included. We excluded studies with a skeletally immature population, revision surgeries in more than 10% of cases, or a primary diagnosis of hip osteoarthritis. We conducted a second review using the same databases for studies reporting clinimetric properties of at least 1 of the PRO instruments identified previously. Articles were selected in an independent, stepwise manner by 2 reviewers. Selected articles were evaluated to determine the presence and quality of measurement properties of the outcome instruments. We found 5 articles assessing 3 PRO instruments: the Hip Outcome Score (HOS), the Non-Arthritic Hip Score, and the 12-item modified Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. The HOS had the highest positive rating for internal consistency, construct validity, agreement, responsiveness, lack of floor/ceiling effect, and interpretability. The Non-Arthritic Hip Score showed evidence for validity and lack of floor/ceiling effect. The modified Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index was only strong for internal consistency and was indeterminate for construct validity. Only 3 PRO instruments have shown clinimetric evidence to support their use to measure outcomes in FAI and labral pathology patients. The HOS has the greatest amount of clinimetric evidence and is the most proven instrument for use in this population. This review shows that

  4. Radiographic findings of femoroacetabular impingement in National Football League Combine athletes undergoing radiographs for previous hip or groin pain.

    PubMed

    Nepple, Jeffrey J; Brophy, Robert H; Matava, Matthew J; Wright, Rick W; Clohisy, John C

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of radiographic findings of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in elite football players with a history of hip pain or groin injury who underwent radiographs. We performed a retrospective review of athletes undergoing hip radiography at the National Football League Combine from 2007 to 2009. Radiographs were obtained in athletes with a history of hip pain or injury. Anteroposterior pelvis and frog-lateral radiographs were obtained in 123 hips (107 players) that met our inclusion criteria. Radiographic indicators of cam-type FAI (alpha angle, head-neck offset ratio) and pincer-type FAI (acetabular retroversion, center-edge angle, acetabular inclination) were recorded. Findings were correlated with clinical factors (previous groin/hip pain, position, race, and body mass index). The most common previous injuries included groin strain (n = 57) and sports hernia/abdominal strain (n = 21). Markers of cam- and/or pincer-type FAI were present in 94.3% of hips (116 of 123). Radiographic evidence of combined cam- and pincer-type FAI was the most common (61.8%, 76 hips), whereas isolated cam-type FAI (9.8%, 12 hips) and pincer-type FAI (22.8%, 28 hips) were less common. The most common deformities included acetabular retroversion (71.5%) and an abnormal alpha angle (61.8%). A body mass index greater than 35 was associated with the presence of global overcoverage (46.2% v 17.3%, P = .025). Radiographic indicators of FAI are very common among athletes evaluated at the National Football League Scouting Combine subjected to radiographic examination for the clinical suspicion of hip disease. Elite football athletes with significant or recurrent pain about the hip should be evaluated clinically and radiographically for FAI, because pain from FAI may be falsely attributed to or may be present in addition to other disorders. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America

  5. Amateur and Recreational Athletes Return to Sport at a High Rate Following Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement.

    PubMed

    Weber, Alexander E; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Cvetanovich, Greg L; Grzybowski, Jeffrey S; Salata, Michael J; Nho, Shane J

    2017-04-01

    To compare the return-to-play rates, patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores, and satisfaction between high-level amateur athletes and recreational athletes and to evaluate for differences in ability to return to sport in these groups based on patient-related and sport-related characteristics. Clinical data were retrieved for 66 (26 male/40 female) consecutive athletes undergoing hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement. Athletes were classified as high-level amateur or recreational. Athletes were also divided into 6 distinct sporting categories based on the physical demands on the hip. Preoperative and 2-year PROs including a sport-specific questionnaire, modified Harris Hip Score (MHHS), and Hip Outcome Scores with Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) and Sports-Specific (HOS-SS) subscales were collected. Of the 66 patients, 49 were recreational and 17 were high-level amateur athletes (10 high school and 7 collegiate). High-level athletes were significantly younger than recreational athletes (18.4 ± 2.3 years vs 29.7 ± 6.8 years; P < .001). After 2 years, all PROs had improved significantly, with no differences between the 2 athletic groups. There was a high overall rate of return for both recreational and high-level amateur athletes (94% vs 88%; P = .60). Increasing preoperative withdrawal time from sport prior to surgery was associated with decreased HOS-SS (r = 0.33; P = .04) and MHHS scores (r = 0.02; P = .02). Overall, athletes who had withdrawn from sport for greater than 8 months before surgery returned to sport significantly more slowly (P = .01). Increasing body mass index (BMI) was associated with lower improvements in HOS (r = 0.26; P = .04) and MHHS scores (r = 0.38; P < .01). Recreational athletes, despite being significantly older than their high-level counterparts, return to play at a similar high rate and with comparable PROs. Increasing preoperative cessation time from sport significantly prolongs return to sport

  6. Open surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement in adolescent athletes: preliminary report on improvement of physical activity level.

    PubMed

    Novais, Eduardo N; Heyworth, Benton E; Stamoulis, Caterina; Sullivan, Kristen; Millis, Michael B; Kim, Young-Jo

    2014-01-01

    The surgical dislocation of the hip (SDH) approach has gained popularity in the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) secondary to pediatric hip disorders. However, it has been suggested that SDH may preclude a return to previous levels of function in athletes. The purpose of this study was (1) to determine the level of activity and pain in young athletes before and after open hip surgery through an SDH approach for the treatment of FAI; (2) to investigate how clinical improvement correlates with physical activity; (3) to determine whether articular cartilage injury and the complexity of surgical procedures are associated with improvement in activity level and pain. SDH was utilized in 29 young athletes treated for symptomatic FAI (20 males 9 females, age range 12.7 to 20.7 years (mean age, 17 y)). Evaluation included sport(s) played, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) physical activity level, and clinical outcome in terms of Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC)-Pain scores. Intraoperative articular cartilage status and anteroposterior pelvic and lateral hip radiographs were assessed. All patients had regularly participated in one or more of 13 distinct sports. The median UCLA score increased with marginal significance (P=0.057) after surgery. Change in the level of pain from preoperatively to postoperatively, as measured by the WOMAC-Pain subscale, was found to be statistically significant (P=0.0024). A statistically significant correlation between changes in UCLA and WOMAC was estimated (ρ=-0.61, P≤0.001). No statistically significant correlation was found between change in UCLA and the addition of a second procedure other than femoral head-neck osteochondroplasty. Finally, no statistically significant correlation was found between severity of cartilage injury and change in UCLA or WOMAC scores. The femoral α-angle improved an average of 22.7 degrees (P<0.001) after surgery. Pain relief and maintenance or

  7. Two-year outcomes after arthroscopic surgery compared to physical therapy for femoracetabular impingement: A protocol for a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mansell, Nancy S; Rhon, Daniel I; Marchant, Bryant G; Slevin, John M; Meyer, John L

    2016-02-04

    As the prevalence of hip pathology in the younger athletic population rises, the medical community continues to investigate effective intervention options. Femoracetabular impingement is the morphologically abnormal articulation of the femoral head against the acetabulum, and often implicated in pre-arthritic hip conditions of musculoskeletal nature. Arthroscopic surgical decompression and non-surgical rehabilitation programs focused on strengthening and stability are common interventions. However, they have never been directly compared in clinical trials. The primary purpose of this study will be to assess the difference in outcomes between these 2 commonly utilized interventions for femoracetabular impingement. The study will be a single site, non-inferiority, randomized controlled trial comparing two different treatment approaches (surgical and nonsurgical) for FAI. The enrollment goal is for a total of 80 subjects with a diagnosis of Femoracetabular impingement that are surgical candidates and have failed 6 weeks of conservative treatment. This will be a convenience sample of consecutive patients that are Tricare beneficiaries and seeking care at Madigan Army Medical Center. Patients that meet the criteria will be screened, provide written consent before enrollment, and then randomized into one of two arms (Group I = hip arthroscopy, Group II = physical therapy). Group I will undergo hip arthroscopy with or without labral repair. Group II will follow an impairment based physical therapy program consisting of 2 sessions per week for 6 weeks. The primary outcome will be the Hip Outcome Score and secondary measures will include the International Hip Outcome Tool and the Global Rating of Change. Measures will be taken at baseline, 6 months, 1 and 2 years. Hip-related healthcare utilization between both groups will also be assessed at the end of 2 years. The current evidence to support both surgical and conservative interventions for femoroacetabular impingement is

  8. [Arthroscopic therapy of ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation].

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhibin; Mi, Kun; Wei, Renzhi; Liu, Wu; Wang, Bin

    2011-07-01

    To study the operative procedure and the effectiveness of arthroscopic therapy for ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation. Between March 2008 and April 2010, 38 patients with ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation were treated. Among them, there were 28 males and 10 females with an average age of 28 years (range, 18 to 42 years). The time from internal fixation to admission was 12-16 months (mean, 13.8 months). There were pressing pain in anterolateral and anterior ankle. The dorsal extension ranged from -20 to -5 degrees (mean, -10.6 degrees), and the palmar flexion was 30-40 degrees (mean, 35.5 degrees). The total score was 48.32 +/- 9.24 and the pain score was 7.26 +/- 1.22 before operation according to American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and hindfoot score system. The X-ray films showed osteophyte formation in anterior tibia and talus; MRI showed cartilage injury in 22 cases. Arthroscopic intervention included removing osteophytes, debriding fabric scars and synovial membrane tissues, and removing osteochondral fragments. Arthroscopic microfracture technique was used in 22 patients with cartilage injury. All incisions healed primarily. Thirty-eight cases were followed up 10-26 months (mean, 16 months). At last follow-up, 26 patients had normal range of motion (ROM); the dorsal extension was 15-25 degrees (mean, 19.6 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-45 degrees (mean, 40.7 degrees). Eight patients had mild limited ROM; the dorsal extension was 5-15 degrees (mean, 7.2 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-45 degrees (mean, 39.5 degrees). Four patients had mild limited ROM and pain in posterior portion of the ankle after a long walking (3-4 hours); the dorsal extension was 0-5 degrees (mean, 2.6 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-40 degrees (mean, 37.5 degrees). The total score was 89.45 +/- 9.55 and the pain score was 1.42 +/- 1.26 after

  9. Posttraumatic impingement syndrome of the ankle--indication and results of arthroscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Heino

    2011-06-01

    Persisting pain after an ankle sprain is often caused by the development of intraarticular fibrous scars or even tibiotalar spurs due to repetitive trauma. This may result in a posttraumatic impingement syndrome of the ankle. Pain is typically provoked by dorsiflexion of the ankle and palpation of the tibiotalar anterior joint space. The study evaluates the outcome of arthroscopic treatment of the ankle impingement syndrome. 32 patients are included (16-65 years, mean age 38 years) who underwent an arthroscopic operation because of an impingement syndrome of the ankle grades I-III (Scranton) due to a trauma without therapeutic response to conservative therapy over 3 months. Diagnostic criteria were palpatoric anterior ankle joint pain and pain provoked by dorsiflexion, in cases of grades II and III lesions spurs on the X-ray as well. The mean follow-up time was 49 months. The evaluation of the results was done with the West Point Ankle Score. The study is designed as a retrospective case series. 26 patients reached more than 80 points in the West Point Ankle Score corresponding to a good or excellent result (mean result 86 points, ranging from 80 to 98 points). The preoperative mean score reached up to 64 points overall (57-70). Five patients rated the postoperative result fair, one bad with 73 points at mean (62-78). Preoperatively they reached 56 point on an average (48-62). The fair and the poor results were associated with severe ankle sprain leading to ligament ruptures or fractures where severe chondral lesions were to be found with arthroscopy. The results of the study show that ankle arthroscopy with resection of hypertrophic synovium and fibrous bands (type I) or tibial spurs (types II and III injuries) after an ankle sprain haven proven to be a reliable therapy for a posttraumatic impingement syndrome of the ankle that does not respond to conservative treatment. It is characterized by low morbidity and good to excellent results in most cases. The outcome

  10. The diagnostic performance of non-contrast 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-T MRI) versus 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance arthrography (1.5-T MRA) in femoro-acetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Rodríguez, Ana M; De Lucas-Villarrubia, Jose C; Pastrana-Ledesma, Miguel; Hualde-Juvera, Ana; Méndez-Alonso, Santiago; Padron, Mario

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T non-contrast MRI versus 1.5-T MRA for assessing labrum and articular cartilage lesions in patients with clinical suspicion of femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI). Fifty patients (thirty men and twenty women, mean age 42.5 years) underwent 1.5-T MRA, 3-T MRI and arthroscopy on the same hip. An optimized high-resolution proton density spin echo pulse sequence was included in the 3-T non-contrast MRI protocol. The 3-T non-contrast MRI identified forty-two of the forty-three arthroscopically proven tears at the labral-chondral transitional zone (sensitivity, 97.7%; specificity, 100%; positive predictive value (PPV), 100%; negative predictive value (NPV), 87.5%; accuracy 98%). With 1.5-T MRA, forty-four tears were diagnosed. However, there was one false positive (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 85.7%; PPV, 97.7%; NPV, 100%; accuracy 98%). Agreement between arthroscopy and MRI, whether 3-T non-contrast MRI or 1.5-T MRA, as to the degree of chondral lesion in the acetabulum was reached in half of the patients and in the femur in 76% of patients. Non-invasive assessment of the hip is possible with 3-T MR magnet. 3-T non-contrast MRI could replace MRA as the workhorse technique for assessing hip internal damage. MRA would then be reserved for young adults with a strong clinical suspicion of FAI but normal findings on 3-T non-contrast MRI. When compared with 1.5-T MRA, optimized sequences with 3-T non-contrast MRI help in detecting normal variants and in diagnosing articular cartilage lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of range of motion and contact zones with commonly performed physical exam manoeuvers for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI): what do these tests mean?

    PubMed

    Bedi, Asheesh; Thompson, Matthew; Uliana, Christiano; Magennis, Erin; Kelly, Bryan T

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of the magnitude and location of mechanical conflicts is critical to reliably and reproducibly improve functional range of motion and outcomes after surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). The purpose of this study was to assess the ROM and location of intra-articular and extra-articular mechanical conflict with seven commonly performed physical exam manoeuvers in a cohort of hips with symptomatic FAI. Internal rotation in flexion results in mechanical contact between the anterolateral and anterior femoral head-neck junction with the acetabulum, most commonly at a 1:15 o'clock position. Associated adduction, however, significantly reduces the available internal rotation secondary to contact in the same locations. Straight abduction results in mechanical conflict between the superior femoral head-neck junction and the 12:00 o'clock position of the acetabulum. With external rotation of the hip in various degrees of hip flexion, the potential mechanical impingement is extra-articular between the greater trochanter and ischium or pubic ramus. The zones of proximal femoral and acetabular contact are not intuitive, and may extend significantly more laterally and distally on the femoral head-neck junction than previously appreciated.

  12. Arthroscopic acetabuloplasty without labral detachment for focal pincer-type impingement: a minimum 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Comba, Fernando M; Slullitel, Pablo A; Bronenberg, Pedro; Zanotti, Gerardo; Buttaro, Martin A; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2017-07-01

    In order to access and resect the acetabular rim, arthroscopic acetabuloplasty was described with labral detachment. When the chondrolabral junction remains intact, acetabuloplasty and labral refixation can be performed maintaining an unharmed labrum. We aimed to evaluate the outcome of a group of patients treated with arthroscopic acetabuloplasty without labral detachment. During the study period, we retrospectively analysed 44 patients with pincer-type o combined impingement and an intact chondroblabral junction, with an average follow-up of 32 months (range: 27-38). We excluded patients with isolated CAM-type impingement and previous hip pathology. Radiographs were analysed to define impingement and classify grade of osteoarthritis. Clinical evaluation consisted of pre-operative and post-operative modified Harris hip score (mHHS) and WOMAC as well as post-operative visual analogue scale (VAS) of pain and satisfaction. Reoperations were considered surgical failures for purposes of survival analysis. Mean mHHS changed from 51.06 (SD 4.81) pre-operatively to 84.97 (SD 12.79) post-operatively. Pre-operative WOMAC was 29.18 (SD 8) and post-operative, 13.10 (SD 11). Post-operative VAS was 7.5 and 2.27 for satisfaction and pain, respectively. When comparing patients with Tönnis 0 to those with Tönnis 1, the former showed better results regarding post-operative mHHS (89.9 s versus 77.85, P = 0.03), pain VAS (1.5 versus 6.3, P = 0.03) and satisfaction VAS (8.2 versus 6.3, P = 0.01). Survival was 100% at 24 months and 76% at 40 months (95% CI: 35-98%). Arthroscopic acetabuloplasty without labral detachment achieved good clinical outcomes. Slight degenerative changes on radiographs correlated with poorer clinical outcomes.

  13. Arthroscopic acetabuloplasty without labral detachment for focal pincer-type impingement: a minimum 2-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Fernando M.; Bronenberg, Pedro; Zanotti, Gerardo; Buttaro, Martin A.; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In order to access and resect the acetabular rim, arthroscopic acetabuloplasty was described with labral detachment. When the chondrolabral junction remains intact, acetabuloplasty and labral refixation can be performed maintaining an unharmed labrum. We aimed to evaluate the outcome of a group of patients treated with arthroscopic acetabuloplasty without labral detachment. During the study period, we retrospectively analysed 44 patients with pincer-type o combined impingement and an intact chondroblabral junction, with an average follow-up of 32 months (range: 27–38). We excluded patients with isolated CAM-type impingement and previous hip pathology. Radiographs were analysed to define impingement and classify grade of osteoarthritis. Clinical evaluation consisted of pre-operative and post-operative modified Harris hip score (mHHS) and WOMAC as well as post-operative visual analogue scale (VAS) of pain and satisfaction. Reoperations were considered surgical failures for purposes of survival analysis. Mean mHHS changed from 51.06 (SD 4.81) pre-operatively to 84.97 (SD 12.79) post-operatively. Pre-operative WOMAC was 29.18 (SD 8) and post-operative, 13.10 (SD 11). Post-operative VAS was 7.5 and 2.27 for satisfaction and pain, respectively. When comparing patients with Tönnis 0 to those with Tönnis 1, the former showed better results regarding post-operative mHHS (89.9 s versus 77.85, P = 0.03), pain VAS (1.5 versus 6.3, P = 0.03) and satisfaction VAS (8.2 versus 6.3, P = 0.01). Survival was 100% at 24 months and 76% at 40 months (95% CI: 35–98%). Arthroscopic acetabuloplasty without labral detachment achieved good clinical outcomes. Slight degenerative changes on radiographs correlated with poorer clinical outcomes. PMID:28630735

  14. Prevalence of pincer, cam, and combined deformities in Japanese hip joints evaluated with the Japanese Hip Society diagnostic guideline for femoroacetabular impingement: A CT-based study.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Tomohiro; Mori, Kanji; Itakura, Shin; Furuya, Yuki; Kawasaki, Taku; Imai, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is thought to be associated with hip osteoarthritis. We investigated the prevalences of radiologic deformities of the pincer, cam, and their combinations in Japanese hip joints using computed tomography (CT) according to the Japanese Hip Society diagnostic guideline for FAI. Multi-slice CT images were evaluated. Pincer deformities were defined as: type 1: center-edge angle (CE) ≥40°; type 2: CE ≥ 30° and acetabular roof obliquity ≤0°; type 3: CE ≥ 25° and retroverted acetabulum. Cam deformities were defined as: type 1: CE ≥ 25°, α-angle ≥55°, and head-neck offset ratio <0.14; type 2: CE ≥ 25°, α-angle ≥55°, and herniation pit positive; type 3: CE ≥ 25°, α-angle ≥55°, and pistol grip deformity positive. We studied 128 hips. Pincer was detected in 35.9% (type 1, 12.5%; type 2, 18.0%; type 3, 13.3%). Cam was detected in 24.2% (type 1, 23.4%; type 2, 7.8%; type 3, 10.9%). Combined deformities were detected in 10.2%. Type 3 pincer/type 1 cam was the most frequent combined deformity compared with all combined deformities. All of the cam deformities, total combined deformities, and all radiological FAIs appeared significantly more often in men. When we used this guideline to diagnose FAI in a Japanese population, radiological FAI was common, and pincer deformities were more common than cam deformities. The most frequent seen pincer, cam, and combined deformities was type 2 pincer, type 1 cam, and the combination of type 3 pincer/type 1 cam, respectively. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Pain, activities of daily living and sport function at different time points after hip arthroscopy in patients with femoroacetabular impingement: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, Signe; Langeskov-Christensen, Martin; Lund, Bent; Naal, Florian D; Mechlenburg, Inger; Dalgas, Ulrik; Casartelli, Nicola C

    2017-04-01

    To investigate pain, activities of daily living (ADL) function, sport function, quality of life and satisfaction at different time points after hip arthroscopy in patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Systematic review with meta-analysis. Weighted mean differences between preoperative and postoperative outcomes were calculated and used for meta-analysis. EMBASE, MEDLINE, SportsDiscus, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and PEDro. Studies that evaluated hip pain, ADL function, sport function and quality of life before and after hip arthroscopy and postoperative satisfaction in patients with symptomatic FAI. Twenty-six studies (22 case series, 3 cohort studies, 1 randomised controlled trial (RCT)) were included in the systematic review and 19 in the meta-analysis. Clinically relevant pain and ADL function improvements were first reported between 3 and 6 months, and sport function improvements between 6 months and 1 year after surgery. It is not clear when quality of life improvements were first achieved. On average, residual mild pain and ADL and sport function scores lower than their healthy counterparts were reported by patients following surgery. Postoperative patient satisfaction ranged from 68% to 100%. On average, patients reported earlier pain and ADL function improvements, and slower sport function improvements after hip arthroscopy for FAI. However, average scores from patients indicate residual mild hip pain and/or hip function lower than their healthy counterparts after surgery. Owing to the current low level of evidence, future RCTs and cohort studies should investigate the effectiveness of hip arthroscopy in patients with FAI. CRD42015019649. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Impingement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uziel, Mary S.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the impact of impingement in fishery resources at different power plants in the United States, covering publications of 1976-77. Consideration is given to engineering studies and biological effects for reducing impingement. A list of 96 references is also presented. (HM)

  17. Impingement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uziel, Mary S.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the impact of impingement in fishery resources at different power plants in the United States, covering publications of 1976-77. Consideration is given to engineering studies and biological effects for reducing impingement. A list of 96 references is also presented. (HM)

  18. Spine-hip relations add understandings to the pathophysiology of femoro-acetabular impingement: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rivière, C; Hardijzer, A; Lazennec, J-Y; Beaulé, P; Muirhead-Allwood, S; Cobb, J

    2017-06-01

    Relationship between hip pathoanatomy and symptomatic FAI has been reported to be weak. This is explained by the reciprocal interaction between proximal femur and acetabular anatomies, but potentially also by the individual spine-hip relations (SHR). The key-answer for a complete understanding of the pathophysiology of FAI might lie in the comprehension of the SHRs, which have not yet been fully addressed. Therefore we conducted a systematic review to answer the subsequent questions: Is there any evidence of a relationship between FAI and (1) sagittal pelvic kinematics, (2) pelvic incidence, and (3) types of SHRs? A systematic review of the existing literature utilizing PubMed and Google search engines was performed in December 2016. Only studies published in peer-reviewed journals over the last ten years in either English or French were reviewed. We identified 90 reports, of which 9 met our eligibility criteria. Review of literature shows Caucasian FAI patients have a pelvis with higher anterior tilt, lesser sagittal mobility, and lower pelvic incidence compared to healthy patients. We found no study having assessed the relationship between SHR and FAI. In order to help further investigations at answering questions 3 and 4, we have developed a classification for SHRs. The classification according spino-pelvic parameters allows identifying patient at risk regarding FAI occurrence. Higher anterior pelvic tilt in standing, sitting and squatting positions and lower pelvic incidence have been found to correlate with symptomatic FAI. Because defining the individual SHR might increase the understanding of the pathophysiology of hip impingement, we have developed a classification for SHRs. Level IV, systematic review of Level III and IV studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Limited therapeutic benefits of intra-articular cortisone injection for patients with femoro-acetabular impingement and labral tear.

    PubMed

    Krych, Aaron J; Griffith, Timothy B; Hudgens, Joshua L; Kuzma, Scott A; Sierra, Rafael J; Levy, Bruce A

    2014-04-01

    Intra-articular (IA) hip cortisone injection is commonly performed as a therapeutic modality in patients with femoral acetabular impingement (FAI). To our knowledge, there is no published data evaluating the clinical benefit of these injections. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of therapeutic IA cortisone injection in these patients. At our institution, patients with FAI and labral tear prospectively recorded their numerical rating scale (NRS) pain scores pre-injection, during post-injection anaesthetic phase, and at 14 days post-injection. From this cohort, all patients treated with guided IA cortisone injection, no radiographic evidence of arthritis (Tönnis grade 0 or 1) and pain relief during the anaesthetic phase of the IA injection were included. An absolute change of two points on the NRS score was considered the minimal amount of clinically significant pain relief. Pain scores were compared between the different types of steroid injected. Fifty-four patients (35 females, 19 males) with a mean age of 32 ± 12 years were included. Average median pre-injection NRS score was 7.0 (range 2.5-10.0), post-injection anaesthetic phase was 1.0 (range 0.0-5.0), and 14 day post-injection was 5.0 (range 0.0-10.0). As a group, NRS scores significantly diminished from post-injection anaesthetic phase to 14 days post-injection (p < 0.001). At 14 days post-injection, only 20 patients (37 %) and at 6 weeks, only 3 patients (6 %) reported a clinically significant decrease in pain. Average duration of pain relief was 9.8 days. There was no difference in pain reduction between steroid preparations. In patients with symptomatic FAI and labral tear, intra-articular cortisone injection has limited clinical benefit as a therapeutic modality. However, anaesthetic-only IA injections for patients who may be candidates for hip arthroscopy can be a useful diagnostic tool.

  20. Radiographic signs for detection of femoroacetabular impingement and hip dysplasia should be carefully used in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Ipach, Ingmar; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Sachsenmaier, Saskia; Buck, Elisabeth; Syha, Roland; Mittag, Falk

    2014-05-08

    During the last years, terms like acetabular retroversion, excessive overcoverage, and abnormal head-neck-junction with the so called "pistol-grip-deformity" has been added to the classical description of hip dysplasia. These anatomical changes could lead to a femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Both kinds of FAI has been indentified as a main reason for hip pain and progressive degenerative changes leading to early osteoarthritis of the hip. A lot of radiographic criteria on pelvic views have been established to detect classical dysplasia and FAI. The present study was initiated to assess the hypothesis that age and severity of osteoarthritis affect measurements of different radiographic parameters. The pelvic radiographs of 1614 patients were measured for head-ratio, CE-angle, roof obliquity, extrusion-index, depth-to-width ratio, CCD-angle, sharp's angle. To evaluate the severity of osteoarthritis of the hip the classification by Kellgren and Lawrence was used. Associations between age and radiographic parameters or severity of osteoarthritis were assessed by Spearman's (ρ) or Kendall's (r) rank correlation coefficient, respectively. 366 (22.7%) patients presented no sign of osteoarthritis, 367 (22.7%) patients presented I° osteoarthritis, 460 (28.5%) patients presented II° osteoarthritis, 307 (19%) III° osteoarthritis and 114 (7.1%) IV° osteoarthritis of the hip. The mean head-ratio of all patients was 1.13 ± 0.26 (0.76 - 2.40), the mean CE-angle 40.05° ± 10.13° (0° - 70°), the mean roof obliquity was 35.27° ± 4.96° (10° - 55°), the mean extrusion-index was 12.99 ± 9.21 (6.20 - 95.2), the mean depth-to-width ratio was 59.30 ± 8.90 (6.30 - 100), the mean CCD-angle was 127.68° ± 7.22° (123° - 162°) and the mean sharp's angle was 9.75° ± 5.40° (1° - 34°) There was a weak association between age and the severity of osteoarthritis of the hips (left: r= 0.291; right: r=0.275; both P<0.001) with higher osteoarthritis levels observable for

  1. COMPARISON OF RANGE OF MOTION, STRENGTH, AND HOP TEST PERFORMANCE OF DANCERS WITH AND WITHOUT A CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS OF FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Carcia, Christopher R.; Christoforetti, John J.; Martin, RobRoy L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Dancers commonly experience anterior hip pain caused by femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) that interrupts training and performance in dance. A paucity of literature exists to guide appropriate evaluation and management of FAI among dancers. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if dancers with clinical signs of FAI have differences in hip range of motion, strength, and hop test performance compared to healthy dancers. Study Design Quasi-experimental, cohort comparison. Methods Fifteen dancers aged between 18- 21 years with clinical signs of FAI that included anterior hip pain and provocative impingement tests were compared to 13 age-matched dancers for passive hip joint range of motion, isometric hip strength, and performance of the medial triple hop, lateral triple hop, and cross-over hop tests. Results No statistically significant differences in range of motion were noted for flexion (Healthy = 145° + 7°; FAI = 147° + 10°; p=0.59), internal rotation (Healthy = 63° + 7°; FAI = 61° + 11°; p=0.50), and external rotation (Healthy = 37° + 9°; FAI = 34° + 12°; p=0.68) between the two groups. Hip extension strength was significantly less in the dancers with FAI (224 + 55 Newtons) compared to the healthy group (293 ± 58 Newtons; F(1,26) = 10.2; p=0.004). No statistically significant differences were noted for flexion, internal rotation, external rotation, abduction, or adduction isometric strength. The medial triple hop test was significantly less in the FAI group (354 ± 43 cm) compared to the healthy group (410 ± 50 cm; F(1,26) = 10.3; p = 0.004). Similar results were observed for the lateral hop test, as the FAI group (294 ± 38 cm) performed worse than the healthy controls (344 ± 54cm; F(1,26) = 7.8; p = 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference between the FAI group (2.7 ± 0.92 seconds) and the healthy

  2. COMPARISON OF RANGE OF MOTION, STRENGTH, AND HOP TEST PERFORMANCE OF DANCERS WITH AND WITHOUT A CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS OF FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Kivlan, Benjamin R; Carcia, Christopher R; Christoforetti, John J; Martin, RobRoy L

    2016-08-01

    Dancers commonly experience anterior hip pain caused by femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) that interrupts training and performance in dance. A paucity of literature exists to guide appropriate evaluation and management of FAI among dancers. The purpose of this study was to determine if dancers with clinical signs of FAI have differences in hip range of motion, strength, and hop test performance compared to healthy dancers. Quasi-experimental, cohort comparison. Fifteen dancers aged between 18- 21 years with clinical signs of FAI that included anterior hip pain and provocative impingement tests were compared to 13 age-matched dancers for passive hip joint range of motion, isometric hip strength, and performance of the medial triple hop, lateral triple hop, and cross-over hop tests. No statistically significant differences in range of motion were noted for flexion (Healthy = 145° + 7°; FAI = 147° + 10°; p=0.59), internal rotation (Healthy = 63° + 7°; FAI = 61° + 11°; p=0.50), and external rotation (Healthy = 37° + 9°; FAI = 34° + 12°; p=0.68) between the two groups. Hip extension strength was significantly less in the dancers with FAI (224 + 55 Newtons) compared to the healthy group (293 ± 58 Newtons; F(1,26) = 10.2; p=0.004). No statistically significant differences were noted for flexion, internal rotation, external rotation, abduction, or adduction isometric strength. The medial triple hop test was significantly less in the FAI group (354 ± 43 cm) compared to the healthy group (410 ± 50 cm; F(1,26) = 10.3; p = 0.004). Similar results were observed for the lateral hop test, as the FAI group (294 ± 38 cm) performed worse than the healthy controls (344 ± 54cm; F(1,26) = 7.8; p = 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference between the FAI group (2.7 ± 0.92 seconds) and the healthy group (2.5 ± 0.75 seconds) on the crossover hop

  3. IMPROVEMENTS IN KNEE EXTENSION STRENGTH ARE ASSOCIATED WITH IMPROVEMENTS IN SELF-REPORTED HIP FUNCTION FOLLOWING ARTHROSCOPY FOR FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Thomas J.; Amesur, Ajit K.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Di Stasi, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Background Recovery of strength is critical for return to sport, and is a known predictor of functional outcomes in post-surgical orthopedic populations. Muscle weakness is a known impairment in patients with femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS) but whether improvements in muscle strength after arthroscopy are associated with improved hip function is unknown. Hypothesis/Purpose To examine the relationships between changes in hip and thigh muscle strength and self-reported function in athletes undergoing arthroscopy for FAIS. Study Design Single cohort descriptive and correlational study Methods Twenty-eight athletes underwent strength testing and completed the Hip Outcome Score Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) and Sports (HOS-S) subscales prior to and six months after surgery. Isokinetic knee extension and flexion strength were measured using a Biodex dynamometer at 60 °/s and 300 °/s. Isometric hip abduction strength was measured using a custom dynamometer. Changes in strength, limb symmetry, and HOS scores were assessed using paired t-tests. Spearman's rank correlations were used to examine relationships between change in involved limb strength and change in HOS scores. Results Subjects were tested an average of 32 days before and 178 days after surgery. HOS-ADL and HOS-S subscales improved by a mean of 19.0 ± 21.1 and 23.8 ± 31.9, respectively, over time (p < 0.001). Hip abduction strength did not increase over time in either limb (p ≥ 0.27). Involved limb knee flexion and extension strength did not increase significantly over time (p-values: 0.10-0.48) with the exception of knee extension at 300 °/s (p = 0.04). Uninvolved limb knee extension strength at both velocities and knee flexion strength at 60 °/s improved significantly over time (p < 0.012). Increases in knee extension strength (60 °/s) of the involved limb were significantly correlated with improvements on the HOS-ADL (r = 0.431; 0 = 0

  4. Assessment of Disability Related to Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome by Use of the Patient-Reported Outcome Measure Information System (PROMIS) and Objective Measures of Physical Performance.

    PubMed

    Sheean, Andrew J; Schmitz, Matthew R; Ward, Catherine L; Barrow, Aaron E; Tennent, David J; Roach, Christopher J; Burns, Travis C; Wilken, Jason M

    2017-09-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement System (PROMIS) has been described as a valuable tool for characterizing outcomes among patients with specific musculoskeletal conditions. Additionally, previously proposed objective measures of physical performance among patients with nonarthritic hip abnormalities are costly and not practically incorporated into routine clinical practice. (1) To determine the ability of the PROMIS to differentiate between patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and asymptomatic controls, (2) to determine the effect of FAI on subjects' completion of timed physical performance measures, and (3) to determine whether associations exist between established patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures and subjects' completion of physical performance measures. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Twenty-two asymptomatic controls (CON group) and 20 patients with FAI completed multiple activities to assess physical ability: self-selected walking velocity (SSWV), timed stair ascent (TSA), four-square step test (FSST), and sit-to-stand five times test (STS5). All subjects also underwent a battery of PRO questionnaires: Visual Analog Scale for Pain (VAS), Modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-33), Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), and PROMIS. Descriptive analyses were performed and comparisons between groups were made by use of paired t tests with Bonferroni-Holm correction. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were used to determine associations between physical performance measures and PRO. The magnitude of differences between groups for each measured variable was calculated by use of Cohen's d. Significant differences between CON and FAI groups were observed for all hip-specific PRO measures (CON vs FAI for all; HOOS 99.2 vs 42.8, P < .001, iHOT-33 99.0 vs 26.6, P < .001, mHHS 99.6 vs 62.2, P < .001). Similarly, PROMIS scores were

  5. Unrecognized osteoid osteoma of the proximal femur with associated cam impingement

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Justin A.; Coleman, Erin M.; Cohen, Gary S.; Kropf, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Femoro-acetabular impingement is a common cause of hip pain in young athletes. Evaluation typically includes radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. It is important to appreciate uncommon diagnoses and the role of complimentary imaging. This clinical vignette emphasizes the need complete imaging with CT in select case of atypical hip pain. We present a 19-year old soccer player who underwent seemingly successful arthroscopic FAI surgery but returned with pain. Computed tomography (CT) revealed osteoid osteoma of the lesser trochanter. The lesion was successfully treated with percutaneous CT guided radiofrequency ablation. PMID:27583164

  6. Prospective 12-month functional and vocational outcomes of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement as part of an evidence-based hip pain rehabilitation pathway in an active military population

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, A N; Nixon, J; Roberts, A; Barker-Davies, R; Villar, R; Houghton, J M

    2016-01-01

    Background Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is common with an estimated prevalence of 10–15% among young active individuals. The natural history of the disorder is progression to early osteoarthritis. Hip arthroscopy is recommended if conservative treatments fail; however, outcomes are unclear, particularly in highly active populations. Aim To evaluate the functional and vocational outcome of hip arthroscopy, as part of an evidence-based rehabilitation hip pain pathway, for the treatment of FAI in an active military population. Methods All patients in the defence rehabilitation hip pain pathway, with a confirmed diagnosis of FAI who failed conservative treatment, were assessed prior to surgery and at 2, 6 and 12 months postsurgery. Outcome measures included the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for hip pain, Non-Arthritic Hip Score (NAHS) for function, and vocational assessments including functional activity assessment (FAA) and Joint Medical Employment Standard for military employability and deployability. Results 101 patients completed the study (mean age=33 years) (male:female:75:26) (Royal Navy/British Army/Royal Air Force: 13%/48%/39%). Outcomes demonstrated significant improvements with large effect size. Preoperative NAHS mean=62.9 (SD 16.4), 12-month postoperative NAHS mean=78.8 (18.3), mean improvement in NAHS=15.9 (95% CI 12.3 to 19.5, p<0.001). Preoperative VAS pain mean=51.3 (20.9), 12-month postoperative VAS pain=25.6 (24.5). Mean improvement 25.7 (95% CI 19.4 to 31.99, p<0.001). 73% of patients had a deployable medical category at 12 months postoperative. Conclusions These data confirm that hip arthroscopy as part of a structured evidence-based multidisciplinary care pathway produces significant and continued symptomatic, functional and vocational improvements over a 12-month period in a military population exposed to high intensity, weight-bearing exercise in uncontrolled and unforgiving environments. PMID:27900190

  7. MRI of lower extremity impingement and friction syndromes in children

    PubMed Central

    Aydıngöz, Üstün; Özdemir, Zeynep Maraş; Güneş, Altan; Ergen, Fatma Bilge

    2016-01-01

    Although generally more common in adults, lower extremity impingement and friction syndromes are also observed in the pediatric age group. Encompassing femoroacetabular impingement, iliopsoas impingement, subspine impingement, and ischiofemoral impingement around the hip; patellar tendon–lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome; iliotibial band friction syndrome; and medial synovial plica syndrome in the knee as well as talocalcaneal impingement on the hindfoot, these syndromes frequently cause pain and may mimic other, and occasionally more ominous, conditions in children. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal impingement and friction syndromes. Iliopsoas, subspine, and ischiofemoral impingements have been recently described, while some features of femoroacetabular and talocalcaneal impingements have recently gained increased relevance in the pediatric population. Fellowship-trained pediatric radiologists and radiologists with imaging workloads of exclusively or overwhelmingly pediatric patients (particularly those without a structured musculoskeletal imaging program as part of their imaging training) specifically need to be aware of these rare syndromes that mostly have quite characteristic imaging findings. This review highlights MRI features of lower extremity impingement and friction syndromes in children and provides updated pertinent pathophysiologic and clinical data. PMID:27538047

  8. Intraoperative and Early Postoperative Complications After Hip Arthroscopic Surgery: A Prospective Multicenter Trial Utilizing a Validated Grading Scheme.

    PubMed

    Larson, Christopher M; Clohisy, John C; Beaulé, Paul E; Kelly, Bryan T; Giveans, M Russell; Stone, Rebecca M; Samuelson, Kathryn M

    2016-09-01

    There is limited literature looking at comprehensive complication rates after arthroscopic hip procedures. To prospectively report complication rates for a consecutive series of hips undergoing arthroscopic procedures. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Over a 29-month period, 1615 consecutive hips in patients with a mean age of 30.5 years underwent arthroscopic hip procedures at 4 institutions. The diagnosis, demographic information, and procedures were recorded, and a validated grading classification for complications of hip joint surgery was utilized prospectively. The cohort with complications was observed postoperatively for a mean of 36.7 months (range, 24-54 months). There were 1487 primary hip arthroscopic procedures and 128 revision hip arthroscopic procedures. Arthroscopic femoroacetabular impingement correction was performed in 1505 hips (93.2%), and 1273 hips (78.8%) underwent a labral repair procedure. The most common event was postoperative lateral femoral cutaneous (LFC) nerve disturbance (16.5%), which persisted beyond 6 months in only 1.6%. The incidence of iatrogenic chondral injuries was 1.2%, iatrogenic labral punctures was 0.9%, superficial portal infections was 1.1%, sensory deficits about the foot was 0.8%, deep venous thrombosis was 0.1%, pulmonary embolism was 0.1%, perineal numbness (pudendal nerve) was 1.4%, heterotopic ossification was 0.8%, and femoral neck stress fractures was 0.1%. There was no iatrogenic instability, avascular necrosis, or extra-abdominal fluid extravasation identified in this cohort. The overall complication rate, not including temporary LFC periportal and thigh numbness (sequela), was 8.3% (134 hips). Overall, a grade 1 complication was seen in 7.2% (117 hips), grade 2 in 0.6% (10 hips), grade 3 in 0.4% (6 hips), and grade 4 in 0.1% (1 hip). There was a significantly higher rate of complications for longer surgical time and traction time (P < .01) and for female patients as compared with male patients (P = .017

  9. Sonographic Findings in Subcoracoid Impingement Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Lappin, Maura; Gallo, Andrew; Krzyzek, Monika; Evans, Korboi; Chen, Yin-Ting

    2017-02-01

    Subcoracoid impingement syndrome is a rare and underrecognized cause of anterior shoulder pain. Currently, subcoracoid impingement syndrome is understood to involve impingement of anatomic structures such as the subcoracoid bursa and subscapularis tendon within the coracohumeral space, and there are no reports of sonographic findings in subcoracoid impingement syndrome other than the impingement of thickened subscapularis bursa. Here we report a case of subcoracoid impingement syndrome, including a novel sonographic finding, arthroscopic findings, and a proposed pathophysiology. V. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Traffic Light Grading System of Hip Dysplasia to Predict the Success of Arthroscopic Hip Surgery.

    PubMed

    Grammatopoulos, George; Davies, Owain L I; El-Bakoury, Ahmed; Gill, Harinderjit S; Pollard, Tom C B; Andrade, Antonio J

    2017-10-01

    the greatest chance of failure (odds ratio, 10; P < .001) was the red zone, with an AIf of 20° to 100° and an LCEAf of 0° to 10°. Overall, the 7-year hip survival rate in hip dysplasia appears inferior compared with that reported in femoroacetabular impingement (78%). Hip arthroscopic surgery is associated with an excellent chance of hip preservation in mild dysplasia (green zone: AI = 0°-15°, LCEA = 15°-25°) and no articular wear. The authors advise that the greatest caution should be used when considering arthroscopic options in cases of severe dysplasia (red zone: AI >20° and/or LCEA <10°).

  11. Treatment of anterolateral impingements of the ankle joint by arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Al-Husseiny Moustafa

    2007-09-01

    Impingement syndromes of the ankle joint are among the most common intraarticular ankle lesions. Soft tissue impingement lesions of the ankle usually occur as a result of synovial, or capsular irritation secondary to traumatic injuries, usually ankle sprains, leading to chronic ankle pain. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate arthroscopic debridement of an anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle. During the period between October 2000 and February 2004, 23 patients with residual complaints after an ankle sprain were diagnosed as anterolateral impingement of the ankle, and were treated by arthroscopic debridement. At a minimum of 6 months follow up, patients were asked to complete an American orthopaedic foot and ankle society (AOFAS) ankle and hind foot score. The average follow-up was 25 months (range 12-38). The average pre-operative patient assessed AOFAS score was 34 (range 4-57). At the end of follow-up the mean AOFAS score was 89 (range 60-100). In terms of patient satisfaction 22 patients said they would accept the same arthroscopic procedure again for the same complaints. At the end of follow-up, 7 patients had excellent results, and 14 patients had good results while two patients had fair results. We believe that arthroscopic debridement of the anterolateral impingement soft tissues are a good, and effective method of treatment.

  12. Arthroscopic Hip Surgery in the Elite Athlete: Comparison of Female and Male Competitive Athletes.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Kotaro R; Matsuda, Shuichi; Safran, Marc R

    2017-07-01

    Few studies have published the results of hip arthroscopic surgery in elite athletes and none studying a significant number of elite female athletes. (1) To compare sex-based differences in the ability to return to prior competitive sports activity after arthroscopic hip surgery. (2) To compare sex-based differences in the type of sports activity, diagnosis, and treatment in athletes requiring hip arthroscopic surgery. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data on all elite athletes who underwent primary hip arthroscopic surgery between 2007 and 2014 were included. Athletes with a Hip Sports Activity Scale (HSAS) score of over 6 were identified. The preoperative evaluation included a medical history, history of sports activity, and hip-specific outcome scores (Modified Harris Hip Score [MHHS] and International Hip Outcome Tool-33 [iHOT-33]). Surgical findings and time to return to competitive sports were documented. Of 547 hips in 484 consecutive patients, 98 elite athletes (49 female) with a mean follow-up of 18.9 ± 12.8 months were identified. Eighty patients desired to return to their original competitive activity: 38 were female (42 hips; mean age, 21.5 ± 3.9 years), and 42 were male (54 hips; mean age, 20.5 ± 1.9 years). Moreover, 84.2% of female athletes and 83.3% of male athletes were able to return to the same level of competition at a mean of 8.3 ± 3.0 and 8.8 ± 2.9 months, respectively. Significant improvements between preoperative and postoperative outcome scores were seen in both groups (all P < .0001). Female athletes had more pincer femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) ( P = .0004) and instability ( P < .0001). Conversely, male athletes were diagnosed more commonly with combined FAI ( P < .0001), demonstrated greater acetabular cartilage damage ( P = .0004), and required microfracture more often ( P = .0014). Female athletes competed more frequently in flexibility (4/38, 11%; P = .047) and endurance (9/38, 24%) sports, while male athletes

  13. Arthroscopic treatment of unstable total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Ricardo; Aguinaga, Iñaki; Corcuera, Irene; Ponte, Juan; Usabiaga, Jaime

    2010-06-01

    Hip arthroscopy may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of apparently well-implanted but unstable total hip replacement prostheses. We present 2 cases of arthroscopically assisted capsular tightening in unstable total hip replacements. Both cases had significant capsular laxity. Case 2 had impingement of the lower part of the acetabulum with the lesser trochanter that caused hip dislocation. Early revision surgery can be avoided with the use of this technique in selected cases of unstable total hip replacements.

  14. Normal anatomy and imaging of the hip: emphasis on impingement assessment.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Mary Kristen; Petersen, Brian; Strickland, Colin; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2013-07-01

    A comprehensive knowledge of normal hip anatomy and imaging techniques is essential in the evaluation and assessment of the patient with hip pain. This article reviews the osseous, soft tissue, and vascular components of the hip and the normal anatomical variants encountered in routine hip imaging. Basic and advanced hip imaging is discussed with particular emphasis on radiographic and computed tomography measurements and their utility in evaluating patients with developmental hip dysplasia and femoroacetabular impingement syndrome.

  15. Anterior Inferior Iliac Spine (AIIS) and Subspine Hip Impingement.

    PubMed

    Carton, Patrick; Filan, David

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal morphology of the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) and the subspine region of the acetabular rim are increasingly being recognised as a source of symptomatic extra-articular hip impingement. This review article aims to highlight important differences in the pathogenesis, clinical presentation and management of extra-articular hip impingement from both the AIIS and subspine bony regions, and the outcome following surgical intervention. A literature review was undertaken to examine the supporting evidence for AIIS and subspine hip impingement. A narrative account of the Author's professional experience in this area, including operative technique for arthroscopic correction, is also presented. Abnormal morphology of the AIIS and subspine region has been classified using cadaveric, radiological and arthroscopic means; the clinical presentation and operative treatment has been documented in several case series studies. Dual pathology is often present - recognition and treatment of both intra- and extra-articular components are necessary for good postoperative outcome. AIIS and sub-spine hip impingement should be considered as distinct pathological entities, which may also co-exist. Symptom relief can be expected following arthroscopic deformity correction with the treatment of concomitant intra-articular pathology. Failure to recognise and treat the extra-articular component may affect postoperative outcome. V.

  16. Anterior Inferior Iliac Spine (AIIS) and Subspine Hip Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Carton, Patrick; Filan, David

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Abnormal morphology of the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) and the subspine region of the acetabular rim are increasingly being recognised as a source of symptomatic extra-articular hip impingement. This review article aims to highlight important differences in the pathogenesis, clinical presentation and management of extra-articular hip impingement from both the AIIS and subspine bony regions, and the outcome following surgical intervention. Methods A literature review was undertaken to examine the supporting evidence for AIIS and subspine hip impingement. A narrative account of the Author’s professional experience in this area, including operative technique for arthroscopic correction, is also presented. Results Abnormal morphology of the AIIS and subspine region has been classified using cadaveric, radiological and arthroscopic means; the clinical presentation and operative treatment has been documented in several case series studies. Dual pathology is often present - recognition and treatment of both intra- and extra-articular components are necessary for good postoperative outcome. Conclusions AIIS and sub-spine hip impingement should be considered as distinct pathological entities, which may also co-exist. Symptom relief can be expected following arthroscopic deformity correction with the treatment of concomitant intra-articular pathology. Failure to recognise and treat the extra-articular component may affect postoperative outcome. Level of evidence V. PMID:28066737

  17. Arthroscopic Interphalangeal Arthrodesis of the Thumb.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Arthrodesis of the interphalangeal joint of the thumb is an effective treatment for pain, deformity, or instability at the joint. Arthroscopic interphalangeal arthrodesis of the thumb is a minimally invasive surgery and has better cosmetic results and less surgical trauma as compared with the open approaches. The purpose of this technical note is to report the details of the arthroscopic interphalangeal arthrodesis with oblique placement of the headless screw. No traction device is used for this technique. It is indicated in recalcitrant painful arthritis of the interphalangeal joint of the thumb. It is contraindicated in case of significant deformity of the joint as a result of subchondral bone collapse. It is also contraindicated if there is impinging volar osteophyte, local infection, or lack of expertise.

  18. Endoscopic treatment of calcaneo-fibular impingement.

    PubMed

    Bauer, T; Deranlot, J; Hardy, Ph

    2011-01-01

    The calcaneo-fibular impingement syndrome is frequent after calcaneal fracture and is linked to the decreased space between the tip of the fibula and the lateral wall of the calcaneus. The reasons for the painful symptoms are mixed with both bony and soft tissue involvement. The abnormal bony contact between the lateral calcaneal cortex and the tip of the fibula depends mainly on the size and localization of the lateral exostosis of the calcaneal wall. The soft tissue impingement is due to the fibrosis and scar tissues in the lateral gutter and to the compression of the peroneal tendons in the retromalleolar groove and under the tip of the malleolus. A 2-portal endoscopic technique is described for the treatment of calcaneo-fibular impingement with bone resection, soft tissue debridement and peroneal tendons release. One of the advantages of this endoscopic technique is the possibility of an assessment and treatment of associated lesions in the same procedure. A subtalar joint fusion can be done before if needed under arthroscopic control. As this endoscopic technique is very efficient to relieve symptoms of calcaneo-fibular impingement and is focused on the most relevant symptoms, it can thus be indicated for most of cases of calcaneal malunions, whatever the type of malunion and depending of the painful symptoms.

  19. Posterior ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Sandro; Buda, Roberto; Mosca, Massimiliano; Parma, Alessandro; Di Caprio, Francesco

    2013-03-01

    Posterior ankle impingement is a common cause of chronic ankle pain and results from compression of bony or soft tissue structures during ankle plantar flexion. Bony impingement is most commonly related to an os trigonum or prominent trigonal process. Posteromedial soft tissue impingement generally arises from an inversion injury, with compression of the posterior tibiotalar ligament between the medial malleolus and talus. Posterolateral soft tissue impingement is caused by an accessory ligament, the posterior intermalleolar ligament, which spans the posterior ankle between the posterior tibiofibular and posterior talofibular ligaments. Finally, anomalous muscles have also been described as a cause of posterior impingement.

  20. Arthroscopy for anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Koczy, Bogdan; Pyda, Michał; Stołtny, Tomasz; Mielnik, Michał; Pajak, Jan; Hermanson, Jacek; Pasek, Jarosław; Widuchowski, Jerzy

    2009-01-01

    Anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint is a common consequence of ankle sprain due to excessive supination and adduction of the foot, injuries to the tibiofibular syndesmosis and lateral malleolus fractures. Twenty-two arthroscopic procedures to treat anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint were performed at the Independent Public Regional Hospital of Trauma Surgery in Piekary Slaskie between 2006 and 2007. The study group included male patients at the mean age of 34 (17 to 55) years. Medical histories revealed ankle sprain in 13 patients, lateral malleolus fracture in 7, and isolated tibiofibular syndesmotic disruption in 2. The mean time from the injury to the arthroscopic treatment was 5 years (range 2 to 8 years). All patients that underwent arthroscopy were evaluated according to the AOFAS score at baseline (before surgery), and at 3 and 12 months after the treatment. The procedure consisted in the removal of hypertrophic, inflamed and scarred soft tissue from the lateral recess. The mean preoperative AOFAS score was 75.4 points. Post-operatively, the AOFAS functional scores increased to 90.6 and 92 points in the third and twelfth month after the procedure respectively. One patient showed temporary neurapraxia of the dorsal intermediate nerve and the ramus cutaneus branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. These results show that arthroscopic treatment of anterolateral soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint produces satisfactory early outcomes.

  1. Arthroscopic removal of an osteoid osteoma of the talus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Resnick, R B; Jarolem, K L; Sheskier, S C; Desai, P; Cisa, J

    1995-04-01

    This article describes a patient with a 10-year history of persistent ankle pain. Differential diagnosis included osteoid osteoma and anterior ankle impingement. This patient subsequently underwent arthroscopic excision of a lesion on the talar neck following a complete radiographic work-up, which was nondiagnostic. The diagnosis of osteoid osteoma was finalized upon pathologic study of the arthroscopic shavings. The use of a motorized instrument for excision did not preclude pathologic evaluation of the specimen. Therefore, in an accessible location on the talar neck, arthroscopic excision of an osteoid osteoma can be performed.

  2. Assessment of congruence and impingement of the hip joint in professional ballet dancers: a motion capture study.

    PubMed

    Charbonnier, Caecilia; Kolo, Frank C; Duthon, Victoria B; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia; Becker, Christoph D; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Menetrey, Jacques

    2011-03-01

    Early hip osteoarthritis in dancers could be explained by femoroacetabular impingements. However, there is a lack of validated noninvasive methods and dynamic studies to ascertain impingement during motion. Moreover, it is unknown whether the femoral head and acetabulum are congruent in typical dancing positions. The practice of some dancing movements could cause a loss of hip joint congruence and recurrent impingements, which could lead to early osteoarthritis. Descriptive laboratory study. Eleven pairs of female dancer's hips were motion captured with an optical tracking system while performing 6 different dancing movements. The resulting computed motions were applied to patient-specific hip joint 3-dimensional models based on magnetic resonance images. While visualizing the dancer's hip in motion, the authors detected impingements using computer-assisted techniques. The range of motion and congruence of the hip joint were also quantified in those 6 recorded dancing movements. The frequency of impingement and subluxation varied with the type of movement. Four dancing movements (développé à la seconde, grand écart facial, grand écart latéral, and grand plié) seem to induce significant stress in the hip joint, according to the observed high frequency of impingement and amount of subluxation. The femoroacetabular translations were high (range, 0.93 to 6.35 mm). For almost all movements, the computed zones of impingement were mainly located in the superior or posterosuperior quadrant of the acetabulum, which was relevant with respect to radiologically diagnosed damaged zones in the labrum. All dancers' hips were morphologically normal. Impingements and subluxations are frequently observed in typical ballet movements, causing cartilage hypercompression. These movements should be limited in frequency. The present study indicates that some dancing movements could damage the hip joint, which could lead to early osteoarthritis.

  3. Effect of changes in pelvic tilt on range of motion to impingement and radiographic parameters of acetabular morphologic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ross, James R; Nepple, Jeffrey J; Philippon, Marc J; Kelly, Bryan T; Larson, Christopher M; Bedi, Asheesh

    2014-10-01

    The current understanding of the effect of dynamic changes in pelvic tilt on the functional acetabular orientation and occurrence of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is limited. To determine the effect of changes in pelvic tilt on (1) terminal hip range of motion and (2) measurements of acetabular version as assessed on 2- and 3-dimensional imaging. Controlled laboratory study. Preoperative pelvic computed tomographic scans of 48 patients (50 hips) who underwent arthroscopic surgery for the treatment of FAI were analyzed. The mean age of the study population was 25.7 years (range, 14-56 years), and 56% were male. Three-dimensional models of the hips were created, allowing manipulation of the pelvic tilt and simulation of hip range of motion to osseous contact. Acetabular version was measured and the presence of the crossover sign, prominent ischial spine sign, and posterior wall sign was recorded on simulated plain radiographs. Measurements of range of motion to bony impingement during (1) hip flexion, (2) internal rotation in 90° of flexion, and (3) internal rotation in 90° of flexion and 15° adduction were performed, and the location of bony contact between the proximal femur and acetabular rim was defined. These measurements were calculated for -10° (posterior), 0° (native), and +10° (anterior) pelvic orientations. In native tilt, mean cranial acetabular version was 3.3°, while central version averaged 16.2°. Anterior pelvic tilt (10° change) resulted in significant retroversion, with mean decreases in cranial and central version of 5.9° and 5.8°, respectively (P < .0001 for both). Additionally, this resulted in a significantly increased proportion of positive crossover, posterior wall, and prominent ischial spine signs (P < .001 for all). Anterior pelvic tilt (10° change) resulted in a decrease in internal rotation in 90° of flexion of 5.9° (P < .0001) and internal rotation in 90° of flexion and 15° adduction of 8.5° (P < .0001), with a shift

  4. Revision arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Abouali, Jihad Alexander Karim; Hatzantoni, Katerina; Holtby, Richard; Veillette, Christian; Theodoropoulos, John

    2013-09-01

    Failed anterior shoulder stabilization procedures have traditionally been treated with open procedures. Recent advances in arthroscopic techniques have allowed for certain failed stabilization procedures to be treated by arthroscopic surgery. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the outcomes of revision arthroscopic Bankart repair. We searched Medline, Embase, and CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) for articles on revision arthroscopic Bankart repairs. Key words included shoulder dislocation, anterior shoulder instability, revision surgery, and arthroscopic Bankart repair. Two reviewers selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodologic quality, and extracted data. We included 16 studies comprising 349 patients. All studies were retrospective (1 Level II study and 15 Level IV studies). The mean incidence of recurrent instability after revision arthroscopic Bankart repair was 12.7%, and the mean follow-up period was 35.4 months. The most common cause for failure of the primary surgeries was a traumatic injury (62.1%), and 85.1% of patients returned to playing sports. The reasons for failure of revision cases included glenohumeral bone loss, hyperlaxity, and return to contact sports. With proper patient selection, the outcomes of revision arthroscopic Bankart repair appear similar to those of revision open Bankart repair. Prospective, randomized clinical trials are required to confirm these findings. Level IV, systematic review of Level II and Level IV studies. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous tenotomy for the treatment of iliopsoas impingement: a description of technique and case study.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Matthew J; Rezaian, Nimah; Hopkins, James M K

    2015-04-01

    Iliopsoas impingement is a commonly recognised source of groin pain following total hip replacement. When conservative measures fail, open or arthroscopic iliopsoas tendon release can reliably alleviate pain and improve function. This article describes an alternative ultrasound-guided percutaneous technique, achieving iliopsoas tenotomy utilising a modified 18G coaxial needle and thus minimising the morbidity and cost associated with an open or arthroscopic procedure. This method proved successful with resultant complete resolution of patient symptoms. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first case of ultrasound-guided percutaneous iliopsoas tenotomy for iliopsoas impingement post total hip replacement. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  6. US in ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pesquer, Lionel; Guillo, Stephane; Meyer, Philippe; Hauger, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Ankle impingement is a common condition occurring secondary to sprain or repeated microtrauma. Clinical symptoms are chronic pain located in the affected region and limited range of ankle motion. There are three types of ankle impingement syndrome: anterior impingement, which can be subdivided into anterolateral, anteromedial and purely anterior impingement; posterior impingement, which can be subdivided into posterior and posteromedial impingement; and calcaneal peroneal impingement which is secondary to planovalgus foot deformity. This paper evaluates physiological and clinical elements of these three types of ankle impingement syndrome as well as the role of ultrasound (US) imaging and US-guided treatment.

  7. Arthroscopic Management of Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Pitta, Michael; Davis, William; Argintar, Evan H

    2016-02-01

    Arthroscopic surgery is commonly performed in the knee, shoulder, elbow, and hip. However, the role it plays in the management of osteoarthritis is controversial. Routine arthroscopic management of osteoarthritis was once common, but this practice has been recently scrutinized. Although some believe that there is no role for arthroscopic treatment in the management of osteoarthritis, it may be appropriate and beneficial in certain situations. The clinical success of such treatment may be rooted in appropriate patient selection and adherence to a specific surgical technique. Arthroscopy may serve as an effective and less invasive option than traditional methods of managing osteoarthritis.

  8. Finite element prediction of contact pressures in cam-type femoroacetabular impingement with varied alpha angles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Wang, Wanchun; Thoreson, Andrew R; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zhu, Weihong; Dou, Pengcheng

    2017-02-01

    Three dimensional finite element models of cam-type FAI with alpha angles of 60°, 70°, 80°, and 90° were created to investigate the cartilage contact mechanics in daily activities. Intra-articular cartilage contact pressures during routine daily activities were assessed and cross-compared with a normal control hip. Alpha angles and hip range of motion were found to have a combined influence on the cartilage contact mechanics in hips with cam-type FAI, thereby resulting in abnormally high pressures and driving the cartilage damage. In particular, alpha angles of 80° or greater contribute to substantial pressure increase under certain types of daily activities.

  9. EVALUATION OF PRESENTATION OF SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT AFTER EPIPHYSIOLYSIS OF THE PROXIMAL FEMUR.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Fábio Peng; de Britto, Paulo Sérgio Gérzon; Neto, Lauro Machado; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures.

  10. Authorship in the field of femoroacetabular impingement: an analysis of journal publications.

    PubMed

    Duong, A; Kay, J; Khan, M; Simunovic, N; Ayeni, O R

    2017-01-01

    This review provides a bibliometric analysis of the contributors to the field of FAI research. A comprehensive search of three databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PubMed) was performed to identify all clinical research articles on the topic of FAI (from inception to 2015). Cadaveric and animal studies were excluded. Study characteristics including authors, residing country of corresponding author, and journal were abstracted from the respective databases. In total, 1073 articles were included in this review. There were a total of 5471 different authors who contributed to the field of FAI research, 28.3 % of whom were only published in one article. The top 20 authors were associated with over half of all publications, and research studies were typically performed in their countries of residence. The greatest proportion of FAI-related articles was published in the Journal of Arthroscopy and Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. The number of authors contributing to FAI research is increasing, suggesting not only increasing prevalence of FAI treatment among orthopaedic surgeons but also increasing interest among hip arthroscopists in furthering understanding regarding the diagnosis and management of the condition. The number of publications produced by the top 20 authors (and their affiliated countries: USA, Switzerland, Canada, and the UK) is expected to contribute to a majority of future publications. Current trends suggest that the quality of evidence will continue to improve in the near future, as large-scale, collaborative studies are currently underway. Retrospective study, Level IV.

  11. EVALUATION OF PRESENTATION OF SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF FEMOROACETABULAR IMPINGEMENT AFTER EPIPHYSIOLYSIS OF THE PROXIMAL FEMUR

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Fábio Peng; de Britto, Paulo Sérgio Gérzon; Neto, Lauro Machado; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures. PMID:27027007

  12. Femoroacetabular impingement and labral tears in the adolescent hip: diagnosis and surgical advances.

    PubMed

    Friend, L; Kelly, Bryan T

    2009-02-01

    To identify several of the major trends and advancements in the diagnosis and care of the adolescent hip that have recently been responsible for reshaping the standard of care for this group of patients. Recent research has provided an expanded understanding of hip mechanics and anatomy, improved imaging techniques and, in particular, produced a better appreciation of factors that predispose the hip to degenerative changes. It has led to the development and expansion of several treatment options, including hip arthroscopy, safe surgical dislocation of the hip and periacetabular rotational osteotomy. An appreciation of emerging trends in the diagnosis and treatment of adolescent hip problems is important, as prompt recognition of and intervention for certain hip disorders may prevent ongoing injury and avoid or ameliorate chronic conditions associated with the development of degenerative joint changes and osteoarthritis.

  13. Arthroscopic Ankle Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Byron

    2016-10-01

    Arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis is a cost-effective option for many patients with posttraumatic arthritis of the ankle joint. Rehabilitation is generally quicker than conventional open techniques, and rates of fusion are comparable or better than traditional open techniques. Unless the arthroscopic surgeon has considerable experience, the best results are seen in patients with very little deformity in the ankle joint. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impingement syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... arch of the shoulder blade, it can cause shoulder pain called impingement syndrome. The tendons become compressed, damaged, and inflamed leading to rotator cuff tendonitis. This can occur ... use of the shoulder like baseball pitching, or from an injury.

  15. Relationship between femoroacetabular contact areas and hip position in the normal joint: an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, Cecilia; Lopomo, Nicola; Bonanzinga, Tommaso; Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria; Safran, Marc R; Marcacci, Maurilio; Zaffagnini, Stefano

    2013-02-01

    Different approaches have been proposed to diagnose femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) condition and hip instability. It is still debatable which test is the most effective to make a correct diagnosis. The true mechanics of the hip during particular physical examination manoeuvres is unknown. Eight fresh frozen hips were passively taken through 3 different commonly used positions for FAI diagnosis and hip instability: 90° Flexion-Adduction-Internal Rotation, Hyperextension-Adduction-External Rotation and Hyperextension-Neutral-External Rotation. Kinematics and anatomical data were acquired by an optoelectronic system. The contact areas between acetabulum and femoral head were analysed to determine whether these tests are able to localize regions of the hip that may give patients pain. In the hip positions where the femur was in Hyperextension-External Rotation, the contact area was mainly concentrated in the posterosuperior area of the acetabulum, while during 90° Flexion-Adduction-Internal Rotation position, there was a wider distribution of contact, not specific to the anterolateral acetabulum. The results confirm the ability of the Hyperextension-External Rotation tests to particularly analyse the posterior region of the acetabulum. Placing the hip in 90° of Flexion-Adduction-Internal Rotation allows for testing a wider zone of the acetabulum and is not specific to abutment of the femoral head-neck region against the anterolateral acetabulum.

  16. True submalleolar accessory ossicles causing impingement of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Vega, Jordi; Marimón, Jesús; Golanó, Pau; Pérez-Carro, Luis; Salmerón, Jorge; Aguilera, Josep Maria

    2010-02-01

    True ossicle in the distal portion of the malleolus is only sporadically observed, and related disease has been rarely reported. We present two cases of atypical ankle impingement resulting from an ankle sprain. Plain radiographs revealed true submalleolar ossicles. Conservative treatment failed, and arthroscopy was performed. Instability of the ossicle and surrounding fibrotic soft tissue was evident; a gap between the ossicle and the tip of the malleolus seen during plantar flexion of the ankle disappeared in dorsal flexion, resulting in compression of the surrounding soft tissue. Arthroscopic excision of the accessory ossicle relieved the symptoms and enabled both patients to return to full preinjury activities.

  17. Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff disease.

    PubMed

    Gartsman, G M

    1995-01-01

    Rotator cuff disease represents a spectrum of tendon lesions including inflammation of an intrinsically normal tendon, tendon fibrosis, partial-thickness tears, complete tears, and cuff tear arthropathy. An in-depth analysis of the entire subject is beyond the scope of this article. This article will focus on the arthroscopic management of the spectrum of rotator cuff disease in an attempt to provide a timely summary of the present state of knowledge. Five stages of rotator cuff disease will be reviewed: stage 2 impingement, partial-thickness cuff tears, complete-thickness rotator cuff tears, irreparable rotator cuff tears, and cuff tear arthropathy. In preparing this article I have assumed that the reader is familiar with the diagnosis of rotator cuff lesions through the use of appropriate patient history, physical examination, and radiologic studies.

  18. Decompression of Posterior Ankle Impingement With Concomitant Anterior Ankle Pathology by Posterior Ankle Arthroscopy in the Supine Position.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle endoscopy is a safe and effective approach for treatment of posterior ankle impingement. This is usually performed with the patient in prone position. The purpose of this technical note is to describe an arthroscopic approach of decompression of posterior ankle impingement with the patient in supine position. This is indicated if there is posterior ankle impingement together with other ankle pathology requiring anterior ankle arthroscopy. This approach allows treatment of both anterior ankle and posterior ankle pathology with the patient in the supine position. Concomitant anterior ankle arthroscopy can be performed with the usual orientation without the need of change of patient's position.

  19. Arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lopes, R; Andrieu, M; Bauer, T

    2016-12-01

    Arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis is gaining in popularity based on evidence of bone fusion in over 90% of cases, with a shorter time to healing, a simpler postoperative course, and fewer complication compared to open surgery. Two arthroscopic techniques have been reported: one with the patient in lateral decubitus and lateral portals and the other with the patient prone and posterior portals. The objective of this technical note is to describe these two techniques, with emphasis on the specific characteristics of each. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Arthroscopic Tarsometatarsal Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Tarsometatarsal (Lisfranc) osteoarthritis can be a disabling condition and is commonly due to posttraumatic causes. Tarsometatarsal arthrodesis is indicated if the pain does not subdue with conservative treatment. Classically, this is performed as an open procedure. The purpose of this technical note is to describe a minimally invasive approach of arthroscopic arthrodesis of the involved tarsometatarsal joints. The arthroscopic procedure is performed through the junction portals of the involved articulation. It has the advantages of better cosmesis, less wound complication, less bone resection, and more thorough joint debridement. However, it is contraindicated if there is an associated significant foot deformity or shortening of the involved foot rays.

  1. Modified arthroscopic Brostrom procedure.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-09-01

    The open modified Brostrom anatomic repair technique is widely accepted as the reference standard for lateral ankle stabilization. However, there is high incidence of intra-articular pathologies associated with chronic lateral ankle instability which may not be addressed by an isolated open Brostrom procedure. Arthroscopic Brostrom procedure with suture anchor has been described for anatomic repair of chronic lateral ankle instability and management of intra-articular lesions. However, the complication rates seemed to be higher than open Brostrom procedure. Modification of the arthroscopic Brostrom procedure with the use of bone tunnel may reduce the risk of certain complications.

  2. Chronic ankle instability: Arthroscopic anatomical repair.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Hernández, M; Mellado-Romero, M; Páramo-Díaz, P; García-Lamas, L; Vilà-Rico, J

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries. Despite appropriate conservative treatment, approximately 20-40% of patients continue to have chronic ankle instability and pain. In 75-80% of cases there is an isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. A retrospective observational study was conducted on 21 patients surgically treated for chronic ankle instability by means of an arthroscopic anatomical repair, between May 2012 and January 2013. There were 15 men and 6 women, with a mean age of 30.43 years (range 18-48). The mean follow-up was 29 months (range 25-33). All patients were treated by arthroscopic anatomical repair of anterior talofibular ligament. Four (19%) patients were found to have varus hindfoot deformity. Associated injuries were present in 13 (62%) patients. There were 6 cases of osteochondral lesions, 3 cases of posterior ankle impingement syndrome, and 6 cases of peroneal pathology. All these injuries were surgically treated in the same surgical time. A clinical-functional study was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The mean score before surgery was 66.12 (range 60-71), and after surgery it increased up to a mean of 96.95 (range 90-100). All patients were able to return to their previous sport activity within a mean of 21.5 weeks (range 17-28). Complications were found in 3 (14%) patients. Arthroscopic anatomical ligament repair technique has excellent clinical-functional results with a low percentage of complications, and enables patients to return to their previous sport activity within a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Direct Flame Impingement

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    During the DFI process, high velocity flame jets impinge upon the material being heated, creating a high heat transfer rate. As a result, refractory walls and exhaust gases are cooler, which increases thermal efficiency and lowers NOx emissions. Because the jet nozzles are located a few inches from the load, furnace size can be reduced significantly.

  4. Arthroscopic-assisted posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar tendon autograft: a technique for graft passage.

    PubMed

    Mariani, P P; Adriani, E; Maresca, G

    1996-08-01

    During arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction, passage of the graft into the knee joint may be difficult, especially when using the patellar tendon. Because of the angle of passage, the bone block ends may become entangled or caught on the superior edge of the posterior tibial tunnel when passing the graft from the tibia to the femur. The use of a blunt trocar through the posteromedial portal avoids impingement of the bone block against the edge of the tibial tunnel. This method uses the pulley principle and permits the graft to pass freely into the knee. This method has been used successfully by the authors in more than 40 PCL arthroscopic reconstructions.

  5. Arthroscopic Resection of Too-Long Anterior Process of the Calcaneus.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-10-01

    A too-long anterior process (TLAP) of the calcaneus is an elongated anteromedial process of the calcaneus impinging the navicular or the talar head. TLAP can cause recurrent ankle sprain, peroneal muscle spasm, or persistent tarsal pain in adolescents. Arthroscopic resection is indicated if the symptoms do not respond to conservative treatment. It has the advantage of assessment of completeness of bone resection and treatment of associated lesions of the adjacent joints. The purpose of this technical note is to report an arthroscopic approach of the resection of the TLAP with the lateral midtarsal portal as the viewing portal.

  6. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2005-10-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical disorder characterized by posterior ankle pain that occurs in forced plantar flexion. The pain may be acute as a result of trauma or chronic from repetitive stress. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but it also may result from flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Patients usually report chronic or recurrent posterior ankle pain caused or exacerbated by forced plantar flexion or push-off maneuvers, such as may occur during dancing, kicking, or downhill running. Diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement syndrome is based primarily on clinical history and physical examination. Radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging depict associated bone and soft-tissue abnormalities. Symptoms typically improve with nonsurgical management, but surgery may be required in refractory cases.

  7. Boxer's elbow: internal impingement of the coronoid and olecranon process. A report of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Paul M; Loosemore, Mike; Watts, Adam C

    2017-03-01

    Boxer's elbow has been described in the literature as an extension and hyperextension injury. However, in our experience, there is a coexisting impingement lesion in the anterior compartment of the elbow that has not previously been described. We report a series of professional boxers with elbow disease treated arthroscopically. The aim of the paper was to accurately describe the pathoanatomy of the condition, the key points in its diagnosis, and the outcomes of surgical treatment. Seven professional boxers were treated for symptomatic elbow disease. Clinical evaluation included range of motion and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score. The arthroscopic findings and procedures were documented. Symptoms were mainly those of anterior and posterior impingement; 6 elbows had an anterior impingement lesion and 6 had a posterior impingement lesion. Postoperatively, the mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score was 2.7 (range, 0-13.3) at a median of 15 (range, 6-36) months postoperatively. All boxers returned to their previous level of competition and 5 won their next bout. All of the boxers used an orthodox stance, and in all but 1 case the left elbow was the pathologic elbow. Boxers are prone to development of anterior and posterior elbow impingement. The side of the pathologic process is related to the boxer's stance, with the lead arm being more vulnerable. Arthroscopic débridement is an effective treatment, enabling return to a high competitive level. Surgeons, sports medicine physicians, and physiotherapists should be aware of the condition. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Arthroscopic psoas tenotomy.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Michael; Jung, Jochen; Dienst, Michael

    2006-08-01

    Tenotomy may be indicated for psoas tendinitis or painful snapping if conservative treatment remains unsuccessful. Because of significant complications with open techniques, endoscopic operations have been developed. We present a new arthroscopic technique to access and release the psoas tendon from the hip joint. This procedure can be performed in addition to other arthroscopic procedures of the hip joint or alone. To exclude additional hip disease, a diagnostic round of the joint should be completed. After hip arthroscopy of the central compartment has been performed, traction is released and the 30 degrees arthroscope is placed via the proximal anterolateral portal lying on the anterior femoral neck. The medial synovial fold can be identified. This fold lies slightly medially underneath the anteromedial capsule at the level of the psoas tendon. The arthroscope is turned toward the anterior capsule. Sometimes, the tendon shines through a thin articular capsule, or it may even be accessed directly via a hole connecting the hip joint and the iliopectineal bursa at the level of the anterior head-neck junction. If this cannot be done, an electrothermic probe is introduced via the anterior portal to make a 2-cm transverse capsular incision. The tendon is released with the back side of the electrothermic device turned to the iliacus muscle that lies anterior to the psoas tendon. A complete release is achieved when the tendon stumps can be seen gapping at a distance and the fibers of the iliacus muscle are visible. The first 9 patients who underwent surgery performed according to this technique developed no complications, and their hip flexion strength was restored to normal within 3 months.

  9. Arthroscopic bursectomy with concomitant iliotibial band release for the treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis.

    PubMed

    Farr, Derek; Selesnick, Harlan; Janecki, Chet; Cordas, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Trochanteric bursitis with lateral hip pain is a commonly encountered orthopaedic condition. Although most patients respond to corticosteroid injections, rest, physical therapy (PT), stretching, and anti-inflammatory medications, those with recalcitrant symptoms may require operative intervention. Studies have explored the use of the arthroscope in the treatment of these patients. However, these reports have not addressed the underlying pathology in this chronic condition. We believe that the iliotibial band must be addressed and is the main cause of pain, inflammation, and trochanteric impingement leading to the development of bursitis. We report a new technique for arthroscopic trochanteric bursectomy with iliotibial band release. Our technique involves 2 incisions--one 4 cm proximal to the greater trochanter along the anterior border of the iliotibial band, and the other 4 cm distal and along the posterior border. The 30 degrees arthroscope is introduced through the inferior portal, and a cannula is introduced through the superior portal. A 5.5-mm arthroscopic shaver is inserted through the superior cannula to clear off the surface of the iliotibial band, so that it may be adequately visualized. A hooked electrocautery probe is then used to longitudinally incise the iliotibial band until it no longer rubs, causing impingement over the greater trochanter.

  10. [Arthroscopic treatment for osteoarthritic knee].

    PubMed

    Bloom, Shlomo; Lebel, David; Cohen, Eugen; Atar, Dan; Rath, Ehud

    2008-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of knee morbidity. Age and overweight are the main risk factors for development of knee OA. The majority of patients respond to conservative treatment. For those who don't, surgical treatment is the only alternative. Arthroscopic surgery for the osteoarthritic knee is a well known procedure. Recently, numerous publications addressed the advantages of arthroscopic treatment for this indication. Some of the publications concluded that arthroscopic treatment for knee OA equals placebo. Others found temporary relief of symptoms. Among special subgroup of patients, in which acute pain exacerbation, mechanical block or early OA, utilizing arthroscopic techniques revealed satisfactory results. In this review, we discuss the indications and contraindications for arthroscopic treatment of the osteoarthritic knee according to the latest literature.

  11. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ELBOW STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Luis Alfredo Gómez; Dal Molin, Fabio Farina; Visco, Adalberto; Fernandes, Luis Filipe Daneu; dos Santos, Murilo Cunha Rafael; Cardozo Filho, Nivaldo Souza; Gómez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    To present the arthroscopic surgical technique and the evaluation of the results from this technique for treating elbow stiffness. Methods: Between April 2007 and January 2010, ten elbows of ten patients with elbow stiffness underwent arthroscopic treatment to release the range of motion. The minimum follow-up was 11 months, with an average of 27 months. All the patients were male and their average age was 32.8 years (ranging from 22 to 48 years). After the arthroscopic treatment, they were followed up weekly in the first month and every three months thereafter. The clinical evaluation was made using the criteria of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Results: All the patients were satisfied with the results from the arthroscopic treatment. The average UCLA score was 33.8 points. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment for elbow stiffness is a minimally invasive surgical technique that was shown to be efficient for treating this complication. PMID:27027027

  12. Liquid film target impingement scrubber

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Coleman, Charles F.

    1977-03-15

    An improved liquid film impingement scrubber is provided wherein particulates suspended in a gas are removed by jetting the particle-containing gas onto a relatively small thin liquid layer impingement target surface. The impingement target is in the form of a porous material which allows a suitable contacting liquid from a pressurized chamber to exude therethrough to form a thin liquid film target surface. The gas-supported particles collected by impingement of the gas on the target are continuously removed and flushed from the system by the liquid flow through each of a number of pores in the target.

  13. Internal impingement in the etiology of rotator cuff tendinosis revisited.

    PubMed

    Budoff, Jeffrey E; Nirschl, Robert P; Ilahi, Omer A; Rodin, Dennis M

    2003-10-01

    The theory of internal impingement holds that, in overhead athletes, repeated contact between the undersurface of the rotator cuff and the posterosuperior glenoid rim leads to articular-sided partial-thickness rotator cuff tears and superior labral lesions. However, we have noted this same constellation of lesions in our general patient population. These recreational athletic patients do not routinely assume the position of extreme abduction and external rotation, and thus are unlikely to experience significant internal impingement forces. The goal of this study was to document the prevalence of superior labral lesions in patients being treated for partial-thickness undersurface rotator cuff tears. Retrospective case series. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 75 shoulders arthroscopically treated for partial-thickness articular-sided rotator cuff tears. With the exception of one professional tennis player, no patients were playing sports at a professional or major college level. No professional or collegiate throwing athletes were included. The prevalence of these lesions and their association with recreational athletics was noted. We found that 55 of 75 (73.3%) shoulders with articular-sided partial-thickness rotator cuff tears also had superior labral lesions. A statistically significant increased prevalence of superior labral lesions in the dominant shoulder was seen (P =.03). In addition, our patients who engaged in overhand throwing had significantly fewer superior labral lesions in the dominant shoulders than did nonthrowers (P =.017). The "kissing lesions" of undersurface rotator cuff tears and posterosuperior labral damage may be explained by mechanisms other than "internal impingement."

  14. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis: a review of management in the hip impingement era

    PubMed Central

    Mahran, Mahmoud A.; Baraka, Mostafa M.; Hefny, Hany M.

    2017-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) remains the most common adolescent hip disorder. Most cases present with stable slips, and in situ fixation is the most commonly adopted treatment worldwide. The introduction of the concept of femoroacetabular impingement and subsequent studies have revealed SCFE-related hip impingement to be a significant pre-arthritic condition, and the previously suggested remodeling of the proximal femur after in situ fixation has been called into question. Complex proximal femoral osteotomies and more recently intra-articular procedures via surgical hip dislocation have been employed. The literature is still lacking a strong evidence to undertake such aggressive procedures. Moreover, the application of a particular procedure regarding the nature of the slip, being stable or unstable, the degree of the slip, and the condition of the physis has not been extensively described in the literature. The purpose of this article is to outline the SCFE-related hip impingement, to review the best evidence for the current treatment options for both stable and unstable slips, and to develop an algorithm for decision making. PMID:28513428

  15. [Surgical treatment of hip osteoarthritis: hpdete on hip arthroscopy].

    PubMed

    Ilizaliturri Sánchez, Víctor M; Camacho Galindo, Javier

    2007-10-01

    Arthroscopic surgery of the hip is a routine procedure in an increasing number of institutions around the world. Indications for this procedure increase as more experience is developed. Thanks to hip arthroscopy some intraarticular lesions like labral or ligamentum teres tears and cartilage lesions have been recognized. All of these have the potential to develop hip osteoarthritis. Open techniques for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement have been transformed to arthroscopic techniques. Femoroacetabular impingement has the potential to cause hip osteoarthritis. The role of hip arthroscopy in the treatment of formally established hip osteoarthritis is limited and has better results in young patients with early degenerative changes.

  16. Arthroscopic excision of ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Bontempo, Nicholas A; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2014-02-01

    Arthroscopy is an advancing field in orthopedics, the applications of which have been expanding over time. Traditionally, excision of ganglion cysts has been done in an open fashion. However, more recently, studies show outcomes following arthroscopic excision to be as good as open excision. Cosmetically, the incisions are smaller and heal faster following arthroscopy. In addition, there is the suggested benefit that patients will regain function and return to work faster following arthroscopic excision. More prospective studies comparing open and arthroscopic excision of ganglion cysts need to be done in order to delineate if there is a true functional benefit.

  17. Intra-articular plica causing ankle impingement in a young handball player: a case report.

    PubMed

    Somorjai, Nicolaas; Jong, Bob; Draijer, W F

    2013-01-01

    Ankle sprains are common injuries that respond well to rehabilitation. In the case of persisting symptoms, the differential diagnosis should include osteochondral defects, tendon injury, mechanical instability, and ankle impingement. In the present case report, we describe a 16-year-old male handball player who presented with persisting pain and locking in the right ankle 3 years after having sustained multiple minor inversion trauma. The clinical examination and conventional radiography showed no abnormalities. On magnetic resonance imaging, a flake fracture at the anteromedial talar dome and/or loose body was assumed. Arthroscopic examination revealed an intra-articular plica originating from an osteochondral fossa at the anteromedial tibial plafond. The plica was debrided. Retrospectively, the arthroscopic findings matched the radiographs and magnetic resonance images. The postoperative protocol consisted of early mobilization. At 6 weeks of follow-up, the patient had no pain and had returned to his sports activities. The present case report illustrates, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of ankle impingement due to a, most likely congenital, intra-articular plica arising from an osteochondral fossa at the anteromedial tibial plafond. This rare clinical condition can be diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging. Arthroscopic debridement will effectively relieve the symptoms. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Intratendinous supraspinatus cyst as a cause of shoulder impingement

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Akshay; Karuppaiah, Karthik; Elias, David; Tavakkolizadeh, Adel

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 29-year-old gentleman with shoulder impingement. An articular-sided intratendinous supraspinatus cyst was identified as the cause of his symptoms. Arthroscopic cyst debridement resulted in a good outcome at 1-year follow-up. Cysts around the shoulder are a well described pathological entity. They consist of different categories, including intraosseus cysts of the humeral head and glenoid, paralabral cysts and cysts associated with the acromioclavicular joint. Although paralabral cysts that lie intramuscularly or between the muscle bellies have frequently been reported, this is the first report of an intratendinous supraspinatus cyst with an intact rotator cuff. We describe the case, its management and the postsurgical outcome. PMID:27582975

  19. Arthroscopic Patellar Lateral Facetectomy.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Marcio B; Sanchez, George; Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-04-01

    Isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis is relatively prevalent, with the lateral facet of the patella being the most commonly affected portion. This pathology can be a result of a patellar maltracking syndrome, patella instability, or idiopathic degenerative changes. A thorough diagnostic work-up with a physical examination and imaging studies are mandatory for a proper diagnosis and to rule out other causes of patellofemoral knee pain. These patients are often treated nonoperatively with exercises for patella mobility, intra-articular injections, braces, patellar tracking, quadriceps balance and strength, and activity modification. Patients with lateral patellar pain that is refractory to nonoperative management, and who have a clear bony deformity on the patella overriding the lateral aspect of the trochlea, can benefit from surgical intervention. We recommend an arthroscopic lateral patellar facetectomy because the joint can be dynamically assessed, treated, and re-evaluated intraoperatively to ensure that normal bony contact has been restored.

  20. Impinging jets atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, E. A.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the characteristics of the spray produced by an impinging-jet injector is presented. Predictions of the spray droplet size and distribution are obtained through studying the formation and disintegration of the liquid sheet formed by the impact of two cylindrical jets of the same diameter and momentum. Two breakup regimes of the sheet are considered depending on Weber number, with transition occurring at Weber numbers between 500 and 2000. In the lower Weber number regime, the breakup is due to Taylor cardioidal waves, while at Weber number higher than 2000, the sheet disintegration is by the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability waves. Theoretical expressions to predict the sheet thickness and shape are derived for the low Weber number breakup regime. An existing mathematical analysis of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of radially moving liquid sheets is adopted in the predictions of resultant drop sizes by sheet breakup at Weber numbers greater than 2000. Comparisons of present theoretical results with experimental measurements and empirical correlations reported in the literature reveal favorable agreement.

  1. Arthroscopic revision of Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Neri, Brian R; Tuckman, David V; Bravman, Jonathan T; Yim, Duke; Sahajpal, Deenesh T; Rokito, Andrew S

    2007-01-01

    The success of revision surgery for failed Bankart repair is not well known. This purpose of this study was to report the success rates achieved using arthroscopic techniques to revise failed Bankart repairs. Twelve arthroscopic revision Bankart repairs were performed on patients with recurrent unidirectional shoulder instability after open or arthroscopic Bankart repair. Follow-up was available on 11 of the 12 patients at a mean of 34.4 months (range, 25-56 months). The surgical findings, possible modes of failure, shoulder scores (Rowe score, University of California Los Angeles [UCLA], Simple Shoulder Test), and clinical outcome were evaluated. Various modes of failure were recognized during revision arthroscopic Bankart repairs. Good-to-excellent results were obtained in 8 patients (73%) undergoing revision stabilization according to Rowe and UCLA scoring. A subluxation or dislocation event occurred in 3 (27%) of the 11 patients at a mean of 8.7 months (range, 6-12 months) postoperatively. Arthroscopic revision Bankart repairs are technically challenging procedures but can be used to achieve stable, pain-free, functional shoulders with return to prior sport. Owing to limited follow-up and the small number of patients in this study, we were unable to conclude any pattern of failure or selection criteria for this procedure.

  2. Current UK practices in the management of subacromial impingement

    PubMed Central

    Drury, Colin; Tait, Gavin R

    2015-01-01

    Background Controversy presently exists surrounding the management of patients with subacromial impingement. This study aims to highlight current UK practices in the management of these patients. Methods BESS members were invited to complete a questionnaire and responses were received from 157 consultant shoulder surgeons. Results Physiotherapy is an integral part of management for 93% of surgeons with a minimum period of 12 weeks being most popular prior to consideration of arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Subacromial steroid injection is used by 95% and 86% repeat this if the patient has failed to respond to a previous injection by the general practioner. From initial presentation, 77% felt there should be at least 3 months of conservative management before proceeding to surgery. Good but transient response to subacromial injection was considered the best predictor of good surgical outcome by 77%. The coracoacromial ligament is fully released by 78%, although there was greater variation in how aggressive surgeons were with acromioplasty. Most (59%) do not include the nontender acromioclavicular joint to any extent in routine acromioplasty. Hospital physiotherapy protocols are used by 63% for postoperative rehabilitation. Conclusions Variation exists in the management regimes offered to patients with subacromial impingement, but most employ a minimum period of 12 weeks of conservative management incorporating physiotherapy and at least 2 subacromial steriod injections. PMID:27582972

  3. Does arthroscopic subacromial decompression improve quality of life.

    PubMed

    Butt, U; Whiteman, A; Wilson, J; Paul, E; Roy, B

    2015-04-01

    There has been a significant rise in the volume of subacromial decompression surgery performed in the UK. This study aimed to determine whether arthroscopic subacromial decompression improves health related quality of life in a cost effective manner. Patients undergoing arthroscopic subacromial decompression surgery for impingement were enrolled between 2012 and 2014. The Oxford shoulder score and the EQ-5D™ instruments were completed prior to and following surgery. A cost-utility analysis was performed. Eighty-three patients were eligible for the study with a mean follow-up duration of 15 months (range: 4-27 months). The mean Oxford shoulder score improved by 13 points (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11-15 points). The mean health utility gain extrapolated from the EQ-5D™ questionnaire improved by 0.23 (95% CI: 0.16-0.30), translating to a minimum cost per QALY of £5,683. Subacromial decompression leads to significant improvement in function and quality of life in a cost effective manner. This provides justification for its ongoing practice by appropriately trained shoulder surgeons in correctly selected patients.

  4. Low altitude plume impingement handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon D.

    1991-01-01

    Plume Impingement modeling is required whenever an object immersed in a rocket exhaust plume must survive or remain undamaged within specified limits, due to thermal and pressure environments induced by the plume. At high altitudes inviscid plume models, Monte Carlo techniques along with the Plume Impingement Program can be used to predict reasonably accurate environments since there are usually no strong flowfield/body interactions or atmospheric effects. However, at low altitudes there is plume-atmospheric mixing and potential large flowfield perturbations due to plume-structure interaction. If the impinged surface is large relative to the flowfield and the flowfield is supersonic, the shock near the surface can stand off the surface several exit radii. This results in an effective total pressure that is higher than that which exists in the free plume at the surface. Additionally, in two phase plumes, there can be strong particle-gas interaction in the flowfield immediately ahead of the surface. To date there have been three levels of sophistication that have been used for low altitude plume induced environment predictions. Level 1 calculations rely on empirical characterizations of the flowfield and relatively simple impingement modeling. An example of this technique is described by Piesik. A Level 2 approach consists of characterizing the viscous plume using the SPF/2 code or RAMP2/LAMP and using the Plume Impingement Program to predict the environments. A Level 3 analysis would consist of using a Navier-Stokes code such as the FDNS code to model the flowfield and structure during a single calculation. To date, Level 1 and Level 2 type analyses have been primarily used to perform environment calculations. The recent advances in CFD modeling and computer resources allow Level 2 type analysis to be used for final design studies. Following some background on low altitude impingement, Level 1, 2, and 3 type analysis will be described.

  5. Anterolateral ankle impingement in adolescents: outcomes of nonoperative and operative treatment.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Eric W; Chambers, Reid; Kaufman, Elizabeth; Chambers, Henry G

    2010-03-01

    Ankle sprains in adolescents usually resolve with conservative management but a few patients may develop ankle impingement syndrome. There have been adult studies addressing surgical treatment of this pathology, but our study evaluated the surgical management of anterolateral ankle impingement in adolescents by comparing their outcomes after nonoperative treatment and subsequent surgical intervention. Thirteen patients (children and adolescents) diagnosed with ankle impingement by history, physical examination, and magnetic resonance imaging during a 9-year period at our institution underwent eventual arthroscopic debridement. A retrospective chart review of these patients was performed and they were evaluated using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) functional rating scale on 3 separate occasions: (1) initial presentation, (2) termination of nonoperative management, and (3) final postoperative follow-up visit. Thirteen adolescents (11 girls and 2 boys; 14 ankles) with a mean age of 15.6 (11.9-18.3) years met the inclusion criteria; of these, all had arthroscopic surgery. Mean duration of reported symptoms was 9.6 (4-15) months and mean duration of nonoperative management (physical therapy, activity modifications) was 6.9 (2-12) months. The mean AOFAS rating (out of 100 total) at initial presentation was 68.4 (40-84) and after nonoperative management was no better with a mean of 68.2 (63-76). The mean AOFAS rating at final follow-up was 90.6 (52-100), which was statistically significant (Pimpingement is confirmed by clinical and

  6. Swimmers' painful shoulder arthroscopic findings and return rate to sports.

    PubMed

    Brushøj, C; Bak, K; Johannsen, H V; Faunø, P

    2007-08-01

    Shoulder pain is the most common musculo-skeletal complaint in competitive swimmers. It remains one of the shoulder pain syndromes in overhead athletes where no golden standard of treatment exists. Eighteen competitive swimmers who all had undergone shoulder arthroscopy for therapy-resistant shoulder pain were retrospectively evaluated with respect to operative findings and ability to return to their sport after the operation. The most common finding at arthroscopy was labral pathology in 11 (61%) and subacromial impingement in five shoulders (28%). Operative procedures included debridement in 11 swimmers, partial release of the coraco-acromial ligament in four, and bursectomy in four. Sixteen (89%) responded to the follow-up evaluation. Nine swimmers (56%) were able to compete at preinjury level after 4 (2-9) months. Findings at arthroscopy suggest that the term "Swimmer's shoulder" covers a variety of pathologies including labral wearing and subacromial impingement. Arthroscopic debridement of labral tears or bursectomy in swimmers with shoulder pain has a low success rate with regard to return to sport. Further understanding and investigation of this syndromes complex pathophysiology is needed.

  7. Is there a pathological alpha angle for hip impingement? A diagnostic test study.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Cristián; Barahona, Maximiliano; Diaz, Jorge; Brañes, Julian; Chaparro, Felipe; Hinzpeter, Jaime

    2016-08-01

    The normal value of alpha angle is controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the alpha angle in asymptomatic volunteers versus patients who had undergone surgery for symptomatic cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and determine a diagnostic cut-off value for symptomatic cam impingement. This is a diagnostic test study. Cases were defined as those patients who had undergone surgery for symptomatic cam or mixed type FAI. Controls were defined as asymptomatic volunteers, with no history of hip pain who had undergone a computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis for a non-joint or bone-related reason. In both groups, the alpha angle was measured in an oblique axial CT reconstruction of the femoral neck. A logistic regression model was first estimated and a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was then calculated. The diagnostic cut-off value selected was the one that maximizes sensitivity and specificity. Data were analysed from 38 consecutive cases of cam or mixed FAI and 101 controls. The average alpha angle was 67°(±12°) among cases and 48°°(±5°) among controls. An odds ratio of 1.28 [1.18-1.39] was obtained. A ROC curve of 0.96 [0.93-0.99] was calculated, and using an alpha angle of 57° as the diagnostic cut-off value, provided a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 95%. If a patient complains of hip pain and an alpha angle of 57° is found in CT, strongly suggest that cam impingement is causing the pain.

  8. Is there a pathological alpha angle for hip impingement? A diagnostic test study

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Cristián; Barahona, Maximiliano; Diaz, Jorge; Brañes, Julian; Chaparro, Felipe; Hinzpeter, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    The normal value of alpha angle is controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the alpha angle in asymptomatic volunteers versus patients who had undergone surgery for symptomatic cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and determine a diagnostic cut-off value for symptomatic cam impingement. This is a diagnostic test study. Cases were defined as those patients who had undergone surgery for symptomatic cam or mixed type FAI. Controls were defined as asymptomatic volunteers, with no history of hip pain who had undergone a computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis for a non-joint or bone-related reason. In both groups, the alpha angle was measured in an oblique axial CT reconstruction of the femoral neck. A logistic regression model was first estimated and a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve was then calculated. The diagnostic cut-off value selected was the one that maximizes sensitivity and specificity. Data were analysed from 38 consecutive cases of cam or mixed FAI and 101 controls. The average alpha angle was 67°(±12°) among cases and 48°°(±5°) among controls. An odds ratio of 1.28 [1.18–1.39] was obtained. A ROC curve of 0.96 [0.93–0.99] was calculated, and using an alpha angle of 57° as the diagnostic cut-off value, provided a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 95%. If a patient complains of hip pain and an alpha angle of 57° is found in CT, strongly suggest that cam impingement is causing the pain. PMID:27583162

  9. Tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis: a new arthroscopic procedure.

    PubMed

    Arriaza, R; Leyes, M

    2011-01-01

    Tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis is considered an aggressive and technically demanding procedure that can be used to treat severe deformities of the hindfoot, and it is rarely performed. The indications for ankle arthroscopy are increasing, and arthroscopic tibiotalar arthrodesis is a common and successful procedure, but arthroscopic tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis has not been previously reported in the literature. A case of extensive talus necrosis with severe hindfoot deformity treated by means of an arthroscopic tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis is presented.

  10. Fiber-optics couple arthroscope to TV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, J. M.; Rhodes, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    Convenient, hand-held coupler images output of arthroscope onto coherent fiber bundle. Arthroscope allows surgeons to examine internal organs through any small opening in body. Coupler is also used for engine inspection, instrument repair, and around-corner visual inspection. Image from arthroscope travels along flexible bundle and appears at other cable end where it is recollimated by lens. Image is read from lens or projected on color TV camera.

  11. Morphological classification of acromial spur: correlation between Rockwood tilt view and arthroscopic finding

    PubMed Central

    Kongmalai, Pinkawas; Apivatgaroon, Adinun; Chernchujit, Bancha

    2017-01-01

    Purpose and hypothesis: Acromion spur is the extrinsic factor for impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tear. The Rockwood tilt view can be used to evaluate prominence of the anterior acromion, however no study has shown the correlation of findings between the Rockwood tilt view and the arthroscopic finding. Methods: We developed the arthroscopic classification of acromion spur as type 1 flat spur, type 2 bump spur, type 3 heel spur, type 4 keel spur, and type 5 irregular spur. Patients with rotator cuff syndrome who underwent arthroscopic surgery were recruited. Two observers were asked to classify the type of spur from arthroscopic findings and Rockwood tilt views separately in random pattern. The prevalence of supraspinatus tendon tear was also recorded as no tear, partial-thickness tear, and full-thickness tear. Results: The keel spur (33.9%) was the most common finding followed by the heel spur (27.8%). The correlation was high especially for the heel, the keel, and the irregular spur (75.47%, 74.03%, and 72.73%, respectively.) These three types of spurs have a high prevalence of full thickness of supraspinatus tendon tear. Conclusion: The Rockwood tilt view can be used to evaluate the morphology of an acromion spur, especially the at-risk spur that correlates highly with the full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. The arthroscopic classification will also be a useful tool to improve communication between the surgeon and the guide for appropriate treatment in a rotator cuff tear patient when encountering the heel, keel, and irregular spur. PMID:28074776

  12. [Arthroscopic treatment for osteoarthritis: knee and shoulder].

    PubMed

    Almazán, Arturo; Cruz, Francisco; Pérez, Francisco; Bravo, César; Ibarra, Clemente

    2007-10-01

    We discuss the role of arthroscopy in the treatment of knee and shoulder osteoarthritis. The most widely used arthroscopic techniques used in these joints for the treatment of osteoarthritis are arthroscopic lavage, arthroscopic debridement, abrasion arthrosplasty and microfractures. Even though arthroscopic techniques are only useful for a specific group of patients and that the procedure does not modify disease's natural history, it is an accessible therapeutic option. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier España S.L Barcelona. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. A Simple Technique for Capsular Repair After Hip Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Reardon, Patrick J.; Levy, Bruce A.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Capsulotomy is typically performed during arthroscopic treatment for femoroacetabular impingement. As the frequency of hip arthroscopy continues to expand rapidly, increased attention is being paid to the implications of interportal capsulotomy and the need for repair. To minimize the risk of postoperative instability, capsular closure has been recommended to restore the anatomy and biomechanical function of the capsule. We present a reliable, efficient, and effective method for arthroscopic closure of the interportal capsulotomy after hip arthroscopy. PMID:26870655

  14. Rotational effects on impingement cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, A. H.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Koo, J. J.; Preiser, U. Z.

    1987-01-01

    The present consideration of rotation effects on heat transfer in a radially exhausted, impingement-cooled turbine blade model gives attention to experimental results for Reynolds and Rossby numbers and blade/coolant temperature ratio values that are representative of small gas turbine engines. On the basis of a model that encompasses the effects of Coriolis force and buoyancy on heat transfer, bouyancy is identified as the cause of an average Nusselt number that is 20-30 percent lower than expected from previous nonrotating data. A heuristic model is proposed which predicts that the impingement jets nearest the blade roots should deflect inward, due to a centripetal force generated by their tangential velocity counter to the blade motion. Potentially serious thermal stresses must be anticipated from rotation effects in the course of blade design.

  15. Rotational effects on impingement cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, A. H.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Koo, J. J.; Preiser, U. Z.

    The present consideration of rotation effects on heat transfer in a radially exhausted, impingement-cooled turbine blade model gives attention to experimental results for Reynolds and Rossby numbers and blade/coolant temperature ratio values that are representative of small gas turbine engines. On the basis of a model that encompasses the effects of Coriolis force and buoyancy on heat transfer, bouyancy is identified as the cause of an average Nusselt number that is 20-30 percent lower than expected from previous nonrotating data. A heuristic model is proposed which predicts that the impingement jets nearest the blade roots should deflect inward, due to a centripetal force generated by their tangential velocity counter to the blade motion. Potentially serious thermal stresses must be anticipated from rotation effects in the course of blade design.

  16. Electrical Aspects of Impinging Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Yu-Chien

    This dissertation examines the use of electric fields as one mechanism for controlling combustion as flames are partially extinguished when impinging on nearby surfaces. Electrical aspects of flames, specifically, the production of chemi-ions in hydrocarbon flames and the use of convective flows driven by these ions, have been investigated in a wide range of applications in prior work but despite this fairly comprehensive effort to study electrical aspects of combustion, relatively little research has focused on electrical phenomena near flame extinguishment, nor for flames near impingement surfaces. Electrical impinging flames have complex properties under global influences of ion-driven winds and flow field disturbances from the impingement surface. Challenges of measurements when an electric field is applied in the system have limited an understanding of changes to the flame behavior and species concentrations caused by the field. This research initially characterizes the ability of high voltage power supplies to respond on sufficiently short time scales to permit real time electrical flame actuation. The study then characterizes the influence of an electric field on the impinging flame shape, ion current and flow field of the thermal plume associated with the flame. The more significant further examinations can be separated into two parts: 1) the potential for using electric fields to control the release of carbon monoxide (CO) from surface-impinging flames, and 2) an investigation of controlling electrically the heat transfer to a plate on which the flame impinges. Carbon monoxide (CO) results from the incomplete oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels and, while CO can be desirable in some syngas processes, it is usually a dangerous emission from forest fires, gas heaters, gas stoves, or furnaces where insufficient oxygen in the core reaction does not fully oxidize the fuel to carbon dioxide and water. Determining how carbon monoxide is released and how heat transfer

  17. Arthroscopically Assisted Modified Jones Procedure.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    The modified Jones procedure is the classic operative treatment of symptomatic clawed hallux. It is composed of transfer of the extensor hallucis longus tendon to the first metatarsal neck and fusion of the hallux interphalangeal joint. The purpose of this technical note is to report the technique of an arthroscopically assisted modified Jones procedure. This can be combined with other minimally invasive bone and soft-tissue procedures to correct all aspects of the complex cavus foot deformity.

  18. Active Control of Supersonic Impinging Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADPO11106 TITLE: Active Control of Supersonic Impinging Jets DISTRIBUTION...component part numbers comprise the compilation report: ADPO11101 thru ADP011178 UNCLASSIFIED 8-1 Active Control of Supersonic Impinging Jets A...Street, Tallahassee, FL 32310, USA krotha &fmrl.fsu.edu Experimental studies of supersonic impinging jet flows suggest that they are greatly influenced

  19. Modelling techniques for jet impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.; Herling, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    A technique for testing scale models for the determination of fluctuating pressure loads due to jet impingement has been investigated using a quarter-scale model of a boilerplate test facility in which a JT-15D engine with a rectangular outer nozzle blows over a small curved airfoil representing the upper-surface of a wing. When model and full-scale spectra of fluctuating surface pressures are reduced to plots of pressure coefficient power-spectral density vs Strouhal number, moderate agreement is obtained, but a shift of spectral peaks is noted. However, when a correction for the ratio of average jet to ambient temperature is applied, the spectral peaks agree.

  20. Externally blown flap impingement noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.; Lasagna, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of externally blown flap impingement noise was conducted using a full-scale turbofan engine and aircraft wing. The noise produced with a daisy nozzle installed on the engine exhaust system was greater than that produced by a conical nozzle at the same thrust. The daisy nozzle caused the jet velocity to decay about 35 percent at the flap. The presence of the wing next to the conical nozzle increased the noise, as did increasing the flap deflection. Compared with the conical nozzle, the daisy nozzle produced slightly less noise at a flap deflection of 60 deg but produced more noise at the lower flap deflections tested.

  1. Outcome Predictors in Nonoperative Management of Newly Diagnosed Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    TaheriAzam, Afshin; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen; Moayyeri, Alireza

    2005-01-01

    subacromial injection of local anesthetics. Three current accepted approaches to treatment of impingement syndrome include conservative management, arthroscopic surgery, and open surgical interventions. All of these therapeutic modalities have been found to be effective, even though there is controversy in the medical literature[2–6] about their success rates. Based on the effectiveness of noninvasive therapies, many investigators recommend a period of conservative management for at least 6–12 months.[6–10] Nevertheless, with the advent of arthroscopic surgical techniques, which are remarkably less invasive and require shorter rehabilitation periods than open surgical procedures, some surgeons suggest earlier arthroscopic intervention in rotator cuff disorders.[11] A significant amount of our knowledge about the prognostic factors associated with the response to conservative therapy is from retrospective studies. The aim of our study is to determine these prognostic factors on the basis of a prospective investigation. PMID:16369368

  2. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression in the treatment of full thickness rotator cuff tears: a 3- to 6-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Zvijac, J E; Levy, H J; Lemak, L J

    1994-10-01

    Arthroscopic subacromial decompression has become an accepted treatment for patients with impingement syndrome; however, its use for full thickness rotator cuff tears continues to be controversial. The purpose of this study is to determine if the results of arthroscopic subacromial decompression alone for full thickness rotator cuff tears deteriorate at long-term follow-up. We reevaluated all 25 patients with full thickness rotator cuff tears who underwent arthroscopic subacromial decompression from our original study group. Based on the University of California at Los Angeles shoulder rating, 68% of patients were rated as excellent or good at the present mean follow-up of 45.8 months (range 36-72 months). This represents a significant decrease from our initial report of 84% satisfactory results at a mean follow-up of 24.6 months. There was a significant decrease in ratings with regard to pain and function; however, no significant deterioration was noted with regard to motion and strength. Two additional patients required open rotator cuff repair since the time of initial follow-up for a total of six. Large and massive rotator cuff tears fared worse over time as compared with small and moderate size tears. Although 1- to 3-year results of arthroscopic subacromial decompression and rotator cuff debridement were favorable, the long-term follow-up demonstrates deterioration of results. We therefore cannot support the use of decompression and debridement alone in the treatment of repairable full thickness rotator cuff tears.

  3. Nanofluid impingement jet heat transfer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Experimental investigation to study the heat transfer between a vertical round alumina-water nanofluid jet and a horizontal circular round surface is carried out. Different jet flow rates, jet nozzle diameters, various circular disk diameters and three nanoparticles concentrations (0, 6.6 and 10%, respectively) are used. The experimental results indicate that using nanofluid as a heat transfer carrier can enhance the heat transfer process. For the same Reynolds number, the experimental data show an increase in the Nusselt numbers as the nanoparticle concentration increases. Size of heating disk diameters shows reverse effect on heat transfer. It is also found that presenting the data in terms of Reynolds number at impingement jet diameter can take into account on both effects of jet heights and nozzle diameter. Presenting the data in terms of Peclet numbers, at fixed impingement nozzle diameter, makes the data less sensitive to the percentage change of the nanoparticle concentrations. Finally, general heat transfer correlation is obtained verses Peclet numbers using nanoparticle concentrations and the nozzle diameter ratio as parameters. PMID:22340669

  4. Arthroscopic Transosseous Bony Bankart Repair

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Matthew D.; Burns, Joseph P.; Snyder, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of glenoid bony integrity is critical to minimizing the risk of recurrence and re-creating normal kinematics in the setting of anterior glenohumeral instability. We present an arthroscopic suture anchor–based technique for treating large bony Bankart fractures in which the fragment is secured to the intact glenoid using mattress sutures placed through the bony fragment and augmented with soft-tissue repair proximal and distal to the bony lesion. This straightforward technique has led to excellent fragment reduction and good outcomes in our experience. PMID:25973373

  5. Results of arthroscopic meniscal repair

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, María Belén; Arroquy, Damián; Chahla, Jorge; Guiñazú, Jorge; Bisso, Martín Carboni; Vilaseca, Tomás

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Currently the arthroscopic treatment of meniscal pathology has become one of the most common procedures in orthopedic practice and although in most cases meniscectomy is done, meniscal sutures are the treatment of choice when a reparable lesion is diagnosed, especially in young patients. It has been reported that the meniscal repair leads to a lower incidence of developing degenerative changes in the long-term when compared with meniscectomy and nonsurgical treatment of meniscal injuries. The aim of this study was to determine the success rate of meniscal repair achieved in our sports medicine practice. Methods: Between 2006 and 2015, 62 meniscal tears in 58 patients with a mean age of 31 years (range 15-58) were repaired. Mean follow-up was 52 months (range 6-120 months). In 16 patients (28%) was associated with arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. The repair techniques used included outside-in sutures, inside-out sutures, all-inside sutures and a combination of techniques. Failure of the repair was defined by the requirement for repeat knee arthroscopy and partial or subtotal meniscectomy. The indication of arthroscopic revision was based on the presence of mechanical symptoms, after the suture. Results: Failure of meniscus repair occurred in four patients (failure rate: 6.45%), one case was associated with ACL reconstruction (failure rate: 6.25%) and 3 had undergone isolated meniscal suture (failure rate: 8%). The average time for the reoperation was 15 months (4-24). We had no intraoperative complications. Conclusion: The reported failure rate of meniscal repair in stable knees varies between 12% and 43%, with reports that demonstrate a clinical success rate of 100%. In this study, we obtained a success rate of 93.5%. These results are slightly higher than those in the literature, which can be attributed to careful selection of patients and the fact that clinical success tends to be better than the assessed arthroscopically. In summary, we consider the

  6. Ankle instability and arthroscopic lateral ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Jorge I; Mangone, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle ligament insufficiency has focused on 2 main categories: local soft-tissue reconstruction and tendon grafts/transfer procedures. There is an increasing interest in the arthroscopic solutions for chronic instability of the ankle. Recent biomechanical studies suggest the at least one of the arthroscopic techniques can provide equivalent results to current open local soft-tissue reconstruction (such as the modified Brostrom technique). Arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament reconstruction is becoming an increasingly acceptable method for the surgical management of chronic lateral ankle instability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Impinging Underexpanded Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was designed to create a simplified simulation of the flow through a hole in the surface of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle and the subsequent impingement of the flow on internal structures. In addition to planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization, pressure measurements were recorded on the surface of an impingement target. The PLIF images themselves provide quantitative spatial information about structure of the impinging jets. The images also help in the interpretation of impingement surface pressure profiles by highlighting the flow structures corresponding to distinctive features of these pressure profiles. The shape of the pressure distribution along the impingement surface was found to be double-peaked in cases with a sufficiently high jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio so as to have a Mach disk, as well as in cases where a flow feature called a recirculation bubble formed at the impingement surface. The formation of a recirculation bubble was in turn found to depend very sensitively upon the jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio. The pressure measured at the surface was typically less than half the nozzle plenum pressure at low jet pressure ratios and decreased with increasing jet pressure ratios. Angled impingement cases showed that impingement at a 60deg angle resulted in up to a factor of three increase in maximum pressure at the plate compared to normal incidence.

  8. [Clinical or radiological diagnosis of impingement].

    PubMed

    Kloth, J K; Zeifang, F; Weber, M-A

    2015-03-01

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is a clinically common entity involving trapping of tendons or bursa with typical clinical findings. Important radiological procedures are ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography. Projection radiography and computed tomography (CT) are ideal to identify bony changes and CT arthrography also serves as an alternative method in cases of contraindications for MRI. These modalities support the clinically suspected diagnosis of impingement syndrome and may identify its cause in primary diagnosis. In addition, effects of impingement are determined by imaging. Therapy decisions are based on a synopsis of radiological and clinical findings. The sensitivity and specificity of these imaging modalities with regard to the diagnostics of a clinically evident impingement syndrome are given in this review article. Orthopedic and trauma surgeons express the suspicion of an impingement syndrome based on patient history and physical examination and radiologists confirm structural changes and damage of intra-articular structures using dedicated imaging techniques.

  9. Externally blown flap impingement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasagna, P. L.; Putnam, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Tests of the noise produced by the impingement of the jet exhaust on the wing and flap for an externally blown flap system were conducted with a CF700 turbofan engine and an F-111B wing panel. The noise produced with a daisy nozzle installed on the engine was greater than that produced by a conical nozzle at the same thrust. The presence of the wing next to the test nozzles increased the noise, as did increasing the flap deflection angle. Compared with the conical nozzle, the daisy nozzle produced slightly less noise at a flap deflection of 60 deg but produced more noise at the lower flap deflections tested. Tests showed that the single-slotted flap deflected 60 deg, produced less noise than the double-slotted flaps. Also, maintaining the maximum distance between the exit nozzle and flap system resulted in a minor reduction in noise.

  10. Arthroscopic training resources in orthopedic resident education.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Ryan; John, Tamara; Lawler, Jeffrey; Moorman, Claude; Nicandri, Gregg

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of use, perceived effectiveness, and preference for arthroscopic surgical skill training resources. An electronic survey was sent to orthopedics residents, residency program directors, and orthopedic sports medicine attending physicians in the United States. The frequency and perceived effectiveness of 10 types of adjunctive arthroscopic skills training was assessed. Residents and faculty members were asked to rate their confidence in resident ability to perform common arthroscopic procedures. Surveys were completed by 40 of 152 (26.3%) orthopedic residency program directors, 70 of 426 (16.4%) sports medicine faculty, and 235 of 3,170 (7.4%) orthopedic residents. The use of adjunctive methods of training varied from only 9.8% of programs with virtual reality training to 80.5% of programs that used reading of published materials to develop arthroscopic skill. Practice on cadaveric specimens was viewed as the most effective and preferred adjunctive method of training. Residents trained on cadaveric specimens reported increased confidence in their ability to perform arthroscopic procedures. The resources for developing arthroscopic surgical skill vary considerably across orthopedic residency programs in the United States. Adjunctive training methods were perceived to be effective at supplementing traditional training in the operating room. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. [Arthroscopic therapy of Baker's cyst with radiofrequency].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-jie; Wang, Zhi-gang; Li, Zhong-li; Cai, Xu; Zhang, Wen-tao; Hao, Li-bo; Chen, Ji-ying; Gao, Li

    2004-02-22

    To explore the feasibility of arthroscopic therapy of Baker's cysts with radiofrequency. Since Feb. 2000 to Oct. 2002 a surgical arthroscopic treatment for popliteal cyst in a series of 21 patients. Men 14 and female 7, the age from 45 to 66 year. To do CT scan 11 and MR in 8. To insert a arthroscope to Baker's cyst, and inject salline in the visceral layer of capsule under the arthroscope, so that remove of the capsule easily. The radiofrequency to clear the capsule of cyst and hemostasia. All of the cases studied, a connection between joint space and cyst was found in 13 cases. The popliteal cyst was found to be almost invariably associated with other knee disorders. Follow-up in all of the case. No nerve and blood vessel injure, no infection in this group. The function is well include 3 cases relapsed after re-operation by arthroscope debridement. Surgical arthroscopic therapy of Baker's cysts is safety and reliable; To removal of capsule integrity and repair of all intraarticular lesions and sealing of the junction between Baker's cyst and the dorsal recessus of the knee joint for preventing recurrent are very important.

  12. Arthroscopic lysis in knee arthrofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, J; Vidal, C; Medina, E; Baena, J

    1993-01-01

    Arthrofibrosis continues to be a difficult complication in articular surgery on the knee. We present our experience in 21 cases of arthroscopic lysis as an alternative to mobilization under anesthesia. The technique begins with the liberation of the adhesions of the suprapatellar pouch, continues down both gutters, and ends with a cleaning of the notch where necessary. When a restriction of patellar mobility persists, we make a retinacular release. The results obtained are very satisfactory, with an average increase in the arc of mobility of 68 degrees. The average gain in mobility at 6 months is significantly greater than that achieved in the immediate postoperative period. Longer follow-up showed no improvement in range of motion after 6 months.

  13. An arthroscopic hip documentation form.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Satesh; Khan, Munir; Kuiper, Jan-Herman; Richardson, James B; Davies, Jonathan P

    2008-07-01

    Hip arthroscopy is becoming increasingly popular. A simple, precise, and practical means of recording arthroscopic findings will be useful for diagnostic, research, and audit purposes. Basic principles of cartography exist to produce two-dimensional paper representations of our spherical planet. We used the same principles to produce a two-dimensional map of the acetabulum and femoral head. The resulting hip diagram shows the acetabulum as viewed from the side and the femoral head as viewed from above. The ligamentum teres is attached to the medial margin of the head. The head-neck junction and part of the femoral neck is shown at the opposite margin of the ligamentum teres. The hip documentation form is simple, precise, and accurate. We use it to record our findings at hip arthroscopy, which we have used to assist us in our practice.

  14. [Consequences of arthroscopic meniscal resection].

    PubMed

    Faunø, P; Nielsen, A B

    1993-10-18

    The functional and radiological consequences of arthroscopic meniscal resection were assessed in an 8.5 years follow up of 136 patients. Twenty three percent had undergone re-arthroscopy. Function related pain in the operated knee was reported by 44% of the patients. Radiological degenerative changes appeared in significantly more of the operated knees than in the knees not operated. The combination of varus knees and resection of the medial meniscus or valgus knees and lateral resection was associated with significantly more degenerative changes than after resection in knees with normal alignment. Resection of flap tears was associated with more re-operations and more function related knee pain than resection of bucket-handle lesions.

  15. Study of liquid jet impingement on screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, F. T.; Ricker, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    A model is presented for an unconfined flow, such as a free jet, impinging on a screen which incorporates the influence of liquid deflection by the screen. The boundary layer blockage coefficient is introduced. This coefficient depends on the screen weave geometry and the jet impingement angle, and essentially accounts for the increase in fluid particle trajectory length through the screen resulting from the flow deflection. Comparisons were made with previous experimental studies to determine empirical values of the blockage coefficient. It is concluded that the new model reliably predicts the bulk flow and penetration characteristics of an impinging liquid jet interacting with a screen.

  16. The Wiese Knot: A Sliding-Locking Arthroscopic Knot.

    PubMed

    Parada, Stephen A; Shaw, K Aaron; Eichinger, Josef K; Boykin, Nathan T; Gloystein, David M; Ledford, Cheryl L; Arrington, Edward D; Wiese, Paul T

    2017-02-01

    Despite recent advances in knotless suture devices for arthroscopic surgical procedures, arthroscopic knot tying remains a necessary skill for the arthroscopic surgeon. Successful completion of arthroscopic knot tying relies on a thorough understanding of the chosen technique, proper suture management, adequate knot tensioning and securement, and the ability to reproducibly create the knot. We introduce a technique that serves as both a sliding and locking knot while being simple to master and reproducible to perform.

  17. Supersonic rectangular jet impingement noise experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norum, Thomas D.

    1989-04-01

    The discrete frequency sound produced by jets issuing from a convergent, rectangular nozzle of aspect ratio 4.24 was investigated. Experiments were performed both with the free jet and with the jet impinging on a hard ground surface. The impingement tones that dominate the impinging jet spectra show a definite staging behavior which appears to be biased toward the free jet screech frequency once the separation distance exceeds the region of substantial shock cell development. The frequency variation of the impingement tone stages fit the details of a feedback cycle if the disturbance convection velocity is chosen to be 20 percent higher than that necessary to satisfy the screech feedback loop. Phase locked optical records show a flapping mode of jet oscillation with tones at or near the screech frequency, with superimposed symmetric oscillations when a second dominant tone of unrelated frequency appears in the spectrum.

  18. Physical tests for shoulder impingements and local lesions of bursa, tendon or labrum that may accompany impingement.

    PubMed

    Hanchard, Nigel C A; Lenza, Mário; Handoll, Helen H G; Takwoingi, Yemisi

    2013-04-30

    95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the index tests. Meta-analysis was not performed. We included 33 studies involving 4002 shoulders in 3852 patients. Although 28 studies were prospective, study quality was still generally poor. Mainly reflecting the use of surgery as a reference test in most studies, all but two studies were judged as not meeting the criteria for having a representative spectrum of patients. However, even these two studies only partly recruited from primary care.The target conditions assessed in the 33 studies were grouped under five main categories: subacromial or internal impingement, rotator cuff tendinopathy or tears, long head of biceps tendinopathy or tears, glenoid labral lesions and multiple undifferentiated target conditions. The majority of studies used arthroscopic surgery as the reference standard. Eight studies utilised reference standards which were potentially applicable to primary care (local anaesthesia, one study; ultrasound, three studies) or the hospital outpatient setting (magnetic resonance imaging, four studies). One study used a variety of reference standards, some applicable to primary care or the hospital outpatient setting. In two of these studies the reference standard used was acceptable for identifying the target condition, but in six it was only partially so. The studies evaluated numerous standard, modified, or combination index tests and 14 novel index tests. There were 170 target condition/index test combinations, but only six instances of any index test being performed and interpreted similarly in two studies. Only two studies of a modified empty can test for full thickness tear of the rotator cuff, and two studies of a modified anterior slide test for type II superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions, were clinically homogenous. Due to the limited number of studies, meta-analyses were considered inappropriate. Sensitivity and specificity estimates from each study are presented on forest plots for the

  19. Revision of failed arthroscopic bankart repairs.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Domenick J

    2007-04-01

    The results following open revision surgery following a failed arthroscopic Bankart procedure are not well documented. To evaluate the results of patients with a failed arthroscopic Bankart repair treated with a traditional, open Bankart repair. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty patients (28 male and 2 female) who had a mean age of 24 years (range 15-36) at the time of operation were evaluated. The mean interval from the time of the operation to the final follow-up was 46 months (range 24-55). The rating systems of Rowe and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) were recorded preoperatively and at the time of the final evaluation. After open repair, mean modified Rowe scores improved from 25 preoperatively to 84.2 points. The results were excellent in 2 (6.7%), good in 24 (80%), and fair in 4 (13.3%); there were no poor results. The UCLA shoulder score improved from a mean of 17 points preoperatively to 29 points (P = .001 for all comparisons). Twenty-six patients (87%) did not have an anchor placement inferior to the 4-o'clock position for a right shoulder or the 8-o'clock position for the left shoulder after the index arthroscopic repair. There were no rotator interval closures performed at the index arthroscopic Bankart repair, and 10 patients (33%) required an interval closure at the open revision procedure. Twenty-five patients (83%) immobilized the operated arm in a sling for less than 2 weeks following the index arthroscopic repair. Patients with failed arthroscopic Bankart repairs can be successfully treated with a revision, open Bankart repair. Inadequate postoperative immobilization, large rotator intervals, and improper anchor placement are possible risk factors that may increase the incidence of failure of an arthroscopic Bankart repair.

  20. A new interdisciplinary treatment strategy versus usual medical care for the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dorrestijn, Oscar; Stevens, Martin; Diercks, Ron L; van der Meer, Klaas; Winters, Jan C

    2007-01-01

    Background Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is the most frequently recorded shoulder disorder. When conservative treatment of SIS fails, a subacromial decompression is warranted. However, the best moment of referral for surgery is not well defined. Both early and late referrals have disadvantages – unnecessary operations and smaller improvements in shoulder function, respectively. This paper describes the design of a new interdisciplinary treatment strategy for SIS (TRANSIT), which comprises rules to treat SIS in primary care and a well-defined moment of referral for surgery. Methods/Design The effectiveness of an arthroscopic subacromial decompression versus usual medical care will be evaluated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Patients are eligible for inclusion when experiencing a recurrence of SIS within one year after a first episode of SIS which was successfully treated with a subacromial corticosteroid injection. After inclusion they will receive injection treatment again by their general practitioner. When, after this treatment, there is a second recurrence within a year post-injection, the participants will be randomized to either an arthroscopic subacromial decompression (intervention group) or continuation of usual medical care (control group). The latter will be performed by a general practitioner according to the Dutch National Guidelines for Shoulder Problems. At inclusion, at randomization and three, six and 12 months post-randomization an outcome assessment will take place. The primary outcome measure is the patient-reported Shoulder Disability Questionnaire. The secondary outcome measures include both disease-specific and generic measures, and an economic evaluation. Treatment effects will be compared for all measurement points by using a GLM repeated measures analyses. Discussion The rationale and design of an RCT comparing arthroscopic subacromial decompression with usual medical care for subacromial impingement syndrome are

  1. Posterior ankle impingement in the dancer.

    PubMed

    Moser, Brad R

    2011-01-01

    Dancers spend a lot of time in the relevé position in demi-pointe and en pointe in their training and their careers. Pain from both osseous and soft tissue causes may start to occur in the posterior aspect of their ankle. This article reviews the potential causes of posterior ankle impingement in dancers. It will discuss the clinical evaluation of a dancer and the appropriate workup and radiographic studies needed to further evaluate a dancer with suspected posterior ankle impingement.

  2. Cleaning verification by air/water impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa L.; Littlefield, Maria D.; Melton, Gregory S.; Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper will discuss how the Kennedy Space Center intends to perform precision cleaning verification by Air/Water Impingement in lieu of chlorofluorocarbon-113 gravimetric nonvolatile residue analysis (NVR). Test results will be given that demonstrate the effectiveness of the Air/Water system. A brief discussion of the Total Carbon method via the use of a high temperature combustion analyzer will also be given. The necessary equipment for impingement will be shown along with other possible applications of this technology.

  3. Achilles Impingement Tendinopathy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Mark J; Mourelatos, Jan; Mar, Alice

    2017-02-28

    Haglund's syndrome is impingement of the retrocalcaneal bursa and Achilles tendon caused by a prominence of the posterosuperior calcaneus. Radiographic measurements are not sensitive or specific for diagnosing Haglund's deformity. Localization of a bone deformity and tendinopathy in the same sagittal section of a magnetic resonance imaging scan can assist with the diagnosis in equivocal cases. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of Haglund's syndrome in patients presenting with Achilles tendinopathy and note any associated findings to determine the criteria for a diagnosis of Haglund's syndrome. We reviewed 40 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles tendinopathy and 19 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles high-grade tears and/or ruptures. Achilles tendinopathy was often in close proximity to the superior aspect of the calcaneal tuberosity, consistent with impingement (67.5%). Patients with Achilles impingement tendinopathy were more often female (p < .04) and were significantly heavier than patients presenting with noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy (p = .014) or Achilles tendon rupture (p = .010). Impingement tendinopathy occurred medially (8 of 20) and centrally (10 of 20) more often than laterally (2 of 20) and was associated with a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with a loss of calcaneal recess more often than a superior projection (22 of 27 versus 8 of 27; p < .001). Haglund's deformity should be reserved for defining a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with loss of calcaneal recess because this corresponds with impingement. Achilles impingement tendinopathy might be more appropriate terminology for Haglund's syndrome, because the bone deformity is often subtle. Of the 27 images with Achilles impingement tendinopathy, 10 (37.0%) extended to a location prone to Achilles tendon rupture. Given these findings, insertional and noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy are not mutually

  4. Atomization characteristics of impinging liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, H. M.; Anderson, W. E.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    A systematic study is presented of the atomization of impinging liquid jets investigating the effects of jet conditions (laminar versus turbulent), orifice diameter, impingement angle and jet velocity. Results are compared to current theories in terms of sheet breakup length, sheet shape and drop size. Experiments contrasting laminar and turbulent jet conditions clearly show that the jet conditions have a dramatic effect on the atomization process.

  5. Shoulder impingement in the United States military.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Mark S; Cameron, Kenneth L; Tucker, Christopher J; Benigni, Matthew; Blaine, Theodore A; Owens, Brett D

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the incidence and characteristics of primary, or external, shoulder impingement in an occupationally and physically active population. A longitudinal, prospective epidemiologic database was used to determine the incidence and risk factors for shoulder subacromial impingement in the United States (U.S.) military. Our hypothesis was that shoulder impingement is influenced by age, sex, race, military rank, and branch of service. The Defense Medical Epidemiology Database was queried for all shoulder impingement injuries using International Classification of Disease, Ninth Addition, Clinical Modification code 726.10 within a 10-year period from 1999 through 2008. An overall injury incidence was calculated, and a multivariate analysis performed among demographic groups. In an at-risk population of 13,768,534 person-years, we identified 106,940 cases of shoulder impingement resulting in an incidence of 7.77/1000 person-years in the U.S. military. The incidence of shoulder impingement increased with age and was highest in the group aged ≥40 years (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 4.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.61-5.21), was 9.5% higher among men (IRR, 1.10, 95% CI, 1.06-1.13), and compared with service members in the Navy, those in the Air Force, Army, and Marine Corps were associated with higher rates of shoulder impingement (IRR, 1.46 [95% CI, 1.42-1.50], 1.42 [95% CI, 1.39-1.46], and 1.31 [95% CI, 1.26-1.36], respectively). The incidence of shoulder impingement among U.S. military personnel is 7.77/1000 person-years. An age of ≥40 years was a significant independent risk factor for injury. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Arthroscopic landmarks of the equine carpus.

    PubMed

    Hurtig, M B; Fretz, P B

    1986-11-15

    The radiocarpal and middle carpal joints of 4 clinically normal horses and 24 necropsy specimens were examined with an arthroscope to describe the topographic anatomy of these joints. The carpal bones of the radiocarpal joint had congruent articular surfaces in extension, but carpal flexion resulted in a stairstep between the radial and intermediate carpal bones. The variable surface anatomy, as well as the restricted synovial space and the technical limitations of the arthroscope, contributed to the need for more than one arthroscopic approach to the radiocarpal joint to ensure a thorough examination. The middle carpal joint's hinge-like biomechanics resulted in a spacious synovial cavity that was more amenable to arthroscopic examination. Careful planning was necessary to ensure that areas of interest were distant from the arthroscope-insertion site to allow the best perspective possible. The lateral approach to the middle carpal joint provided the best viewing of both facets of the intermediate and third carpal bones as well as the dorsal rim of the radial carpal bone. The medial approach did not allow complete inspection of these areas.

  7. Arthroscopic Treatment of Iliotibial Band Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cowden, Courtney H.; Barber, F. Alan

    2013-01-01

    Lateral knee pain in athletes is commonly seen in the sports medicine clinic, and the diagnosis of iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome is frequently made. Although conservative management including rest from activity, equipment modification, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and physical therapy is the mainstay of treatment initially, refractory cases do exist. Multiple surgical techniques have been described including an arthroscopic technique. Arthroscopic release of the ITB attachment to the lateral femoral epicondyle and resection of the lateral synovial recess for recalcitrant ITB syndrome comprise a valid option that can have a good outcome. This option avoids the complications associated with open surgery and allows for a complete arthroscopic knee examination. Division or lengthening of the ITB band itself is not a necessary step in this technique. PMID:24843846

  8. ORV Arthroscopic Transosseous Bony Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    Myer, Daniel M; Caldwell, Paul E

    2012-12-01

    The arthroscopic treatment of the "bony Bankart lesion" continues to evolve. We present a novel technique that we developed at Orthopaedic Research of Virginia, the "transosseous bony Bankart repair," which incorporates several essential concepts to provide for optimal healing and rehabilitation. We promote arthroscopic repair emphasizing bone preservation, a fracture interface without interposing sutures, the ability to reduce capsular volume, and multiple points of stable glenolabral fixation. Our technique positions suture anchors within the subchondral bone of the intact glenoid to allow for an anatomic reduction of the bony fragment. By use of an arthroscopic drill, spinal needle, and nitinol suture passing wire, the sutures are passed in a retrograde fashion through the bony Bankart fragment and anterior capsule in a mattress configuration. Additional inferior and superior anchors are placed to further provide stability and reduce capsular volume. While maximizing fracture surface area and optimizing bony healing, the end result is an anatomic reduction of the bony fragment and the glenoid articular surface.

  9. Excimer laser in arthroscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koort, Hans J.

    1991-05-01

    The development of efficient high-power lasersystems for use in surgery, especially in arthroscopic fields, leads to a new push for all endoscopic techniques. Both techniques, laser and endoscope, complete each other in an ideal way and allow applications which could not be reached with conventional techniques. One of the newer laser types is the excimer laser, which will be a good choice for surface treatment because of its very considerate interaction with tissue. One example is the ablation or smoothing of articular cartilage and meniscal shaving in orthopaedics. On the other hand, the power of this laser system is high enough to cut tissue, for instance in the lateral release, and offers therefore an alternative to the mechanical and electrical instruments. All lasers can only work fine with effective delivery systems. Sometimes there is only a single fiber, which becomes very stiff at diameters of more than 800 micrometers . This fiber often allows only the tangential treatment of tissue, most of the laser power is lost in the background. New fiber systems with many, sometimes hundreds of very thin single fibers, could offer a solution. Special handpieces and fibersystems offer distinct advantages in small joint arthroscopy, especially those for use with excimer lasers will be discussed.

  10. Arthroscopic Findings in Anterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hantes, Michael; Raoulis, Vasilios

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the last years, basic research and arthroscopic surgery, have improved our understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. It is a fact that arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability has evolved considerably over the past decades. The aim of this paper is to present the variety of pathologies that should be identified and treated during shoulder arthroscopy when dealing with anterior shoulder instability cases. Methods: A review of the current literature regarding arthroscopic shoulder anatomy, anatomic variants, and arthroscopic findings in anterior shoulder instability, is presented. In addition, correlation of arthroscopic findings with physical examination and advanced imaging (CT and MRI) in order to improve our understanding in anterior shoulder instability pathology is discussed. Results: Shoulder instability represents a broad spectrum of disease and a thorough understanding of the pathoanatomy is the key for a successful treatment of the unstable shoulder. Patients can have a variety of pathologies concomitant with a traditional Bankart lesion, such as injuries of the glenoid (bony Bankart), injuries of the glenoid labrum, superiorly (SLAP) or anteroinferiorly (e.g. anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion, and Perthes), capsular lesions (humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament), and accompanying osseous-cartilage lesions (Hill-Sachs, glenolabral articular disruption). Shoulder arthroscopy allows for a detailed visualization and a dynamic examination of all anatomic structures, identification of pathologic findings, and treatment of all concomitant lesions. Conclusion: Surgeons must be well prepared and understanding the normal anatomy of the glenohumeral joint, including its anatomic variants to seek for the possible pathologic lesions in anterior shoulder instability during shoulder arthroscopy. Patient selection criteria, improved surgical techniques, and implants available have contributed to the enhancement of

  11. [Comprehensive arthroscopic management of shoulder osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Ríos, D; Martetschlager, F; Millett, P J

    2012-01-01

    Shoulder osteoarthritis has been considered as a cause of severe pain and loss of shoulder function. Many patients with shoulder osteoarthritis are young and have demanding activities, which leads to questioning the choice of arthroplasty. This is why in this paper we describe the comprehensive arthroscopic management (CAM) that combines arthroscopic debridement, capsular release, osteoplasty of the lower humeral head, and auxiliary nerve decompression. In our experience this technique has shown short-term promising results as it decreases pain and allows patients to resume high performance demanding activities.

  12. Arthroscopically assisted percutaneous fixation of Bennett fractures.

    PubMed

    Culp, Randall W; Johnson, Jeff W

    2010-01-01

    Arthroscopic-assisted reduction and fixation of Bennett-type fractures of the thumb metacarpal allow for the confirmation of reduction as well as the assessment of the degree of chondral damage. With use of a 1.9-mm arthroscope and a traction tower, direct visualization and reduction is possible. Traditional methods of fixation are used to secure the fracture fragment. Postoperative rehabilitation follows the usual protocol used in both open and percutaneous techniques. However, the potential to obtain and confirm a more accurate articular reduction may reduce the incidence of late arthritis of the thumb carpometacarpal articulation.

  13. Arthroscopic Capsular Release of the Talocalcaneonavicular Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Arthrofibrosis of the talocalcaneonavicular joint can follow talar neck fracture especially if anterior approaches have been used for fracture fixation. Capsular release of the talocalcaneonavicular joint is indicated if the painful hindfoot stiffness cannot be controlled with conservative treatment. Open capsular release of the talocalcaneonavicular joint demands extensive soft tissue dissection and hinders early postoperative mobilization exercise of the joint. The purpose of this technical note is to describe a minimally invasive approach of arthroscopic capsular release of the talocalcaneonavicular joint that is composed of arthroscopic release of the talonavicular joint and the anterior subtalar joint. This allows immediate postoperative mobilization of the joint.

  14. Arthroscopic Capsular Release of the Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Adhesive capsulitis of the ankle is also known as frozen ankle and results in marked fibrosis and contracture of the ankle capsule. Arthroscopic capsular release is indicated for symptomatic frozen ankle that is resistant to conservative treatment. It is contraindicated for ankle stiffness due to degenerative joint disease, intra-articular malunion, or adhesion of the extensors of the ankle. The procedure consists of endoscopic posterior ankle capsulectomy and arthroscopic anterior ankle capsulotomy. It has the advantages of being minimally invasive surgery and allowing early postoperative vigorous mobilization of the ankle joint.

  15. Modified Arthroscopic Brostrom Procedure With Bone Tunnels.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-08-01

    The open anatomic repair of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments (modified Brostrom procedure) is widely accepted as the standard surgical stabilization procedure for lateral ankle instability that does not respond to conservative measures. Arthroscopic Brostrom procedures with a suture anchor have been reported to achieve both anatomic repair of the lateral ankle ligaments and management of the associated intra-articular lesions. However, the complication rates are higher than open Brostom procedures. Many of these complications are associated with the use of a suture anchor. We report a modified arthroscopic Brostrom procedure in which the anterolateral ankle capsule is anchored to the lateral malleolus through small bone tunnels instead of suture anchors.

  16. Experiments on free and impinging supersonic microjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phalnikar, K. A.; Kumar, R.; Alvi, F. S.

    2008-05-01

    The fluid dynamics of microflows has recently commanded considerable attention because of their potential applications. Until now, with a few exceptions, most of the studies have been limited to low speed flows. This experimental study examines supersonic microjets of 100-1,000 μm in size with exit velocities in the range of 300-500 m/s. Such microjets are presently being used to actively control larger supersonic impinging jets, which occur in STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing) aircraft, cavity flows, and flow separation. Flow properties of free as well as impinging supersonic microjets have been experimentally investigated over a range of geometric and flow parameters. The flowfield is visualized using a micro-schlieren system with a high magnification. These schlieren images clearly show the characteristic shock cell structure typically observed in larger supersonic jets. Quantitative measurements of the jet decay and spreading rates as well as shock cell spacing are obtained using micro-pitot probe surveys. In general, the mean flow features of free microjets are similar to larger supersonic jets operating at higher Reynolds numbers. However, some differences are also observed, most likely due to pronounced viscous effects associated with jets at these small scales. Limited studies of impinging microjets were also conducted. They reveal that, similar to the behavior of free microjets, the flow structure of impinging microjets strongly resembles that of larger supersonic impinging jets.

  17. Spray formation processes of impinging jet injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. E.; Ryan, H. M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    A study examining impinging liquid jets has been underway to determine physical mechanisms responsible for combustion instabilities in liquid bi-propellant rocket engines. Primary atomization has been identified as an important process. Measurements of atomization length, wave structure, and drop size and velocity distribution were made under various ambient conditions. Test parameters included geometric effects and flow effects. It was observed that pre-impingement jet conditions, specifically whether they were laminar or turbulent, had the major effect on primary atomization. Comparison of the measurements with results from a two dimensional linear aerodynamic stability model of a thinning, viscous sheet were made. Measured turbulent impinging jet characteristics were contrary to model predictions; the structure of waves generated near the point of jet impingement were dependent primarily on jet diameter and independent of jet velocity. It has been postulated that these impact waves are related to pressure and momentum fluctuations near the impingement region and control the eventual disintegration of the liquid sheet into ligaments. Examination of the temporal characteristics of primary atomization (ligament shedding frequency) strongly suggests that the periodic nature of primary atomization is a key process in combustion instability.

  18. Spray formation processes of impinging jet injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. E.; Ryan, H. M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1993-11-01

    A study examining impinging liquid jets has been underway to determine physical mechanisms responsible for combustion instabilities in liquid bi-propellant rocket engines. Primary atomization has been identified as an important process. Measurements of atomization length, wave structure, and drop size and velocity distribution were made under various ambient conditions. Test parameters included geometric effects and flow effects. It was observed that pre-impingement jet conditions, specifically whether they were laminar or turbulent, had the major effect on primary atomization. Comparison of the measurements with results from a two dimensional linear aerodynamic stability model of a thinning, viscous sheet were made. Measured turbulent impinging jet characteristics were contrary to model predictions; the structure of waves generated near the point of jet impingement were dependent primarily on jet diameter and independent of jet velocity. It has been postulated that these impact waves are related to pressure and momentum fluctuations near the impingement region and control the eventual disintegration of the liquid sheet into ligaments. Examination of the temporal characteristics of primary atomization (ligament shedding frequency) strongly suggests that the periodic nature of primary atomization is a key process in combustion instability.

  19. Design an efficient air impingement nozzle array

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, N.I.

    1995-08-01

    Direct air impingement is the most commonly used system for heating, cooling,and drying webs and films. Air impingement heat-transfer systems blow jets of air (or other gas) perpendicular to the web from an array of nozzles. These may be slot nozzles positioned across the web or a two-dimensional array of round nozzles, typically holes in a plate. Designing air impingement systems essentially means specifying the key geometric parameters that control the heat-transfer coefficient: slot width, slot-to-slot pitch, and slot-to-web stand-off distance, as well as some secondary parameters that affect heat transfer uniformity in the longitudinal and transverse directions. Slot nozzle array designs based on published optimization correlations usually have a near-maximum heat-transfer coefficient for a given impingement velocity, but an accessibly high nozzle area per unit impinged area. This increase construction and operating cost because the air volumes are too high. This article addresses that problem by providing a systematic design procedure along with the required design data.

  20. Effect of isokinetic training on shoulder impingement.

    PubMed

    Wang, T L; Fu, B M; Ngai, G; Yung, P

    2014-01-31

    The aim of this study was to review the literature evaluating the effect of isokinetic training in patients suffering from shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). Studies published up to March 2011 were located from the Pubmed, Scopus, Lilacs, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and Cochrane Library databases using "isokinetic", "shoulder", and "impingement" as key words. Referenced studies were also checked. Studies were included if isokinetic training was employed as at least one of the treatments in the therapeutic program to treat shoulder impingement or other shoulder pathologies leading to impingement-related pain. All eligible studies described the level of evidence, patient characteristics, interventions, outcome evaluation, results, complications, and return to work. There were 2 randomized control trials (RCTs) and 4 studies with level 4 evidence that met the inclusion criteria. All of the studies included showed a statistically or clinically significant outcome after isokinetic training. However, most of the studies could not identify the isolated effect of isokinetic training. There was not enough evidence to support or refute the effectiveness of isokinetic training for SIS. This result does not reflect a true lack of effect, but rather a lack of RCTs. A consensus definition of the different types and stages of SIS is urgently needed. More RCTs are also essential to clarify the value of this technique. The homogeneity of treatment interventions, study populations, and outcome measures should be prioritized. Further studies are also needed to clarify the differences in isokinetic data across different types and stages of shoulder impingement.

  1. Industrial stator vane with sequential impingement cooling inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russell B; Fedock, John A; Goebel, Gloria E; Krueger, Judson J; Rawlings, Christopher K; Memmen, Robert L

    2013-08-06

    A turbine stator vane for an industrial engine, the vane having two impingement cooling inserts that produce a series of impingement cooling from the pressure side to the suction side of the vane walls. Each insert includes a spar with a row of alternating impingement cooling channels and return air channels extending in a radial direction. Impingement cooling plates cover the two sides of the insert and having rows of impingement cooling holes aligned with the impingement cooling channels and return air openings aligned with the return air channel.

  2. Improved Stirling engine performance using jet impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. C.; Britt, E. J.; Thieme, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    Of the many factors influencing the performance of a Stirling engine, that of transferring the combustion gas heat into the working fluid is crucial. By utilizing the high heat transfer rates obtainable with a jet impingement heat transfer system, it is possible to reduce the flame temperature required for engine operation. Also, the required amount of heater tube surface area may be reduced, resulting in a decrease in the engine nonswept volume and a related increase in engine efficiency. A jet impingement heat transfer system was designed by Rasor Associates, Inc., and tested in the GPU-3 Stirling engine at the NASA Lewis Research Center. For a small penalty in pumping power (less than 0.5% of engine output) the jet impingement heat transfer system provided a higher combustion-gas-side heat transfer coefficient and a smoothing of heater temperature profiles resulting in lower combustion system temperatures and a 5 to 8% increase in engine power output and efficiency.

  3. Microtextured Surfaces for Turbine Blade Impingement Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryer, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Gas turbine engine technology is constantly challenged to operate at higher combustor outlet temperatures. In a modern gas turbine engine, these temperatures can exceed the blade and disk material limits by 600 F or more, necessitating both internal and film cooling schemes in addition to the use of thermal barrier coatings. Internal convective cooling is inadequate in many blade locations, and both internal and film cooling approaches can lead to significant performance penalties in the engine. Micro Cooling Concepts, Inc., has developed a turbine blade cooling concept that provides enhanced internal impingement cooling effectiveness via the use of microstructured impingement surfaces. These surfaces significantly increase the cooling capability of the impinging flow, as compared to a conventional untextured surface. This approach can be combined with microchannel cooling and external film cooling to tailor the cooling capability per the external heating profile. The cooling system then can be optimized to minimize impact on engine performance.

  4. Calculations of slurry pump jet impingement loads

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.T.

    1996-03-04

    This paper presents a methodology to calculate the impingement load in the region of a submerged turbulent jet where a potential core exits and the jet is not fully developed. The profile of the jet flow velocities is represented by a piece-wise linear function which satisfies the conservation of momentum flux of the jet flow. The adequacy of the of the predicted jet expansion is further verified by considering the continuity of the jet flow from the region of potential core to the fully developed region. The jet impingement load can be calculated either as a direct impingement force or a drag force using the jet velocity field determined by the methodology presented.

  5. Improved Stirling engine performance using jet impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. C.; Britt, E. J.; Thieme, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    Of the many factors influencing the performance of a Stirling engine, that of transferring the combustion gas heat into the working fluid is crucial. By utilizing the high heat transfer rates obtainable with a jet impingement heat transfer system, it is possible to reduce the flame temperature required for engine operation. Also, the required amount of heater tube surface area may be reduced, resulting in a decrease in the engine nonswept volume and a related increase in engine efficiency. A jet impingement heat transfer system was designed by Rasor Associates, Inc., and tested in the GPU-3 Stirling engine at the NASA Lewis Research Center. For a small penalty in pumping power (less than 0.5% of engine output) the jet impingement heat transfer system provided a higher combustion-gas-side heat transfer coefficient and a smoothing of heater temperature profiles resulting in lower combustion system temperatures and a 5 to 8% increase in engine power output and efficiency.

  6. Properties of the cartilage layer from the cam-type hip impingement deformity.

    PubMed

    Speirs, Andrew D; Beaulé, Paul E; Huang, Adrian; Frei, Hanspeter

    2017-04-11

    Femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI) is associated with significant acetabular cartilage damage and degenerative arthritis. To understand the contact stress and thus biomechanical mechanisms that may contribute to degeneration, the material behaviour of the cartilage layer is required. The objective of this study is to determine the fibril-reinforced poroelastic properties and composition of cartilage from cam deformities and to compare to those of normal cartilage. Patients undergoing surgical treatment of a symptomatic cam FAI deformity were recruited from the clinical practice of one of the authors. Osteochondral specimens were retrieved from the deformity during surgery using a trephine. Control specimens were retrieved from the anterior femoral head bearing surface during autopsy procedures. Indentation stress-relaxation tests were performed to determine the modulus (ES), Poisson's ratio (ν) and permeability (k0) of the poroelastic component, and the strain-independent (E0) and -dependent (Eε) moduli of the fibril-reinforcement using finite element analysis and optimization. Safranin-O staining was used to quantify proteoglycan content. ES and ν were 71% and 37% lower, respectively, in Cam specimens compared to controls, and k0 was approximately triple that of Control specimens (p<0.05). No significant differences were seen in the fibrillar components, E0 and Eε. Proteoglycan content was substantially depleted in Cam specimens, and was correlated with ES, ν and k0. This study showed that cartilage from the cam deformity exhibits severe degeneration in terms of the mechanical behaviour and composition changes, and is consistent with osteoarthritis. This further supports the hypothesis that FAI is a cause of hip osteoarthritis.

  7. Plume impingement forces on inclined flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legge, H.

    Plume impingement from spacecraft control thrusters on vehicles in space is simulated in wind tunnel scale experiments. Pressure and shear stress are measured on flat plates inclined to the plume axis between 0 and 90 deg. In addition to a nozzle of a 0.5N thruster, a free jet from a thin plate orifice was used, by which the flow regime from nearly free molecular flow to continuum flow was covered. Simple pressure and shear stress laws are given by which the impingement pressure and shear stress can be estimated for engineering applications.

  8. Acoustics measurements in normal jet impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    The dependence of far field acoustic measurements for a uniform jet on nozzle to plate spacing for small dimensionless spacings (h/d - 0.75 to 3.0) was investigated. Spectra from a real time analyzer were read and processed by an HP 2116 minicomputer in on-line mode. Similar data was generated for a fully developed pipe flow exit condition jet to compare with other investigations. The data base for normal jet impingement was extended to smaller values of nozzle to plate spacing. The effects of slight noise heating (30 deg rise) of the jet on the far field noise produced by the impinging jet are demonstrated.

  9. Optimal management of shoulder impingement syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Hooks, Todd R; Wilk, Kevin E

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder impingement is a progressive orthopedic condition that occurs as a result of altered biomechanics and/or structural abnormalities. An effective nonoperative treatment for impingement syndrome is aimed at addressing the underlying causative factor or factors that are identified after a complete and thorough evaluation. The clinician devises an effective rehabilitation program to regain full glenohumeral range of motion, reestablish dynamic rotator cuff stability, and implement a progression of resistive exercises to fully restore strength and local muscular endurance in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers. The clinician can introduce stresses and forces via sport-specific drills and functional activities to allow a return to activity. PMID:24648778

  10. Arthroscopic-assisted Broström-Gould for chronic ankle instability: a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Nery, Caio; Raduan, Fernando; Del Buono, Angelo; Asaumi, Inacio Diogo; Cohen, Moises; Maffulli, Nicola

    2011-11-01

    Lateral ankle sprains account for 85% of ankle lesions. Combined open and arthroscopic procedures could improve the diagnosis and management of intra-articular lesions and allow surgeons to perform minimally invasive anatomic reconstruction of the lateral ligament complex. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Forty consecutive patients underwent ankle arthroscopy for recurrent (2 or more episodes) lateral ankle instability unresponsive to nonoperative measures. The clinical diagnosis of mechanical instability was confirmed at imaging (plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and arthroscopic assessment. All patients underwent arthroscopic Broström-Gould repair for management of lateral ankle instability; secondary lesions were also managed. Postoperatively, the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score was administered to assess the functional status; clinical examination and conventional radiographs were performed in all patients. Thirty-eight patients were reviewed at an average postoperative follow-up of 9.8 years. The mean AOFAS score was 90 (range, 44-100) at the last follow-up. No significantly different outcomes were found in patients who had undergone microfractures for management of grade III to IV cartilage lesions compared with patients with no cartilage lesions. Postoperative AOFAS scores were graded as excellent and good in almost all patients (94.7%). Concerning failure rate, 2 patients (5.3%) reported a low AOFAS score: one patient underwent soft tissue removal for anterior impingement, and one received simultaneous medial ankle instability repair. The arthroscopic Broström-Gould-assisted technique could be a viable alternative to the gold-standard Broström-Gould procedure for anatomic repair of chronic lateral ankle instability and management of intra-articular lesions. Prospective randomized controlled trials are needed.

  11. Short-term results after arthroscopic resection of synovial plicae in the radiohumeral joint: a case series of 64 procedures

    PubMed Central

    Brahe Pedersen, Jens; Kristensen, Pia Kjær; Mønsted, Peter; Thillemann, Theis Muncholm

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Painful Synovial Plicae (SP) in the posterolateral corner of the radiohumeral joint may be confused with lateral epicondylitis. The SP may impinge between the radial head and the humeral capitellum causing pain and snapping. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term results after arthroscopic plica resection of the elbow. Methods: In this case series, we included a consecutive series of 64 arthroscopies (60 patients) with arthroscopic plica resection of the elbow. Inclusion criteria were six months of lateral elbow pain and unsuccessful conservative treatment. Patients had either ultrasonography verified plicae or pain on palpation of the plica. Patients were evaluated with an Oxford Elbow Score (OES) preoperatively, after three months and after mean 22 months (range: 12–31) of follow-up. Furthermore, baseline characteristics were recorded including, gender, age, body mass index (BMI), occupation, smoking and cartilage damage. Results: The mean age was 44 years (range: 18–66). In 13 elbows, International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade 1 lesions were present in association with the plica. Preoperatively the mean OES was 19 (95% CI: 17–20). At three and 22 month follow-up the OES increased to 33 (95% CI: 30–36) and 35 (95% CI: 32–38), respectively (p < 0.001). Cartilage injury and gender did not affect the outcome. We reported no complications. Discussion: Arthroscopic plica resection of the elbow indicates an improved OES after three and 22 months. A randomized prospective trial is needed to validate the effect of arthroscopic treatment of synovial elbow plicae. PMID:28589876

  12. Short-term results after arthroscopic resection of synovial plicae in the radiohumeral joint: a case series of 64 procedures.

    PubMed

    Brahe Pedersen, Jens; Kristensen, Pia Kjær; Mønsted, Peter; Thillemann, Theis Muncholm

    2017-01-01

    Painful Synovial Plicae (SP) in the posterolateral corner of the radiohumeral joint may be confused with lateral epicondylitis. The SP may impinge between the radial head and the humeral capitellum causing pain and snapping. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term results after arthroscopic plica resection of the elbow. In this case series, we included a consecutive series of 64 arthroscopies (60 patients) with arthroscopic plica resection of the elbow. Inclusion criteria were six months of lateral elbow pain and unsuccessful conservative treatment. Patients had either ultrasonography verified plicae or pain on palpation of the plica. Patients were evaluated with an Oxford Elbow Score (OES) preoperatively, after three months and after mean 22 months (range: 12-31) of follow-up. Furthermore, baseline characteristics were recorded including, gender, age, body mass index (BMI), occupation, smoking and cartilage damage. The mean age was 44 years (range: 18-66). In 13 elbows, International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade 1 lesions were present in association with the plica. Preoperatively the mean OES was 19 (95% CI: 17-20). At three and 22 month follow-up the OES increased to 33 (95% CI: 30-36) and 35 (95% CI: 32-38), respectively (p < 0.001). Cartilage injury and gender did not affect the outcome. We reported no complications. Arthroscopic plica resection of the elbow indicates an improved OES after three and 22 months. A randomized prospective trial is needed to validate the effect of arthroscopic treatment of synovial elbow plicae. © The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  13. Arthroscopic-assisted treatment of coronoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Adams, Julie E; Merten, Sheri M; Steinmann, Scott P

    2007-10-01

    Little information exists regarding arthroscopic treatment of coronoid fractures; this study reports outcomes in a series of patients. Forty-one coronoid fractures were identified by retrospective chart review; 7 were treated arthroscopically; 6 with >12 months of available follow-up. Regan-Morrey fracture types were II (n = 4) and III (n = 3). The age of the patients averaged 37 years; the mechanism of injury was a fall in 6 patients and a motocross accident in 1 patient. Fracture fixation included: plate-and-screws following arthroscopic reduction (1); screws (2) and threaded Steinmann pins (2); 2 fractures were debrided. Three patients had immediate (2) or delayed (1) lateral ulnar collateral ligament repair. Follow-up averaged 31.8 months. The range of motion averaged 9 degrees to 133 degrees in flexion-extension and 87 degrees/79 degrees in prono-supination. Mayo Elbow Performance scores were 100 in 5 of 6 patients and unavailable in 1 patient. Complications included asymptomatic heterotopic ossification (1) and delayed ulnar neuropathy (1). In our series of coronoid fractures treated with arthroscopic means, all patients had a functional, pain-free result. All patients returned to preoperative avocations and occupations. Level IV, therapeutic case series.

  14. [Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff calcifying tendinitis].

    PubMed

    Ozkoç, Gürkan; Akpinar, Sercan; Hersekli, Murat Ali; Ozalay, Metin; Tandoğan, Reha N

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of arthroscopic treatment in patients with rotator cuff calcifying tendinitis unresponsive to conservative treatment. Arthroscopic treatment was performed in 10 patients (6 females, 4 males; mean age 46 years; range 34 to 53 years) in whom pain and functional disability persisted for more than a year despite conservative therapy for rotator cuff calcifying tendinitis. Arthroscopic bursectomy was also carried out. One patient underwent repair for rotator cuff tear. The patients were evaluated before and after surgery with the use of Constant scores and direct radiographs. The mean follow-up period was 12 months (range 6 to 19 months). The mean Constant scores were 66 (range 45 to 70) and 93 (range 89 to 96) before surgery and on final examinations, respectively. Postoperative radiographs demonstrated incomplete removal of calcifications in four patients; however, complaints of pain disappeared in these patients and radiologic controls showed that residual deposits underwent spontaneous resorption. Arthroscopic removal of calcium deposits together with bursectomy seems to be effective and reliable in patients with chronic calcifying tendinitis unresponsive to conservative treatment.

  15. Arthroscopic Arthrodesis of the Distal Tibiofibular Syndesmosis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Chronic syndesmosis disruption can occur if an acute lesion is missed or inadequately managed. This can result in significant functional deficit and development of post-traumatic ankle arthritis. Anatomic reduction of the syndesmosis and maintenance of the reduction by syndesmotic screw fixation alone, ligamentous reconstruction, or fusion of the syndesmosis are recommended. A technique of arthroscopic distal tibiofibular syndesmosis arthrodesis is described.

  16. Arthroscopic Marginal Resection of a Lipoma of the Supraspinatus Muscle in the Subacromial Space

    PubMed Central

    Pagán Conesa, Alejandro; Aznar, Carlos Verdú; Herrera, Manuel Ruiz; Lopez-Prats, Fernando Anacleto

    2015-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is a common cause of shoulder pain in young adults and seniors at present. The etiology of this syndrome is associated with several shoulder disorders, most related to aging, overhead activities, and overuse. The subacromial space is well circumscribed and limited in size, and soft-tissue growing lesions, such as tumors, can endanger the normal function of the shoulder girdle. We present a case of shoulder impingement syndrome caused by an intramuscular lipoma of the supraspinatus muscle in the subacromial space in a 50-year-old male bank manager. Radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and a computed tomography scan showed a well-circumscribed soft-tissue tumor at the supraspinatus-musculotendinous junction. It was arthroscopically inspected and dissected and complete marginal excision was performed through a conventional augmented anterolateral portal, avoiding the need to open the trapezius fascia or perform an acromial osteotomy. Microscopic study showed a benign lipoma, and the shoulder function of the patient was fully recovered after a rehabilitation period of 4 months. This less invasive technique shows similar results to conventional open surgery. PMID:26759779

  17. Arthroscopic retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation to chondral lesion in femoral head.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Sarper; Toker, Berkin; Taser, Omer

    2014-06-01

    This report describes the treatment of 2 cases of full-thickness cartilage defect of the femoral head. The authors performed osteochondral autologous transplantation with a different technique that has not been reported to date. One patient was 37 years old, and the other was 42 years old. Both presented with hip pain. In both patients, radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a focal chondral defect on the weight-bearing area of the femoral head and acetabular impingement. A retrograde osteochondral autologous transplantation technique combined with hip arthroscopy and arthroscopic impingement treatment was performed. After a 2-month recovery period, the symptoms were resolved. In the first year of follow-up, Harris Hip scores improved significantly (case 1, 56.6 to 87.6; case 2, 58.6 to 90). The technique described yielded good short- and midterm clinical and radiologic outcomes. To the authors' knowledge, this report is the first to describe a retrograde osteochondral transplantation technique performed with hip arthroscopy in the femoral head.

  18. Defining the lateral edge of the femoroacetabular articulation: correlation analysis between radiographs and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Ashish; Bomar, James D; Jeffords, Megan E; Huang, Ming-Tung; Wenger, Dennis R; Upasani, Vidyadhar V

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the variation in measuring the lateral center edge angle of Wiberg (LCEA) using the lateral edge of the sourcil (LCEA-S) compared to the lateral edge of the acetabulum (LCEA-E), and to correlate these measurements with three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT)-based analysis of the femoroacetabular articulation. A retrospective analysis was performed on 24 patients (45 hips) treated for hip dysplasia at a single institution. All patients were required to have an anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiograph and pelvic CT. LCEA-S and LCEA-E measurements were calculated from radiographs. Axial CT images were processed to standardize pelvic orientation and calculate the LCEA at three points (posterior, central, anterior) along the acetabular edge. Correlation analysis was used to evaluate radiographic and CT measures. Eight males and 16 females with an average age of 14.6 years were included. The LCEA-S (16.5° ± 2.0°) was found to be significantly less than the LCEA-E (26.0° ± 2.0°) (p < 0.001). The LCEA-S had the greatest correlation with the central measurement on the 3D-CT (r s = 0.893; p < 0.001). The LCEA-E had the greatest correlation with the anterior measurement on the 3D-CT (r = 0.834; p < 0.001). The LCEA can change significantly depending on the bony landmark used to define the lateral edge of the femoroacetabular articulation. The edge of the sourcil most closely correlates with the central weight-bearing portion of the articular surface on the 3D-CT and should be used to define the LCEA when treating patients with hip dysplasia. Level III, retrospective comparison study.

  19. Randomized controlled trial of arthroscopic electrothermal capsulorrhaphy with Bankart repair and isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    McRae, Sheila; Leiter, Jeff; Subramanian, Kanthalu; Litchfield, Robert; MacDonald, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Electrothermal arthroscopic capsulorrhaphy (ETAC) was introduced as an adjunct to shoulder stabilization surgery to address capsular laxity in the treatment of traumatic anterior dislocation. No previous RCT has compared arthroscopic Bankart repair with ETAC of the medial glenohumeral ligament and anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament versus undergoing arthroscopic Bankart repair alone. Our hypothesis was that there would be no difference in quality of life between these two groups. Complication/failure rates were also compared. Eighty-eight patients were randomly assigned to receive arthroscopic Bankart repair with (n = 44) or without ETAC (n = 44). Post-operative visits occurred at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months with WOSI, ASES, and Constant scores completed, and rates of dislocation/subluxation were determined. Data on 74 patients were analysed, with the rest lost to follow-up. There were no differences between groups at any post-surgery time points for WOSI, ASES, or Constant scores (n.s.). Eight patients in the no-ETAC group and 7 in the ETAC group were considered failures (n.s.). No benefits in patient-reported outcome or recurrence rates using ETAC were found. Mean WOSI scores 2 years post-surgery were virtually identical for the two groups. ETAC could not be shown to provide benefit or detriment when combined with arthroscopic labral repair for traumatic anterior instability of the shoulder. II.

  20. SHOULDER MUSCLE IMBALANCE AND SUBACROMIAL IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME IN OVERHEAD ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Subacromial impingement is a frequent and painful condition among athletes, particularly those involved in overhead sports such as baseball and swimming. There are generally two types of subacromial impingement: structural and functional. While structural impingement is caused by a physical loss of area in the subacromial space due to bony growth or inflammation, functional impingement is a relative loss of subacromial space secondary to altered scapulohumeral mechanics resulting from glenohumeral instability and muscle imbalance. The purpose of this review is to describe the role of muscle imbalance in subacromial impingement in order to guide sports physical therapy evaluation and interventions. PMID:21655457

  1. Arthroscopic Keller technique for Freiberg disease.

    PubMed

    Carro, Luis Perez; Golano, Pau; Fariñas, Oscar; Cerezal, Luis; Abad, Jose

    2004-07-01

    Freiberg disease is a disorder that has a predilection for the second metatarsal head. Keller excision of the base of the proximal phalanx is a procedure described for the treatment of late-stage Freiberg disease. We describe a case of a 60-year-old man, with a stage IV lesion according to Smillie's classification, treated by debridement, removal of the free body, and arthroscopic Keller excision. Arthroscopic treatment allows the patient to begin and maintain an aggressive postoperative physical therapy program immediately after surgery, thus decreasing the risk of scarring and contracture. At last evaluation, 2 years postoperatively, he is symptom-free. A suggested pattern of minimally invasive surgery management of this disease is proposed.

  2. Arthroscopic releases for arthrofibrosis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Chen, Michael R; Dragoo, Jason L

    2011-11-01

    Intra-articular inflammation or fibrosis may lead to decreased soft-tissue and capsular compliance, which may result in pain or loss of motion within the knee. Etiology of intra-articular fibrosis may include isolated anterior interval scarring and posterior capsular contracture, as well as fibrosis that involves the suprapatellar pouch or arthrofibrosis that involves the entire synovial space. Initial nonsurgical management, including compression, elevation, and physical therapy, can decrease knee pain and inflammation and maintain range of motion. Surgical management is indicated in the patient who fails conservative treatment. Surgical options include arthroscopic releases of the anterior interval, posterior capsule, and peripatellar and suprapatellar regions. Recent advances in arthroscopic technique have led to improved outcomes in patients with intra-articular fibrosis of the knee.

  3. Arthroscopic Taloplasty for an Anterolateral Snapping Ankle.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Anterior ankle snapping syndrome is rare. Snapping of the extensor digitorum longus due to attenuated inferior extensor retinaculum and snapping due to hypertrophied or low-lying peroneal tertius muscle have been reported. We reported a new mechanism of anterolateral snapping due to a hypertrophied talar head. Anterolateral snapping ankle can be revealed by active dorsiflexion and plantarflexion of the ankle with the foot inverted. Foot inversion will tension the inferior extensor retinaculum and uncover the dorsolateral prominence of the talar head. The dorsolateral prominence of the talar head will snap over the proximal edge of the inferior extensor retinaculum. This technical note reports the technique of arthroscopic contouring of the talar head via extra-articular ankle arthroscopy. We named this technique arthroscopic taloplasty.

  4. Iliotibial Band Lengthening: An Arthroscopic Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Todd P; Mease, Samuel J; Issa, Kimona; Festa, Anthony; McInerney, Vincent K; Scillia, Anthony J

    2017-06-01

    Iliotibial (IT) band syndrome is a common cause of lateral knee pain in runners and cyclists. Many can be treated nonoperatively; however, some may require surgical lengthening of their IT band to achieve optimal pain relief and a return to preinjury level of activity. Several studies have been published detailing surgical lengthening procedures and satisfactory outcomes after these procedures. However, it is important to continue to improve on and optimize outcomes. We present our arthroscopic IT band-lengthening procedure.

  5. Complications of arthroscopic surgery of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Papavasiliou, A. V.; Bardakos, N. V.

    2012-01-01

    Over recent years hip arthroscopic surgery has evolved into one of the most rapidly expanding fields in orthopaedic surgery. Complications are largely transient and incidences between 0.5% and 6.4% have been reported. However, major complications can and do occur. This article analyses the reported complications and makes recommendations based on the literature review and personal experience on how to minimise them. PMID:23610683

  6. Biomechanical characteristics of 9 arthroscopic knots.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Kevin A; Patton, Daniel J; Dai, Qiang; Wongworawat, Montri D

    2010-06-01

    To determine the optimal arthroscopic slipknot through comparison of ease of placement, loop security, knot security, and amount of suture material needed using a new suture material. Nine commonly used arthroscopic knots (Dines, Field, Nicky, Hu, San Diego, Snyder, Tennessee slider, Triad, and Tuckahoe) were tested by use of modern suture material, FiberWire (Arthrex, Naples, FL), with the Instron materials testing machine (Instron, Norwood, MA) for ease of knot placement (forward and backward sliding), loop security, and knot security. The amount of suture material needed to create the knot was compared by use of the knot weight. Analysis of variance with Kruskal-Wallis analysis and Bonferroni correction (alpha < .01) was used to compare different knots. The Tennessee slider knot sustained the greatest force at failure (269 N), the greatest knot resistance (32 N), and the smallest mass (8.5 mg). The Dines was the only knot superior in all 3 knot placement categories. The Nicky held the most loop force (66 N), and the Tuckahoe had the greatest loop resistance (20 N) (P < .01 for all except mass [P < .05]). Our study comprehensively presents ease-of-placement and security characteristics of 9 common and new arthroscopic knots using modern FiberWire suture. The Tennessee slider knot showed superior characteristics in knot security and knot mass. The Dines knot was the most ideal knot to place. However, the surgeon will need to review the individual knot characteristics and select the knot most suited to application. This study analyzed 9 arthroscopic knots with modern suture material and identified those with superior characteristics. Copyright (c) 2010 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Arthroscopic capsular release for refractory shoulder stiffness.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the results of the arthroscopic treatment of refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder with two to nine years of follow-up, comparing the pre- and postoperative range of motion. This was an observational study (case series) of 18 patients who underwent arthroscopic capsular release for refractory shoulder stiffness. The mean age was of 53.6 years (range: 39 to 68), with female predominance (77.77%) and nine cases left shoulders. There were 6 primary (33.33%) and 12 secondary cases (66.67%). Arthroscopic capsular release was performed in all patients after a mean of 9.33 months of physical therapy (range: 6 to 20 months) with a minimum follow-up of two years (range: 26 to 110 months). The mean active and passive forward flexion, external rotation and internal rotation increased from 94.4°/103.3°, 11.9°/21.9°, and S1/L5 vertebral level, respectively, to 151.1°/153.8°, 57.2°/64.4°, and T12/T10 vertebral level, respectively. There was a significant difference between the pre- and postoperative range of motion (p < 0.001). According to the Constant-Murley functional score (ROM), the value increased from 14 (preoperative mean) to 30 points (postoperative mean). Postoperatively, all patients showed diminished shoulder pain (none or mild/15 or 10 points in the Constant-Murley score). Arthroscopic treatment is an effective treatment for refractory shoulder stiffness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with vortex rings impinging permeable and solid boundaries are presented in order to investigate the influence of permeability. Utilizing Particle Image Velocimetry, we compared the behaviour of a vortex ring impinging four different reticulated foams (with permeability k ˜ 26 - 85 × 10-8 m2) and a solid boundary. Results show how permeability affects the stretching phenomena of the vortex ring and the formation and evolution of the secondary vortex ring with opposite sign. Moreover, permeability also affects the macroscopic no-slip boundary condition found on the solid boundary, turning it into an apparent slip boundary condition for the most permeable boundary. The apparent slip-boundary condition and the flux exchange between the ambient fluid and the foam are jointly responsible for both the modified formation of the secondary vortex and changes on the vortex ring diameter increase.

  9. Subtalar arthroscopic arthrodesis: Technique and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vilá-Rico, Jesús; Mellado-Romero, María Angeles; Bravo-Giménez, Beatriz; Jiménez-Díaz, Verónica; Ojeda-Thies, Cristina

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the surgical technique and our results with arthroscopic posterior subtalar arthrodesis. Retrospective case series of 65 patients (38 men and 27 women) averaging 50 years of age (range 21-72 years) undergoing posterior arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis using one or two percutaneous 6.5-7.3mm screws between May 2004 and February 2011, with a mean follow-up of 57.5 months (range 24-105 months). We achieved a 95.4% union rate after an average of 12.1 weeks (range 9 to 16 weeks). 12.3% of patients suffered complications, including superficial infection, nonunion and need for hardware removal. The AOFAS score improved from 51.5 points (19-61 points) preoperatively to 81.9 points (60-94 points) in the postoperative period. We describe the surgical technique for arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis, which as proven to be a safe and reliable technique in our experience, with consistent improvements in AOFAS scores. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Arthroscopic Correlates of Subtle Syndesmotic Injury.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Gregory P; DeFontes, Kenneth; Barr, Cameron R; Parks, Brent G; Camire, Lyn M

    2017-05-01

    Arthroscopic criteria for identifying syndesmotic disruption have been variable and subjective. We aimed to quantify syndesmotic disruption arthroscopically using a standardized measurement device. Ten cadaveric lower extremity specimens were tested in intact state and after serial sectioning of the syndesmotic structures (anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament [AiTFL], interosseous ligament [IOL], posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament [PiTFL], deltoid). Diagnostic ankle arthroscopy was performed after each sectioning. Manual external rotational stress was applied across the tibiofibular joint. Custom-manufactured spherical balls of increasing diameter mounted on the end of an arthroscopic probe were inserted into the tibiofibular space to determine the degree of diastasis of the tibiofibular joint under each condition. A ball 3 mm in diameter reliably indicated a high likelihood of combined disruption of the AiTFL and IOL. Disruption of the AiTFL alone could not be reliably distinguished from the intact state. Use of a spherical probe placed into the tibiofibular space during manual external rotation of the ankle provided an objective measure of syndesmotic instability. Passage of a 2.5-mm probe indicated some disruption of the syndesmosis, but the test had poor negative predictive value. Passage of a 3.0-mm spherical probe indicated very high likelihood of disruption of both the AiTFL and the IOL. The findings challenge the previously used but unsupported standard of a 2-mm diastasis of the tibiofibular articulation for diagnosis of subtle syndesmotic instability.

  11. Gas turbine bucket with impingement cooled platform

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Raphael Durand

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine bucket having an airfoil portion and a root portion, with a substantially planar platform at an interface between the airfoil portion and root portion, a platform cooling arrangement including at least one bore in the root portion and at least one impingement cooling tube seated in the bore, the tube extending beyond the bore with an outlet in close proximity to a targeted area on an underside of the platform.

  12. An approximation technique for jet impingement flow

    SciTech Connect

    Najafi, Mahmoud; Fincher, Donald; Rahni, Taeibi; Javadi, KH.; Massah, H.

    2015-03-10

    The analytical approximate solution of a non-linear jet impingement flow model will be demonstrated. We will show that this is an improvement over the series approximation obtained via the Adomian decomposition method, which is itself, a powerful method for analysing non-linear differential equations. The results of these approximations will be compared to the Runge-Kutta approximation in order to demonstrate their validity.

  13. Crater Formation Due to Lunar Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsell, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Thruster plume impingement on a surface comprised of small, loose particles may cause blast ejecta to be spread over a large area and possibly cause damage to the vehicle. For this reason it is important to study the effects of plume impingement and crater formation on surfaces like those found on the moon. Lunar soil, also known as regolith, is made up of fine granular particles on the order of 100 microns.i Whenever a vehicle lifts-off from such a surface, the exhaust plume from the main engine will cause the formation of a crater. This crater formation may cause laterally ejected mass to be deflected and possibly damage the vehicle. This study is a first attempt at analyzing the dynamics of crater formation due to thruster exhaust plume impingement during liftoff from the moon. Though soil erosion on the lunar surface is not considered, this study aims at examining the evolution of the shear stress along the lunar surface as the engine fires. The location of the regions of high shear stress will determine where the crater begins to form and will lend insight into how big the crater will be. This information will help determine the probability that something will strike the vehicle. The final sections of this report discuss a novel method for studying this problem that uses a volume of fluid (VOF)ii method to track the movement of both the exhaust plume and the eroding surface.

  14. Impingement Heat Transfer of Reciprocating Jet Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Lo May; Chang, Shyy Woei; Chiou, Shyr Fuu

    This paper describes an experimental study of impingement heat transfer of reciprocating jet-array with piston cooling application for marine heavy-duty diesel engine. A selection of heat transfer measurements illustrates the manner by which the individual and interactive influences of reciprocating force and buoyancy on heat transfer for the impinging jet-array. It is demonstrated that the reciprocating force coupled with buoyancy interaction causes considerable heat transfer modifications from the static results. The isolated reciprocating force effect could initially reduce heat transfer to a level about 0.45 of static level with weak reciprocation but recovers when the reciprocating force increases. Heat transfer improvement and impediment could be aided by the location-dependent buoyancy effect in addition to the reciprocating force effect. An empirical heat transfer correlation, which is physically consistent, has been developed to permit the evaluation of the individual and synergistic effects of reciprocating force and buoyancy interaction on local heat transfer of the impinging jet-array.

  15. Nozzle cavity impingement/area reduction insert

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane

    2002-01-01

    A turbine vane segment is provided that has inner and outer walls spaced from one another, a vane extending between the inner and outer walls and having leading and trailing edges and pressure and suction sides, the vane including discrete leading edge, intermediate, aft and trailing edge cavities between the leading and trailing edges and extending lengthwise of the vane for flowing a cooling medium; and an insert sleeve within at least one of the cavities and spaced from interior wall surfaces thereof. The insert sleeve has an inlet for flowing the cooling medium into the insert sleeve and has impingement holes defined in first and second walls thereof that respectively face the pressure and suction sides of the vane. The impingement holes of at least one of those first and second walls are defined along substantially only a first, upstream portion thereof, whereby the cooling flow is predominantly impingement cooling along a first region of the insert wall corresponding to the first, upstream portion and the cooling flow is predominantly convective cooling along a second region corresponding to a second, downstream portion of the at least one wall of the insert sleeve.

  16. Circular and Elliptic Submerged Impinging Water Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudey, Eric; Benedicto, Olivier; Ravier, Emmanuel; Gutmark, Ephraim

    1999-11-01

    Experiments and CFD have been performed to study circular and elliptic jets in a submerged water jet facility. The tests included discharge coefficient measurement to evaluate pressure losses encountered in noncircular nozzles compared to circular ones. Three-dimensional pressure mappings on the impingement surface and PIV measurement of the jet mean and turbulent velocity have been performed at different compound impingement angles relative to the impingement surface and at different stand-off distances. The objective was to investigate the effect of the non-circular geometry on the flow field and on the impact region. The tests were performed in a close loop system in which the water was pumped through the nozzles into a clear Plexiglas tank. The Reynolds numbers were typically in the range of 250000. Discharge coefficients of the elliptic nozzle was somewhat lower than that of the circular jet but spreading rate and turbulence level were higher. Pressure mapping showed that the nozzle exit geometry had an effect on the pressure distribution in the impact region and that high-pressure zones were generated at specific impact points. PIV measurements showed that for a same total exit area, the elliptic jets affected a surface area that is 8the equivalent circular. The turbulence level in the elliptic jet tripled due to the nozzle design. Results of the CFD model were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Arthroscopic visualization during excision of a central physeal bar.

    PubMed

    Stricker, S

    1992-01-01

    A centrally located developmental physeal bar in the proximal tibia was removed via a metaphyseal window. The use of an arthroscope to assist in the complete removal of the bone bridge is described. The arthroscope improved visualization and allowed reduction in the size of the metaphyseal window. At 2-year follow-up, the growth plate showed no evidence of bar reformation.

  18. Subtalar joint arthrodesis: open and arthroscopic indications and surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Roster, Brent; Kreulen, Christopher; Giza, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Arthrodesis of the subtalar joint can be performed via both open and arthroscopic techniques. Both groups of procedures have their own relative indications and contraindications, as well as complications. Good results have been reported for both general procedures, although some studies suggest superiority with arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Arthroscopic Assessment and Treatment of Dancers' Knee Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Daniel M.; Campbell, Pat

    1985-01-01

    Arthroscopic examination of 16 dancers with dance-related knee injuries which defied conservative treatment showed 15 meniscal tears and 4 cases of chondromalacia patellae. Partial arthroscopic meniscectomy was used to treat the tears. The results were excellent, with 13 of the 16 returning to preoperative levels of dance activity. (MT)

  20. [Treatment of lateral ankle joint instability. Open or arthroscopic?].

    PubMed

    Galla, M

    2016-02-01

    Chronic ankle joint instability often necessitates operative treatment. Operative treatment methods are classified into non-anatomical tenodesis, anatomical reconstruction and direct repair. In addition to open approaches, arthroscopic techniques are increasingly becoming established. This article describes the various operative treatment procedures, their advantages and disadvantages and in particular the arthroscopic feasibility.

  1. [EFFECTIVENESS OF ARTHROSCOPY FOR ANKLE IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Han, Guansheng; Xu, Bin; Geng, Chunhui; Cheng, Xinde

    2014-06-01

    To explore the effectiveness of arthroscopy for ankle impingement syndrome. Between March 2009 and April 2013, 30 patients with ankle impingement syndrome were treated. Among them, there were 22 males and 8 females with an average age of 28.6 years (range, 16-55 years). Twenty-six patients had a history of obvious ankle sprains. The disease duration was 6-62 months (mean, 21.5 months). All cases had ankle pain, limitation of activity, and positive results of ankle impact test. According to Meislin scoring criteria, 5 cases were rated as good, 8 cases as medium, and 17 cases as poor; the excellent and good rate was 16.7%. American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score was 43.3 ± 5.1. Visual analogue scale (VAS) score was 6.7 ± 2.3. Preoperative X-ray film showed ankle loose bodies and hyperplasia osteophyte in 6 cases, and lateral malleolus old avulsion fracture in 4 cases. MRI showed soft tissue in the ankle joint in the 17 cases, and articular cartilage injury of tibiotalar joint and bone marrow edema in 7 cases. The location, degree, and organization of the impact were observed under arthroscopy. The joint debridement, removal of loose body and osteophyte, plasty of articular cartilage, and plasma radiofrequency ablation of lateral and medial ligaments were performed. All incisions healed primarily. No infection of skin and joint, or neurological and vascular injury was found. All patients were followed up 6-32 months (mean, 19.5 months). According to Meislin scoring criteria at last follow-up, 16 cases were rated as excellent, 11 cases as good, and 3 cases as medium; the excellent and good rate was 90.0%, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative value (Z = 6.045, P = 0.000). AOFAS score was 89.8 ± 4.3, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative score (t = 38.180, P = 0.000). VAS score was 2.8 ± 1.6, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative score (t = 7.624, P = 0.000). A clear

  2. Ankle impingement syndromes: a review of etiology and related implications.

    PubMed

    Hess, Gregory William

    2011-10-01

    Ankle injuries are common occurrences in athletics involving and requiring extreme ranges of motion. Ankle sprains specifically occur with a 1 in 10,000 person rate in active individuals each day. If trauma is repetitive, the ankle structures have potential to experience secondary injury and dysfunction. Included in this category of dysfunction are both anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes where disruption of the bony structures, joint capsule, ligaments, and tendons typically occurs. Ankle impingement is described as ankle pain that occurs during athletic activity, with recurrent, extreme dorsiflexion or plantar flexion with the joint under a load. Ankle impingements can be classified according to what structures become involved both anteriorly and posteriorly. Osseous impingement, soft tissue impingement, impingement of the distal fascicle of anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament, and meniscoid lesions are all documented causes of ankle impingement. These changes tend to be brought about and exacerbated by extreme ranges of motion. Understanding various impingement types will better enable the clinician to prevent, identify, treat, and rehabilitate affected ankles. Acknowledging activities that predispose to ankle impingement syndrome will enhance prevention and recovery processes. Description of ankle impingement etiology and pathology is the objective of the current review.

  3. Arthroscopic ablation of osteoid osteoma in the wrist.

    PubMed

    Kamrani, Reza Shahryar; Farhadi, Leyla; Emamzadehfard, Sahra

    2013-09-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a benign bone tumor that rarely involves joints. Although there are several reports of arthroscopic osteoid osteoma excisions, to our knowledge, there are no reports of this type of treatment for osteoid osteoma in carpal bones. We report two cases of arthroscopic (a person who had a pain in the left wrist and the other one with carpal tunnel syndrome) with excision of osteoid osteoma in the carpal bones. We think arthroscopic excision is the best choice for treatment as long as the tumor is accessible for arthroscopic surgery, when osteoid osteoma has classic clinical and imaging findings and is near an articular surface. However, when the tumor is far from the joint surfaces, when we need pathologic confirmation or when the tumor is easily accessible using a non-articular approach, arthroscopic excision may not be the most appropriate technique.

  4. Arthroscopic tenodesis of the long head of the biceps.

    PubMed

    Harwin, Steven F; Birns, Michael E; Mbabuike, Jean-Jacques; Porter, David A; Galano, Gregory J

    2014-11-01

    The long head of the biceps (LHB) is commonly implicated in shoulder pathology due to its anatomic course and intimacy with the rotator cuff and superior labrum of the glenoid. Treatment of tendinosis of the LHB may be required secondary to partial thickness tears, instability/subluxation, associated rotator cuff tears, or SLAP (superior labrum, anterior to posterior) lesions. Treatment options include open or arthroscopic techniques for tenodesis vs tenotomy. Controversy exists in the orthopedic literature regarding the preferred procedure. The all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique is a viable and reproducible option for treatment. This article provides a review of the all-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis technique using proximal interference screw fixation and its subsequent postoperative regimen. All-arthroscopic biceps tenodesis maintains elbow flexion and supination power, minimizes cosmetic deformities, and leads to less fatigue soreness after active flexion. Thus, arthroscopic biceps tenodesis should be offered and encouraged as a treatment option for younger, active patients. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Rationale of arthroscopic surgery of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Murakami, KenIchiro

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has been widely used for treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements and diseases for the last 40 years. Although 626 articles have been hit by Pubmed search in terms of "TMJ arthroscopic surgery", this review article is described based on distinguished publishing works and on my experiences with TMJ arthroscopic surgery and related research with an aim to analyse the rationale of arthroscopic surgeries of the temporomandibular joint. With arthrocentesis emerging as an alternative, less invasive, treatment for internal derangement with closed lock, the primary indication of arthroscopic surgery seems to be somewhat limited. However, the value of endoscopic inspection and surgery has its position for both patient and physician with its long-term reliable results.

  6. Accessory talar facet impingement in pathologic conditions of the peritalar region in adults.

    PubMed

    Niki, Hisateru; Hirano, Takaaki; Akiyama, Yui; Beppu, Moroe

    2014-10-01

    Associations between accessory anterolateral talar facet (AALTF) and sinus tarsi pain in adults have not been reported. This study aimed to investigate the clinical and imaging characteristics of pathologic conditions of the peritalar region in adults with painful accessory talar facet impingement (ATFI). We included 31 patients (aged 19-75 years) with persistent sinus tarsi pain who underwent surgery and had pathologic conditions of the peritalar region, including adult acquired flatfoot deformity (AAFD; 18 patients), ankle osteoarthritis (8 patients), and ankle instability (5 patients). Continuity between the articular surface of the posterior facet of the talus and AALTF was identified on preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cartilage. In addition, focal abutting bone marrow edema (FABME) of the talus and calcaneal neck around the AALTF on short TI inversion recovery sequence MRI was confirmed. Subtalar arthroscopy was used to evaluate the AALTF surface characteristics. Pre- and postoperative objective scores were compared. Eight pre- and postoperative radiographic parameters were compared to confirm the effect of foot alignment changes after reconstructions on sinus tarsi pain with ATFI. Pre- and postoperative changes in FABME were compared with 17.1 (7-60) months of follow-up. Subjects underwent accessory facet resection with balancing reconstruction. Arthroscopically, 66% of patients showed a focal defect on the AALTF cartilage surface, and 83% showed attenuation of the posterior capsular ligament. All x-ray parameters in AAFD patients showed significant improvement postoperatively (P < .001). Mean objective scores improved from 54.0 preoperatively to 91.0 postoperatively (P < .001). Sinus tarsi pain and FABME were absent in all cases at the final follow-up. AALTF represents a new etiology of subsequent painful intra-articular talocalcaneal impingement. When addressing sinus tarsi pain, it is important to detect the

  7. Arthroscopic microfracture may not be superior to arthroscopic debridement, but abrasion arthroplasty results are good, although not great.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-03-01

    Microfracture is nonanatomic because microfracture destroys the gross structure and the complex microscopic infrastructure of the subchondral plate, and may promote subchondral cyst formation. In consideration of the destruction of subchondral anatomy, it may be time to abandon the arthroscopic microfracture procedure. However, arthroscopic abrasion arthroplasty results in a positive outcome in 66% of patients, and may still merit consideration as a salvage procedure.

  8. Diagnostic performance of direct traction MR arthrography of the hip: detection of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison.

    PubMed

    Schmaranzer, Florian; Klauser, Andrea; Kogler, Michael; Henninger, Benjamin; Forstner, Thomas; Reichkendler, Markus; Schmaranzer, Ehrenfried

    2015-06-01

    To assess diagnostic performance of traction MR arthrography of the hip in detection and grading of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison. Seventy-five MR arthrograms obtained ± traction of 73 consecutive patients (mean age, 34.5 years; range, 14-54 years) who underwent arthroscopy were included. Traction technique included weight-adapted traction (15-23 kg), a supporting plate for the contralateral leg, and intra-articular injection of 18-27 ml (local anaesthetic and contrast agent). Patients reported on neuropraxia and on pain. Two blinded readers independently assessed femoroacetabular cartilage and labrum lesions which were correlated with arthroscopy. Interobserver agreement was calculated using κ values. Joint distraction ± traction was evaluated in consensus. No procedure had to be stopped. There were no cases of neuropraxia. Accuracy for detection of labral lesions was 92 %/93 %, 91 %/83 % for acetabular lesions, and 92 %/88 % for femoral cartilage lesions for reader 1/reader 2, respectively. Interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.58) for grading of labrum lesions and substantial (κ = 0.7, κ = 0.68) for grading of acetabular and femoral cartilage lesions. Joint distraction was achieved in 72/75 and 14/75 hips with/without traction, respectively. Traction MR arthrography safely enabled accurate detection and grading of labral and chondral lesions. • The used traction technique was well tolerated by most patients. • The used traction technique almost consistently achieved separation of cartilage layers. • Traction MR arthrography enabled accurate detection of chondral and labral lesions.

  9. Active Control of Supersonic Impinging Jets Using Supersonic Microjets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    impinging jet experiments . control technique, which utilizes supersonic microjets and significantly alleviates the...an Obstacle", NASA TT F-15719, 1974. 15. Phalnikar, K. A., Alvi, F. S. and Shih, C. "Behavior of Free and Impinging Supersonic Microjets ," AIAA Paper...S., "Active Control of Supersonic Impingement Tones Using Steady and Pulsed Microjets ," submitted to Experiments in Fluids, August 2005, under

  10. Optimization of a GO2/GH2 Impinging Injector Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, P. Kevin; Shyy, Wei; Vaidyanathan, Rajkumar

    1999-01-01

    An existing injector optimization methodology, method i, is used to investigate optimal design points for a GO2/GH2 impinging injector element. The impinging element, an F-O-F triplet, is optimized in terms of such relevant design variables as fuel pressure drop, DELTA-P(sub f), oxidizer pressure drop, DELTA-P(sub o), combustor length, L(sub comb), and impingement angle, alpha, for a given mixture ratio and chamber pressure.

  11. Meralgia paresthetica and femoral acetabular impingement: a possible association.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aiesha

    2010-12-11

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh. Etiology is divided into spontaneous and iatrogenic causes. To my knowledge this has never been attributed to femoral acetabular impingement. This case highlights the presence of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement syndrome thus raising the possibility of an association. Femoral acetabular impingement; Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; Dysesthesia; Nerve conduction studies.

  12. Meralgia Paresthetica and Femoral Acetabular Impingement: A Possible Association

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aiesha

    2010-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh. Etiology is divided into spontaneous and iatrogenic causes. To my knowledge this has never been attributed to femoral acetabular impingement. This case highlights the presence of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement syndrome thus raising the possibility of an association. Keywords Femoral acetabular impingement; Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; Dysesthesia; Nerve conduction studies PMID:22043261

  13. Hindfoot endoscopy for posterior ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Scholten, P E; Sierevelt, I N; van Dijk, C N

    2008-12-01

    The surgical treatment of posterior ankle impingement is associated with a high rate of complications and a substantial time to recover. An endoscopic approach to the posterior ankle (hindfoot endoscopy) may lack these disadvantages. We hypothesized that hindfoot endoscopy causes less morbidity and facilitates a quick recovery compared with open surgery. Fifty-five consecutive patients with posterior ankle impingement were treated with an endoscopic removal of bone fragments and/or scar tissue. The symptoms were caused by trauma (65%) or overuse (35%). All patients were enrolled in a prospective protocol. At baseline, the age, sex, work and sports activities, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot scores, and preinjury Tegner scores were determined for all patients. At the time of follow-up, AOFAS hindfoot scores and Tegner scores were assessed and the time to return to work and sports activities was determined. Complications were recorded. Patients scored the overall result as poor, fair, good, or excellent by means of a 4-point Likert scale. The median duration of follow-up was thirty-six months, and no patient was lost to follow-up. The median AOFAS hindfoot score increased from 75 points preoperatively to 90 points at the time of final follow-up. The median time to return to work and sports activities was two and eight weeks, respectively. At the time of follow-up, patients in the overuse group were more satisfied than those in the posttraumatic group, and the AOFAS hindfoot scores were higher in patients in the overuse group (median, 100 points) compared with patients in the posttraumatic group (median, 90 points). A complication occurred in one patient who had a temporary loss of sensation of the posteromedial aspect of the heel. The outcome after endoscopic treatment of posterior ankle impingement compares favorably with the results of open surgery reported in the literature. Hindfoot endoscopy appears to cause less morbidity than open

  14. Ankle impingement: a review of multimodality imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Zappia, M; Reginelli, A; Carfora, M; D'Agosto, G F; La Porta, M; Genovese, E A; Fonio, P

    2013-08-01

    Ankle impingement is defined as entrapment of an anatomic structure that leads to pain and decreased range of motion of the ankle and can be classified as either soft tissue or osseous (Bassett et al. in J Bone Joint Surg Am 72:55-59, 1990). The impingement syndromes of the ankle are a group of painful disorders that limit full range of movement. Symptoms are due to compression of soft-tissues or osseous structures during particular movements (Ogilvie-Harris et al. in Arthroscopy 13:564-574, 1997). Osseous impingement can result from spur formation along the anterior margin of the distal tibia and talus or as a result of a prominent posterolateral talar process, the os trigonum. Soft-tissue impingement usually results from scarring and fibrosis associated with synovial, capsular, or ligamentous injury. Soft-tissue impingement most often occurs in the anterolateral gutter, the medial ankle, or in the region of the syndesmosis (Van den Bekerom and Raven in Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 15:465-471, 2007). The main impingement syndromes are anterolateral, anterior, anteromedial, posterior, and posteromedial impingement. These conditions arise from initial ankle injuries, which, in the subacute or chronic situation, lead to development of abnormal osseous and soft-tissue thickening within the ankle joint. The relative contributions of the osseous and soft-tissue abnormalities are variable, but whatever component is dominant there is physical impingement and painful limitation of ankle movement. Conventional radiography is usually the first imaging technique performer and allows assessment of any potential bone abnormality, particularly in anterior and posterior impingement. Computed tomography (CT) and isotope bone scanning have been largely superseded by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. MR imaging can demonstrate osseous and soft-tissue edema in anterior or posterior impingement. MR imaging is the most useful imaging modality in evaluating suspected soft

  15. Evaluation of Impingement Syndromes in the Overhead-Throwing Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, Christopher M.; Coen, Michael J.; Screnar, Pat

    2000-01-01

    Objective: We outline impingement entities, describe the history and physical examination, and provide an overview of treatment beyond that routinely used in glenohumeral and scapulothoracic dysfunction. Background: In the athlete, pain and dysfunction due to excessive overhead use or abnormal positioning of the shoulder is common and can result from multiple etiologies, including impingement syndromes. Primary, secondary, internal, and coracoid impingement have all been described. Description: These entities will be discussed, including pathology, evaluation, and treatment. Clinical Advantages: Incorporating a systematic evaluation and treatment of impingement syndromes optimizes care for the patient with shoulder pain. PMID:16558643

  16. Arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs.

    PubMed

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Seijas Vázquez, Roberto; García Balletbó, Montserrat; Álvarez Díaz, Pedro; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Cuscó Segarra, Xavier; Rius Vilarrubia, Marta; Cugat Bertomeu, Ramón

    2011-02-01

    Partial or total meniscectomy are common procedures performed at Orthopedic Surgery departments. Despite providing a great relief of pain, it has been related to early onset knee osteoarthritis. Meniscal allograft transplantation has been proposed as an alternative to meniscectomy. The purposes of this study were to describe an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs technique and to report the preliminary results. All meniscal allograft transplantations performed between 2001 and 2006 were approached for eligibility, and a total of 35 patients (involving 37 menisci) were finally engaged in the study. Patients were excluded if they had ipsilateral knee ligament reconstruction or cartilage repair surgery before meniscal transplantation or other knee surgeries after the meniscal transplantation. Scores on Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale for pain were obtained at a mean follow-up of 38.6 months and compared to pre-operative data. Data on chondral lesions were obtained during the arthroscopic procedure and through imaging (radiographs and MRI) studies pre-operatively. Two graft failures out of 59 transplants (3.4%) were found. Daily life accidents were responsible for all graft failures. Significant improvements for Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and VAS for pain scores following the meniscal allograft transplantation were found (P < 0.0001). Controlling for chondral lesion, there was no significant interactions for Lysholm (n.s.), Subjective IKDC Form (n.s.), and VAS for pain scores (n.s.). This study demonstrated that an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs improved knee function and symptoms after a total meniscectomy. Improvements were observed independently of the degree of chondral lesion.

  17. Arthroscopic Posterior Subtalar Arthrodesis: Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Vilá y Rico, Jesús; Ojeda Thies, Cristina; Parra Sanchez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Surgical fusion of the subtalar joint is a procedure indicated to alleviate pain of subtalar origin, such as in post-traumatic osteoarthritis, adult-acquired flatfoot deformity, and other disorders. Open subtalar arthrodesis has been performed with predictable results, but concerns exist regarding injury to proprioception and local vascularity due to wide surgical dissection. Minimally invasive techniques try to improve results by avoiding these issues but have a reputation for being technically demanding. We describe the surgical technique for arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis, which has proved to be a safe and reliable technique in our experience, with consistent improvements in American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society scores. PMID:27073783

  18. Arthroscopic Posterior Subtalar Arthrodesis: Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Vilá Y Rico, Jesús; Ojeda Thies, Cristina; Parra Sanchez, Guillermo

    2016-02-01

    Surgical fusion of the subtalar joint is a procedure indicated to alleviate pain of subtalar origin, such as in post-traumatic osteoarthritis, adult-acquired flatfoot deformity, and other disorders. Open subtalar arthrodesis has been performed with predictable results, but concerns exist regarding injury to proprioception and local vascularity due to wide surgical dissection. Minimally invasive techniques try to improve results by avoiding these issues but have a reputation for being technically demanding. We describe the surgical technique for arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis, which has proved to be a safe and reliable technique in our experience, with consistent improvements in American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society scores.

  19. [Arthroscopic treatment for calcaneal spur syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stropek, S; Dvorák, M

    2008-10-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Arthroscopic treatment of calcaneal spur syndrome is a tissue-sparing and effective approach when conservative therapy has failed. This method, its results and our experience with the treatment of this syndrome are presented here. MATERIAL Between January 2003 and November 2007, 26 patients underwent an arthroscopic procedure for calcaneal spur syndrome; of these, 20 were women with an average age of 49 years, and six were men with an average age of 45 years. Four, three women and one man, were lost to follow-up, therefore 22 patients with 24 heels were eventually evaluated. All had conservative therapy for 3 to 6 monts. METHODS The arthroscopic method used was developed by the arthroscopic group of the Orthopaedic Service of Hospital Hermanos Ameijeiras in Havana, Cuba. The surgical technique insolves treatment of the spur and plantar fasciitis commonly found in calcaneal spur syndrome, but it also addresses adjacent calcaneal periostitis. RESULTS The results were evaluated on the scale that is part of the foot function index developed by Budiman-Mak for measuring rheumatoid arthritis pain. The patients were asked mine questions on pain intensity during various activities before and after surgery. Pain was evaluated on a scale with grades from 0 to 9. The average value was 5.9 before surgery and 1.4 after surgery. A 0-1 pain range was reported by 25 %, 1-2 by 26 % and 2-4 by 22 % of the patients. All patients reported improvement. DISCUSSION The orthopaedic group in Havana led by Carlos achieved 85 % excellent outcomes (pain range, 0-2) at one-year followup; this was 79 % in our study, in which no problems with foot arches or wound infection were recorded. CONCLUSIONS The heel spur syndrome is a result of an inflamed ligament (plantar fascia) due to repeated microtrauma. It is not a traction osteophyte,but a reaction of the tissue where it attaches to the calcaneus. Adjacent calcaneal periostitis is usually present as well. Therefore, this

  20. Ultrasonography of the shoulder with arthroscopic correlation.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Corrie M; Bedi, Asheesh; Morag, Yoav; Jacobson, Jon A

    2013-07-01

    Ultrasonography is a well-established and widely accepted modality for the evaluation of rotator cuff tears and injury to the biceps brachii tendon. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging have comparable sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing both full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. This article addresses the ultrasonographic diagnosis of abnormalities of the rotator cuff, rotator interval, and biceps brachii, with magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopic correlation. Characteristic ultrasonographic findings as well as imaging pitfalls are reviewed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Arthroscopic and open Bankart repairs provide similar outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Abboud, Joseph A; Hasan, Syed A; Ramsey, Matthew L; Williams, Gerald R

    2006-05-01

    Recurrent instability after arthroscopic Bankart repair has decreased, largely because of improvements in surgical technique. We wanted to know whether there were differences in functional outcomes (using a validated outcomes measure) in patients who had arthroscopic Bankart repair or open Bankart repair for recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability. We retrospectively reviewed 106 patients who had a Bankart repair for recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability from 1998-2001. Of the 93 patients included, 69 patients had arthroscopic Bankart repair and 24 patients had open Bankart repair. The indications for surgery in the two groups were similar. The average age of the patients was 29.9 years (arthroscopic Bankart repair, 31 years; open Bankart repair, 28 years). The followup ranged from 24-77 months. The average modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score (PENN score) for pain, satisfaction, and function were 26.3, 8.5, and 55.1, respectively, in the arthroscopic Bankart repair group and 26.6, 8.8, and 54.2, respectively, in the open Bankart repair group. The total score was 90 in the arthroscopic Bankart repair group and 89.5 in the open Bankart repair group. Recurrent instability occurred in one patient in each group. We found no difference in outcomes between the arthroscopic and open Bankart repair groups using patient-assessed outcomes. Therapeutic Study, Level III (retrospective comparative study). See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  2. Psoas impingement syndrome in hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Luigi; Jennifer, Yanow; Pappagallo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The degenerative processes underlying osteoarthritis of the hip produce both anatomical and biomechanical changes in and around the involved joint. A good understanding of hip anatomy and the forces crossing the hip joint is essential to understand both hip pathology and current treatment techniques. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) has become a mainstay of treatment for advanced osteoarthritis of the hip. Several factors contribute to post-operative hip pain in THA patients. Iliopsoas impingement on the prosthetic cup after total hip replacement is one of the causes of pain following hip surgery, often due to an anterior overlap of the implant with respect to the acetabulum. The anatomic shape of the anterior acetabular ridge, which may be straight or curved, influences this overlap. In this paper we present a case illustrating a psoas impingement-like syndrome in a patient with severe hip osteoarthritis who has not undergone hip replacement surgery. We discuss the compensatory strategies employed by the patient to reduce pain and prevent falls, and show CT scan images depicting the underlying anatomic pathology.

  3. Droplet Impingement Boiling on Heated Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Julie; Clavijo, Cristian; Maynes, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    When a droplet impinges on a solid surface at a temperature well above the saturation temperature, vaporization of the liquid begins immediately after contact. Different boiling regimes may result depending on the surface temperature and volatility of the liquid. The nucleate boiling regime is characterized by explosive atomization, which occurs when vapor bubbles burst causing an extravagant shower of small micro droplets as well as the well-known ``sizzling'' sound. In this work, we show that the vapor is surprisingly re-directed during impingement on a superhydrophobic surface such that atomization is completely suppressed. We hypothesize that this occurs because vapor escapes through the superhydrophobic interface such that the top of the droplet remains free of bursting vapor bubbles. We explore a wide range of surface patterning with feature spacing of 8 to 32 microns and solid area fractions of 10 to 50 percent; surface temperatures from 100 C to 400 C; and Weber numbers of 1 to 100. Atomization is found to decrease with increasing feature spacing and decreasing solid fraction, and vanishes completely for large spacing. It may be that large feature spacing promotes early transition to the Leidenfrost regime.

  4. Confined Impinging Jets in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonomo, B.; Cirillo, L.; Manca, O.; Mansi, N.; Nardini, S.

    2016-09-01

    Impinging jets are adopted in drying of textiles, paper, cooling of gas turbine components, freezing of tissue in cryosurgery and manufacturing, electronic cooling. In this paper an experimental investigation is carried out on impinging jets in porous media with the wall heated from below with a uniform heat flux. The fluid is air. The experimental apparatus is made up of a fun systems, a test section, a tube, to reduce the section in a circular section. The tube is long 1.0 m and diameter of 0.012 m. The test section has a diameter of 0.10 m and it has the thickness of 10, 20 and 40 mm. In the test section the lower plate is in aluminum and is heated by an electrical resistance whereas the upper plate is in Plexiglas. The experiments are carried out employing a aluminum foam 40 PPI at three thickness as the test section. Results are obtained in a Reynolds number range from 5100 to 15300 and wall heat flux range from 510 W/m2 to 1400 W/m2. Results are given in terms of wall temperature profiles, local and average Nusselt numbers, pressure drops, friction factor and Richardson number.

  5. Posture in people with shoulder impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Skolimowski, Jarosław; Barczyk, Katarzyna; Dudek, Krzysztof; Skolimowska, Beata; Demczuk-Włodarczyk, Ewa; Anwajler, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    The posture of people with shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) is a result of adaptive defensive posturing to decrease the intensity of pain in the affected joint. The aim of this work is to characterise trunk and shoulder girdle positioning in patients with SIS. The study involved 58 patients treated for SIS in the years 2004-2006. Symptoms had been present for 40 months on average. A photogrammetric study was performed with the use of a MORA 4G system. It consisted in measuring lordosis and kyphosis, as well as the symmetry of some selected anthropometric points in the frontal plane. Changes in posture presenting as an increased angle of trunk inclination in the sagittal plane and in the frontal plane were observed in all patients. There was asymmetry of bony points as regards the position of the scapula and the waist triangles. The impingement syndrome is associated with displacement of all bony points analysed. Changes in posture are a result of adaptive mechanisms. Trunk asymmetry is secondary to changes in the spatial position of the scapula.

  6. Sessile drop deformations under an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, James Q.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of steady axisymmetric deformations of a liquid sessile drop on a flat solid surface under an impinging gas jet is of interest for understanding the fundamental behavior of free surface flows as well as for establishing the theoretical basis in process design for the Aerosol direct-write technology. It is studied here numerically using a Galerkin finite-element method, by computing solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. For effective material deposition in Aerosol printing, the desired value of Reynolds number for the laminar gas jet is found to be greater than ~500. The sessile drop can be severely deformed by an impinging gas jet when the capillary number is approaching a critical value beyond which no steady axisymmetric free surface deformation can exist. Solution branches in a parameter space show turning points at the critical values of capillary number, which typically indicate the onset of free surface shape instability. By tracking solution branches around turning points with an arc-length continuation algorithm, critical values of capillary number can be accurately determined. Near turning points, all the free surface profiles in various parameter settings take a common shape with a dimple at the center and bulge near the contact line. An empirical formula for the critical capillary number for sessile drops with contact angle is derived for typical ranges of jet Reynolds number and relative drop sizes especially pertinent to Aerosol printing.

  7. Arthroscopic knotless peripheral ulnar-sided TFCC repair.

    PubMed

    Geissler, William B

    2011-08-01

    Peripheral ulnar-sided tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) are common injuries and are amenable to arthroscopic repair. This article describes an all-arthroscopic knotless technique for TFCC repair. This technique has the advantage of being all arthroscopic using 3 portals, has the ability to repair both the superficial and deep layers of the articular disk, repairs the articular disk directly back to bone, and does not require any suture knots that may irritate the surrounding soft tissues. The surgical technique is described in detail. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Arthroscopic Anatomic Glenoid Reconstruction Without Subscapularis Split

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ivan H.; Urquhart, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The role of bone loss from the anterior glenoid in recurrent shoulder instability has been well established. We present a completely arthroscopic technique for reconstructing the anterior glenoid with distal tibial allograft and without a subscapularis split. We perform the arthroscopy in the lateral position. We measure and size an allograft distal tibial graft and place it arthroscopically. We use an inside-out medial portal to introduce the graft into the shoulder, passing it through the rotator interval and above the subscapularis. A double-cannula system is used to pass the graft, which is temporarily fixed with K-wires and held in place with cannulated screws. We then perform a Bankart-like repair of the soft tissues to balance the shoulder and augment our repair. Our technique is not only anatomic in the re-creation of the glenoid surface but also anatomic in the preservation of the coracoid and subscapularis tendon and repair of the capsulolabral complex. PMID:26697303

  9. Pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic procedure in the knee.

    PubMed

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Isolani, Guilherme Rufini; Baracho, Filipe Ribas; de Oliveira Franco, Ana Paula Gebert; Ridder Bauer, Luiz Antônio; Namba, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review all cases of pseudoaneurysm in the literature, in predominantly arthroscopic procedures on the knee, and to report on a case of pseudoaneurysm that we treated. A bibliographic search was conducted for scientific articles published in Brazilian and foreign periodicals over the last 23 years. Forty-seven cases were found, in 40 articles. In addition to these 47 cases, there was the case that we treated, which was also included in the data. Among the operations that progressed with formation of a pseudoaneurysm, 60% were cases of meniscal injuries and 23%, anterior cruciate ligament injuries. In 46% of the cases, the artery affected with the popliteal, and in 21%, the inferomedial genicular artery. The commonest clinical symptom was pain (37%), followed by pulsating tumor (31%), edema of the calf (12%) and hemarthrosis (11%). The median time taken to make the diagnosis was 11 days, but it ranged from one day to 10 weeks after the procedure. Although rare, pseudoaneurysms are a risk that is inherent to arthroscopic surgery. All patients should be made aware of the vascular risks, even in small-scale procedures.

  10. Arthroscopic tibiotalar and subtalar joint arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Roussignol, X

    2016-02-01

    Arthroscopy has become indispensable for performing tibiotalar and subtalar arthrodesis. Now in 2015, it is the gold-standard surgical technique, and open surgery is reserved only for cases in which arthroscopy is contraindicated: material ablation after consolidation failure, osteophytes precluding a work chamber, excentric talus, severe malunion, bone defect requiring grafting, associated midfoot deformity, etc. The first reports of arthroscopic tibiotalar and subtalar arthrodesis date from the early 1990s. Consolidation rates were comparable to open surgery, but with significantly fewer postoperative complications: infection, skin necrosis, etc. Arthroscopy was for many years reserved to moderate deformity, with frontal or sagittal deviation less than 10°. The recent literature, however, seems to extend indications, the only restriction being the surgeon's experience. Tibiotalar arthrodesis on a posterior arthroscopic approach remains little used. And yet the posterior work chamber is much larger, and initial series showed consolidation rates similar to those of an anterior approach. The surgical technique for posterior tibiotalar arthrodesis was described by Van Dijk et al., initially using a posterior para-Achilles approach. This may be hampered by posterior osteophytes or ankylosis of the subtalar joint line (revision of non-consolidated arthrodesis, sequelae of calcaneal thalamus fracture) and is now used only by foot and ankle specialists. Posterior double tibiotalar-subtalar arthrodesis, described by Devos Bevernage et al., is facilitated by transplantar calcaneo-talo-tibial intramedullary nailing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic procedure in the knee☆

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Isolani, Guilherme Rufini; Baracho, Filipe Ribas; de Oliveira Franco, Ana Paula Gebert; Ridder Bauer, Luiz Antônio; Namba, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review all cases of pseudoaneurysm in the literature, in predominantly arthroscopic procedures on the knee, and to report on a case of pseudoaneurysm that we treated. A bibliographic search was conducted for scientific articles published in Brazilian and foreign periodicals over the last 23 years. Forty-seven cases were found, in 40 articles. In addition to these 47 cases, there was the case that we treated, which was also included in the data. Among the operations that progressed with formation of a pseudoaneurysm, 60% were cases of meniscal injuries and 23%, anterior cruciate ligament injuries. In 46% of the cases, the artery affected with the popliteal, and in 21%, the inferomedial genicular artery. The commonest clinical symptom was pain (37%), followed by pulsating tumor (31%), edema of the calf (12%) and hemarthrosis (11%). The median time taken to make the diagnosis was 11 days, but it ranged from one day to 10 weeks after the procedure. Although rare, pseudoaneurysms are a risk that is inherent to arthroscopic surgery. All patients should be made aware of the vascular risks, even in small-scale procedures. PMID:26229905

  12. Primary Frozen Shoulder Syndrome: Arthroscopic Capsular Release

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or primary frozen shoulder syndrome, is a fairly common orthopaedic problem characterized by shoulder pain and loss of motion. In most cases, conservative treatment (6-month physical therapy program and intra-articular steroid injections) improves symptoms and restores shoulder motion. In refractory cases, arthroscopic capsular release is indicated. This surgical procedure carries several advantages over other treatment modalities. First, it provides precise and controlled release of the capsule and ligaments, reducing the risk of traumatic complications observed after forceful shoulder manipulation. Second, release of the capsule and the involved structures with a radiofrequency device delays healing, which prevents adhesion formation. Third, the technique is straightforward, and an oral postoperative steroid program decreases pain and allows for a pleasant early rehabilitation program. Fourth, the procedure is performed with the patient fully awake under an interscalene block, which boosts the patient's confidence and adherence to the physical therapy protocol. In patients with refractory primary frozen shoulder syndrome, arthroscopic capsular release emerges as a suitable option that leads to a faster and long-lasting recovery. PMID:26870652

  13. Arthroscopically assisted central physeal bar resection.

    PubMed

    Marsh, James S; Polzhofer, Gert K

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-seven central physeal bars were removed with an arthroscopically assisted technique. Thirty children (32 cases) have been followed to maturity or physeal closure. There were 19 boys and 11 girls, aged 4-14 years (mean, 9.5 years). Site of arrest was distal femur (15), proximal tibia (9), distal tibia (6), and distal radius (2). Mean follow-up was 6.5 years (range, 2-12 years). Adequate longitudinal growth was realized in 21 patients (70%) just after bar resection. Five patients (17%) required osteotomy, lengthening, or epiphysiodesis in addition to bar resection. In 4 patients (13%), bar resection failed. Failures occurred in those patients whose source of growth arrest was infection (3) or degree of physeal trauma approached 50% (1 case). This is the first series that studies and documents the efficacy of the arthroscope in central physeal bar resection. It provides the best visualization with minimal morbidity. The technique is described, including a discussion of technical tips and pitfalls.

  14. Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff disease.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Claudius D; Schmidt, Christopher C

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize the current concepts on rotator cuff disease with an emphasis on arthroscopic treatment. Most rotator cuff tears are the result of an ongoing attritional process. Once present, a tear is likely to gradually increase in size. Partial-thickness and subscapularis tears can both be successfully treated arthroscopically if conservative management fails. Partial tears involving greater than 50% of tendon thickness should be repaired. Articular-sided partial tears involving less than 50% of the rotator cuff can reliably be treated with debridement. A more aggressive approach should be considered for low-grade tears (<50%) if they occur on the bursal side. Biomechanical and anatomic studies have shown clear superiority with dual-row fixation compared with single-row techniques. However, current studies have yet to show clear clinical advantage with dual-row over single-row repairs. Biceps tenotomy or tenodesis can reliably provide symptomatic improvement in patients with irreparable massive tears. True pseudoparalysis of the shoulder is a contraindication to this procedure alone and other alternatives should be considered.

  15. Arthroscopic approach and anatomy of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Aprato, Alessandro; Giachino, Matteo; Masse, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Hip arthroscopy has gained popularity among the orthopedic community and a precise assessment of indications, techniques and results is constantly brought on. Methods In this chapter the principal standard entry portals for central and peripheral compartment are discussed. The description starts from the superficial landmarks for portals placement and continues with the deep layers. For each entry point an illustration of the main structures encountered is provided and the principal structures at risk for different portals are accurately examined. Articular anatomical description is carried out from the arthroscope point of view and sub-divided into central and peripheral compartment. The two compartments are systematically analyzed and the accessible articular areas for each portal explained. Moreover, some anatomical variations that can be found in the normal hip are reported. Conclusion The anatomical knowledge of the hip joint along with a precise notion of the structures encountered with the arthroscope is an essential requirement for a secure and successful surgery. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066735

  16. Occult hemoglobin as an indicator of impingement stress in fishes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    During the process of impingement on cooling system intake screens, fish may be subject to different types of stress, the total of which often results in the death of individual fish. This report assesses the use of occult hemoglobin in fish demand mucus as an indicator of impingement stress. (ACR)

  17. Round impinging jets with relatively large stand-off distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shademan, Mehrdad; Balachandar, Ram; Roussinova, Vesselina; Barron, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Large eddy simulation and particle image velocimetry measurements have been performed to evaluate the characteristics of a turbulent impinging jet with large nozzle height-to-diameter ratio (H/D = 20). The Reynolds number considered is approximately 28 000 based on the jet exit velocity and nozzle diameter. Mean normalized centerline velocity in both the free jet and impingement regions and pressure distribution over the plate obtained from simulations and experiments show good agreement. The ring-like vortices generated due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the exit of the nozzle merge, break down and transform into large scale structures while traveling towards the impingement plate. A Strouhal number of 0.63 was found for the vortices generated at the exit of the nozzle. However, this parameter is reduced along the centerline towards the impingement zone. A characteristic frequency was also determined for the large scale structures impinging on the plate. The expansion, growth, tilt, and three-dimensionality of the impinging structures cause dislocation of the impinging flow from the centerline, which is significantly larger when compared with flows having small H/D ratios. Contrary to the behavior of impinging jets with small stand-off distance, due to the loss of coherence, the large scale structures do not result in significant secondary vortices in the wall jet region and consequently less fluctuations were observed for wall shear stress.

  18. Multispecies impingement in a tropical power plant, Straits of Malacca.

    PubMed

    Azila, A; Chong, V C

    2010-07-01

    Marine organisms comprised about 70% of the total impinged materials by weight at water intake screens in the Kapar Power Station (KPS), Malaysia. The general groupings of 'fish', 'shrimp', 'crab', 'cephalopod' and 'others' contributed 26% (87 species), 65% (29), 2% (17), 2% (3) and 5% (42) of the total number of impinged organisms, respectively. In general, higher impingement occurred during spring tide, at nighttime and in shallow water. The glass perchlet, anchovies, ponyfishes, mojarra, catfishes, hairtail, scat and young croakers were the most vulnerable fishes. Vulnerable invertebrates included cephalopods, sea urchin, rockshells and jellyfishes, but penaeid shrimps were the most susceptible in terms of both mortality and body injury. Annually, KPS is estimated to kill 8.5 x 10(6) marine organisms (42 tons) by impingement. This amount, however, is minimal compared to commercial fishery harvests. Multispecies impingement at Malaysian power plants poses the problem of finding the best mitigation options for tropical situations.

  19. Regeneratively cooled transition duct with transversely buffered impingement nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, Jay A; Lee, Ching-Pang; Crawford, Michael E

    2015-04-21

    A cooling arrangement (56) having: a duct (30) configured to receive hot gases (16) from a combustor; and a flow sleeve (50) surrounding the duct and defining a cooling plenum (52) there between, wherein the flow sleeve is configured to form impingement cooling jets (70) emanating from dimples (82) in the flow sleeve effective to predominately cool the duct in an impingement cooling zone (60), and wherein the flow sleeve defines a convection cooling zone (64) effective to cool the duct solely via a cross-flow (76), the cross-flow comprising cooling fluid (72) exhausting from the impingement cooling zone. In the impingement cooling zone an undimpled portion (84) of the flow sleeve tapers away from the duct as the undimpled portion nears the convection cooling zone. The flow sleeve is configured to effect a greater velocity of the cross-flow in the convection cooling zone than in the impingement cooling zone.

  20. Drop Impingement on Highly Wetting Micro/Nano Porous Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buie, Cullen; Joung, Youngsoo

    2011-11-01

    Recently, we developed a novel fabrication method using a combination of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and break down anodization (BDA) to achieve highly wetting nanoporous surfaces with microscale features. In this study we investigate droplet impingement behavior on these surfaces as a function of impact velocity, droplet size, and liquid properties. We observe impingement modes we denote as ``necking'' (droplet breaks before full penetration in the porous surface), ``spreading'' (continuous wicking into the porous surface), and ``jetting'' (jets of liquid emanate from the edges of the wicking liquid). To predict the droplet impingement modes, we've developed a non-dimensional parameter that is a function of droplet velocity, dynamic viscosity, effective pore radius and contact angle. The novel dimensionless parameter successfully predicts drop impingement modes across multiple fluids. Results of this study will inform the design of spray impingement cooling systems for electronics applications where the ``spreading'' mode is preferred.

  1. Subsampling program for the estimation of fish impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchamp, John J.; Kumar, K. D.

    1984-11-01

    Federal regulations require operators of nuclear and coal-fired power-generating stations to estimate the number of fish impinged on intake screens. During winter months, impingement may range into the hundreds of thousands for certain species, making it impossible to count all intake screens completely. We present graphs for determinig the appropriate“optimal” subsample that must be obtained to estimate the total number impinged. Since the number of fish impinged tends to change drastically within a short time period, the subsample size is determined based on the most recent data. This allows for the changing nature of the species-age composition of the impinged fish. These graphs can also be used for subsampling fish catches in an aquatic system when the size of the catch is too large to sample completely.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry analysis of an angled impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irhoud, Alexandre; Benson, Michael; Verhulst, Claire; van Poppel, Bret; Elkins, Chris; Helmer, David

    2016-11-01

    Impinging jets are used to achieve high heat transfer rates in applications ranging from gas turbine engines to electronics. Despite the importance and relative simplicity of the geometry, simulations historically fail to accurately predict the flow behavior in the vicinity of the flow impingement. In this work, we present results from a novel experimental technique, Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV), which measures three-dimensional time-averaged velocity without the need for optical access. The geometry considered in this study is a circular jet angled at 45 degrees and impinging on a flat plate, with a separation of approximately seven jet diameters between the jet exit and the impingement location. Two flow conditions are considered, with Reynolds numbers of roughly 800 and 14,000. Measurements from the MRV experiment are compared to predictions from Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) simulations, thus demonstrating the utility of MRV for validation of numerical analyses of impinging jet flow.

  3. Arthroscopic Suture Anchor Tenodesis: Loop-Suture Technique

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Min Soo; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Lee, Seung Won; Park, Young Eun; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2013-01-01

    With advancements in arthroscopic surgery, arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor recently has been reported to be a reasonable option for the treatment of biceps pathologies, especially for those that are symptomatic or accompanied by a rotator cuff tear. We introduce our technique of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor that we call the loop-suture technique, which is constructed with 1 loop strand and another sutured strand. This technique can help to improve biceps grip and simultaneously minimize longitudinal splitting of the tendon. In addition, it is relatively simple and can be performed with the use of conventional devices and arthroscopic portals used for rotator cuff repair, without the formation of additional portals or a separate incision for the tenodesis. PMID:23875133

  4. Investigations of scaling laws for jet impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, J. B.; Haviland, J. K.; Catalano, G. D.; Herling, W. W.

    1976-01-01

    The statistical properties of tangential flows over surfaces were investigated by two techniques. In one, a laser-Doppler velocimeter was used in a smoke-laden jet to measure one-point statistical properties, including mean velocities, turbulent intensities, intermittencies, autocorrelations, and power spectral densities. In the other technique, free stream and surface pressure probes connected to 1/8 inch microphones were used to obtain single point rms and 1/3 octave pressures, as well as two point cross correlations, the latter being converted to auto spectra, amplitude ratios, phase lags, and coherences. The results of these studies support the vortex model of jets, give some insights into the effects of surface impingement, and confirm that jet diameter and velocity are the scaling parameters for circular jets, while Reynolds number is relatively unimportant.

  5. Removal of biofilms by impinging water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cense, A. W.; van Dongen, M. E. H.; Gottenbos, B.; Nuijs, A. M.; Shulepov, S. Y.

    2006-12-01

    The process of impinging water droplets on Streptococcus mutans biofilms was studied experimentally and numerically. Droplets were experimentally produced by natural breakup of a cylindrical liquid jet. Droplet diameter and velocity were varied between 20 and 200 μm and between 20 and 100 m/s, respectively. The resulting erosion process of the biofilm was determined experimentally with high-speed recording techniques and a quantitative relationship between the removal rate, droplet size, and velocity was determined. The shear stress and the pressure on the surface during droplet impact were determined by numerical simulations, and a qualitative agreement between the experiment and the simulation was obtained. Furthermore, it was shown that the stresses on the surface are strongly reduced when a water film is present.

  6. Investigation of scrubbing and impingement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were conducted in an acoustic wind tunnel to determine surface pressure spectra and far field noise caused by turbulence impinging on an airfoil and turbulence convected past a sharp trailing edge. Measured effects of flow velocity and turbulence intensity were compared with predictions from several theories. Also, tests were conducted in an anechoic chamber to determine surface pressure spectra and far field noise caused by a deflected airfoil scrubbed by a subsonic jet. This installation simulated both an under-the-wing and an upper-surface-blowing externally blown flap, depending on the deflection angle. Surface and far field spectra, and cross correlation coherence and delay time, were utilized to infer the major noise-producing mechanisms.

  7. Open Versus Arthroscopic Biceps Tenodesis: A Comparison of Functional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Duchman, Kyle R; DeMik, David E.; Uribe, Bastian; Wolf, Brian R; Bollier, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Background The proximal aspect of the long head of the biceps brachii (LHB) is a frequent source of anterior shoulder pain. Multiple techniques for LHB tenodesis have been described. However, comparative outcomes are lacking. The present study aims to compare functional results, patient reported outcomes, complications, and clinical failures for patients undergoing open versus arthroscopic LHB tenodesis. Methods All patients who underwent open or arthroscopic LHB tenodesis from 2009-2012 at a single institution were identified. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and operative variables of interest, including concomitant procedures, were recorded. Minimum 1-year follow-up was required for inclusion. Outcomes, including patient reported outcomes, physical exam findings, and complications were compared between open and arthroscopic LHB tenodesis patients. Results Overall, 45 patients (25 open, 20 arthroscopic) were available for analysis. In total, there was a single clinical failure in a patient who underwent arthroscopic LHB tenodesis. No other complications or failures were noted. Active shoulder forward elevation was increased in the open tenodesis group as compared to the arthroscopic tenodesis group (177.8 ± 9.3° vs. 171.3 ± 11.7°; p = 0.049). Otherwise, there was no difference in range of motion or strength. For both groups, both the SF-36 and ASES scores improved significantly from preoperative values. Conclusion Both open and arthroscopic LHB tenodesis provide good to excellent outcomes with few complications. Given the recent increased utilization of LHB tenodesis, future studies should use randomization and prospective data collection in order to determine if discrete patient populations are better served by either open or arthroscopic LHB tenodesis techniques PMID:27528841

  8. Thermodynamics of flame impingement heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, S. K.; Agrawal, G. K.; Chakraborty, Suman

    2007-08-01

    A theoretical model for entropy generation and utilization of work potential (exergy) in flame impingement (both premixed and diffusion) heat transfer has been developed in this article, to offer physical insights on the optimal operational regimes, depicting high values of the surface heat flux with minimal exergy destruction, within the practical constraints. The irreversibility components due to different physical processes have been evaluated from a general entropy transport equation. The velocity, temperature, and species concentration fields required for the solution of entropy transport equation have been determined from the numerical computation of flow-field in the flame. Global two-step chemical kinetics has been considered with methane (CH4) and air as fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The results have been predicted in terms of average nondimensional heat flux, expressed as Nusselt number at the target plate, the irreversibility components, and second law efficiency, as functions of the pertinent input parameters such as the jet Reynolds number and the ratio of plate separation distance to nozzle diameter (H /d). The average Nusselt number has been found to increase with an increase in jet Reynolds number and a decrease in H /d ratio, up to a value of 8. The dominant source of thermodynamic irreversibility in a premixed flame has been attributed to the thermal energy exchange whereas, in a diffusion flame, the same has been attributed to an uncontrolled exchange of electrons accompanying the reactive kinetics. The second law efficiency has been found to increase with an increase in jet Reynolds number and an increase in the H /d ratio, up to a value of 20. Values of the jet Reynolds number greater than 10 000 and H /d ratio in the tune of 15 have been observed to pertain to the regime of optimum flame impingement heat transfer, consistent with the energy and exergy balance constraints.

  9. Intratendinous rotator cuff tears: prevalence and clinical and radiological outcomes of arthroscopically confirmed intratendinous tears at midterm follow-up.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Eun; Panchal, Karnav; Jeong, Jae-Jung; Kim, Young-Yul; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Ju-Yeob; Ji, Jong-Hun

    2015-02-01

    Intratendinous tears of the rotator cuff are rare, and little has been written about them. To investigate the prevalence and clinical and radiological outcomes of arthroscopically confirmed intratendinous tears treated with transtendon suture bridge repair. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Included in the study were 33 patients (16 male, 17 female; mean age, 53.4 years) with arthroscopically confirmed intratendinous tears treated with transtendon suture bridge repair from March 2006 to July 2012. A history of trauma was found in 10 cases (30.3%). The dominant arm was involved in 26 cases (78.8%). The mean follow-up duration was 56 months. Preoperatively, a thorough physical examination was performed; at final follow-up, shoulder range of motion (ROM) in forward flexion, abduction, external rotation (ER) at the side, and internal rotation (IR) at the back was noted, and clinical outcomes (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES] score; University of California, Los Angeles [UCLA] score; visual analog scale [VAS] for pain; and Simple Shoulder Test [SST]) were recorded and compared with the preoperative data. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at 6 months to investigate rotator cuff healing status and repair integrity. The prevalence of arthroscopically confirmed intratendinous tears was 4.7% among all arthroscopically treated partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. Impingement signs were positive in most of the patients (positive Hawkins-Kennedy test result in 78.8%, positive Neer sign in 66.7%, and either positive Hawkins-Kennedy test result or Neer sign in 84.8%). At final follow-up, mean ASES, UCLA, VAS, and SST scores improved significantly from a preoperative mean of 51.4, 18.9, 6.0, and 5.4, respectively, to a postoperative mean of 90.6, 32.9, 1.4, and 10.8, respectively (P < .001). According to the UCLA rating scale, outcomes were excellent in 17, good in 13, and fair in 3 cases. Shoulder ROM in forward flexion, abduction, ER at

  10. Turbine vane segment and impingement insert configuration for fail-safe impingement insert retention

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Kellock, Iain Robertson

    2003-05-13

    An impingement insert sleeve is provided that is adapted to be disposed in a coolant cavity defined through a stator vane. The insert has a generally open inlet end and first and second pairs of diametrically opposed side walls, and at least one fail-safe tab defined at a longitudinal end of the insert for limiting radial displacement of the insert with respect to the stator vane.

  11. Posterior arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis: ten cases at one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Albert, A; Deleu, P-A; Leemrijse, T; Maldague, P; Devos Bevernage, B

    2011-06-01

    Isolated subtalar arthrodesis is the treatment of choice for several conditions -mostly subtalar arthritis, tarsal coalition and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction- unresponsive to conservative treatment. Arthroscopic procedures are an interesting recent alternative, less invasive than conventional open techniques. Posterior arthroscopy, in prone position, could be more advantageous than the conventional lateral and/or anterior approach. Ten cases, from 20 to 59-years-old, were prospectively followed up for minimum of one-year (range 12 to 31 months). Arthritis and tarsal coalition were the most common indications. Fusion was observed in all cases at a maximum of nine weeks. Mean average AOFAS score improved from 47 to 78. No complications were noted related to the technique. Only two patients, operated for a symptomatic subtalar coalition, complained of some residual pain due to a lateral submalleolar impingement. Interest of preservation of vascular talar supply and bone grafting are discussed. The good results using this innovative technique are encouraging. Long-term randomized studies remain necessary to confirm the reliability of the procedure in these different indications, and the type of bone graft to favour, if really needed. Level IV therapeutic study. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Arthroscopic knee anatomy in young achondroplasia patients.

    PubMed

    Del Pilar Duque Orozco, M; Record, N C; Rogers, K J; Bober, M B; Mackenzie, W G; Atanda, A

    2017-06-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, affecting more than 250 000 individuals worldwide. In these patients, the developing knee undergoes multiple anatomical changes. The purpose of this study was to characterise the intra-articular knee anatomy in children with achondroplasia who underwent knee arthroscopy. Records of achondroplasia patients who underwent knee arthroscopy between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data, operative reports, follow-up notes, MRI and arthroscopy images were reviewed. Bony, cartilaginous and ligamentous changes were noted. The trochlea sulcus angle was measured from intra-operative arthroscopic images. A total of 12 knee arthroscopies in nine patients were performed. The mean age at surgery was 16.9 years (12 to 22). In all patients, the indication for surgery was knee pain and/or mechanical symptoms that were refractory to non-operative treatment. Three anatomical variations involving the distal femur were found in all knees: a deep femoral trochlea; a high A-shaped intercondylar notch; and a vertically oriented anterior cruciate ligament. The average trochlea sulcus angle measured 123°. Pathology included: synovial plica (one knee); chondral lesions (three knees); discoid lateral meniscus (11 knees); and meniscal tears (six knees). All patients were pain-free and returned to normal activity at final follow-up. Children with achondroplasia have characteristic distal femur anatomy noted during knee arthroscopy. These variations should be considered normal during knee arthroscopy in these patients. Arthroscopic findings confirmed previous MRI findings within this specific population with the addition of a deep trochlear groove which was not previously reported.

  13. Arthroscopic knee anatomy in young achondroplasia patients

    PubMed Central

    del Pilar Duque Orozco, M.; Record, N. C.; Rogers, K. J; Bober, M. B.; Mackenzie, W. G.; Atanda, A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia, affecting more than 250 000 individuals worldwide. In these patients, the developing knee undergoes multiple anatomical changes. The purpose of this study was to characterise the intra-articular knee anatomy in children with achondroplasia who underwent knee arthroscopy. Methods Records of achondroplasia patients who underwent knee arthroscopy between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data, operative reports, follow-up notes, MRI and arthroscopy images were reviewed. Bony, cartilaginous and ligamentous changes were noted. The trochlea sulcus angle was measured from intra-operative arthroscopic images. Results A total of 12 knee arthroscopies in nine patients were performed. The mean age at surgery was 16.9 years (12 to 22). In all patients, the indication for surgery was knee pain and/or mechanical symptoms that were refractory to non-operative treatment. Three anatomical variations involving the distal femur were found in all knees: a deep femoral trochlea; a high A-shaped intercondylar notch; and a vertically oriented anterior cruciate ligament. The average trochlea sulcus angle measured 123°. Pathology included: synovial plica (one knee); chondral lesions (three knees); discoid lateral meniscus (11 knees); and meniscal tears (six knees). All patients were pain-free and returned to normal activity at final follow-up. Conclusion Children with achondroplasia have characteristic distal femur anatomy noted during knee arthroscopy. These variations should be considered normal during knee arthroscopy in these patients. Arthroscopic findings confirmed previous MRI findings within this specific population with the addition of a deep trochlear groove which was not previously reported. PMID:28828058

  14. [Arthroscopically assisted treatment of ankle fractures].

    PubMed

    Braunstein, M; Baumbach, S F; Böcker, W; Mutschler, W; Polzer, H

    2016-02-01

    Acute ankle fractures are one of the most common fractures in adults with an incidence of 0.1-0.2 % per year. Operative treatment by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) is the standard method of treatment for unstable or dislocated fractures. The main goal of the operation is the anatomical realignment of the joint and restoration of ankle stability; nevertheless, anatomical reduction does not automatically lead to favorable clinical results. According to several studies the mid-term and in particular the long-term outcome following operative treatment is often poor with residual symptoms including chronic pain, stiffness, recurrent swelling and ankle instability. There is growing evidence that this poor outcome might be related to occult intra-articular injuries involving cartilage and soft tissues. In recent studies the frequency of fracture-related osteochondral lesions was reported to be approximately 64 %. By physical examination, standard radiography or even computed tomography (CT), these intra-articular pathologies cannot be reliably diagnosed; therefore, many authors emphasize the value of ankle arthroscopy in acute fracture treatment as it has become a safe and effective diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Arthroscopically assisted open reduction and internal fixation (AORIF) allows control of the reduction as well examination of all intra-articular structures. If necessary, intra-articular pathologies can be addressed by removing ruptured ligaments and loose bodies, performing chondroplasty or microfracturing. So far there is no evidence that supplementary ankle arthroscopy increases the complication rate. On the other hand, the positive effect of AORIF has also not been clearly documented; nevertheless, there are clear indications that arthroscopically assisted fracture treatment is beneficial, especially in complex fractures.

  15. CERVICAL CONTRIBUTION TO FUNCTIONAL SHOULDER IMPINGEMENT: TWO CASE REPORTS

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Subacromial impingement is a common condition among overhead athletes. The cause of subacromial impingement can be multifactorial and often involves impaired rotator cuff function. Case Description The following cases outline the presentation, examination and intervention of two overhead athletes, a high school football quarterback and a collegiate swimmer, each presenting with signs and symptoms of subacromial impingement. The unique feature in each case was the manifestation of the cervical spine as the apparent source of rotator cuff weakness, which contributed to functional subacromial impingement although other overt signs of cervical or associated nerve root involvement were absent. Outcome Subsequent to this finding, the athletes demonstrated a rapid recovery of rotator cuff strength and resolution of impingement symptoms in response to cervical retraction and retraction with extension range of motion exercises along with posture correction. They both returned to unrestricted sporting activities within a week, with maintenance of strength and without reoccurrence of symptoms. Discussion The signs of functional subacromial impingement often include weakness of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus. The cause of the weakness in the two cases appeared to be the result of stresses associated with forward head posture contributing to a possible intermittent C5 nerve root compression. The findings in the two cases would suggest the cervical spine should be considered as a potential cause of rotator cuff weakness in individuals presenting with subacromial impingement. Future research should examine the influence of cervical postures and shoulder muscle strength. Level of Evidence 4 PMID:27904800

  16. Shoulder impingement syndrome in relation to shoulder intensive work

    PubMed Central

    Frost, P.; Andersen, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse the risk of shoulder impingement syndrome relative to shoulder intensive work. METHODS: A cross sectional study of a historical cohort of 1591 workers employed between 1986 and 1993 at a slaughterhouse or a chemical factory. Workers not doing tasks in slaughtering or meat processing constituted the reference group. Intensity of shoulder work in meat processing tasks was assessed by video based observations. Information on shoulder disorders was collected by questionnaire and by physical examinations. Impingement syndrome was diagnosed when shoulder symptoms had been present for at least 3 months during the past year and there were signs of subacromial impingement in the corresponding shoulder at physical examination. Shoulder function was assessed at the same occasion with the Constant scoring technique. Prevalence of shoulder impingement syndrome was analysed according to job title and cumulative exposure. RESULTS: Prevalence ratio for shoulder impingement syndrome was 5.27 (95% confidence interval (95% CI), 2.09 to 12.26) among currently working and 7.90 (95% CI, 2.94 to 21.18) among former slaughterhouse workers. Transformed model based prevalence ratios according to years in slaughterhouse work showed an overall association between cumulative exposure and risk for shoulder impingement syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the hypothesis that shoulder intensive work is a risk factor for impingement syndrome of the shoulder. Despite the historical cohort design healthy worker selection may have influenced the exposure- response relation found.   PMID:10472322

  17. Experimental and Computational Study of Underexpanded Jet Impingement Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufer, Shann J.; Nowak, Robert J.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Picetti, Donald

    2009-01-01

    An experiment was performed to assess CFD modeling of a hypersonic-vehicle breach, boundary-layer flow ingestion and internal surface impingement. Tests were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel. Four simulated breaches were tested and impingement heat flux data was obtained for each case using both phosphor thermography and thin film gages on targets placed inside the model. A separate target was used to measure the surface pressure distribution. The measured jet impingement width and peak location are in good agreement with CFD analysis.

  18. Scaling laws for drop impingement on porous films and papers.

    PubMed

    Joung, Young Soo; Buie, Cullen R

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates drop impingement on highly wetting porous films and papers. Experiments reveal previously unexplored impingement modes on porous surfaces designated as necking, spreading, and jetting. Dimensional analysis yields a nondimensional parameter, denoted the Washburn-Reynolds number, relating droplet kinetic energy and surface energy. The impingement modes correlate with Washburn-Reynolds number variations spanning four orders of magnitude and a corresponding energy conservation analysis for droplet spreading shows good agreement with the experimental results. The simple scaling laws presented will inform the investigation of dynamic interactions between porous surfaces and liquid drops.

  19. Arthroscopic Suprapectoral and Open Subpectoral Biceps Tenodesis: Radiographic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hodgins, Justin L; Kovacevic, David; Purcell, Stephen; Jobin, Charles M; Levine, William N; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2016-11-01

    To provide a detailed account of the location of the long head of the biceps (LHB) tenodesis tunnels using an all-arthroscopic suprapectoral technique in a prospective group of patients. These patients were then compared with a retrospective group of open subpectoral tenodesis patients of similar characteristics. Postoperative radiographs from a prospective group of all-arthroscopic suprapectoral LHB tenodeses were compared with a retrospective group of open subpectoral tenodeses. Digital anteroposterior images were used to measure distances from clinically pertinent radiographic landmarks to tenodesis tunnel sites. Forty patients (20 all-arthroscopic, 20 open) met the inclusion criteria. The inferior border of the bicipital groove was located a mean distance of 33.7 ± 6.9 mm from the top of the humeral head. The mean distance measured in the open group was approximately 28 mm (P < .001) distal compared with the arthroscopic group. The humeral diameter was 7.5 ± 5.4 mm narrower at the subpectoral tenodesis site (P < .001). All 20 patients in the open subpectoral group had tenodesis tunnels placed distal to the bicipital groove compared with 17 of 20 patients (85%) in the all-arthroscopic group. There were 2 cases of lateral wall cortical reaming during subpectoral tenodesis but no periprosthetic humeral fractures. There were 2 cases of bicortical reaming during the all-arthroscopic tenodesis with no known complications. The location of biceps tenodesis significantly differs between all-arthroscopic suprapectoral and open subpectoral techniques, and the open subpectoral method achieves fixation in a significantly narrower region of the humerus. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. No evidence of long-term benefits of arthroscopicacromioplasty in the treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome: Five-year results of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ketola, S; Lehtinen, J; Rousi, T; Nissinen, M; Huhtala, H; Konttinen, Y T; Arnala, I

    2013-01-01

    To report the five-year results of a randomised controlled trial examining the effectiveness of arthroscopic acromioplasty in the treatment of stage II shoulder impingement syndrome. A total of 140 patients were randomly divided into two groups: 1) supervised exercise programme (n = 70, exercise group); and 2) arthroscopic acromioplasty followed by a similar exercise programme (n = 70, combined treatment group). The main outcome measure was self-reported pain as measured on a visual analogue scale. At the five-year assessment a total of 109 patients were examined (52 in the exercise group and 57 in the combined treatment group). There was a significant decrease in mean self-reported pain on the VAS between baseline and the five-year follow-up in both the exercise group (from 6.5 (1 to 10) to 2.2 (0 to 8); p < 0.001) and the combined treatment group (from 6.4 (2 to 10) to 1.9 (0 to 8); p < 0.001). The same trend was seen in the secondary outcome measures (disability, working ability, pain at night, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire and reported painful days). An intention-to-treat analysis showed statistically significant improvements in both groups at five years compared with baseline. Further, improvement continued between the two- and five-year timepoints. No statistically significant differences were found in the patient-centred primary and secondary parameters between the two treatment groups. Differences in the patient-centred primary and secondary parameters between the two treatment groups were not statistically significant, suggesting that acromioplasty is not cost-effective. Structured exercise treatment seems to be the treatment of choice for shoulder impingement syndrome.

  1. Wenzel to Cassie transition for droplet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavijo, Cristian; Crockett, Julie; Maynes, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Advantages posed by self-cleaning, superhydrophobic surfaces quickly diminish as the liquid penetrates gas-filled cavities resulting in the so-called Wenzel state. To prevent penetration, surfaces must exhibit nanoscale features since penetrating pressure increases significantly for decreasing feature size. However, certain applications require microscale roughness such as those seeking to relax the no-slip condition and thus penetration reversal in microscale features remains of interest. Unfortunately, recent efforts to accomplish such reversal are complicated or locally-disruptive to the flow such as electrically-tunable surfaces and boiling. Here, we show that a Wenzel-to-Cassie transition is possible with a modest surface temperature increase. Dynamics are discussed for a water droplet impinging (We =100) on a wide range of superhydrophobic surfaces with features varying in height from 4 microns to 18 microns and separation distance of 8 microns to 16 microns. Results reveal that dewetting rates increase with increasing feature height and temperature up to 30 mL/s. A first order model is constructed to validate our hypothesis that surface tension and triple line dissipation are the two dominating forces during dewetting. Good agreement is found between the model and experimental results. We gratefully acknowlege the National Science Foundation for funding this work.

  2. Control of Impingement Heat Transfer Using Mist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Azusa; Hiwada, Munehiko; Mimatsu, Junji; Sugimoto, Hiraku; Oyakawa, Kenyuu

    Impingement heat transfer from a circular orifice jet by using latent heat of water mists was studied experimentally. The amounts of mists of about Zauter's mean diameter 14 µm were from 60 to 200 g/h within a range where liquid films were not formed on the target plate and mists were added near the orifice edge. Experiments covered Reynolds numbers from 12,500 to 50,000 and a heat flux is 1,400 W/m2. The experimental results indicate that adding mists had little influence on free jet mean velocity profiles and target plate pressure coefficients. On the other hand, mists had a strong influence on temperature and humidity profiles of a free jet and they also influenced Nusselt number distributions on the target plate. Increases of mists and Reynolds number caused increases in Nusselt number on the developed region. In addition, we investigated influence of the way mists were added and these results showed that Nusselt number was influenced not only by the amounts of mists but also by the adding method. Local Nusselt number profiles with mists were closely related to temperature distributions of the free jet at the location corresponding to the target plate.

  3. Mixing Characteristics of Turbulent Twin Impinging Axisymmetric Jets at Various Impingement Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, Brian Donn

    An experimental study is first presented on the comparison between two commonly used velocity measurement techniques applied in experimental fluid dynamics: Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The comparison is performed in the near-field region of an axisymmetric circular turbulent jet where the flow field contains large scale turbulent structures. The comparison was performed for five Reynolds numbers, based on diameter, between 5,000 and 25,000. The Reynolds numbers selected cover the critical Reynolds number range, 10,000 to 20,000 where the characteristics of the flow transition to a fully developed turbulent mixing layer. A comparison between these two measurement techniques was performed in order to determine the differences between an intrusive (CTA) and non-intrusive (PIV) method when applied to a practical application. The results and observations obtained from the comparison between the two techniques were applied to better characterize the time-averaged characteristics of a single axisymmetric turbulent jet with a Reynolds number of 7,500. The mean and fluctuating velocities, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), and vorticity were measured as a baseline case. Additionally, smoke visualization was utilized to determine the mixing characteristics of the transient start of an axisymmetric turbulent jet. The shedding frequencies, also known as, the `preferred mode were investigated for a single jet. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was also utilized to characterize the pre-and post-regions of the interaction region of two axisymmetric, incompressible turbulent jets at included angles: 30, 45, and 60 degrees. The Reynolds number selected (7,500) was within the range of critical Reynolds numbers and the geometrical distance to twin jet impingement, X0, remained constant at 10.33D for each impingement angle. The mean and fluctuating velocities, vorticity, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) were measured. Smoke Visualization

  4. Effect of impinging plate geometry on the self-excitation of subsonic impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinoth, B. R.; Rathakrishnan, E.

    2011-11-01

    In the generation of discrete tones by subsonic impinging jets, there exists a difference of opinion as how the feedback is achieved, i.e., the path of the feedback acoustic waves is whether inside the jet or outside the jet? The only available model (Tam and Ahuja model) for the prediction of an average subsonic jet impingement tone frequency assumes that the upstream part of the feedback loop is closed by an upstream propagating neutral wave of the jet. But, there is no information about the plate geometry in the model. The present study aims at understanding the effect of the plate geometry (size and co-axial hole in the plate) on the self-excitation process of subsonic impinging jets and the path of the acoustic feedback to the nozzle exit. The present results show that there is no effect of plate diameter on the frequency of the self-excitation. A new type of tones is generated for plates with co-axial hole (hole diameter is equal to nozzle exit diameter) for Mach numbers 0.9 and 0.95, in addition to the axisymmetric and helical mode tones observed for plates without co-axial hole. The stability results show that the Strouhal number of the least dispersive upstream propagating neutral waves match with the average Strouhal number of the new tones observed in the present experiments. The present study extends the validity of the model of Tam and Ahuja to a plate with co-axial hole (annular plate) and by doing so, we indirectly confirmed that the major acoustic feedback path to the nozzle exit is inside the jet.

  5. Impingement in Total Hip Replacement: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D.; Callaghan, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of total hip impingement, whether or not accompanied by frank dislocation, holds substantial untoward clinical consequences, especially as less-forgiving advanced bearing implant designs come into ever more widespread use. Biomechanical aspects of impingement and dislocation have historically received relatively little scientific attention, although that situation is now rapidly changing. The present article reviews contemporary laboratory and clinical research on the impingement/dislocation phenomena, focusing particularly on how implant design variables, surgical implantation factors and patient activity each act individually and in concert to pose impingement and dislocation challenges. In recent years, several powerful new research methodologies have emerged that have greatly expanded the scope for clinical translation of systematic laboratory study. Transferring the findings from such research into yet better implant designs, and even better surgical procedures, offers encouragement that the clinical impact of this troublesome complication can be further reduced. PMID:19956356

  6. Shoulder Impingement Syndromes: Implications on Physical Therapy Examination and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    A painful shoulder presents challenges in examination, diagnosis and intervention for the physical therapist because of the complexity of the structures involved. A common cause of shoulder pain is shoulder impingement syndrome. This was first described as a condition in which the soft tissues of the subacromial space were chronically entrapped and compressed between the humeral head and the subacromial arch. This definition does not account for the myriad potential causes of shoulder impingement conditions, as forms of impingement other than subacromial soft tissue compression may explain different symptomatic shoulder injuries. This paper describes shoulder impingement syndromes that have been hypothesized, identified and analyzed in the literature. Physical Therapy examination and intervention for these syndromes are also discussed. PMID:25792938

  7. Impinging jet separators for liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    In many liquid metal MHD power, cycles, it is necessary to separate the phases of a high-speed liquid-gas flow. The usual method is to impinge the jet at a glancing angle against a solid surface. These surface separators achieve good separation of the two phases at a cost of a large velocity loss due to friction at the separator surface. This report deals with attempts to greatly reduce the friction loss by impinging two jets against each other. In the crude impinging jet separators tested to date, friction losses were greatly reduced, but the separation of the two phases was found to be much poorer than that achievable with surface separators. Analyses are presented which show many lines of attack (mainly changes in separator geometry) which should yield much better separation for impinging jet separators).

  8. Two stage serial impingement cooling for isogrid structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Morrison, Jay A.

    2014-09-09

    A system for cooling a wall (24) of a component having an outer surface with raised ribs (12) defining a structural pocket (10), including: an inner wall (26) within the structural pocket and separating the wall outer surface within the pocket into a first region (28) outside of the inner wall and a second region (40) enclosed by the inner wall; a plate (14) disposed atop the raised ribs and enclosing the structural pocket, the plate having a plate impingement hole (16) to direct cooling air onto an impingement cooled area (38) of the first region; a cap having a skirt (50) in contact with the inner wall, the cap having a cap impingement hole (20) configured to direct the cooling air onto an impingement cooled area (44) of the second region, and; a film cooling hole (22) formed through the wall in the second region.

  9. A flash photographic method for droplet impingement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, V.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes an experimental method to visualize the impingement process of a liquid droplet onto a solid surface with sufficient clarity to reveal fine details of the droplet surface structure and rim jet produced during the impingement process. The method incorporates a 35 mm SLR camera with bellows, motor drive, macro lens, backlighting by a short duration flash lamp, diffusers and a commercially available timing control unit to trigger the flash. Results using the experimental arrangement are demonstrated for a water droplet striking a horizontal surface at a velocity of about 1 m/s, though the photographic method may be applied to any other condition and liquid. A series of photographs are presented that show the repeatability of the impingement process, image clarity, surface structure of the droplet during impingement.

  10. Coracoid impingement syndrome due to intensive rock climbing training.

    PubMed

    Schöffl, Volker; Schneider, Hans; Küpper, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Overuse and acute injuries to the upper body are common in rock climbing. Such injuries primarily affect the fingers; but shoulder problems are increasingly common, especially among more experienced and older climbers who climb at a high ability level. Such shoulder problems are often due to subacromial impingement, shoulder dislocations with bankart lesions, hyperlaxity, SLAP lesions or irritations of the long biceps tendon. In contrast to these known conditions, we describe a case of an ambitious female rock climber who trained intensively and developed a coracoid impingement caused by hypertrophied subscapularis tendon and muscle following sport-specific training. Diagnosis was made through clinical evaluation and confirmed by magnetic resonance tomography. Coracoid impingement syndrome is a less common cause of shoulder pain and occurs when the subscapularis tendon impinges between the coracoid and the lesser tuberosity of the humerus. The patient was treated successfully with a conservative therapy and returned to full activity within 6 weeks.

  11. Experimental water droplet impingement data on modern aircraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, Michael; Breer, Marlin D.; Craig, Neil C.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental method has been developed to determine the water droplet impingement characteristics on two- and three-dimensional aircraft surfaces. The experimental water droplet impingement data are used to validate particle trajectory analysis codes that are used in aircraft icing analyses and engine inlet particle separator analyses. The aircraft surface is covered with thin strips of blotter paper in areas of interest. The surface is then exposed to an airstream that contains a dyed-water spray cloud. The water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter paper strips by measuring the optical reflectance of each strip with an automated reflectometer. Preliminary experimental and analytical impingement efficiency data are presented for a NLF(1)-0414F airfoil, s swept MS(1)-0317 airfoil, a swept NACA 0012 wingtip and for a Boeing 737-300 engine inlet model.

  12. Measurements in a large angle oblique jet impingement flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    The flow field associated with the oblique impingement of an axisymmetric jet was investigated in the externally blown flap configuration for the STOL aircraft. The passive and active spreading characteristics of the shallow angle (a greater than or = approximately to 15 degrees) oblique impingement flow, the role of the initially azimuthal vorticity field, and the stagnation point region were studied, and compared to the large ( a = 45 degres) oblique jet impingement flow. A description of the characteristics of the large angle impingement flow is presented: A flow field near the plate as showing two distinct patterns, one near the location of the maximum surface pressure, and another about the geometric intersection of the jet axis with the plate; and turbulence in the region above the plate which is greater than the one accounted for by the convection of turbulence energy by the mean motion.

  13. Experimental water droplet impingement data on modern aircraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, Michael; Breer, Marlin D.; Craig, Neil C.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental method has been developed to determine the water droplet impingement characteristics on two- and three-dimensional aircraft surfaces. The experimental water droplet impingement data are used to validate particle trajectory analysis codes that are used in aircraft icing analyses and engine inlet particle separator analyses. The aircraft surface is covered with thin strips of blotter paper in areas of interest. The surface is then exposed to an airstream that contains a dyed-water spray cloud. The water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter paper strips by measuring the optical reflectance of each strip with an automated reflectometer. Preliminary experimental and analytical impingement efficiency data are presented for a NLF(1)-0414F airfoil, s swept MS(1)-0317 airfoil, a swept NACA 0012 wingtip and for a Boeing 737-300 engine inlet model.

  14. Talar Osteochondroma Fracture Presenting as Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Ercin, Ersin; Bilgili, Mustafa Gokhan; Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Avsar, Serdar

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondromas are the most common benign bone tumors. They are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. When symptomatic, the symptoms are usually due to its location and size. Fracture of an osteochondroma presenting as posterior ankle impingement is a rare condition. We describe a 22-year-old man with solitary exostosis who presented with a posterior ankle mass and posterior ankle impingement with 2 years of follow-up. Surgical intervention was the treatment of choice in this patient, and histologic examination revealed a benign osteochondroma. Osteochondromas found in the posterior aspect of the talus can be complicated by fracture due to persistent motion of the ankle. Talar osteochondroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement causes. Posterior talar osteochondromas, especially when a stalk is present, should be treated surgically before it is more complicated by a fracture and posterior ankle impingement.

  15. The role of capsular distention in the arthroscopic management of arthrofibrosis of the knee: A technical consideration.

    PubMed

    Millett, P J; Steadman, J R

    2001-09-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of arthrofibrosis of the knee is a technically challenging procedure. Capsular distention with fluid before arthroscopy results in easier and safer insertion of arthroscopic instruments with improved arthroscopic visualization. In addition, it stretches the entire capsule, including the difficult to access posterior capsule. This report describes a simple technique for capsular distention before arthroscopic treatment of arthrofibrosis of the knee.

  16. Plume Impingement Analysis for the European Service Module Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yim, John Tamin; Sibe, Fabien; Ierardo, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Plume impingement analyses were performed for the European Service Module (ESM) propulsion system Orbital Maneuvering System engine (OMS-E), auxiliary engines, and reaction control system (RCS) engines. The heat flux from plume impingement on the solar arrays and other surfaces are evaluated. This information is used to provide inputs for the ESM thermal analyses and help determine the optimal configuration for the RCS engines.

  17. Prefemoral fat pad impingement syndrome: identification and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Borja, Maria J; Jose, Jean; Vecchione, David; Clifford, Paul D; Lesniak, Bryson P

    2013-01-01

    Fat pad impingement syndrome refers to anterior knee pain caused by hemorrhage, inflammation, fibrosis and/or degeneration of the anterior knee fat pads. Symptomatic impingement of the prefemoral fat pad can be clinically significant but easily overlooked on magnetic resonance imaging, unless looked for. It should be evaluated in patients with persistent anterior knee pain, particulary if accompanied with mechanical symptoms and lack of intra-articular pathology.

  18. Liquid jet impingement heat transfer with or without boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. F.; Gan, Y. P.; Tian, Y. C.; Lei, D. H.; Gomi, T.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the important studies in the area of impingement heat transfer with or without phase change, with emphasis on the research conducted at Beijing Polytechnic University mainly with circular jets. Heat transfer characteristics of single phase jets are discussed in detail. Comment is presented on boiling heat transfer of impinging jets for steady and transient states. Some special cooling configurations of two-phase jets are also introduced.

  19. Level of the Subscapularis Split During Arthroscopic Latarjet.

    PubMed

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J; Arrigoni, Paolo; Narbona, Pablo; Burkhart, Stephen S; Barth, Johannes

    2017-08-16

    To determine the location of the subscapularis split during arthroscopic Latarjet created by an inside-out technique passing a switching stick from the posterior portal across the glenohumeral joint. An inside-out technique was used to arthroscopically create a subscapularis split in 20 fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders. The distance between the exit point of the switching stick and the upper border of the subscapularis and the anterior circumflex vessels was measured arthroscopically and after open dissection. Twelve splits were in the upper third of the subscapularis, 3 were at the junction of the upper third and the middle third, and 5 were in the middle third. None were at the junction between the middle and lower third as desired. Using the inside-out method during arthroscopic Latarjet may produce a high subscapularis split if it is performed from with a switching stick that is inserted through the posterior approach, and passed across the glenohumeral joint at the level of the inferior glenoid. This study analyzed the relative risk of high subscapularis split during the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Arthroscopic treatment of glenohumeral instability in soccer goalkeepers.

    PubMed

    Terra, B B; Ejnisman, B; Figueiredo, E A; Andreoli, C V; Pochini, A C; Cohen, C; Arliani, G G; Cohen, M

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to report epidemiologic data and results of arthroscopic treatment of glenohumeral instability in soccer goalkeepers. We included 12 soccer goalkeepers with a mean age of 28.9 years (range 18-45 years) with acute or recurrent traumatic anterior instability who underwent an arthroscopic anatomic capsulolabral repair with bone anchors. Patients who underwent surgery within 4 weeks of the first episode of dislocation were classified as acute instability. The results were evaluated using the Rowe Scale and analyzed according to stability, range of motion and function. The mean follow-up was 3.8 years. The most common mechanism of injury (90% of the cases) was abduction, external rotation and extension. Associated injuries were present in 57.2% of recurrent cases and 20% of acute cases (p<0.293). Excellent or good results were observed in 80% of the cases of acute instability and in 57.2% of cases in the group with recurrent instability (p<0.586). From a total of 12 soccer goalkeepers who underwent the arthroscopic capsulolabral repair, good or excellent results were obtained in 66.6% of cases of glenohumeral instability. Surgical arthroscopic repair was possible in all cases of acute or recurrent instability based on well-established inclusion criteria, i. e., with well-defined exclusion criteria, such as HAGL lesion and significant glenohumeral bone loss, the arthroscopic capsulolabral repair can be carried out in soccer goalkeepers.

  1. Arthroscopic treatment for greater tuberosity fractures: rationale and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Taverna, Ettore; Sansone, Valerio; Battistella, Ferdinando

    2004-07-01

    A description of a new technique for arthroscopic treatment of minimally displaced greater tuberosity fractures of the humerus and associated soft tissue lesions is presented. This kind of fracture is usually treated nonsurgically. However, recent evidence suggests that even a small amount of superior displacement may produce shoulder dysfunction and require a perfect surgical reduction and fixation. Moreover, any displaced fracture of the greater tuberosity presents a high rate of associated and largely undetected soft tissue lesions. To avoid underestimating accompanying soft tissue pathology, arthroscopic assessment before open treatment of greater tuberosity fractures has been suggested. In 2 earlier case reports, we described the use of an arthroscope not only to diagnose and treat a rotator cuff tear and a Bankart lesion associated with a minimally displaced greater tuberosity fracture but also to arthroscopically reduce and treat the fracture. With advancements in arthroscopy and equipment, we refined and systematized the original arthroscopic technique that we have routinely used since 1997. This article presents the new technique.

  2. Comparison of two arthroscopic pump systems based on image quality.

    PubMed

    Tuijthof, G J M; van den Boomen, H; van Heerwaarden, R J; van Dijk, C N

    2008-06-01

    The effectiveness of arthroscopic pump systems has been investigated with either subjective measures or measures that were unrelated to the image quality. The goal of this study is to determine the performance of an automated pump in comparison to a gravity pump based on objective assessment of the quality of the arthroscopic view. Ten arthroscopic operations performed with a gravity pump and ten performed with an automated pump (FMS Duo system) were matched on duration of the surgery and shaver usage, type of operation, and surgical experience. Quality of the view was defined by means of the presence or absence of previously described definitions of disturbances (bleeding, turbidity, air bubbles, and loose fibrous tissue). The percentage of disturbances for all operations was assessed with a time-disturbance analysis of the recorded operations. The Mann-Whitney U test shows a significant difference in favor of the automated pump for the presence of turbidity only (Exact Sig. [2*(1-tailed Sig.)] = 0.015). Otherwise, no differences were determined (Exact Sig. [2*(1-tailed Sig.)] > 0.436). A new objective method is successfully applied to assess efficiency of pump systems based on the quality of the arthroscopic view. Important disturbances (bleeding, air bubbles, and loose fibrous tissue) are not reduced by an automated pump used in combination with a tourniquet. The most frequent disturbance turbidity is reduced by around 50%. It is questionable if this result justifies the use of an automated pump for straightforward arthroscopic knee surgeries using a tourniquet.

  3. Dynamics of laminar circular jet impingement upon convex cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    New, T. H.; Long, J.

    2015-02-01

    Flow dynamics associated with a laminar circular jet impinging upon a convex cylinder has been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence and digital particle-image velocimetry techniques. Cylinder-to-jet diameter ratios of 1, 2, and 4 were investigated, while the jet-to-cylinder separation distance was kept at four jet diameters throughout. Flow visualization and λ2 criterion results show that once the jet ring-vortices impinge upon the cylindrical surface, they move away from the impingement point by wrapping themselves partially around the surface. As the cylinder diameter increases, wall boundary layer separation, vortex dipole formation, and separation locations are initiated earlier along the cylindrical surface, producing significantly larger wakes. Along the cylinder straight-edges, ring-vortex cores are significantly smaller after impingement. This is due to accentuated vortex-stretching caused by partial wrapping around the cylindrical surface by the ring-vortices, on top of their movement away from the impingement point. Interestingly, vortex dipoles demonstrate a strong tendency to travel upstream and interact with other upstream vortex dipoles, instead of moving downstream gradually seen for flat-surface jet-impingements. Wall shear stress results are also presented to quantify the effects of cylinder diameter-ratio on surface skin friction distribution. Finally, these preceding observations are corroborated and explained in a three-dimensional flow dynamics model presented here.

  4. Supersonic impinging jet noise reduction using a hybrid control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, Alex; Kumar, Rajan

    2015-07-01

    Control of the highly resonant flowfield associated with supersonic impinging jet has been experimentally investigated. Measurements were made in the supersonic impinging jet facility at the Florida State University for a Mach 1.5 ideally expanded jet. Measurements included unsteady pressures on a surface plate near the nozzle exit, acoustics in the nearfield and beneath the impingement plane, and velocity field using particle image velocimetry. Both passive control using porous surface and active control with high momentum microjet injection are effective in reducing nearfield noise and flow unsteadiness over a range of geometrical parameters; however, the type of noise reduction achieved by the two techniques is different. The passive control reduces broadband noise whereas microjet injection attenuates high amplitude impinging tones. The hybrid control, a combination of two control methods, reduces both broadband and high amplitude impinging tones and surprisingly its effectiveness is more that the additive effect of the two control techniques. The flow field measurements show that with hybrid control the impinging jet is stabilized and the turbulence quantities such as streamwise turbulence intensity, transverse turbulence intensity and turbulent shear stress are significantly reduced.

  5. Using the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool as a Pass-Fail Examination

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Ryan J.; Nicandri, Gregg T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Examination of arthroscopic skill requires evaluation tools that are valid and reliable with clear criteria for passing. The Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool was developed as a video-based assessment of technical skill with criteria for passing established by a panel of experts. The purpose of this study was to test the validity and reliability of the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool as a pass-fail examination of arthroscopic skill. Methods: Twenty-eight residents and two sports medicine faculty members were recorded performing diagnostic knee arthroscopy on a left and right cadaveric specimen in our arthroscopic skills laboratory. Procedure videos were evaluated with use of the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool by two raters blind to subject identity. Subjects were considered to pass the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool when they attained scores of ≥3 on all eight assessment domains. Results: The raters agreed on a pass-fail rating for fifty-five of sixty videos rated with an interclass correlation coefficient value of 0.83. Ten of thirty participants were assigned passing scores by both raters for both diagnostic arthroscopies performed in the laboratory. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that logging more than eighty arthroscopic cases or performing more than thirty-five arthroscopic knee cases was predictive of attaining a passing Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool score on both procedures performed in the laboratory. Conclusions: The Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool is valid and reliable as a pass-fail examination of diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee in the simulation laboratory. Clinical Relevance: This study demonstrates that the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool may be a useful tool for pass-fail examination of diagnostic arthroscopy of the knee in the simulation laboratory. Further study is necessary to determine whether the Arthroscopic Surgery Skill

  6. Is Arthroscopic Technique Superior to Open Reduction Internal Fixation in the Treatment of Isolated Displaced Greater Tuberosity Fractures?

    PubMed

    Liao, Weixiong; Zhang, Hao; Li, Zhongli; Li, Ji

    2016-05-01

    month thereafter. Radiographs showed optimal reduction immediately after surgery and at every followup. Radiographs were obtained to assess fracture healing. Patients were followed up for a mean of 34 months (range, 24-48 months). At the last followup, ROM, VAS score, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score were used to evaluate clinical outcomes. All these data were retrieved from our institutional database through chart review. Complications were assessed through chart review by one observer other than the operating surgeon. Patients who underwent arthroscopic double-row suture anchor fixation had longer surgical times than did patients who underwent ORIF (mean, 95.3 minutes, SD, 10.6 minutes vs mean, 61.5 minutes, SD, 7.2 minutes; mean difference, 33.9 minutes; 95% CI, 27.4-40.3 minutes; p < 0.001). All patients achieved bone union within 3 months. Compared with patients who had ORIF, the patients who had arthroscopic double-row suture anchor fixation had greater ranges of forward flexion (mean, 152.7°, SD, 13.3° vs mean, 137.7°, SD, 19.2°; p = 0.017) and abduction (mean, 146.0°, SD, 16.4° vs mean, 132.4°, SD, 20.5°; p = 0.048), and higher ASES score (mean, 91.8 points, SD, 4.1 points vs mean, 87.4 points, SD, 5.8 points; p = 0.021); however, in general, these differences were small and of questionable clinical importance. With the numbers available, there were no differences in the proportion of patients experiencing complications resulting in reoperation; secondary subacromial impingement occurred in two patients in the ORIF group and postoperative stiffness in one from the ORIF group. The two patients experiencing secondary subacromial impingement underwent reoperation to remove the implant. The patient with postoperative stiffness underwent adhesion release while receiving anesthesia, to improve the function of the shoulder. These three patients had the only reoperations. We found that in the hands of surgeons comfortable with both

  7. Incapacity of work after arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Tobias M; Freude, Thomas; Fiedler, Sebastian; Schröter, Steffen; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ateschrang, Atesch

    2015-10-01

    The incapacity with respect to work following anterior-inferior shoulder dislocation and subsequent Bankart repair has not been previously examined. The objective of this study was to examine a patient's incapacity according to the classification by the REFA Association. The recovery time was measured and the outcome of patients with heavy workload was compared to those with lower workloads. A total of 74 patients who underwent isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The Constant-Murley Score, UCLA Shoulder Score and ROWE Score for Shoulder Instability were recorded for clinical assessment. The mean follow-up time was 43.1 months (SD ± 17.4; 24-110 months) with a mean age of 34.7 years (SD ± 12.6). Workload was classified as per the REFA Association classification system. Postoperative duration of a patient's incapacity with respect to work and other subjective ratings were provided by the patients themselves. The mean incapacity of work was 2.73 months (95 % CI 1.19-5.36). The incapacity of work was 2.06 months (95 % CI 1.55-2.68) in the group with low physical strains at work (REFA 0-1) and 3.40 months (95 % CI 2.70-4.24) in the group with heavy workload (REFA 2-4/p = 0.005). Overall, the mean Constant-Murley Score was 87.7 (SD ± 13.5). The average UCLA Shoulder Score summed up to 31.9 (SD ± 3.87) and the mean ROWE Score was 87.6 (SD ± 21.7). 13 (17.5 %) patients had problems to compete in their jobs. Three patients had to change the job postoperatively. In this study, a relationship between the time of incapacity of work and the workload was observed; patients with low physical strains returned significantly earlier to work after arthroscopic Bankart repair (p = 0.005). In general, the clinical results as measured in the Constant/UCLA/Rowe score were comparable to other studies.

  8. ACL Roof Impingement Revisited: Does the Independent Femoral Drilling Technique Avoid Roof Impingement With Anteriorly Placed Tibial Tunnels?

    PubMed

    Tanksley, John A; Werner, Brian C; Conte, Evan J; Lustenberger, David P; Burrus, M Tyrrell; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Gwathmey, F Winston; Miller, Mark D

    2017-05-01

    Anatomic femoral tunnel placement for single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is now well accepted. The ideal location for the tibial tunnel has not been studied extensively, although some biomechanical and clinical studies suggest that placement of the tibial tunnel in the anterior part of the ACL tibial attachment site may be desirable. However, the concern for intercondylar roof impingement has tempered enthusiasm for anterior tibial tunnel placement. To compare the potential for intercondylar roof impingement of ACL grafts with anteriorly positioned tibial tunnels after either transtibial (TT) or independent femoral (IF) tunnel drilling. Controlled laboratory study. Twelve fresh-frozen cadaver knees were randomized to either a TT or IF drilling technique. Tibial guide pins were drilled in the anterior third of the native ACL tibial attachment site after debridement. All efforts were made to drill the femoral tunnel anatomically in the center of the attachment site, and the surrogate ACL graft was visualized using 3-dimensional computed tomography. Reformatting was used to evaluate for roof impingement. Tunnel dimensions, knee flexion angles, and intra-articular sagittal graft angles were also measured. The Impingement Review Index (IRI) was used to evaluate for graft impingement. Two grafts (2/6, 33.3%) in the TT group impinged upon the intercondylar roof and demonstrated angular deformity (IRI type 1). No grafts in the IF group impinged, although 2 of 6 (66.7%) IF grafts touched the roof without deformation (IRI type 2). The presence or absence of impingement was not statistically significant. The mean sagittal tibial tunnel guide pin position prior to drilling was 27.6% of the sagittal diameter of the tibia (range, 22%-33.9%). However, computed tomography performed postdrilling detected substantial posterior enlargement in 2 TT specimens. A significant difference in the sagittal graft angle was noted between the 2 groups. TT grafts were

  9. Cryogenic Impinging Jets Subjected to High Frequency Transverse Acoustic Forcing in a High Pressure Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-27

    numerical study on the physical mechanism of impact waves and mixing process, and atomization of impinging jets. Chen et al carried out his numerical...used to capture the physical response of impact waves present on impingement sheet formed by two like on like impinging jets. Dynamic mode...speed, backlit imaging was used to capture the physical response of impact waves present on impingement sheet formed by two like on like impinging

  10. Space Station flexible dynamics under plume impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor

    1993-01-01

    Assembly of the Space Station requires numerous construction flights by the Space Shuttle. A particularly challenging problem is that of control of each intermediate station configuration when the shuttle orbiter is approaching it to deliver the next component. The necessary braking maneuvers cause orbiter thruster plumes to impinge on the station, especially its solar arrays. This in turn causes both overall attitude errors and excitation of flexible-body vibration modes. These plume loads are predicted to lead to CMG saturation during the approach of the orbiter to the SC-5 station configuration, necessitating the use of the station RCS jets for desaturation. They are also expected to lead to significant excitation of solar array vibrations. It is therefore of great practical importance to investigate the effects of plume loads on the flexible dynamics of station configuration SC-5 as accurately as possible. However, this system possesses a great many flexible modes (89 below 5 rad/s), making analysis time-consuming and complicated. Model reduction techniques can be used to overcome this problem, reducing the system model to one which retains only the significant dynamics, i.e. those which are strongly excited by the control inputs or plume disturbance forces and which strongly couple with the measured outputs. The particular technique to be used in this study is the subsystem balancing approach which was previously developed by the present investigator. This method is very efficient computationally. Furthermore, it gives accurate results even for the difficult case where the structure has many closed-spaced natural frequencies, when standard modal truncation can give misleading results. Station configuration SC-5 is a good example of such a structure.

  11. Simulating regolith ejecta due to gas impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Wesley Allen; Metzger, Philip; Dove, Adrienne; Britt, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Space missions operating at or near the surface of a planet or small body must consider possible gas-regolith interactions, as they can cause hazardous effects or, conversely, be employed to accomplish mission goals. They are also directly related to a body's surface properties; thus understanding these interactions could provide an additional tool to analyze mission data. The Python Regolith Interaction Calculator (PyRIC), built upon a computational technique developed in the Apollo era, was used to assess interactions between rocket exhaust and an asteroid's surface. It focused specifically on threshold conditions for causing regolith ejecta. To improve this model, and learn more about the underlying physics, we have begun ground-based experiments studying the interaction between gas impingement and regolith simulant. Compressed air, initially standing in for rocket exhaust, is directed through a rocket nozzle at a bed of simulant. We assess the qualitative behavior of various simulants when subjected to a known maximum surface pressure, both in atmosphere and in a chamber initially at vacuum. These behaviors are compared to prior computational results, and possible flow patterns are inferred. Our future work will continue these experiments in microgravity through the use of a drop tower. These will use several simulant types and various pressure levels to observe the effects gas flow can have on target surfaces. Combining this with a characterization of the surface pressure distribution, tighter bounds can be set on the cohesive threshold necessary to maintain regolith integrity. This will aid the characterization of actual regolith distributions, as well as informing the surface operation phase of mission design.

  12. The Arthroscopic Ulnohumeral Arthroplasty: From Mini-Open to Arthroscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Degreef, Ilse; De Smet, Luc

    2011-01-01

    In cubarthritis—osteoarthritis of the elbow—surgical procedures may be considered to debride the elbow joint to reduce pain, to increase mobility, and to postpone joint replacement surgery. The ulnohumeral arthroplasty as described by Outerbridge and Kashiwagi was originally introduced to debride both anterior and posterior elbow compartments through a direct posterior mini-open approach. To achieve this, a distal humeral fenestration throughout the humeral fossa is performed. Although with an elbow arthroscopy, a technique that was obviously developed later on, all compartments can be easily visualized. The arthroscopic fenestration of the humerus preserves its advantages, with good clinical results focused on pain relief and gaining mobility. On top, future elbow joint locking based on degenerative loose bodies can be prevented. Therefore, this surgery is often done in young, more active patients and even in sportsmen. These patients, however, need to be prompted to restrict loading on the elbow in the immediate postoperative period, because the elbow is biomechanically weakened and may be prone to a fracture. However, both outcome and postoperative rehabilitation are promising and the arthroscopic Outerbridge procedure is a reliable procedure with an easy rehabilitation. Therefore, the threshold is relatively low in early cubarthritis and recurrent locking of the elbow. In this paper, we present a literature review and the author's experience and own research on the Outerbridge procedure. PMID:22096621

  13. Arthroscopic acromioplasty: a comparison between workers' compensation and non-workers' compensation populations.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Gregory P

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of the present prospective study was to analyze a consecutive series of patients with subacromial impingement syndrome who were managed with arthroscopic acromioplasty by a single surgeon. A consecutive series of 106 patients (106 shoulders) with a mean age of 44.7 years (range, twenty to seventy years) was analyzed after a mean duration of follow-up of thirty-two months. The Workers' Compensation group included forty patients (twenty-five men and fifteen women) with a mean age of 41.7 years. The non-Workers' Compensation group included sixty-six patients (thirty-two men and thirty-four women) with a mean age of 46.5 years. The work-demand level was categorized according to the Dictionary of Occupational Titles from the United States Department of Labor. Previously unrecognized intra-articular pathological changes were categorized with use of consistent criteria. Workers' Compensation status, the work-demand level, and the presence of associated intra-articular pathological changes were analyzed for their effect on outcome scores and time to return to full-duty work. The mean outcome scores for the entire population showed significant improvement when the preoperative values were compared with the postoperative values; specifically, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score improved from 41.8 to 86.9, the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) score improved from 5.1 to 10.0, and the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain improved from 6.0 to 1.1 (p < 0.05). Postoperatively, there was no significant difference in the mean outcome scores between the Workers' Compensation and non-Workers' Compensation groups or between different work-demand levels. There was, however, a significant difference in the average time to return to full-duty work (13.7 weeks in the Workers' Compensation group compared with 9.1 weeks in the non-Workers' Compensation group; p = 0.0001), with the Workers' Compensation group having relatively heavier work-demand levels. Intra

  14. Arthroscopic bursectomy for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Van Hofwegen, Christopher; Baker, Champ L; Savory, Carlton G; Baker, Champ L

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of arthroscopic bursectomy for pain relief in patients with trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty. In this retrospective case series of 12 patients undergoing arthroscopic treatment of recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis after hip arthroplasty, outcomes were assessed via phone interview with a numeric pain rating scale from 1 to 10 and were compared with preoperative pain ratings. Patients were asked the percentage of time they had painless hip function and whether they would have the surgery again. At an average 36-month follow-up (range, 4-85 months), the average numeric pain scale rating improved from 9.3 to 3.3. At an average of 62% of the time, patients had painless use of the hip. Ten of 12 patients in the study felt the pain relief gained was substantial enough to warrant having procedure again. In these patients, arthroscopic bursectomy was a viable option for patients with recalcitrant bursitis after hip arthroplasty.

  15. Ganglion cyst in the supraspinous fossa: arthroscopically undetectable cases.

    PubMed

    Shimokobe, Hisao; Gotoh, Masafumi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Yoshikawa, Eiichiro; Kume, Shinichiro; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Nagata, Kensei; Shiba, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes of arthroscopic decompression for ganglion cyst in the supraspinous fossa; however, little attention has been paid to the difficulty in detecting these cysts during arthroscopy. In this report, we present 2 cases in which ganglion cysts in the supraspinous fossa were undetectable during arthroscopy. The ganglion cysts were not identified in these cases during surgery despite arthroscopic decompression being performed through the area in which the cyst was expected until the suprascapular nerve was entirely exposed. After surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the disappearance of the ganglion cyst and external rotation strength was fully improved, without shoulder pain. We emphasize here that surgeons should be aware of this difficulty when performing arthroscopic decompression of ganglion cysts in the supraspinous fossa.

  16. Simulation of arthroscopic surgery using MRI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, Geoffrey; Genetti, Jon

    1994-01-01

    With the availability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology in the medical field and the development of powerful graphics engines in the computer world the possibility now exists for the simulation of surgery using data obtained from an actual patient. This paper describes a surgical simulation system which will allow a physician or a medical student to practice surgery on a patient without ever entering an operating room. This could substantially lower the cost of medial training by providing an alternative to the use of cadavers. This project involves the use of volume data acquired by MRI which are converted to polygonal form using a corrected marching cubes algorithm. The data are then colored and a simulation of surface response based on springy structures is performed in real time. Control for the system is obtained through the use of an attached analog-to-digital unit. A remote electronic device is described which simulates an imaginary tool having features in common with both arthroscope and laparoscope.

  17. Arthroscopic treatment of the septic knee.

    PubMed

    Smith, M J

    1986-01-01

    Pyarthrosis of the knee was treated in 30 patients by arthroscopic decompression and lavage, coupled with parenteral and oral antibiotics. There were 21 men and nine women patients whose ages ranged from 6 months to 65 years of age. Twenty-two patients were considered to have a hematogenous origin as a cause of their pyarthrosis, and eight were caused by penetrating trauma. Twenty-eight of these patients had the onset of symptoms within 72 h prior to arthroscopy. Two adults had the onset of their symptoms 1 week prior to treatment. Follow-up has ranged from 6 months to 5 years. Staphylococcus aureus was cultured in 20 knees, Streptococcus pneumonia in three knees, Haemophilus influenzae in four knees, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in one knee. The average hospital stay among 22 children aged 12 years or younger was 3.50 days. The other eight patients had an average hospital stay of 9.50 days. Three adults with diabetes and other medical problems, such as renal failure, had an average hospital stay of 17.33 days. Excellent results were obtained in 28 (93.3%) of 30 patients and good results were obtained in two (6.7%) of 30 patients. There were no poor results or recurrences, and no cases of osteomyelitis occurred. This method of treatment markedly reduces the morbidity and hospital stay of patients with a septic knee.

  18. Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Indication and Technique.

    PubMed

    Gilotra, Mohit; O'Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder arthroscopy and rotator cuff repair techniques are frequently used by most practicing orthopaedic surgeons. A thorough patient history and physical examination can often confirm the presence of a rotator cuff tear, and imaging can be used to evaluate the extent of the injury. The indication for rotator cuff repair is a painful shoulder refractory to nonsurgical management. Arthroscopic techniques, including capsular and coracohumeral ligament releases to decrease tension on the repair, facilitate successful rotator cuff repair. Biomechanically, a double-row transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repair provides excellent results for medium-size rotator cuff tears. Larger, retracted rotator cuff tears may be better repaired with oblique convergence sutures and a medial single-row rotator cuff repair. The biology of healing, the preservation of blood supply, and the trephination of the bony healing bed are essential parts of all rotator cuff repair procedures. Protection of the rotator cuff repair with an abduction sling for 4 to 8 weeks postoperatively and the delay of active motion until early healing has occurred will improve outcomes.

  19. Arthroscopic release of first metatarsophalangeal arthrofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun H

    2006-08-01

    Various degrees of first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrofibrosis frequently occur in patients with bunion surgery or big toe trauma. In those patients with functional limitation who fail to respond to conservative treatment, surgery is indicated. We describe here an arthroscopic approach to first metatarsophalangeal release that is designed to improve functional results. Dorsomedial and dorsolateral portals are established at the medial and lateral sides of the extensor hallucis longus tendon. Through these 2 portals, the dorsal capsule is released and the medial and lateral joint gutters can be cleared up. The metatarsosesamoid compartment is approached through the straight medial portal and the working portal, the latter of which is located 4 cm proximal to the joint line between the abductor hallucis tendon and the medial head of the flexor hallucis brevis. Under visualization through the medial portal, adhesions around the sesamoid apparatus can be debrided with a shaver through the working portal. This completes the release of joint circumference and improves the motion range of the joint.

  20. Open Latarjet versus arthroscopic Latarjet: clinical results and cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Randelli, P; Fossati, C; Stoppani, C; Evola, F R; De Girolamo, L

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical results between open and arthroscopic Latarjet and perform a cost analysis of the two techniques. A systematic review of articles present in PubMed and MEDLINE was performed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Studies concerning post-operative outcomes following Latarjet procedures for chronic anterior shoulder instability were selected for analysis. The clinical and radiographic results as well as the costs of the open and arthroscopic techniques were evaluated. Twenty-three articles, describing a total of 1317 shoulders, met the inclusion criteria: 17 studies were related to open Latarjet, and 6 to the arthroscopic technique. Despite the heterogeneity of the evaluation scales, the clinical results seemed very satisfactory for both techniques. We detected a statistically significant difference in the percentage of bone graft healing in favour of the open technique (88.6 vs 77.6 %). Recurrent dislocation was more frequent following open surgery (3.3 % after open surgery vs 0.3 % after arthroscopy), but this finding was biased by the large difference in follow-up duration between the two techniques. The direct costs of the arthroscopic procedure were double in comparison to open surgery (€2335 vs €1040). A lack of data prevented evaluation of indirect costs and, therefore, a cost-effectiveness analysis. The open and arthroscopic Latarjet techniques showed excellent and comparable clinical results. However, the much higher direct costs of the arthroscopic procedure do not seem, at present, to be justified by a benefit to the patient. III.

  1. Biomechanical comparison of open and arthroscopic Latarjet procedures.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Borges, Johanna; Agneskirchner, Jens D; Bobrowitsch, Evgenij; Patzer, Thilo; Struck, Melena; Smith, Tomas; Wellmann, Mathias

    2013-04-01

    To biomechanically compare the effectiveness of the standard open and arthroscopic techniques of the Latarjet procedure to address a critical anterior glenoid defect in combination with a capsular insufficiency. Translation testing of 12 human cadaveric shoulder specimens was performed in a robot-assisted setup under 3 different conditions: (1) intact/vented shoulder joint, (2) combined anterior glenoid bone and capsular defect, and (3) open and arthroscopic Latarjet procedures. Testing was performed for each condition in 2 test positions: 60° of glenohumeral abduction with neutral rotation (ABD position) and 60° of abduction and external rotation (ABER position). Each position was tested with a passive humerus load of 30 N in the anterior, inferior, and anteroinferior directions. Translational movement of the humeral head was evaluated with and without the application of a 10-N load to the conjoint tendon (CJT). In the ABD position, translations after the open Latarjet procedure significantly differed from the arthroscopic technique in the anterior and anteroinferior directions when testing was performed with loading of the CJTs (CJT loading). Without CJT loading, the open Latarjet technique showed significantly lower translations in the anterior, inferior (P = .004), and anteroinferior (P = .001) testing directions in the ABD position. In the ABER position, the arthroscopic procedure showed no significant difference compared with the standard open procedure. We found a superior stabilization effect of the open Latarjet technique in the ABD position. The difference is ascribed to the anterior capsular repair, which was performed within the open technique and omitted during the arthroscopic procedure. The reduction of translation in a pure abduction position of the arm is more effectively performed with a conventional open Latarjet technique that includes a capsular repair. In combined ABER position, there was no difference found between the open and

  2. Effect of Mirrored Views on Endoscopic and Arthroscopic Skill Performance

    PubMed Central

    Benninger, Emanuel; Meier, Christoph; Wirth, Stefan; Koch, Peter Philipp; Meyer, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Background: Arthroscopic procedures may be technically challenging because of impaired vision, limited space, and the 2-dimensional vision of a 3-dimensional structure. Spatial orientation may get more complicated when the camera is pointing toward the surgeon. Hypothesis: Spatial orientation and arthroscopic performance may be improved by simply mirroring the image on the monitor in different configurations regarding the position and orientation of camera and instrument. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Thirty volunteers from an orthopaedic department were divided into 3 equal groups according to their arthroscopic experience (beginners, intermediates, seniors). All subjects were asked to perform a standardized task in a closed box mimicking an endoscopic space. The same task had to be performed in 4 different configurations regarding camera and instrument position and orientation (pointing toward or away from the subject) with either the original or mirrored image on the monitor. Efficiency (time per stick; TPS), precision (successful completion of the task), and difficulty rating using a visual analog scale (VAS) were analyzed. Results: Mirroring the image demonstrated no advantage over the original images in any configuration regarding TPS. Successful completion of the task was significantly better when the image was mirrored in the configuration with the camera pointing toward and the instrument away from the surgeon. There was a positive correlation between TPS and subjective VAS difficulty rating (r = 0.762, P = .000) and a negative correlation between the successful completion of the task and VAS (r = −0.515, P = .000). Conclusion: Mirroring the image may have a positive effect on arthroscopic performance of surgeons in certain configurations. A significantly improved performance was seen when the arthroscope was pointing toward and the grasping instrument pointing away from the subject. Mirroring the image may facilitate surgery in

  3. Complications Associated With Arthroscopic Labral Repair Implants: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Felder, Jerrod J; Elliott, Michael P; Mair, Scott D

    2015-07-01

    Arthroscopic labral repair in the shoulder has become commonplace in recent years. A variety of implants have evolved in parallel with arthroscopic techniques. Any orthopedic implant that is placed in close proximity to the joint has the potential to cause subsequent damage to the articular surface if it is left prominent or dislodges secondary to improper surgical technique. This article focuses on a series of implant-related complications of labral surgery and their subsequent management. Additionally, correct patient selection and surgical technique are discussed. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Arthroscopic Correction of a Supracondylar Malunion in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Steven M.; Sakamoto, Sara; Abernathie, Brenon L.; Hausman, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Malunions are a well-recognized complication of pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures. Results of corrective osteotomies vary, and complication rates have been reported to be as high as 40%. Considering the high rate of complications for malunion correction, we investigated the feasibility of arthroscopy. We present a technique for arthroscopic supracondylar osteotomy and percutaneous pinning. There are many advantages of an arthroscopic approach to malunion correction, including extension-type deformity correction, safe access to the anterior humerus, and minimal dissection and scarring; any intracapsular contracture can be addressed as well. Elbow arthroscopy appears to be a viable option in the pediatric orthopaedic surgeon's armamentarium. PMID:26258033

  5. Arthroscopic Release of Lateral Half of the Talocalcaneonavicular Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-12-01

    Arthrofibrosis of the talocalcaneonavicular joint can follow trauma or surgery of the joint. Arthroscopic release of the lateral half of the talocalcaneonavicular joint is indicated if the painful restriction of hindfoot inversion together with tenderness of the lateral side of the joint that is not controlled with conservative treatment. This procedure is contraindicated in other causes of painful stiffness including post-traumatic arthritis, osteonecrosis, and malunion. This technique includes arthroscopic release of the lateral side of the anterior subtalar joint and the talonavicular joint. This is a technically demanding technique and should be reserved for the experienced foot and ankle arthroscopists.

  6. Arthroscopic skills assessment and use of box model for training in arthroscopic surgery using Sawbones – “FAST” workstation

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Saumitra; Radi, Mohamed Abdel; Ramadan, Islam Karam-allah; Said, Hatem Galal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Arthroscopic skills training outside the operative room may decrease risks and errors by trainee surgeons. There is a need of simple objective method for evaluating proficiency and skill of arthroscopy trainees using simple bench model of arthroscopic simulator. The aim of this study is to correlate motor task performance to level of prior arthroscopic experience and establish benchmarks for training modules. Methods: Twenty orthopaedic surgeons performed a set of tasks to assess a) arthroscopic triangulation, b) navigation, c) object handling and d) meniscus trimming using SAWBONES “FAST” arthroscopy skills workstation. Time to completion and the errors were computed. The subjects were divided into four levels; “Novice”, “Beginner”, “Intermediate” and “Advanced” based on previous arthroscopy experience, for analyses of performance. Results: The task performance under transparent dome was not related to experience of the surgeon unlike opaque dome, highlighting the importance of hand-eye co-ordination required in arthroscopy. Median time to completion for each task improved as the level of experience increased and this was found to be statistically significant (p < .05) e.g. time for maze navigation (Novice – 166 s, Beginner – 135.5 s, Intermediate – 100 s, Advance – 97.5 s) and the similar results for all tasks. Majority (>85%) of subjects across all the levels reported improvement in performance with sequential tasks. Conclusion: Use of the arthroscope requires visuo-spatial coordination which is a skill that develops with practice. This simple box model can reliably differentiate the arthroscopic skills based on experience and can be used to monitor progression of skills of trainees in institutions. PMID:27801643

  7. Supersonic moist air jet impingements on flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Miah Md. Ashraful; Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2010-02-01

    Pronounced aeroacoustic resonances are exhibited in the flowfield where a jet emerges from an orifice or a nozzle and impinges on a solid surface. One instance where such resonances are produced is in a high speed jet impingement, such as in the space launch vehicle systems, jet-engine exhaust impingement, and in the short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft, etc. A highly unsteady flowfield leading to a drastic increase of noise level with very high dynamic pressure and thermal loads are noticed on nearby surfaces results dramatic lift loss, severe ground erosion and hot gas ingestion to the inlet in the jet engines. This highly unsteady behavior of the impinging jets is due to a feedback loop between the fluid and acoustic fields. In actual jet flow, the working gas may contain condensable gas such as steam or moist air. In these cases, the non-equilibrium condensation may occur at the region between nozzle exit and an object. The jet flow with non-equilibrium condensation may be quite different from that without condensation. Therefore, in this study, the effect of the non-equilibrium condensation of moist air on the axisymmetric under-expanded supersonic impinging jet on a vertical flat plate was investigated numerically.

  8. The Effect of Impingement on Transitional Behavior in Underexpanded Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2009-01-01

    An investigation into the development of flow unsteadiness in impinging axisymmetric underexpanded jets has been conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. The study has examined the effect of an impingement target placed at various distances and angles on transitional behavior of such jets. Two nozzles, with exit Mach numbers of 1.0 and 2.6, were used in this investigation. Planar laser-induced fluorescence of nitric oxide (NO PLIF) has been used to identify flow unsteadiness and to image transitional and turbulent flow features. Measurements of the location of the onset of various degrees of unsteady flow behavior have been made using these PLIF images. Both qualitative and quantitative comparisons are presented to demonstrate the observed effects of impingement and flow parameters on the process of the transition to turbulence. The presence of the impingement target was found to significantly shorten the distance to transition to turbulence by up to a factor of approximately three, with closer targets resulting in slightly shorter distance to transition and turbulence. The location at which the flow first exhibits unsteadiness was found to have a strong dependence on the presence and location of key flow structures. This paper presents quantitative results on transition criteria for free and impinging jets.

  9. Hypersonic turbulent expansion-corner flow with shock impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Kung-Ming; Lu, Frank K.

    1992-01-01

    Mean and fluctuating surface pressure data were obtained in a Mach 8, turbulent, cold flow past an expansion corner subjected to shock impingement. The expansion corner of 2.5 or 4.25 deg was located at 0.77 m (30.25 in.) from the leading edge of a shape-edged flat plate while an external shock, generated by either a 2- or 4-deg sharp wedge, impinged at the corner, or at one boundary layer thickness ahead or behind the corner. The mean pressure distribution was strongly influenced by the mutual interaction between the shock and the expansion. For example, the upstream influence decreased when the shock impinged downstream of the corner. Also, the unsteadiness of the interactions was characterized by an intermittent region and a local rms pressure peak near the upstream influence line. The peak rms pressure fluctuations increased with a larger overall interaction strength. Shock impingement downstream of the corner resulted in lower peaks and also in a shorter region of reduced fluctuation levels. These features may be exploited in inlet design by impinging the cowl shock downstream of an expansion corner instead of at the corner. In addition, a limited Pitot pressure survey showed a thinning of the boundary layer downstream of the corner.

  10. Shear layer characteristics of supersonic free and impinging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. B.; Kumar, R.

    2015-09-01

    The initial shear layer characteristics of a jet play an important role in the initiation and development of instabilities and hence radiated noise. Particle image velocimetry has been utilized to study the initial shear layer development of supersonic free and impinging jets. Microjet control employed to reduce flow unsteadiness and jet noise appears to affect the development of the shear layer, particularly near the nozzle exit. Velocity field measurements near the nozzle exit show that the initially thin, uncontrolled shear layer develops at a constant rate while microjet control is characterized by a rapid nonlinear thickening that asymptotes downstream. The shear layer linear growth rate with microjet control, in both the free and the impinging jet, is diminished. In addition, the thickened shear layer with control leads to a reduction in azimuthal vorticity for both free and impinging jets. Linear stability theory is used to compute unstable growth rates and convection velocities of the resultant velocity profiles. The results show that while the convection velocity is largely unaffected, the unstable growth rates are significantly reduced over all frequencies with microjet injection. For the case of the impinging jet, microjet control leads to near elimination of the impingement tones and an appreciable reduction in broadband levels. Similarly, for the free jet, significant reduction in overall sound pressure levels in the peak radiation direction is observed.

  11. Thermal-hydraulic performance of convective boiling jet array impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, R.; De Brún, C.; Kempers, R.; Lupoi, R.; Robinson, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    Jet impingement boiling is investigated with regard to heat transfer and pressure drop performance using a novel laser sintered 3D printed jet impingement manifold design. Water was the working fluid at atmospheric pressure with inlet subcooling of 7oC. The convective boiling performance of the impinging jet system was investigated for a flat copper target surface for 2700≤Re≤5400. The results indicate that the heat transfer performance of the impinging jet is independent of Reynolds number for fully developed boiling. Also, the investigation of nozzle to plate spacing shows that low spacing delays the onset of nucleate boiling causing a superheat overshoot that is not observed with larger gaps. However, no sensitivity to the gap spacing was measured once boiling was fully developed. The assessment of the pressure drop performance showed that the design effectively transfers heat with low pumping power requirements. In particular, owing to the insensitivity of the heat transfer to flow rate during fully developed boiling, the coefficient of performance of jet impingement boiling in the fully developed boiling regime deteriorates with increased flow rate due to the increase in pumping power flux.

  12. Synergistic degradation of chitosan by impinging stream and jet cavitation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongchun; Wang, Pengfei; Yuan, Yuan; Ren, Xian'e; Yang, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Chitosan degradation was investigated using a combination of jet cavitation and impinging stream. Different operating parameters such as the initial concentration (1-5 g L(-1)), initial pH (3.2-4.8), solution temperature (30, 40, 50, 60, and 70°C), inlet pressure (0.1-0.45 MPa), and treatment time (0-120 min) were optimized to achieve the maximum degradation of chitosan. After the optimization of jet cavitation parameters, chitosan degradation was carried out using venturi tubes of different structures (the fluidic generator). The efficiency of the jet cavitation degradation was improved significantly by combining with impinging stream. The structures of the degradation products were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. This study has conclusively established that a combination of jet cavitation and impinging stream can be effectively used for the complete degradation of chitosan.

  13. The jet impingement phase of molten core-concrete interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1986-01-01

    Scoping calculations have been carried out demonstrating that a significant and abrupt reduction in the corium temperature may be realized when molten corium drains as a jet from a localized breach in the RPV lower head to impinge upon the concrete basemat. The temperature decrease may range from a value of approx.170 K (approx.140 K) for limestone (basaltic) aggregate concrete to a value approaching the initial corium superheat depending upon whether the forced convection impingement heat flux is assumed to be controlled by either thermal conduction across a slag film layer or the temperature boundary condition represented by a corium crust. The magnitude of the temperature reduction remains significant as the initial corium temperature, impinging corium mass, and initial localized breach size are varied over their range of potential values.

  14. Apollo Video Photogrammetry Estimation of Plume Impingement Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher; Lane, John; Metzger, Philip; Clements, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Each of the six Apollo mission landers touched down at unique sites on the lunar surface. Aside from the Apollo 12 landing site located 180 meters from the Surveyor III lander, plume impingement effects on ground hardware during the landings were largely not an issue. The Constellation Project's planned return to the moon requires numerous landings at the same site. Since the top few centimeters are loosely packed regolith, plume impingement from the lander ejects the granular material at high velocities. With high vacuum conditions on the moon (10 (exp -14) to 10 (epx -12) torr), motion of all particles is completely ballistic. Estimates from damage to the Surveyor III show that the ejected regolith particles to be anywhere 400 m/s to 2500 m/s. It is imperative to understand the physics of plume impingement to safely design landing sites for the Constellation Program.

  15. The Factors Affecting Pain Pattern after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Wan; Kim, Dong-Gyun

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated the factors that affect pain pattern after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Methods From June 2009 to October 2010, 210 patients underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair operations. Of them, 84 patients were enrolled as subjects of the present study. The evaluation of postoperative pain was conducted by visual analog scale (VAS) scores during postoperative outpatient interviews at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months. The factors that were thought to affect postoperative pain were evaluated by dividing into three categories: preoperative, operative, and postoperative. Results Pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery showed a strictly decreasing pain pattern. In single analysis and multiple regression tests for factors influencing the strictly decreasing pain pattern, initial VAS and pain onset were shown to be statistically significant factors (p = 0.012, 0.012, 0.044 and 0.028, respectively). With regard to the factors influencing lower than average intensity pain pattern for each period, the stiffness of internal rotation at 3 months postoperatively was shown to be a statistically significant factor in single and multiple regression tests (p = 0.017 and p = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions High initial VAS scores and the acute onset of pain affected the strictly decreasing postoperative pain pattern. Additionally, stiffness of internal rotation at postoperative 3 months affected the higher than average intensity pain pattern for each period after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PMID:25436062

  16. Arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability in professional athletes.

    PubMed

    Pantalone, Andrea; Vanni, Daniele; Guelfi, Matteo; Di Mauro, Michele; Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic shoulder instability is a common disease, especially in sportsmen. If inadequately or late treated, it may be responsible for an articular biomechanics alteration, with serious problems. This is much more obvious for professionals athletes, because corporate and market needs force them to a premature return to sport. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate if arthroscopic approach may be better than the open one and allowing a shoulder function rapid recovery, with fast return to sport. From January 2003 to January 2014, 46 professional athletes underwent surgical treatment for post traumatic shoulder instability. Two groups were made: 25 athletes treated arthroscopically and 21 treated with open approach. Patients were followed up from 36 to 92 months, according to Rowe Score for Instability and VAS scoring system. Patients in the open group returned later than the first one to sport. Moreover, pain in postoperative period and during rehabilitation, was lower in the arthroscopic group. There was only one recurrence in the open group. Arthroscopic surgical approach appears to be excellent in shoulder instability management, reducing recovery time, allowing a faster return to sport, with less pain, if compared with open surgery. III, a case control-study.

  17. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF OSTEOCHONDRAL LESIONS OF THE TALUS

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Mariana Korbage; de Cillo, Mario Sergio Paulillo; Bittar, Cinthia Kelly; Zabeu, José Luis Amin; Cezar, Caroliny Nociti Moreira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess pain and function of the ankle in patients with injuries up to 1.5 cm diameter by the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score after arthroscopic treatment. Methods: The AOFAS scale was applied before and after arthroscopy, as well as the degree of subjective satisfaction of ambulatory patients. Patients with type I osteochondral injuries, acute trauma, using plaster, presenting lesions in other joints of the lower limbs and cognitive impairment that would prevent the application of the satisfaction questionnaire were excluded from the study. Statistical analysis was performed using unpaired t test with Welch correction, Mann Whitney test, and ANOVA, with Kruskal Wallis test and Dun test, considering p value lower than 0.05. Results: There was an increased AOFAS scores after arthroscopic treatment in 52 (94.5%) patients. The mean values of AOFAS score in 55 patients was 77.32 ± 6.67 points preoperative and 93.10± 8.24 points postoperative, with a mean variation of 15.8 points, p<0.001. Patients with stage II, III and IV injuries showed an increased AOFAS scores after arthroscopic treatment, p<0.001. No difference was found between medial and lateral injuries, p >0.05. Conclusion: Patients with stage II, III or IV osteochondral injuries of the talus of up to 1.5 cm diameter, whether medial or lateral, showed a significant improvement after arthroscopic treatment. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Study. PMID:26997911

  18. Arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability in professional athletes

    PubMed Central

    Pantalone, Andrea; Vanni, Daniele; Guelfi, Matteo; Di Mauro, Michele; Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Post-traumatic shoulder instability is a common disease, especially in sportsmen. If inadequately or late treated, it may be responsible for an articular biomechanics alteration, with serious problems. This is much more obvious for professionals athletes, because corporate and market needs force them to a premature return to sport. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate if arthroscopic approach may be better than the open one and allowing a shoulder function rapid recovery, with fast return to sport. Materials and methods From January 2003 to January 2014, 46 professional athletes underwent surgical treatment for post traumatic shoulder instability. Two groups were made: 25 athletes treated arthroscopically and 21 treated with open approach. Patients were followed up from 36 to 92 months, according to Rowe Score for Instability and VAS scoring system. Results Patients in the open group returned later than the first one to sport. Moreover, pain in postoperative period and during rehabilitation, was lower in the arthroscopic group. There was only one recurrence in the open group. Conclusions Arthroscopic surgical approach appears to be excellent in shoulder instability management, reducing recovery time, allowing a faster return to sport, with less pain, if compared with open surgery. Level of Evidence III, a case control-study. PMID:28217564

  19. Arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Zvijac, J E; Lau, A C; Hechtman, K S; Uribe, J W; Tjin-A-Tsoi, E W

    1999-09-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare disease, with multiple forms, anatomic sites, and treatment methods having been described. During a 10-year period, 14 patients, 7 male and 7 female, average age 35 years (range, 19 to 64 years) were treated for PVNS with arthroscopic partial or total synovectomy. Average follow-up was 42 months (range, 8 to 83 months). Twelve patients had diffuse and 2 had a localized form. Results were assessed subjectively, clinically, and radiographically, and were rated as excellent, good, fair, or poor. There were no complications and 10 patients (72%) were rated as excellent or good, 2 patients (14%) as fair, and 2 patients (14%) as poor. The recurrence rate was 14% and occurred in the group with diffuse PVNS. Radiographs did not show any bone erosion. The most widely accepted treatment for PVNS is synovectomy, and both open and arthroscopic synovectomy have been advocated as treatment. Advantages of arthroscopic treatment include accurate evaluation of the knee joint, treatment of other pathology, more rapid rehabilitation, decreased risk of joint stiffness, and less pain. In our experience, it appears that arthroscopic synovectomy is an effective method of treatment of this disorder.

  20. Effects of a synovial fluid substitute on early recovery after arthroscopic subacromial decompression of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Marcheggiani Muccioli, G M; Wykes, P; Hundle, B; Grassi, A; Roatti, G; Funk, L

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether the use of a synovial fluid substitute (Viscoseal) after arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) of the shoulder was safe (primary outcome) and effective in reducing the postsurgical pain on the day of surgery and the time from surgery to discharge (secondary outcomes), compared with patients undergoing standard ASD alone. Forty-six patients with primary isolated shoulder subacromial impingement were randomly assigned to either undergo SAD alone (control group: n = 21) or to receive 10 ml Viscoseal into the subacromial space at the end of the procedure (treatment group: n = 25). No adverse events were reported in either group. All clinical scores improved significantly in each group from preoperative to 12-week follow-up (p < 0.01). The Viscoseal group experienced significantly (p = 0.001) less severe pain 4 h after the surgery {mean 54.0 ± 43.1, median 50 [interquartile range (IQR) 0-100]} and shorter time from surgery to discharge [mean 5.2 ± 1.4, median 5 (IQR 4-6)] than the control group [mean 102.4 ± 40.2, median 100 (IQR 50-150) and mean 11.0 ± 5.3, median 12 (IQR 6-16), respectively]. The Viscoseal group also required less analgesia postoperatively than the control group in the first 8 h: 24% of the Viscoseal required no analgesia, while all patients in the control group required analgesia; 24% of the control group required opiates compared with 4% in the Viscoseal group. Viscoseal was safe and well tolerated after shoulder arthroscopy. It provided excellent pain relief and a faster discharge time after ASD of the shoulder. The use of Viscoseal should be investigated in larger randomized controlled trials and for other shoulder arthroscopy procedures. Level II, Pilot Prospective Comparative Study.

  1. Impingement and Dislocation in Total HIP Arthroplasty: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D; Elkins, Jacob M; Pedersen, Douglas R; Callaghan, John J

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary total hip arthroplasty, instability has been a complication in approximately 2% to 5% of primary surgeries and 5% to 10% of revisions. Due to the reduction in the incidence of wear-induced osteolysis that has been achieved over the last decade, instability now stands as the single most common reason for revision surgery. Moreover, even without frank dislocation, impingement and subluxation are implicated in a set of new concerns arising with advanced bearings, associated with the relatively unforgiving nature of many of those designs. Against that backdrop, the biomechanical factors responsible for impingement, subluxation, and dislocation remain under-investigated relative to their burden of morbidity. This manuscript outlines a 15-year program of laboratory and clinical research undertaken to improve the scientific basis for understanding total hip impingement and dislocation. The broad theme has been to systematically evaluate the role of surgical factors, implant design factors, and patient factors in predisposing total hip constructs to impinge, sublux, and/or dislocate. Because this class of adverse biomechanical events had not lent itself well to study with existing approaches, it was necessary to develop (and validate) a series of new research methodologies, relying heavily on advanced finite element formulations. Specific areas of focus have included identifying the biomechanical challenges posed by dislocation-prone patient activities, quantifying design parameter effects and component surgical positioning effects for conventional metal-on-polyethylene implant constructs, and the impingement/dislocation behavior of non-conventional constructs, quantifying the stabilizing role of the hip capsule (and of surgical repairs of capsule defects), and systematically studying impingement and edge loading of hard-on-hard bearings, fracture of ceramic liners, confounding effects of patient obesity, and subluxation-mediated worsening of third body

  2. Polymer-induced turbulence modifications in an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Alvarez, R.; Christensen, K. T.

    2012-05-01

    This effort explores the impact of dilute polymer solutions on the turbulence characteristics in a submerged liquid impinging-jet configuration. Turbulent impinging jets are commonly used in technological applications such as drying, scouring, cooling, or heating due to an enhancement in transport characteristics in the impingement region under certain nozzle-to-wall configurations. Previous efforts have identified significant turbulence modifications in the presence of dilute concentrations of polymer in both bounded and unbounded flows, though the former has received considerably more attention. To this end, particle-image velocimetry measurements were taken for an axisymmetric turbulent impinging jet with a nozzle-to-wall distance H/ D = 6.8 and nominal Reynolds number of 26,000. Measurements were performed for both plain water and dilute polymer solutions of polyethylene oxide at concentrations of 50 and 100 ppm. The mean and turbulence characteristics of these three flows are contrasted and it is observed that the two polymer solutions modify both the mean and turbulent characteristics of the jet in all three regions of interest (the free-jet, impingement, and wall-jet regions). Of interest, the 50 ppm case yielded a slight suppression of the turbulence in the free-jet region accompanied by a longer axial length of the potential core compared to the case of plain water. In contrast, the 100 ppm case exhibits clear enhancement of the turbulence in the free-jet region and a shortening of the potential core length. The effect of polymer was opposite in the impingement and wall-jet regions wherein the turbulence was slightly suppressed in the 100 ppm case in a manner consistent with the onset of the Toms effect in this wall-bounded region of the flow.

  3. Assessing Arthroscopic Skills Using Wireless Elbow-Worn Motion Sensors.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Georgina S J; Guyver, Paul; Strickland, Louise; Alvand, Abtin; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Hargrove, Caroline; Lo, Benny P L; Rees, Jonathan L

    2015-07-01

    Assessment of surgical skill is a critical component of surgical training. Approaches to assessment remain predominantly subjective, although more objective measures such as Global Rating Scales are in use. This study aimed to validate the use of elbow-worn, wireless, miniaturized motion sensors to assess the technical skill of trainees performing arthroscopic procedures in a simulated environment. Thirty participants were divided into three groups on the basis of their surgical experience: novices (n = 15), intermediates (n = 10), and experts (n = 5). All participants performed three standardized tasks on an arthroscopic virtual reality simulator while wearing wireless wrist and elbow motion sensors. Video output was recorded and a validated Global Rating Scale was used to assess performance; dexterity metrics were recorded from the simulator. Finally, live motion data were recorded via Bluetooth from the wireless wrist and elbow motion sensors and custom algorithms produced an arthroscopic performance score. Construct validity was demonstrated for all tasks, with Global Rating Scale scores and virtual reality output metrics showing significant differences between novices, intermediates, and experts (p < 0.001). The correlation of the virtual reality path length to the number of hand movements calculated from the wireless sensors was very high (p < 0.001). A comparison of the arthroscopic performance score levels with virtual reality output metrics also showed highly significant differences (p < 0.01). Comparisons of the arthroscopic performance score levels with the Global Rating Scale scores showed strong and highly significant correlations (p < 0.001) for both sensor locations, but those of the elbow-worn sensors were stronger and more significant (p < 0.001) than those of the wrist-worn sensors. A new wireless assessment of surgical performance system for objective assessment of surgical skills has proven valid for assessing arthroscopic skills. The elbow

  4. Slow electrons impinging on dielectric solids. I. Basic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Dapor, M.; Miotello, A.

    1997-07-01

    The basic aspects related to the scattering processes, useful for both the analytical and Monte Carlo calculation of backscattering and the depth distribution of low-energy ({ital E}{sub 0}{le}10 keV) electrons impinging on solid targets, are described. After a careful analysis of the scattering mechanisms, selected new results regarding elastic and inelastic scattering of low-energy electrons impinging on SiO{sub 2} are reported. Comparison with experimental data and earlier theoretical results show a general good agreement. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Extremely high heat fluxes beneath impinging liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Lienhard, J. H., V.

    1993-05-01

    Measurements of jet-impingement heat fluxes up to 400 MW/sq m were obtained using a specially designed experimental arrangement where a thin metal plate was heated from one side with a plasma arc and cooled from the other side with an unsubmerged impinging water jet produced by a 34 MPa piston pump supplying a large cylindrical plenum. The results of this study, where heating was confined to the stagnation region, show no evidence of a critical heat flux, even up to the maximum power applied. The large fluxes were limited only by wall failure and the power of the heating source, and not by liquid-side thermal resistance.

  6. Fundamental studies of impingement cooling thermal boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, M. G.; Ireland, P. T.; Wang, Z.; Jones, T. V.; Pearce, W. J.

    1993-02-01

    Measurements were made of the local heat transfer at the surface of a flat plate underneath a confined impinging jet. Thermochromic liquid crystals were used to measure the surface temperature of a uniformly heated plate cooled by an impinging jet. The temperature of the wall through which the jet passes was controlled, and experiments were performed to measure the two heat transfer coefficients which arise from this three temperature problem. The effect of Reynolds number and plate to jet spacing on heat transfer was investigated. The heat transfer results are discussed in terms of the interpreted flow field.

  7. Experimental Study of Supercooled Large Droplet Impingement Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, M.; Rachman, A.; Wong, S. C.; Hung, K. E.; Vu, G. T.

    2003-01-01

    Typically, ice accretion results from small supercooled droplets (droplets cooled below freezing), usually 5 to 50 microns in diameter, which can freeze upon impact with an aircraft surface. Recently, ice accretions resulting from supercooled large droplet (SLD) conditions have become a safety concern. Current ice accretion codes have been extensively tested for Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 25, Appendix C icing conditions but have not been validated for SLD icing conditions. This report presents experimental methods for investigating large droplet impingement dynamics and for obtaining small and large water droplet impingement data.

  8. Cold plate with combined inclined impingement and ribbed channels

    DOEpatents

    Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-12-22

    Heat transfer devices and methods for making the same that include a first enclosure having at least one inlet port; a second enclosure having a bottom plate and one or more dividing walls to establish channels, at least one internal surface of each channel having rib structures to create turbulence in a fluid flow; and a jet plate connecting the first enclosure and the second enclosure having impinging jets that convey fluid from the first enclosure to the channels, said impinging jets being set at an angular deviation from normal to cause local acceleration of fluid and to increase a local heat transfer rate.

  9. Experimental Study of Supercooled Large Droplet Impingement Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, M.; Rachman, A.; Wong, S. C.; Hung, K. E.; Vu, G. T.

    2003-01-01

    Typically, ice accretion results from small supercooled droplets (droplets cooled below freezing), usually 5 to 50 microns in diameter, which can freeze upon impact with an aircraft surface. Recently, ice accretions resulting from supercooled large droplet (SLD) conditions have become a safety concern. Current ice accretion codes have been extensively tested for Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 25, Appendix C icing conditions but have not been validated for SLD icing conditions. This report presents experimental methods for investigating large droplet impingement dynamics and for obtaining small and large water droplet impingement data.

  10. Osteoid osteoma of the glenoid: Arthroscopic treatment.

    PubMed

    Malavolta, E A; Assunção, J H; Rebolledo, D C S; Gracitelli, M E C; Correia, L F M; Ferreira Neto, A A; de Camargo, O P

    2015-12-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a benign tumor that is rarely found in the scapula. We report a clinical case involving a 36-year-old female patient who suffered from progressive pain in her right shoulder for 1 year. This patient was initially diagnosed with impingement syndrome and was treated unsuccessfully with medication and physical therapy for approximately 2 months. Based on imaging exams, a juxta-articular osteoid osteoma of the glenoid was identified. The patient underwent a shoulder arthroscopy that included tumor removal and treatment of the resulting chondral lesion. At 6-, 12- and 36-month assessments, the patient was asymptomatic, with a normal range of motion and experienced a pain intensity corresponding to 0 points on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and 35 points on the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Scale. A postoperative MRI indicated the absence of any residual tumor tissue or inflammatory signs. We believe that the approach described in this paper allows juxta-articular osteoid osteomas to be accessed in a minimally invasive manner and permits not only adequate resection but also the treatment of chondral lesions that could remain after tumor resection.

  11. Fundamental arthroscopic skill differentiation with virtual reality simulation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Kelsey; Pedowitz, Robert

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use and validity of virtual reality modules as part of the educational approach to mastering arthroscopy in a safe environment by assessing the ability to distinguish between experience levels. Additionally, the study aimed to evaluate whether experts have greater ambidexterity than do novices. Three virtual reality modules (Swemac/Augmented Reality Systems, Linkoping, Sweden) were created to test fundamental arthroscopic skills. Thirty participants-10 experts consisting of faculty, 10 intermediate participants consisting of orthopaedic residents, and 10 novices consisting of medical students-performed each exercise. Steady and Telescope was designed to train centering and image stability. Steady and Probe was designed to train basic triangulation. Track and Moving Target was designed to train coordinated motions of arthroscope and probe. Metrics reflecting speed, accuracy, and efficiency of motion were used to measure construct validity. Steady and Probe and Track a Moving Target both exhibited construct validity, with better performance by experts and intermediate participants than by novices (P < .05), whereas Steady and Telescope did not show validity. There was an overall trend toward better ambidexterity as a function of greater surgical experience, with experts consistently more proficient than novices throughout all 3 modules. This study represents a new way to assess basic arthroscopy skills using virtual reality modules developed through task deconstruction. Participants with the most arthroscopic experience performed better and were more consistent than novices on all 3 virtual reality modules. Greater arthroscopic experience correlates with more symmetry of ambidextrous performance. However, further adjustment of the modules may better simulate fundamental arthroscopic skills and discriminate between experience levels. Arthroscopy training is a critical element of orthopaedic surgery resident training

  12. Graft position and fusion rate following arthroscopic Latarjet.

    PubMed

    Casabianca, Laurent; Gerometta, Antoine; Massein, Audrey; Khiami, Frederic; Rousseau, Romain; Hardy, Alexandre; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues; Loriaut, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure is recently becoming an increasingly popular technique. Nevertheless, position and fusion of the autograft had not been well studied yet. The purpose of this study was to assess the positioning of the coracoid graft and the fusion rate on CT scan in the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. The study design was a prospective series of 19 consecutive patients who received arthroscopic Latarjet procedure. Radiological assessment on CT scan performed 3 months post-operatively included an analysis of the fusion and the position of the coracoid bone graft using a validated method. 02:30-04:20 was considered an ideal positioning in the sagittal view. In the axial view, the positioning was considered as flush, congruent, medial, too medial, or lateral. The median age of patients was 27.6 (±6.9). Mean operative time was of 161 min ±34.8. The fusion rate was of 78 %. Coracoid grafts were positioned 01:52 h (56° ± 14°) to 4:04 h (122° ± 12.5°). In the axial view, 32 % of the grafts positioning were considered as flush, 38 % as congruent, 30 % as medial, and 6 % too medial. No lateral position was noted. Two complications occurred, one graft fracture during screwing requiring opening conversion and an early case of osteolysis in a medial-positioned graft. The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure is a technically challenging technique that provides satisfactory fusion rate and graft positioning with a low complication rate. The clinical importance of this study lies in the observation that it is the first study to evaluate the position of the coracoid bone graft in arthroscopic Latarjet according to a detailed and validated method. IV.

  13. Systematic Review of Biceps Tenodesis: Arthroscopic Versus Open.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Vineet Thomas; Tan, Bryan H M; Kumar, V Prem

    2016-02-01

    We present a systematic review of the recent literature regarding the use of arthroscopic and open methods of tenodesis for lesions of the long head of the biceps brachii and present an analysis of the subjective and objective outcomes after these 2 procedures. PubMed was carefully reviewed for suitable articles relating to biceps tenodesis, both open and arthroscopic. We included studies reporting on the clinical outcomes of these 2 procedures that were of Level I to IV evidence and were published in the English language. The primary clinical outcomes for each study were determined, normalized, and reported as the percentage of good or excellent results versus poor results based on the outcome scores and criteria laid out by the authors in each of the studies. The exclusion criteria included studies in which biceps tenodesis was performed in patients with concomitant rotator cuff repairs, nonhuman studies, and biomechanical studies. A total of 16 studies met our inclusion criteria. Among all studies, a total of 205 arthroscopic tenodesis procedures and a total of 271 open tenodesis procedures were performed. Among the 271 open tenodesis patients, 98% had a good or excellent outcome, with a poor outcome in 5 patients (2%). Among the 205 patients who underwent arthroscopic tenodesis, 98% had a good or excellent outcome, with a poor outcome in 5 patients (2%). Both open and arthroscopic biceps tenodesis provided satisfactory outcomes in most patients, and there were no identifiable differences in this review. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF PIGMENTED VILLONODULAR SYNOVITIS OF ANKLE].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Li, Jian; Li, Qi

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the ankle. Twelve patients who were initially diagnosed as having PVNS of the ankle were treated between January 2005 and May 2012. There were 6 males and 6 females, aged 20-50 years (mean, 35.4 years). Disease duration ranged from 6 months to 12 years (median, 3.6 years). One case of recurrence was included. The preoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score was 55.5 ± 7.6. According to degree and range of the PVNS lesions, 4 cases of local PVNS were treated with arthroscopic debridement, and 8 cases of diffuse PVNS were treated with arthroscopically assisted arthrotomy; and local radiotherapy was given in all patients after operation. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients. The mean follow-up time was 2.8 years (range, 1-6 years). At 12 months after operation, no obvious pain, swelling, and limited range of motion of the ankle were observed. The AOFAS score was increased to 84.3 ± 3.4 at 12 months, and it was significantly higher than that at preoperation (P < 0.05) and at 3 months after operation (82.8 ± 3.8) (P < 0.05). There was no recurrence during follow-up. Arthroscopic arthrotomy combined with postoperative radiotherapy are recommended for PVNS of the ankle according to the PVNS lesion degree and range. And arthroscopically assisted surgery has many advantages of less traumas and hemorrhage, fast recovery, and less complications.

  15. Long Term Outcomes of Arthroscopic Shoulder Instability Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Karataglis, D.; Agathangelidis, F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anterior shoulder instability has been successfully managed arthroscopically over the past two decades with refined “anatomic” reconstruction procedures involving the use of anchors for the repositioning and re-tensioning of the antero-inferior capsuloligamentous complex, in an effort to recreate its “bumper effect”. Methods: Research and online content related to arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability was reviewed and their results compared. Results: The short- and mid-term results of this technique have been very satisfactory. The greatest number of recent reports suggests that long-term results (>5 years follow-up) remain rather satisfactory, especially in the absence of significant glenoid bone loss (>20-25%). In these studies recurrent instability, in the form of either dislocation or subluxation, ranges from 5.1 to over 20%, clinical scores, more than 5 years after the index procedure, remain good or excellent in >80% of patient population as do patient satisfaction and return to previous level of activities. As regards arthroscopic non-anatomic bony procedures (Latarjet or Bristow procedures) performed in revision cases or in the presence of >20-25% bone loss of the anteroinferior aspect of the glenoid, recent reports suggest that their long-term results are very satisfactory both in terms of re-dislocation rates and patient satisfaction. Conclusion: It appears that even “lege artis” performance of arthroscopic reconstruction decelerates but does not obliterate the degenerative procedure of dislocation arthropathy. The presence and grade of arthritic changes correlate with the number of dislocations sustained prior to the arthroscopic intervention, the number of anchors used and the age at initial dislocation and surgery. However, the clinical significance of radiologically evident dislocation arthropathy is debatable. PMID:28400881

  16. First validation of the PASSPORT training environment for arthroscopic skills.

    PubMed

    Tuijthof, Gabriëlle J M; van Sterkenburg, Maayke N; Sierevelt, Inger N; van Oldenrijk, Jakob; Van Dijk, C Niek; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J

    2010-02-01

    The demand for high quality care is in contrast to reduced training time for residents to develop arthroscopic skills. Thereto, simulators are introduced to train skills away from the operating room. In our clinic, a physical simulation environment to Practice Arthroscopic Surgical Skills for Perfect Operative Real-life Treatment (PASSPORT) is being developed. The PASSPORT concept consists of maintaining the normal arthroscopic equipment, replacing the human knee joint by a phantom, and integrating registration devices to provide performance feedback. The first prototype of the knee phantom allows inspection, treatment of menisci, irrigation, and limb stressing. PASSPORT was evaluated for face and construct validity. Construct validity was assessed by measuring the performance of two groups with different levels of arthroscopic experience (20 surgeons and 8 residents). Participants performed a navigation task five times on PASSPORT. Task times were recorded. Face validity was assessed by completion of a short questionnaire on the participants' impressions and comments for improvements. Construct validity was demonstrated as the surgeons (median task time 19.7 s [8.0-37.6]) were more efficient than the residents (55.2 s [27.9-96.6]) in task completion for each repetition (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.05). The prototype of the knee phantom sufficiently imitated limb outer appearance (79%), portal resistance (82%), and arthroscopic view (81%). Improvements are required for the stressing device and the material of cruciate ligaments. Our physical simulation environment (PASSPORT) demonstrates its potential to evolve as a training modality. In future, automated performance feedback is aimed for.

  17. Complications Following Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Tear Repair

    PubMed Central

    Audigé, Laurent; Blum, Raphael; Müller, Andreas M.; Flury, Matthias; Durchholz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Valid comparison of outcomes after surgical procedures requires consensus on which instruments and parameters should be used, including the recording and evaluation of surgical complications. An international standard outlining the terminology and definitions of surgical complications in orthopaedics is lacking. Purpose This study systematically reviewed the literature for terms and definitions related to the occurrence of negative events or complications after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) with specific focus on shoulder stiffness. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases were searched for reviews, clinical studies, and case reports of complications associated with ARCR. Reference lists of selected articles were also screened. The terminology of complications and their definitions were extracted from all relevant original articles by a single reviewer and verified by a second reviewer. Definitions of shoulder stiffness or equivalent terms were tabulated. Results Of 654 references published after 2007 and obtained from the search, 233 full-text papers (44 reviews, 155 studies, 31 case reports, and 3 surgical technique presentations) were reviewed. Twenty-two additional references cited for a definition were checked. One report defined the term surgical complication. There were 242 different terms used to describe local events and 64 to describe nonlocal events. Furthermore, 16 definitions of terms such as frozen shoulder, shoulder stiffness, or stiff painful shoulder were identified. Diagnosis criteria for shoulder stiffness differed widely; 12 various definitions for restriction in range of motion were noted. One definition included a gradation of stiffness severity, whereas another considered the patient’s subjective assessment of motion. Conclusion The literature does not consistently report on complications after ARCR, making valid comparison of the incidence of

  18. Arthroscopic classification of posterior labrum glenoid insertion.

    PubMed

    Nourissat, G; Radier, C; Aim, F; Lacoste, S

    2014-04-01

    We performed a prospective arthroscopic study to explore the variability of the posterior labrum glenoid insertion. We aimed to classify the insertions and to explore whether these insertions can be identified by pre-operative arthro-CT scan. From January to December 2011, 86 patients were prospectively included in the current study. During arthroscopy, anterior labrum was evaluated and posterior labrum was assessed in 3 different locations: superior, medial, and inferior. For each segment, the labrum was considered normally inserted (directly to the glenoid cartilage), medialized (inserted at the posterior part of the glenoid bone, without direct contact with the cartilage), torn (macroscopic degenerative changes, tears, fragments) or absent (agenesis). Imaging was analyzed segment by segment by an experienced osteoarticular radiologist, using the same classification. Four types of posterior labrum insertions were identified. Type 1, 60% of the cases, corresponded to a posterior labrum totally inserted in the glenoid, with direct contact with the cartilage. Type 2, 20% of the cases, represented medialized insertion of the superior segment. Type 3, 15% of the cases, represented an associated medialization of the superior and medial segment of the posterior labrum. Type 4 is a medialized insertion of the all-posterior labrum. Fifty-six shoulders were used for arthro-CT and arthroscopy correlation: for the superior segment (n=22/56), the sensitivity of arthro-CT to identify an abnormal insertion when the labrum is medialized was 68.18%, specificity 70.59%, positive predictive value (PPV) 60%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 77.42%. For the medial segment (n=16/56), the sensitivity of arthro-CT to identify an abnormal insertion when the labrum is medialized was 81.25%, specificity 57.50%, PPV 43.33% and NPV 88.46%. For the inferior segment (n=5/56), the sensitivity was 100%, specificity 47.60%, PPV 15.63% and NPV 100%. The current study points out the high

  19. Arthroscopic proximal versus open subpectoral biceps tenodesis with arthroscopic repair of small- or medium-sized rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Yi, Young; Lee, Jong-Myoung; Kwon, Seok Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Woo

    2016-12-01

    The study was aimed to compare arthroscopic proximal biceps tenodesis and open subpectoral biceps tenodesis in repair of small or medium rotator cuff tears. Eighty-five patients underwent biceps tenodesis with arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear, and 66 patients were followed for median of 26.8 (18-42) months with ultrasonography were reviewed. The arthroscopic biceps tenodesis group included 34 cases, and the open subpectoral biceps group included 32 cases. Patients were evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), and constant scores. Rotator cuff repair and fixation of the biceps tendon were assessed by ultrasonography. Fixation failure and degree of deformity were evaluated by the pain in the bicipital groove and biceps apex distance (BAD). VAS score and tenderness at the bicipital groove decreased significantly in the open subpectoral group at 3 months postoperative. In both groups, the range of motion, ASES score, and constant score increased significantly (P < 0.05). Rotator cuff retear occurred in three cases (8.8 %) in the arthroscopic group and two cases in the open subpectoral group (6.2 %). There was no significant difference in BAD between the two groups. There was no difference between open subpectoral tenodesis and arthroscopic proximal tenodesis at the time of the final follow-up; however, open subpectoral tenodesis showed encouraging results at 3-month follow-up. This early result of subpectoral tenodesis was related to removing most part of biceps tendinitis and using intra-bicipital groove tenodesis technique. III.

  20. Noise generated by impingement of a jet upon a large flat board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W. A.; Miles, J. H.; Dorsch, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Data were obtained on the noise generated by an air jet impinging on a large flat board. The board was large enough so that the flow leaving the edges of the board generated no significant noise. The impingement angle, nozzle shape and size, jet velocity, and the distance from the nozzle to the board were varied in the experiment. Far-field noise data are presented. The nozzle-alone noise contribution to the total noise was generally small and was subtracted from the total, leaving the impingement-only noise. The impingement-only noise was adequately correlated by eighth power of the peak impingement velocity and first power of the impingement area. The spectral data were correlated by a Strouhal number based on the peak impingement velocity and a characteristic impingement diameter.

  1. A battery-powered slide impinger for ultra-low volume droplet sampling.

    PubMed

    Wilhide, J D; Daniel, P

    1995-12-01

    A variation of the battery-powered slide impinger is described. The impinger uses a commercially available cordless screwdriver to rotate teflon-coated glass microscope slides for collection of aerosol droplets. The device is inexpensive and easy to construct.

  2. Free and Impinging Supersonic Microjets - An Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phalnikar, Koustubh; Alvi, Farrukh; Shih, Chiang

    2000-11-01

    Recent years have seen considerable research in the fluid dynamics of microjets due to their potential use in applications such as micro-propulsion, cooling of MEMS components and fine particle deposition and removal. To date, most of this work has been limited to low velocity flows. The present study examines supersonic microjets in the range of 50 - 400 microns with exit velocities in the range of 400-500 m/s. Such microjets are presently being used to actively control supersonic impinging jets which occur in STOVL (Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing) aircraft. The flow field is visualized using a lens based micro-Schlieren system with effective magnifications greater than 100 x. Schlieren images, which to the best of our knowledge have never before been obtained at this scale, clearly show the characteristic shock cell structure observed in large-scale jets. Based on these images, the jet is clearly supersonic as far as 10-12 diameters downstream. Quantitative measurements providing jet decay and spreading rates are also obtained via pressure surveys using micro-pitot probes. In addition to free microjets, the impingement of these supersonic microjets on flat surfaces is also studied. Based on visual data, the flow structure of impinging microjets strongly resembles that of larger, macro supersonic impinging jets.

  3. A comprehensive analysis of cavitation and liquid impingement erosion data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.

    1983-01-01

    Cavitation-erosion experimental data previously covering several materials tested in a rotating disk device and a magnetostriction apparatus were analyzed using new normalization and curve-fitting techniques. From this process a universal approach is derived which can include data from cavitation and liquid impingement studies for specific materials from different test devices.

  4. Rocket exhaust plume impingement on the Voyager spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baerwald, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    In connection with the conduction of the long-duration Voyager missions to the outer planets and the sophisticated propulsion systems required, it was necessary to carry out an investigation to avoid exhaust plume impingement problems. The rarefied gas dynamics literature indicates that, for most engineering surfaces, the assumption of diffuse reemission and complete thermal accommodation is warranted in the free molecular flow regime. This assumption was applied to an analysis of a spacecraft plume impingement problem in the near-free molecular flow regime and yielded results to within a few percent of flight data. The importance of a correct treatment of the surface temperature was also demonstrated. Specular reflection, on the other hand, was shown to yield results which may be unconservative by a factor of 2 or 3. It is pointed out that one of the most difficult portions of an exhaust plume impingement analysis is the simulation of the impinged hardware. The geometry involved must be described as accurately and completely as possible.

  5. Wetting and spreading behaviors of impinging microdroplets on textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Dae Hee; Lee, Sang Joon; CenterBiofluid and Biomimic Reseach Team

    2012-11-01

    Textured surfaces having an array of microscale pillars have been receiving large attention because of their potential uses for robust superhydrophobic and superoleophobic surfaces. In many practical applications, the textured surfaces usually accompany impinging small-scale droplets. To better understand the impinging phenomena on the textured surfaces, the wetting and spreading behaviors of water microdroplets are investigated experimentally. Microdroplets with diameter less than 50 μm are ejected from a piezoelectric printhead with varying Weber number. The final wetting state of an impinging droplet can be estimated by comparing the wetting pressures of the droplet and the capillary pressure of the textured surface. The wetting behaviors obtained experimentally are well agreed with the estimated results. In addition, the transition from bouncing to non-bouncing behaviors in the partially penetrated wetting state is observed. This transition implies the possibility of withdrawal of the penetrated liquid from the inter-pillar space. The maximum spreading factors (ratio of the maximum spreading diameter to the initial diameter) of the impinging droplets have close correlation with the texture area fraction of the surfaces. This work was supported by Creative Research Initiatives (Diagnosis of Biofluid Flow Phenomena and Biomimic Research) of MEST/KOSEF.

  6. Measurements of a single pulse impinging jet. A CFD reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovo, Mirko; Rojo, Borja; Golubev, Maxim

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports three sets of measurements of a single pulse impinging jet. The purpose is to serve as a reference for CFD validation. A gas injector generates a single pulse jet at Re ~90000. The jet impinges on a temperature controlled flat target at different angles (0º, 30º, 45º and 60º). The jet velocity field is measured with PIV. The evolution of the jet velocity profile in time is reported at two different locations (suitable as CFD inlet conditions). At the same locations also turbulence quantities are reported. The impingement wall temperature is measured with fast responding thermocouples and infrared camera. These give high time and space resolution respectively. Results are reported in a format suitable for comparison with CFD simulations. The results show that the heat transfer effects are highest for the jet impinging normally on the target. Target inclination has remarkable effects on the jet penetration rate and repeatability. Even small target inclinations result creates a preferential direction for the jet flow and cause a shift in the position of the stagnation region.

  7. Liquid jet impinging orthogonally on a wettability-patterned surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukoravas, Theodore; Ghosh, Aritra; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2016-11-01

    Jet impingement has many technological applications because of its numerous merits, especially those related to the ability of liquids to carry away heat very efficiently. The present study introduces a new configuration employing a wettability-patterning approach to divert an orthogonally-impinging laminar water jet onto a predetermined portion of the target surface. Diverging wettable tracks on a superhydrophobic background provide the means to re-direct the impinging jet along paths determined by the shape of these tracks on the solid surface. In a heat transfer example of this method, an open-surface heat exchanger is constructed and its heat transfer performance is characterized. Since this approach facilitates prolonged liquid contact with the underlying heated surface through thin-film spreading, evaporative cooling is also promoted. We demonstrate flow cases extracting 100 W/cm2 at water flow rates of O(10 mL/min). By comparing with other jet-impingement cooling approaches, the present method provides roughly four times more efficient cooling by using less amount of coolant. The reduced coolant use, combined with the gravity-independent character of this technique, offer a new paradigm for compact heat transfer devices designed to operate in reduced- or zero-gravity environments.

  8. [Impingement syndrome of the shoulder. Clinical data and radiologic findings].

    PubMed

    Masala, S; Fanucci, E; Maiotti, M; Nardocci, M; Gaudioso, C; Apruzzese, A; Di Mario, M; Simonetti, G

    1995-01-01

    Subcoracoid impingement syndrome pain is elicited by some positions of the upper limbs, i.e., adduction and inward rotation, whenever coracohumeral space reduces. Although acquired or congenital malformations of the humeral head and/or coracoid apophysis are the most common causes of painful syndromes, repeated flections and inward rotations of the upper limbs, typical of some sports, such as swimming and tennis, and of some sports, such as swimming and tennis, and of some kinds of work, are predisposing factors. The subcoracoid impingement syndrome exhibits on pathogenomonic signs at clinics and the specificity of diagnostic methods is low, which calls for reliable radiologic assessment of this condition. Fifteen patients with subcoracoid impingement syndrome underwent X-ray, US, CT and MR studies. Plain radiography detected no specific signs of this syndrome, but yielded useful information regarding other painful syndromes of the shoulder, such as anatomical variants of the acromion and degenerative changes. US yield was poor because of the acoustic window of the coracoid apophysis, but supraspinatus tendon changes were demonstrated in 2 cases. CT and MRI proved to be the most reliable and accurate diagnostic methods, the former thanks to its sensitivity to even slight bone changes and to its capabilities in measuring coracohumeral distance and acquiring dynamic scans and the latter because it detects tendon, bursa and rotator cuff changes. To conclude, in our opinion, when the subcoracoid impingement syndrome is clinically suspected, plain X-ray films should be performed first and followed by MR scans.

  9. Fuctional outcome after open and arthroscopic bankart repair for traumatic shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Lützner, Jörg; Krummenauer, F; Lübke, J; Kirschner, S; Günther, K-P; Bottesi, M

    2009-01-28

    Both open and arthroscopic Bankart repair are established procedures in the treatment of anterior shoulder instability. While the open procedure is still considered as the "golden standard" functional outcome is supposed to be better in the arthroscopic procedure. The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the functional outcome between open and arthroscopic Bankart repair. In 199 patients a Bankart procedure with suture anchors was performed, either arthroscopically in presence of an detached, but not elongated capsulolabral complex (40) or open (159). After a median time of 31 months (12 to 67 months) 174 patients were contacted and agreed to follow-up, 135 after open and 39 after arthroscopic Bankart procedure. Re-dislocations occurred in 8% after open and 15% after arthroscopic Bankart procedure. After open surgery 4 of the 11 re-dislocations occurred after a new adequate trauma and 1 of the 6 re-dislocations after arthroscopic surgery. Re-dislocations after arthroscopic procedure occurred earlier than after open Bankart repair. An external rotation lag of 20 degrees or more was observed more often (16%) after open than after arthroscopic surgery (3%). The Rowe score demonstrated "good" or "excellent" functional results in 87% after open and in 80% patients after arthroscopic treatment. In this retrospective investigation the open Bankart procedure demonstrated good functional results. The arthroscopic treatment without capsular shift resulted in a better range of motion, but showed a tendency towards more frequently and earlier recurrence of instability. Sensitive patient selection for arthroscopic Bankart repair is recommended especially in patients with more than five dislocations.

  10. Comparative analysis of visual field and image distortion in 30° and 70° arthroscopes.

    PubMed

    Kekatpure, Aashay L; Adikrishna, Arnold; Sun, Ji-Ho; Sim, Gyeong-Bo; Chun, Jae-Myung; Jeon, In-Ho

    2016-07-01

    There have been very few attempts to compare the visual fields and image distortion in arthroscopes. To better understand the images generated using existing arthroscopes, we performed image-mapping experiments to assess field of view and image distortion. The purpose of this study was to quantify and compare the visual fields obtained using 30° and 70° arthroscopes and assess image distortion in each arthroscope. A complete arthroscopy system was used in this study. To perform this quantitative analysis, we created a customized measurement device that consisted of three parts: (1) distance marker, (2) chessboard pattern, and (3) angle marker. Three observers collectively assessed the appropriate position of the arthroscope during simulation. For each scope, ten simulations were performed at distances between 1 and 3 cm. Using the obtained arthroscope images, field of view and image distortion were measured and calculated. The field of view of the 70° arthroscope was 5, 10, and 15 mm wider in diameter in comparison with the 30° arthroscope at 1, 2, and 3 cm, respectively. Moreover, the 70° arthroscope had less 0.66, 0.13, and 0.26 pixels of root-mean-square distance than the 30° arthroscope at 1, 2, and 3 cm, respectively. The 70° arthroscope also contained 0.78 pixels less at the maximal error than the average 30° arthroscope. Therefore, the 70° arthroscope demonstrated less distortion than the 30° arthroscope. There was no significant difference between the two scopes with respect to median curvature measurement at 1-cm distance. The 70° arthroscope demonstrates technical advantages over the 30° arthroscope, including a wider field of view and a less image distortion at the periphery. A wide angle and less image distortion can help better orient the surgeon within the joint cavity when a panoramic picture is needed to repair rotator cuff tears, in case of hip arthroscopy, or while treating the lesions of posterior horn of medial meniscus.

  11. EFFECT OF IMPACTION, BOUNCE AND REAEROSOLIZATION ON THE COLLECTION EFFICIENCY OF IMPINGERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The collection efficiency of liquid impingers was studied experimentally as a function of the sampling flow rate with test particles in the bacterial size range. Three impingers were tested: two All-Glass Impingers(AGI-4 and AGI-30),widely used for bioaerosol sampling, and a newl...

  12. EFFECT OF IMPACTION, BOUNCE AND REAEROSOLIZATION ON THE COLLECTION EFFICIENCY OF IMPINGERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The collection efficiency of liquid impingers was studied experimentally as a function of the sampling flow rate with test particles in the bacterial size range. Three impingers were tested: two All-Glass Impingers(AGI-4 and AGI-30),widely used for bioaerosol sampling, and a newl...

  13. The 1991 version of the plume impingement computer program. Volume 1: Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Robert L.; Somers, Richard E.; Prendergast, Maurice J.; Clayton, Joseph P.; Smith, Sheldon D.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this contract was to continue development of a vacuum plume impingement evaluator to provide an analyst with a capability for rapid assessment of thruster plume impingement scenarios. The research was divided into three areas: Plume Impingement Computer Program (PLIMP) modification/validation; graphics development; and documentation in the form of a Plume Handbook and PLIMP Input Guide.

  14. Arthroscopic Resection Arthroplasty of the Radial Column for SLAC Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Tyson K.; Walden, Anna L.; Wilt, Jessica M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Symptomatic advanced scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) wrists are typically treated with extensive open procedures, including but not limited to scaphoidectomy plus four-corner fusion (4CF) and proximal row carpectomy (PRC). Although a minimally invasive arthroscopic option would be desirable, no convincing reports exist in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to describe a new surgical technique and outcomes on 14 patients who underwent arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column (ARARC) for arthroscopic stage II through stage IIIB SLAC wrists and to describe an arthroscopic staging classification of the radiocarpal joint for patients with SLAC wrist. Patients and Methods Data were collected prospectively on 17 patients presenting with radiographic stage I through III SLAC wrist who underwent ARARC in lieu of scaphoidectomy and 4CF or PRC. Fourteen patients (12 men and 2 women) subject to 1-year follow-up were included. The average age was 57 years (range 41 to 78). The mean follow-up was 24 months (range 12 to 61). Arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radial column is described for varying stages of arthritic changes of the radioscaphoid joint. Midcarpal resection was not performed. Results The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score was 66 preoperatively and 28 at final follow-up. The mean satisfaction (0 = not satisfied, 5 = completely satisfied) at final follow-up was 4.5 (range 3 to 5). The pain level (on 0–10 scale) improved from 6.6 to 1.3. The total arc of motion changed from 124° preoperatively to 142° postoperatively following an ARARC. Grip was 16 kg preoperatively and 18 kg postoperatively. Radiographic stages typically underestimated arthroscopic staging. Although four of our patients appeared to be radiographic stage I, all were found to have arthritis involving some or all of the radioscaphoid articulation at the time of arthroscopy. Clinical Relevance

  15. Hip arthroscopy and osteoarthritis: Where are the limits and indications?

    PubMed

    Mella, Claudio; Villalón, Ignacio E; Núñez, Álvaro; Paccot, Daniel; Díaz-Ledezma, Claudio

    2015-10-16

    The use of hip arthroscopy, as a surgical technique, has increased significantly over the past ten years. The procedure has shown good and excellent results in symptom relief and function improvement for patients with femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI) and concurrent chondro-labral lesions. It is also a reliable method to correct the characteristic pathomorphologic alteration of FAI. However, surgical results are less successful among patients with advanced articular damage and secondary hip osteoarthritis. The aim of this article is to present some clinical and imagenological tools to discriminate the good candidates for arthroscopic FAI treatment from those who are not, due to extensive articular damage.

  16. Hip arthroscopy and osteoarthritis: Where are the limits and indications?

    PubMed Central

    Mella, Claudio; Villalón, Ignacio E.; Núñez, Álvaro; Paccot, Daniel; Díaz-Ledezma, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The use of hip arthroscopy, as a surgical technique, has increased significantly over the past ten years. The procedure has shown good and excellent results in symptom relief and function improvement for patients with femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI) and concurrent chondro-labral lesions. It is also a reliable method to correct the characteristic pathomorphologic alteration of FAI. However, surgical results are less successful among patients with advanced articular damage and secondary hip osteoarthritis. The aim of this article is to present some clinical and imagenological tools to discriminate the good candidates for arthroscopic FAI treatment from those who are not, due to extensive articular damage. PMID:27163082

  17. Three cases of septic arthritis following a recent arthroscopic procedure

    PubMed Central

    Rowton, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    We report three cases of septic arthritis in patients who presented with a painful, swollen and supurative knee joint following a recent arthroscopic procedure, 8–15 days prior to attendance. In all three cases, patients presented with pain and swelling of the affected knee joint with discharge from the port sites. All were sent for washout of the affected joint and received intravenous antibiotic cover. Any patient presenting within 1 month of a recent arthroscopic procedure with pain and swelling of that joint should be presumed to have septic arthritis until proven otherwise. They must have urgent treatment in the form of joint washout and intravenous antibiotics, and receive 6 weeks oral antibiotics on discharge. PMID:23345477

  18. Evaluation of arthroscopic treatment of posterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, José Carlos; Maia, Lucas Russo; Fonseca, Juliano Rocha; Zabeu, José Luís Amim; Garcia, Jesely Pereira Myrrha

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide data for the analysis of arthroscopy as a method of surgical treatment for shoulder and discuss its actual indications and preliminary results. METHODS: We evaluated 15 patients submitted to reverse Bankart arthroscopic surgery. We used the UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) score to measure the results before surgery and 12 months thereafter. RESULTS: The average UCLA score changed from 26.67±0.25 (SD 0.97) before surgery to 34.20±0.53 (SD 2.04) after surgery. The effectiveness of surgery was 93%. In five cases loose bodies were found. A patient undergoing remplissage was evaluated separately. The data did not change after 24 months post-surgery. CONCLUSION: The arthroscopic treatment of posterior shoulder instability and posterior dislocation of the shoulder has been proved feasible and results in our series followed the same trends as in the literature. Level of Evidence III, Transversal Retrospective Study. PMID:26207089

  19. Arthroscopic Management of Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the Knee Joint.

    PubMed

    Dwidmuthe, Samir; Barick, Devashis; Rathi, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis (PVNS) of knee joint is a rare disorder of Synovium. Hip and knee joint are commonly affected joints. The knee PVNS presents as a localized or diffuse form. Diagnosis if often delayed and permanent joint damage occurs with advanced disease. Ultrasound examination shows fluid collection and synovial hypertrophy. Magnetic resonance imaging helps in clinching the diagnosis. Final confirmation of PVNS is done with histopathological examination of synovial tissue removed. Post operative radiation has shown to reduce the rate of recurrent disease. 25 years male presented to us with painless swelling of left knee joint of 3 months duration. Radiographs were normal. MRI showed synovial hypertrophy with changes suggestive of PVNS. We did arthroscopic six portal synovectomy. The patient regained his function and was asymptomatic at 2 year follow up. We want to emphasize that early diagnosis and well done arthroscopic Synovectomy gives good clinical outcome with low recurrence rate. Radiotherapy should be reserved for recurrent disease.

  20. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  1. Arthroscopy for shoulder instability and a technique for arthroscopic repair.

    PubMed

    Wiley, A M

    1988-01-01

    At this time the principal role of the arthroscope in the management of dislocating shoulder seems to be the identification of the intra-articular pathology. The findings should enable a surgeon to carry out an appropriate open repair, and the results of such surgery are excellent. Is there a place for arthroscopic repair? Some patients sometimes request it; others have had a failed open repair, or wish to avoid a scar. The author has devised a removable "Rivet," which fixes a loose labrum and the inferior glenohumeral ligament back on to a roughened glenoid margin. Use of this technique avoids some of the hazards that occur with implanting a staple or similar device in the joint. The "Rivet" is removed after 4-6 weeks. Ten patients have been so treated, with a follow-up of 6 months to 2 years. There was one failure, with a return of dislocation.

  2. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL).

    PubMed

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all-inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive.

  3. A virtual-reality training system for knee arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Heng, Pheng-Ann; Cheng, Chun-Yiu; Wong, Tien-Tsin; Xu, Yangsheng; Chui, Yim-Pan; Chan, Kai-Ming; Tso, Shiu-Kit

    2004-06-01

    Surgical training systems based on virtual-reality (VR) simulation techniques offer a cost-effective and efficient alternative to traditional training methods. This paper describes a VR system for training arthroscopic knee surgery. Virtual models used in this system are constructed from the Visual Human Project dataset. Our system simulates soft tissue deformation with topological change in real-time using finite-element analysis. To offer realistic tactile feedback, we build a tailor-made force feedback hardware.

  4. Virtual reality based system for training on knee arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Heng, Pheng-Ann; Cheng, Chun-Yiu; Wong, Tien-Tsin; Yangsheng, Xu; Chui, Yim-Pan; Chan, Kai-Ming; Tso, Shiu Kit

    2004-01-01

    Surgical training systems based on virtual reality (VR) and simulation techniques offer a cost-effective and efficient alternative to traditional training methods. This paper describes a virtual reality system for training arthroscopic knee surgery. The virtual model used in this system is constructed from the Visual Human Project dataset. The system simulates the real-time deformation of soft tissue with topological change using finite element analysis. To offer the realistic tactile feedback, we construct a specialized force feedback hardware.

  5. Arthroscopic Revision Surgery for Failure of Open Latarjet Technique.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Adrián; Cuéllar, Ricardo; de Heredia, Pablo Beltrán

    2017-05-01

    To