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Sample records for fepro cell labeling

  1. Effects of Ferumoxides – Protamine Sulfate Labeling on Immunomodulatory Characteristics of Macrophage-like THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Janic, Branislava; Iskander, A. S. M.; Rad, Ali M.; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Arbab, Ali S.

    2008-01-01

    Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (SPIO) complexed with cationic transfection agent is used to label various mammalian cells. Labeled cells can then be utilized as an in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes. However, certain number of in vivo administered labeled cells may be cleared from tissues by the host's macrophages. For successful translation to routine clinical application of SPIO labeling method it is important that this mode of in vivo clearance of iron does not elicit any diverse immunological effects. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that SPIO agent ferumoxides-protamine sulfate (FePro) incorporation into macrophages does not alter immunological properties of these cells with regard to differentiation, chemotaxis, and ability to respond to the activation stimuli and to modulate T cell response. We used THP-1 cell line as a model for studying macrophage cell type. THP-1 cells were magnetically labeled with FePro, differentiated with 100 nM of phorbol ester, 12-Myristate-13-acetate (TPA) and stimulated with 100 ng/ml of LPS. The results showed 1) FePro labeling had no effect on the changes in morphology and expression of cell surface proteins associated with TPA induced differentiation; 2) FePro labeled cells responded to LPS with slightly higher levels of NFκB pathway activation, as shown by immunobloting; TNF-α secretion and cell surface expression levels of CD54 and CD83 activation markers, under these conditions, were still comparable to the levels observed in non-labeled cells; 3) FePro labeling exhibited differential, chemokine dependent, effect on THP-1 chemotaxis with a decrease in cell directional migration to MCP-1; 4) FePro labeling did not affect the ability of THP-1 cells to down-regulate T cell expression of CD4 and CD8 and to induce T cell proliferation. Our study demonstrated that intracellular incorporation of FePro complexes does not alter overall immunological properties of THP-1 cells. The described experiments provide

  2. Quantification of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (SPIO)-labeled Cells Using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Ali M; Arbab, Ali S; Iskander, ASM; Jiang, Quan; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To show the feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled cells. Materials and Methods Lymphocytes and 9L rat gliosarcoma cells were labeled with Ferumoxides-Protamine Sulfate complex (FE-PRO). Cells were labeled efficiently (more than 95%) and iron concentration inside each cell was measured by spectrophotometry (4.77-30.21 picograms). Phantom tubes containing different number of labeled or unlabeled cells as well as different concentrations of FE-PRO were made. In addition, labeled and unlabeled cells were injected into fresh and fixed rat brains. Results Cellular viability and proliferation of labeled and unlabeled cells were shown to be similar. T2-weighted images were acquired using 7 T and 3 T MRI systems and R2 maps of the tubes containing cells, free FE-PRO, and brains were made. There was a strong linear correlation between R2 values and labeled cell numbers but the regression lines were different for the lymphocytes and gliosarcoma cells. Similarly, there was strong correlation between R2 values and free iron. However, free iron had higher R2 values than the labeled cells for the same concentration of iron. Conclusion Our data indicated that in vivo quantification of labeled cells can be done by careful consideration of different factors and specific control groups. PMID:17623892

  3. Label Structured Cell Proliferation Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-16

    variable as a mass-like quantity. The specific model for the dynamics of life and death processes of a population of cells labeled with CFSE is proposed in... variables = + where < 0 is label degradation velocity. Because we really don’t understand completely the degradation process (there appears to be...little agreement as to what variables on which this velocity might depend) and to allow for generality (other labels that might be used may well

  4. Isotope Labeling in Insect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Krishna; Dutta, Arpana; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen remarkable progress in applying nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins that have traditionally been difficult to study due to issues with folding, posttranslational modification, and expression levels or combinations thereof. In particular, insect cells have proved useful in allowing large quantities of isotope-labeled, functional proteins to be obtained and purified to homogeneity, allowing study of their structures and dynamics by using NMR. Here, we provide protocols that have proven successful in such endeavors. PMID:22167667

  5. Leukemic cell labeling with indium-111-oxine

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Takagi, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Yui, T.; Ishibashi, T.; Kimura, H.; Kariyone, S.

    1984-01-01

    Leukemic cells were labeled with In-111-oxine in patients with acute leukemia. In vitro labeling studies revealed that labeling efficiency reached maximum 80.8 +- 3.6% (mean +- 1SD) by 2 times washes after 20 minutes incubation time. Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion test and in vitro culture of leukemic cells, which showed no cellular damage during labeling procedure. Elution of In-111 from the labeled cells was 10.0 +- 1.2% at 12 hours after labeling. For in vivo leukemic cell kinetic studies, more than 10/sup 8/ leukemic cells separated from Ficoll-Hypacque sedimentation were labeled by 30 minutes of In-111-oxine incubation and two times washes at 37/sup 0/C. In vivo studies were performed in 7 patients with acute myeloblastic, lymphoblastic leukemia and blastic crisis of chronic myelocytic leukemia. Labeled leukemic cells disappeared in single exponential fashion with half life of 9.6 to 31.8 hours. Total leukemic cell pool in peripheral circulation was calculated, which correlated well with peripheral leukemic cell counts (r=0.99). No relationship was observed between total leukemic cell pool and leukemic cell turnover rate. Migration patterns of labeled leukemic cells showed that pulmonary uptake was evident within 15 minutes after the infusion and returned to base-line. Splenic and hepatic uptake showed gradual increase up to 24 hours. Bone marrow accumulation was shown only in 2 cases. Presently, there are no suitable radionuclides for leukemic cell labeling. In-111-oxine labeled leukemic cells would overcome this difficulty.

  6. Stem cell labeling for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Himmelreich, Uwe; Hoehn, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    In vivo applications of cells for the monitoring of their cell dynamics increasingly use non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. This imaging modality allows in particular to follow the migrational activity of stem cells intended for cell therapy strategies. All these approaches require the prior labeling of the cells under investigation for excellent contrast against the host tissue background in the imaging modality. The present review discusses the various routes of cell labeling and describes the potential to observe both cell localization and their cell-specific function in vivo. Possibilities for labeling strategies, pros and cons of various contrast agents are pointed out while potential ambiguities or problems of labeling strategies are emphasized.

  7. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-09-07

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Reversibility of cell surface label rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Cell surface labeling can cause rearrangements of randomly distributed membrane components. Removal of the label bound to the cell surface allows the membrane components to return to their original random distribution, demonstrating that label is necessary to maintain as well as to induce rearrangements. With scanning electron microscopy, the rearrangement of concanavalin A (con A) and ricin binding sites on LA-9 cells has been followed by means of hemocyanin, a visual label. The removal of con A from its binding sites at the cell surface with alpha- methyl mannoside, and the return of these sites to their original distribution are also followed in this manner. There are labeling differences with con A and ricin. Under some conditions, however, the same rearrangements are seen with both lectins. The disappearance of labeled sites from areas of ruffling activity is a major feature of the rearrangements seen. Both this ruffling activity and the rearrangement of label are sensitive to cytochalasin B, and ruffling activity, perhaps along with other cytochalasin-sensitive structure, may play a role in the rearrangements of labeled sites. PMID:1025154

  9. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  10. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  11. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  12. Labeling Cells with Silver/Dendrimer Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    labeling. A PAMAME5.NH 2 dendrimer was used as a template to prepare first a silver -dendrimer complex in an aqueous solution at biologic pH=7.4...electron microscope operating at 200 kV. Samples were prepared by mounting a drop of aqueous solutions of nanoparticles on carbon-coated copper grids...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP019741 TITLE: Labeling Cells with Silver /Dendrimer Nanocomposites

  13. Labeled cells in patients with malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Dutcher, J.P.

    1984-07-01

    Recently, new approaches for radiosotopic cell labeling have gained prominence in the investigation of various aspects of malignant diseases and in the clinical care of such patients. Isotopes such as indium-111 can be visualized with standard scanning techniques providing further information about the migration of normal and malignant cells has been discovered. In vivo studies have been performed with indium-111 in animals and humans, including comparisons of the migration of abnormal cells (malignant) and of lymphocytes to abnormal nodes. Evaluation and comparison of the migration of carcinoma cells, normal lymphoid cells, and malignant lymphoid cells in animals show markedly different patterns of distribution, which could have bearing on investigations of mechanisms of metastasis. In vivo human studies also have evaluated the migration patterns of lymphoid cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and well-differentiated lymphoma, showing very different migrating behavior between these two polarities of a similar diseases. There are concerns about the use of an isotope such as indium-111 for the labeling of long-lived cells such as lymphocytes. Laboratory studies have demonstrated impaired cell function at high concentrations of radioactivity. Some workers have expressed concern about long-term changes in cells that recirculate. Others cite precedents of other long-term uses of isotopes, therapeutically, without detrimental effects. These concerns continue to be investigated. Finally, an area of much interest in the use of indium-111 is the labeling of granulocytes. This technique has been useful diagnostically, to localize infections. The major value in patients with malignancy, primarily with hematologic malignancies, is to evaluate the potential benefit of granulocyte transfusions. Many of these patients develop prolonged granulocytopenia and become infected, and granulocyte transfusions may become a therapeutic consideration.

  14. Detection and Quantification of Magnetically Labeled Cells by Cellular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Frank, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    Labeling cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, paramagnetic contrast agent (gadolinium) or perfluorocarbons allows for the possibility of tracking single or clusters of labeled cells within target tissues following either direct implantation or intravenous injection. This review summarizes the practical issues regarding detection and quantification of magnetically labeled cells with various MRI contrast agents with a focus on SPIO nanoparticles. PMID:18995978

  15. Isotope labeling of proteins in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Skora, Lukasz; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D

    2015-01-01

    Protein targets of contemporary research are often membrane proteins, multiprotein complexes, secreted proteins, or other proteins of human origin. These are difficult to express in the standard expression host used for most nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, Escherichia coli. Insect cells represent an attractive alternative, since they have become a well-established expression system and simple solutions have been developed for generation of viruses to efficiently introduce the target protein DNA into cells. Insect cells enable production of a larger fraction of the human proteome in a properly folded way than bacteria, as insect cells have a very similar set of cytosolic chaperones and a closely related secretory pathway. Here, the limited and defined glycosylation pattern that insect cells produce is an advantage for structural biology studies. For these reasons, insect cells have been established as the most widely used eukaryotic expression host for crystallographic studies. In the past decade, significant advancements have enabled amino acid type-specific as well as uniform isotope labeling of proteins in insect cells, turning them into an attractive expression host for NMR studies.

  16. Synthetic Glycosphingolipids for Live-Cell Labeling.

    PubMed

    Dauner, Martin; Batroff, Ellen; Bachmann, Verena; Hauck, Christof R; Wittmann, Valentin

    2016-07-20

    Glycosphingolipids are an important component of cell membranes that are involved in many biological processes. Fluorescently labeled glycosphingolipids are frequently used to gain insight into their localization. However, the attachment of a fluorophore to the glycan part or-more commonly-to the lipid part of glycosphingolipids is known to alter the biophysical properties and can perturb the biological function of the probe. Presented here is the synthesis of novel glycosphingolipid probes with mono- and disaccharide head groups and ceramide moieties containing fatty acids of varying chain length (C4 to C20). These glycosphingolipids bear an azide or an alkyne group as chemical reporter to which a fluorophore can be attached through a bioorthogonal ligation reaction. The fluorescent tag and any linker connected to it can be chosen in a flexible manner. We demonstrate the suitability of the probes by selective visualization of the plasma membrane of living cells by confocal microscopy techniques. Whereas the derivatives with the shorter fatty acids can be directly applied to HEK 293T cells, the hydrophobic glycosphingolipids with longer fatty acids can be delivered to cells using fusogenic liposomes.

  17. Label-fracture: a method for high resolution labeling of cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pinto da Silva, P; Kan, F W

    1984-09-01

    We introduce here a technique, "label-fracture," that allows the observation of the distribution of a cytochemical label on a cell surface. Cell surfaces labeled with an electron-dense marker (colloidal gold) are freeze-fractured and the fracture faces are replicated by plantinum/carbon evaporation. The exoplasmic halves of the membrane, apparently stabilized by the deposition of the Pt/C replica, are washed in distilled water. The new method reveals the surface distribution of the label coincident with the Pt/C replica of the exoplasmic fracture face. Initial applications indicate high resolution (less than or equal to 15 nm) and exceedingly low background. "Label-fracture" provides extensive views of the distribution of the label on membrane surfaces while preserving cell shape and relating to the freeze-fracture morphology of exoplasmic fracture faces. The regionalization of wheat germ agglutinin receptors on the plasma membranes of boar sperm cells is illustrated. The method and the interpretation of its results are straightforward. Label-fracture is appropriate for routine use as a surface labeling technique.

  18. Cells labeled with multiple fluorophores bound to a nucleic acid carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Dattagupta, N.; Kamarch, M.E.

    1989-04-25

    In passing labeled cells through a cell sorter, the improvement which comprises employing a labeled cell comprising a cell, an antibody specific to and bound to such cell, a nucleic acid fragment joined to the antibody, and a plurality of labels on the nucleic acid fragment. Because of the presence of multiple labels, the sensitivity of the separation of labeled cells in increased.

  19. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. State of the science of blood cell labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    Blood cell labeling can be considered a science in as far as it is based on precise knowledge and can be readily reproduced. This benchmark criterion is applied to all current cell labeling modalities and their relative merits and deficiencies are discussed. Mechanisms are given where they are known as well as labeling yields, label stability, and cell functionality. The focus is on the methodology and its suitability to the clinical setting rather than on clinical applications per se. Clinical results are cited only as proof of efficacy of the various methods. The emphasis is on technetium as the cell label, although comparisons are made between technetium and indium, and all blood cells are covered. 52 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. High efficiency labeling of glycoproteins on living cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ying; Ramya, T. N. C.; Dirksen, Anouk; Dawson, Philip E.; Paulson, James C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a simple method for efficiently labeling cell surface glycans on virtually any living animal cell. The method employs mild Periodate oxidation to generate an aldehyde on sialic acids, followed by Aniline-catalyzed oxime Ligation with a suitable tag (PAL). Aniline catalysis dramatically accelerates oxime ligation, allowing use of low concentrations of aminooxy-biotin at neutral pH to label the majority of cell surface glycoproteins while maintaining high cell viability. PMID:19234450

  2. Instant magnetic labeling of tumor cells by ultrasound in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Runyang; Yang, Jian; Wu, Ed X.; Lin, Shuyu

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic labeling of living cells creates opportunities for numerous biomedical applications. Here we describe an instantly cell magnetic labeling method based on ultrasound. We present a detailed study on the ultrasound performance of a simple and efficient labeling protocol for H-22 cells in vitro. High frequency focus ultrasound was investigated as an alternative method to achieve instant cell labeling with the magnetic particles without the need for adjunct agents or initiating cell cultures. Mean diameter of 168 nm dextran-T40 coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were prepared by means of classical coprecipitation in solution in our laboratory. H-22 tumor cells suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH=7.2) were exposed to ultrasound at 1.37 MHz for up to 120 s in the presence of SPIOs. The cellular uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles was detected by prussion blue staining. The viability of cells was determined by a trypan blue exclusion test. At 2 W power and 60 s ultrasound exposure in presence of 410 μg/ml SPIOs, H-22 cell labeling efficiency reached 69.4±6.3% and the labeled cells exhibited an iron content of 10.38±2.43 pg per cell. Furthermore, 95.2±3.2% cells remained viable. The results indicated that the ultrasound protocol could be potentially applied to label cells with large-sized magnetic particles. We also calculated the shear stress at the 2 W power and 1.37 MHz used in experiments. The results showed that the shear stress threshold for ultrasonically induced H-22 cell reparable sonoporation was 697 Pa. These findings provide a quantitative guidance in designing ultrasound protocols for cell labeling.

  3. Sequential Immunoprecipitation of Secretory Vesicle Proteins from Biosynthetically Labelled Cells.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse radiolabelling of cells with radioactive amino acids is a common method for studying the biosynthesis of proteins. The labelled proteins can then be immunoprecipitated and analysed by electrophoresis and imaging techniques. This chapter presents a protocol for the biosynthetic labelling and immunoprecipitation of pancreatic islet proteins which are known to be affected in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

  4. Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles: opportunity for magnetic cell imaging and cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Wilhelm, Claire; Clément, Olivier; Gazeau, Florence

    2013-01-01

    This tutorial describes a method of controlled cell labeling with citrate-coated ultra small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. This method may provide basically all kinds of cells with sufficient magnetization to allow cell detection by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to enable potential magnetic manipulation. In order to efficiently exploit labeled cells, quantify the magnetic load and deliver or follow-up magnetic cells, we herein describe the main requirements that should be applied during the labeling procedure. Moreover we present some recommendations for cell detection and quantification by MRI and detail magnetic guiding on some real-case studies in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Identification and behavior of label-retaining cells in epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Bickenbach, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    A subpopulation of stem cells has been demonstrated in several renewing tissues. Such cells have a slow cell cycle and provide differentiating cells during normal turnover and during regeneration of the tissue following damage. The presence of slowly-cycling cells in epithelia from regions of skin and oral mucosa was examined by labeling 10-day-old mice and 5-day-old hamsters with tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/H-TdR) and observing the rate at which label was diluted from the basal cells. Label was rapidly diluted by cell division in most cells but a small percentage of basal cells (label-retaining cells, LRCS) was found to retain label for up to ninety days. Electron microscopic autoradiography and ..beta..-glucuronidase histochemistry with autoradiography were used to distinguish slowly-cycling keratinocytes from Langerhans cells. Such findings of slowly-cycling keratinocytes in epithelia with the ability to proliferate in culture and with a direct relationship to patterns of tissue architecture suggest that LRCs in epithelia correspond to stem cells described in other continuously renewing tissues.

  6. Carbon "Quantum" Dots for Fluorescence Labeling of Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Hui; Cao, Li; LeCroy, Gregory E; Wang, Ping; Meziani, Mohammed J; Dong, Yiyang; Liu, Yuanfang; Luo, Pengju G; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-09-02

    The specifically synthesized and selected carbon dots of relatively high fluorescence quantum yields were evaluated in their fluorescence labeling of cells. For the cancer cell lines, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was generally efficient, resulting in the labeling of the cells with bright fluorescence emissions for both one- and two-photon excitations from predominantly the cell membrane and cytoplasm. In the exploration on labeling the live stem cells, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was relatively less efficient, though fluorescence emissions could still be adequately detected in the labeled cells, with the emissions again predominantly from the cell membrane and cytoplasm. This combined with the observed more efficient internalization of the same carbon dots by the fixed stem cells might suggest some significant selectivity of the stem cells toward surface functionalities of the carbon dots. The needs and possible strategies for more systematic and comparative studies on the fluorescence labeling of different cells, including especially live stem cells, by carbon dots as a new class of brightly fluorescent probes are discussed.

  7. Nucleoside analog labeling of neural stem cells and their progeny.

    PubMed

    DeBoer, Erik Michael; Rasin, Mladen-Roko

    2013-01-01

    Nucleoside analog pulse labeling is an important technique which can assess the birthdate, cell cycle maintenance, or cycling rates of cells during development. This method has evolved over several decades of use and is now applied to a multitude of tissue subtypes and systems. The methodology in this chapter covers the classic uses for analog pulse labeling as well as their use in conjunction with the newly characterized technique of in utero electroporation (IUE).

  8. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling.

  9. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celikkin, Nehar; Jakubcová, Lucie; Zenke, Martin; Hoss, Mareike; Wong, John Erik; Hieronymus, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3+ DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking.

  10. Production of Alexa Fluor 488-labeled reovirus and characterization of target cell binding, competence, and immunogenicity of labeled virions.

    PubMed

    Fecek, Ronald J; Busch, Ryan; Lin, Hong; Pal, Kasturi; Cunningham, Cynthia A; Cuff, Christopher F

    2006-07-31

    Respiratory enteric orphan virus (reovirus) has been used to study many aspects of the biology and genetics of viruses, viral infection, pathogenesis, and the immune response to virus infection. This report describes the functional activity of virus labeled with Alexa Fluor 488, a stable fluorescent dye. Matrix assisted laser desorption-time of flight analysis indicated that Alexa Fluor 488 labeled the outer capsid proteins of reovirus. Labeled virus bound to murine L929 fibroblasts as determined by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy, and the specificity of binding were demonstrated by competitive inhibition with non-labeled virus. Labeled reovirus induced apoptosis and cytopathic effect in infected L929 cells. Mice infected with labeled virus mounted robust serum antibody and CD8(+) T-cell responses, indicating that labeled virus retained immunogenicity in vivo. These results indicate that Alexa Fluor 488-labeled virus provides a powerful new tool to analyze reovirus infection in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  12. Near-infrared fluorescence labeling of iron nanoparticles and applications for cell labeling and in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinke; Liu, Yingxun; Hou, Yong; Chen, Zhongpin; Gu, Ning

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) labeled iron nanoparticles were synthesized and applied to labeling human cells for monitoring the engraftment process, imaging tumors, testing intracellular molecular environment surrounding the nanoparticles, and tracing biodistribution of nanoparticles in vivo. These studies demonstrated that the NIRF-labeled iron nanoparticles provided an excellent method not only for cell labeling but also for in vivo monitoring and tracing of iron nanoparticles due to the excellent in vivo imaging performance of the NIR fluorophores. However, the availability of commercial iron nanoparticles labeled with suitable NIRF dyes is limited. Optimal wavelength for in vivo imaging is centered at 800 nm, where tissue autofluorescence is minimal. Here we describe the manufacture of 12-nm 3-dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles, their labeling with a new near-infrared fluorophore, IRDye800CW (excitation/emission: 778/806 nm), and their applications for cell labeling and in vivo imaging.

  13. Identification of autoreactive B cells with labeled nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Gies, Vincent; Wagner, Alain; Seifert, Cécile; Guffroy, Aurélien; Fauny, Jean-D; Knapp, Anne-M; Pasquali, Jean-L; Martin, Thierry; Dumortier, Hélène; Korganow, Anne-S; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline

    2017-04-04

    The pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases has not been completely elucidated yet, and only a few specific treatments have been developed so far. In autoimmune diseases mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, the specific detection and analysis of autoreactive B cells is crucial for a better understanding of the physiopathology. Biological characterization of these cells may help to define new therapeutic targets. Very few techniques allowing the precise detection of autoreactive B cells have been described so far. Herein we propose a new flow cytometry technique for specific detection of anti-nucleosome B cells, which secrete autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus, using labeled nucleosomes. We produced different fluorochrome-labeled nucleosomes, characterized them, and finally tested them in flow cytometry. Nucleosomes labeled via the cysteines present in H3 histone specifically bind to autoreactive B cells in the anti-DNA transgenic B6.56R mice model. The present work validates the use of fluorochrome-labeled nucleosomes via cysteines to identify anti-nucleosome B cells and offers new opportunities for the description of autoreactive B cell phenotype.

  14. Cell Labeling via Membrane-Anchored Lipophilic MR Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cell tracking in vivo with MR imaging requires the development of contrast agents with increased sensitivity that effectively label and are retained by cells. Most clinically approved Gd(III)-based contrast agents require high incubation concentrations and prolonged incubation times for cellular internalization. Strategies to increase contrast agent permeability have included conjugating Gd(III) complexes to cell penetrating peptides, nanoparticles, and small molecules which have greatly improved cell labeling but have not resulted in improved cellular retention. To overcome these challenges, we have synthesized a series of lipophilic Gd(III)-based MR contrast agents that label cell membranes in vitro. Two of the agents were synthesized with a multiplexing strategy to contain three Gd(III) chelates (1 and 2) while the third contains a single Gd(III) chelate (3). These new agents exhibit significantly enhanced labeling and retention in HeLa and MDA-MB-231-mcherry cells compared to agents that are internalized by cells (4 and Prohance). PMID:24787689

  15. X-ray microscopic studies of labeled nuclear cell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, S.; Schneider, G.; Steuernagel, A.; Lucchesi, J.; Schulze, E.; Rudolph, D.; Schmahl, G.

    2000-05-01

    In X-ray microscopy different proteins are not readily distinguishable. However, in cell biology it is often desirable to localize single proteins, e.g., inside the cell nucleus. This can be achieved by immunogold labeling. Colloidal gold conjugated antibodies are used to mark the protein specifically. With silver solution these are enlarged so as to heighten their contrast. The strong absorption of silver allows easy visualization of the label in the nuclei. In this study male specific lethal 1 protein in male Drosophila melanogaster cells was labeled. This protein forms, together with four other proteins, a complex that is associated with the male X chromosome. It regulates dosage compensation by enhancing X-linked gene transcription in males. Room temperature and cyro transmission X-ray microscopic images (taken with the Göttingen TXM at BESSY) of these labeled cells are shown. Confocal laser scan microscopy ascertains the correct identification of the label in the X-ray micrographs, and allows comparison of the structural information available from both instruments.

  16. Interfacial Polymerization for Colorimetric Labeling of Protein Expression in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Jacob L.; Sheldon, Phillip R.; Hoversten, Liv J.; Romero, Gabriela; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Berron, Brad J.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the location of rare proteins in cells typically requires the use of on-sample amplification. Antibody based recognition and enzymatic amplification is used to produce large amounts of visible label at the site of protein expression, but these techniques suffer from the presence of nonspecific reactivity in the biological sample and from poor spatial control over the label. Polymerization based amplification is a recently developed alternative means of creating an on-sample amplification for fluorescence applications, while not suffering from endogenous labels or loss of signal localization. This manuscript builds upon polymerization based amplification by developing a stable, archivable, and colorimetric mode of amplification termed Polymer Dye Labeling. The basic concept involves an interfacial polymer grown at the site of protein expression and subsequent staining of this polymer with an appropriate dye. The dyes Evans Blue and eosin were initially investigated for colorimetric response in a microarray setting, where both specifically stained polymer films on glass. The process was translated to the staining of protein expression in human dermal fibroblast cells, and Polymer Dye Labeling was specific to regions consistent with desired protein expression. The labeling is stable for over 200 days in ambient conditions and is also compatible with modern mounting medium. PMID:25536421

  17. Labeling proteins on live mammalian cells using click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Nikić, Ivana; Kang, Jun Hee; Girona, Gemma Estrada; Aramburu, Iker Valle; Lemke, Edward A

    2015-05-01

    We describe a protocol for the rapid labeling of cell-surface proteins in living mammalian cells using click chemistry. The labeling method is based on strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) and strain-promoted inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition (SPIEDAC) reactions, in which noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) bearing ring-strained alkynes or alkenes react, respectively, with dyes containing azide or tetrazine groups. To introduce ncAAs site specifically into a protein of interest (POI), we use genetic code expansion technology. The protocol can be described as comprising two steps. In the first step, an Amber stop codon is introduced--by site-directed mutagenesis--at the desired site on the gene encoding the POI. This plasmid is then transfected into mammalian cells, along with another plasmid that encodes an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA (RS/tRNA) pair that is orthogonal to the host's translational machinery. In the presence of the ncAA, the orthogonal RS/tRNA pair specifically suppresses the Amber codon by incorporating the ncAA into the polypeptide chain of the POI. In the second step, the expressed POI is labeled with a suitably reactive dye derivative that is directly supplied to the growth medium. We provide a detailed protocol for using commercially available ncAAs and dyes for labeling the insulin receptor, and we discuss the optimal surface-labeling conditions and the limitations of labeling living mammalian cells. The protocol involves an initial cloning step that can take 4-7 d, followed by the described transfections and labeling reaction steps, which can take 3-4 d.

  18. Imaging and manipulating proteins in live cells through covalent labeling.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lin; Karpenko, Iuliia A; Hiblot, Julien; Johnsson, Kai

    2015-12-01

    The past 20 years have witnessed the advent of numerous technologies to specifically and covalently label proteins in cellulo and in vivo with synthetic probes. These technologies range from self-labeling proteins tags to non-natural amino acids, and the question is no longer how we can specifically label a given protein but rather with what additional functionality we wish to equip it. In addition, progress in fields such as super-resolution microscopy and genome editing have either provided additional motivation to label proteins with advanced synthetic probes or removed some of the difficulties of conducting such experiments. By focusing on two particular applications, live-cell imaging and the generation of reversible protein switches, we outline the opportunities and challenges of the field and how the synergy between synthetic chemistry and protein engineering will make it possible to conduct experiments that are not feasible with conventional approaches.

  19. Selective in vivo metabolic cell-labeling-mediated cancer targeting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Ruibo; Cai, Kaimin; He, Hua; Liu, Yang; Yen, Jonathan; Wang, Zhiyu; Xu, Ming; Sun, Yiwen; Zhou, Xin; Yin, Qian; Tang, Li; Dobrucki, Iwona T; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Chaney, Eric J; Boppart, Stephen A; Fan, Timothy M; Lezmi, Stéphane; Chen, Xuesi; Yin, Lichen; Cheng, Jianjun

    2017-02-13

    Distinguishing cancer cells from normal cells through surface receptors is vital for cancer diagnosis and targeted therapy. Metabolic glycoengineering of unnatural sugars provides a powerful tool to manually introduce chemical receptors onto the cell surface; however, cancer-selective labeling still remains a great challenge. Herein we report the design of sugars that can selectively label cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, we inhibit the cell-labeling activity of tetraacetyl-N-azidoacetylmannosamine (Ac4ManAz) by converting its anomeric acetyl group to a caged ether bond that can be selectively cleaved by cancer-overexpressed enzymes and thus enables the overexpression of azido groups on the surface of cancer cells. Histone deacetylase and cathepsin L-responsive acetylated azidomannosamine, one such enzymatically activatable Ac4ManAz analog developed, mediated cancer-selective labeling in vivo, which enhanced tumor accumulation of a dibenzocyclooctyne-doxorubicin conjugate via click chemistry and enabled targeted therapy against LS174T colon cancer, MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer and 4T1 metastatic breast cancer in mice.

  20. Endothelial cell labeling with indium-111-oxine as a marker of cell attachment to bioprosthetic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sharefkin, J.B.; Lather, C.; Smith, M.; Rich, N.M.

    1983-03-01

    Canine vascular endothelium labeled with indium-111-oxine was used as a marker of cell attachment to vascular prosthetic surfaces with complex textures. Primarily cultured and freshly harvested endothelial cells both took up the label rapidly. An average of 72% of a 32 micro Ci labeling dose was taken up by 1.5 X 10(6) cells in 10 min in serum-free medium. Over 95% of freshly labeled cells were viable by trypan blue tests and only 5% of the label was released after 1 h incubations at 37 degrees C. Labeled and unlabeled cells had similar rates of attachment to plastic dishes. Scanning electron microscopic studies showed that labeled cells retained their ability to spread on tissue culture dishes even at low (1%) serum levels. Labeled endothelial cells seeded onto Dacron or expanded polytetrafluoroethylene vascular prostheses by methods used in current surgical models could be identified by autoradiography of microscopic sections of the prostheses, and the efficiency of cell attachment to the prosthesis could be measured by gamma counting. Indium-111 labeling affords a simple and rapid way to measure initial cell attachment to, and distribution on, vascular prosthetic materials. The method could also allow measurement of early cell loss from a flow surface in vivo by using external gamma imaging.

  1. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; ...

    2016-03-15

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individualmore » cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. In conclusion, this system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells.« less

  2. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; Blaby, Ian K; Huang, Allen; Niazi, Kayvan Reza; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-15

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individual cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. This system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells.

  3. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; Blaby, Ian K.; Huang, Allen; Niazi, Kayvan Reza; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-15

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individual cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. In conclusion, this system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells.

  4. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; Blaby, Ian K.; Huang, Allen; Niazi, Kayvan Reza; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individual cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. This system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells. PMID:26975219

  5. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; Blaby, Ian K.; Huang, Allen; Niazi, Kayvan Reza; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-01

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individual cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. This system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells.

  6. Live imaging of multicolor-labeled cells in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Boulina, Maria; Samarajeewa, Hasitha; Baker, James D.; Kim, Michael D.; Chiba, Akira

    2013-01-01

    We describe LOLLIbow, a Brainbow-based live imaging system with applications in developmental biology and neurobiology. The development of an animal, including the environmentally sensitive adaptation of its brain, is thought to proceed through continual orchestration among diverse cell types as they divide, migrate, transform and interact with one another within the body. To facilitate direct visualization of such dynamic morphogenesis by individual cells in vivo, we have modified the original Brainbow for Drosophila in which live imaging is practical during much of its development. Our system offers permanent fluorescent labels that reveal fine morphological details of individual cells without requiring dissection or fixation of the samples. It also features a non-invasive means to control the timing of stochastic tricolor cell labeling with a light pulse. We demonstrate applicability of the new system in a variety of settings that could benefit from direct imaging of the developing multicellular organism with single-cell resolution. PMID:23482495

  7. Label-free density difference amplification-based cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Song, Jihwan; Song, Minsun; Kang, Taewook; Kim, Dongchoul; Lee, Luke P

    2014-11-01

    The selective cell separation is a critical step in fundamental life sciences, translational medicine, biotechnology, and energy harvesting. Conventional cell separation methods are fluorescent activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting based on fluorescent probes and magnetic particles on cell surfaces. Label-free cell separation methods such as Raman-activated cell sorting, electro-physiologically activated cell sorting, dielectric-activated cell sorting, or inertial microfluidic cell sorting are, however, limited when separating cells of the same kind or cells with similar sizes and dielectric properties, as well as similar electrophysiological phenotypes. Here we report a label-free density difference amplification-based cell sorting (dDACS) without using any external optical, magnetic, electrical forces, or fluidic activations. The conceptual microfluidic design consists of an inlet, hydraulic jump cavity, and multiple outlets. Incoming particles experience gravity, buoyancy, and drag forces in the separation chamber. The height and distance that each particle can reach in the chamber are different and depend on its density, thus allowing for the separation of particles into multiple outlets. The separation behavior of the particles, based on the ratio of the channel heights of the inlet and chamber and Reynolds number has been systematically studied. Numerical simulation reveals that the difference between the heights of only lighter particles with densities close to that of water increases with increasing the ratio of the channel heights, while decreasing Reynolds number can amplify the difference in the heights between the particles considered irrespective of their densities.

  8. Trypsinization-dependent cell labeling with fluorescent nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Trypsin is often used to detach adhered cell subculture from a substrate. However, the proteolytic activity of trypsin may harm cells by cleaving the cell membrane proteins. The present study shows that cellular uptake of fluorescent nanoparticles is remarkably increased within 24 h after trypsinization. These results highlight the trypsin-induced protein digestion, provoking leaky cell plasma membrane which leads to the strongly enhanced cellular uptake of the nanoparticles. To prevent this effect, one should expose cells to the nanoparticle (NP)-based fluorescent labels at least 48 h after trypsinization. PMID:25328505

  9. Immunomicrospheres - Reagents for cell labeling and separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Dreyer, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    Immunomicrospheres are specially designed microscopic particles that have antibodies or similar molecules chemically bound to their surfaces. The antibody-coated microspheres react in a highly specific way with target cells, viruses, or other antigenic agents. Immunomicrospheres may be synthesized so that they incorporate compounds that are highly radioactive, intensely fluorescent, magnetic, electron opaque, highly colored, or pharmacologically active. These various types of microspheres may be coated with pure, highly specific monoclonal antibodies obtained by the new hybridoma cell cloning techniques or with conventional antibody preparations. Some of the many present and potential applications for these new reagents are (1) new types of radioimmune or immunofluorescent assays, (2) improved fluorescence microscopy, (3) separation of cells on the basis of the fluorescent, electrophoretic, or magnetic properties of bound immunomicrospheres, (4) markers for use in several types of electron or standard light microscopy, and (5) delivery of lethal compouds to specific undesirable living cells. The combination of the various new types of synthetic microspheres and the newly available homogeneous antibodies offers new opportunities in research, diagnosis, and therapy.

  10. Labeling proteins inside living cells using external fluorophores for microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Kai Wen; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Ren, Pin; Youn, Yeoan; Deng, Xiang; Ge, Pinghua; Lee, Sang Hak; Belmont, Andrew S; Selvin, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Site-specific fluorescent labeling of proteins inside live mammalian cells has been achieved by employing Streptolysin O, a bacterial toxin which forms temporary pores in the membrane and allows delivery of virtually any fluorescent probes, ranging from labeled IgG’s to small ligands, with high efficiency (>85% of cells). The whole process, including recovery, takes 30 min, and the cell is ready to be imaged immediately. A variety of cell viability tests were performed after treatment with SLO to ensure that the cells have intact membranes, are able to divide, respond normally to signaling molecules, and maintains healthy organelle morphology. When combined with Oxyrase, a cell-friendly photostabilizer, a ~20x improvement in fluorescence photostability is achieved. By adding in glutathione, fluorophores are made to blink, enabling super-resolution fluorescence with 20–30 nm resolution over a long time (~30 min) under continuous illumination. Example applications in conventional and super-resolution imaging of native and transfected cells include p65 signal transduction activation, single molecule tracking of kinesin, and specific labeling of a series of nuclear and cytoplasmic protein complexes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20378.001 PMID:27935478

  11. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Israel, O.; Groshar, D.; Weininger, J.

    1984-07-01

    Red blood cells labeled with 99mTc constitute a suitable intravascular agent for imaging of vascular abnormalities. Hemangiomas are characterized by low perfusion and a high blood pool. This ''perfusion blood-pool mismatch,'' not encountered in other lesions, may help in the specific diagnosis of this tumor. This is particularly so in cavernous hemangiomas of the liver where three-phase 99mTc-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy should precede liver biopsy. Red cell scintigraphy also is useful for establishing the vascular nature of hemangiomas of the head and neck and the skin and for diagnosis of venous occlusion. Heat-damaged red blood cells provide a specific spleen imaging agent. This should be used when patients with suspected splenic pathology have equivocal colloid scintigraphy.

  12. Cancer cell labeling and tracking using fluorescent and magnetic nanodiamond.

    PubMed

    Lien, Zhi-Yi; Hsu, Tzu-Chia; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Liao, Wei-Siang; Hwang, Kuo-Chu; Chao, Jui-I

    2012-09-01

    Nanodiamond, a promising carbon nanomaterial, develops for biomedical applications such as cancer cell labeling and detection. Here, we establish the nanodiamond-bearing cancer cell lines using the fluorescent and magnetic nanodiamond (FMND). Treatment with FMND particles did not significantly induce cytotoxicity and growth inhibition in HFL-1 normal lung fibroblasts and A549 lung cancer cells. The fluorescence intensities and particle complexities were increased in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by treatment with FMND particles in lung cancer cells; however, the existence of FMND particles inside the cells did not alter cellular size distribution. The FMND-bearing lung cancer cells could be separated by the fluorescent and magnetic properties of FMNDs using the flow cytometer and magnetic device, respectively. The FMND-bearing cancer cells were identified by the existence of FMNDs using flow cytometer and confocal microscope analysis. More importantly, the cell morphology, viability, growth ability and total protein expression profiles in the FMND-bearing cells were similar to those of the parental cells. The separated FMND-bearing cells with various generations were cryopreservation for further applications. After re-thawing the FMND-bearing cancer cell lines, the cells still retained the cell survival and growth ability. Additionally, a variety of human cancer types including colon (RKO), breast (MCF-7), cervical (HeLa), and bladder (BFTC905) cancer cells could be used the same strategy to prepare the FMND-bearing cancer cells. These results show that the FMND-bearing cancer cell lines, which reserve the parental cell functions, can be applied for specific cancer cell labeling and tracking. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of misoprostol and cimetidine on gastric cell labeling index

    SciTech Connect

    Fich, A.; Arber, N.; Sestieri, M.; Zajicek, G.; Rachmilewitz, D.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of misoprostol and cimetidine on gastric cell turnover was studied. Endoscopic biopsy specimens of fundic and antral mucosa were obtained from duodenal ulcer patients before and after 4 wk of therapy with cimetidine 1.2 g/day or misoprostol 800 micrograms/day. Biopsy specimens were incubated with (/sup 3/H)thymidine. Glandular column length and number of labeled cells were determined after autoradiography. There was no significant difference in column length of antral or fundic glands before or after therapy with cimetidine and misoprostol. The number of antral and fundic labeled cells was significantly decreased after misoprostol treatment (3.6 +/- 0.3 and 4.6 +/- 0.4, mean +/- SE), as opposed to their respective number before therapy (6.9 +/- 0.5 and 8.3 +/- 0.8) (p less than 0.01). On the other hand, after treatment with cimetidine, the number of antral and fundic labeled cells was significantly higher (11.8 +/- 0.9 and 7.5 +/- 1.0, respectively) as compared with their number before therapy (5.7 +/- 0.5 and 5.6 +/- 0.6, respectively). The decreased gastric cell turnover induced by misoprostol indicates that the trophic effect of prostanoids on gastric mucosa is not due to an increase in cellular kinetics. The increased gastric cell turnover induced by cimetidine may contribute to its therapeutic effect in peptic ulcer disease.

  14. In vivo quantification of magnetically labelled cells by MRI relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Ulysse; Lajous, Hélène; El Atifi, Michèle; Bidart, Marie; Auboiroux, Vincent; Fries, Pascal Henry; Berger, François; Lahrech, Hana

    2016-11-01

    Cellular MRI, which visualizes magnetically labelled cells (cells*), is an active research field for in vivo cell therapy and tracking. The simultaneous relaxation rate measurements (R2 *, R2 , R1 ) are the basis of a quantitative cellular MRI method proposed here. U937 cells were labelled with Molday ION Rhodamine B, a bi-functional superparamagnetic and fluorescent nanoparticle (U937*). U937* viability and proliferation were not affected in vitro. In vitro relaxometry was performed in a cell concentration range of [2.5 × 10(4) -10(8) ] cells/mL. These measurements show the existence of complementary cell concentration intervals where these rates vary linearly. The juxtaposition of these intervals delineates a wide cell concentration range over which one of the relaxation rates in a voxel of an in vivo image can be converted into an absolute cell concentration. The linear regime was found at high concentrations for R1 in the range of [10(6) - 2 × 10(8) ] cells/mL, at intermediate concentrations for R2 in [2.5 × 10(5) - 5 × 10(7) ] cells/mL and at low concentrations for R2 * in [8 × 10(4) - 5 × 10(6) ] cells/mL. In vivo relaxometry was performed in a longitudinal study, with labelled U937 cells injected into a U87 glioma mouse model. Using in vitro data, maps of in vivo U937* concentrations were obtained by converting one of the in vivo relaxation rates to cell concentration maps. MRI results were compared with the corresponding optical images of the same brains, showing the usefulness of our method to accurately follow therapeutic cell biodistribution in a longitudinal study. Results also demonstrate that the method quantifies a large range of magnetically labelled cells*. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Chromium-51 labeling of sheep red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, G J; Gravelle, D R; Lo, J; Powe, J E

    1992-02-01

    The failure of sheep red blood cells (RBCs) labeled with Chromium-51 (Cr-51) using the ascorbic acid technique to act as a suitable intravascular marker of blood volume in a septic sheep model prompted us to investigate the technique of radiolabeling sheep erythrocytes with this isotope. Consequently, we studied thirteen sheep in which the labeling efficiency of Cr-51 as sodium chromate and hemoglobin typing was determined for each animal. Mean Cr-51 labeling efficiency of sheep RBCs was 67.5% (n = 13). Although 5 of the 13 sheep were discovered to have two types of hemoglobin (Hb) as determined by electrophoresis, overall labeling efficiency of sheep RBCs was determined to be independent of the type of hemoglobin present. However, when two types of Hb were present (Hb-A and Hb-B), Cr-51 had a higher affinity for Hb-B (80%) than Hb-A (20%) even though both Hb types are present in similar proportions (Hb-A = 53%, Hb-B = 46%). The results of this study indicate that sheep RBCs express a lower labeling efficiency for Cr-51 than do human RBCs and that Cr-51 has a higher affinity for Hb-B than for Hb-A when both hemoglobin types are present. This difference is noteworthy when interpreting Cr-51 RBC data in experimental sheep models. Furthermore, caution should be exercised when extrapolating established human protocols to animal models.

  16. Stem Cells and Labeling for Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gazdic, Marina; Volarevic, Vladislav; Arsenijevic, Aleksandar; Erceg, Slaven; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that usually results in sudden and long-lasting locomotor and sensory neuron degeneration below the lesion site. During the last two decades, the search for new therapies has been revolutionized with the improved knowledge of stem cell (SC) biology. SCs therapy offers several attractive strategies for spinal cord repair. The transplantation of SCs promotes remyelination, neurite outgrowth and axonal elongation, and activates resident or transplanted progenitor cells across the lesion cavity. However, optimized growth and differentiation protocols along with reliable safety assays should be established prior to the clinical application of SCs. Additionally, the ideal method of SCs labeling for efficient cell tracking after SCI remains a challenging issue that requires further investigation. This review summarizes the current findings on the SCs-based therapeutic strategies, and compares different SCs labeling approaches for SCI. PMID:28035961

  17. Detection threshold of single SPIO-labeled cells with FIESTA.

    PubMed

    Heyn, Chris; Bowen, Chris V; Rutt, Brian K; Foster, Paula J

    2005-02-01

    MRI of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled cells has become a valuable tool for studying the in vivo trafficking of transplanted cells. Cellular detection with MRI is generally considered to be orders of magnitude less sensitive than other techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT), or optical fluorescence microscopy. However, an analytic description of the detection threshold for single SPIO-labeled cells and the parameters that govern detection has not been adequately provided. In the present work, the detection threshold for single SPIO-labeled cells and the effect of resolution and SNR were studied for a balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequence (3D-FIESTA). Based on the results from both theoretical and experimental analyses, an expression that predicts the minimum detectable mass of SPIO (m(c)) required to detect a single cell against a uniform signal background was derived: m(c) = 5v/(K(fsl) x SNR), where v is the voxel volume, SNR is the image signal-to-noise ratio, and K(fsl) is an empirical constant measured to be 6.2 +/- 0.5 x 10(-5) microl/pgFe. Using this expression, it was shown that the sensitivity of MRI is not very different from that of PET, requiring femtomole quantities of SPIO iron for detection under typical micro-imaging conditions (100 microm isotropic resolution, SNR = 60). The results of this work will aid in the design of cellular imaging experiments by defining the lower limit of SPIO labeling required for single cell detection at any given resolution and SNR.

  18. Goalpha labels ON bipolar cells in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wu, Samuel M

    2003-06-23

    By using double-label immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, we studied rod and cone synaptic contacts, photoreceptor-bipolar cell convergence, and patterns of axon terminal ramification of ON bipolar cells in the tiger salamander retina. An antibody to recoverin, a calcium-binding protein found in photoreceptors and other retinal neurons in various vertebrates, differentially labeled rods and cones by lightly staining rod cell bodies, axons, and synaptic pedicles and heavily staining cone cell bodies and pedicles. An antibody to G(oalpha) labeled most ON bipolar cells, with axon terminals ramified mainly in strata 6-9 and a minor band in stratum 3 of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Stratum 10 of the IPL was G(oalpha) negative, and previous studies showed that axon terminals of rod-dominated ON bipolar cells are monostratified in that stratum. The axonal morphology of G(oalpha)-positive cells resembled that of the cone-dominated (DBC(C)) or mixed rod and cone ON (DBC(M)) bipolar cells. The G(oalpha)-positive dendritic processes made close contact with all cone pedicles and superficial contact with some rod pedicles, consistent with the idea that G(oalpha) subunits are present in DBC(C)s and DBC(M)s. The size and density of these cells were analyzed, and their spatial distributions were determined. To our knowledge, this is the first study to characterize photoreceptor inputs and axon terminal morphology of a population of ON bipolar cell with the use of a G(oalpha) antibody as an immunomarker in the salamander retina. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Non-label immune cell state prediction using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Taro; Chiu, Liang-da; Fujita, Katsumasa; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Fujita, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    The acquired immune system, mainly composed of T and B lymphocytes, plays a key role in protecting the host from infection. It is important and technically challenging to identify cell types and their activation status in living and intact immune cells, without staining or killing the cells. Using Raman spectroscopy, we succeeded in discriminating between living T cells and B cells, and visualized the activation status of living T cells without labeling. Although the Raman spectra of T cells and B cells were similar, they could be distinguished by discriminant analysis of the principal components. Raman spectra of activated T cells with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies largely differed compared to that of naïve T cells, enabling the prediction of T cell activation status at a single cell level. Our analysis revealed that the spectra of individual T cells gradually change from the pattern of naïve T cells to that of activated T cells during the first 24 h of activation, indicating that changes in Raman spectra reflect slow changes rather than rapid changes in cell state during activation. Our results indicate that the Raman spectrum enables the detection of dynamic changes in individual cell state scattered in a heterogeneous population. PMID:27876845

  20. Measurement of posttransfusion red cell survival with the biotin label.

    PubMed

    Mock, Donald M; Widness, John A; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Strauss, Ronald G; Cancelas, Jose A; Cohen, Robert M; Lindsell, Christopher J; Franco, Robert S

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize and critically assess information concerning the biotin method to label red blood cells (RBC) for use in studies of RBC and transfusion biology-information that will prove useful to a broad audience of clinicians and scientists. A review of RBC biology, with emphasis on RBC senescence and in vivo survival, is included, followed by an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of biotin-labeled RBC (BioRBC) for measuring circulating RBC volume, posttransfusion RBC recovery, RBC life span, and RBC age-dependent properties. The advantages of BioRBC over (51)Cr RBC labeling, the current reference method, are discussed. Because the biotin method is straightforward and robust, including the ability to follow the entire life spans of multiple RBC populations concurrently in the same subject, BioRBC offers distinct advantages for studying RBC biology and physiology, particularly RBC survival. The method for biotin labeling, validation of the method, and application of BioRBCs to studies of sickle cell disease, diabetes, and anemia of prematurity are reviewed. Studies documenting the safe use of BioRBC are reviewed; unanswered questions requiring future studies, remaining concerns, and regulatory barriers to broader application of BioRBC including adoption as a new reference method are also presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Labeled cells in the investigation of hematologic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, J.B.; Hansell, J.

    1984-07-01

    Radiolabeling techniques for white cells, platelets, and erythrocytes are reviewed. The early studies using diisopropylfluoro-32P contributed to an understanding of the production and circulation of the blood elements, and 51Cr proved useful in localizing sites of cell migration or destruction. 111In-oxine has further improved the understanding of blood cell organ sequestration, and permitted combined kinetic and organ imaging studies. Radionuclide labels have been essential for the elucidation of various hematologic disorders, such as the neutropenias, thrombocytopenias, anemias, and polycythemia. Many new treatments, including monoclonal antibodies, have been evaluated with radionuclides.

  2. Label-free classification of cultured cells through diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ke; Feng, Yuanming; Jacobs, Kenneth M; Lu, Jun Q; Brock, R Scott; Yang, Li V; Bertrand, Fred E; Farwell, Mary A; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2011-06-01

    Automated classification of biological cells according to their 3D morphology is highly desired in a flow cytometer setting. We have investigated this possibility experimentally and numerically using a diffraction imaging approach. A fast image analysis software based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) algorithm has been developed to extract feature parameters from measured diffraction images. The results of GLCM analysis and subsequent classification demonstrate the potential for rapid classification among six types of cultured cells. Combined with numerical results we show that the method of diffraction imaging flow cytometry has the capacity as a platform for high-throughput and label-free classification of biological cells.

  3. Blood cell labelling. Theory and methods: radiation hazards.

    PubMed

    Trott, N G; Akbari, R B

    1984-02-03

    The chief physical properties of the radionuclide In111 are outlined, and compared with those of three other radionuclides, Tc99m, I131 and Cr51 which have similar applications. It is pointed out that the gamma-rays of In111 are appreciably more penetrating in lead than those of Tc99m and the significance of this, both in the use of shielding on syringes and in the effectiveness of lead glass screens is discussed. Examples are given of the dosimetry for In111 labelled cells in humans and it is noted that the absorbed dose in the spleen per mCi (37 MBq) injected may be some 10 rad (0.1 Gy). The problems that have been noted of damage to cells arising from oxine labelling and now considered to be due to radiation damage are briefly reviewed.

  4. Cell Labeling and Injection in Developing Embryonic Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Dirschinger, Ralf J.; Evans, Sylvia M.; Puceat, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Testing the fate of embryonic or pluripotent stem cell-derivatives in in vitro protocols has led to controversial outcomes that do not necessarily reflect their in vivo potential. Preferably, these cells should be placed in a proper embryonic environment in order to acquire their definite phenotype. Furthermore, cell lineage tracing studies in the mouse after labeling cells with dyes or retroviral vectors has remained mostly limited to early stage mouse embryos with still poorly developed organs. To overcome these limitations, we designed standard and ultrasound-mediated microinjection protocols to inject various agents in targeted regions of the heart in mouse embryos at E9.5 and later stages of development.  Embryonic explant or embryos are then cultured or left to further develop in utero. These agents include fluorescent dyes, virus, shRNAs, or stem cell-derived progenitor cells. Our approaches allow for preservation of the function of the organ while monitoring migration and fate of labeled and/or injected cells. These technologies can be extended to other organs and will be very helpful to address key biological questions in biology of development. PMID:24797676

  5. Label-free quantitative cell division monitoring of endothelial cells by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Bauwens, Andreas; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Müthing, Johannes; Karch, Helge; von Bally, Gert

    2010-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables quantitative multifocus phase contrast imaging for nondestructive technical inspection and live cell analysis. Time-lapse investigations on human brain microvascular endothelial cells demonstrate the use of DHM for label-free dynamic quantitative monitoring of cell division of mother cells into daughter cells. Cytokinetic DHM analysis provides future applications in toxicology and cancer research.

  6. Ultra-fast stem cell labelling using cationised magnetoferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia Carreira, S.; Armstrong, J. P. K.; Seddon, A. M.; Perriman, A. W.; Hartley-Davies, R.; Schwarzacher, W.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) facilitates many important biotechnological applications, such as cell imaging and remote manipulation. However, to achieve adequate cellular loading of SPIONs, long incubation times (24 hours and more) or laborious surface functionalisation are often employed, which can adversely affect cell function. Here, we demonstrate that chemical cationisation of magnetoferritin produces a highly membrane-active nanoparticle that can magnetise human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) using incubation times as short as one minute. Magnetisation persisted for several weeks in culture and provided significant T2* contrast enhancement during magnetic resonance imaging. Exposure to cationised magnetoferritin did not adversely affect the membrane integrity, proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation capacity of hMSCs, which provides the first detailed evidence for the biocompatibility of magnetoferritin. The combination of synthetic ease and flexibility, the rapidity of labelling and absence of cytotoxicity make this novel nanoparticle system an easily accessible and versatile platform for a range of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine.Magnetic cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) facilitates many important biotechnological applications, such as cell imaging and remote manipulation. However, to achieve adequate cellular loading of SPIONs, long incubation times (24 hours and more) or laborious surface functionalisation are often employed, which can adversely affect cell function. Here, we demonstrate that chemical cationisation of magnetoferritin produces a highly membrane-active nanoparticle that can magnetise human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) using incubation times as short as one minute. Magnetisation persisted for several weeks in culture and provided significant T2* contrast enhancement during magnetic resonance imaging. Exposure to cationised

  7. Microfluidic magnetophoretic separations of immunomagnetically labeled rare mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas P; Forry, Samuel P

    2012-04-21

    Immunomagnetic isolation and magnetophoresis in microfluidics have emerged as viable techniques for the separation, fractionation, and enrichment of rare cells. Here we present the development and characterization of a microfluidic system that incorporates an angled permanent magnet for the lateral magnetophoresis of superparamagnetic beads and labeled cell-bead complexes. A numerical model, based on the relevant transport processes, is developed as a design tool for the demonstration and prediction of magnetophoretic displacement. We employ a dimensionless magnetophoresis parameter to efficiently investigate the design space, gain insight into the physics of the system, and compare results across the vast spectrum of magnetophoretic microfluidic systems. The numerical model and theoretical analysis are experimentally validated by the lateral magnetophoretic deflection of superparamagnetic beads and magnetically labeled breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells in a microfluidic device that incorporates a permanent magnet angled relative to the flow. Through the dimensionless magnetophoresis parameter, the transition between regimes of magnetophoretic action, from hydrodynamically dominated (magnetic deflection) to magnetically dominated (magnetic capture), is experimentally identified. This powerful tool and theoretical framework enables efficient device and experiment design of biologically relevant systems, taking into account their inherent variability and labeling distributions. This analysis identifies the necessary beads, magnet configuration (orientation), magnet type (permanent, ferromagnetic, electromagnet), flow rate, channel geometry, and buffer to achieve the desired level of magnetophoretic deflection or capture.

  8. Fluorescent labeling of tetracysteine-tagged proteins in intact cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Gaietta, Guido; Zürn, Alexander; Adams, Stephen R; Terrillon, Sonia; Ellisman, Mark H; Tsien, Roger Y; Lohse, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a general protocol for labeling proteins with the membrane-permeant fluorogenic biarsenical dye fluorescein arsenical hairpin binder–ethanedithiol (FlAsH-EDT2). Generation of the tetracysteine-tagged protein construct by itself is not described, as this is a protein-specific process. This method allows site-selective labeling of proteins in living cells and has been applied to a wide variety of proteins and biological problems. We provide here a generally applicable labeling procedure and discuss the problems that can occur as well as general considerations that must be taken into account when designing and implementing the procedure. The method can even be applied to proteins with expression below 1 pmol mg−1 of protein, such as G protein–coupled receptors, and it can be used to study the intracellular localization of proteins as well as functional interactions in fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. The labeling procedure using FlAsH-EDT2 as described takes 2–3 h, depending on the number of samples to be processed. PMID:20885379

  9. Label-free cell separation and sorting in microfluidic systems

    PubMed Central

    Gossett, Daniel R.; Weaver, Westbrook M.; Mach, Albert J.; Hur, Soojung Claire; Tse, Henry Tat Kwong; Lee, Wonhee; Amini, Hamed

    2010-01-01

    Cell separation and sorting are essential steps in cell biology research and in many diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Recently, there has been interest in methods which avoid the use of biochemical labels; numerous intrinsic biomarkers have been explored to identify cells including size, electrical polarizability, and hydrodynamic properties. This review highlights microfluidic techniques used for label-free discrimination and fractionation of cell populations. Microfluidic systems have been adopted to precisely handle single cells and interface with other tools for biochemical analysis. We analyzed many of these techniques, detailing their mode of separation, while concentrating on recent developments and evaluating their prospects for application. Furthermore, this was done from a perspective where inertial effects are considered important and general performance metrics were proposed which would ease comparison of reported technologies. Lastly, we assess the current state of these technologies and suggest directions which may make them more accessible. Figure A wide range of microfluidic technologies have been developed to separate and sort cells by taking advantage of differences in their intrinsic biophysical properties PMID:20419490

  10. A Fast Multi-Object Extraction Algorithm Based on Cell-Based Connected Components Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qingyi; Takaki, Takeshi; Ishii, Idaku

    We describe a cell-based connected component labeling algorithm to calculate the 0th and 1st moment features as the attributes for labeled regions. These can be used to indicate their sizes and positions for multi-object extraction. Based on the additivity in moment features, the cell-based labeling algorithm can label divided cells of a certain size in an image by scanning the image only once to obtain the moment features of the labeled regions with remarkably reduced computational complexity and memory consumption for labeling. Our algorithm is a simple-one-time-scan cell-based labeling algorithm, which is suitable for hardware and parallel implementation. We also compared it with conventional labeling algorithms. The experimental results showed that our algorithm is faster than conventional raster-scan labeling algorithms.

  11. Label-free electronic detection of target cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandyarpour, Rahim; Javanmard, Mehdi; Harris, James; Davis, Ronald W.

    2014-03-01

    In this manuscript we describe an electronic label-free method for detection of target cells, which has potential applications ranging from pathogen detection for food safety all the way to detection of circulating tumor cells for cancer diagnosis. The nanoelectronic platform consists of a stack of electrodes separated by a 30nm thick insulating layer. Cells binding to the tip of the sensor result in a decrease in the impedance at the sensing tip due to an increase in the fringing capacitance between the electrodes. As a proof of concept we demonstrate the ability to detect Saccharomyces Cerevisae cells with high specificity using a sensor functionalized with Concanavalin A. Ultimately we envision using this sensor in conjunction with a technology for pre-concentration of target cells to develop a fully integrated micro total analysis system.

  12. Commercial Nanoparticles for Stem Cell Labeling and Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaqi; Xu, Chenjie; Ow, Hooisweng

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy provides promising solutions for diseases and injuries that conventional medicines and therapies cannot effectively treat. To achieve its full therapeutic potentials, the homing process, survival, differentiation, and engraftment of stem cells post transplantation must be clearly understood. To address this need, non-invasive imaging technologies based on nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed to track transplanted stem cells. Here we summarize existing commercial NPs which can act as contrast agents of three commonly used imaging modalities, including fluorescence imaging, magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic imaging, for stem cell labeling and tracking. Specifically, we go through their technologies, industry distributors, applications and existing concerns in stem cell research. Finally, we provide an industry perspective on the potential challenges and future for the development of new NP products. PMID:23946821

  13. Labeling index in squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Balzi, M.; Ninu, B.M.; Becciolini, A.; Scubla, E.; Boanini, P.; Gallina, E.; Gallo, O.; Fini-Storchi, O.; Bondi, R. )

    1991-07-01

    Two cell kinetic parameters, the 3H-thymidine labeling index (TLI) and the mitotic index (MI), were studied in vitro on fragments of squamous cell carcinoma tissue of the larynx. They were evaluated to identify those elements able to characterize the growth of these solid tumors. The values of these parameters were analyzed as a function of the clinical stage and the involvement of the regional lymph nodes. Results showed a statistically significant increase in the TLI from stage T1 to T3. No statistically significant differences in the TLI values were observed between the patients with positive and negative lymph nodes.

  14. Endogenously EGFP-Labeled Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junli; Rao, Rammohan V.; Spilman, Patricia; Mangada, Julie; Xie, Lin; Vitelli, Cathy; Gorostiza, Olivia F.; Madden, David T.; Zeng, Xianmin; Jin, Kunlin; Hart, Matthew J.; Bredesen, Dale E.; Galvan, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived precursors holds great promise for treating various disease conditions. Tracing of precursors derived from ESC after transplantation is important to determine their migration and fate. Chemical labeling, as well as transfection or viral-mediated transduction of tracer genes in ESC or in ESC-derived precursors, which are the methods that have been used in the generation of the vast majority of labeled ESCs, have serious drawbacks such as varying efficacy. To circumvent this problem we generated endogenously traceable mouse (m)ESC clones by direct derivation from blastocysts of transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under control of the housekeeping ß-actin promoter. The only previous report of endogenously EGFP-labeled mESC derived directly from transgenic EGFP embryos is that of Ahn and colleagues (Ahn et al, 2008. Cytotherapy 10:759–769), who used embryos from a different transgenic line and used a significantly different protocol for derivation. Cells from a high-expressing EGFP-mESC clone, G11, retain high levels of EGFP expression after differentiation into derivatives of all three primary germ layers both in vitro and in vivo, and contribution to all tissues in chimeric progeny. To determine whether progenitor cells derived from G11 could be used in transplantation experiments, we differentiated them to early neuronal precursors and injected them into syngeneic mouse brains. Transplanted EGFP-expressing cells at different stages of differentiation along the neuronal lineage could be identified in brains by expression of EGFP twelve weeks after transplantation. Our results suggest that the EGFP-mESC(G11) line may constitute a useful tool in ESC-based cell and tissue replacement studies. PMID:21874159

  15. Endogenously EGFP-Labeled Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junli; Rao, Rammohan V; Spilman, Patricia; Mangada, Julie; Xie, Lin; Vitelli, Cathy; Gorostiza, Olivia F; Madden, David T; Zeng, Xianmin; Jin, Kunlin; Hart, Matthew J; Bredesen, Dale E; Galvan, Veronica

    2011-02-01

    Transplantation of embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived precursors holds great promise for treating various disease conditions. Tracing of precursors derived from ESC after transplantation is important to determine their migration and fate. Chemical labeling, as well as transfection or viral-mediated transduction of tracer genes in ESC or in ESC-derived precursors, which are the methods that have been used in the generation of the vast majority of labeled ESCs, have serious drawbacks such as varying efficacy. To circumvent this problem we generated endogenously traceable mouse (m)ESC clones by direct derivation from blastocysts of transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under control of the housekeeping β-actin promoter The only previous report of endogenously EGFP-labeled mESC derived directly from transgenic EGFP embryos is that of Ahn and colleagues (Ahn et al, 2008. Cytotherapy 10:759-769), who used embryos from a different transgenic line and used a significantly different protocol for derivation. Cells from a high-expressing EGFP-mESC clone, G11, retain high levels of EGFP expression after differentiation into derivatives of all three primary germ layers both in vitro and in vivo, and contribution to all tissues in chimeric progeny. To determine whether progenitor cells derived from G11 could be used in transplantation experiments, we differentiated them to early neuronal precursors and injected them into syngeneic mouse brains. Transplanted EGFP-expressing cells at different stages of differentiation along the neuronal lineage could be identified in brains by expression of EGFP twelve weeks after transplantation. Our results suggest that the EGFP-mESC(G11) line may constitute a useful tool in ESC-based cell and tissue replacement studies.

  16. Label-Free Ratiometric Imaging of Serotonin in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Anand Kant; Maity, Barun Kumar; Surendran, Dayana; Tripathy, Umakanta; Maiti, Sudipta

    2017-08-24

    Ratiometric imaging can quantitatively measure changes in cellular analyte concentrations using specially designed fluorescent labels. We describe a label-free ratiometric imaging technique for direct detection of changes in intravesicular serotonin concentration in live cells. At higher concentrations, serotonin forms transient oligomers whose ultraviolet emission is shifted to longer wavelengths. We access the ultraviolet/blue emission using relatively benign three-photon excitation and split it into two imaging channels, whose ratio reports the concentration. The technique is sensitive at a physiologically relevant concentration range (10-150 mM serotonin). As a proof of principle, we measure the increase of intravesicular serotonin concentration with the addition of external serotonin. In general, since emission spectra of molecules are often sensitive to concentration, our method may be applicable to other natively fluorescent intracellular molecules which are present at high concentrations.

  17. Hoechst fluorescence intensity can be used to separate viable bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells from viable non-bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Pulvermacher, P. M.; Schultz, E.; Schell, K.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) is a powerful compound to study the mitotic activity of a cell. Most techniques that identify BrdU-labeled cells require conditions that kill the cells. However, the fluorescence intensity of the membrane-permeable Hoechst dyes is reduced by the incorporation of BrdU into DNA, allowing the separation of viable BrdU positive (BrdU+) cells from viable BrdU negative (BrdU-) cells. METHODS: Cultures of proliferating cells were supplemented with BrdU for 48 h and other cultures of proliferating cells were maintained without BrdU. Mixtures of viable BrdU+ and viable BrdU- cells from the two proliferating cultures were stained with Hoechst 33342. The viable BrdU+ and BrdU- cells were sorted into different fractions from a mixture of BrdU+ and BrdU- cells based on Hoechst fluorescence intensity and the ability to exclude the vital dye, propidium iodide. Subsequently, samples from the original mixture, the sorted BrdU+ cell population, and the sorted BrdU- cell population were immunostained using an anti-BrdU monoclonal antibody and evaluated using flow cytometry. RESULTS: Two mixtures consisting of approximately 55% and 69% BrdU+ cells were sorted into fractions consisting of greater than 93% BrdU+ cells and 92% BrdU- cells. The separated cell populations were maintained in vitro after sorting to demonstrate their viability. CONCLUSIONS: Hoechst fluorescence intensity in combination with cell sorting is an effective tool to separate viable BrdU+ from viable BrdU- cells for further study. The separated cell populations were maintained in vitro after sorting to demonstrate their viability. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Hoechst fluorescence intensity can be used to separate viable bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells from viable non-bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Pulvermacher, P. M.; Schultz, E.; Schell, K.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) is a powerful compound to study the mitotic activity of a cell. Most techniques that identify BrdU-labeled cells require conditions that kill the cells. However, the fluorescence intensity of the membrane-permeable Hoechst dyes is reduced by the incorporation of BrdU into DNA, allowing the separation of viable BrdU positive (BrdU+) cells from viable BrdU negative (BrdU-) cells. METHODS: Cultures of proliferating cells were supplemented with BrdU for 48 h and other cultures of proliferating cells were maintained without BrdU. Mixtures of viable BrdU+ and viable BrdU- cells from the two proliferating cultures were stained with Hoechst 33342. The viable BrdU+ and BrdU- cells were sorted into different fractions from a mixture of BrdU+ and BrdU- cells based on Hoechst fluorescence intensity and the ability to exclude the vital dye, propidium iodide. Subsequently, samples from the original mixture, the sorted BrdU+ cell population, and the sorted BrdU- cell population were immunostained using an anti-BrdU monoclonal antibody and evaluated using flow cytometry. RESULTS: Two mixtures consisting of approximately 55% and 69% BrdU+ cells were sorted into fractions consisting of greater than 93% BrdU+ cells and 92% BrdU- cells. The separated cell populations were maintained in vitro after sorting to demonstrate their viability. CONCLUSIONS: Hoechst fluorescence intensity in combination with cell sorting is an effective tool to separate viable BrdU+ from viable BrdU- cells for further study. The separated cell populations were maintained in vitro after sorting to demonstrate their viability. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Label-free detection of immune complexes with myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Szittner, Z; Bentlage, A E H; Rovero, P; Migliorini, P; Lóránd, V; Prechl, J; Vidarsson, G

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to provide proof-of-concept for quantitative and qualitative label-free detection of immune complexes through myeloid cells with imaging surface plasmon resonance. Surface plasmon resonance imaging was first applied to monitor the binding of human sera from healthy and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients to immobilized citrullinated RA-specific peptide antigens, histone citrullinated peptide 2 (HCP2) and viral citrullinated peptide 2 (VCP2). Next, the binding of monocytoid cell line U937 to the resulting immune complexes on the sensor surface was monitored. As control, binding of U937 was monitored to immunoglobulin (Ig)G subclasses simultaneously. Cell response results were compared to results of cyclic citrullinated peptide 2 (CCP2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), clinical RA diagnosis and antigen-specific antibody distribution of the samples. Human IgG3 triggered the most pronounced response, followed by IgG1 and IgG4, while IgG2 did not result in U937 cell binding. Serum samples obtained from RA patients resulted in a significantly increased cell response to VCP2 compared to healthy controls. The strength of cell response towards VCP2 immune complexes showed significant correlation with levels of antigen-specific IgA, IgG and IgG3. Cellular responses on VCP2 immune complexes showed significant association with both CCP2-based serological positivity and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria-based clinical RA diagnosis. Immunoglobulin-triggered binding of monocytoid cells can be monitored using a label-free multiplex technology. Because these binding events are presumably initiated by Fc receptors, the system provides a tool for biological detection of autoantibodies with diagnostic value, here exemplified by anti-citrullinated antibodies. This provides added information to antibody levels, as interaction with Fc-receptor-expressing cells is also affected by post-translational modification of the immunoglobulins.

  20. Modulating cell-cell communication with a high-throughput label-free cell assay.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangshan; Lai, Fang; Fang, Ye

    2012-02-01

    A high-throughput label-free cell assay for modulating cell-cell communication is demonstrated with the Epic® system, a resonant waveguide grating sensor platform. Natural killer (NK) cells are known to be able to recognize abnormal cells (e.g., cancer cells and cells presenting intercellular adhesion molecule 1 [ICAM1] through cell surface receptors) and kill them. In this study, the effect of effecter cells NK92MI on two kinds of target cells, cervical cancer cells (HeLa) and Chinese hamster ovarian cells overexpressing ICAM1 (CHO-ICAM1), was examined. Living target cells' response to NK92MI cells was monitored in real time and measured as wavelength shift in picometers. The authors showed that the detectability of target cell response is affected by multiple factors: the ratio of effecter cells to target cells (E/T), the interaction time of the two types of cells, and the target cell type. For example, with the effecter cells NK92MI and the same incubation time of 16 h, a minimal E/T ratio of 1 is required to detect HeLa cell response, whereas an E/T of 0.5 is sufficient to detect CHO-ICAM1 cell response. The authors confirmed that NK92MI cell-mediated target cell cytotoxicity results in negative optical signals and is associated with apoptosis mainly through caspase pathways. Distinct optical signals could be generated with the pretreatment of the target cells with various known pharmaceutical reagents, making the assay useful for discovering new chemicals that may affect cell-cell communications.

  1. Chronology of Islet Differentiation Revealed By Temporal Cell Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Li, Zhongmei; German, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Neurogenin 3 plays a pivotal role in pancreatic endocrine differentiation. Whereas mouse models expressing reporters such as eGFP or LacZ under the control of the Neurog3 gene enable us to label cells in the pancreatic endocrine lineage, the long half-life of most reporter proteins makes it difficult to distinguish cells actively expressing neurogenin 3 from differentiated cells that have stopped transcribing the gene. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In order to separate the transient neurogenin 3 –expressing endocrine progenitor cells from the differentiating endocrine cells, we developed a mouse model (Ngn3-Timer) in which DsRed-E5, a fluorescent protein that shifts its emission spectrum from green to red over time, was expressed transgenically from the NEUROG3 locus. RESULTS In the Ngn3-Timer embryos, green-dominant cells could be readily detected by microscopy or flow cytometry and distinguished from green/red double-positive cells. When fluorescent cells were sorted into three different populations by a fluorescence-activated cell sorter, placed in culture, and then reanalyzed by flow cytometry, green-dominant cells converted to green/red double-positive cells within 6 h. The sorted cell populations were then used to determine the temporal patterns of expression for 145 transcriptional regulators in the developing pancreas. CONCLUSIONS The precise temporal resolution of this model defines the narrow window of neurogenin 3 expression in islet progenitor cells and permits sequential analyses of sorted cells as well as the testing of gene regulatory models for the differentiation of pancreatic islet cells. PMID:19478145

  2. A novel synthesis of polyacrolein microspheres and their application for cell labeling and cell separation.

    PubMed

    Margel, S; Beitler, U; Ofarim, M

    1981-01-01

    A novel method for the synthesis of polyacrolein microspheres with fluorescent or magnetic properties is described. These microspheres carry reactive aldehyde groups on their surface, which are used for covalent binding of various proteins at physiological pH. Polyacrolein microspheres may be used as a simple tool for cell labeling and cell separation. The feasibility of specific labeling of fresh human red blood cells and of the separation of human red blood cells from turkey red blood cells by means of a magnetic field is discussed.

  3. Live-cell protein labelling with nanometre precision by cell squeezing

    PubMed Central

    Kollmannsperger, Alina; Sharei, Armon; Raulf, Anika; Heilemann, Mike; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs F.; Wieneke, Ralph; Tampé, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Live-cell labelling techniques to visualize proteins with minimal disturbance are important; however, the currently available methods are limited in their labelling efficiency, specificity and cell permeability. We describe high-throughput protein labelling facilitated by minimalistic probes delivered to mammalian cells by microfluidic cell squeezing. High-affinity and target-specific tracing of proteins in various subcellular compartments is demonstrated, culminating in photoinduced labelling within live cells. Both the fine-tuned delivery of subnanomolar concentrations and the minimal size of the probe allow for live-cell super-resolution imaging with very low background and nanometre precision. This method is fast in probe delivery (∼1,000,000 cells per second), versatile across cell types and can be readily transferred to a multitude of proteins. Moreover, the technique succeeds in combination with well-established methods to gain multiplexed labelling and has demonstrated potential to precisely trace target proteins, in live mammalian cells, by super-resolution microscopy. PMID:26822409

  4. Live-cell protein labelling with nanometre precision by cell squeezing.

    PubMed

    Kollmannsperger, Alina; Sharei, Armon; Raulf, Anika; Heilemann, Mike; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs F; Wieneke, Ralph; Tampé, Robert

    2016-01-29

    Live-cell labelling techniques to visualize proteins with minimal disturbance are important; however, the currently available methods are limited in their labelling efficiency, specificity and cell permeability. We describe high-throughput protein labelling facilitated by minimalistic probes delivered to mammalian cells by microfluidic cell squeezing. High-affinity and target-specific tracing of proteins in various subcellular compartments is demonstrated, culminating in photoinduced labelling within live cells. Both the fine-tuned delivery of subnanomolar concentrations and the minimal size of the probe allow for live-cell super-resolution imaging with very low background and nanometre precision. This method is fast in probe delivery (∼ 1,000,000 cells per second), versatile across cell types and can be readily transferred to a multitude of proteins. Moreover, the technique succeeds in combination with well-established methods to gain multiplexed labelling and has demonstrated potential to precisely trace target proteins, in live mammalian cells, by super-resolution microscopy.

  5. Antibody microarrays for label-free cell-based applications.

    PubMed

    Milgram, Sarah; Bombera, Radoslaw; Livache, Thierry; Roupioz, Yoann

    2012-02-01

    The recent advances in microtechnologies have shown the interest of developing microarrays dedicated to cell analysis. In this way, miniaturized cell analyzing platforms use several detection techniques requiring specific solid supports for microarray read-out (colorimetric, fluorescent, electrochemical, acoustic, optical…). Real-time and label-free techniques, such as Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi), arouse increasing interest for applications in miniaturized formats. Thus, we focused our study on chemical methods for antibody-based microarray fabrication dedicated to the SPRi analysis of cells or cellular activity. Three different approaches were designed and developed for specific applications. In the first case, a polypyrrole-based chemistry was used to array antibody-microarray for specific capture of whole living cells. In the second case, the polypyrrole-based chemistry was complexified in a three molecular level assembly using DNA and antibody conjugates to allow the specific release of cells after their capture. Finally, in the third case, a thiol-based chemistry was developed for long incubation times of biological samples of high complexity. This last approach was focused on the simultaneous study of both cell type characterization and secretory activity (detection of proteins secreted by cells). This paper describes three original methods allowing a rapid and efficient analysis of cellular sample on-chip using immunoaffinity-based assays. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cell-free measurements of brightness of fluorescently labeled antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haiying; Tourkakis, George; Shi, Dennis; Kim, David M.; Zhang, Hairong; Du, Tommy; Eades, William C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2017-01-01

    Validation of imaging contrast agents, such as fluorescently labeled imaging antibodies, has been recognized as a critical challenge in clinical and preclinical studies. As the number of applications for imaging antibodies grows, these materials are increasingly being subjected to careful scrutiny. Antibody fluorescent brightness is one of the key parameters that is of critical importance. Direct measurements of the brightness with common spectroscopy methods are challenging, because the fluorescent properties of the imaging antibodies are highly sensitive to the methods of conjugation, degree of labeling, and contamination with free dyes. Traditional methods rely on cell-based assays that lack reproducibility and accuracy. In this manuscript, we present a novel and general approach for measuring the brightness using antibody-avid polystyrene beads and flow cytometry. As compared to a cell-based method, the described technique is rapid, quantitative, and highly reproducible. The proposed method requires less than ten microgram of sample and is applicable for optimizing synthetic conjugation procedures, testing commercial imaging antibodies, and performing high-throughput validation of conjugation procedures. PMID:28150730

  7. Cell-free measurements of brightness of fluorescently labeled antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haiying; Tourkakis, George; Shi, Dennis; Kim, David M.; Zhang, Hairong; Du, Tommy; Eades, William C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2017-02-01

    Validation of imaging contrast agents, such as fluorescently labeled imaging antibodies, has been recognized as a critical challenge in clinical and preclinical studies. As the number of applications for imaging antibodies grows, these materials are increasingly being subjected to careful scrutiny. Antibody fluorescent brightness is one of the key parameters that is of critical importance. Direct measurements of the brightness with common spectroscopy methods are challenging, because the fluorescent properties of the imaging antibodies are highly sensitive to the methods of conjugation, degree of labeling, and contamination with free dyes. Traditional methods rely on cell-based assays that lack reproducibility and accuracy. In this manuscript, we present a novel and general approach for measuring the brightness using antibody-avid polystyrene beads and flow cytometry. As compared to a cell-based method, the described technique is rapid, quantitative, and highly reproducible. The proposed method requires less than ten microgram of sample and is applicable for optimizing synthetic conjugation procedures, testing commercial imaging antibodies, and performing high-throughput validation of conjugation procedures.

  8. Normal ovarian surface epithelial label-retaining cells exhibit stem/progenitor cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Szotek, Paul P; Chang, Henry L; Brennand, Kristen; Fujino, Akihiro; Pieretti-Vanmarcke, Rafael; Lo Celso, Cristina; Dombkowski, David; Preffer, Frederic; Cohen, Kenneth S; Teixeira, Jose; Donahoe, Patricia K

    2008-08-26

    Ovulation induces cyclic rupture and regenerative repair of the ovarian coelomic epithelium. This process of repeated disruption and repair accompanied by complex remodeling typifies a somatic stem/progenitor cell-mediated process. Using BrdU incorporation and doxycycline inducible histone2B-green fluorescent protein pulse-chase techniques, we identify a label-retaining cell population in the coelomic epithelium of the adult mouse ovary as candidate somatic stem/progenitor cells. The identified population exhibits quiescence with asymmetric label retention, functional response to estrous cycling in vivo by proliferation, enhanced growth characteristics by in vitro colony formation, and cytoprotective mechanisms by enrichment for the side population. Together, these characteristics identify the label-retaining cell population as a candidate for the putative somatic stem/progenitor cells of the coelomic epithelium of the mouse ovary.

  9. Normal ovarian surface epithelial label-retaining cells exhibit stem/progenitor cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Szotek, Paul P.; Chang, Henry L.; Brennand, Kristen; Fujino, Akihiro; Pieretti-Vanmarcke, Rafael; Lo Celso, Cristina; Dombkowski, David; Preffer, Frederic; Cohen, Kenneth S.; Teixeira, Jose; Donahoe, Patricia K.

    2008-01-01

    Ovulation induces cyclic rupture and regenerative repair of the ovarian coelomic epithelium. This process of repeated disruption and repair accompanied by complex remodeling typifies a somatic stem/progenitor cell-mediated process. Using BrdU incorporation and doxycycline inducible histone2B-green fluorescent protein pulse–chase techniques, we identify a label-retaining cell population in the coelomic epithelium of the adult mouse ovary as candidate somatic stem/progenitor cells. The identified population exhibits quiescence with asymmetric label retention, functional response to estrous cycling in vivo by proliferation, enhanced growth characteristics by in vitro colony formation, and cytoprotective mechanisms by enrichment for the side population. Together, these characteristics identify the label-retaining cell population as a candidate for the putative somatic stem/progenitor cells of the coelomic epithelium of the mouse ovary. PMID:18711140

  10. HaloTag protein-mediated specific labeling of living cells with quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    So, Min-kyung; Yao Hequan; Rao Jianghong

    2008-09-26

    Quantum dots emerge as an attractive alternative to small molecule fluorophores as fluorescent tags for in vivo cell labeling and imaging. This communication presents a method for specific labeling of live cells using quantum dots. The labeling is mediated by HaloTag protein expressed at the cell surface which forms a stable covalent adduct with its ligand (HaloTag ligand). The labeling can be performed in one single step with quantum dot conjugates that are functionalized with HaloTag ligand, or in two steps with biotinylated HaloTag ligand first and followed by streptavidin coated quantum dots. Live cell fluorescence imaging indicates that the labeling is specific and takes place at the cell surface. This HaloTag protein-mediated cell labeling method should facilitate the application of quantum dots for live cell imaging.

  11. Nanoparticle-labeled stem cells: a novel therapeutic vehicle

    PubMed Central

    El-Sadik, Abir O; El-Ansary, Afaf; Sabry, Sherif M

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been described as a general purpose technology. It has already generated a range of inventions and innovations. Development of nanotechnology will provide clinical medicine with a range of new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities such as medical imaging, medical diagnosis, drug delivery, and cancer detection and management. Nanoparticles such as manganese, polystyrene, silica, titanium oxide, gold, silver, carbon, quantum dots, and iron oxide have received enormous attention in the creation of new types of analytical tools for biotechnology and life sciences. Labeling of stem cells with nanoparticles overcame the problems in homing and fixing stem cells to their desired site and guiding extension of stem cells to specific directions. Although the biologic effects of some nanoparticles have already been assessed, information on toxicity and possible mechanisms of various particle types remains inadequate. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the mechanisms of internalization and distribution of nanoparticles inside stem cells, as well as the influence of different types of nanoparticles on stem cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and cytotoxicity, and to assess the role of nanoparticles in tracking the fate of stem cells used in tissue regeneration. PMID:22291483

  12. Experimental study of super paramagnetic iron oxide labeled synovial mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang-Yuan; Li, Hong-Hang; Chen, Chang-Hui; Bi, Sheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and changes of biological characteristics before and after synovial mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) labelled by super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO). The rabbit SMSCs were isolated, cultured, purified and identified in vitro. After adding the different concentrations of SPIO-labelled liquid, the cells were incubated 24 h in 37°C carbon dioxide incubator. The labeled-cell samples were observed by Prussian blue staining, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and the cell biology before and after the labeling was compared. The blue stained particles could be seen in the cytoplasm; the SPIO label was positive in 95% SMSC cells. With the concentration of the label liquid increasing, the blue-stained cytoplasm became darker. A large number of high electron density particles could be seen in the cytoplasm and in the pinocytosis vesicles by TEM, which suggested SPIO label positive. When the SPIO concentration was (12.5~50) μg/mL, the differences in cell proliferation and cell viability between the SMSCs after labelling and the SMSCs before labelling were not significant; when the concentration was over 100 μg/mL, the cell proliferation and cell viability were inhibited. A certain concentration range of SPIO can safely label the rabbit SMSC according to this study, which is important for solving the problem of tracing SMSCs in the joints.

  13. Evaluating the efficacy of subcellular fractionation of blast cells using live cell labeling and 2D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yin Ying; Penno, Megan; Perugini, Michelle; Lewis, Ian; Hoffmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Labeling of exposed cell surface proteins of live cells using CyDye DIGE fluor minimal dyes is an efficient strategy for cell surface proteome profiling and quantifying differentially expressed proteins in diseases. Here we describe a strategy to evaluate a two-step detergent-based protein fractionation method using live cell labeling followed by visualization of the fluorescently labeled cell surface proteins and fractionated proteins within a single 2D gel.

  14. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy of quantum dot labeled proteins on whole cells in liquid.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Dukes, Madeline J; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of cells fully immersed in liquid is a new methodology with many application areas. Proteins, in live cells immobilized on microchips, are labeled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles. In this protocol, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is labeled. The cells are fixed after a selected labeling time, for example, 5 min as needed to form EGFR dimers. The microchip with cells is then imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Thereafter, the microchip with the labeled cells and one with a spacer are assembled in a special microfluidic device and imaged with STEM.

  15. Aptamer-mediated indirect quantum dot labeling and fluorescent imaging of target proteins in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Guo, Qiuping; Huang, Jin; Li, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Protein labeling for dynamic living cell imaging plays a significant role in basic biological research, as well as in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. We have developed a novel strategy in which the dynamic visualization of proteins within living cells is achieved by using aptamers as mediators for indirect protein labeling of quantum dots (QDs). With this strategy, the target protein angiogenin was successfully labeled with fluorescent QDs in a minor intactness model, which was mediated by the aptamer AL6-B. Subsequent living cell imaging analyses indicated that the QDs nanoprobes were selectively bound to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, gradually internalized into the cytoplasm, and mostly localized in the lysosome organelle, indicating that the labeled protein retained high activity. Compared with traditional direct protein labeling methods, the proposed aptamer-mediated strategy is simple, inexpensive, and provides a highly selective, stable, and intact labeling platform that has shown great promise for future biomedical labeling and intracellular protein dynamic analyses.

  16. Multiplexed labeling system for high-throughput cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Song, In Hyun; Shin, Woo Jung; Kim, Byung Woo; Kim, Dong-Ik; Um, Soong Ho

    2016-09-01

    Flow cytometry and fluorescence activated cell sorting techniques were designed to realize configurable classification and separation of target cells. A number of cell phenotypes with different functionalities have recently been revealed. Before simultaneous selective capture of cells, it is desirable to label different samples with the corresponding dyes in a multiplexing manner to allow for a single analysis. However, few methods to obtain multiple fluorescent colors for various cell types have been developed. Even when restricted laser sources are employed, a small number of color codes can be expressed simultaneously. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to manifest DNA nanostructure-based multifluorescent colors formed by a complex of dyes. Highly precise self-assembly of fluorescent dye-conjugated oligonucleotides gives anisotropic DNA nanostructures, Y- and tree-shaped DNA (Y-DNA and T-DNA, respectively), which may be used as platforms for fluorescent codes. As a proof of concept, we have demonstrated seven different fluorescent codes with only two different fluorescent dyes using T-DNA. This method provides maximum efficiency for current flow cytometry. We are confident that this system will provide highly efficient multiplexed fluorescent detection for bioanalysis compared with one-to-one fluorescent correspondence for specific marker detection.

  17. Cell-specific labeling enzymes for analysis of cell-cell communication in continuous co-culture.

    PubMed

    Tape, Christopher J; Norrie, Ida C; Worboys, Jonathan D; Lim, Lindsay; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Jørgensen, Claus

    2014-07-01

    We report the orthologous screening, engineering, and optimization of amino acid conversion enzymes for cell-specific proteomic labeling. Intracellular endoplasmic-reticulum-anchored Mycobacterium tuberculosis diaminopimelate decarboxylase (DDC(M.tub-KDEL)) confers cell-specific meso-2,6-diaminopimelate-dependent proliferation to multiple eukaryotic cell types. Optimized lysine racemase (Lyr(M37-KDEL)) supports D-lysine specific proliferation and efficient cell-specific isotopic labeling. When ectopically expressed in discrete cell types, these enzymes confer 90% cell-specific isotopic labeling efficiency after 10 days of co-culture. Moreover, DDC(M.tub-KDEL) and Lyr(M37-KDEL) facilitate equally high cell-specific labeling fidelity without daily media exchange. Consequently, the reported novel enzyme pairing can be used to study cell-specific signaling in uninterrupted, continuous co-cultures. Demonstrating the importance of increased labeling stability for addressing novel biological questions, we compare the cell-specific phosphoproteome of fibroblasts in direct co-culture with epithelial tumor cells in both interrupted (daily media exchange) and continuous (no media exchange) co-cultures. This analysis identified multiple cell-specific phosphorylation sites specifically regulated in the continuous co-culture. Given their applicability to multiple cell types, continuous co-culture labeling fidelity, and suitability for long-term cell-cell phospho-signaling experiments, we propose DDC(M.tub-KDEL) and Lyr(M37-KDEL) as excellent enzymes for cell-specific labeling with amino acid precursors. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Fluorescent labeling of cells and biomolecules with nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Suga, Masakazu; Sasaki, Yu F.; Ohta, Toshihiro; Yasuhara, Masato; Dohi, Taeko; Suzuki, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2005-04-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles, such as nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs), novel nanometer-size probes and have the potential to be used as easy imaging tool for molecular biology and bioimaging including medical applications, since some nanocrystals emit higher and far longer fluorescence than conventional organic probes. QDs are now becoming widely used in biotechnology and medical applications. QDs have several advantages over organic fluorophores with regard to high luminescence, stability against photobleaching, and a range of fluorescence wavelengths from blue to infrared depending on the particle size. In this review, we reported labeling of some kinds of immune cells and biomolecules with several QDs coated with hydrophilic carboxyl/amine groups, and reported that we could image the circulation of mouse lymphocytes in vivo by QDs. In addition, we also reported here about the cytotoxicity of these nanocrystals.

  19. Radionuclide-labeled red blood cells: current status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Chervu, L.R.

    1984-04-01

    Radiolabeling of red cells and their clinical and research application in nuclear medicine constitute an area of continued interest and steady growth during the past two decades. Technetium-/sup 99/m-labeled red cells in particular have revolutionized the field of cardiovascular nuclear medicine by making possible the external evaluation of various heart parameters with minimum radiation dose or trauma to the patient. Among other areas of study that use /sup 99/mTc -RBC are blood pool imaging, detection of vascular malformations, red cell mass determination, detection of gastrointestinal bleeding, and of hemangiomas. Heat-damaged /sup 99/mTc -RBC find application in spleen imaging, accessory spleen localization, detection of GI bleeding, and in other areas. A critical evaluation is presented of the various in vitro and in vivo labeling techniques that are currently available for red cell labeling. Even though the presently used procedures provide satisfactory labeled preparations, ideal radioisotopic RBC labels remain to be developed. Intermediate (2-3 days) as well as long-lived (approximately 30 days) radionuclidic labels are highly desirable for a number of clinical procedures where /sup 99/mTc is not useful due to its short half-life. New approaches such as the use of radiolabeled antibodies to red cell antigens, or labeling specific receptor sites in the cell may lead to substantial improvements in the labeling methodology and could yield labeled cells with the least damage and maximum in vivo stability.

  20. Dynamic and label-free cell-based assays using the real-time cell electronic sensing system.

    PubMed

    Atienza, Josephine M; Yu, Naichen; Kirstein, Shelli L; Xi, Biao; Wang, Xiaobo; Xu, Xiao; Abassi, Yama A

    2006-10-01

    Cell-based assays have become an integral part of the preclinical drug development process. Recently, noninvasive label-free cell-based assay technologies have taken center stage, offering important and distinct advantages over and in addition to traditional label-based endpoint assays. Dynamic monitoring of live cells, the preclusion of label, and kinetics are some of the fundamental features of cell-based label-free technologies. In this article we will discuss the real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES, ACEA Biosciences Inc., San Diego, CA) system and some of its key applications for cell-based assays such as cell proliferation and cytotoxicity, functional assays for receptor-ligand analysis, cell adhesion and spreading assays, dynamic monitoring of endothelial barrier function, and dynamic monitoring of cell migration and invasion. Also, where appropriate we will briefly discuss other label-free technologies in an application-specific manner.

  1. Rapid and simple methods for labeling white blood cells and platelets with indium-111-oxine

    SciTech Connect

    Steffel, F.G.; Rao, S.A.

    1987-06-01

    Simple procedures in a kit form for labeling white blood cells (WBCs) and platelets with commercially available indium-111 (/sup 111/In)-oxine have been developed for the convenience of small community hospitals. The time required for the labeling procedure is less than 2 hr. The resulting scintigrams from the clinical studies in both WBCs and platelets showed that the /sup 111/In-labeled cells have a high degree of viability.

  2. DiI cell labeling in lamprey embryos.

    PubMed

    Nikitina, Natalya; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana

    2009-01-01

    Lampreys are one of the most basal animals in which many of the true vertebrate characteristics (e.g., neural crest, placodes, segmented brain, skull, paired sensory organs, pharyngeal skeleton) are present. Studying the molecular and developmental mechanisms responsible for the formation of these structures in lamprey and higher vertebrates can provide insight into how these vertebrate characteristics evolved. The relative ease of obtaining mature adults and embryos makes this animal an ideal model for investigations into early vertebrate evolution. In addition, studies of features that are unique to lampreys can provide insights into mechanisms of parallel evolution. Lamprey embryos are particularly amenable to injection techniques. Like zebrafish and Xenopus embryos, they have double chorions and are resistant to surface-tension-induced rupture when removed from liquid. They can therefore be injected in a dry dish; this eliminates the need to support the embryo while performing injections and makes the procedure very rapid. Also, a single ovulating female can contain up to 100,000 eggs, so the number of injectable embryos per fertilization is not a limiting factor. This protocol describes how to label lamprey embryo cells by microinjecting the fluorescent dye DiI (1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate) to study cell fate during development.

  3. Enhanced detection of fluorescence quenching in labeled cells

    DOEpatents

    Crissman, H.A.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1987-11-30

    A method is provided for quantifying BrdU labeled DNA in cells. The BrdU is substituted onto the DNA and the DNA is stained with a first fluorochrome having a fluorescence which is quenchable by BrdU. The first fluorochrome is preferably a thymidine base halogen analogue, such as a Hoechst fluorochrome. The DNA is then stained with a second fluorochrome having a fluorescence which is substantially uneffected by BrdU. The second fluorochrome may be selected from the group consisting of mithramycin, chromomycin A3, olivomycin, propidium iodide and ethidium bromine. The fluorescence from the first and second fluorochromes is then measured to obtain first and second output signals, respectively. The first output signal is subtracted from the second output signal to obtain a difference signal which is functionally related to the quantity of BrdU incorporated into DNA. The technique is particularly useful for quantifying the synthesis of DNA during the S-phase of the cell cycle. 2 figs.

  4. Enhanced detection of fluorescence quenching in labeled cells

    DOEpatents

    Crissman, Harry A.; Steinkamp, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for quantifying BrdU labeled DNA in cells. The BrdU is incorporated into the DNA and the DNA is stained with a first fluorochrome having a fluorescence which is quenchable by BrdU. The first fluorochrome is preferably a thymidine base halogen analogue, such as a Hoechst fluorochrome. The DNA is then stained with a second fluorochrome having a fluorescence that is substantially uneffected by BrdU. The second fluorochrome may be selected from the group consisting of mithramycin, chromomycin A3, olivomycin, propidium iodide and ethidium bromine. The fluorescence from the first and second fluorochromes is then measured to obtain first and second output signals, respectively. The first output signal is substracted from the second output signal to obtain a difference signal which is functionally related to the quantity of BrdU incorporated into DNA. The technique is particularly useful for quantifying the synthesis of DNA during the S-phase of the cell cycle.

  5. Imidazolium-tagged glycan probes for non-covalent labeling of live cells.

    PubMed

    Benito-Alifonso, David; Tremell, Shirley; Sadler, Joanna C; Berry, Monica; Galan, M Carmen

    2016-04-07

    Selective, bioorthogonal and fast labeling of glycoconjugates in living cells is a major challenge for synthetic and cellular biology. Here we report the use imidazolium tagged-mannosamine derivative (ITag-Man) for the non-covalent, rapid and site-specific labeling of sialic acid containing glycoproteins using commercial N-nitrilotriacetate fluorescent reagents in a range of cell lines.

  6. Traceless affinity labeling of endogenous proteins for functional analysis in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Hamachi, Itaru

    2012-09-18

    Protein labeling and imaging techniques have provided tremendous opportunities to study the structure, function, dynamics, and localization of individual proteins in the complex environment of living cells. Molecular biology-based approaches, such as GFP-fusion tags and monoclonal antibodies, have served as important tools for the visualization of individual proteins in cells. Although these techniques continue to be valuable for live cell imaging, they have a number of limitations that have only been addressed by recent progress in chemistry-based approaches. These chemical approaches benefit greatly from the smaller probe sizes that should result in fewer perturbations to proteins and to biological systems as a whole. Despite the research in this area, so far none of these labeling techniques permit labeling and imaging of selected endogenous proteins in living cells. Researchers have widely used affinity labeling, in which the protein of interest is labeled by a reactive group attached to a ligand, to identify and characterize proteins. Since the first report of affinity labeling in the early 1960s, efforts to fine-tune the chemical structures of both the reactive group and ligand have led to protein labeling with excellent target selectivity in the whole proteome of living cells. Although the chemical probes used for affinity labeling generally inactivate target proteins, this strategy holds promise as a valuable tool for the labeling and imaging of endogenous proteins in living cells and by extension in living animals. In this Account, we summarize traceless affinity labeling, a technique explored mainly in our laboratory. In our overview of the different labeling techniques, we emphasize the challenge of designing chemical probes that allow for dissociation of the affinity module (often a ligand) after the labeling reaction so that the labeled protein retains its native function. This feature distinguishes the traceless labeling approach from the traditional

  7. Aquaporin 2-labeled cells differentiate to intercalated cells in response to potassium depletion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wan-Young; Nam, Sun Ah; Choi, Arum; Kim, Yu-Mi; Park, Sang Hee; Kim, Yong Kyun; Kim, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian renal collecting duct consists of principal cells (PCs) and intercalated cells (ICs). Both PCs and ICs are involved in potassium (K(+)) homeostasis, PCs through their role in K(+) secretion and ICs through their ability to facilitate K(+) resorption. We previously hypothesized that PCs may differentiate into ICs upon K(+) depletion. However, no direct evidence has yet been obtained to conclusively demonstrate that PCs differentiate into ICs in response to K(+) depletion. Here, we present direct evidence for the differentiation of PCs into ICs by cell lineage tracing using aquaporin 2 (AQP2)-Cre mice and R26R-EYFP transgenic mice. In control mice, AQP2-EYFP(+) cells exhibited mainly a PC phenotype (AQP2-positive/H(+)-ATPase-negative). Interestingly, some AQP2-EYFP(+) cells exhibited an IC phenotype (H(+)-ATPase-positive/AQP2-negative); these cells accounted for 1.7 %. After K(+) depletion, the proportion of AQP2-EYFP(+) cells with an IC phenotype was increased to 4.1 %. Furthermore, some AQP2-EYFP(+) cells exhibited a "null cell" phenotype (AQP2-negative/H(+)-ATPase-negative) after K(+) depletion. Collectively, our data demonstrate that AQP2-labeled cells can differentiate into ICs, as well as null cells, in response to K(+) depletion. This finding indicates that some of AQP2-labeled cells possess properties of progenitor cells and that they can differentiate into ICs in the adult mouse kidney.

  8. Simple SPION Incubation as an Efficient Intracellular Labeling Method for Tracking Neural Progenitor Cells Using MRI

    PubMed Central

    D. M., Jayaseema; Lai, Jiann-Shiun; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Chang, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been well-established for tracking neural progenitor cells (NPC). Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) approved for clinical application are the most common agents used for labeling. Conventionally, transfection agents (TAs) were added with SPIONs to facilitate cell labeling because SPIONs in the native unmodified form were deemed inefficient for intracellular labeling. However, compelling evidence also shows that simple SPION incubation is not invariably ineffective. The labeling efficiency can be improved by prolonged incubation and elevated iron doses. The goal of the present study was to establish simple SPION incubation as an efficient intracellular labeling method. To this end, NPCs derived from the neonatal subventricular zone were incubated with SPIONs (Feridex®) and then evaluated in vitro with regard to the labeling efficiency and biological functions. The results showed that, following 48 hours of incubation at 75 µg/ml, nearly all NPCs exhibited visible SPION intake. Evidence from light microscopy, electron microscopy, chemical analysis, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the effectiveness of the labeling. Additionally, biological assays showed that the labeled NPCs exhibited unaffected viability, oxidative stress, apoptosis and differentiation. In the demonstrated in vivo cellular MRI experiment, the hypointensities representing the SPION labeled NPCs remained observable throughout the entire tracking period. The findings indicate that simple SPION incubation without the addition of TAs is an efficient intracellular magnetic labeling method. This simple approach may be considered as an alternative approach to the mainstream labeling method that involves the use of TAs. PMID:23468856

  9. Simple SPION incubation as an efficient intracellular labeling method for tracking neural progenitor cells using MRI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiao-Chi V; Ku, Min-Chi; D M, Jayaseema; Lai, Jiann-Shiun; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Chang, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been well-established for tracking neural progenitor cells (NPC). Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) approved for clinical application are the most common agents used for labeling. Conventionally, transfection agents (TAs) were added with SPIONs to facilitate cell labeling because SPIONs in the native unmodified form were deemed inefficient for intracellular labeling. However, compelling evidence also shows that simple SPION incubation is not invariably ineffective. The labeling efficiency can be improved by prolonged incubation and elevated iron doses. The goal of the present study was to establish simple SPION incubation as an efficient intracellular labeling method. To this end, NPCs derived from the neonatal subventricular zone were incubated with SPIONs (Feridex®) and then evaluated in vitro with regard to the labeling efficiency and biological functions. The results showed that, following 48 hours of incubation at 75 µg/ml, nearly all NPCs exhibited visible SPION intake. Evidence from light microscopy, electron microscopy, chemical analysis, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the effectiveness of the labeling. Additionally, biological assays showed that the labeled NPCs exhibited unaffected viability, oxidative stress, apoptosis and differentiation. In the demonstrated in vivo cellular MRI experiment, the hypointensities representing the SPION labeled NPCs remained observable throughout the entire tracking period. The findings indicate that simple SPION incubation without the addition of TAs is an efficient intracellular magnetic labeling method. This simple approach may be considered as an alternative approach to the mainstream labeling method that involves the use of TAs.

  10. Water-Soluble Lipophilic MR Contrast Agents for Cell Membrane Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Christiane E.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term cell tracking with MR imaging necessitates the development of contrast agents that both label and are retained by cells. One promising strategy for long-term cell labeling is the development of lipophilic Gd(III)-based contrast agents that anchor into the cell membrane. We have previously reported the efficacy of monomeric and multimeric lipophilic agents and showed that the monomeric agents have improved labeling and contrast enhancement of cell populations. Here, we report on the synthesis, characterization, and in vitro testing of a series of monomeric lipophilic contrast agents with varied alkyl chain compositions. We show that these agents disperse in water, localize to the cell membrane, and label HeLa and MCF7 cells effectively. Additionally, these agents have up to 10-fold improved retention in cells compared to clinically available ProHance®. PMID:26215869

  11. Cell-specific Labeling Enzymes for Analysis of Cell–Cell Communication in Continuous Co-culture*

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Norrie, Ida C.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Lim, Lindsay; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    We report the orthologous screening, engineering, and optimization of amino acid conversion enzymes for cell-specific proteomic labeling. Intracellular endoplasmic-reticulum-anchored Mycobacterium tuberculosis diaminopimelate decarboxylase (DDCM.tub-KDEL) confers cell-specific meso-2,6-diaminopimelate-dependent proliferation to multiple eukaryotic cell types. Optimized lysine racemase (LyrM37-KDEL) supports D-lysine specific proliferation and efficient cell-specific isotopic labeling. When ectopically expressed in discrete cell types, these enzymes confer 90% cell-specific isotopic labeling efficiency after 10 days of co-culture. Moreover, DDCM.tub-KDEL and LyrM37-KDEL facilitate equally high cell-specific labeling fidelity without daily media exchange. Consequently, the reported novel enzyme pairing can be used to study cell-specific signaling in uninterrupted, continuous co-cultures. Demonstrating the importance of increased labeling stability for addressing novel biological questions, we compare the cell-specific phosphoproteome of fibroblasts in direct co-culture with epithelial tumor cells in both interrupted (daily media exchange) and continuous (no media exchange) co-cultures. This analysis identified multiple cell-specific phosphorylation sites specifically regulated in the continuous co-culture. Given their applicability to multiple cell types, continuous co-culture labeling fidelity, and suitability for long-term cell–cell phospho-signaling experiments, we propose DDCM.tub-KDEL and LyrM37-KDEL as excellent enzymes for cell-specific labeling with amino acid precursors. PMID:24820872

  12. Efficient intracytoplasmic labeling of human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells with ferumoxides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Kwon; Lee, Man Kyoung; Jin, Hye Jin; Kim, Dal-Soo; Yang, Yoon Sun; Oh, Wonil; Yang, Sung-Eun; Park, Tae Seok; Lee, Soo Yeol; Kim, Bum-Soo; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2007-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells found in several adult tissues; they have the capacity to differentiate into mesodermal, ectodermal, and endodermal tissues in vitro. There have been several reports that MSCs have therapeutic effects in a variety of diseases. Therefore, using a cell labeling technique, monitoring their temporal and spatial migration in vivo, would be useful in the clinical setting. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)--tracking of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled cells--is a noninvasive technique for determining the location and migration of transplanted cells. In the present study, we evaluated the influence and toxicity of SPIO (ferumoxides) labeling on multiple differentiated MSCs. To evaluate the influence and toxicity of ferumoxides labeling on differentiation of MSCs, a variety of concentrations of ferumoxides were used for labeling MSCs. We found that the cytoplasm of adherent cells was effectively labeled at low concentrations of ferumoxides. Compared with unlabeled controls, the ferumoxides-labeled MSCs exhibited a similar proliferation rate and apoptotic progression. The labeled MSCs differentiated into osteoblasts and adipocytes in an identical fashion as the unlabeled cells. However, chondrogenesis and neurogenesis were inhibited at high concentrations of ferumoxides. Our results suggest the effective concentration for ferumoxides use in tracking MSCs.

  13. Snap-, CLIP- and Halo-Tag Labelling of Budding Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stagge, Franziska; Mitronova, Gyuzel Y.; Belov, Vladimir N.; Wurm, Christian A.; Jakobs, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of the localization and the spatial and temporal dynamics of specifically labelled proteins is an indispensable tool in cell biology. Besides fluorescent proteins as tags, tag-mediated labelling utilizing self-labelling proteins as the SNAP-, CLIP-, or the Halo-tag are widely used, flexible labelling systems relying on exogenously supplied fluorophores. Unfortunately, labelling of live budding yeast cells proved to be challenging with these approaches because of the limited accessibility of the cell interior to the dyes. In this study we developed a fast and reliable electroporation-based labelling protocol for living budding yeast cells expressing SNAP-, CLIP-, or Halo-tagged fusion proteins. For the Halo-tag, we demonstrate that it is crucial to use the 6′-carboxy isomers and not the 5′-carboxy isomers of important dyes to ensure cell viability. We report on a simple rule for the analysis of 1H NMR spectra to discriminate between 6′- and 5′-carboxy isomers of fluorescein and rhodamine derivatives. We demonstrate the usability of the labelling protocol by imaging yeast cells with STED super-resolution microscopy and dual colour live cell microscopy. The large number of available fluorophores for these self-labelling proteins and the simplicity of the protocol described here expands the available toolbox for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:24205303

  14. SNAP-, CLIP- and Halo-tag labelling of budding yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Stagge, Franziska; Mitronova, Gyuzel Y; Belov, Vladimir N; Wurm, Christian A; Jakobs, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of the localization and the spatial and temporal dynamics of specifically labelled proteins is an indispensable tool in cell biology. Besides fluorescent proteins as tags, tag-mediated labelling utilizing self-labelling proteins as the SNAP-, CLIP-, or the Halo-tag are widely used, flexible labelling systems relying on exogenously supplied fluorophores. Unfortunately, labelling of live budding yeast cells proved to be challenging with these approaches because of the limited accessibility of the cell interior to the dyes. In this study we developed a fast and reliable electroporation-based labelling protocol for living budding yeast cells expressing SNAP-, CLIP-, or Halo-tagged fusion proteins. For the Halo-tag, we demonstrate that it is crucial to use the 6'-carboxy isomers and not the 5'-carboxy isomers of important dyes to ensure cell viability. We report on a simple rule for the analysis of ¹H NMR spectra to discriminate between 6'- and 5'-carboxy isomers of fluorescein and rhodamine derivatives. We demonstrate the usability of the labelling protocol by imaging yeast cells with STED super-resolution microscopy and dual colour live cell microscopy. The large number of available fluorophores for these self-labelling proteins and the simplicity of the protocol described here expands the available toolbox for the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  15. Cell labeling and tracking method without distorted signals by phagocytosis of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sun-Woong; Lee, Sangmin; Na, Jin Hee; Yoon, Hwa In; Lee, Dong-Eun; Koo, Heebeom; Cho, Yong Woo; Kim, Sun Hwa; Jeong, Seo Young; Kwon, Ick Chan; Choi, Kuiwon; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2014-01-01

    Cell labeling and tracking are important processes in understanding biologic mechanisms and the therapeutic effect of inoculated cells in vivo. Numerous attempts have been made to label and track inoculated cells in vivo; however, these methods have limitations as a result of their biological effects, including secondary phagocytosis of macrophages and genetic modification. Here, we investigated a new cell labeling and tracking strategy based on metabolic glycoengineering and bioorthogonal click chemistry. We first treated cells with tetra-acetylated N-azidoacetyl-D-mannosamine to generate unnatural sialic acids with azide groups on the surface of the target cells. The azide-labeled cells were then transplanted to mouse liver, and dibenzyl cyclooctyne-conjugated Cy5 (DBCO-Cy5) was intravenously injected into mice to chemically bind with the azide groups on the surface of the target cells in vivo for target cell visualization. Unnatural sialic acids with azide groups could be artificially induced on the surface of target cells by glycoengineering. We then tracked the azide groups on the surface of the cells by DBCO-Cy5 in vivo using bioorthogonal click chemistry. Importantly, labeling efficacy was enhanced and false signals by phagocytosis of macrophages were reduced. This strategy will be highly useful for cell labeling and tracking.

  16. Cell Labeling and Tracking Method without Distorted Signals by Phagocytosis of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sun-Woong; Lee, Sangmin; Na, Jin Hee; Yoon, Hwa In; Lee, Dong-Eun; Koo, Heebeom; Cho, Yong Woo; Kim, Sun Hwa; Jeong, Seo Young; Kwon, Ick Chan; Choi, Kuiwon; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2014-01-01

    Cell labeling and tracking are important processes in understanding biologic mechanisms and the therapeutic effect of inoculated cells in vivo. Numerous attempts have been made to label and track inoculated cells in vivo; however, these methods have limitations as a result of their biological effects, including secondary phagocytosis of macrophages and genetic modification. Here, we investigated a new cell labeling and tracking strategy based on metabolic glycoengineering and bioorthogonal click chemistry. We first treated cells with tetra-acetylated N-azidoacetyl-D-mannosamine to generate unnatural sialic acids with azide groups on the surface of the target cells. The azide-labeled cells were then transplanted to mouse liver, and dibenzyl cyclooctyne-conjugated Cy5 (DBCO-Cy5) was intravenously injected into mice to chemically bind with the azide groups on the surface of the target cells in vivo for target cell visualization. Unnatural sialic acids with azide groups could be artificially induced on the surface of target cells by glycoengineering. We then tracked the azide groups on the surface of the cells by DBCO-Cy5 in vivo using bioorthogonal click chemistry. Importantly, labeling efficacy was enhanced and false signals by phagocytosis of macrophages were reduced. This strategy will be highly useful for cell labeling and tracking. PMID:24578725

  17. Electrostatically Stabilized Magnetic Nanoparticles - An Optimized Protocol to Label Murine T Cells for in vivo MRI.

    PubMed

    Wuerfel, Eva; Smyth, Maureen; Millward, Jason M; Schellenberger, Eyk; Glumm, Jana; Prozorovski, Timour; Aktas, Orhan; Schulze-Topphoff, Ulf; Schnorr, Jörg; Wagner, Susanne; Taupitz, Matthias; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Wuerfel, Jens

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel highly efficient protocol to magnetically label T cells applying electrostatically stabilized very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP). Our long-term aim is to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate T cell dynamics in vivo during the course of neuroinflammatory disorders such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Encephalitogenic T cells were co-incubated with VSOP, or with protamine-complexed VSOP (VProt), respectively, at different conditions, optimizing concentrations and incubation times. Labeling efficacy was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry as well as histologically, and evaluated on a 7 T MR system. Furthermore, we investigated possible alterations of T cell physiology caused by the labeling procedure. T cell co-incubation with VSOP resulted in an efficient cellular iron uptake. T2 times of labeled cells dropped significantly, resulting in prominent hypointensity on T2*-weighted scans. Optimal labeling efficacy was achieved by VProt (1 mM Fe/ml, 8 h incubation; T2 time shortening of ∼80% compared to untreated cells). Although VSOP promoted T cell proliferation and altered the ratio of T cell subpopulations toward a CD4(+) phenotype, no effects on CD4 T cell proliferation or phenotypic stability were observed by labeling in vitro differentiated Th17 cells with VProt. Yet, high concentrations of intracellular iron oxide might induce alterations in T cell function, which should be considered in cell tagging studies. Moreover, we demonstrated that labeling of encephalitogenic T cells did not affect pathogenicity; labeled T cells were still capable of inducing EAE in susceptible recipient mice.

  18. Labeling of mesenchymal stem cells for MRI with single-cell sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ariza de Schellenberger, Angela; Kratz, Harald; Farr, Tracy D; Löwa, Norbert; Hauptmann, Ralf; Wagner, Susanne; Taupitz, Matthias; Schnorr, Jörg; Schellenberger, Eyk A

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive cell detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for the development of cell therapies. However, clinically approved contrast agents that allow single-cell detection are currently not available. Therefore, we compared very small iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP) and new multicore carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (multicore particles, MCP) designed by our department for magnetic particle imaging (MPI) with discontinued Resovist(®) regarding their suitability for detection of single mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) by MRI. We achieved an average intracellular nanoparticle (NP) load of >10 pg Fe per cell without the use of transfection agents. NP loading did not lead to significantly different results in proliferation, colony formation, and multilineage in vitro differentiation assays in comparison to controls. MRI allowed single-cell detection using VSOP, MCP, and Resovist(®) in conjunction with high-resolution T2*-weighted imaging at 7 T with postprocessing of phase images in agarose cell phantoms and in vivo after delivery of 2,000 NP-labeled MSC into mouse brains via the left carotid artery. With optimized labeling conditions, a detection rate of ~45% was achieved; however, the experiments were limited by nonhomogeneous NP loading of the MSC population. Attempts should be made to achieve better cell separation for homogeneous NP loading and to thus improve NP-uptake-dependent biocompatibility studies and cell detection by MRI and future MPI. Additionally, using a 7 T MR imager equipped with a cryocoil resulted in approximately two times higher detection. In conclusion, we established labeling conditions for new high-relaxivity MCP, VSOP, and Resovist(®) for improved MRI of MSC with single-cell sensitivity.

  19. Labeling of mesenchymal stem cells for MRI with single-cell sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ariza de Schellenberger, Angela; Kratz, Harald; Farr, Tracy D; Löwa, Norbert; Hauptmann, Ralf; Wagner, Susanne; Taupitz, Matthias; Schnorr, Jörg; Schellenberger, Eyk A

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive cell detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for the development of cell therapies. However, clinically approved contrast agents that allow single-cell detection are currently not available. Therefore, we compared very small iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP) and new multicore carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (multicore particles, MCP) designed by our department for magnetic particle imaging (MPI) with discontinued Resovist® regarding their suitability for detection of single mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) by MRI. We achieved an average intracellular nanoparticle (NP) load of >10 pg Fe per cell without the use of transfection agents. NP loading did not lead to significantly different results in proliferation, colony formation, and multilineage in vitro differentiation assays in comparison to controls. MRI allowed single-cell detection using VSOP, MCP, and Resovist® in conjunction with high-resolution T2*-weighted imaging at 7 T with postprocessing of phase images in agarose cell phantoms and in vivo after delivery of 2,000 NP-labeled MSC into mouse brains via the left carotid artery. With optimized labeling conditions, a detection rate of ~45% was achieved; however, the experiments were limited by nonhomogeneous NP loading of the MSC population. Attempts should be made to achieve better cell separation for homogeneous NP loading and to thus improve NP-uptake-dependent biocompatibility studies and cell detection by MRI and future MPI. Additionally, using a 7 T MR imager equipped with a cryocoil resulted in approximately two times higher detection. In conclusion, we established labeling conditions for new high-relaxivity MCP, VSOP, and Resovist® for improved MRI of MSC with single-cell sensitivity. PMID:27110112

  20. Chocolate intake associated with failed labeling of (99m)Tc red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Bustani, Hussam; Colavolpe, Cecile; Imbert-Joscht, Isabelle; Havlik, Patrick; Pisano, Pascale; Guillet, Benjamin Alain

    2009-06-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) labeled in vivo with (99m)Tc-pertechnetate are used worldwide in nuclear medicine departments. Here, we present a case of (99m)Tc-RBC labeling failure associated with chocolate intake in a 25-y-old woman, resulting in uninterpretable images. Because of this clinical observation, we performed in vitro RBC labeling on blood samples from volunteers after they consumed chocolate. Chocolate intake inhibited the labeling rate, compared with the control condition, and significantly increased the (99m)Tc free fraction (34.1% +/- 11.3% vs. 14.0% +/- 1.2%). We cannot explain how this interaction could occur, but cacao components are known to modulate red cell and plasma oxidoreductive status and to modify red cell membrane permeability and plasticity. Therefore, for patients who can be considered likely to consume chocolate, such as young patients, we recommend that they limit their consumption of chocolate for 12 h before RBC labeling.

  1. In Vivo Quantum Dot Labeling of Mammalian Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Slotkin, Jonathan R.; Chakrabarti, Lina; Dai, Hai Ning; Carney, Rosalind S.E.; Hirata, Tsutomu; Bregman, Barbara S.; Gallicano, G. Ian; Corbin, Joshua G.; Haydar, Tarik F.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) are a class of multifunctional inorganic fluorophores that hold great promise for clinical applications and biomedical research. Because no methods currently exist for directed QD-labeling of mammalian cells in the nervous system in vivo, we developed novel in utero electroporation and ultrasound-guided in vivo delivery techniques to efficiently and directly label neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs) of the developing mammalian central nervous system with QDs. Our initial safety and proof of concept studies of one and two-cell QD-labeled mouse embryos reveal that QDs are compatible with early mammalian embryonic development. Our in vivo experiments further show that in utero labeled NSPCs continue to develop in an apparent normal manner. These studies reveal that QDs can be effectively used to label mammalian NSPCs in vivo and will be useful for studies of in vivo fate mapping, cellular migration, and NSPC differentiation during mammalian development. PMID:17626285

  2. Classification of blood cells and tumor cells using label-free ultrasound and photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Strohm, Eric M; Kolios, Michael C

    2015-08-01

    A label-free method that can identify cells in a blood sample using high frequency photoacoustic and ultrasound signals is demonstrated. When the wavelength of the ultrasound or photoacoustic wave is similar to the size of a single cell (frequencies of 100-500 MHz), unique periodic features occur within the ultrasound and photoacoustic power spectrum that depend on the cell size, structure, and morphology. These spectral features can be used to identify different cell types present in blood, such as red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), and circulating tumor cells. Circulating melanoma cells are ideal for photoacoustic detection due to their endogenous optical absorption properties. Using a 532 nm pulsed laser and a 375 MHz transducer, the ultrasound and photoacoustic signals from RBCs, WBCs, and melanoma cells were individually measured in an acoustic microscope to examine how the signals change between cell types. A photoacoustic and ultrasound signal was detected from RBCs and melanoma cells; only an ultrasound signal was detected from WBCs. The different cell types were distinctly separated using the ultrasound and photoacoustic signal amplitude and power spectral periodicity. The size of each cell was also estimated from the spectral periodicity. For the first time, sound waves generated using pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustics have been used to identify and size single cells, with applications toward counting and identifying cells, including circulating melanoma cells.

  3. A new class of macrocyclic lanthanide complexes for cell labeling and magnetic resonance imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Quan; Dai, Houquan; Merritt, Matthew E; Malloy, Craig; Pan, Cai Yuan; Li, Wen-Hong

    2005-11-23

    Lanthanide complexes have wide applications in biochemical research and biomedical imaging. We have designed and synthesized a new class of macrocyclic lanthanide chelates, Ln/DTPA-PDA-C(n), for cell labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. Two lipophilic Gd3+ complexes, Gd/DTPA-PDA-C(n) (n = 10, 12), labeled a number of cultured mammalian cells noninvasively at concentrations as low as a few micromolar. Cells took up these agents rapidly and showed robust intensity increases in T1-weighed MR images. Labeled cells showed normal morphology and doubling time as control cells. In addition to cultured cells, these agents also labeled primary cells in tissues such as dissected pancreatic islets. To study the mechanism of cellular uptake, we applied the technique of diffusion enhanced fluorescence resonance energy transfer (DEFRET) to determine the cellular localization of these lipophilic lanthanide complexes. After loading cells with a luminescent complex, Tb/DTPA-PDA-C10, we observed DEFRET between the Tb3+ complex and extracellular, but not intracellular, calcein. We concluded that these cyclic lanthanide complexes label cells by inserting two hydrophobic alkyl chains into cell membranes with the hydrophilic metal binding site facing the extracellular medium. As the first imaging application of these macrocyclic lanthanide chelates, we labeled insulin secreting beta-cells with Gd/DTPA-PDA-C12. Labeled cells were encapsulated in hollow fibers and were implanted in a nude mouse. MR imaging of implanted beta-cells showed that these cells could be followed in vivo for up to two weeks. The combined advantages of this new class of macrocyclic contrast agents ensure future imaging applications to track cell movement and localization in different biological systems.

  4. Innovative fluorescent magnetic albumin microbead-assisted cell labeling and intracellular imaging of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqin; Wei, Fang; Yan, Shuang; Zhang, Huiru; Tan, Xiaorong; Zhang, Lu; Zhou, Guangzhou; Cui, Liuqing; Li, Cuixiang; Wang, Liang; Li, Yatao

    2014-04-15

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticle-based polymer microbeads utilized as carriers are attractive materials widely applied in the biomedical field. However, the deficiency of toxicity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability for polymer materials often limits the application of these microbeads. In the present study, magnetic albumin microbeads (MAMbs), i.e., human serum albumin-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, are synthesized to label human U251 glioblastoma multiforme cells. The effects of MAMbs on the biological behavior of U251 glioblastoma cells, including their proliferation, cell viability, cytoskeletal structure, cell cycle, and apoptosis rate, are investigated. Moreover, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-MAMbs are fabricated by reaction with fluorescent dye FITC used for intracellular imaging of U251 glioblastoma cells. MAMbs possess undetectable cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility with U251 glioblastoma cells, as demonstrated by the biological behavior and morphology of U251 cells exposed to MAMbs. Furthermore, the constructed fluorescent MAMbs allow effective intracellular imaging, as illustrated by fluorescence microscopic analysis. The fabricated fluorescent MAMbs have promising perspectives in biomedical research, especially in cell-targeted labeling and intracellular fluorescence magnetic dual-mode imaging in cancer-targeted diagnosis and therapy. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Site-directed spin labeling of proteins for distance measurements in vitro and in cells.

    PubMed

    Roser, P; Schmidt, M J; Drescher, M; Summerer, D

    2016-06-15

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy allows studying the structure, dynamics, and interactions of proteins via distance measurements in the nanometer range. We here give an overview of available spin labels, the strategies for their introduction into proteins, and the associated potentials for protein structural studies in vitro and in the context of living cells.

  6. Photo-triggered fluorescent labelling of recombinant proteins in live cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Deokho; Sato, Kohei; Min, Kyoungmi; Shigenaga, Akira; Jung, Juyeon; Otaka, Akira; Kwon, Youngeun

    2015-06-14

    A method to photo-chemically trigger fluorescent labelling of proteins in live cells is developed. The approach is based on photo-caged split-intein mediated conditional protein trans-splicing reaction and enabled background-free fluorescent labelling of target proteins with the necessary spatiotemporal control.

  7. Gallbladder visualization during technetium-99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy for gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, D.R.

    1985-12-01

    Localization of radionuclide activity in the gallbladder was seen on delayed views following injection of 99mTc-labeled red blood cells for gastrointestinal bleeding in five patients. The mechanism for this unusual finding probably relates to labeling of heme, the biochemical precursor of bilirubin. All patients had had prior transfusions. All but one had severe renal impairment, probably an important predisposing factor.

  8. GABAergic and glycinergic pathways to goldfish retinal ganglion cells: an ultrastructural double label study

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    An ultrastructural double label has been employed to compare GABAergic and glycinergic systems in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of the goldfish retina. Electron microscope autoradiography of /sup 3/H-GABA and /sup 3/H-glycine uptake was combined with retrograde HRP-labeling of ganglion cells. When surveyed for distribution, GABAergic and glycinergic synapses were found onto labeled ganglion cells throughout the IPL. This reinforces previous physiological work that described GABAergic and glycinergic influences on a variety of ganglion cells in goldfish and carp; These physiological effects often reflect direct inputs.

  9. Specific chemotaxis of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells: Implications for MRI of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Bennewitz, Margaret F.; Tang, Kevin S.; Markakis, Eleni A.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a lethal disease, marked by infiltration of cancerous cells into the surrounding normal brain. The dire outcome of GBM patients stems in part from the limitations of current neuroimaging methods. Notably, early cancer detection methodologies are lacking, without the ability to identify aggressive, metastatic tumor cells. We propose a novel approach for tumor detection using MRI, based on imaging specific tumor tropism of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) labeled with micron-sized iron oxide particles (MPIOs). Procedures MPIO labeled and unlabeled MSCs were compared for viability, multi-lineage differentiation, and migration, where both chemotactic and chemokinetic movement were assessed in the presence of serum free medium, serum containing medium, and glioma conditioned medium. MRI was performed on agarose samples, consisting of MPIO labeled single MSCs, to confirm the capability to detect single cells. Results We determined that MPIO labeled MSCs exhibit specific and significant chemotactic migration towards glioma conditioned medium in vitro. Confocal fluorescence microscopy confirmed that MPIOs are internalized and do not impact important cell processes of MSCs. Lastly, MPIO labeled MSCs appear as single distinct, dark spots on T2* weighted MRI, supporting the robustness of this contrast agent for cell tracking. Conclusions This is the first study to show that MPIO labeled MSCs exhibit specific tropism toward tumor-secreted factors in vitro. The potential for detecting single MPIO labeled MSCs provides rationale for in vivo extension of this methodology to visualize GBM in animal models. PMID:22418788

  10. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles as Optical Labels for Imaging Cell Surface Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.

    Assaying the expression of cell surface proteins has widespread application for characterizing cell type, developmental stage, and monitoring disease transformation. Immunophenotyping is conducted by treating cells with labelled targeting moieties that have high affinity for relevant surface protein(s). The sensitivity and specificity of immunophenotyping is defined by the choice of contrast agent and therefore, the number of resolvable signals that can be used to simultaneously label cells. Narrow band width surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles are proposed as optical labels for multiplexed immunophenotying. Two types of surface coatings were investigated to passivate the gold nanoparticles, incorporate SERS functionality, and to facilitate attachment of targeting antibodies. Thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) forms dative bonds with the gold surface and is compatible with multiple physisorbed Raman-active reporter molecules. Ternary lipid bilayers are used to encapsulate the gold nanoparticles particles, and incorporate three different classes of Raman reporters. TEM, UV-Visible absorbance spectroscopy, DLS, and electrophoretic light scattering were used characterize the particle coating. Colourimetric protein assay, and secondary antibody labelling were used to quantify the antibody conjugation. Three different in vitromodels were used to investigate the binding efficacy and specificity of SERS labels for their biomarker targets. Primary human CLL cells, LY10 B lymphoma, and A549 adenocarcinoma lines were targeted. Dark field imaging was used to visualize the colocalization of SERS labels with cells, and evidence of receptor clustering was obtained based on colour shifts of the particles' Rayleigh scattering. Widefield, and spatially-resolved Raman spectra were used to detect labels singly, and in combination from labelled cells. Fluorescence flow cytometry was used to test the particles' binding specificity, and SERS from labelled cells was also

  11. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment.

  12. Tumor-Initiating Label-Retaining Cancer Cells in Human Gastrointestinal Cancers Undergo Asymmetric Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M.; Mullinax, John E.; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J.; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Garfield, Susan H.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-01-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  13. Siloxane nanoprobes for labeling and dual modality imaging of neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Addington, Caroline P.; Cusick, Alex; Shankar, Rohini Vidya; Agarwal, Shubhangi; Stabenfeldt, Sarah E.; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic for a myriad of medical conditions, including cancer, traumatic brain injury, and cardiovascular disease among others. A thorough understanding of the efficacy and cellular dynamics of these therapies necessitates the ability to non-invasively track cells in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a platform to track cells as a non-invasive modality with superior resolution and soft tissue contrast. We recently reported a new nanoprobe platform for cell labeling and imaging using fluorophore doped siloxane core nanoemulsions as dual modality (1H MRI/Fluorescence), dual-functional (oximetry/detection) nanoprobes. Here, we successfully demonstrate the labeling, dual-modality imaging, and oximetry of neural progenitor/stem cells (NPSCs) in vitro using this platform. Labeling at a concentration of 10 μl/104 cells with a 40%v/v polydimethylsiloxane core nanoemulsion, doped with rhodamine, had minimal effect on viability, no effect on migration, proliferation and differentiation of NPSCs and allowed for unambiguous visualization of labeled NPSCs by 1H MR and fluorescence and local pO2 reporting by labeled NPSCs. This new approach for cell labeling with a positive contrast 1H MR probe has the potential to improve mechanistic knowledge of current therapies, and guide the design of future cell therapies due to its clinical translatability. PMID:26597417

  14. The effect of 125I-5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine labelling on murine tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, C. J.; Sheridan, J. W.; Donald, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    Labelling with 125IUdR at radioactivity concentrations commonly employed in studied with i.v. injected tumour cells (1.0-0.1 microCi/ml) was shown to reduce considerably the in vitro reproductive viability of mastocytoma tumour cells. Velocity sedimentation cell separation studies on mastocytoma cells that had been labelled for 12 h with 0.8 microCi/ml 125IUdR yielded a population that varied markedly between fraction with respect to distribution of label and, in parallel, with respect to induced loss of reproductive viability. A similar population of mastocytoma cells that had been labelled for 36 h with 0.01 microCi/ml 125IUdR yielded fractions where distribution of label was not associated with reduced reproductive viability. Although in vivo survival (as distinct from reproductive viability) of tumour cells injected i.v. and i.p. was not significantly altered within 7 h and 30 h respectively by the commonly used concentrations of 125IUdR, it is suggested that in studies of the fate of injected tumour cells exponentially growing cells be labelled with 125IUdR for intervals well in excess of population doubling times at concentrations less than or equal to 0.025 microCi/ml. PMID:6784742

  15. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  16. In vivo red blood cell compatibility testing using indium-113m tropolone-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, G.J.; Gravelle, D.; Dietz, G.; Driedger, A.A.; King, M.; Cradduck, T.D.

    1988-05-01

    In vivo radionuclide crossmatch is a method for identifying compatible blood for transfusion when allo- or autoantibodies preclude the use of conventional crossmatching techniques. A technique for labeling small volumes of donor red blood cells with (/sup 113m/In)tropolone is reported. The use of /sup 113m/In minimizes the accumulation of background radioactivity and the radiation dose especially so when multiple crossmatches are performed. Labeling red cells with (/sup 113m/In)tropolone is faster and easier to perform than with other radionuclides. Consistently high labeling efficiencies are obtained and minimal /sup 113m/In activity elutes from the labeled red blood cells. A case study involving 22 crossmatches is presented to demonstrate the technique. The radiation dose equivalent from /sup 113m/In is significantly less than with other radionuclides that may be used to label red cells.

  17. The application of super paramagnetic iron oxide-labeled mesenchymal stem cells in cell-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yiying; Feng, Gang; Huang, Zhongming; Yan, Weiqi

    2013-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy has great potential for tissue regeneration. However, being able to monitor the in vivo behavior of implanted MSCs and understand the fate of these cells is necessary for further development of successful therapies and requires an effective, non-invasive and non-toxic technique for cell tracking. Super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) is an idea label and tracer of MSCs. MRI can be used to follow SPIO-labeled MSCs and has been proposed as a gold standard for monitoring the in vivo biodistribution and migration of implanted SPIO-labeled MSCs. This review discusses the biological effects of SPIO labeling on MSCs and the therapeutic applications of local or systemic delivery of these labeled cells.

  18. Scattering pulse of label free fine structure cells to determine the size scale of scattering structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Kaixing; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    Scattering pulse is sensitive to the morphology and components of each single label-free cell. The most direct detection result, label free cell's scattering pulse is studied in this paper as a novel trait to recognize large malignant cells from small normal cells. A set of intrinsic scattering pulse calculation method is figured out, which combines both hydraulic focusing theory and small particle's scattering principle. Based on the scattering detection angle ranges of widely used flow cytometry, the scattering pulses formed by cell scattering energy in forward scattering angle 2°-5° and side scattering angle 80°-110° are discussed. Combining the analysis of cell's illuminating light energy, the peak, area, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of label free cells' scattering pulses for fine structure cells with diameter 1-20 μm are studied to extract the interrelations of scattering pulse's features and cell's morphology. The theoretical and experimental results show that cell's diameter and FWHM of its scattering pulse agree with approximate linear distribution; the peak and area of scattering pulse do not always increase with cell's diameter becoming larger, but when cell's diameter is less than about 16 μm the monotone increasing relation of scattering pulse peak or area with cell's diameter can be obtained. This relationship between the features of scattering pulse and cell's size is potentially a useful but very simple criterion to distinguishing malignant and normal cells by their sizes and morphologies in label free cells clinical examinations.

  19. Mouse Label-Retaining Cells Are Molecularly And Functionally Distinct From Reserve Intestinal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Nakauka-Ddamba, Angela; Tobias, John; Jensen, Shane T.; Lengner, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Intestinal homeostasis and regeneration after injury is controlled by 2 different types of cells–slow cycling, injury-resistant reserve intestinal stem cells (ISC) and actively proliferative ISC. Putative reserve ISCs have been identified using a variety of methods, including CreER insertions at Hopx or Bmi1 loci in mice and DNA label retention. Label-retaining cells (LRCs) include dormant stem cells in several tissues; in the intestine, LRCs appear to share some properties with reserve ISCs, which can be marked by reporter alleles. We investigated the relationships between these populations. METHODS Studies were performed in Lgr5–EGFP-IRES-creERT2, Bmi1-CreERT2, Hopx-CreERT2, and TRE-H2BGFP::Hopx-CreERT2::lox-stop-lox-tdTomato mice. Intestinal epithelial cell populations were purified; we compared reporter allele-marked reserve ISCs and several LRC populations (marked by H2B-GFP retention) using histologic, flow cytometry and functional and single-cell gene expression assays. RESULTS LRCs were dynamic and their cellular composition changed with time. Short-term LRCs had properties of secretory progenitor cells undergoing commitment to the Paneth or enteroendocrine lineages while retaining some stem cell activity. Long-term LRCs lost stem cell activity and were a homogenous population of terminally differentiated Paneth cells. Reserve ISCs marked with HopxCreER were primarily quiescent (in G0), with inactive Wnt signaling and robust stem cell activity. In contrast, most LRCs were in G1 arrest and expressed genes that are regulated by the Wnt pathway or are in the secretory lineage. Conclusions LRCs are molecularly and functionally distinct from reporter-marked reserve intestinal stem cells. This information provides an important basis for future studies of relationships among intestinal stem cell populations. PMID:27237597

  20. Specific labelling of cell populations in blood with targeted immuno-fluorescent/magnetic glyconanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Juan; García, Isabel; Genicio, Nuria; Padro, Daniel; Penadés, Soledad

    2011-12-01

    Current performance of iron oxide nanoparticle-based contrast agents in clinical use is based on the unspecific accumulation of the probes in certain organs or tissues. Specific targeted biofunctional nanoparticles would significantly increase their potential as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in vivo. In this study, multimodal fluorescent/magnetic glyco-nanoparticles were synthesized from gold-coated magnetite (glyco-ferrites) and converted into specific probes by the covalent coupling of protein G and subsequent incubation with an IgG antibody. The immuno-magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles were applied to the specific labelling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a complex biological medium, as human blood. We have been able to label specifically PBMCs present in blood in a percentage as low as 0.10-0.17%. Red blood cells (RBCs) were also clearly labelled, even though the inherent T(2) contrast arising from the high iron content of these cells (coming mainly from haemoglobin). The labelling was further assessed at cellular level by fluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, we have developed new contrast agents able to label specifically a cell population under adverse biological conditions (low abundance, low intrinsic T(2), high protein content). These findings open the door to the application of these probes for the labelling and tracking of endogenous cell populations like metastatic cancer cells, or progenitor stem cells that exist in very low amount in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cell-impedance-based label-free technology for the identification of new drugs.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2017-04-01

    Drug discovery has progressed from relatively simple binding or activity screening assays to high-throughput screening of sophisticated compound libraries with emphasis on miniaturization and automation. The development of functional assays has enhanced the success rate in discovering novel drug molecules. Many technologies, originally based on radioactive labeling, have sequentially been replaced by methods based on fluorescence labeling. Recently, the focus has switched to label-free technologies in cell-based screening assays. Areas covered: Label-free, cell-impedance-based methods comprise of different technologies including surface plasmon resonance, mass spectrometry and biosensors applied for screening of anticancer drugs, G protein-coupled receptors, receptor tyrosine kinase and virus inhibitors, drug and nanoparticle cytotoxicity. Many of the developed methods have been used for high-throughput screening in cell lines. Cell viability and morphological damage prediction have been monitored in three-dimensional spheroid human HT-29 carcinoma cells and whole Schistosomula larvae. Expert opinion: Progress in label-free, cell-impedance-based technologies has facilitated drug screening and may enhance the discovery of potential novel drug molecules through, and improve target molecule identification in, alternative signal pathways. The variety of technologies to measure cellular responses through label-free cell-impedance based approaches all support future drug development and should provide excellent assets for finding better medicines.

  2. Label-free isolation of circulating tumor cells in microfluidic devices: Current research and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Cima, Igor; Wen Yee, Chay; Iliescu, Florina S.; Min Phyo, Wai; Hon Lim, Kiat; Iliescu, Ciprian; Han Tan, Min

    2013-01-01

    This review will cover the recent advances in label-free approaches to isolate and manipulate circulating tumor cells (CTCs). In essence, label-free approaches do not rely on antibodies or biological markers for labeling the cells of interest, but enrich them using the differential physical properties intrinsic to cancer and blood cells. We will discuss technologies that isolate cells based on their biomechanical and electrical properties. Label-free approaches to analyze CTCs have been recently invoked as a valid alternative to “marker-based” techniques, because classical epithelial and tumor markers are lost on some CTC populations and there is no comprehensive phenotypic definition for CTCs. We will highlight the advantages and drawbacks of these technologies and the status on their implementation in the clinics. PMID:24403992

  3. Endowing carbon nanotubes with superparamagnetic properties: applications for cell labeling, MRI cell tracking and magnetic manipulations.

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Giuseppe; Garofalo, Antonio; Popa, Gabriela; Wilhelm, Claire; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Felder-Flesch, Delphine; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2013-05-21

    Coating of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) imparts novel magnetic, optical, and thermal properties with potential applications in the biomedical domain. Multi-walled CNTs have been decorated with iron oxide superparamagnetic NPs. Two different approaches have been investigated based on ligand exchange or "click chemistry". The presence of the NPs on the nanotube surface allows conferring magnetic properties to CNTs. We have evaluated the potential of the NP/CNT hybrids as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their interactions with cells. The capacity of the hybrids to magnetically monitor and manipulate cells has also been investigated. The NP/CNTs can be manipulated by a remote magnetic field with enhanced contrast in MRI. They are internalized into tumor cells without showing cytotoxicity. The labeled cells can be magnetically manipulated as they display magnetic mobility and are detected at a single cell level through high resolution MRI.

  4. Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Labeled with Plasmonic Gold Nanostars for Cellular Tracking and Photothermal Cancer Cell Ablation.

    PubMed

    Shammas, Ronnie L; Fales, Andrew M; Crawford, Bridget M; Wisdom, Amy J; Devi, Gayathri R; Brown, David A; Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Hollenbeck, Scott T

    2017-04-01

    Gold nanostars are unique nanoplatforms that can be imaged in real time and transform light energy into heat to ablate cells. Adipose-derived stem cells migrate toward tumor niches in response to chemokines. The ability of adipose-derived stem cells to migrate and integrate into tumors makes them ideal vehicles for the targeted delivery of cancer nanotherapeutics. To test the labeling efficiency of gold nanostars, undifferentiated adipose-derived stem cells were incubated with gold nanostars and a commercially available nanoparticle (Qtracker), then imaged using two-photon photoluminescence microscopy. The effects of gold nanostars on cell phenotype, proliferation, and viability were assessed with flow cytometry, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide metabolic assay, and trypan blue, respectively. Trilineage differentiation of gold nanostar-labeled adipose-derived stem cells was induced with the appropriate media. Photothermolysis was performed on adipose-derived stem cells cultured alone or in co-culture with SKBR3 cancer cells. Efficient uptake of gold nanostars occurred in adipose-derived stem cells, with persistence of the luminescent signal over 4 days. Labeling efficiency and signal quality were greater than with Qtracker. Gold nanostars did not affect cell phenotype, viability, or proliferation, and exhibited stronger luminescence than Qtracker throughout differentiation. Zones of complete ablation surrounding the gold nanostar-labeled adipose-derived stem cells were observed following photothermolysis in both monoculture and co-culture models. Gold nanostars effectively label adipose-derived stem cells without altering cell phenotype. Once labeled, photoactivation of gold nanostar-labeled adipose-derived stem cells ablates neighboring cancer cells, demonstrating the potential of adipose-derived stem cells as a vehicle for the delivery of site-specific cancer therapy.

  5. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) for quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Hoedt, Esthelle; Zhang, Guoan; Neubert, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is a powerful approach for high-throughput quantitative proteomics. SILAC allows highly accurate protein quantitation through metabolic encoding of whole cell proteomes using stable isotope labeled amino acids. Since its introduction in 2002, SILAC has become increasingly popular. In this chapter we review the methodology and application of SILAC, with an emphasis on three research areas: dynamics of posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and protein turnover.

  6. Fast, Cell-compatible Click Chemistry with Copper-chelating Azides for Biomolecular Labeling**

    PubMed Central

    Uttamapinant, Chayasith; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Grecian, Scott; Clarke, Scott; Singh, Upinder; Slade, Peter; Gee, Kyle R.; Ting, Alice. Y.

    2012-01-01

    We report that azides capable of copper-chelation undergo much faster “Click chemistry” (copper-accelerated azide-alkyne cycloaddition, or CuAAC) than nonchelating azides under a variety of biocompatible conditions. This kinetic enhancement allowed us to perform site-specific protein labeling on the surface of living cells with only 10–40 µM CuI/II and much higher signal than could be obtained using the best previously-reported live-cell compatible CuAAC labeling conditions. Detection sensitivity was also increased for CuAAC detection of alkyne-modified proteins and RNA labeled by metabolic feeding. PMID:22555882

  7. Endowing carbon nanotubes with superparamagnetic properties: applications for cell labeling, MRI cell tracking and magnetic manipulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamanna, Giuseppe; Garofalo, Antonio; Popa, Gabriela; Wilhelm, Claire; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Felder-Flesch, Delphine; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2013-05-01

    Coating of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) imparts novel magnetic, optical, and thermal properties with potential applications in the biomedical domain. Multi-walled CNTs have been decorated with iron oxide superparamagnetic NPs. Two different approaches have been investigated based on ligand exchange or ``click chemistry''. The presence of the NPs on the nanotube surface allows conferring magnetic properties to CNTs. We have evaluated the potential of the NP/CNT hybrids as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their interactions with cells. The capacity of the hybrids to magnetically monitor and manipulate cells has also been investigated. The NP/CNTs can be manipulated by a remote magnetic field with enhanced contrast in MRI. They are internalized into tumor cells without showing cytotoxicity. The labeled cells can be magnetically manipulated as they display magnetic mobility and are detected at a single cell level through high resolution MRI.Coating of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) imparts novel magnetic, optical, and thermal properties with potential applications in the biomedical domain. Multi-walled CNTs have been decorated with iron oxide superparamagnetic NPs. Two different approaches have been investigated based on ligand exchange or ``click chemistry''. The presence of the NPs on the nanotube surface allows conferring magnetic properties to CNTs. We have evaluated the potential of the NP/CNT hybrids as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their interactions with cells. The capacity of the hybrids to magnetically monitor and manipulate cells has also been investigated. The NP/CNTs can be manipulated by a remote magnetic field with enhanced contrast in MRI. They are internalized into tumor cells without showing cytotoxicity. The labeled cells can be magnetically manipulated as they display magnetic mobility and are detected at a single cell level through high

  8. Variations in labeling protocol influence incorporation, distribution and retention of iron oxide nanoparticles into human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    van Tiel, Sandra T; Wielopolski, Piotr A; Houston, Gavin C; Krestin, Gabriel P; Bernsen, Monique R

    2010-01-01

    Various studies have shown that various cell types can be labeled with iron oxide particles and visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, reported protocols for cell labeling show a large variation in terms of labeling dose and incubation time. It is therefore not clear how different labeling protocols may influence labeling efficiency. Systematic assessment of the effects of various labeling protocols on labeling efficiency of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) using two different types of iron oxide nanoparticles, i.e. super paramagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIOs) and microparticles of iron oxide (MPIOs), demonstrated that probe concentration, incubation time and particle characteristics all influence the efficiency of label incorporation, label distribution, label retention and cell behavior. For SPIO the optimal labeling protocol consisted of a dose of 12.5 µg iron/2 ml/9.5 cm(2) and an incubation time of 24 h, resulting in an average iron load of 12.0 pg iron/per cell (uptake efficiency of 9.6%). At 4 h many SPIOs are seen sticking to the outside of the cell instead of being taken up by the cell. For MPIO optimal labeling was obtained with a dose of 50 µg iron/2 ml/9.5 cm(2). Incubation time was of less importance since most of the particles were already incorporated within 4 h with a 100% labeling efficiency, resulting in an intracellular iron load of 626 pg/cell. MPIO were taken up more efficiently than SPIO and were also better tolerated. HUVEC could be exposed to and contain higher amounts of iron without causing significant cell death, even though MPIO had a much more pronounced effect on cell appearance. Using optimal labeling conditions as found for HUVEC on other cell lines, we observed that different cell types react differently to identical labeling conditions. Consequently, for each cell type separately an optimal protocol has to be established.

  9. Supernova: A Versatile Vector System for Single-Cell Labeling and Gene Function Studies in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenshu; Mizuno, Hidenobu; Iwata, Ryohei; Nakazawa, Shingo; Yasuda, Kosuke; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Iwasato, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe “Supernova” series of vector systems that enable single-cell labeling and labeled cell-specific gene manipulation, when introduced by in utero electroporation (IUE) or adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery. In Supernova, sparse labeling relies on low TRE leakage. In a small population of cells with over-threshold leakage, initial tTA-independent weak expression is enhanced by tTA/TRE-positive feedback along with a site-specific recombination system (e.g., Cre/loxP, Flpe/FRT). Sparse and bright labeling by Supernova with little background enables the visualization of the morphological details of individual neurons in densely packed brain areas such as the cortex and hippocampus, both during development and in adulthood. Sparseness levels are adjustable. Labeled cell-specific gene knockout was accomplished by introducing Cre/loxP-based Supernova vectors into floxed mice. Furthermore, by combining with RNAi, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies, IUE-based Supernova achieved labeled cell-specific gene knockdown and editing/knockout without requiring genetically altered mice. Thus, Supernova system is highly extensible and widely applicable for single-cell analyses in complex organs, such as the mammalian brain. PMID:27775045

  10. Supernova: A Versatile Vector System for Single-Cell Labeling and Gene Function Studies in vivo.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenshu; Mizuno, Hidenobu; Iwata, Ryohei; Nakazawa, Shingo; Yasuda, Kosuke; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Iwasato, Takuji

    2016-10-24

    Here we describe "Supernova" series of vector systems that enable single-cell labeling and labeled cell-specific gene manipulation, when introduced by in utero electroporation (IUE) or adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery. In Supernova, sparse labeling relies on low TRE leakage. In a small population of cells with over-threshold leakage, initial tTA-independent weak expression is enhanced by tTA/TRE-positive feedback along with a site-specific recombination system (e.g., Cre/loxP, Flpe/FRT). Sparse and bright labeling by Supernova with little background enables the visualization of the morphological details of individual neurons in densely packed brain areas such as the cortex and hippocampus, both during development and in adulthood. Sparseness levels are adjustable. Labeled cell-specific gene knockout was accomplished by introducing Cre/loxP-based Supernova vectors into floxed mice. Furthermore, by combining with RNAi, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies, IUE-based Supernova achieved labeled cell-specific gene knockdown and editing/knockout without requiring genetically altered mice. Thus, Supernova system is highly extensible and widely applicable for single-cell analyses in complex organs, such as the mammalian brain.

  11. Cell Labeling for 19F MRI: New and Improved Approach to Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsion Design

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sravan K.; Williams, Jonathan; Janjic, Jelena M.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes novel perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions designed to improve ex vivo cell labeling for 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 19F MRI is a powerful non-invasive technique for monitoring cells of the immune system in vivo, where cells are labeled ex vivo with PFC nanoemulsions in cell culture. The quality of 19F MRI is directly affected by the quality of ex vivo PFC cell labeling. When co-cultured with cells for longer periods of time, nanoemulsions tend to settle due to high specific weight of PFC oils (1.5–2.0 g/mL). This in turn can decrease efficacy of excess nanoemulsion removal and reliability of the cell labeling in vitro. To solve this problem, novel PFC nanoemulsions are reported which demonstrate lack of sedimentation and high stability under cell labeling conditions. They are monodisperse, have small droplet size (~130 nm) and low polydispersity (<0.15), show a single peak in the 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum at −71.4 ppm and possess high fluorine content. The droplet size and polydispersity remained unchanged after 160 days of follow up at three temperatures (4, 25 and 37 °C). Further, stressors such as elevated temperature in the presence of cells, and centrifugation, did not affect the nanoemulsion droplet size and polydispersity. Detailed synthetic methodology and in vitro testing for these new PFC nanoemulsions is presented. PMID:25586263

  12. Extensive labeling with [3H]ethanolamine of a hydrophilic protein of animal cells.

    PubMed

    Tisdale, E J; Tartakoff, A M

    1988-06-15

    Murine T-lymphomas and Thy-1- mutants were labeled overnight with [3H]ethanolamine to detect proteins which possess a glycophospholipid anchor. When labeled cells were treated with 10% trichloroacetic acid and then analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography, both Thy-1 and a second intensely labeled protein (46 kDa) were observed. The presence of the radiolabeled 46-kDa protein in wild type and class E Thy-1 negative cells (cells in which Thy-1 is synthesized but cannot be labeled with [3H]ethanolamine) suggested incorporation into a distinct moiety. Labeling of the 46-kDa protein with [3H]ethanolamine is rapidly inhibited by cycloheximide. Further characterization of the 46-kDa protein by subcellular fractionation and Triton X-114 partitioning indicated that the protein is located in the cytosol. The protein is basic and does not bind to either concanavalin A or wheat germ agglutinin. Labeling of a 46-kDa protein has also been demonstrated in Chinese hamster ovary, COS, rat myeloma, cloned human T-lymphocytes, and HeLa cells. Pronase digestion of the [3H]ethanolamine-labeled 46-kDa protein of wild type lymphoma cells generated a nonbasic and polar labeled fragment which is labile to strong acid and base ([3H]ethanolamine is liberated), insensitive to periodate oxidation and alkaline phosphatase, and does not bind to concanavalin A or wheat germ agglutinin. Judging from methylation studies, the labeled ethanolamine residue does not contain a free amino group. Based on these results, we report a novel post-translational modification of selected protein(s) by the covalent addition of [3H]ethanolamine.

  13. Double labeling autoradiography. Cell kinetic studies with /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-thymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Schultze, B.

    1981-01-01

    Examples of the multiple applicability of the double labeling method with /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-TdR are demonstrated. Double labeling with /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-TdR makes it possible to determine the cycle and its phases with high precision by modifying the usual percent labeled mitoses method with a single injection of /sup 3/H-TdR. In addition, data is provided on the variances of the transit times through the cycle phases. For example, in the case of the jejunal crypt cells of the mouse, the transit times through successive cycle phases are uncorrelated. In the case of glial cells the double labeling method provides cell kinetic parameters despite the paucity of proliferating glial cells. In the adult untreated animal, glial cell mitoses are so rare that the percent labeled mitoses method can not be utilized. However, the S-phase duration can be measured by double labeling and the cycle time can be determined by the so-called method of labeled S phases. With the latter method the passage through the S phase of the /sup 3/H-TdR-labeled S phase cells can be registered by injecting /sup 14/C-TdR at different time intervals following /sup 3/H-TdR application. In this way an S-phase duration of about 10 hr and a cycle time of about 20 hr was found for glial cells in the adult untreated mouse. An exchange of glial cells between the growth fraction and the nongrowth fraction has also been shown by double labeling. A quite different application of the double labeling method with 3H- and /sup 14/C-TdR is the in vivo study of the cell cycle phase-specific effect of drugs used in chemotherapy of tumors. The effect of vincristine on these cells has been studied. Vincristine affects cells in S and G2 in such a manner that they are arrested during the next metaphase and subsequently become necrotic. It has no effect on G1 cells.

  14. A microfluidics-based technique for automated and rapid labeling of cells for flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patibandla, Phani K.; Estrada, Rosendo; Kannan, Manasaa; Sethu, Palaniappan

    2014-03-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful technique capable of simultaneous multi-parametric analysis of heterogeneous cell populations for research and clinical applications. In recent years, the flow cytometer has been miniaturized and made portable for application in clinical- and resource-limited settings. The sample preparation procedure, i.e. labeling of cells with antibodies conjugated to fluorescent labels, is a time consuming (˜45 min) and labor-intensive procedure. Microfluidics provides enabling technologies to accomplish rapid and automated sample preparation. Using an integrated microfluidic device consisting of a labeling and washing module, we demonstrate a new protocol that can eliminate sample handling and accomplish sample and reagent metering, high-efficiency mixing, labeling and washing in rapid automated fashion. The labeling module consists of a long microfluidic channel with an integrated chaotic mixer. Samples and reagents are precisely metered into this device to accomplish rapid and high-efficiency mixing. The mixed sample and reagents are collected in a holding syringe and held for up to 8 min following which the mixture is introduced into an inertial washing module to obtain ‘analysis-ready’ samples. The washing module consists of a high aspect ratio channel capable of focusing cells to equilibrium positions close to the channel walls. By introducing the cells and labeling reagents in a narrow stream at the center of the channel flanked on both sides by a wash buffer, the elution of cells into the wash buffer away from the free unbound antibodies is accomplished. After initial calibration experiments to determine appropriate ‘holding time’ to allow antibody binding, both modules were used in conjunction to label MOLT-3 cells (T lymphoblast cell line) with three different antibodies simultaneously. Results confirm no significant difference in mean fluorescence intensity values for all three antibodies labels (p < 0.01) between the

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Iron Oxide-Labeled Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Rhys J.P.; Khoja, Suhail; Almeida, Shone; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Han, Fei; Engel, James; Zhao, Peng; Hu, Peng; Stanley, Edouard G.; Elefanty, Andrew G.; Kwon, Murray

    2016-01-01

    Given the limited regenerative capacity of the heart, cellular therapy with stem cell-derived cardiac cells could be a potential treatment for patients with heart disease. However, reliable imaging techniques to longitudinally assess engraftment of the transplanted cells are scant. To address this issue, we used ferumoxytol as a labeling agent of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac progenitor cells (hESC-CPCs) to facilitate tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a large animal model. Differentiating hESCs were exposed to ferumoxytol at different time points and varying concentrations. We determined that treatment with ferumoxytol at 300 μg/ml on day 0 of cardiac differentiation offered adequate cell viability and signal intensity for MRI detection without compromising further differentiation into definitive cardiac lineages. Labeled hESC-CPCs were transplanted by open surgical methods into the left ventricular free wall of uninjured pig hearts and imaged both ex vivo and in vivo. Comprehensive T2*-weighted images were obtained immediately after transplantation and 40 days later before termination. The localization and dispersion of labeled cells could be effectively imaged and tracked at days 0 and 40 by MRI. Thus, under the described conditions, ferumoxytol can be used as a long-term, differentiation-neutral cell-labeling agent to track transplanted hESC-CPCs in vivo using MRI. Significance The development of a safe and reproducible in vivo imaging technique to track the fate of transplanted human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac progenitor cells (hESC-CPCs) is a necessary step to clinical translation. An iron oxide nanoparticle (ferumoxytol)-based approach was used for cell labeling and subsequent in vivo magnetic resonance imaging monitoring of hESC-CPCs transplanted into uninjured pig hearts. The present results demonstrate the use of ferumoxytol labeling and imaging techniques in tracking the location and dispersion of cell grafts

  16. Labeling and Imaging Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Quantum Dots

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, adipose and muscle cells. Adult derived MSCs are being actively investigated because of their potential to be utilized for therapeutic cell-based transplantation. Methods...

  17. Labeling and Imaging Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Quantum Dots

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, adipose and muscle cells. Adult derived MSCs are being actively investigated because of their potential to be utilized for therapeutic cell-based transplantation. Methods...

  18. Protein labeling with fluorogenic probes for no-wash live-cell imaging of proteins.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yuichiro; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2013-08-01

    Protein labeling by using a protein tag and its specific fluorescent probe is increasingly becoming a useful technique for the real-time imaging of proteins in living cells. Recently, fluorogenic probes for protein labeling were developed. When using these probes, a washing step is not required for the removal of free probes from the cells, thus, allowing rapid detection of proteins in living cells with high signal-to-noise ratio. Various chemical principles have been applied in the designing of probes to include a turn-on fluorescence switch that is activated by the protein labeling reaction. In this review, we describe about the design strategy of the probes and the advances in fluorogenic protein labeling systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cell Proliferation Analysis Using EdU Labeling in Whole Plant and Histological Samples of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kazda, Anita; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Watson, J Matthew; Riha, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The ability to analyze cell division in both spatial and temporal dimensions within an organism is a key requirement in developmental biology. Specialized cell types within individual organs, such as those within shoot and root apical meristems, have often been identified by differences in their rates of proliferation prior to the characterization of distinguishing molecular markers. Replication-dependent labeling of DNA is a widely used method for assaying cell proliferation. The earliest approaches used radioactive labeling with tritiated thymidine, which were later followed by immunodetection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). A major advance in DNA labeling came with the use of 5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine (EdU) which has proven to have multiple advantages over BrdU. Here we describe the methodology for analyzing EdU labeling and retention in whole plants and histological sections of Arabidopsis.

  20. Easy labeling of proliferative phase and sporogonic phase of microsporidia Nosema bombycis in host cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Guo, Wei; Dang, Xiaoqun; Huang, Yukang; Liu, Fangyan; Meng, Xianzhi; An, Yaoyao; Long, Mengxian; Bao, Jialing; Zhou, Zeyang; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Pan, Guoqing

    2017-01-01

    Microsporidia are eukaryotic, unicellular parasites that have been studied for more than 150 years. These organisms are extraordinary in their ability to invade a wide range of hosts including vertebrates and invertebrates, such as human and commercially important animals. A lack of appropriate labeling methods has limited the research of the cell cycle and protein locations in intracellular stages. In this report, an easy fluorescent labeling method has been developed to mark the proliferative and sporogonic phases of microsporidia Nosema bombycis in host cells. Based on the presence of chitin, Calcofluor White M2R was used to label the sporogonic phase, while β-tubulin antibody coupled with fluorescence secondary antibody were used to label the proliferative phase by immunofluorescence. This method is simple, efficient and can be used on both infected cells and tissue slices, providing a great potential application in microsporidia research.

  1. Fluorescent Photo-conversion: A second chance to label unique cells.

    PubMed

    Mellott, Adam J; Shinogle, Heather E; Moore, David S; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-03-01

    Not all cells behave uniformly after treatment in tissue engineering studies. In fact, some treated cells display no signs of treatment or show unique characteristics not consistent with other treated cells. What if the "unique" cells could be isolated from a treated population, and further studied? Photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as Dendra2, allow for the ability to selectively identify unique cells with a secondary label within a primary labeled treated population. In the current study, select cells were identified and labeled through photo-conversion of Dendra2-transfected human Wharton's Jelly cells (hWJCs) for the first time. Robust photo-conversion of green-to-red fluorescence was achieved consistently in arbitrarily selected cells, allowing for precise cell identification of select hWJCs. The current study demonstrates a method that offers investigators the opportunity to selectively label and identify unique cells within a treated population for further study or isolation from the treatment population. Photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as Dendra2, offer the ability over non-photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as green fluorescent protein, to analyze unique individual cells within a treated population, which allows investigators to gain more meaningful information on how a treatment affects all cells within a target population.

  2. Increasing magnetite contents of polymeric magnetic particles dramatically improves labeling of neural stem cell transplant populations.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher F; Rai, Ahmad; Sneddon, Gregor; Yiu, Humphrey H P; Polyak, Boris; Chari, Divya M

    2015-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of therapeutic cells to sites of injury/disease in the central nervous system is a key goal for the translation of clinical cell transplantation therapies. Recently, 'magnetic cell localization strategies' have emerged as a promising and safe approach for targeted delivery of magnetic particle (MP) labeled stem cells to pathology sites. For neuroregenerative applications, this approach is limited by the lack of available neurocompatible MPs, and low cell labeling achieved in neural stem/precursor populations. We demonstrate that high magnetite content, self-sedimenting polymeric MPs [unfunctionalized poly(lactic acid) coated, without a transfecting component] achieve efficient labeling (≥90%) of primary neural stem cells (NSCs)-a 'hard-to-label' transplant population of major clinical relevance. Our protocols showed high safety with respect to key stem cell regenerative parameters. Critically, labeled cells were effectively localized in an in vitro flow system by magnetic force highlighting the translational potential of the methods used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fate of 3H-thymidine labelled myogenic cells in regeneration of muscle isografts.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, E; Mares, V; Stichová, J

    1976-03-05

    Intact and denervated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of 20-day-old inbred Lewis-Wistar rats were labelled with 3H-thymidine. Ninety minutes after the injection of the isotope 4.0% of the nuclei were labelled in the intact (i.e. innervated) and 9.6% in the muscles, denervated 3 days before administration of the isotope. The labelled EDL muscles were grafted into the bed of the previously removed EDL muscles of inbred animals and these isografts were studied 30 days later. In the EDL muscles, regenerated from innervated isografts only occasionally labelled endothelial cells were found whereas in the muscles regenerated from denervated isografts also parenchymal muscle nuclei were regularly labelled. The incidence of labelled nuclei in the regenerated EDL muscles was, however, about 20 times lower than in the donor EDL muscles. The presen experiments provide a direct proof of utilization of donor satelite cell nuclei for regeneration in grafted muscle tissue. With respect to the low incidence of labelled nuclei in regenerated EDL muscles, other sources of cells apparently also contribute to the regeneration process.

  4. A Genetically Encoded AND Gate for Cell-Targeted Metabolic Labeling of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Alborz; Segall-Shapiro, Thomas H.; Kou, Songzi; Jindal, Granton A.; Hoff, Kevin G.; Liu, Shirley; Chitsaz, Mohsen; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Silberg, Jonathan J.; Tirrell, David A.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a genetic AND gate for cell-targeted metabolic labeling and proteomic analysis in complex cellular systems. The centerpiece of the AND gate is a bisected methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) that charges the Met surrogate azidonorleucine (Anl) to tRNAMet. Cellular protein labeling occurs only upon activation of two different promoters that drive expression of the N- and C-terminal fragments of the bisected MetRS. Anl-labeled proteins can be tagged with fluorescent dyes or affinity reagents via either copper-catalyzed or strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition. Protein labeling is apparent within five minutes after addition of Anl to bacterial cells in which the AND gate has been activated. This method allows spatial and temporal control of proteomic labeling and identification of proteins made in specific cellular subpopulations. The approach is demonstrated by selective labeling of proteins in bacterial cells immobilized in the center of a laminar-flow microfluidic channel, where they are exposed to overlapping, opposed gradients of inducers of the N- and C-terminal MetRS fragments. The observed labeling profile is predicted accurately from the strengths of the individual input signals. PMID:23406315

  5. Abcg2-Labeled Cells Contribute to Different Cell Populations in the Embryonic and Adult Heart.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Michelle J; Maher, Travis J; Li, Qinglu; Garry, Mary G; Sorrentino, Brian P; Martin, Cindy M

    2016-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily G member 2 (Abcg2)-expressing cardiac-side population cells have been identified in the developing and adult heart, although the role they play in mammalian heart growth and regeneration remains unclear. In this study, we use genetic lineage tracing to follow the cell fate of Abcg2-expressing cells in the embryonic and adult heart. During cardiac embryogenesis, the Abcg2 lineage gives rise to multiple cardiovascular cell types, including cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells. This capacity for Abcg2-expressing cells to contribute to cardiomyocytes decreases rapidly during the postnatal period. We further tested the role of the Abcg2 lineage following myocardial injury. One month following ischemia reperfusion injury, Abcg2-expressing cells contributed significantly to the endothelial cell lineage, however, there was no contribution to regenerated cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, consistent with previous results showing that Abcg2 plays an important cytoprotective role during oxidative stress, we show an increase in Abcg2 labeling of the vasculature, a decrease in the scar area, and a moderate improvement in cardiac function following myocardial injury. We have uncovered a difference in the capacity of Abcg2-expressing cells to generate the cardiovascular lineages during embryogenesis, postnatal growth, and cardiac regeneration.

  6. Fluorophore-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticle labeling and analysis of engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Dustin J; Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A; Hohm, Sarah A; Lahey, Ryan; Zhou, Ping; Creer, Michael H; Piwnica-Worms, David; Nolta, Jan A

    2008-02-01

    The use of nanometer-sized iron oxide particles combined with molecular imaging techniques enables dynamic studies of homing and trafficking of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Identifying clinically applicable strategies for loading nanoparticles into primitive HSC requires strictly defined culture conditions to maintain viability without inducing terminal differentiation. In the current study, fluorescent molecules were covalently linked to dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (Feridex) to characterize human HSC labeling to monitor the engraftment process. Conjugating fluorophores to the dextran coat for fluorescence-activated cell sorting purification eliminated spurious signals from nonsequestered nanoparticle contaminants. A short-term defined incubation strategy was developed that allowed efficient labeling of both quiescent and cycling HSC, with no discernable toxicity in vitro or in vivo. Transplantation of purified primary human cord blood lineage-depleted and CD34(+) cells into immunodeficient mice allowed detection of labeled human HSC in the recipient bones. Flow cytometry was used to precisely quantitate the cell populations that had sequestered the nanoparticles and to follow their fate post-transplantation. Flow cytometry endpoint analysis confirmed the presence of nanoparticle-labeled human stem cells in the marrow. The use of fluorophore-labeled iron oxide nanoparticles for fluorescence imaging in combination with flow cytometry allows evaluation of labeling efficiencies and homing capabilities of defined human HSC subsets.

  7. Iron oxide labelling of human mesenchymal stem cells in collagen hydrogels for articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Heymer, Andrea; Haddad, Daniel; Weber, Meike; Gbureck, Uwe; Jakob, Peter M; Eulert, Jochen; Nöth, Ulrich

    2008-04-01

    For the development of new therapeutical cell-based strategies for articular cartilage repair, a reliable cell monitoring technique is required to track the cells in vivo non-invasively and repeatedly. We present a systematic and detailed study on the performance and biological impact of a simple and efficient labelling protocol for human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Commercially available very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOPs) were used as magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent. Iron uptake via endocytosis was confirmed histologically with prussian blue staining and quantified by mass spectrometry. Compared with unlabelled cells, VSOP-labelling did neither influence the viability nor the proliferation potential of hMSCs. Furthermore, iron incorporation did not affect hMSCs in undergoing adipogenic, osteogenic or chondrogenic differentiation, as demonstrated histologically and by gene expression analyses. The efficiency of the labelling protocol was assessed with high-resolution MR imaging at 11.7T. VSOP-labelled hMSCs were visualised in a collagen type I hydrogel, which is in clinical use for matrix-based articular cartilage repair. The presence of VSOP-labelled hMSCs was indicated by distinct hypointense spots in the MR images, as a result of iron specific loss of signal intensity. In summary, this labelling technique has great potential to visualise hMSCs and track their migration after transplantation for articular cartilage repair with MR imaging.

  8. Direct fluorescent-dye labeling of α-tubulin in mammalian cells for live cell and super resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Schvartz, Tomer; Aloush, Noa; Goliand, Inna; Segal, Inbar; Nachmias, Dikla; Arbely, Eyal; Elia, Natalie

    2017-08-23

    Genetic code expansion and bioorthogonal labeling offer, for the first time, a way for direct, site-specific labeling of proteins with fluorescent-dyes in live cells. Although the small size and superb photophysical parameters of fluorescent-dyes offer unique advantages for high-resolution microscopy, this approach has yet to be embraced as a tool in live cell imaging. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of this approach by applying it for α-tubulin labeling. After a series of calibrations, we site-specifically labeled α-tubulin with Silicon Rhodamine (SiR) in live mammalian cells in an efficient and robust manner. SiR-labeled tubulin successfully incorporated into endogenous microtubules at high density, enabling video recording of microtubule dynamics in interphase and mitotic cells. Applying this labeling approach to structured illumination microscopy (SIM) resulted an increase in resolution, highlighting the advantages in using a smaller, brighter tag. Therefore, using our optimized assay, genetic code expansion provides an attractive tool for labeling proteins with a minimal, bright tag in quantitative high-resolution imaging. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  9. Numerical modelling of label-structured cell population growth using CFSE distribution data

    PubMed Central

    Luzyanina, Tatyana; Roose, Dirk; Schenkel, Tim; Sester, Martina; Ehl, Stephan; Meyerhans, Andreas; Bocharov, Gennady

    2007-01-01

    Background The flow cytometry analysis of CFSE-labelled cells is currently one of the most informative experimental techniques for studying cell proliferation in immunology. The quantitative interpretation and understanding of such heterogenous cell population data requires the development of distributed parameter mathematical models and computational techniques for data assimilation. Methods and Results The mathematical modelling of label-structured cell population dynamics leads to a hyperbolic partial differential equation in one space variable. The model contains fundamental parameters of cell turnover and label dilution that need to be estimated from the flow cytometry data on the kinetics of the CFSE label distribution. To this end a maximum likelihood approach is used. The Lax-Wendroff method is used to solve the corresponding initial-boundary value problem for the model equation. By fitting two original experimental data sets with the model we show its biological consistency and potential for quantitative characterization of the cell division and death rates, treated as continuous functions of the CFSE expression level. Conclusion Once the initial distribution of the proliferating cell population with respect to the CFSE intensity is given, the distributed parameter modelling allows one to work directly with the histograms of the CFSE fluorescence without the need to specify the marker ranges. The label-structured model and the elaborated computational approach establish a quantitative basis for more informative interpretation of the flow cytometry CFSE systems. PMID:17650320

  10. Noninvasive imaging of protein metabolic labeling in single human cells using stable isotopes and Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Lenferink, Aufried; Otto, Cees

    2008-12-15

    We have combined nonresonant Raman microspectroscopy and spectral imaging with stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to selectively detect the incorporation of deuterium-labeled phenylalanine, tyrosine, and methionine into proteins in intact, single HeLa cells. The C-D stretching vibrational bands in these amino acids are observed in the 2100-2300 cm(-1) spectral region that is devoid of vibrational contributions from other, nondeuterated intracellular constituents. We found that incubation with deuterated amino acids for 8 h in cell culture already led to clearly detectable isotope-related signals in Raman spectra of HeLa cells. As expected, the level of isotope incorporation into proteins increased with incubation time, reaching 55% for deuterated phenylalanine after 28 h. Raman spectral imaging of HeLa cells incubated with deuterium-labeled amino acids showed similar spatial distributions for both isotope-labeled and unlabeled proteins, as evidenced by Raman ratio imaging. The SILAC-Raman methodology presented here combines the strengths of stable isotopic labeling of cells with the nondestructive and quantitative nature of Raman chemical imaging and is likely to become a powerful tool in both cell biology applications and research on tissues or whole organisms.

  11. Differential Labeling of Cell-surface and Internalized Proteins after Antibody Feeding of Live Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Kathryn M.; Kennedy, Matthew J.; Gunnersen, Jenny M.

    2014-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the cell-surface localization of a putative transmembrane receptor in cultured neurons, we labeled the protein on the surface of live neurons with a specific primary antibody raised against an extracellular portion of the protein. Given that receptors are trafficked to and from the surface, if cells are permeabilized after fixation then both cell-surface and internal protein will be detected by the same labeled secondary antibody. Here, we adapted a method used to study protein trafficking (“antibody feeding”) to differentially label protein that had been internalized by endocytosis during the antibody incubation step and protein that either remained on the cell surface or was trafficked to the surface during this period. The ability to distinguish these two pools of protein was made possible through the incorporation of an overnight blocking step with highly-concentrated unlabeled secondary antibody after an initial incubation of unpermeabilized neurons with a fluorescently-labeled secondary antibody. After the blocking step, permeabilization of the neurons allowed detection of the internalized pool with a fluorescent secondary antibody labeled with a different fluorophore. Using this technique we were able to obtain important information about the subcellular location of this putative receptor, revealing that it was, indeed, trafficked to the cell-surface in neurons. This technique is broadly applicable to a range of cell types and cell-surface proteins, providing a suitable antibody to an extracellular epitope is available. PMID:24561550

  12. Fluorine-19 Labeling of Stromal Vascular Fraction Cells for Clinical Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Laura C.; Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Wang, Guan; Bar-Shir, Amnon; Helfer, Brooke M.; O’Hanlon, Charles F.; Kraitchman, Dara L.; Rodriguez, Ricardo L.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells are used clinically for various therapeutic targets. The location and persistence of engrafted SVF cells are important parameters for determining treatment failure versus success. We used the GID SVF-1 platform and a clinical protocol to harvest and label SVF cells with the fluorinated (19F) agent CS-1000 as part of a first-in-human phase I trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT02035085) to track SVF cells with magnetic resonance imaging during treatment of radiation-induced fibrosis in breast cancer patients. Flow cytometry revealed that SVF cells consisted of 25.0% ± 15.8% CD45+, 24.6% ± 12.5% CD34+, and 7.5% ± 3.3% CD31+ cells, with 2.1 ± 0.7 × 105 cells per cubic centimeter of adipose tissue obtained. Fluorescent CS-1000 (CS-ATM DM Green) labeled 87.0% ± 13.5% of CD34+ progenitor cells compared with 47.8% ± 18.5% of hematopoietic CD45+ cells, with an average of 2.8 ± 2.0 × 1012 19F atoms per cell, determined using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The vast majority (92.7% ± 5.0%) of CD31+ cells were also labeled, although most coexpressed CD34. Only 16% ± 22.3% of CD45−/CD31−/CD34− (triple-negative) cells were labeled with CS-ATM DM Green. After induction of cell death by either apoptosis or necrosis, >95% of 19F was released from the cells, indicating that fluorine retention can be used as a surrogate marker for cell survival. Labeled-SVF cells engrafted in a silicone breast phantom could be visualized with a clinical 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner at a sensitivity of approximately 2 × 106 cells at a depth of 5 mm. The current protocol can be used to image transplanted SVF cells at clinically relevant cell concentrations in patients. Significance Stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells harvested from adipose tissue offer great promise in regenerative medicine, but methods to track such cell therapies are needed to ensure correct administration and monitor survival. A clinical protocol

  13. Detecting Pyronin Y labeled RNA transcripts in live cell microenvironments by phasor-FLIM analysis.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Laura M; Jones, Mark R; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-03-01

    Pyronin Y is an environment-sensitive probe which labels all double-stranded RNA in live cells. Methods to determine which RNA species Pyronin Y may be labeling are limited due to the lack of studies aimed at determining whether this probe has different spectroscopic properties when bound to specific transcripts. A major issue is that transcripts are difficult to isolate and study individually. We detected transcripts directly in their biological environment allowing us to identify RNA species on the basis of their location in the cell. We show that the phasor approach to lifetime analysis has the sensitivity to determine at least six different RNA species in live fibroblast cells. The detected lifetime differences were consistent among cells. To our knowledge this is the first application of a spectroscopic technique aimed at identifying Pyronin Y labeled RNA subtypes in living cells.

  14. Detecting Pyronin Y labeled RNA transcripts in live cell microenvironments by phasor-FLIM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Laura M.; Jones, Mark R.; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-03-01

    Pyronin Y is an environment-sensitive probe which labels all double-stranded RNA in live cells. Methods to determine which RNA species Pyronin Y may be labeling are limited due to the lack of studies aimed at determining whether this probe has different spectroscopic properties when bound to specific transcripts. A major issue is that transcripts are difficult to isolate and study individually. We detected transcripts directly in their biological environment allowing us to identify RNA species on the basis of their location in the cell. We show that the phasor approach to lifetime analysis has the sensitivity to determine at least six different RNA species in live fibroblast cells. The detected lifetime differences were consistent among cells. To our knowledge this is the first application of a spectroscopic technique aimed at identifying Pyronin Y labeled RNA subtypes in living cells.

  15. Single cell systems biology by super-resolution imaging and combinatorial labeling

    PubMed Central

    Lubeck, Eric; Cai, Long

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a powerful quantitative tool for exploring regulatory networks in single cells. However, the number of molecular species that can be measured simultaneously is limited by the spectral separability of fluorophores. Here we demonstrate a simple but general strategy to drastically increase the capacity for multiplex detection of molecules in single cells by using optical super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and combinatorial labeling. As a proof of principle, we labeled mRNAs with unique combinations of fluorophores using Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH), and resolved the sequences and combinations of fluorophores with SRM. We measured the mRNA levels of 32 genes simultaneously in single S. cerevisiae cells. These experiments demonstrate that combinatorial labeling and super-resolution imaging of single cells provides a natural approach to bring systems biology into single cells. PMID:22660740

  16. Self-Assembled Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoclusters for Universal Cell Labeling and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuzhen; Zhang, Jun; Jiang, Shengwei; Lin, Gan; Luo, Bing; Yao, Huan; Lin, Yuchun; He, Chengyong; Liu, Gang; Lin, Zhongning

    2016-05-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have been widely used in a variety of biomedical applications, especially as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cell labeling. In this study, SPIO nanoparticles were stabilized with amphiphilic low molecular weight polyethylenimine (PEI) in an aqueous phase to form monodispersed nanocomposites with a controlled clustering structure. The iron-based nanoclusters with a size of 115.3 ± 40.23 nm showed excellent performance on cellular uptake and cell labeling in different types of cells, moreover, which could be tracked by MRI with high sensitivity. The SPIO nanoclusters presented negligible cytotoxicity in various types of cells as detected using MTS, LDH, and flow cytometry assays. Significantly, we found that ferritin protein played an essential role in protecting stress from SPIO nanoclusters. Taken together, the self-assembly of SPIO nanoclusters with good magnetic properties provides a safe and efficient method for universal cell labeling with noninvasive MRI monitoring capability.

  17. Fluorophore Conjugated Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Labeling and Analysis of Engrafting Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Dustin J.; Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A.; Hohm, Sarah A.; Lahey, Ryan; Creer, Michael H.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Nolta, Jan A.

    2010-01-01

    The use of nanometer-sized iron oxide particles combined with molecular imaging techniques enable dynamic studies of homing and trafficking of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Identifying clinically applicable strategies for loading nanoparticles into primitive HSC requires strictly defined culture conditions to maintain viability without inducing terminal differentiation. In the current study, fluorescent molecules were covalently linked to dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (Feridex) to characterize human HSC labeling to monitor the engraftment process. Conjugating fluorophores to the dextran coat for FACS purification eliminated spurious signals from non-sequestered nanoparticle contaminants. A short-term defined incubation strategy was developed which allowed efficient labeling of both quiescent and cycling HSC, with no discernable toxicity in vitro or in vivo. Transplantation of purified primary human cord blood lineage-depleted and CD34+ cells into immunodeficient mice allowed detection of labeled human HSC in the recipient bones. Flow cytometry was used to precisely quantitate the cell populations that had sequestered the nanoparticles, and to follow their fate post-transplantation. Flow cytometry endpoint analysis confirmed the presence of nanoparticle-labeled human stem cells in the marrow. The use of fluorophore-labeled iron oxide nanoparticles for fluorescence imaging in combination with flow cytometry allows evaluation of labeling efficiencies and homing capabilities of defined human HSC subsets. PMID:18055451

  18. Labeling of stem cells with monocrystalline iron oxide for tracking and localization by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Calzi, Sergio Li; Kent, David L.; Chang, Kyung-Hee; Padgett, Kyle R.; Afzal, Aqeela; Chandra, Saurav B.; Caballero, Sergio; English, Denis; Garlington, Wendy; Hiscott, Paul S.; Sheridan, Carl M.; Grant, Maria B.; Forder, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Precise localization of exogenously delivered stem cells is critical to our understanding of their reparative response. Our current inability to determine the exact location of small numbers of cells may hinder optimal development of these cells for clinical use. We describe a method using magnetic resonance imaging to track and localize small numbers of stem cells following transplantation. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were labeled with monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) which neither adversely altered their viability nor their ability to migrate in vitro and allowed successful detection of limited numbers of these cells in muscle. MION-labeled stem cells were also injected into the vitreous cavity of mice undergoing the model of choroidal neovascularization, laser rupture of Bruch’s membrane. Migration of the MION-labeled cells from the injection site towards the laser burns was visualized by MRI. In conclusion, MION labeling of EPC provides a non-invasive means to define the location of small numbers of these cells. Localization of these cells following injection is critical to their optimization for therapy. PMID:19345699

  19. Concepts, labeling procedures, and design of cell proliferation studies relating to carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Goldsworthy, T L; Butterworth, B E; Maronpot, R R

    1993-01-01

    Chemicals may induce cell proliferation directly as mitogens or indirectly via cell death with subsequent proliferation to replace lost cells. Chemically induced proliferation has been demonstrated to play a role in the carcinogenic process. A wide range of procedures and techniques are currently being used to define the quantitative relationship between the extent and duration of chemically induced cell proliferation and carcinogenic potential in different species and target organs. However, a limited database and nonstandard protocols and procedures for measuring cell proliferation have made it difficult to compare results between laboratories. Comparison of frequencies of S phase between control and treated animals is the most commonly used end point in cell proliferation studies and may be regarded as an indirect indication of a proliferative response. This response can be ascertained as labeling indexes (LI; percentage of cells in S phase) after the administration of the DNA precursor labels (tritiated thymidine; 3H-TdR; bromodeoxyuridine, BrdU) or through immunostaining of the endogenous cell replication marker, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Both approaches are applicable to tissue sections. An important issue in the design of experimental studies for measuring LI is determining how and when to investigate proliferative responses in relation to the chemical treatment regimen. Variables to consider when designing cell proliferation studies include the animal's age, chemical dose and method of treatment, choice and dose of label, time and length that the label is administered, and methods of quantitation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7912190

  20. Mathematical modelling of adult hippocampal neurogenesis: effects of altered stem cell dynamics on cell counts and bromodeoxyuridine-labelled cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziebell, Frederik; Martin-Villalba, Ana; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna

    2014-01-01

    In the adult hippocampus, neurogenesis—the process of generating mature granule cells from adult neural stem cells—occurs throughout the entire lifetime. In order to investigate the involved regulatory mechanisms, knockout (KO) experiments, which modify the dynamic behaviour of this process, were conducted in the past. Evaluating these KOs is a non-trivial task owing to the complicated nature of the hippocampal neurogenic niche. In this study, we model neurogenesis as a multicompartmental system of ordinary differential equations based on experimental data. To analyse the results of KO experiments, we investigate how changes of cell properties, reflected by model parameters, influence the dynamics of cell counts and of the experimentally observed counts of cells labelled by the cell division marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). We find that changing cell proliferation rates or the fraction of self-renewal, reflecting the balance between symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions, may result in multiple time phases in the response of the system, such as an initial increase in cell counts followed by a decrease. Furthermore, these phases may be qualitatively different in cells at different differentiation stages and even between mitotically labelled cells and all cells existing in the system. PMID:24598209

  1. Red Cell Volume Can Be Accurately Determined in Sheep Using a Non-radioactive Biotin Label

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Donald M.; Mock, Nell I.; Lankford, Gary L.; Burmeister, Leon F.; Strauss, Ronald G.; Widness, John A.

    2009-01-01

    The sheep has served as an informative animal model for investigation of human fetal and newborn erythropoiesis and red blood cell (RBC) kinetics. We previously validated the permanent label (14C)cyanate for measuring red cell volume (RCV) in sheep. Here we validate biotin labeling of RBCs as a nonradioactive method for measuring RCV in sheep with the anticipation that it can be applied in studies of human infants. The RCV was determined simultaneously using two techniques for quantitation of the biotin label. The first quantified total blood concentration of biotin label on biotin-labeled RBCs using (125I)streptavidin. The second enumerated biotin-labeled RBCs by flow cytometry after incubation with fluorescein-conjugated avidin. RCV measurements made using the two-biotin quantitation techniques were validated against both (14C)cyanate and 51Cr as reference methods. Both biotin techniques produced RCV values that agreed well with the reference methods and with each other, producing correlation coefficients averaging ≥ 0.93. Sequential repetitive measurements in the same animal also agreed with the (14C)cyanate method and each other (average difference < 10%). These results establish biotin-labeled RBCs as an accurate method for performing RCV measurements in sheep. This biotin method can be applied in studies that model neonatal erythropoiesis. PMID:18596580

  2. Red cell volume can be accurately determined in sheep using a nonradioactive biotin label.

    PubMed

    Mock, Donald M; Mock, Nell I; Lankford, Gary L; Burmeister, Leon F; Strauss, Ronald G; Widness, John A

    2008-11-01

    The sheep has served as an informative animal model for investigation of human fetal and newborn erythropoiesis and red blood cell (RBC) kinetics. We previously validated the permanent label (14C)cyanate for measuring red cell volume (RCV) in sheep. Here, we validate biotin labeling of RBCs as a nonradioactive method for measuring RCV in sheep with the anticipation that it can be applied in studies of human infants. The RCV was determined simultaneously using two techniques for quantitation of the biotin label. The first one quantified total blood concentration of biotin label on biotin-labeled RBCs using (125I)streptavidin. The second one enumerated biotin-labeled RBCs by flow cytometry after incubation with fluorescein-conjugated avidin. RCV measurements made using the two biotin quantitation techniques were validated against both (14C)cyanate and 51Cr as reference methods. Both biotin techniques produced RCV values that agreed well with the reference methods and with each other, producing correlation coefficients averaging >or =0.93. Sequential repetitive measurements in the same animal also agreed with the (14C)cyanate method and each other (average difference <10%). These results establish biotin-labeled RBCs as an accurate method for performing RCV measurements in sheep. This biotin method can be applied in studies that model neonatal erythropoiesis.

  3. Biocompatible nanoparticle labeling of stem cells and their distribution in brain.

    PubMed

    Rehni, Ashish K; Singh, Thakur Gurjeet; Chitkara, Mansi; Sandhu, I S

    2012-01-01

    Nanolabeling is an invaluable novel technique in biology to detect and characterize different parts of biological systems including microscopic entities, viz., cells inside the living systems. Stem cells (SCs) are multipotent cells with the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, fat, muscle cells, and neurons and are being investigated for their utility in cell-based transplantation therapy. Yet, adequate methods to track transplanted SCs in vivo are limited, precluding functional studies. Nanoparticles (quantum dots) offer an alternative to organic dyes and fluorescent proteins to label and track cells in vitro and in vivo. These nanoparticles are resistant to chemical and metabolic degradation, demonstrating long-term photo stability. Here, we describe the technology of labeling the stem cells with silver nitrate nanoparticles in an in vitro coculture model. This is followed by defining the procedure of administering these cells in vivo and studying the distribution pattern and resultant regenerative effects of the "tagged" stem cells.

  4. A Dual SILAC Proteomic Labeling Strategy for Quantifying Constitutive and Cell-Cell Induced Protein Secretion.

    PubMed

    Stiess, Michael; Wegehingel, Sabine; Nguyen, Chuong; Nickel, Walter; Bradke, Frank; Cambridge, Sidney B

    2015-08-07

    Recent evidence suggests that the extracellular protein milieu is much more complex than previously assumed as various secretome analyses from different cell types described the release of hundreds to thousands of proteins. The extracellular function of many of these proteins has yet to be determined particularly in the context of three-dimensional tissues with abundant cell-cell contacts. Toward this goal, we developed a strategy of dual SILAC labeling astrocytic cultures for in silico exclusion of unlabeled proteins from serum or neurons used for stimulation. For constitutive secretion, this strategy allowed the precise quantification of the extra-to-intracellular protein ratio of more than 2000 identified proteins. Ratios covered 4 orders of magnitude indicating that the intracellular vs extracellular contributions of different proteins can be variable. Functionally, the secretome of labeled forebrain astrocytic cultures specifically changed within hours after adding unlabeled, "physiological" forebrain neurons. "Nonphysiological" cerebellar hindbrain neurons, however, elicited a different, highly repulsive secretory response. Our data also suggest a significant association of constitutive secretion with the classical secretion pathway and regulated secretion with unconventional pathways. We conclude that quantitative proteomics can help to elucidate general principles of cellular secretion and provide functional insight into the abundant extracellular presence of proteins.

  5. Gold nanoparticle-cell labeling methodology for tracking stem cells within the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betzer, Oshra; Meir, Rinat; Motiei, Menachem; Yadid, Gal; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2017-02-01

    Cell therapy provides a promising approach for diseases and injuries that conventional therapies cannot cure effectively. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be used as effective targeted therapy, as they exhibit homing capabilities to sites of injury and inflammation, exert anti-inflammatory effects, and can differentiate in order to regenerate damaged tissue. Despite the potential efficacy of cell therapy, applying cell-based therapy in clinical practice is very challenging; there is a need to uncover the mystery regarding the fate of the transplanted cells. Therefore, in this study, we developed a method for longitudinal and quantitative in vivo cell tracking, based on the superior visualization abilities of classical X-ray computed tomography (CT), and combined with gold nanoparticles as labeling agents. We applied this technique for non-invasive imaging of MSCs transplanted in a rat model for depression, a highly prevalent and disabling neuropsychiatric disorder lacking effective treatment. Our results, which demonstrate that cell migration could be detected as early as 24 hours and up to one month post-transplantation, revealed that MSCs specifically navigated and homed to distinct depression related brain regions. This research further reveals that cell therapy is a beneficial approach for treating neuropsychiatric disorders; Behavioral manifestations of core symptoms of depressive behavior, were significantly attenuated following treatment. We expect This CT-based technique to lead to a significant enhancement in cellular therapy both for basic research and clinical applications of brain pathologies.

  6. Ferumoxytol: a new, clinically applicable label for stem-cell tracking in arthritic joints with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Aman; Nejadnik, Hossein; Chapelin, Fanny; Lenkov, Olga; Gawande, Rakhee; Lee, Sungmin; Gupta, Sandeep N; Aflakian, Nooshin; Derugin, Nikita; Messing, Solomon; Lin, Guiting; Lue, Tom F; Pisani, Laura; Daldrup-Link, Heike E

    2013-01-01

    Aim To develop a clinically applicable MRI technique for tracking stem cells in matrix-associated stem-cell implants, using the US FDA-approved iron supplement ferumoxytol. Materials & methods Ferumoxytol-labeling of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) was optimized in vitro. A total of 11 rats with osteochondral defects of both femurs were implanted with ferumoxytol- or ferumoxides-labeled or unlabeled ADSCs, and underwent MRI up to 4 weeks post matrix-associated stem-cell implant. The signal-to-noise ratio of different matrix-associated stem-cell implant was compared with t-tests and correlated with histopathology. Results An incubation concentration of 500 µg iron/ml ferumoxytol and 10 µg/ml protamine sulfate led to significant cellular iron uptake, T2 signal effects and unimpaired ADSC viability. In vivo, ferumoxytol-and ferumoxides-labeled ADSCs demonstrated significantly lower signal-to-noise ratio values compared with unlabeled controls (p < 0.01). Histopathology confirmed engraftment of labeled ADSCs, with slow dilution of the iron label over time. Conclusion Ferumoxytol can be used for in vivo tracking of stem cells with MRI. PMID:23534832

  7. Intracellular localization of radioactively labeled misonidazole in EMT-6 tumor cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.G.; Ngan-Lee, J.; Chapman, J.D.

    1982-03-01

    Misonidazole, as an electron-affinic drug, is capable of accepting electrons from ascorbate, NADPH and a number of enzymes in anoxic reaction mixtures such as cellular homogenates and microsomal fractions. Although the intracellular location of many of the above electron donors has been established, (usually in microsomes and mitochondria), the sites of covalent binding of metabolically activated misonidazle and its catabolites to cellular macromolecules remain to be elucidated. The biological effects of misonidazle differ quantitatively and possibly qualitatively when cells are incubated in air vis-a-vis hypoxic conditions. Difference in uptake of labeled misonidazole by hypoxic or aerobic cells may render this radiosensitizing agent of value in the clinical management of certain tumors. We are currently attempting to establish the intracellular sites of covalent binding of radioactively labeled misonidazole and its catabolites in EMT-6 tumor cells. Single cell suspensions of EMT-6 tumor cells labeled with /sup 14/C-Misonidazole in hypoxic conditions were homogenized to yield nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions, which were assayed for acid-precipitable radioactivity. The distributon of label bound to various intracellular molecular classes, in both the acid soluble and macromolecular fraction, was determined for EMT-6 cells labeled in air and hypoxia.

  8. Magnetic labeling of non-phagocytic adherent cells with iron oxide nanoparticles: a comprehensive study.

    PubMed

    Boutry, Sébastien; Brunin, Stéphanie; Mahieu, Isabelle; Laurent, Sophie; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N

    2008-01-01

    Small particles of iron oxide (SPIO) and ultrasmall particles of iron oxide (USPIO), inducing a strong negative contrast on T(2) and T(2)*-weighted MR images, are the most commonly used systems for the magnetic labeling of cultured cells and their subsequent detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this work is to study the influence of iron incubation concentration, nanoparticle size and nanoparticle coating on the magnetic labeling and the viability of non-phagocytic adherent cells in culture. The magnetic labeling of 3T6 fibroblasts was studied by T(2)-weighted MRI at 4.7 T and by dosing-or cytochemical revealing-of iron through methods based on Perl's Prussian blue staining. Cells were incubated for 48 h with increasing iron concentrations of SPIO (25-1000 microg Fe/ml Endorem. Sinerem, a USPIO (20-40 nm) coated with neutral dextran, and Resovist (65 nm), a SPIO bearing an anionic carboxydextran coating, were compared with Endorem (dextran-coated, 80-150 nm) as magnetic tags. The iron loading of marrow stromal cell primary cultures (MSCs) isolated from rat femurs was compared with that of 3T6 fibroblasts. The SPIO-labeling of cells with Endorem was found to be dependent on the iron incubation concentration. MSCs, more sparsely distributed in the culture, exhibited higher iron contents than more densely populated 3T6 fibroblast cultures. A larger iron loading was achieved with Resovist than with Endorem, which in turn was more efficient than Sinerem as a magnetic tag. The magnetic labeling of cultured non-phagocytic adherent cells with iron oxide nanoparticles was thus found to be dependent on the relative concentration of the magnetic tag and of the cells in culture, on the nanoparticle size, and on the coating type. The viability of cells, estimated by methods assessing cell membrane permeability, was not affected by magnetic labeling in the conditions used in this work.

  9. Covalent affinity labeling, radioautography, and immunocytochemistry localize the glucocorticoid receptor in rat testicular Leydig cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T. )

    1989-12-01

    The presence and distribution of glucocorticoid receptors in the rat testis were examined by using 2 approaches: in vivo quantitative radioautography and immunocytochemistry. Radioautographic localization was made possible through the availability of a glucocorticoid receptor affinity label, dexamethasone 21-mesylate, which binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor, thereby preventing dissociation of the steroid-receptor complex. Adrenalectomized adult rats were injected with a tritiated (3H) form of this steroid into the testis and the tissue was processed for light-microscope radioautography. Silver grains were observed primarily over the Leydig cells of the interstitial space and to a lesser extent, over the cellular layers which make up the seminiferous epithelium, with no one cell type showing preferential labeling. To determine the specificity of the labeling, a 25- or 50-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone was injected simultaneously with the same dose of (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate. In these control experiments, a marked reduction in label intensity was noted over the Leydig as well as tubular cells. Endocytic macrophages of the interstitium were non-specifically labeled, indicating uptake of the ligand possibly by fluid-phase endocytosis. A quantitative analysis of the label confirmed the presence of statistically significant numbers of specific binding sites for glucocorticoids in both Leydig cells and the cellular layers of the seminiferous epithelium; 86% of the label was found over Leydig cells, and only 14% over the cells of the seminiferous epithelium. These binding data were confirmed by light-microscope immunocytochemistry using a monoclonal antibody to the glucocorticoid receptor.

  10. Labeling Cell Surface GPIs and GPI-Anchored Proteins through Metabolic Engineering with Artificial Inositol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lili; Gao, Jian; Guo, Zhongwu

    2015-08-10

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring of proteins to the cell surface is important for various biological processes, but GPI-anchored proteins are difficult to study. An effective strategy was developed for the metabolic engineering of cell-surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins by using inositol derivatives carrying an azido group. The azide-labeled GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins were then tagged with biotin on live cells through a click reaction, which allows further elaboration with streptavidin-conjugated dyes or other molecules. The strategy can be used to label GPI-anchored proteins with various tags for biological studies.

  11. Functional investigations on embryonic stem cells labeled with clinically translatable iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Liqin; Cao, Jianbo; Huang, Yue; Lin, Yu; Wu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xiuqin; Liu, Gang

    2014-07-01

    Stem cell based therapies offer significant potential in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been increasingly used to track the transplanted cells, enabling in vivo determination of cell fate. However, the impact of SPIO-labeling on the cell phenotype and differentiation capacity of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unclear. In this study, we wrapped SPIO nanoparticles with stearic acid grafted PEI600, termed as Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO, to generate efficient and non-toxic ESC labeling tools. Our results showed that efficient labeling of ESCs at an optimized low dosage of Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles did not alter the differentiation and self-renewal properties of ESCs. The localization of the transplanted ESCs observed by MRI correlated well with histological studies. These findings demonstrate that Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles have potential to be clinically translatable MRI probes and may enable non-invasive in vivo tracking of ESCs in experimental and clinical settings during cell-based therapies.Stem cell based therapies offer significant potential in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been increasingly used to track the transplanted cells, enabling in vivo determination of cell fate. However, the impact of SPIO-labeling on the cell phenotype and differentiation capacity of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unclear. In this study, we wrapped SPIO nanoparticles with stearic acid grafted PEI600, termed as Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO, to generate efficient and non-toxic ESC labeling tools. Our results showed that efficient labeling of ESCs at an optimized low dosage of Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles did not alter the differentiation and self-renewal properties of ESCs. The localization of the transplanted ESCs observed by MRI

  12. EdU, a new thymidine analogue for labelling proliferating cells in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Chehrehasa, Fatemah; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Dwyer, Patrick; Abrahamsen, Greger; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2009-02-15

    Labelling and identifying proliferating cells is central to understanding neurogenesis and neural lineages in vivo and in vitro. We present here a novel thymidine analogue, ethynyl deoxyuridine (EdU) for labelling dividing cells, detected with a fluorescent azide which forms a covalent bond via the "click" chemistry reaction (the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of an organic azide to a terminal acetylene). Unlike the commonly used BrdU, EdU detection requires no heat or acid treatment. It is quick and easy and compatible with multiple probes for fluorescence immunochemistry, facilitating the characterisation of proliferating cells at high resolution.

  13. Label-free fingerprinting of tumor cells in bulk flow using inline digital holographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dhananjay Kumar; Ahrens, Caroline C.; Li, Wei; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale and label-free phenotyping of cells holds great promise in medicine, especially in cancer diagnostics and prognosis. Here, we introduce inline digital holography microscopy for volumetric imaging of cells in bulk flow and fingerprinting of flowing tumor cells based on two metrics, in-focus scattered intensity and cell diameter. Using planar distribution of immobilized particles, we identify the optimal recording distance and microscope objective magnification that minimizes the error in measurement of particle position, size and scattered intensity. Using the optimized conditions and the two metrics, we demonstrate the capacity to enumerate and fingerprint more than 100,000 cells. Finally, we highlight the power of our label-free and high throughput technology by characterizing breast tumor cell lines with different metastatic potentials and distinguishing drug resistant ovarian cancer cells from their parental cell line. PMID:28270966

  14. Macrophage phagocytosis alters the MRI signal of ferumoxytol-labeled mesenchymal stromal cells in cartilage defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Lenkov, Olga; Gassert, Florian; Fretwell, Deborah; Lam, Isaac; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2016-05-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are a promising tool for cartilage regeneration in arthritic joints. hMSC labeling with iron oxide nanoparticles enables non-invasive in vivo monitoring of transplanted cells in cartilage defects with MR imaging. Since graft failure leads to macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo whether nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs show distinct MR signal characteristics before and after phagocytosis by macrophages. We found that apoptotic nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were phagocytosed by macrophages while viable nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were not. Serial MRI scans of hMSC transplants in arthritic joints of recipient rats showed that the iron signal of apoptotic, nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs engulfed by macrophages disappeared faster compared to viable hMSCs. This corresponded to poor cartilage repair outcomes of the apoptotic hMSC transplants. Therefore, rapid decline of iron MRI signal at the transplant site can indicate cell death and predict incomplete defect repair weeks later. Currently, hMSC graft failure can be only diagnosed by lack of cartilage defect repair several months after cell transplantation. The described imaging signs can diagnose hMSC transplant failure more readily, which could enable timely re-interventions and avoid unnecessary follow up studies of lost transplants.

  15. Macrophage phagocytosis alters the MRI signal of ferumoxytol-labeled mesenchymal stromal cells in cartilage defects

    PubMed Central

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Lenkov, Olga; Gassert, Florian; Fretwell, Deborah; Lam, Isaac; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are a promising tool for cartilage regeneration in arthritic joints. hMSC labeling with iron oxide nanoparticles enables non-invasive in vivo monitoring of transplanted cells in cartilage defects with MR imaging. Since graft failure leads to macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo whether nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs show distinct MR signal characteristics before and after phagocytosis by macrophages. We found that apoptotic nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were phagocytosed by macrophages while viable nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were not. Serial MRI scans of hMSC transplants in arthritic joints of recipient rats showed that the iron signal of apoptotic, nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs engulfed by macrophages disappeared faster compared to viable hMSCs. This corresponded to poor cartilage repair outcomes of the apoptotic hMSC transplants. Therefore, rapid decline of iron MRI signal at the transplant site can indicate cell death and predict incomplete defect repair weeks later. Currently, hMSC graft failure can be only diagnosed by lack of cartilage defect repair several months after cell transplantation. The described imaging signs can diagnose hMSC transplant failure more readily, which could enable timely re-interventions and avoid unnecessary follow up studies of lost transplants. PMID:27174199

  16. Assessment of a Nuclear Affinity Labeling Method for Tracking Implanted Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leiker, Merced; Suzuki, Gen; Iyer, Vijay S.; Canty, John M.; Lee, Techung

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic implantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is entering the realm of clinical trials for several human diseases, and yet much remains uncertain regarding their dynamic distribution and cell fate after in vivo application. Discrepancies in the literature can be attributed in part to the use of different cell labeling/tracking methods and cell administration protocols. To identify a stem cell detection method suitable for myocardial implantation in a large animal model, we experimented on three different MSC labeling methods: adenovirus-mediated expression of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) and β-galactosidase (LacZ), and nuclear staining with DAPI. Intramuscular and intracoronary administrations of labeled porcine MSCs identified the nuclear affinity dye to be a reliable stem cell tracking marker. Stem cell identification is facilitated by an optimized live cell labeling condition generating bright blue fluorescence sharply confined to the nucleus. DAPI-labeled MSCs retained full viability, ceased proliferation, and exhibited an increased differentiation potential. The labeled MSCs remained fully active in expressing key growth factor and cytokine genes, and notably exhibited enhanced expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand SDF1, indicating their competency in response to tissue injury. Histological analysis revealed that approximately half a million MSCs or ∼2% of the administered MSCs remained localized in the normal pig heart 2 weeks after coronary infusion. That the vast majority of these identified MSCs were interstitial indicated the ability of MSCs to migrate across the coronary endothelium. No evidence was obtained indicating MSC differentiation to cardiomyocyte. PMID:19069634

  17. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with [sup 99]Tc

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Babich, J.W.; Straub, R.; Richards, P.

    1992-05-26

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of [sup 99m]Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium. No Drawings

  18. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with .sup.9 TC

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Babich, John W.; Straub, Rita; Richards, Powell

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium.

  19. Uncovering stem-cell heterogeneity in the microniche with label-free microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Lydia L.

    2013-03-01

    Better suited for large number of cells from bulk tissue, traditional cell-screening techniques, such as fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), cannot easily screen stem or progenitor cells from minute populations found in their physiological niches. Furthermore, they rely upon irreversible antibody binding, potentially altering cell properties, including gene expression and regenerative capacity. We have developed a label-free, single-cell analysis microfluidic platform capable of quantifying cell-surface marker expression of functional organ stem cells directly isolated from their micro-anatomical niche. With this platform, we have screened single quiescent muscle stem (satellite) cells derived from single myofibers, and we have uncovered an important heterogeneity in the surface-marker expression of these cells. By sorting the screened cells with our microfluidic device, we have determined what this heterogeneity means in terms of muscle stem-cell functionality. For instance, we show that the levels of beta1-integrin can predict the differentiation capacity of quiescent satellite cells, and in contrast to recent literature, that some CXCR4 + cells are not myogenic. Our results provide the first direct demonstration of a microniche-specific variation in gene expression in stem cells of the same lineage. Overall, our label-free, single-cell analysis and cell-sorting platform could be extended to other systems involving rare-cell subsets. This work was funded by the W. M. Keck Foundation, NIH, and California Institute of Regenerative Medicine

  20. Use of indium-111-labeled cells in measurement of cellular dynamics of experimental cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.; Wang, T.; Fawwaz, R.; Satake, K.; Nowygrod, R.; Reemtsma, K.; Hardy, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    This study evaluates the kinetics and utility of infused indium-111-labeled cells in detecting rejection in ACI to Lewis rat heart allografts. Syngeneic leukocytes, lymph node lymphocytes, and platelets were isolated and labeled with indium-111 (/sup 111/In) oxine, respectively, and were infused i.v. into Lewis rats carrying beating ACI or syngeneic hearts from post-transplant days 0 to 6. Recipients were imaged serially at 24 hr after infusion of labeled cells followed by excision of both native and transplanted hearts for direct isotope count. Labeled leukocytes accumulative progressively in the allograft with the scan becoming positive by post-transplant day 4. The ratio of allograft to native heart isotope counts rose from 1.25 on day 1 to 10.07 (P less than 0.0001) on day 7. The Lewis recipients infused with labeled lymphocytes showed a positive scan on days 6 and 7 whereas the allograft to native heart isotope count ratio rose from 0.97 on day 1 to 5.33 (P less than 0.001) on day 7. Recipients infused with /sup 111/In-labeled platelets showed a positive scan on days 5 to 7 and the allograft to native heart isotope count ratio rose sharply from 2.56 on day 4 to 16.98 (P less than 0.005) on day 7. Syngeneic heart grafts failed to demonstrate significant accumulation of any of the labeled cell population. These studies confirm the importance of nonlymphocytic cells in cellular rejection, evaluate the kinetics of graft invasion by the various cell types, and suggest that the techniques used afford a method for a safe and an early detection of allograft rejection.

  1. Rapid and label-free classification of human glioma cells by infrared spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Gerald; Küchler, Saskia; Hermann, Andreas; Koch, Edmund; Salzer, Reiner; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias

    2008-12-01

    The discrimination of cell types is a crucial task in cell biology. Available techniques, based on an irreversible treatment of the cells, do not allow a sensitive label-free characterization under in situ conditions. Infrared spectroscopic imaging is a new and useful tool for studying individual cells. It has established itself as a powerful method to probe the molecular composition and to indicate the biochemistry of cells. Monolayers of cultivated U343, T1115 and T508 human glioma cells were characterized using infrared spectroscopic imaging. A classification algorithm based on linear discriminant analysis was developed to distinguish different cells without labeling. The classification is based upon spectral features which mainly arise from proteins, nucleic acids, and cholesterol. An accuracy of 91% and 84% was obtained for cells of U343 and T1115, respectively. Cells of the T508 cell line exhibit some misclassifications resulting in a lower accuracy rate of 73%. As the results demonstrate, the potential of infrared spectroscopic imaging method to assess the overall molecular composition of cells in a non-destructive manner opens the possibility to characterize cells on a molecular level without labels or an irreversible treatment.

  2. Zebrabow: multispectral cell labeling for cell tracing and lineage analysis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y Albert; Freundlich, Tom; Weissman, Tamily A; Schoppik, David; Wang, X Cindy; Zimmerman, Steve; Ciruna, Brian; Sanes, Joshua R; Lichtman, Jeff W; Schier, Alexander F

    2013-07-01

    Advances in imaging and cell-labeling techniques have greatly enhanced our understanding of developmental and neurobiological processes. Among vertebrates, zebrafish is uniquely suited for in vivo imaging owing to its small size and optical translucency. However, distinguishing and following cells over extended time periods remains difficult. Previous studies have demonstrated that Cre recombinase-mediated recombination can lead to combinatorial expression of spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins (RFP, YFP and CFP) in neighboring cells, creating a 'Brainbow' of colors. The random combination of fluorescent proteins provides a way to distinguish adjacent cells, visualize cellular interactions and perform lineage analyses. Here, we describe Zebrabow (Zebrafish Brainbow) tools for in vivo multicolor imaging in zebrafish. First, we show that the broadly expressed ubi:Zebrabow line provides diverse color profiles that can be optimized by modulating Cre activity. Second, we find that colors are inherited equally among daughter cells and remain stable throughout embryonic and larval stages. Third, we show that UAS:Zebrabow lines can be used in combination with Gal4 to generate broad or tissue-specific expression patterns and facilitate tracing of axonal processes. Fourth, we demonstrate that Zebrabow can be used for long-term lineage analysis. Using the cornea as a model system, we provide evidence that embryonic corneal epithelial clones are replaced by large, wedge-shaped clones formed by centripetal expansion of cells from the peripheral cornea. The Zebrabow tool set presented here provides a resource for next-generation color-based anatomical and lineage analyses in zebrafish.

  3. Label-free Optofluidic Cell Classifier Utilizing Support Vector Machines

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tsung-Feng; Mei, Zhe; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    A unique optofluidic lab-on-a-chip device that can measure optically encoded forward scattering signals has been demonstrated. From the design of the spatial pattern, the position and velocity of each cell in the flow can be detected and then a spatial cell distribution over the cross section of the channel can be generated. According to the forward scattering intensity and position information of cells, a data-mining method, support vector machines (SVMs), is applied for cell classification. With the help of SVMs, the multi-dimensional analysis can be performed to significantly increase all figures of merit for cell classification. PMID:23997428

  4. Label-free Optofluidic Cell Classifier Utilizing Support Vector Machines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Feng; Mei, Zhe; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2013-09-01

    A unique optofluidic lab-on-a-chip device that can measure optically encoded forward scattering signals has been demonstrated. From the design of the spatial pattern, the position and velocity of each cell in the flow can be detected and then a spatial cell distribution over the cross section of the channel can be generated. According to the forward scattering intensity and position information of cells, a data-mining method, support vector machines (SVMs), is applied for cell classification. With the help of SVMs, the multi-dimensional analysis can be performed to significantly increase all figures of merit for cell classification.

  5. Troubleshooting and deconvoluting label-free cell phenotypic assays in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ye

    2013-01-01

    Central to drug discovery and development is to comprehend the target(s), potency, efficacy and safety of drug molecules using pharmacological assays. Owing to their ability to provide a holistic view of drug actions in native cells, label-free biosensor-enabled cell phenotypic assays have been emerging as new generation phenotypic assays for drug discovery. Despite the benefits associated with wide pathway coverage, high sensitivity, high information content, non-invasiveness and real-time kinetics, label-free cell phenotypic assays are often viewed to be a blackbox in the era of target-centric drug discovery. This article first reviews the biochemical and biological complexity of drug-target interactions, and then discusses the key characteristics of label-free cell phenotypic assays and presents a five-step strategy to troubleshooting and deconvoluting the label-free cell phenotypic profiles of drugs. Drug-target interactions are intrinsically complicated. Label-free cell phenotypic signatures of drugs mirror the innate complexity of drug-target interactions, and can be effectively deconvoluted using the five-step strategy. The past decades have witnessed dramatic expansion of pharmacological assays ranging from molecular to phenotypic assays, which is coincident with the realization of the innate complexity of drug-target interactions. The clinical features of a drug are defined by how it operates at the system level and by its distinct polypharmacology, ontarget, phenotypic and network pharmacology. Approaches to examine the biochemical, cellular and molecular mechanisms of action of drugs are essential to increase the efficiency of drug discovery and development. Label-free cell phenotypic assays and the troubleshooting and deconvoluting approach presented here may hold great promise in drug discovery and development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Advances in chemical labeling of proteins in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qi; Bruchez, Marcel P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The pursuit of quantitative biological information with imaging requires robust labeling approaches that can be used in multiple applications and with a variety of detectable colors and properties. In addition to conventional fluorescent proteins, chemists and biologists have come together to provide a range of approaches that combine dye chemistry with the convenience of genetic targeting. This hybrid-tagging approach combines the rational design of properties available through synthetic dye chemistry with the robust biological targeting available with genetic encoding. In this review, we discuss the current range of approaches that have been exploited for dye targeting, or targeting and activation, and some of the recent applications that are uniquely enabled by these hybrid-tagging approaches. PMID:25743694

  7. Labeled stem cells as disease models and in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Ellerström, Catharina; Strehl, Raimund; Hyllner, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide unique possibilities for in vitro studies of human cells in basic research, disease modeling as well as in industrial applications. By introducing relevant genome engineering technology, and thereby creating, for example, reporter cell lines, one will facilitate and improve safety pharmacology, toxicity testing, and can help the scientists to better understand pathological processes in humans. This review discusses how the merger of these two fields, human pluripotent stem cells and genome engineering, form extremely powerful tools and how they have been implemented already within the scientific community. In sharp contrast to immortalized human cell lines, which are both easy to expand and very simple to transfect, the genetically modified pluripotent stem cell line can be directed to a specific cell lineage and provide the user with highly relevant information. We highlight some of the challenges the field had to solve and how new technology advancements has removed the early bottlenecks.

  8. Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis and isotope labeling of mammalian proteins.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takaho; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the cell-free protein synthesis method, using an Escherichia coli cell extract. This is a cost-effective method for milligram-scale protein production and is particularly useful for the production of mammalian proteins, protein complexes, and membrane proteins that are difficult to synthesize by recombinant expression methods, using E. coli and eukaryotic cells. By adjusting the conditions of the cell-free method, zinc-binding proteins, disulfide-bonded proteins, ligand-bound proteins, etc., may also be produced. Stable isotope labeling of proteins can be accomplished by the cell-free method, simply by using stable isotope-labeled amino acid(s) in the cell-free reaction. Moreover, the cell-free protein synthesis method facilitates the avoidance of stable isotope scrambling and dilution over the recombinant expression methods and is therefore advantageous for amino acid-selective stable isotope labeling. Site-specific stable isotope labeling is also possible with a tRNA molecule specific to the UAG codon. By the cell-free protein synthesis method, coupled transcription-translation is performed from a plasmid vector or a PCR-amplified DNA fragment encoding the protein. A milligram quantity of protein can be produced with a milliliter-scale reaction solution in the dialysis mode. More than a thousand solution structures have been determined by NMR spectroscopy for uniformly labeled samples of human and mouse functional domain proteins, produced by the cell-free method. Here, we describe the practical aspects of mammalian protein production by the cell-free method for NMR spectroscopy. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. From seeing to believing: labelling strategies for in vivo cell-tracking experiments.

    PubMed

    Progatzky, Fränze; Dallman, Margaret J; Lo Celso, Cristina

    2013-06-06

    Intravital microscopy has become increasingly popular over the past few decades because it provides high-resolution and real-time information about complex biological processes. Technological advances that allow deeper penetration in live tissues, such as the development of confocal and two-photon microscopy, together with the generation of ever-new fluorophores that facilitate bright labelling of cells and tissue components have made imaging of vertebrate model organisms efficient and highly informative. Genetic manipulation leading to expression of fluorescent proteins is undoubtedly the labelling method of choice and has been used to visualize several cell types in vivo. This approach, however, can be technically challenging and time consuming. Over the years, several dyes have been developed to allow rapid, effective and bright ex vivo labelling of cells for subsequent transplantation and imaging. Here, we review and discuss the advantages and limitations of a number of strategies commonly used to label and track cells at high resolution in vivo in mouse and zebrafish, using fluorescence microscopy. While the quest for the perfect label is far from achieved, current reagents are valuable tools enabling the progress of biological discovery, so long as they are selected and used appropriately.

  10. From seeing to believing: labelling strategies for in vivo cell-tracking experiments

    PubMed Central

    Progatzky, Fränze; Dallman, Margaret J.; Lo Celso, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has become increasingly popular over the past few decades because it provides high-resolution and real-time information about complex biological processes. Technological advances that allow deeper penetration in live tissues, such as the development of confocal and two-photon microscopy, together with the generation of ever-new fluorophores that facilitate bright labelling of cells and tissue components have made imaging of vertebrate model organisms efficient and highly informative. Genetic manipulation leading to expression of fluorescent proteins is undoubtedly the labelling method of choice and has been used to visualize several cell types in vivo. This approach, however, can be technically challenging and time consuming. Over the years, several dyes have been developed to allow rapid, effective and bright ex vivo labelling of cells for subsequent transplantation and imaging. Here, we review and discuss the advantages and limitations of a number of strategies commonly used to label and track cells at high resolution in vivo in mouse and zebrafish, using fluorescence microscopy. While the quest for the perfect label is far from achieved, current reagents are valuable tools enabling the progress of biological discovery, so long as they are selected and used appropriately. PMID:23853708

  11. Label-free multiphoton imaging and photoablation of preinvasive cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin; Wu, Guizhu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Xingshan; Xie, Shusen

    2012-01-01

    Detection and treatment of early lesions in epithelial tissue offer several possibilities for curing cancer, but it is challenging. Here, we present an optical technique, the combination of multiphoton imaging and absorption, to label-freely detect and ablate preinvasive cancer cells in epithelial tissue. We find that multiphoton imaging can label-freely visualize the principal features of nuclear atypia associated with epithelial precancerous lesions, and the spatial localization of multiphoton absorption can perform targeted ablation of preinvasive cancer cells with micrometer-sized volume precision. These results indicate that this optical technique has the capability to label-freely visualize and remove preinvasive cancer cells in epithelial tissue. This study highlights the potential of this technique as a "seek-and-treat" tool for early lesions in epithelial tissue.

  12. Illumination of growth, division and secretion by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, M Sloan; Swarts, Benjamin M; Fox, Douglas M; Lim, Shion An; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-03-01

    The cell surface is the essential interface between a bacterium and its surroundings. Composed primarily of molecules that are not directly genetically encoded, this highly dynamic structure accommodates the basic cellular processes of growth and division as well as the transport of molecules between the cytoplasm and the extracellular milieu. In this review, we describe aspects of bacterial growth, division and secretion that have recently been uncovered by metabolic labeling of the cell envelope. Metabolite derivatives can be used to label a variety of macromolecules, from proteins to non-genetically-encoded glycans and lipids. The embedded metabolite enables precise tracking in time and space, and the versatility of newer chemoselective detection methods offers the ability to execute multiple experiments concurrently. In addition to reviewing the discoveries enabled by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell envelope, we also discuss the potential of these techniques for translational applications. Finally, we offer some guidelines for implementing this emerging technology.

  13. Illumination of growth, division and secretion by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Siegrist, M. Sloan; Swarts, Benjamin M.; Fox, Douglas M.; Lim, Shion An; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface is the essential interface between a bacterium and its surroundings. Composed primarily of molecules that are not directly genetically encoded, this highly dynamic structure accommodates the basic cellular processes of growth and division as well as the transport of molecules between the cytoplasm and the extracellular milieu. In this review, we describe aspects of bacterial growth, division and secretion that have recently been uncovered by metabolic labeling of the cell envelope. Metabolite derivatives can be used to label a variety of macromolecules, from proteins to non-genetically-encoded glycans and lipids. The embedded metabolite enables precise tracking in time and space, and the versatility of newer chemoselective detection methods offers the ability to execute multiple experiments concurrently. In addition to reviewing the discoveries enabled by metabolic labeling of the bacterial cell envelope, we also discuss the potential of these techniques for translational applications. Finally, we offer some guidelines for implementing this emerging technology. PMID:25725012

  14. A scalable label-free approach to separate human pluripotent cells from differentiated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, N A; Bock, H; Hoeve, M A; Pells, S; Williams, C; McPhee, G; Freile, P; Choudhury, D; De Sousa, P A

    2016-01-01

    The broad capacity of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to grow and differentiate demands the development of rapid, scalable, and label-free methods to separate living cell populations for clinical and industrial applications. Here, we identify differences in cell stiffness, expressed as cell elastic modulus (CEM), for hESC versus mesenchymal progenitors, osteoblast-like derivatives, and fibroblasts using atomic force microscopy and data processing algorithms to characterize the stiffness of cell populations. Undifferentiated hESC exhibited a range of CEMs whose median was nearly three-fold lower than those of differentiated cells, information we exploited to develop a label-free separation device based on the principles of tangential flow filtration. To test the device's utility, we segregated hESC mixed with fibroblasts and hESC-mesenchymal progenitors induced to undergo osteogenic differentiation. The device permitted a throughput of 10(6)-10(7) cells per min and up to 50% removal of specific cell types per single pass. The level of enrichment and depletion of soft, pluripotent hESC in the respective channels was found to rise with increasing stiffness of the differentiating cells, suggesting CEM can serve as a major discriminator. Our results demonstrate the principle of a scalable, label-free, solution for separation of heterogeneous cell populations deriving from human pluripotent stem cells.

  15. A scalable label-free approach to separate human pluripotent cells from differentiated derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, N. A.; Hoeve, M. A.; Pells, S.; Williams, C.; McPhee, G.

    2016-01-01

    The broad capacity of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to grow and differentiate demands the development of rapid, scalable, and label-free methods to separate living cell populations for clinical and industrial applications. Here, we identify differences in cell stiffness, expressed as cell elastic modulus (CEM), for hESC versus mesenchymal progenitors, osteoblast-like derivatives, and fibroblasts using atomic force microscopy and data processing algorithms to characterize the stiffness of cell populations. Undifferentiated hESC exhibited a range of CEMs whose median was nearly three-fold lower than those of differentiated cells, information we exploited to develop a label-free separation device based on the principles of tangential flow filtration. To test the device's utility, we segregated hESC mixed with fibroblasts and hESC-mesenchymal progenitors induced to undergo osteogenic differentiation. The device permitted a throughput of 106–107 cells per min and up to 50% removal of specific cell types per single pass. The level of enrichment and depletion of soft, pluripotent hESC in the respective channels was found to rise with increasing stiffness of the differentiating cells, suggesting CEM can serve as a major discriminator. Our results demonstrate the principle of a scalable, label-free, solution for separation of heterogeneous cell populations deriving from human pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26858819

  16. Magnetic resonance investigation of magnetic-labeled baker's yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy Morais, J. P. M.; Azevedo, R. B.; Silva, L. P.; Lacava, Z. G. M.; Báo, S. N.; Silva, O.; Pelegrini, F.; Gansau, C.; Buske, N.; Safarik, I.; Safarikova, M.; Morais, P. C.

    2004-05-01

    In this study, the interaction of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles (5 and 10 nm core-size) with Saccharomyces cerevisae was investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs revealed magnetite nanoparticles attached externally to the cell wall. The MR data support the strong interaction among the nanoparticles supported by the cells. A remarkable shift in the resonance field was used as signature of particle attachment to the cell wall.

  17. Adeno associated viral-mediated intraosseous labeling of bone marrow derived cells for CNS tracking.

    PubMed

    Selenica, Maj-Linda B; Reid, Patrick; Pena, Gabriela; Alvarez, Jennifer; Hunt, Jerry B; Nash, Kevin R; Morgan, Dave; Gordon, Marcia N; Lee, Daniel C

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation, including microglial activation in the CNS, is an important hallmark in many neurodegenerative diseases. Microglial stimuli not only impact the brain microenvironment by production and release of cytokines and chemokines, but also influence the activity of bone marrow derived cells and blood born macrophage populations. In many diseases including brain disorders and spinal cord injury, researchers have tried to harbor the neuroprotective and repair properties of these subpopulations. Hematopoietic bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) are of great interest, especially during gene therapy because certain hematopoietic cell subpopulations traffic to the sites of injury and inflammation. The aim of this study was to develop a method of labeling endogenous bone marrow derived cells through intraosseous impregnation of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) or lentivirus. We utilized rAAV serotype 9 (rAAV-9) or lentivirus for gene delivery of green florescence protein (GFP) to the mouse bone marrow cells. Flow cytometry showed that both viruses were able to efficiently transduce mouse bone marrow cells in vivo. However, the rAAV9-GFP viral construct transduced BMDCs more efficiently than the lentivirus (11.2% vs. 6.8%), as indicated by cellular GFP expression. We also demonstrate that GFP labeled cells correspond to bone marrow cells of myeloid origin using CD11b as a marker. Additionally, we characterized the ability of bone marrow derived, GFP labeled cells to extravasate into the brain parenchyma upon acute and subchronic neuroinflammatory stimuli in the mouse CNS. Viral mediated over expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) or intracranial injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recruited GFP labeled BMDCs from the periphery into the brain parenchyma compared to vehicle treated mice. Altogether our findings demonstrate a useful method of labeling endogenous BMDCs via viral transduction and the ability to track subpopulations throughout the body

  18. 40 CFR 600.304-12 - Fuel economy label-special requirements for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel economy label-special requirements for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. 600.304-12 Section 600.304-12 Protection of Environment... fuel cell vehicles. Fuel economy labels for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles must meet the...

  19. Cytotoxic effects of iron oxide nanoparticles and implications for safety in cell labelling.

    PubMed

    Soenen, Stefaan J H; Himmelreich, Uwe; Nuytten, Nele; De Cuyper, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    The in vitro labelling of cultured cells with iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) is a frequent practice in biomedical research. To date, the potential cytotoxicity of these particles remains an issue of debate. In the present study, 4 different NP types (dextran-coated Endorem, carboxydextran-coated Resovist, lipid-coated magnetoliposomes (MLs) and citrate-coated very small iron oxide particles (VSOP)) are tested on a variety of cell types, being C17.2 neural progenitor cells, PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells and human blood outgrowth endothelial cells. Using different NP concentrations, the effect of the NPs on cell morphology, cytoskeleton, proliferation, reactive oxygen species, functionality, viability and cellular homeostasis is investigated. Through a systematic study, the safe concentrations for every particle type are determined, showing that MLs can lead up to 67.37 ± 5.98 pg Fe/cell whereas VSOP are the most toxic particles and only reach 18.65 ± 2.07 pg Fe/cell. Using these concentrations, it is shown that for MRI up to 500 cells/μl labelled with VSOP are required to efficiently visualize in an agar phantom in contrast to only 50 cells/μl for MLs and 200 cells/μl for Endorem and Resovist. These results highlight the importance of in-depth cytotoxic evaluation of cell labelling studies as at non-toxic concentrations, some particles appear to be less suitable for the MR visualization of labelled cells. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Biological Characteristics of Fluorescent Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Labeled Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-wei; Bai, Yu; Guo, Hui-hui

    2017-01-01

    Tracking transplanted stem cells is necessary to clarify cellular properties and improve transplantation success. In this study, we investigate the effects of fluorescent superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) (Molday ION Rhodamine-B™, MIRB) on biological properties of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) and monitor hDPSCs in vitro and in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Morphological analysis showed that intracellular MIRB particles were distributed in the cytoplasm surrounding the nuclei of hDPSCs. 12.5–100 μg/mL MIRB all resulted in 100% labeling efficiency. MTT showed that 12.5–50 μg/mL MIRB could promote cell proliferation and MIRB over 100 μg/mL exhibited toxic effect on hDPSCs. In vitro MRI showed that 1 × 106 cells labeled with various concentrations of MIRB (12.5–100 μg/mL) could be visualized. In vivo MRI showed that transplanted cells could be clearly visualized up to 60 days after transplantation. These results suggest that 12.5–50 μg/mL MIRB is a safe range for labeling hDPSCs. MIRB labeled hDPSCs cell can be visualized by MRI in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that MIRB is a promising candidate for hDPSCs tracking in hDPSCs based dental pulp regeneration therapy. PMID:28298928

  1. Tracking Transplanted Stem Cells Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and the Nanoparticle Labeling Method in Urology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Lee, Hong J.; Song, Yun Seob

    2015-01-01

    A reliable in vivo imaging method to localize transplanted cells and monitor their viability would enable a systematic investigation of cell therapy. Most stem cell transplantation studies have used immunohistological staining, which does not provide information about the migration of transplanted cells in vivo in the same host. Molecular imaging visualizes targeted cells in a living host, which enables determining the biological processes occurring in transplanted stem cells. Molecular imaging with labeled nanoparticles provides the opportunity to monitor transplanted cells noninvasively without sacrifice and to repeatedly evaluate them. Among several molecular imaging techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides high resolution and sensitivity of transplanted cells. MRI is a powerful noninvasive imaging modality with excellent image resolution for studying cellular dynamics. Several types of nanoparticles including superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles have been used to magnetically label stem cells and monitor viability by MRI in the urologic field. This review focuses on the current role and limitations of MRI with labeled nanoparticles for tracking transplanted stem cells in urology. PMID:26413510

  2. Tracking Transplanted Stem Cells Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and the Nanoparticle Labeling Method in Urology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Heon; Lee, Hong J; Song, Yun Seob

    2015-01-01

    A reliable in vivo imaging method to localize transplanted cells and monitor their viability would enable a systematic investigation of cell therapy. Most stem cell transplantation studies have used immunohistological staining, which does not provide information about the migration of transplanted cells in vivo in the same host. Molecular imaging visualizes targeted cells in a living host, which enables determining the biological processes occurring in transplanted stem cells. Molecular imaging with labeled nanoparticles provides the opportunity to monitor transplanted cells noninvasively without sacrifice and to repeatedly evaluate them. Among several molecular imaging techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides high resolution and sensitivity of transplanted cells. MRI is a powerful noninvasive imaging modality with excellent image resolution for studying cellular dynamics. Several types of nanoparticles including superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles have been used to magnetically label stem cells and monitor viability by MRI in the urologic field. This review focuses on the current role and limitations of MRI with labeled nanoparticles for tracking transplanted stem cells in urology.

  3. Label-free imaging to study phenotypic behavioural traits of cells in complex co-cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suman, Rakesh; Smith, Gabrielle; Hazel, Kathryn E. A.; Kasprowicz, Richard; Coles, Mark; O’Toole, Peter; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2016-02-01

    Time-lapse imaging is a fundamental tool for studying cellular behaviours, however studies of primary cells in complex co-culture environments often requires fluorescent labelling and significant light exposure that can perturb their natural function over time. Here, we describe ptychographic phase imaging that permits prolonged label-free time-lapse imaging of microglia in the presence of neurons and astrocytes, which better resembles in vivo microenvironments. We demonstrate the use of ptychography as an assay to study the phenotypic behaviour of microglial cells in primary neuronal co-cultures through the addition of cyclosporine A, a potent immune-modulator.

  4. Tumor cell differentiation by label-free microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Autofluorescence and Raman measurements of U251-MG glioblastoma cells prior and subsequent to activation of tumor suppressor genes are compared. While phase contrast images and fluorescence intensity patterns of the tumor (control) cells and the less malignant cells are similar, differences can be deduced from fluorescence spectra and nanosecond decay times. In particular, upon excitation around 375nm, the fluorescence ratio of the protein bound and the free coenzyme NADH depends on the state of malignancy and reflects different cytoplasmic (including lysosomal) and mitochondrial contributions. Slight differences are also observed in the Raman spectra of these cell lines, mainly originating from small granules (lysosomes) surrounding the cell nucleus. While larger numbers of fluorescence and Raman spectra are evaluated by multivariate statistical methods, additional information is obtained from spectral images and fluorescence lifetime images (FLIM).

  5. Label-Retaining Cells in the Adult Murine Salivary Glands Possess Characteristics of Adult Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chibly, Alejandro M.; Querin, Lauren; Harris, Zoey; Limesand, Kirsten H.

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy is the primary treatment for patients with head and neck cancer, which account for roughly 500,000 annual cases worldwide. Dysfunction of the salivary glands and associated conditions like xerostomia and dysphagia are often developed by these patients, greatly diminishing their life quality. Current preventative and palliative care fail to deliver an improvement in the quality of life, thus accentuating the need for regenerative therapies. In this study, a model of label retaining cells (LRCs) in murine salivary glands was developed, in which LRCs demonstrated proliferative potential and possessed markers of putative salivary progenitors. Mice were labeled with 5-Ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) at postnatal day 10 and chased for 8 weeks. Tissue sections from salivary glands obtained at the end of chase demonstrated co-localization between LRCs and the salivary progenitor markers keratin 5 and keratin 14, as well as kit mRNA, indicating that LRCs encompass a heterogeneous population of salivary progenitors. Proliferative potential of LRCs was demonstrated by a sphere assay, in which LRCs were found in primary and secondary spheres and they co-localized with the proliferation marker Ki67 throughout sphere formation. Surprisingly, LRCs were shown to be radio-resistant and evade apoptosis following radiation treatment. The clinical significance of these findings lie in the potential of this model to study the mechanisms that prevent salivary progenitors from maintaining homeostasis upon exposure to radiation, which will in turn facilitate the development of regenerative therapies for salivary gland dysfunction. PMID:25238060

  6. Magnetic Cell Labeling of Primary and Stem Cell-Derived Pig Hepatocytes for MRI-Based Cell Tracking of Hepatocyte Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Dwayne R.; Garrett, Wesley M.; Welch, Glenn; Caperna, Thomas J.; Talbot, Neil C.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2015-01-01

    Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this work, we describe culture conditions for magnetic cell labeling of cells from two different pig hepatocyte cell sources; primary pig hepatocytes (ppHEP) and stem cell-derived hepatocytes (PICM-19FF). The magnetic particle is a micron-sized iron oxide particle (MPIO) that has been extensively studied for magnetic cell labeling for MRI-based cell tracking. ppHEP could endocytose MPIO with labeling percentages as high as 70%, achieving iron content as high as ~55 pg/cell, with >75% viability. PICM-19FF had labeling >97%, achieving iron content ~38 pg/cell, with viability >99%. Extensive morphological and functional assays indicated that magnetic cell labeling was benign to the cells. The results encourage the use of MRI-based cell tracking for the development and clinical use of hepatocyte transplantation methodologies. Further, these results generally highlight the importance of functional cell assays in the evaluation of contrast agent biocompatibility. PMID:25856627

  7. Magnetic cell labeling of primary and stem cell-derived pig hepatocytes for MRI-based cell tracking of hepatocyte transplantation.

    PubMed

    Roach, Dwayne R; Garrett, Wesley M; Welch, Glenn; Caperna, Thomas J; Talbot, Neil C; Shapiro, Erik M

    2015-01-01

    Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this work, we describe culture conditions for magnetic cell labeling of cells from two different pig hepatocyte cell sources; primary pig hepatocytes (ppHEP) and stem cell-derived hepatocytes (PICM-19FF). The magnetic particle is a micron-sized iron oxide particle (MPIO) that has been extensively studied for magnetic cell labeling for MRI-based cell tracking. ppHEP could endocytose MPIO with labeling percentages as high as 70%, achieving iron content as high as ~55 pg/cell, with >75% viability. PICM-19FF had labeling >97%, achieving iron content ~38 pg/cell, with viability >99%. Extensive morphological and functional assays indicated that magnetic cell labeling was benign to the cells. The results encourage the use of MRI-based cell tracking for the development and clinical use of hepatocyte transplantation methodologies. Further, these results generally highlight the importance of functional cell assays in the evaluation of contrast agent biocompatibility.

  8. Cell Labeling and Targeting with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tefft, Brandon J.; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Harburn, J. Jonathan; Klabusay, Martin; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Sandhu, Gurpreet S.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of cells and therapeutic agents would benefit a wide range of biomedical applications by concentrating the therapeutic effect at the target site while minimizing deleterious effects to off-target sites. Magnetic cell targeting is an efficient, safe, and straightforward delivery technique. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are biodegradable, biocompatible, and can be endocytosed into cells to render them responsive to magnetic fields. The synthesis process involves creating magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles followed by high-speed emulsification to form a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) coating. The PLGA-magnetite SPIONs are approximately 120 nm in diameter including the approximately 10 nm diameter magnetite core. When placed in culture medium, SPIONs are naturally endocytosed by cells and stored as small clusters within cytoplasmic endosomes. These particles impart sufficient magnetic mass to the cells to allow for targeting within magnetic fields. Numerous cell sorting and targeting applications are enabled by rendering various cell types responsive to magnetic fields. SPIONs have a variety of other biomedical applications as well including use as a medical imaging contrast agent, targeted drug or gene delivery, diagnostic assays, and generation of local hyperthermia for tumor therapy or tissue soldering. PMID:26554870

  9. In Situ Live-Cell Nucleus Fluorescence Labeling with Bioinspired Fluorescent Probes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Pan; Wang, Houyu; Song, Bin; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2017-08-01

    Fluorescent imaging techniques for visualization of nuclear structure and function in live cells are fundamentally important for exploring major cellular events. The ideal cellular labeling method is capable of realizing label-free, in situ, real-time, and long-term nucleus labeling in live cells, which can fully obtain the nucleus-relative information and effectively alleviate negative effects of alien probes on cellular metabolism. However, current established fluorescent probes-based strategies (e.g., fluorescent proteins-, organic dyes-, fluorescent organic/inorganic nanoparticles-based imaging techniques) are unable to simultaneously realize label-free, in situ, long-term, and real-time nucleus labeling, resulting in inevitable difficulties in fully visualizing nuclear structure and function in live cells. To this end, we present a type of bioinspired fluorescent probes, which are highly efficacious for in situ and label-free tracking of nucleus in long-term and real-time manners. Typically, the bioinspired polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, served as fluorescent probes, can be readily synthesized in situ within live cell nucleus without any further modifications under physiological conditions (37 °C, pH ∼7.4). Compared with other conventional nuclear dyes (e.g., propidium iodide (PI), Hoechst), superior spectroscopic properties (e.g., quantum yield of ∼35.8% and high photostability) and low cytotoxicity of PDA-based probes enable long-term (e.g., 3 h) fluorescence tracking of nucleus. We also demonstrate the generality of this type of bioinspired fluorescent probes in different cell lines and complex biological samples.

  10. Labeling cell surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins through cell metabolic engineering with artificial inositol derivatives**

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhongwu

    2015-01-01

    Protein GPI anchorage to the cell surface is important for various biological processes, but GPI-anchored proteins are difficult to study. This paper developed an effective strategy for metabolic engineering of cell surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins by using inositol derivatives carrying an azido group. The azide-labeled GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins on live cells were then tagged with biotin via click reaction and with a fluorescent molecule. The strategy can be used to label GPI-anchored proteins with various tags for biological studies. PMID:26102235

  11. Label-Free and Continuous-Flow Ferrohydrodynamic Separation of HeLa Cells and Blood Cells in Biocompatible Ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wujun; Zhu, Taotao; Cheng, Rui; Liu, Yufei; He, Jian; Qiu, Hong; Wang, Lianchun; Nagy, Tamas; Querec, Troy D; Unger, Elizabeth R; Mao, Leidong

    2016-06-14

    In this study, a label-free, low-cost, and fast ferrohydrodynamic cell separation scheme is demonstrated using HeLa cells (an epithelial cell line) and red blood cells. The separation is based on cell size difference, and conducted in a custom-made biocompatible ferrofluid that retains the viability of cells during and after the assay for downstream analysis. The scheme offers moderate-throughput (≈10(6) cells h(-1) for a single channel device) and extremely high recovery rate (>99%) without the use of any label. It is envisioned that this separation scheme will have clinical applications in settings where rapid cell enrichment and removal of contaminating blood will improve efficiency of screening and diagnosis such as cervical cancer screening based on mixed populations in exfoliated samples.

  12. Label-Free and Continuous-Flow Ferrohydrodynamic Separation of HeLa Cells and Blood Cells in Biocompatible Ferrofluids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wujun; Zhu, Taotao; Cheng, Rui; Liu, Yufei; He, Jian; Qiu, Hong; Wang, Lianchun; Nagy, Tamas; Querec, Troy D.; Unger, Elizabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a label-free, low-cost, and fast ferrohydrodynamic cell separation scheme is demonstrated using HeLa cells (an epithelial cell line) and red blood cells. The separation is based on cell size difference, and conducted in a custom-made biocompatible ferrofluid that retains the viability of cells during and after the assay for downstream analysis. The scheme offers moderate-throughput (≈106 cells h−1 for a single channel device) and extremely high recovery rate (>99%) without the use of any label. It is envisioned that this separation scheme will have clinical applications in settings where rapid cell enrichment and removal of contaminating blood will improve efficiency of screening and diagnosis such as cervical cancer screening based on mixed populations in exfoliated samples. PMID:27478429

  13. [Comparison of sorting of fluorescently and magnetically labelled dental pulp stem cells].

    PubMed

    Kerényi, Farkas; Tarapcsák, Szabolcs; Hrubi, Edit; Baráthne, Szabó Ágnes; Hegedüs, Viktória; Balogh, Sára; Bágyi, Kinga; Varga, Gábor; Hegedüs, Csaba

    2016-03-01

    Stem cells are present in many tissues, such as dental pulp. Stem cells can be easily isolated from dental pulp because third molars are often removed from patients. Stem cells could be separated from the tissue derived heterogeneous cell population. There are two main methods to separate a cell type from the other ones: the fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and the magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS). The aim of this study was to compare these methods' effect on cell surviving and population growth after sorting on dental pulp cells. The anti-STRO-1 antibody was used as primary antibody to specifically label stem cells. Two secondary antibodies were used: magnetic or fluorescent labelled. We sorted the cells by MACS or by FACS or by combination of both (MACS-FACS). Our results show that the effectivity of MACS and FACS sorting are comparable while of MACS-FACS was significantly higher (MACS 79.53 ± 5.78%, FACS 88.27 ± 3.70%, MACS-FACS 98.43 ± 0.67%). The cell surviving and the post-sorting population growth, on the contrary, are very different. The cell population is growing on first week after MACS but after FACS did not. Moreover, after MACS-FACS, on first week the cell number of population decreased. Taken together, our results suggest to use MACS instead of FACS, at least in case of sorting dental pulp stem cells with anti-STRO-1 antibody.

  14. Original Research: Label-free detection for radiation-induced apoptosis in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Dandan; Feng, Jingwen; Yang, Chengwen; Jin, Changrong; Sa, Yu; Feng, Yuanming

    2016-10-01

    Current flow cytometry (FCM) requires fluorescent dyes labeling cells which make the procedure costly and time consuming. This manuscript reports a feasibility study of detecting the cell apoptosis with a label-free method in glioblastoma cells. A human glioma cell line M059K was exposed to 8 Gy dose of radiation, which enables the cells to undergo radiation-induced apoptosis. The rates of apoptosis were studied at different time points post-irradiation with two different methods: FCM in combination with Annexin V-FITC/PI staining and a newly developed technique named polarization diffraction imaging flow cytometry. Totally 1000 diffraction images were acquired for each sample and the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) algorithm was used in morphological characterization of the apoptotic cells. Among the feature parameters extracted from each image pair, we found that the two GLCM parameters of angular second moment (ASM) and sum entropy (SumEnt) exhibit high sensitivities and consistencies as the apoptotic rates (Pa) measured with FCM method. In addition, no significant difference exists between Pa and ASM_S, Pa and SumEnt_S, respectively (P > 0.05). These results demonstrated that the new label-free method can detect cell apoptosis effectively. Cells can be directly used in the subsequent biochemical experiments as the structure and function of cells and biomolecules are well-preserved with this new method.

  15. Sulforhodamine 101 selectively labels human astrocytoma cells in an animal model of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Georges, Joseph F; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Nichols, Joshua; Tissot, Maya; Preul, Mark C; Feuerstein, Burt; Anderson, Trent; Spetzler, Robert F; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a useful tool for immediate staining of astrocytes. We hypothesized that if the selectivity of SR101was maintained in astrocytoma cells, it could prove useful for glioma research. Cultured astrocytoma cells and acute slices from orthotopic human glioma (n=9) and lymphoma (n=6) xenografts were incubated with SR101 and imaged with confocal microscopy. A subset of slices (n=18) were counter-immunostained with glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD20 for stereological assessment of SR101 co-localization. SR101 differentiated astrocytic tumor cells from lymphoma cells. In acute slices, SR101 labeled 86.50% (±1.86; p<0.0001) of astrocytoma cells and 2.19% (±0.47; p<0.0001) of lymphoma cells. SR101-labeled astrocytoma cells had a distinct morphology when compared with in vivo astrocytes. Immediate imaging of human astrocytoma cells in vitro and in ex vivo rodent xenograft tissue labeled with SR101 can identify astrocytic tumor cells and help visualize the tumor margin. These features are useful in studying astrocytoma in the laboratory and may have clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Tumor cell differentiation by label-free fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Kioschis, Petra; Kessler, Waltraud; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2012-10-01

    Autofluorescence spectra, images, and decay kinetics of U251-MG glioblastoma cells prior and subsequent to activation of tumor suppressor genes are compared. While phase contrast images and fluorescence intensity patterns of tumor (control) cells and less malignant cells are similar, differences can be deduced from autofluorescence spectra and decay kinetics. In particular, upon near UV excitation, the fluorescence ratio of the free and protein-bound coenzyme nicotinamid adenine dinucleotide depends on the state of malignancy and reflects different cytoplasmic (including lysosomal) and mitochondrial contributions. While larger numbers of fluorescence spectra are evaluated by principal component analysis, a multivariate data analysis method, additional information on cell metabolism is obtained from spectral imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

  17. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase: a Potential Approach for Cell labeling

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Song, Haijing; Affleck, Donna; McDougald, Darryl L.; Storms, Robert W.; Zalutksy, Michael R.; Chin, Bennett B.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction To advance the science and clinical application of stem cell therapy, the availability of a highly sensitive, quantitative, and translational method for tracking stem cells would be invaluable. Because hematopoetic stem cells express high levels of the cytosolic enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1), we sought to develop an agent that is specific to ALDH1 and thus to cells expressing the enzyme. Such an agent might be also helpful in identifying tumors that are resistant to cyclophosphomide chemotherapy because ALDH1 is known to be responsible for this resistance. Methods We developed schemes for the synthesis of two 3radioiodinated aldehdyes—N-formylmethyl-5-[*I]iodopyridine-3-carboxamide ([*I]FMIC) and 4-diethylamino-3-[*I]iodobenzaldehyde ([*I]DEIBA)—at no-carrier-added levels from their respective tin precursors. These agents were evaluated using pure ALDH1 and tumor cells that expressed the enzyme. Results The average radiochemical yields for the synthesis [125I]FMIC and [125I]DEIBA were 70 ± 5% and 47 ± 14%, respectively. ALDH1 converted both compounds to respective acids suggesting their suitability as ALDH1 imaging agents. Although ability of ALDH1 within the cells to oxidize one of these substrates was shown, specific uptake in ALDH-expressing tumor cells could not be demonstrated. Conclusion To pursue this approach for ALDH1 imaging, radiolabeled aldehydes need to be designed such that, in addition to being good substrates for ALDH1, the cognate products should be sufficiently polar so as to be retained within the cells. PMID:19875048

  18. Targeted glycoprotein enrichment and identification in stromal cell secretomes using azido sugar metabolic labeling.

    PubMed

    Roper, Stephen M; Zemskova, Marina; Neely, Benjamin A; Martin, Arch; Gao, Peng; Jones, E Ellen; Kraft, Andrew S; Drake, Richard R

    2013-06-01

    Effectively identifying the proteins present in the cellular secretome is complicated due to the presence of cellular protein leakage and serum protein supplements in culture media. A metabolic labeling and click chemistry capture method is described that facilitates the detection of lower abundance glycoproteins in the secretome, even in the presence of serum. Two stromal cell lines were incubated with tetraacetylated sugar-azide analogs for 48 h in serum-free and low-serum conditions. Sugar-azide labeled glycoproteins were covalently linked to alkyne-beads, followed by on-bead trypsin digestion and MS/MS. The resulting glycoproteins were compared between media conditions, cell lines, and azide-sugar labels. Alkyne-bead capture of sugar-azide modified glycoproteins in stromal cell culture media significantly improved the detection of lower abundance secreted glycoproteins compared to standard serum-free secretome preparations. Over 100 secreted glycoproteins were detected in each stromal cell line and significantly enriched relative to a standard secretome preparation. Sugar-azide metabolic labeling is an effective way to enrich for secreted glycoproteins present in cell line secretomes, even in culture media supplemented with serum. The method has utility for identifying secreted stromal proteins associated with cancer progression and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Biocompatible and label-free separation of cancer cells from cell culture lines from white blood cells in ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wujun; Cheng, Rui; Lim, So Hyun; Miller, Joshua R; Zhang, Weizhong; Tang, Wei; Xie, Jin; Mao, Leidong

    2017-06-27

    This paper reports a biocompatible and label-free cell separation method using ferrofluids that can separate a variety of low-concentration cancer cells from cell culture lines (∼100 cancer cells per mL) from undiluted white blood cells, with a throughput of 1.2 mL h(-1) and an average separation efficiency of 82.2%. The separation is based on the size difference of the cancer cells and white blood cells, and is conducted in a custom-made biocompatible ferrofluid that retains not only excellent short-term viabilities but also normal proliferations of 7 commonly used cancer cell lines. A microfluidic device is designed and optimized specifically to shorten the time of live cells' exposure to ferrofluids from hours to seconds, by eliminating time-consuming off-chip sample preparation and extraction steps and integrating them on-chip to achieve a one-step process. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, a ferrofluid with 0.26% volume fraction was used in this microfluidic device to separate spiked cancer cells from cell lines at a concentration of ∼100 cells per mL from white blood cells with a throughput of 1.2 mL h(-1). The separation efficiencies were 80 ± 3%, 81 ± 5%, 82 ± 5%, 82 ± 4%, and 86 ± 6% for A549 lung cancer, H1299 lung cancer, MCF-7 breast cancer, MDA-MB-231 breast cancer, and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines, respectively. The separated cancer cells' purity was between 25.3% and 28.8%. In addition, the separated cancer cells from this strategy showed an average short-term viability of 94.4 ± 1.3%, and these separated cells were cultured and demonstrated normal proliferation to confluence even after the separation process. Owing to its excellent biocompatibility and label-free operation and its ability to recover low concentrations of cancer cells from white blood cells, this method could lead to a promising tool for rare cell separation.

  20. Selective Labeling of Proteins on Living Cell Membranes Using Fluorescent Nanodiamond Probes

    PubMed Central

    Sotoma, Shingo; Iimura, Jun; Igarashi, Ryuji; Hirosawa, Koichiro M.; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Mizukami, Shin; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Takahiro K.; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tochio, Hidehito

    2016-01-01

    The impeccable photostability of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) is an ideal property for use in fluorescence imaging of proteins in living cells. However, such an application requires highly specific labeling of the target proteins with FNDs. Furthermore, the surface of unmodified FNDs tends to adsorb biomolecules nonspecifically, which hinders the reliable targeting of proteins with FNDs. Here, we combined hyperbranched polyglycerol modification of FNDs with the β-lactamase-tag system to develop a strategy for selective imaging of the protein of interest in cells. The combination of these techniques enabled site-specific labeling of Interleukin-18 receptor alpha chain, a membrane receptor, with FNDs, which eventually enabled tracking of the diffusion trajectory of FND-labeled proteins on the membrane surface. PMID:28335184

  1. Labeling cell-surface proteins via antibody quantum dot streptavidin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Mason, John N; Tomlinson, Ian D; Rosenthal, Sandra J; Blakely, Randy D

    2005-01-01

    The quantum dot is a novel fluorescent platform that has the potential to become an alternative to conventional organic dyes used to label biological probes such as antibodies or ligands. Compared to typical fluorescent organic dyes, cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide core-shell nanocrystals, or quantum dots, have greater photostability, resist metabolic and chemical degradation, are nontoxic, and display broad emission and narrow excitation bands. When conjugated to generic adaptor molecules such as streptavidin, quantum dots can be used to label different biotinylated antibodies or ligands without having to customize the quantum dot surface chemistry for each antibody or ligand. In this chapter, we outline the methodology for using streptavidin quantum dots to label biotinylated antibodies that target cell-surface ectodomain proteins on both living and fixed cells.

  2. Targeting single neuronal networks for gene expression and cell labeling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Marshel, James H; Mori, Takuma; Nielsen, Kristina J; Callaway, Edward M

    2010-08-26

    To understand fine-scale structure and function of single mammalian neuronal networks, we developed and validated a strategy to genetically target and trace monosynaptic inputs to a single neuron in vitro and in vivo. The strategy independently targets a neuron and its presynaptic network for specific gene expression and fine-scale labeling, using single-cell electroporation of DNA to target infection and monosynaptic retrograde spread of a genetically modifiable rabies virus. The technique is highly reliable, with transsynaptic labeling occurring in every electroporated neuron infected by the virus. Targeting single neocortical neuronal networks in vivo, we found clusters of both spiny and aspiny neurons surrounding the electroporated neuron in each case, in addition to intricately labeled distal cortical and subcortical inputs. This technique, broadly applicable for probing and manipulating single neuronal networks with single-cell resolution in vivo, may help shed new light on fundamental mechanisms underlying circuit development and information processing by neuronal networks throughout the brain.

  3. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with (2)H, (13)C and (15)N in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Sitarska, Agnieszka; Skora, Lukasz; Klopp, Julia; Roest, Susan; Fernández, César; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D

    2015-06-01

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80% can be achieved for (15)N and (13)C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For (2)H,(15)N and (2)H,(13)C,(15)N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73%, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins.

  4. Cell viability and chondrogenic differentiation capability of human mesenchymal stem cells after iron labeling with iron sucrose.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Nikolaos; Thorfve, Anna; Brantsing, Camilla; Junevik, Katarina; Baranto, Adad; Barreto Henriksson, Helena

    2014-11-01

    For evaluation of cell therapy strategies using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), it is important to be able to trace transplanted cells and their distribution in tissues, for example, cartilage, over time. The aim of the study was to determine effects on cell viability, traceability, and chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs after iron labeling with iron sucrose. hMSCs were collected (seven donors, 13-57 years) from patients undergoing spinal surgery. Two subsets of experiments were performed. (1) Iron labeling of hMSCs: 1 mg/mL of Venofer(®) (iron sucrose) was added (16 h) to cultures. hMSCs were examined for uptake of iron sucrose (Prussian blue staining) and cell viability (flow cytometry). (2) Iron-labeled hMSCs (passage 4) (n=4, pellet mass), 200,000 cells/tube, were cultured (DMEM-HG) with 10 ng/mL TGFβ and compared with controls (from each donor). The pellets were harvested at days 7, 14, and 28. Real-time PCR, IHC, and histology were used to evaluate SOX9, ACAN, C6S, and COL2A1 expression. Mean number of cells containing iron deposits was 98.1% and mean cell viability was 92.7% (no significant difference compared with unlabeled control cells). Pellets containing iron-labeled cells expressed COL2A1 on protein level (all time points), in similar levels as controls, and glycosaminoglycan accumulation was observed in iron-labeled pellets (day 14 or day 28). Results were supported by the expression of chondrogenic genes SOX9, ACAN, and COL2A1. The results in vitro indicate that iron sucrose can be used as a cell tracer for evaluation of cellular distribution in vivo after transplantation of MSCs and thus contribute with important knowledge when exploring new treatment strategies for degenerated cartilaginous tissues.

  5. A label-retaining but unipotent cell population resides in biliary compartment of mammalian liver

    PubMed Central

    Viil, Janeli; Klaas, Mariliis; Valter, Kadri; Belitškin, Denis; Ilmjärv, Sten; Jaks, Viljar

    2017-01-01

    Cells with slow proliferation kinetics that retain the nuclear label over long time periods–the label-retaining cells (LRCs)–represent multipotent stem cells in a number of adult tissues. Since the identity of liver LRCs (LLRCs) had remained elusive we utilized a genetic approach to reveal LLRCs in normal non-injured livers and characterized their regenerative properties in vivo and in culture. We found that LLRCs were located in biliary vessels and participated in the regeneration of biliary but not hepatocyte injury. In culture experiments the sorted LLRCs displayed an enhanced self-renewal capacity but a unipotent biliary differentiation potential. Transcriptome analysis revealed a unique set of tumorigenesis- and nervous system-related genes upregulated in LLRCs when compared to non-LRC cholangiocytes. We conclude that the LLRCs established during the normal morphogenesis of the liver do not represent a multipotent primitive somatic stem cell population but act as unipotent biliary progenitor cells. PMID:28084309

  6. Small Molecule-Photoactive Yellow Protein Labeling Technology in Live Cell Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Gao, Tang; Zhou, Kechao; Zeng, Wenbin

    2016-08-31

    Characterization of the chemical environment, movement, trafficking and interactions of proteins in live cells is essential to understanding their functions. Labeling protein with functional molecules is a widely used approach in protein research to elucidate the protein location and functions both in vitro and in live cells or in vivo. A peptide or a protein tag fused to the protein of interest and provides the opportunities for an attachment of small molecule probes or other fluorophore to image the dynamics of protein localization. Here we reviewed the recent development of no-wash small molecular probes for photoactive yellow protein (PYP-tag), by the means of utilizing a quenching mechanism based on the intramolecular interactions, or an environmental-sensitive fluorophore. Several fluorogenic probes have been developed, with fast labeling kinetics and cell permeability. This technology allows quick live-cell imaging of cell-surface and intracellular proteins without a wash-out procedure.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of ferumoxide-labeled mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage defects: in vitro and in vivo investigations.

    PubMed

    Henning, Tobias D; Gawande, Rakhee; Khurana, Aman; Tavri, Sidhartha; Mandrussow, Lydia; Golovko, Daniel; Horvai, Andrew; Sennino, Barbara; McDonald, Donald; Meier, Reinhard; Wendland, Michael; Derugin, Nikita; Link, Thomas M; Daldrup-Link, Heike E

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to (1) compare three different techniques for ferumoxide labeling of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), (2) evaluate if ferumoxide labeling allows in vivo tracking of matrix-associated stem cell implants (MASIs) in an animal model, and (3) compare the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of ferumoxide-labeled viable and apoptotic MSCs. MSCs labeled with ferumoxide by simple incubation, protamine transfection, or Lipofectin transfection were evaluated with MRI and histopathology. Ferumoxide-labeled and unlabeled viable and apoptotic MSCs in osteochondral defects of rat knee joints were evaluated over 12 weeks with MRI. Signal to noise ratios (SNRs) of viable and apoptotic labeled MASIs were tested for significant differences using t-tests. A simple incubation labeling protocol demonstrated the best compromise between significant magnetic resonance signal effects and preserved cell viability and potential for immediate clinical translation. Labeled viable and apoptotic MASIs did not show significant differences in SNR. Labeled viable but not apoptotic MSCs demonstrated an increasing area of T2 signal loss over time, which correlated to stem cell proliferation at the transplantation site. Histopathology confirmed successful engraftment of viable MSCs. The engraftment of iron oxide-labeled MASIs by simple incubation can be monitored over several weeks with MRI. Viable and apoptotic MASIs can be distinguished via imaging signs of cell proliferation at the transplantation site.

  8. Nestin Reporter Transgene Labels Multiple Central Nervous System Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Avery S.; Goings, Gwendolyn E.; Kim, Yongsoo; Miller, Richard J.; Chenn, Anjen; Szele, Francis G.

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic neuroepithelia and adult subventricular zone (SVZ) stem and progenitor cells express nestin. We characterized a transgenic line that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) specified to neural tissue by the second intronic enhancer of the nestin promoter that had several novel features. During embryogenesis, the dorsal telencephalon contained many and the ventral telencephalon few eGFP+ cells. eGFP+ cells were found in postnatal and adult neurogenic regions. eGFP+ cells in the SVZ expressed multiple phenotype markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein, Dlx, and neuroblast-specific molecules suggesting the transgene is expressed through the lineage. eGFP+ cell numbers increased in the SVZ after cortical injury, suggesting this line will be useful in probing postinjury neurogenesis. In non-neurogenic regions, eGFP was strongly expressed in oligodendrocyte progenitors, but not in astrocytes, even when they were reactive. This eGFP+ mouse will facilitate studies of proliferative neuroepithelia and adult neurogenesis, as well as of parenchymal oligodendrocytes. PMID:21527990

  9. Long-term label retaining cells localize to distinct regions within the female reproductive epithelium.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Amanda L; Pru, James K

    2013-09-01

    The uterus is an extremely plastic organ that undergoes cyclical remodeling including endometrial regeneration during the menstrual cycle. Endometrial remodeling and regeneration also occur during pregnancy and following parturition, particularly in hemochorial implanting species. The mechanisms of endometrial regeneration are not well understood. Endometrial stem/progenitor cells are proposed to contribute to endometrial regeneration in both humans and mice. BrdU label retention has been used to identify potential stem/progenitor cells in mouse endometrium. However, methods are not available to isolate BrdU label-retaining cells (LRC) for functional analyses. Therefore, we employed a transgenic mouse model to identify H2B-GFP LRCs throughout the female reproductive tract with particular interest on the endometrium. We hypothesized that the female reproductive tract contains a population of long-term LRCs that persist even following pregnancy and endometrial regeneration. Endometrial cells were labeled (pulsed) either transplacentally/translactationally or peripubertally. When mice were pulsed transplacentally/translactationally, the label was not retained in the uterus. However, LRCs were concentrated to the distal oviduct and endocervical transition zone (TZ) following natural (i.e., pregnancy/parturition induced) and mechanically induced endometrial regeneration. LRCs in the distal oviduct and endocervical TZ expressed stem cell markers and did not express ERα or PGR, implying the undifferentiated phenotype of these cells. Oviduct and endocervical TZ LRCs did not proliferate during endometrial re-epithelialization, suggesting that they do not contribute to the endometrium in a stem/progenitor cell capacity. In contrast, when mice were pulsed peripubertally long-term LRCs were identified in the endometrial glandular compartment in mice as far out as 9 months post-pulse. These findings suggest that epithelial tissue of the female reproductive tract contains 3

  10. Microfluidic, Label-Free Enrichment of Prostate Cancer Cells in Blood Based on Acoustophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Augustsson, Per; Magnusson, Cecilia; Nordin, Maria; Lilja, Hans; Laurell, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are shed in peripheral blood at advanced metastatic stages of solid cancers. Surface-marker-based detection of CTC predicts recurrence and survival in colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer. However, scarcity and variation in size, morphology, expression profile, and antigen exposure impairs reliable detection and characterization of CTC. We have developed a non-contact, label-free microfluidic acoustophoresis method to separate prostate cancer cells from white blood cells (WBC) through forces generated by ultrasonic resonances in microfluidic channels. Implementation of cell pre-alignment in a temperature-stabilized (±0.5°C) acoustophoresis microchannel dramatically enhanced the discriminatory capacity and enabled the separation of 5-μm microspheres from 7-μm microspheres with 99% purity. Next, we determined the feasibility of employing label-free microfluidic acoustophoresis to discriminate and divert tumor cells from WBCs using erythrocyte-lysed blood from healthy volunteers spiked with tumor cells from three prostate cancer cell-lines (DU145, PC3, LNCaP). For cells fixed with paraformaldehyde, cancer cell recovery ranged from 93.6% to 97.9% with purity ranging from 97.4% to 98.4%. There was no detectable loss of cell viability or cell proliferation subsequent to the exposure of viable tumor cells to acoustophoresis. For non-fixed, viable cells, tumor cell recovery ranged from 72.5% to 93.9% with purity ranging from 79.6% to 99.7%. These data contribute proof-in-principle that label-free microfluidic acoustophoresis can be used to enrich both viable and fixed cancer cells from WBCs with very high recovery and purity. PMID:22897670

  11. Zebrabow: multispectral cell labeling for cell tracing and lineage analysis in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Y. Albert; Freundlich, Tom; Weissman, Tamily A.; Schoppik, David; Wang, X. Cindy; Zimmerman, Steve; Ciruna, Brian; Sanes, Joshua R.; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Schier, Alexander F.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in imaging and cell-labeling techniques have greatly enhanced our understanding of developmental and neurobiological processes. Among vertebrates, zebrafish is uniquely suited for in vivo imaging owing to its small size and optical translucency. However, distinguishing and following cells over extended time periods remains difficult. Previous studies have demonstrated that Cre recombinase-mediated recombination can lead to combinatorial expression of spectrally distinct fluorescent proteins (RFP, YFP and CFP) in neighboring cells, creating a ‘Brainbow’ of colors. The random combination of fluorescent proteins provides a way to distinguish adjacent cells, visualize cellular interactions and perform lineage analyses. Here, we describe Zebrabow (Zebrafish Brainbow) tools for in vivo multicolor imaging in zebrafish. First, we show that the broadly expressed ubi:Zebrabow line provides diverse color profiles that can be optimized by modulating Cre activity. Second, we find that colors are inherited equally among daughter cells and remain stable throughout embryonic and larval stages. Third, we show that UAS:Zebrabow lines can be used in combination with Gal4 to generate broad or tissue-specific expression patterns and facilitate tracing of axonal processes. Fourth, we demonstrate that Zebrabow can be used for long-term lineage analysis. Using the cornea as a model system, we provide evidence that embryonic corneal epithelial clones are replaced by large, wedge-shaped clones formed by centripetal expansion of cells from the peripheral cornea. The Zebrabow tool set presented here provides a resource for next-generation color-based anatomical and lineage analyses in zebrafish. PMID:23757414

  12. Immunospecific red cell binding of iodine /sup 125/-labeled immunoglobulin G erythrocyte autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Masouredis, S.P.; Branks, M.J.; Garratty, G.; Victoria, E.J.

    1987-09-01

    The primary interaction of autoantibodies with red cells has been studied by using labeled autoantibodies. Immunoglobulin G red cell autoantibodies obtained from IgG antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors were labeled with radioactive iodine and compared with alloanti-D with respect to their properties and binding behavior. Iodine /sup 125/-labeled IgG autoantibody migrated as a single homogeneous peak with the same relative mobility as human IgG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric focusing pattern of labeled autoantibodies varied from donor to donor but was similar to that of alloanti-D, consisting of multiple IgG populations with isoelectric points in the neutral to alkaline range. /sup 125/I-autoantibody bound to all human red cells of common Rh phenotypes. Evidence for immunospecific antibody binding of the labeled autoantibody was based on variation in equilibrium binding to nonhuman and human red cells of common and rare phenotypes, enhanced binding after red cell protease modification, antiglobulin reactivity of cell-bound IgG comparable to that of cell-bound anti-D, and saturation binding in autoantibody excess. Scatchard analysis of two /sup 125/I-autoantibody preparations yielded site numbers of 41,500 and 53,300 with equilibrium constants of 3.7 and 2.1 X 10(8) L X mol-1. Dog, rabbit, rhesus monkey, and baboon red cells were antigen(s) negative by quantitative adsorption studies adsorbing less than 3% of the labeled autoantibody. Reduced ability of rare human D--red blood cells to adsorb the autoantibody and identification of donor autoantibodies that bind to Rh null red blood cells indicated that eluates contained multiple antibody populations of complex specificities in contrast to anti-D, which consists of a monospecific antibody population. Another difference is that less than 70% of the autoantibody IgG was adsorbed by maximum binding red blood cells as compared with greater than 85% for alloanti-D.

  13. Cryo-imaging of fluorescently labeled single cells in a mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyer, Grant J.; Roy, Debashish; Salvado, Olivier; Stone, Meredith E.; Wilson, David L.

    2009-02-01

    We developed a cryo-imaging system to provide single-cell detection of fluorescently labeled cells in mouse, with particular applicability to stem cells and metastatic cancer. The Case cryoimaging system consists of a fluorescence microscope, robotic imaging positioner, customized cryostat, PC-based control system, and visualization/analysis software. The system alternates between sectioning (10-40 μm) and imaging, collecting color brightfield and fluorescent blockface image volumes >60GB. In mouse experiments, we imaged quantum-dot labeled stem cells, GFP-labeled cancer and stem cells, and cell-size fluorescent microspheres. To remove subsurface fluorescence, we used a simplified model of light-tissue interaction whereby the next image was scaled, blurred, and subtracted from the current image. We estimated scaling and blurring parameters by minimizing entropy of subtracted images. Tissue specific attenuation parameters were found [uT : heart (267 +/- 47.6 μm), liver (218 +/- 27.1 μm), brain (161 +/- 27.4 μm)] to be within the range of estimates in the literature. "Next image" processing removed subsurface fluorescence equally well across multiple tissues (brain, kidney, liver, adipose tissue, etc.), and analysis of 200 microsphere images in the brain gave 97+/-2% reduction of subsurface fluorescence. Fluorescent signals were determined to arise from single cells based upon geometric and integrated intensity measurements. Next image processing greatly improved axial resolution, enabled high quality 3D volume renderings, and improved enumeration of single cells with connected component analysis by up to 24%. Analysis of image volumes identified metastatic cancer sites, found homing of stem cells to injury sites, and showed microsphere distribution correlated with blood flow patterns. We developed and evaluated cryo-imaging to provide single-cell detection of fluorescently labeled cells in mouse. Our cryo-imaging system provides extreme (>60GB), micron

  14. Viability and MR detectability of iron labeled mesenchymal stem cells used for endoscopic injection into the porcine urethral sphincter.

    PubMed

    Will, Susanne; Martirosian, Petros; Eibofner, Frank; Schick, Fritz; Bantleon, Rüdiger; Vaegler, Martin; Grözinger, Gerd; Claussen, Claus D; Kramer, Ulrich; Schmehl, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    Direct stem cell therapies for functionally impaired tissue require a sufficient number of cells in the target region and a method for verifying the fate of the cells in the subsequent time course. In vivo MRI of iron labeled mesenchymal stem cells has been suggested to comply with these requirements. The study was conducted to evaluate proliferation, migration, differentiation and adhesion effects as well as the obtained iron load of an iron labeling strategy for mesenchymal stem cells. After injection into the porcine urethral sphincter, the labeled cells were monitored for up to six months using MRI. Mesenchymal stem cells were labeled with ferucarbotran (60/100/200 µg/mL) and ferumoxide (200 µg/mL) for the analysis of migration and viability. Phantom MR measurements were made to evaluate effects of iron labeling. For short and long term studies, the iron labeled cells were injected into the porcine urethral sphincter and monitored by MRI. High resolution anatomical images of the porcine urethral sphincter were applied for detection of the iron particles with a turbo-spin-echo sequence and a gradient-echo sequence with multiple TE values. The MR images were then compared with histological staining. The analysis of cell function after iron labeling showed no effects on proliferation or differentiation of the cells. Although the adherence increases with higher iron dose, the ability to migrate decreases as a presumed effect of iron labeling. The iron labeled mesenchymal stem cells were detectable in vivo in MRI and histological staining even six months after injection. Labeling with iron particles and subsequent evaluation with highly resolved three dimensional data acquisition allows sensitive tracking of cells injected into the porcine urethral sphincter for several months without substantial biological effects on mesenchymal stem cells. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Quantitative Label-Free Cell Proliferation Tracking with a Versatile Electrochemical Impedance Detection Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caviglia, C.; Carminati, M.; Heiskanen, A.; Vergani, M.; Ferrari, G.; Sampietro, M.; Andresen, T. L.; Emnéus, J.

    2012-12-01

    Since the use of impedance measurements for label-free monitoring of cells has become widespread but still the choice of sensing configuration is not unique though crucial for a quantitative interpretation of data, we demonstrate the application of a novel custom multipotentiostat platform to study optimal detection strategies. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) has been used to monitor and compare adhesion of different cell lines. HeLa cells and 3T3 fibroblasts have been cultured for 12 hours on interdigitated electrode arrays integrated into a tailor-made cell culture platform. Both vertical and coplanar interdigitated sensing configuration approaches have been used and compared on the same cell populations.

  16. Activity-dependent fluorescent labeling of bacterial cells expressing the TOL pathway

    SciTech Connect

    William K. Keener; Mary E. Watwood

    2005-01-01

    3-Ethynylbenzoate functions as an activity-dependent, fluorogenic and chromogenic probe for Pseudomonas putida mt-2, which is known to degrade toluene via conversion to benzoate, followed by meta ring fission of the intermediate, catechol. This direct physiological analysis allows the fluorescent labeling of cells whose toluene-degrading enzymes have been induced by an aromatic substrate.

  17. Preparation of lucifer yellow fluorescent liposomes: A method for cells' membrane labeling.

    PubMed

    Menna, C; Calonghi, N; Masotti, L; Neyroz, P

    1993-03-01

    This report describes a method to conjugate lucifer yellow to the external surface of liposomes. The heterobifunctional cross-linking reagentN-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate has been used to activate DMPE molecules. The DMPE-dithiopyridine product has been mixed with DMPC to prepare liposome vesicles. These have been reduced by DTT and finally reacted with lucifer yellow-iodoacetamide to produce the fluorescence-labeled vesicles. The quenching of their fluorescence intensity by Kl is consistent with fully exposed fluorophores. The decay of the fluorescence intensity of the lipid-bound lucifer yellow is biexponential (τ1=7.9 ns; τ2=1.1 ns), with a relative yield of 0.16. When the fluorescent liposomes are mixed with cells, the lucifer yellow-DMPE derivative is transferred. Boar spermatozoa and peripheral human blood lymphocytes have been used as cellular models. The extent of incorporation is dependent on the incubation time and temperature. At 36°C, lucifer yellow fluorescence appears in the spermatozoa cells after 10 min of incubation and reaches its maximum at about 60 min. The fluorescent phospholipid derivative seems to incorporate specifically into membrane structures. The highest labeling ratio is observed with integer, scarcely motile, spermatozoa. A poorer labeling yield (≈15%) is found with lymphocytes. Interestingly, photobleaching due to epiillumination of the labeled cells is apparently negligible and cells are clearly visible after irradiation times ranging from several minutes to few hours.

  18. Transplantation of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells in a model of perinatal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiqing; Siow, Bernard; Blamire, Andrew M; Lako, Majlinda; Clowry, Gavin J

    2010-11-01

    Periventricular white matter injury (PVWMI) in preterm infants is a leading cause of cerebral palsy. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation in experimental models of adult demyelinating conditions is reported to reduce neurological deficits so we investigated their potential for treating developmental PVWMI. Neonatal rat MSCs, when cultured and labeled in vitro with fluorescent, micrometer-sized paramagnetic iron oxide particles (MPIO), retained their differentiation potential. Rats received bilateral intracerebral injections of ibotenic acid at postnatal day 5 causing PVWMI-like lesions with localized hypomyelination and sensorimotor deficits. MPIO-labeled MSCs were transplanted near the lesion in the right hemisphere 1 day postlesioning. Animals receiving cell transplants showed significantly increased antimyelin immunoreactivity in the corpus callosum, and improved reaching and retrieval skills, compared to animals receiving conditioned medium only. In separate experiments, in vivo MRI demonstrated that MPIO-labeled cells migrated away from the injection site toward lesioned areas in both hemispheres, confirmed by microscopy postmortem, but double-labeling studies found little evidence of differentiation into neural phenotypes. MSC transplantation led to significantly more forebrain cell proliferation, assayed by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, than in controls. MSC transplants may have been neuroprotective and indirectly contributed to brain repair. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Selective Labelling of Cell-surface Proteins using CyDye DIGE Fluor Minimal Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Hagner-McWhirter, Asa; Winkvist, Maria; Bourin, Stephanie; Marouga, Rita

    2008-01-01

    Surface proteins are central to the cell's ability to react to its environment and to interact with neighboring cells. They are known to be inducers of almost all intracellular signaling. Moreover, they play an important role in environmental adaptation and drug treatment, and are often involved in disease pathogenesis and pathology (1). Protein-protein interactions are intrinsic to signaling pathways, and to gain more insight in these complex biological processes, sensitive and reliable methods are needed for studying cell surface proteins. Two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis is used extensively for detection of biomarkers and other targets in complex protein samples to study differential changes. Cell surface proteins, partly due to their low abundance (1 2% of cellular proteins), are difficult to detect in a 2-D gel without fractionation or some other type of enrichment. They are also often poorly represented in 2-D gels due to their hydrophobic nature and high molecular weight (2). In this study, we present a new protocol for intact cells using CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes for specific labeling and detection of this important group of proteins. The results showed specific labeling of a large number of cell surface proteins with minimal labeling of intracellular proteins. This protocol is rapid, simple to use, and all three CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes (Cy 2, Cy 3 and Cy 5) can be used to label cell-surface proteins. These features allow for multiplexing using the 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with Ettan DIGE technology and analysis of protein expression changes using DeCyder 2-D Differential Analysis Software. The level of cell-surface proteins was followed during serum starvation of CHO cells for various lengths of time (see Table 1). Small changes in abundance were detected with high accuracy, and results are supported by defined statistical methods. PMID:19066531

  20. Selective labelling of cell-surface proteins using CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes.

    PubMed

    Hagner-McWhirter, Asa; Winkvist, Maria; Bourin, Stephanie; Marouga, Rita

    2008-11-26

    Surface proteins are central to the cell's ability to react to its environment and to interact with neighboring cells. They are known to be inducers of almost all intracellular signaling. Moreover, they play an important role in environmental adaptation and drug treatment, and are often involved in disease pathogenesis and pathology (1). Protein-protein interactions are intrinsic to signaling pathways, and to gain more insight in these complex biological processes, sensitive and reliable methods are needed for studying cell surface proteins. Two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis is used extensively for detection of biomarkers and other targets in complex protein samples to study differential changes. Cell surface proteins, partly due to their low abundance (1 2% of cellular proteins), are difficult to detect in a 2-D gel without fractionation or some other type of enrichment. They are also often poorly represented in 2-D gels due to their hydrophobic nature and high molecular weight (2). In this study, we present a new protocol for intact cells using CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes for specific labeling and detection of this important group of proteins. The results showed specific labeling of a large number of cell surface proteins with minimal labeling of intracellular proteins. This protocol is rapid, simple to use, and all three CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes (Cy 2, Cy 3 and Cy 5) can be used to label cell-surface proteins. These features allow for multiplexing using the 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with Ettan DIGE technology and analysis of protein expression changes using DeCyder 2-D Differential Analysis Software. The level of cell-surface proteins was followed during serum starvation of CHO cells for various lengths of time (see Table 1). Small changes in abundance were detected with high accuracy, and results are supported by defined statistical methods.

  1. In vivo Fluorescence Imaging of Muscle Cell Regeneration by Transplanted EGFP-labeled Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyin; Yang, Zhong; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Yaming

    2010-01-01

    In vivo fluorescence imaging (FLI) enables monitoring fluorescent protein (FP)-labeled cells and proteins in living organisms noninvasively. Here, we examined whether this modality could reach a sufficient sensitivity to allow evaluation of the regeneration process of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-labeled muscle precursors (myoblasts). Using a basic FLI station, we were able to detect clear fluorescence signals generated by 40,000 labeled cells injected into a tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of mouse. We observed that the signal declined to ~25% on the 48 hours of cell injection followed by a recovery starting at the second day and reached a peak of ~45% of the original signal by the 7th day, suggesting that the survived population underwent a limited run of proliferation before differentiation. To assess whether transplanted myoblasts could form satellite cells, we injured the transplanted muscles repeatedly with cardiotoxin. We observed a recovery of fluorescence signal following a disappearance of the signal after each cardiotoxin injection. Histology results showed donor-derived cells located underneath basal membrane and expressing Pax7, confirming that the regeneration observed by imaging was indeed mediated by donor-derived satellite cells. Our results show that FLI is a powerful tool that can extend our ability to unveil complicated biological processes such as stem cell-mediated regeneration. PMID:20125125

  2. Binding effect of fluorescence labeled glycyrrhetinic acid with GA receptors in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Qi; Dai, Chun-Mei; Zheng, Yan; Shi, Shu-Dan; Hu, Hai-Yang; Chen, Da-Wei

    2017-11-01

    Glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) is a natural active component from licorice, which is broadly used in traditional Chinese medicine. Lots of glycyrrhetinic acid receptors (GA-R) are proved to locate on the surface of liver cells. Many reports about the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment were dependent on GA modified carriers. However, the reality of GA-R in HCC cells was not clear. In this paper, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18β-GA) was labeled with fluorescence (FITC) by chemical synthesis. Together with the binding effect of fluorescence labeled glycyrrhetinic acid (FITC-GA), the competitive action of 18β-GA with GA-R was investigated in HCC cells. The results showed that in HepG2 cells, 18β-GA and FITC-GA presented similar cytotoxicity. The specific binding saturation of GA showed the dissociation constant (Kd) was 7.457±2.122pmol/L and the maximum binding counts (Bmax) was 2.385±0.175pmol/2.5×10(6) cells, respectively. FITC-GA bound to cytomembrane specifically and 18β-GA competed to bind the sites significantly in HepG2 cells. Therefore, there is binding effect between fluorescence labeled GA and GA-R. The GA-R on HCC cells is confirmed as expected, which provides a useful reference of active target modified by GA and a novel approach for receptors and ligands study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Labeling of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells with biocompatible fluorescent nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tzu-Chia; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hwang, Eric; Chao, Jui-I.

    2014-05-01

    Nanodiamond is a promising carbon nanomaterial developed for biomedical applications. Here, we show fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) with the biocompatible properties that can be used for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells derived from embryonal carcinoma stem (ECS) cells. The fluorescence intensities of FNDs were increased by treatment with FNDs in both the mouse P19 and human NT2/D1 ECS cells. FNDs were taken into ECS cells; however, FNDs did not alter the cellular morphology and growth ability. Moreover, FNDs did not change the protein expression of stem cell marker SSEA-1 of ECS cells. The neuronal differentiation of ECS cells could be induced by retinoic acid (RA). Interestingly, FNDs did not affect on the morphological alteration, cytotoxicity and apoptosis during the neuronal differentiation. Besides, FNDs did not alter the cell viability and the expression of neuron-specific marker β-III-tubulin in these differentiated neuron cells. The existence of FNDs in the neuron cells can be identified by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Together, FND is a biocompatible and readily detectable nanomaterial for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation process and neuron cells from stem cells.

  4. Labeling of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells with biocompatible fluorescent nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Chia; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hwang, Eric; Chao, Jui-I

    2014-05-16

    Nanodiamond is a promising carbon nanomaterial developed for biomedical applications. Here, we show fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) with the biocompatible properties that can be used for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells derived from embryonal carcinoma stem (ECS) cells. The fluorescence intensities of FNDs were increased by treatment with FNDs in both the mouse P19 and human NT2/D1 ECS cells. FNDs were taken into ECS cells; however, FNDs did not alter the cellular morphology and growth ability. Moreover, FNDs did not change the protein expression of stem cell marker SSEA-1 of ECS cells. The neuronal differentiation of ECS cells could be induced by retinoic acid (RA). Interestingly, FNDs did not affect on the morphological alteration, cytotoxicity and apoptosis during the neuronal differentiation. Besides, FNDs did not alter the cell viability and the expression of neuron-specific marker β-III-tubulin in these differentiated neuron cells. The existence of FNDs in the neuron cells can be identified by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Together, FND is a biocompatible and readily detectable nanomaterial for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation process and neuron cells from stem cells.

  5. Combining Perfluorocarbon and Superparamagnetic Iron-oxide Cell Labeling for Improved and Expanded Applications of Cellular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hitchens, T. Kevin; Liu, Li; Foley, Lesley M.; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Ahrens, Eric T.; Ho, Chien

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The ability to detect the migration of cells in living organisms is fundamental in understanding biological processes and important for the development of novel cell-based therapies to treat disease. MRI can be used to detect the migration of cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) or perfluorocarbon (PFC) agents. In this study, we explored combining these two cell-labeling approaches to overcome current limitations and enable new applications for cellular MRI. Methods We characterized 19F-NMR relaxation properties of PFC-labeled cells in the presence of SPIO and imaged cells both ex vivo and in vivo in a rodent inflammation model to demonstrate selective visualization of cell populations. Results We show that with UTE3D, RARE and FLASH 19F images one can uniquely identify PFC-labeled cells, co-localized PFC- and SPIO-labeled cells, and PFC/SPIO co-labeled cells. Conclusion This new methodology has the ability to improve and expand applications of MRI cell tracking. Combining PFC and SPIO strategies can potentially provide a method to quench PFC signal transferred from dead cells to macrophages, thereby eliminating false positives. In addition, combining these techniques could also be used to track two cell types simultaneously and probe cell-cell proximity in vivo with MRI. PMID:24478194

  6. Labeling and tracking of human mesenchymal stem cells using near-infrared technology.

    PubMed

    Armentero, Marie-Therese; Bossolasco, Patrizia; Cova, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    The recently developed near-infrared (NIR) light imaging technology combines low background noise with deep tissue penetration and readily allows imaging and tracking of NIR-labeled cells, following transplantation in small animal model of diseases. The real-time and longitudinal detection of grafted cells in vivo, as well as their rapid ex vivo localization, may further clarify graft interactions with the surrounding, in target and nontarget organs throughout the body, over time. The present chapter describes a protocol for (1) the efficient labeling of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) using a membrane intercalating dye, emitting in the NIR 815 nm spectrum; (2) the stereotaxic transplantation of NIR 815-hMSCs in rodent model of Parkinson's disease; and (3) the longitudinal in vivo detection of the grafted cells and the subsequent ex vivo imaging in selected tissues.

  7. Learning from the Jersey Turnpike:Cell Lysis, Labeling and Washing with Microfluidic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loutherback, Kevin; Morton, Keith; Inglis, David; Tsui, Opheli; Sturm, James; Chou, Stephen; Austin, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Directing objects across functional streamlines at low Reynolds number is difficult but important since this motion can be used to label, lyse, and analyze complex biological objects on-chip without cross-contamination. Here we use an asymmeteric post array to move cells across coflowing reagents and show on-chip, immunofluorescent labeling of platelets with washing and E.Coli cell lysis with simultaneous separation of bacterial chromosome from the cell contents. Furthermore, we develop the concept of a microfluidic metamaterial by using the basic asymmetric post array as a building block for complex particle handling modes. These modular array elements could be of great use for developing robust techniques for on-chip, continuous flow manipulation and analysis of cells, large bio-particles, and functional beads.

  8. Learning from the Jersey Turnpike: Cell Lysis, Labeling and Washing with Microfluidic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Directing objects across functional streamlines at low Reynolds number is difficult but important since this motion can be used to label, lyse, and analyze complex biological objects on-chip without cross-contamination. Here we use an asymmeteric post array to move cells across coflowing reagents and show on-chip, immunofluorescent labeling of platelets with washing and E.Coli cell lysis with simultaneous separation of bacterial chromosome from the cell contents. Furthermore, we develop the concept of a microfluidic metamaterial by using the basic asymmetric post array as a building block for complex particle handling modes. These modular array elements could be of great use for developing robust techniques for on-chip, continuous flow manipulation and analysis of cells, large bio-particles, and functional beads.

  9. Double-labelled HIV-1 particles for study of virus-cell interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lampe, Marko; Briggs, John A.G.; Endress, Thomas; Glass, Baerbel; Riegelsberger, Stefan; Kraeusslich, Hans-Georg; Lamb, Don C.; Braeuchle, Christoph; Mueller, Barbara . E-mail: Barbara_Mueller@med.uni-heidelberg.de

    2007-03-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) delivers its genome to a host cell through fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane. While the viral and cellular proteins involved in entry have been analyzed in detail, the dynamics of virus-cell fusion are largely unknown. Single virus tracing (SVT) provides the unique opportunity to visualize viral particles in real time allowing direct observation of the dynamics of this stochastic process. For this purpose, we developed a double-coloured HIV derivative carrying a green fluorescent label attached to the viral matrix protein combined with a red label fused to the viral Vpr protein designed to distinguish between complete virions and subviral particles lacking MA after membrane fusion. We present here a detailed characterization of this novel tool together with exemplary live cell imaging studies, demonstrating its suitability for real-time analyses of HIV-cell interaction.

  10. Tracking of iron-labeled human neural stem cells by magnetic resonance imaging in cell replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Gómez, Milagros; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) derived from the ventral mesencephalon are powerful research tools and candidates for cell therapies in Parkinson's disease. However, their clinical translation has not been fully realized due, in part, to the limited ability to track stem cell regional localization and survival over long periods of time after in vivo transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging provides an excellent non-invasive method to study the fate of transplanted cells in vivo. For magnetic resonance imaging cell tracking, cells need to be labeled with a contrast agent, such as magnetic nanoparticles, at a concentration high enough to be easily detected by magnetic resonance imaging. Grafting of human neural stem cells labeled with magnetic nanoparticles allows cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging without impairment of cell survival, proliferation, self-renewal, and multipotency. However, the results reviewed here suggest that in long term grafting, activated microglia and macrophages could contribute to magnetic resonance imaging signal by engulfing dead labeled cells or iron nanoparticles dispersed freely in the brain parenchyma over time.

  11. Reconstruction of damaged corneal epithelium using Venus-labeled limbal epithelial stem cells and tracking of surviving donor cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ji-Qing; Liu, Wen-Qiang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Yi-Hua; Hua, Jin-Lian; Liu, Wei-Shuai; Dou, Zhong-Ying; Lei, An-Min

    2013-10-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cells are responsible for the self-renewal and replenishment of the corneal epithelium. Although it is possible to repair the ocular surface using limbal stem cell transplantation, the mechanisms behind this therapy are unclear. To investigate the distribution of surviving donor cells in a reconstructed corneal epithelium, we screened a Venus-labeled limbal stem cell strain in goats. Cells were cultivated on denuded human amniotic membrane for 21 days to produce Venus-labeled corneal epithelial sheets. The Venus-labeled corneal epithelial sheets were transplanted to goat models of limbal stem cell deficiency. At 3 months post-surgery, the damaged corneal epithelia were obviously improved in the transplanted group compared with the non-transplanted control, with the donor cells still residing in the reconstructed ocular surface epithelium. Using Venus as a marker, our results indicated that the location and survival of donor cells varied, depending on the corneal epithelial region. Additionally, immunofluorescent staining of the reconstructed corneal epithelium demonstrated that many P63(+) cells were unevenly distributed among basal and suprabasal epithelial layers. Our study provides a new model, and reveals some of the mechanisms involved in corneal epithelial cell regeneration research.

  12. Novel Positively Charged Nanoparticle Labeling for In Vivo Imaging of Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yukawa, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Shingo; Yoshizumi, Yasuma; Watanabe, Masaki; Saito, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Noguchi, Hirofumi; Oishi, Koichi; Ono, Kenji; Sawada, Makoto; Kato, Ichiro; Onoshima, Daisuke; Obayashi, Momoko; Hayashi, Yumi; Kaji, Noritada; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Shuji; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation has been expected to have various applications for regenerative medicine. However, in order to detect and trace the transplanted stem cells in the body, non-invasive and widely clinically available cell imaging technologies are required. In this paper, we focused on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technology, and investigated whether the trimethylamino dextran-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle -03 (TMADM-03), which was newly developed by our group, could be used for labeling adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) as a contrast agent. No cytotoxicity was observed in ASCs transduced with less than 100 µg-Fe/mL of TMADM-03 after a one hour transduction time. The transduction efficiency of TMADM-03 into ASCs was about four-fold more efficient than that of the alkali-treated dextran-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (ATDM), which is a major component of commercially available contrast agents such as ferucarbotran (Resovist), and the level of labeling was maintained for at least two weeks. In addition, the differentiation ability of ASCs labeled with TMADM-03 and their ability to produce cytokines such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), were confirmed to be maintained. The ASCs labeled with TMADM-03 were transplanted into the left kidney capsule of a mouse. The labeled ASCs could be imaged with good contrast using a 1T MR imaging system. These data suggest that TMADM-03 can therefore be utilized as a contrast agent for the MR imaging of stem cells. PMID:25365191

  13. Fluorine-19 Labeling of Stromal Vascular Fraction Cells for Clinical Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Rose, Laura C; Kadayakkara, Deepak K; Wang, Guan; Bar-Shir, Amnon; Helfer, Brooke M; O'Hanlon, Charles F; Kraitchman, Dara L; Rodriguez, Ricardo L; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2015-12-01

    Stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells are used clinically for various therapeutic targets. The location and persistence of engrafted SVF cells are important parameters for determining treatment failure versus success. We used the GID SVF-1 platform and a clinical protocol to harvest and label SVF cells with the fluorinated ((19)F) agent CS-1000 as part of a first-in-human phase I trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT02035085) to track SVF cells with magnetic resonance imaging during treatment of radiation-induced fibrosis in breast cancer patients. Flow cytometry revealed that SVF cells consisted of 25.0% ± 15.8% CD45+, 24.6% ± 12.5% CD34+, and 7.5% ± 3.3% CD31+ cells, with 2.1 ± 0.7 × 10⁵ cells per cubic centimeter of adipose tissue obtained. Fluorescent CS-1000 (CS-ATM DM Green) labeled 87.0% ± 13.5% of CD34+ progenitor cells compared with 47.8% ± 18.5% of hematopoietic CD45+ cells, with an average of 2.8 ± 2.0 × 10¹² ¹⁹F atoms per cell, determined using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The vast majority (92.7% ± 5.0%) of CD31+ cells were also labeled, although most coexpressed CD34. Only 16% ± 22.3% of CD45-/CD31-/CD34- (triple-negative) cells were labeled with CS-ATM DM Green. After induction of cell death by either apoptosis or necrosis, >95% of ¹⁹F was released from the cells, indicating that fluorine retention can be used as a surrogate marker for cell survival. Labeled-SVF cells engrafted in a silicone breast phantom could be visualized with a clinical 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner at a sensitivity of approximately 2 × 10⁶ cells at a depth of 5 mm. The current protocol can be used to image transplanted SVF cells at clinically relevant cell concentrations in patients. Stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells harvested from adipose tissue offer great promise in regenerative medicine, but methods to track such cell therapies are needed to ensure correct administration and monitor survival. A clinical protocol was

  14. [Labelling endothelial cells with the lectins from Cytisus sessilifolius and Ulex europaeus; comparison between human and animal cells].

    PubMed

    Roussel, F

    1985-01-01

    Cytisus sessilifolius Agglutinin (CSA) was compared with Ulex europaeus Agglutinin (UEA1) for labelling endothelial cells fixed and embedded in paraffin. Human profile characterized by a dimorphism shown by UEA1 with a positive preponderant population and a minor negative one is never found in tested animals. CSA does not mark any endothelial cell in man but reveals endothelial cells in swine, sheep, ox, dog. A dimorphism exists in ox with the same repartition as the one shown in man by UEA1.

  15. Thaw-and-use target cells pre-labeled with calcein AM for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shan; Nguyen, Van; Lin, Yuwen Linda; Kamen, Lynn; Song, An

    2017-08-01

    In vitro antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays are routinely performed to support the research and development of therapeutic antibodies. In ADCC assays, target cells bound by the antibodies are lysed by activated effector cells following interactions between the Fc region of the bound antibody and Fcγ receptors on effector cells. Target cell lysis is typically measured by quantification of released endogenous enzymes, e.g., lactate dehydrogenase, or measurement of released exogenous labels, e.g., (51)Cr, europium or calcein. ADCC assays based on the detection of exogenous labels released from lysed target cells generally show higher sensitivity and require shorter incubation times. However, target cells are usually labeled immediately prior to assay, which inadvertently introduces additional assay variations due to differences in target cell conditions and labeling/handling processes. In this report, we describe the use of thaw-and-use pre-labeled target cells for ADCC assays. Thaw-and-use target cells in our experiments were pre-labeled with the fluorescent dye calcein AM, cryopreserved in single-use aliquots and used directly in assays after thawing. Upon thaw, the pre-labeled cells displayed viability and label retention comparable to freshly labeled cells, responded to ADCC mediated by both peripheral blood mononuclear cells and engineered natural killer cells, performed stably for at least 3 years and provided favorable precision and accuracy to ADCC assays. Implementation of thaw-and-use pre-labeled target cells in ADCC assays can help to alleviate both cell culture and dye labeling derived variability, increase the flexibility of assay scheduling and improve assay consistency and robustness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Label-free haemogram using wavelength modulated Raman spectroscopy for identifying immune-cell subset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok, Praveen C.; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Campbell, Elaine C.; Dholakia, Kishan; Powis, Simon J.

    2014-03-01

    Leucocytes in the blood of mammals form a powerful protective system against a wide range of dangerous pathogens. There are several types of immune cells that has specific role in the whole immune system. The number and type of immune cells alter in the disease state and identifying the type of immune cell provides information about a person's state of health. There are several immune cell subsets that are essentially morphologically identical and require external labeling to enable discrimination. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using Wavelength Modulated Raman Spectroscopy (WMRS) with suitable machine learning algorithms as a label-free method to distinguish between different closely lying immune cell subset. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed on WMRS data from single cells, obtained using confocal Raman microscopy for feature reduction, followed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) for binary discrimination of various cell subset, which yielded an accuracy >85%. The method was successful in discriminating between untouched and unfixed purified populations of CD4+CD3+ and CD8+CD3+ T lymphocyte subsets, and CD56+CD3- natural killer cells with a high degree of specificity. It was also proved sensitive enough to identify unique Raman signatures that allow clear discrimination between dendritic cell subsets, comprising CD303+CD45+ plasmacytoid and CD1c+CD141+ myeloid dendritic cells. The results of this study clearly show that WMRS is highly sensitive and can distinguish between cell types that are morphologically identical.

  17. A Selective and Purification-Free Strategy for Labeling Adherent Cells with Inorganic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Lim, Jing; Yeo, David Chen Loong; Liao, Shanshan; Lans, Malin; Wang, Yaqi; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Goh, Bee Tin; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-03-01

    Cellular labeling with inorganic nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, quantum dots, and fluorescent silica nanoparticles is an important method for the noninvasive visualization of cells using various imaging modalities. Currently, this is mainly achieved through the incubation of cultured cells with the nanoparticles that eventually reach the intracellular compartment through specific or nonspecific internalization. This classic method is advantageous in terms of simplicity and convenience, but it suffers from issues such as difficulties in fully removing free nanoparticles (suspended in solution) and the lack of selectivity on cell types. This article reports an innovative strategy for the specific labeling of adherent cells without the concern of freely suspended nanoparticles. This method relies on a nanocomposite film that is prepared by homogeneously dispersing nanoparticles within a biodegradable polymeric film. When adherent cells are seeded on the film, they adhere, spread, and filtrate into the film through the micropores formed during the film fabrication. The pre-embedded nanoparticles are thus internalized by the cells during this infiltration process. As an example, fluorescent silica nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed within a polycaprolactone film by utilizing cryomilling and heat pressing. Upon incubation within physiological buffer, no silica nanoparticles were released from the nanocomposite film even after 20 d of incubation. However, when adherent cells (e.g., human mesenchymal stem cells) were grown on the film, they became fluorescent after 3 d, which suggests internalization of silica nanoparticles by cells. In comparison, the suspension cells (e.g., monocytes) in the medium remained nonfluorescent no matter whether there was the presence of adherent cells or not. This strategy eventually allowed the selective and concomitant labeling of mesenchymal stem cells during their harvest from bone marrow aspiration.

  18. A Label-free Technique for the Spatio-temporal Imaging of Single Cell Secretions.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Deepa; Christodoulides, Joseph A; Delehanty, James B; Byers, Jeff M; Raphael, Marc P

    2015-11-23

    Inter-cellular communication is an integral part of a complex system that helps in maintaining basic cellular activities. As a result, the malfunctioning of such signaling can lead to many disorders. To understand cell-to-cell signaling, it is essential to study the spatial and temporal nature of the secreted molecules from the cell without disturbing the local environment. Various assays have been developed to study protein secretion, however, these methods are typically based on fluorescent probes which disrupt the relevant signaling pathways. To overcome this limitation, a label-free technique is required. In this paper, we describe the fabrication and application of a label-free localized surface plasmon resonance imaging (LSPRi) technology capable of detecting protein secretions from a single cell. The plasmonic nanostructures are lithographically patterned onto a standard glass coverslip and can be excited using visible light on commercially available light microscopes. Only a small fraction of the coverslip is covered by the nanostructures and hence this technique is well suited for combining common techniques such as fluorescence and bright-field imaging. A multidisciplinary approach is used in this protocol which incorporates sensor nanofabrication and subsequent biofunctionalization, binding kinetics characterization of ligand and analyte, the integration of the chip and live cells, and the analysis of the measured signal. As a whole, this technology enables a general label-free approach towards mapping cellular secretions and correlating them with the responses of nearby cells.

  19. Monitoring Astrocytic Proteome Dynamics by Cell Type-Specific Protein Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Anke; Stellmacher, Anne; Freitag, Christine E.; Landgraf, Peter; Dieterich, Daniela C.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the nervous system to undergo long-term plasticity is based on changes in cellular and synaptic proteomes. While many studies have explored dynamic alterations in neuronal proteomes during plasticity, there has been less attention paid to the astrocytic counterpart. Indeed, progress in identifying cell type-specific proteomes is limited owing to technical difficulties. Here, we present a cell type-specific metabolic tagging technique for a mammalian coculture model based on the bioorthogonal amino acid azidonorleucine and the mutated Mus musculus methionyl-tRNA synthetaseL274G enabling azidonorleucine introduction into de novo synthesized proteins. Azidonorleucine incorporation resulted in cell type-specific protein labeling and retained neuronal or astrocytic cell viability. Furthermore, we were able to label astrocytic de novo synthesized proteins and identified both Connexin-43 and 60S ribosomal protein L10a upregulated upon treatment with Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in astrocytes of a neuron-glia coculture. Taken together, we demonstrate the successful dissociation of astrocytic from neuronal proteomes by cell type-specific metabolic labeling offering new possibilities for the analyses of cell type-specific proteome dynamics. PMID:26690742

  20. Label-free measurements on cell apoptosis using a terahertz metamaterial-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Caihong; Liang, Lanju; Ding, Liang; Jin, Biaobing; Hou, Yayi; Li, Chun; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Weiwei; Hu, Wei; Lu, Yanqing; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2016-06-01

    Label-free, real-time, and in-situ measurement on cell apoptosis is highly desirable in cell biology. We propose here a design of terahertz (THz) metamaterial-based biosensor for meeting this requirement. This metamaterial consists of a planar array of five concentric subwavelength gold ring resonators on a 10 μm-thick polyimide substrate, which can sense the change of dielectric environment above the metamaterial. We employ this sensor to an oral cancer cell (SCC4) with and without cisplatin, a chemotherapy drug for cancer treatment, and find a linear relation between cell apoptosis measured by Flow Cytometry and the relative change of resonant frequencies of the metamaterial measured by THz time-domain spectroscopy. This implies that we can determine the cell apoptosis in a label-free manner. We believe that this metamaterial-based biosensor can be developed into a cheap, label-free, real-time, and in-situ detection tool, which is of significant impact on the study of cell biology.

  1. Label-free hyperspectral microscopy for scatter imaging of biological processes in cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jeeseong C.; Ray, Aniruddha; Cheney, Philip P.; Chon, Bonghwan; Lee, Ji Youn; Briggman, Kimberly A.

    2016-03-01

    We will present unique applications of a label-free, hyperspectral scatter imaging technique in different microscopy platforms including conventional wide-field, dark-field, and confocal. In different platforms, we conducted label-free imaging of cells undergoing biological processes such as nanoparticle uptake, apoptosis, and metabolic flux change in response to the variation of the osmotic pressure. Hyperspectral image analyses resolved spectral endmembers corresponding to unique scattering and absorption characteristics as a result of such processes at the single particle, single organelle, and single cell level, delineating the details of nanomaterial-cell interactions in a 2D cell culture, cell apoptotic characteristics in a 3D culture, and volumetric changes of single cells under the variation of osmotic pressure. Our label-free scatter imaging has the potential for a broad range of biological and biomedical applications such as the development of scatter-based imaging contrast agents and the measurement of scatter parameters of subcellular organelles to identify the sub-micron scale origins of scattering signals in tissue scattering measurements.

  2. Spatiotemporal multicolor labeling of individual cells using peptide-functionalized quantum dots and mixed delivery techniques.

    PubMed

    Delehanty, James B; Bradburne, Christopher E; Susumu, Kimihiro; Boeneman, Kelly; Mei, Bing C; Farrell, Dorothy; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B; Dawson, Philip E; Mattoussi, Hedi; Medintz, Igor L

    2011-07-13

    Multicolor fluorescent labeling of both intra- and extracellular structures is a powerful technique for simultaneous monitoring of multiple complex biochemical processes. This approach remains extremely challenging, however, as it often necessitates the combinatorial use of numerous targeting probes (e.g., antibodies), multistep bioconjugation chemistries, different delivery strategies (e.g., electroporation or transfection reagents), cellular fixation coupled with membrane permeabilization, and complex spectral deconvolution. Here, we present a nanoparticle-based fluorescence labeling strategy for the multicolor labeling of distinct subcellular compartments within live cells without the need for antibody conjugation or cellular fixation/permeabilization. This multipronged approach incorporates an array of delivery strategies, which localize semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) to various subcellular structures. QD uptake is implemented in a spaciotemporal manner by staggering the delivery of QD-peptide composites and exploiting various innate (peptide-mediated endocytosis, peptide-membrane interaction, polymer-based transfection) along with physical (microinjection) cellular delivery modalities to live cells growing in culture over a 4 day period. Imaging of the different intracellular labels is simplified by the unique photophysical characteristics of the QDs in combination with Förster resonance energy transfer sensitization, which allow for multiple spectral windows to be accessed with one excitation wavelength. Using this overall approach, QDs were targeted to both early and late endosomes, the cellular cytosol, and the plasma membrane in live cells, ultimately allowing for simultaneous five-color fluorescent imaging.

  3. Diffusion of fluorescently labeled macromolecules in cultured muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Arrio-Dupont, M; Cribier, S; Foucault, G; Devaux, P F; d'Albis, A

    1996-01-01

    Myotubes were obtained from culture of satellite cells. They had a sarcomeric organization similar to that of muscle. The diffusion in the direction perpendicular to the fibers of microinjected fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans of molecular weight ranging from 9500 to 150,000 was examined by modulated fringe pattern photobleaching. On the time scale of the observation, 10-30 S, all of the dextrans were completely mobile in the cytoplasm. The diffusion coefficients were compared to the values obtained in water. The ratio D(cytoplasm)/D(w) decreased with the hydrodynamic radius R(h) of the macromolecules. The mobility of inert molecules in muscle cells is hindered by both the crowding of the fluid phase of the cytoplasm and the screening effect due to myofilaments: D(cytoplasm)/D(w) = (D/D(w)) protein crowding x (D/D(w))(filament screening). The equation (D/D(w))filament screening = exp(-K(L)RCh) was used for the contribution of the filaments to the restriction of diffusion. A free protein concentration of 135 mg/ml, a solvent viscosity of cytoplasm near that of bulk water, and a calculated K(L) of 0.066 nm(-1), which takes into account the sarcomeric organization of filaments, accurately represent our data. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6 PMID:9172756

  4. Label-free detection of anticancer drug paclitaxel in living cells by confocal Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, H.; Derely, L.; Vegh, A.-G.; Durand, J.-C.; Gergely, C.; Larroque, C.; Fauroux, M.-A.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2013-03-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label-free, and high spatial resolution imaging technique is employed to trace the anticancer drug paclitaxel in living Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells. The Raman images were treated by K-mean cluster analysis to detect the drug in cells. Distribution of paclitaxel in cells is verified by calculating the correlation coefficient between the reference spectrum of the drug and the whole Raman image spectra. A time dependent gradual diffusion of paclitaxel all over the cell is observed suggesting a complementary picture of the pharmaceutical action of this drug based on rapid binding of free tubulin to crystallized paclitaxel.

  5. Kinetics of indium-111-labeled leukemic cells in patients with acute non-lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Yamauchi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of autologous leukemic cells labeled with In-111 oxine were studied in 5 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and one patient with acute premyelocytic leukemia (APL), and kinetics of OKM1 monoclonal antibody-treated leukemic cells were studied in one patient with acute monoblastic leukemia (AMoL). Recoveries of 33.7 +- 23.3%(range, 22.0 to 48.1%) were achieved at 10min after injection of In-111 oxine labeled leukemic cells in AML and APL patients. However, in a patient with AMoL recovery of 12.3% was only achieved at 10min after injection of OKM1-treated leukemic cells. Clearance of the activity from blood was rapid up to one in all patients. The clearance curve of the activity in 5 AML patients showed a hump or a plateau from one to 5hr after injection of labeled leukemic cells. In APL patient and AMoL patient, however, this hump or plateau was not noted. In AML and APL patients the activity over the spleen was higher than that of over the liver at from 30min to 3hr after and showed a plateau or gradual rising thereafter. In a patient with AMoL, the hepatic activity was higher than the splenic activity at 30min after, but thereafter the latter became higher than the former. Liver activity curves showed transient fall at 3hr after and then gradual uprising in all patients. In a patient with APL, high activity was noted over the kidneys. This rose to a maximum after 3hr and then decreased rapidly. Since In-111 oxine stays firmly attached to the cells in spite of the possibility of radiation damage in a long-term survey, it seems an ideal label for studying leukemic cell kinetics.

  6. Cell Labeling with Magneto-Endosymbionts and the Dissection of the Subcellular Location, Fate, and Host Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kayla R; Wakeel, Abdul; Chakraborty, Papia; Foote, Chandler S; Kajiura, Lauren; Barrozo, Joyce C; Chan, Andrea C; Bazarov, Alexey V; Spitler, Ryan; Kutny, Peter M; Denegre, Jim M; Taft, Rob A; Seemann, Joachim; Rice, Bradley W; Contag, Christopher H; Rutt, Brian K; Bell, Caleb B

    2017-06-19

    The purposes of this study are to characterize magneto-endosymbiont (ME) labeling of mammalian cells and to discern the subcellular fate of these living contrast agents. MEs are novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that are being used for cell tracking studies. Understanding the fate of MEs in host cells is valuable for designing in vivo cell tracking experiments. The ME's surface epitopes, contrast-producing paramagnetic magnetosomal iron, and genome were studied using immunocytochemistry (ICC), Fe and MRI contrast measurements, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), respectively. These assays, coupled with other common assays, enabled validation of ME cell labeling and dissection of ME subcellular processing. The assays mentioned above provide qualitative and quantitative assessments of cell labeling, the subcellular localization and the fate of MEs. ICC results, with an ME-specific antibody, qualitatively shows homogenous labeling with MEs. The ferrozine assay shows that MEs have an average of 7 fg Fe/ME, ∼30 % of which contributes to MRI contrast and ME-labeled MDA-MB-231 (MDA-231) cells generally have 2.4 pg Fe/cell, implying ∼350 MEs/cell. Adjusting the concentration of Fe in the ME growth media reduces the concentration of non-MRI contrast-producing Fe. Results from the qPCR assay, which quantifies ME genomes in labeled cells, shows that processing of MEs begins within 24 h in MDA-231 cells. ICC results suggest this intracellular digestion of MEs occurs by the lysosomal degradation pathway. MEs coated with listeriolysin O (LLO) are able to escape the primary phagosome, but subsequently co-localize with LC3, an autophagy-associated molecule, and are processed for digestion. In embryos, where autophagy is transiently suppressed, MEs show an increased capacity for survival and even replication. Finally, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of ME-labeled MDA-231 cells confirms that the magnetosomes (the MRI contrast

  7. Automatic tracking of labeled red blood cells in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Diana; Lima, Rui; Pereira, Ana I; Gayubo, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    The current study proposes an automatic method for the segmentation and tracking of red blood cells flowing through a 100- μm glass capillary. The original images were obtained by means of a confocal system and then processed in MATLAB using the Image Processing Toolbox. The measurements obtained with the proposed automatic method were compared with the results determined by a manual tracking method. The comparison was performed by using both linear regressions and Bland-Altman analysis. The results have shown a good agreement between the two methods. Therefore, the proposed automatic method is a powerful way to provide rapid and accurate measurements for in vitro blood experiments in microchannels. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Morphology and Immunoreactivity of Retrogradely Double-Labeled Ganglion Cells in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Samuel M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the specificity and reliability of a retrograde double-labeling technique that was recently established for identification of retinal ganglion cells (GCs) and to characterize the morphology of displaced (d)GCs (dGs). Methods. A mixture of the gap-junction–impermeable dye Lucifer yellow (LY) and the permeable dye neurobiotin (NB) was applied to the optic nerve stump for retrograde labeling of GCs and the cells coupled with them. A confocal microscope was adopted for morphologic observation. Results. GCs were identified by LY labeling, and they were all clearly labeled by NB. Cells coupled to GCs contained a weak NB signal but no LY. LY and NB revealed axon bundles, somas and dendrites of GCs. The retrogradely identified GCs numbered approximately 50,000 per retina, and they constituted 44% of the total neurons in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). Somas of retrogradely identified dGs were usually negative for glycine, ChAT (choline acetyltransferase), bNOS (brain-type nitric oxidase), GAD (glutamate decarboxylase), and glial markers, and occasionally, they were weakly GABA-positive. dGs averaged 760 per retina and composed 1.7% of total GCs. Sixteen morphologic subtypes of dGs were encountered, three of which were distinct from known GCs. dGs sent dendrites to either sublaminas of the IPL, mostly sublamina a. Conclusions. The retrograde labeling is reliable for identification of GCs. dGs participate in ON and OFF light pathways but favor the OFF pathway. ChAT, bNOS, glycine, and GAD remain reliable AC markers in the GCL. GCs may couple to GABAergic ACs, and the gap junctions likely pass NB and GABA. PMID:21482641

  9. Current approaches for RNA labeling in vitro and in cells based on click reactions.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Daniela; Rentmeister, Andrea

    2014-11-03

    Over recent years, click reactions have become recognized as valuable and flexible tools to label biomacromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, and glycans. Some of the developed strategies can be performed not only in aqueous solution but also in the presence of cellular components, as well as on (or even in) living cells. These labeling strategies require the initial, specific modification of the target molecule with a small, reactive moiety. In the second step, a click reaction is used to covalently couple a reporter molecule to the biomolecule. Depending on the type of reporter, labeling by the click reaction can be used in many different applications, ranging from isolation to functional studies of biomacromolecules. In this minireview, we focus on labeling strategies for RNA that rely on the click reaction. We first highlight click reactions that have been used successfully to label modified RNA, and then describe different strategies to introduce the required reactive groups into target RNA. The benefits and potential limitations of the strategies are critically discussed with regard to possible future developments. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. [Visualization and Functional Regulation of Live Cell Proteins Based on Labeling Probe Design].

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Shin; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

      There are several approaches to understanding the physiological roles of biomolecules: (1) by observing the localization or activities of biomolecules (based on microscopic imaging experiments with fluorescent proteins or fluorescent probes) and (2) by investigating the cellular response via activation or suppression of functions of the target molecule (by using inhibitors, antagonists, siRNAs, etc.). In this context, protein-labeling technology serves as a powerful tool that can be used in various experiments, such as for fluorescence imaging of target proteins. Recently, we developed a protein-labeling technology that uses a mutant β-lactamase (a bacterial hydrolase) as the tag protein. In this protein-labeling technology, also referred to as the BL-tag technology, various β-lactam compounds were used as specific ligands that were covalently labeled to the tag. One major advantage of this labeling technology is that various functions can be carried out by suitably designing both the functional moieties such as the fluorophore and the β-lactam ligand structure. In this review, we briefly introduce the BL-tag technology and describe our future outlook for this technology, such as in fluorescence imaging of biomolecules and functional regulation of cellular proteins in living cells.

  11. The effect of the state of differentiation on labeling of epidermal cell surface glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Brysk, M.M.; Snider, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    Epidermal cells were grown in a medium in which the Ca++ concentration controlled the stage of differentiation. Cell surface molecules of differentiated and undifferentiated cells were compared by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination, by the interaction with /sup 125/I-lectins, and by the metabolic incorporation of L-(/sup 3/H)-fucose. Molecular weights of the labeled components were determined by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. After lactoperoxidase iodination, most of the radioactivity was found in polypeptide bands of 79,000, 65,000 and 56,000 daltons. The 79,000 band is the most intense for undifferentiated cells but disappears as differentiation proceeds. The 56,000 band is present in normal cells at all stages of differentiation but is absent from neoplastic cells. Glycoproteins reacted with /sup 125/I-lectins were found at 180,000, 130,000 and 85,000 daltons. The 130,000 band was the most prominent for differentiated cells labeled with wheat germ agglutinin but was essentially absent from the undifferentiated cells. With Ricinus communis agglutinin, this band was weaker for undifferentiated than for differentiated cells but was the most intense for both. After metabolic incorporation of tritiated fucose, radioactive glycoproteins were found at 130,000 and 85,000 daltons, with comparable intensities for differentiated and undifferentiated cells.

  12. In situ labeling and magnetic resonance imaging of transplanted human hepatic stem cells.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Randall; Wauthier, Eliane; Tallheden, Tommi; Reid, Lola M; Hsu, Edward

    2011-10-01

    The purpose is to address the problem in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of contrast agent dilution. In situ magnetic labeling of cells and MRI were used to assess distribution and growth of human hepatic stem cells (hHpSCs) transplanted into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)/non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. It was done with commercially available magnetic microbeads coupled to an antibody to a surface antigen, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), uniquely expressed in the liver by hepatic progenitors. We validated the microbead connection to cells and related MRI data to optical microscopy observations in order to develop a means to quantitatively estimate cell numbers in the aggregates detected. Cell counts of hHpSCs at different times post-transplantation revealed quantifiable evidence of cell engraftment and expansion. This magnetic labeling methodology can be used with any antibody coupled to a magnetic particle to target any surface antigen that distinguishes transplanted cells from host cells, thus facilitating studies that define methods and strategies for clinical cell therapy programs.

  13. Label-Free Recognition of Drug Resistance via Impedimetric Screening of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bertsch, Arnaud; Mehta, Kapil; Renaud, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel study on label-free recognition and distinction of drug resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7 DOX) from their parental cells (MCF-7 WT) via impedimetric measurements. Drug resistant cells exhibited significant differences in their dielectric properties compared to wild-type cells, exerting much higher extracellular resistance (Rextra). Immunostaining revealed that MCF-7 DOX cells gained a much denser F-actin network upon acquiring drug resistance indicating that remodeling of actin cytoskeleton is probably the reason behind higher Rextra, providing stronger cell architecture. Moreover, having exposed both cell types to doxorubicin, we were able to distinguish these two phenotypes based on their substantially different drug response. Interestingly, impedimetric measurements identified a concentration-dependent and reversible increase in cell stiffness in the presence of low non-lethal drug doses. Combined with a profound frequency analysis, these findings enabled distinguishing distinct cellular responses during drug exposure within four concentration ranges without using any labeling. Overall, this study highlights the possibility to differentiate drug resistant phenotypes from their parental cells and to assess their drug response by using microelectrodes, offering direct, real-time and noninvasive measurements of cell dependent parameters under drug exposure, hence providing a promising step for personalized medicine applications such as evaluation of the disease progress and optimization of the drug treatment of a patient during chemotherapy. PMID:23483910

  14. Vital fluorescent labeling for confocal scanning microscopic study of living cell invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Allan Z.; Chen, Jian M.; Fisher, Gregory W.; Wang, Jane C.

    1997-07-01

    Invasion by cells with malignant or transformed phenotypes precedes destruction of adjacent tissue and fatal cell metastasis. State-of-the-art confocal laser scanning technology facilitates both in vitro and in vivo research into cell invasion and metastasis. In particular, studies performed with living cells yield more precise information than those with fixed cells, giving new insight into cell invasion and metastasis. We have tested a variety of vital florescent dyes and fluorogenic protease substrates in our studies of invasion of cartilage by transformed synoviocytes or osteosarcoma cells. The fluorescent dyes tested include Calcein acetoxy methyl-FITC (Calcein), Hoechst 33342 (Hoechst), CellTracker, DiI, DiO, DiD, and ethidium bromide (EB). The fluorogenic protease substrate used Meoxysuccinyl-Gly-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-AFC (MOS-GPLGP-AFC) for detection of collagenase activity. We found that Calcein-FITC labeling permitted the clearest direct observation of the penetration of transformed synoviocytes and osteosarcoma cells into cartilage. Even better results were obtained when chondrocyte nuclei were counter-stained with Hoechst 33342. During the invasion process, collagenase activity was observed around the synoviocyte in the cartilage matrix labeled with the fluorogenic collagenase substrate. We concluded that of the vital fluorescent dyes tested, a combined application of Calcein-FITC, Hoechst 23223, and MOS- GPLGP-AFC is most appropriate for the study of the cell invasion process.

  15. Optofluidic device for label-free cell classification from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Feng; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    A unique optofluidic lab-on-a-chip device that can detect optically encoded forward scattering signals is demonstrated. With a unique design of a spatial mask that patterns the intensity distribution of the illuminating light, the position and velocity of each travelling cell in the flow can be measured with submicrometer resolution, which enables the generation of a cell distribution plot over the cross section of the channel. The distribution of cells is highly sensitive to its size and stiffness, both being important biomarkers for cell classification without cell labelling. The optical-coding technique offers an easy route to classify cells based on their size and stiffness. Because the stiffness and size of neutrophils are distinct from other types of white blood cells, the number of neutrophils can be detected from other white blood cells and red blood cells. Above all, the enumeration of neutrophil concentration can be obtained from only 5 μL of human blood with a simple blood preparation process saving the usual steps of anticoagulation, centrifugation, antibody labelling, or filtering. The optofluidic system is compact, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate and operate. The system uses a commodity laser diode and a Si PIN photoreceiver and digital signal processing to extract vital information about cells and suppress the noise from the encoded optical scattering signals. The optofluidic device holds promise to be a point-of-care and home care device to measure neutrophil concentration, which is the key indicator of the immune functions for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  16. In Situ Labeling and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of transplanted Human Hepatic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Randall; Wauthier, Eliane; Tallheden, Tommi; Reid, Lola; Hsu, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose is to address the problem in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of contrast agent dilution. Procedures In situ magnetic labeling of cells and MRI were used to assess distribution and growth of human hepatic stem cells (hHpSCs) transplanted into SCID/nod mice. It was done with commercially available magnetic microbeads coupled to an antibody to a surface antigen, Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), uniquely expressed in the liver by hepatic progenitors. Results We validated the microbead connection to cells and related MRI data to optical microscopy observations in order to develop a means to quantitatively estimate cell numbers in the aggregates detected. Cell counts of hHpSCs at different times post-transplantation revealed quantifiable evidence of cell engraftment and expansion. Conclusions This magnetic labeling methodology can be used with any antibody coupled to a magnetic particle to target any surface antigen that distinguishes transplanted cells from host cells, thus facilitating studies that define methods and strategies for clinical cell therapy programs. PMID:20890665

  17. Heterogeneity of basal keratinocytes: nonrandom distribution of thymidine-labeled basal cells in confluent cultures is not a technical artifact

    SciTech Connect

    Milstone, L.M.; LaVigne, J.F.

    1985-06-01

    Basal surface autoradiography of (/sup 3/H)dThd-labeled, confluent, keratinocyte cultures reveals that proliferating cells have a nonrandom, patterned distribution. Unlabeled cells, likewise, appear nonrandomly in clusters. The authors show here that failure to detect DNA synthesis in some basal cells in culture is not an artifact caused either by physical separation of the labeled nuclei from the radiographic emulsion or by a diffusion barrier that would prevent (/sup 3/H)dThd from reaching basal cells.

  18. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

  19. Label-Free Discrimination of Cells Undergoing Apoptosis by Hyperspectral Confocual Reflectance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertani, F. R.; Botti, E.; Costanzo, A.; Ferrari, L.; Mussi, V.; D'Alessandro, M.; Selci, S.

    2013-12-01

    Among the optical techniques used for exploring the properties of cells and tissues, those based on hyperspectral label-free analysis are particularly interesting due to their non-invasive character and their ability to fast collect a huge number of information on the different sample constituents and their spatial distribution. Here we present results obtained with a novel hyperspectral reflectance confocal microscope of label-free discrimination of cells undergoing apoptosis. Our data, analyzed by means of a powerful statistical method, enable to obtain information on the biological status at a single cell level through the local measurement of reflectivity. Furthermore, an optical model of the local dielectric response gives an additional insight of the parameters linking the optical responsivity to the biological status.

  20. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture for quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ong, Shao-En; Mann, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics is an increasingly popular approach to study changes in protein abundances in biological samples. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), one of the more widely used methods for quantitative proteomics, is a metabolic-labeling strategy that encodes whole cellular proteomes. Cells are grown in a culture medium where the natural form of an amino acid is replaced with a stable isotope form, such as arginine bearing six 13C atoms. Incorporation of the "heavy" amino acid occurs through cell growth, protein synthesis, and turnover. SILAC allows "light" and "heavy" proteomes to be distinguished by MS while avoiding any chemical derivatization and associated purification. In this chapter, we provide detailed SILAC protocols and explain how to incorporate SILAC into any experiment.

  1. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; ...

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the α-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore » freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  2. Tritium labelling of a cholesterol amphiphile designed for cell membrane anchoring of proteins.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Balázs; Orbán, Erika; Kele, Zoltán; Tömböly, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane association of proteins can be achieved by the addition of lipid moieties to the polypeptide chain, and such lipid-modified proteins have important biological functions. A class of cell surface proteins contains a complex glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) glycolipid at the C-terminus, and they are accumulated in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains, that is, lipid rafts. Semisynthetic lipoproteins prepared from recombinant proteins and designed lipids are valuable probes and model systems of the membrane-associated proteins. Because GPI-anchored proteins can be reinserted into the cell membrane with the retention of the biological function, they are appropriate candidates for preparing models via reduction of the structural complexity. A synthetic headgroup was added to the 3β-hydroxyl group of cholesterol, an essential lipid component of rafts, and the resulting cholesterol derivative was used as a simplified GPI mimetic. In order to quantitate the membrane integrated GPI mimetic after the exogenous addition to live cells, a tritium labelled cholesterol anchor was prepared. The radioactive label was introduced into the headgroup, and the radiolabelled GPI mimetic anchor was obtained with a specific activity of 1.37 TBq/mmol. The headgroup labelled cholesterol derivative was applied to demonstrate the sensitive detection of the cell membrane association of the anchor under in vivo conditions.

  3. Gene-specific cell labeling using MiMIC transposons

    PubMed Central

    Gnerer, Joshua P.; Venken, Koen J. T.; Dierick, Herman A.

    2015-01-01

    Binary expression systems such as GAL4/UAS, LexA/LexAop and QF/QUAS have greatly enhanced the power of Drosophila as a model organism by allowing spatio-temporal manipulation of gene function as well as cell and neural circuit function. Tissue-specific expression of these heterologous transcription factors relies on random transposon integration near enhancers or promoters that drive the binary transcription factor embedded in the transposon. Alternatively, gene-specific promoter elements are directly fused to the binary factor within the transposon followed by random or site-specific integration. However, such insertions do not consistently recapitulate endogenous expression. We used Minos-Mediated Integration Cassette (MiMIC) transposons to convert host loci into reliable gene-specific binary effectors. MiMIC transposons allow recombinase-mediated cassette exchange to modify the transposon content. We developed novel exchange cassettes to convert coding intronic MiMIC insertions into gene-specific binary factor protein-traps. In addition, we expanded the set of binary factor exchange cassettes available for non-coding intronic MiMIC insertions. We show that binary factor conversions of different insertions in the same locus have indistinguishable expression patterns, suggesting that they reliably reflect endogenous gene expression. We show the efficacy and broad applicability of these new tools by dissecting the cellular expression patterns of the Drosophila serotonin receptor gene family. PMID:25712101

  4. Gene-specific cell labeling using MiMIC transposons.

    PubMed

    Gnerer, Joshua P; Venken, Koen J T; Dierick, Herman A

    2015-04-30

    Binary expression systems such as GAL4/UAS, LexA/LexAop and QF/QUAS have greatly enhanced the power of Drosophila as a model organism by allowing spatio-temporal manipulation of gene function as well as cell and neural circuit function. Tissue-specific expression of these heterologous transcription factors relies on random transposon integration near enhancers or promoters that drive the binary transcription factor embedded in the transposon. Alternatively, gene-specific promoter elements are directly fused to the binary factor within the transposon followed by random or site-specific integration. However, such insertions do not consistently recapitulate endogenous expression. We used Minos-Mediated Integration Cassette (MiMIC) transposons to convert host loci into reliable gene-specific binary effectors. MiMIC transposons allow recombinase-mediated cassette exchange to modify the transposon content. We developed novel exchange cassettes to convert coding intronic MiMIC insertions into gene-specific binary factor protein-traps. In addition, we expanded the set of binary factor exchange cassettes available for non-coding intronic MiMIC insertions. We show that binary factor conversions of different insertions in the same locus have indistinguishable expression patterns, suggesting that they reliably reflect endogenous gene expression. We show the efficacy and broad applicability of these new tools by dissecting the cellular expression patterns of the Drosophila serotonin receptor gene family.

  5. Electrostatically Stabilized Magnetic Nanoparticles – An Optimized Protocol to Label Murine T Cells for in vivo MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wuerfel, Eva; Smyth, Maureen; Millward, Jason M.; Schellenberger, Eyk; Glumm, Jana; Prozorovski, Timour; Aktas, Orhan; Schulze-Topphoff, Ulf; Schnorr, Jörg; Wagner, Susanne; Taupitz, Matthias; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Wuerfel, Jens

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel highly efficient protocol to magnetically label T cells applying electrostatically stabilized very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP). Our long-term aim is to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate T cell dynamics in vivo during the course of neuroinflammatory disorders such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Encephalitogenic T cells were co-incubated with VSOP, or with protamine-complexed VSOP (VProt), respectively, at different conditions, optimizing concentrations and incubation times. Labeling efficacy was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry as well as histologically, and evaluated on a 7 T MR system. Furthermore, we investigated possible alterations of T cell physiology caused by the labeling procedure. T cell co-incubation with VSOP resulted in an efficient cellular iron uptake. T2 times of labeled cells dropped significantly, resulting in prominent hypointensity on T2*-weighted scans. Optimal labeling efficacy was achieved by VProt (1 mM Fe/ml, 8 h incubation; T2 time shortening of ∼80% compared to untreated cells). Although VSOP promoted T cell proliferation and altered the ratio of T cell subpopulations toward a CD4+ phenotype, no effects on CD4 T cell proliferation or phenotypic stability were observed by labeling in vitro differentiated Th17 cells with VProt. Yet, high concentrations of intracellular iron oxide might induce alterations in T cell function, which should be considered in cell tagging studies. Moreover, we demonstrated that labeling of encephalitogenic T cells did not affect pathogenicity; labeled T cells were still capable of inducing EAE in susceptible recipient mice. PMID:22203815

  6. Epithelial Label-Retaining Cells Are Absent during Tooth Cycling in Salmo salar and Polypterus senegalus

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, Sam; Willems, Maxime; Witten, P. Eckhard; Hansen, Tom; Fjelldal, Per Gunnar; Huysseune, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and African bichir (Polypterus senegalus) are both actinopterygian fish species that continuously replace their teeth without the involvement of a successional dental lamina. Instead, they share the presence of a middle dental epithelium: an epithelial tier enclosed by inner and outer dental epithelium. It has been hypothesized that this tier could functionally substitute for a successional dental lamina and might be a potential niche to house epithelial stem cells involved in tooth cycling. Therefore, in this study we performed a BrdU pulse chase experiment on both species to (1) determine the localization and extent of proliferating cells in the dental epithelial layers, (2) describe cell dynamics and (3) investigate if label-retaining cells are present, suggestive for the putative presence of stem cells. Cells proliferate in the middle dental epithelium, outer dental epithelium and cervical loop at the lingual side of the dental organ to form a new tooth germ. Using long chase times, both in S. salar (eight weeks) and P. senegalus (eight weeks and twelve weeks), we could not reveal the presence of label-retaining cells in the dental organ. Immunostaining of P. senegalus dental organs for the transcription factor Sox2, often used as a stem cell marker, labelled cells in the zone of outer dental epithelium which grades into the oral epithelium (ODE transition zone) and the inner dental epithelium of a successor only. The location of Sox2 distribution does not provide evidence for epithelial stem cells in the dental organ and, more specifically, in the middle dental epithelium. Comparison of S. salar and P. senegalus reveals shared traits in tooth cycling and thus advances our understanding of the developmental mechanism that ensures lifelong replacement. PMID:27049953

  7. Correlative fluorescence and scanning transmission electron microscopy of quantum dot-labeled proteins on whole cells in liquid.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Bandmann, Vera; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of cells fully immersed in liquid is a new methodology with many application areas. Proteins, in live cells immobilized on microchips, are labeled with fluorescent quantum dot nanoparticles. In this protocol, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is labeled. The cells are fixed after a selected labeling time, for example, 5 min as needed to form EGFR dimers. The microchip with cells is then imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Thereafter, STEM can be accomplished in two ways. The microchip with the labeled cells and one microchip with a spacer are assembled into a special microfluidic device and imaged with dedicated high-voltage STEM. Alternatively, thin edges of cells can be studied with environmental scanning electron microscopy with a STEM detector, by placing a microchip with cells in a cooled wet environment. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Production of stable isotope-labeled acyl-coenzyme A thioesters by yeast stable isotope labeling by essential nutrients in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Nathaniel W.; Tombline, Gregory; Worth, Andrew J.; Parry, Robert C.; Silvers, Jacob A.; Gillespie, Kevin P.; Basu, Sankha S.; Millen, Jonathan; Goldfarb, David S.; Blair, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters are key metabolites in numerous anabolic and catabolic pathways, including fatty acid biosynthesis and β-oxidation, the Krebs cycle, and cholesterol and isoprenoid biosynthesis. Stable isotope dilution-based methodology is the gold standard for quantitative analyses by mass spectrometry. However, chemical synthesis of families of stable isotope labeled metabolites such as acyl-coenzyme A thioesters is impractical. Previously, we biosynthetically generated a library of stable isotope internal standard analogs of acyl-CoA thioesters by exploiting the essential requirement in mammals and insects for pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) as a metabolic precursor for the CoA backbone. By replacing pantothenic acid in the cell media with commercially available [13C3 15N1]-pantothenic acid, mammalian cells exclusively incorporated [13C3 15N1]-pantothenate into the biosynthesis of acyl-CoA and acyl-CoA thioesters. We have now developed a much more efficient method for generating stable isotope labeled CoA and acyl-CoAs from [13C3 15N1]-pantothenate using Stable Isotope Labeling by Essential nutrients in Cell culture (SILEC) in Pan6 deficient yeast cells. Efficiency and consistency of labeling were also increased, likely due to the stringently defined and reproducible conditions used for yeast culture. The yeast SILEC method greatly enhances the ease of use and accessibility of labeled CoA thioesters and also provides proof-of-concept for generating other labeled metabolites in yeast mutants. PMID:25572876

  9. Resonant waveguide grating biosensor-enabled label-free and fluorescence detection of cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Zaytseva, Natalya; Lynn, Jeffery G.; Wu, Qi; Mudaliar, Deepti J.; Sun, Haiyan; Kuang, Patty Q.; Fang, Ye

    2013-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) is fundamental to many distinct aspects of cell biology, and has been an active topic for label-free biosensors. However, little attention has been paid to study the impact of receptor signaling on the cell adhesion process. We here report the development of resonant waveguide grating biosensor-enabled label-free and fluorescent approaches, and their use for investigating the adhesion of an engineered HEK-293 cell line stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) onto distinct surfaces under both ambient and physiological conditions. Results showed that cell adhesion is sensitive to both temperature and ECM coating, and distinct mechanisms govern the cell adhesion process under different conditions. The β2-AR agonists, but not its antagonists or partial agonists, were found to be capable of triggering signaling during the adhesion process, leading to an increase in the adhesion of the engineered cells onto fibronectin-coated biosensor surfaces. These results suggest that the dual approach presented is useful to investigate the mechanism of cell adhesion, and to identify drug molecules and receptor signaling that interfere with cell adhesion. PMID:24319319

  10. Measurement of Post-Transfusion Red Cell Survival with the Biotin Label

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Donald M; Widness, John A; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Strauss, Ronald G; Cancelas, Jose A; Cohen, Robert M; Lindsell, Christopher J; Franco, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize and critically assess information concerning the biotin method to label red blood cells (RBC) for use in studies of RBC and transfusion biology — information that will prove useful to a broad audience of clinicians and scientists. A review of RBC biology, with emphasis on RBC senescence and in vivo survival is included, followed by an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of biotin labeled RBC (BioRBC) for measuring circulating RBC volume, post-transfusion RBC recovery, RBC lifespan, and RBC age-dependent properties. The advantages of BioRBC over 51Cr RBC labeling, the current reference method, are discussed. Because the biotin method is straightforward and robust, including the ability to follow the entire lifespans of multiple RBC populations concurrently in the same subject, BioRBC offers distinct advantages for studying RBC biology and physiology, particularly RBC survival. The method for biotin labeling, validation of the method, and application of BioRBCs to studies of sickle cell disease, diabetes, and anemia of prematurity are reviewed. Studies documenting the safe use of BioRBC are reviewed; unanswered questions requiring future studies, remaining concerns, and regulatory barriers to broader application of BioRBC including adoption as a new reference method are also presented. PMID:24969019

  11. 19F MRI Detection of Acute Allograft Rejection with In Vivo Perfluorocarbon Labeling of Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hitchens, T. Kevin; Ye, Qing; Eytan, Danielle F.; Janjic, Jelena M.; Ahrens, Eric T.; Ho, Chien

    2010-01-01

    Current diagnosis of organ rejection following transplantation relies on tissue biopsy, which is not ideal due to sampling limitations and risks associated with the invasive procedure. We have previously shown that cellular MRI of iron-oxide labeled immune-cell infiltration can provide a non-invasive measure of rejection status by detecting areas of hypointensity on T2*-weighted images. In the current study, we tested the feasibility of using a fluorine-based cellular tracer agent to detect macrophage accumulation in rodent models of acute allograft rejection by fluorine-19 (19F) MRI and MRS. This study used two rat models of acute rejection, including abdominal heterotopic cardiac transplant and orthotopic kidney transplant models. Following in vivo labeling of monocytes and macrophages with a commercially available agent containing perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether, we observed 19F-signal intensity in the organs experiencing rejection by 19F MRI, and conventional 1H MRI was used for anatomical context. Immunofluorescense and histology confirmed macrophage labeling. These results are consistent with our previous studies and show the complementary nature of the two cellular imaging techniques. With no background signal, 19F MRI/MRS can provide unambiguous detection of fluorine labeled cells, and may be a useful technique for detecting and quantifying rejection grade in patients. PMID:21305593

  12. DNA and chromosome breaks induced by iodine-123-labeled estrogen in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L. |; Mustafi, R.; Hughes, A.; DeSombre, E.R.

    1996-08-01

    The effects of the Auger electron-emitting isotope {sup 123}I, covalently bound to estrogen, on DNA single- and double-strand breakage and on chromosome breakage was determined in estrogen receptor-positive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-ER) cells. Exposure to the {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen induced both single- and double-strand breaks with a ratio of single- to double-strand breaks of 2.8. The corresponding ratio with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays was 15.6. The dose response was biphasic, suggesting either that receptor sites are saturated at high doses, or that there is a nonrandom distribution of breaks induced by the {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen. The {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen treatment induced chromosome aberrations with an efficiency of about 1 aberration for each 1000 disintegrations per cell. This corresponds to the mean lethal dose of {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen for these cells, suggesting that the lethal event induced by the Auger electron emitter bound to estrogen is a chromosome aberration. Most of the chromosome-type aberrations were dicentrics and rings, suggesting that {sup 123}I-labeled estrogen-induced chromosome breaks are rejoined. The F ratio, the ratio of dicentrics to centric rings, was 5.8 {+-} 1.7, which is similar to that seen with high-LET radiations. Our results suggest that {sup 123}I bound to estrogen is an efficient clastogenic agent, the cytotoxic damage produced by {sup 123}I bound to estrogen is very like damage induced by high-LET radiation, and the {sup 123}I in the estrogen receptor-DNA complex is probably in proximity to the sugar-phosphate backbone of the DNA. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Chemical biology-based approaches on fluorescent labeling of proteins in live cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Deokho; Min, Kyoungmi; Jung, Juyeon; Jang, Wonhee; Kwon, Youngeun

    2013-05-01

    Recently, significant advances have been made in live cell imaging owing to the rapid development of selective labeling of proteins in vivo. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was the first example of fluorescent reporters genetically introduced to protein of interest (POI). While GFP and various types of engineered fluorescent proteins (FPs) have been actively used for live cell imaging for many years, the size and the limited windows of fluorescent spectra of GFP and its variants set limits on possible applications. In order to complement FP-based labeling methods, alternative approaches that allow incorporation of synthetic fluorescent probes to target POIs were developed. Synthetic fluorescent probes are smaller than fluorescent proteins, often have improved photochemical properties, and offer a larger variety of colors. These synthetic probes can be introduced to POIs selectively by numerous approaches that can be largely categorized into chemical recognition-based labeling, which utilizes metal-chelating peptide tags and fluorophore-carrying metal complexes, and biological recognition-based labeling, such as (1) specific non-covalent binding between an enzyme tag and its fluorophore-carrying substrate, (2) self-modification of protein tags using substrate variants conjugated to fluorophores, (3) enzymatic reaction to generate a covalent binding between a small molecule substrate and a peptide tag, and (4) split-intein-based C-terminal labeling of target proteins. The chemical recognition-based labeling reaction often suffers from compromised selectivity of metal-ligand interaction in the cytosolic environment, consequently producing high background signals. Use of protein-substrate interactions or enzyme-mediated reactions generally shows improved specificity but each method has its limitations. Some examples are the presence of large linker protein, restriction on the choice of introducible probes due to the substrate specificity of enzymes, and competitive

  14. Bioorthogonal labeling cell-surface proteins expressed in pancreatic cancer cells to identify potential diagnostic/therapeutic biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Haun, Randy S; Quick, Charles M; Siegel, Eric R; Raju, Ilangovan; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Tackett, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    To develop new diagnostic and therapeutic tools to specifically target pancreatic tumors, it is necessary to identify cell-surface proteins that may serve as potential tumor-specific targets. In this study we used an azido-labeled bioorthogonal chemical reporter to metabolically label N-linked glycoproteins on the surface of pancreatic cancer cell lines to identify potential targets that may be exploited for detection and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. Labeled glycoproteins were tagged with biotin using click chemistry, purified by streptavidin-coupled magnetic beads, separated by gel electrophoresis, and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (MS). MS/MS analysis of peptides from 3 cell lines revealed 954 unique proteins enriched in the azido sugar samples relative to control sugar samples. A comparison of the proteins identified in each sample indicated 20% of these proteins were present in 2 cell lines (193 of 954) and 17 of the proteins were found in all 3 cell lines. Five of the 17 proteins identified in all 3 cell lines have not been previously reported to be expressed in pancreatic cancer; thus indicating that novel cell-surface proteins can be revealed through glycoprotein profiling. Western analysis of one of these glycoproteins, ecto-5′-nucleotidase (NT5E), revealed it is expressed in 8 out of 8 pancreatic cancer cell lines examined. Further, immunohistochemical analysis of human pancreatic tissues indicates NT5E is significantly overexpressed in pancreatic tumors compared to normal pancreas. Thus, we have demonstrated that metabolic labeling with bioorthogonal chemical reporters can be used to selectively enrich and identify novel cell-surface glycoproteins expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. PMID:26176765

  15. Label-free detection of liver cancer cells by aptamer-based microcantilever biosensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuejuan; Pan, Yangang; Liu, Huiqing; Bai, Xiaojing; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Bailin

    2016-05-15

    Liver cancer is one of the most common and highly malignant cancers in the world. There are no effective therapeutic options if an early liver cancer diagnosis is not achieved. In this work, detection of HepG2 cells by label-free microcantilever array aptasensor was developed. The sensing microcantilevers were functionalized by HepG2 cells-specific aptamers. Meanwhile, to eliminate the interferences induced by the environment, the reference microcantilevers were modified with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol self-assembled monolayers. The aptasensor exhibits high specificity over not only human liver normal cells, but also other cancer cells of breast, bladder, and cervix tumors. The linear relation ranges from 1×10(3) to 1×10(5)cells/mL, with a detection limit of 300 cells/mL (S/N=3). Our work provides a simple method for detection of liver cancer cells with advantages in terms of simplicity and stability.

  16. Monitoring intraspecies competition in a bacterial cell population by cocultivation of fluorescently labelled strains.

    PubMed

    Stannek, Lorena; Egelkamp, Richard; Gunka, Katrin; Commichau, Fabian M

    2014-01-18

    Many microorganisms such as bacteria proliferate extremely fast and the populations may reach high cell densities. Small fractions of cells in a population always have accumulated mutations that are either detrimental or beneficial for the cell. If the fitness effect of a mutation provides the subpopulation with a strong selective growth advantage, the individuals of this subpopulation may rapidly outcompete and even completely eliminate their immediate fellows. Thus, small genetic changes and selection-driven accumulation of cells that have acquired beneficial mutations may lead to a complete shift of the genotype of a cell population. Here we present a procedure to monitor the rapid clonal expansion and elimination of beneficial and detrimental mutations, respectively, in a bacterial cell population over time by cocultivation of fluorescently labeled individuals of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. The method is easy to perform and very illustrative to display intraspecies competition among the individuals in a bacterial cell population.

  17. Hydrodynamic and label-free sorting of circulating tumor cells from whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geislinger, Thomas M.; Stamp, Melanie E. M.; Wixforth, Achim; Franke, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate continuous, passive, and label-free sorting of different in vitro cancer cell lines (MV3, MCF7, and HEPG2) as model systems for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from undiluted whole blood employing the non-inertial lift effect as driving force. This purely viscous, repulsive cell-wall interaction is sensitive to cell size and deformability differences and yields highly efficient cell separation and high enrichment factors. We show that the performance of the device is robust over a large range of blood cell concentrations and flow rates as well as for the different cell lines. The collected samples usually contain more than 90% of the initially injected CTCs and exhibit average enrichment factors of more than 20 for sorting from whole blood samples.

  18. Suitability of Cell-Based Label-Free Detection for Cytotoxicity Screening of Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Meindl, Claudia; Absenger, Markus; Roblegg, Eva; Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2013-01-01

    Cytotoxicity testing of nanoparticles (NPs) by conventional screening assays is often complicated by interference. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are particularly difficult to assess. To test the suitability of cell-based label-free techniques for this application, a panel of CNTs with different diameters and surface functionalizations was assessed by impedance-based technique (xCELLigence RTCA) and automated microscopy (Cell-IQ) compared to formazan bioreduction (MTS assay). For validation of the label-free systems different concentrations of ethanol and of amine (AMI) polystyrene NPs were used. CNTs were evaluated in various cell lines, but only endothelial EAhy926 cells and L929 and V79 fibroblasts could be evaluated in all systems. Polystyrene particles obtained similar results in all assays. All systems identified thin (<8 nm) CNTs as more cytotoxic than thick (>20 nm) CNTs, but detection by xCELLigence system was less sensitive to CNT-induced cytotoxicity. Despite advantages, such as continuous monitoring and more detailed analysis of cytotoxic effects, label-free techniques cannot be generally recommended for cytotoxicity screening of NPs. PMID:24377092

  19. Label-free somatic cell cytometry in raw milk using acoustophoresis.

    PubMed

    Grenvall, Carl; Folkenberg, Jacob Riis; Augustsson, Per; Laurell, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    A microfluidic system for cell enumeration in raw milk was developed. The new method, preconditions the milk sample using acoustophoresis that removes lipid particles which are larger than a few micrometers. The acoustophoretic preprocessing eliminates the need for conventional sample preparation techniques, which include chemical solvents, cell labeling and centrifugation, and facilitates rapid cell enumeration using microscopy or coulter counter measurements. By introducing an acoustic standing wave with three pressure nodes in a microchannel at the same time as the milk sample is laminated to the channel center, lipids are acoustically driven to the closest pressure antinode at each side of the channel center and the cells in the milk sample are focused in the central pressure node. The extracted center fraction with cells becomes sufficiently clean from lipid vesicles to enable enumeration of somatic cells without any labeling step either by direct light microscopy or by coulter counting. Obtained lipid free milk fractions clearly revealed the cell fraction when analyzed by Coulter Counting. Cell counting as measured by a Coulter Counter after acoustophoretic lipid depletion aligned with the corresponding data obtained by reference measurements based on fluorescence staining and subsequent flow cytometer analysis. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  20. Label free cell tracking in 3D tissue engineering constructs with high resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. A.; Lam, K.-P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Mazzocchi-Jones, D.; Richardson, J. B.; Yang, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering there is an emphasis on studying 3-D live tissue structures. Consequently, to investigate and identify cellular activities and phenotypes in a 3-D environment for all in vitro experiments, including shape, migration/proliferation and axon projection, it is necessary to adopt an optical imaging system that enables monitoring 3-D cellular activities and morphology through the thickness of the construct for an extended culture period without cell labeling. This paper describes a new 3-D tracking algorithm developed for Cell-IQ®, an automated cell imaging platform, which has been equipped with an environmental chamber optimized to enable capturing time-lapse sequences of live cell images over a long-term period without cell labeling. As an integral part of the algorithm, a novel auto-focusing procedure was developed for phase contrast microscopy equipped with 20x and 40x objectives, to provide a more accurate estimation of cell growth/trajectories by allowing 3-D voxels to be computed at high spatiotemporal resolution and cell density. A pilot study was carried out in a phantom system consisting of horizontally aligned nanofiber layers (with precise spacing between them), to mimic features well exemplified in cellular activities of neuronal growth in a 3-D environment. This was followed by detailed investigations concerning axonal projections and dendritic circuitry formation in a 3-D tissue engineering construct. Preliminary work on primary animal neuronal cells in response to chemoattractant and topographic cue within the scaffolds has produced encouraging results.

  1. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riba, J.; Gleichmann, T.; Zimmermann, S.; Zengerle, R.; Koltay, P.

    2016-09-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry.

  2. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing

    PubMed Central

    Riba, J.; Gleichmann, T.; Zimmermann, S.; Zengerle, R.; Koltay, P.

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry. PMID:27596612

  3. Chronic label-free volumetric photoacoustic microscopy of melanoma cells in scaffolds in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xin; Zhang, Yu; Kim, Chulhong; Choi, Sung-Wook; Xia, Younan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    Visualizing cells in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds has been one of the major challenges in tissue engineering. Current imaging modalities have limitations. Microscopy, including confocal microscopy, cannot penetrate deeply (> 300 μm) into the scaffolds; X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) requires staining of the structure with a toxic agent such as osmium tetroxide. Here, we demonstrate photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of the spatial distribution and temporal proliferation of melanoma cells inside three-dimensionally porous scaffolds with thicknesses over 1 mm. Melanoma cells have a strong intrinsic contrast which is easily imaged by label-free PAM with high sensitivity. Spatial distributions of the cells in the scaffold were well-resolved in PAM images. Moreover, we chronically imaged the same cell/scaffold constructs at different time points over 2 weeks. The number of cells in the scaffold was quantitatively measured from the PAM volumetric information. The cell proliferation profile obtained from PAM correlated well with that obtained using the traditional 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. We believe that PAM will become a useful imaging modality for tissue engineering applications, especially when thick scaffold constructs are involved, and that this modality can also be extended to image other cell types labeled with contrast agents.

  4. Label-free three-dimensional imaging of cell nucleus using third-harmonic generation microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jian; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Zi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-09-08

    We report the implementation of the combined third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy for label-free three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of cell nucleus morphological changes in liver tissue. THG imaging shows regular spherical shapes of normal hepatocytes nuclei with inner chromatin structures while revealing the condensation of chromatins and nuclear fragmentations in hepatocytes of diseased liver tissue. Colocalized THG and TPEF imaging provides complementary information of cell nuclei and cytoplasm in tissue. This work suggests that 3-D THG microscopy has the potential for quantitative analysis of nuclear morphology in cells at a submicron-resolution without the need for DNA staining.

  5. Genetic code expansion enables live-cell and super-resolution imaging of site-specifically labeled cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Uttamapinant, Chayasith; Howe, Jonathan D; Lang, Kathrin; Beránek, Václav; Davis, Lloyd; Mahesh, Mohan; Barry, Nicholas P; Chin, Jason W

    2015-04-15

    Methods to site-specifically and densely label proteins in cellular ultrastructures with small, bright, and photostable fluorophores would substantially advance super-resolution imaging. Recent advances in genetic code expansion and bioorthogonal chemistry have enabled the site-specific labeling of proteins. However, the efficient incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins and the specific, fluorescent labeling of the intracellular ultrastructures they form for subdiffraction imaging has not been accomplished. Two challenges have limited progress in this area: (i) the low efficiency of unnatural amino acid incorporation that limits labeling density and therefore spatial resolution and (ii) the uncharacterized specificity of intracellular labeling that will define signal-to-noise, and ultimately resolution, in imaging. Here we demonstrate the efficient production of cystoskeletal proteins (β-actin and vimentin) containing bicyclo[6.1.0]nonyne-lysine at genetically defined sites. We demonstrate their selective fluorescent labeling with respect to the proteome of living cells using tetrazine-fluorophore conjugates, creating densely labeled cytoskeletal ultrastructures. STORM imaging of these densely labeled ultrastructures reveals subdiffraction features, including nuclear actin filaments. This work enables the site-specific, live-cell, fluorescent labeling of intracellular proteins at high density for super-resolution imaging of ultrastructural features within cells.

  6. Sustained Analgesic Peptide Secretion and Cell Labeling Using a Novel Genetic Modification

    PubMed Central

    Gajavelli, Shyam; Castellanos, Daniel A.; Furmanski, Orion; Schiller, Paul C.; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Cell-based therapy for neuropathic pain could provide analgesics to local pain modulatory regions in a sustained, renewable fashion. In order to provide enhanced analgesic efficacy, transplantable cells may be engineered to produce complementary or increased levels of analgesic peptides. In addition, genetic labeling of modified cells is desirable for identification and tracking, but it should be retained intracellularly as desired analgesic peptides are secreted. Usually constructs encode proteins destined for either extra- or intra-cellular compartments, as these pathways do not cross. However, interactions between intracellular destinations provide a window of opportunity to overcome this limitation. In this report, we have explored this approach using a potential supplementary analgesic peptide, [Ser1]-histogranin (SHG), the stable synthetic derivative of a naturally occurring peptide with N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonistic properties. A synthetic SHG gene was combined with (i) nerve growth factor-β (NGF-β) amino-terminal signal peptide to enable secretion, and (ii) a fluorescent cellular label (mRFP) with intervening cathepsin L cleavage site, and subcloned into a lentiviral vector. In addition, an endoplasmic retention signal, KDEL, was added to enable retrieval of mRFP. Using immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopic profile analysis, cells transduced by such lentiviruses were shown to synthesize a single SHG-mRFP polypeptide that was processed, targeted to expected subcellular destinations in several cell types. Dot blot and Western analysis revealed stable transduction and long-term secretion of SHG from PC12 cells in vitro. Transplantation of such cells provided modest analgesia in a rodent pain model consistent with low levels of SHG peptide in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). These results suggest that it is possible to deliver proteins with different final destinations from a single construct, such as pharmacologically active peptide for

  7. Sustained analgesic peptide secretion and cell labeling using a novel genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Gajavelli, Shyam; Castellanos, Daniel A; Furmanski, Orion; Schiller, Paul C; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2008-01-01

    Cell-based therapy for neuropathic pain could provide analgesics to local pain modulatory regions in a sustained, renewable fashion. In order to provide enhanced analgesic efficacy, transplantable cells may be engineered to produce complementary or increased levels of analgesic peptides. In addition, genetic labeling of modified cells is desirable for identification and tracking, but it should be retained intracellularly as desired analgesic peptides are secreted. Usually constructs encode proteins destined for either extra- or intracellular compartments, as these pathways do not cross. However, interactions between intracellular destinations provide a window of opportunity to overcome this limitation. In this report, we have explored this approach using a potential supplementary analgesic peptide, [Ser1]-histogranin (SHG), the stable synthetic derivative of a naturally occurring peptide with N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonistic properties. A synthetic SHG gene was combined with (i) nerve growth factor-beta (NGF-beta) amino-terminal signal peptide to enable secretion, and (ii) a fluorescent cellular label (mRFP) with intervening cathepsin L cleavage site, and subcloned into a lentiviral vector. In addition, an endoplasmic retention signal, KDEL, was added to enable retrieval of mRFP. Using immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopic profile analysis, cells transduced by such lentiviruses were shown to synthesize a single SHG-mRFP polypeptide that was processed, targeted to expected subcellular destinations in several cell types. Dot blot and Western analysis revealed stable transduction and long-term secretion of SHG from PC12 cells in vitro. Transplantation of such cells provided modest analgesia in a rodent pain model consistent with low levels of SHG peptide in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). These results suggest that it is possible to deliver proteins with different final destinations from a single construct, such as pharmacologically active peptide for

  8. A new metabolic cell-wall labelling method reveals peptidoglycan in Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Liechti, G W; Kuru, E; Hall, E; Kalinda, A; Brun, Y V; VanNieuwenhze, M; Maurelli, A T

    2014-02-27

    Peptidoglycan (PG), an essential structure in the cell walls of the vast majority of bacteria, is critical for division and maintaining cell shape and hydrostatic pressure. Bacteria comprising the Chlamydiales were thought to be one of the few exceptions. Chlamydia harbour genes for PG biosynthesis and exhibit susceptibility to 'anti-PG' antibiotics, yet attempts to detect PG in any chlamydial species have proven unsuccessful (the 'chlamydial anomaly'). We used a novel approach to metabolically label chlamydial PG using d-amino acid dipeptide probes and click chemistry. Replicating Chlamydia trachomatis were labelled with these probes throughout their biphasic developmental life cycle, and the results of differential probe incorporation experiments conducted in the presence of ampicillin are consistent with the presence of chlamydial PG-modifying enzymes. These findings culminate 50 years of speculation and debate concerning the chlamydial anomaly and are the strongest evidence so far that chlamydial species possess functional PG.

  9. Review of metabolic pathways activated in cancer cells as determined through isotopic labeling and network analysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wentao; Keibler, Mark A; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2017-02-10

    Cancer metabolism has emerged as an indispensable part of contemporary cancer research. During the past 10 years, the use of stable isotopic tracers and network analysis have unveiled a number of metabolic pathways activated in cancer cells. Here, we review such pathways along with the particular tracers and labeling observations that led to the discovery of their rewiring in cancer cells. The list of such pathways comprises the reductive metabolism of glutamine, altered glycolysis, serine and glycine metabolism, mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) induced reprogramming and the onset of acetate metabolism. Additionally, we demonstrate the critical role of isotopic labeling and network analysis in identifying these pathways. The alterations described in this review do not constitute a complete list, and future research using these powerful tools is likely to discover other cancer-related pathways and new metabolic targets for cancer therapy.

  10. Minimal tags for rapid dual-color live-cell labeling and super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nikić, Ivana; Plass, Tilman; Schraidt, Oliver; Szymański, Jędrzej; Briggs, John A G; Schultz, Carsten; Lemke, Edward A

    2014-02-17

    The growing demands of advanced fluorescence and super-resolution microscopy benefit from the development of small and highly photostable fluorescent probes. Techniques developed to expand the genetic code permit the residue-specific encoding of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) armed with novel clickable chemical handles into proteins in living cells. Here we present the design of new UAAs bearing strained alkene side chains that have improved biocompatibility and stability for the attachment of tetrazine-functionalized organic dyes by the inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition (SPIEDAC). Furthermore, we fine-tuned the SPIEDAC click reaction to obtain an orthogonal variant for rapid protein labeling which we termed selectivity enhanced (se) SPIEDAC. seSPIEDAC and SPIEDAC were combined for the rapid labeling of live mammalian cells with two different fluorescent probes. We demonstrate the strength of our method by visualizing insulin receptors (IRs) and virus-like particles (VLPs) with dual-color super-resolution microscopy.

  11. Photoaffinity labeling of regulatory subunits of protein kinase A in cardiac cell fractions of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mednieks, M. I.; Popova, I.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling in heart tissue of rats flown on Cosmos 2044 was used to measure the regulatory (R) subunits of adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase. A significant decrease of RII subunits in the particulate cell fraction extract (S2; P less than 0.05 in all cases) was observed when extracts of tissue samples from vivarium controls were compared with those from flight animals. Photoaffinity labeling of the soluble fraction (S1) was observed to be unaffected by spaceflight or any of the simulation conditions. Proteins of the S2 fraction constitute a minor (less than 10 percent) component of the total, whereas the S1 fraction contained most of the cell proteins. Changes in a relatively minor aspect of adenosine monophosphate-mediated reactions are considered to be representative of a metabolic effect.

  12. Protein Labelling with Versatile Phosphorescent Metal Complexes for Live Cell Luminescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Connell, Timothy U; James, Janine L; White, Anthony R; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-09-28

    To take advantage of the luminescent properties of d(6) transition metal complexes to label proteins, versatile bifunctional ligands were prepared. Ligands that contain a 1,2,3-triazole heterocycle were synthesised using Cu(I) catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition "click" chemistry and were used to form phosphorescent Ir(III) and Ru(II) complexes. Their emission properties were readily tuned, by changing either the metal ion or the co-ligands. The complexes were tethered to the metalloprotein transferrin using several conjugation strategies. The Ir(III)/Ru(II)-protein conjugates could be visualised in cancer cells using live cell imaging for extended periods without significant photobleaching. These versatile phosphorescent protein-labelling agents could be widely applied to other proteins and biomolecules and are useful alternatives to conventional organic fluorophores for several applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Label-free characterization of white blood cells by measuring 3D refractive index maps

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, HyunJoo; Choi, Chulhee; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of white blood cells (WBCs) is crucial for blood analyses and disease diagnoses. However, current standard techniques rely on cell labeling, a process which imposes significant limitations. Here we present three-dimensional (3D) optical measurements and the label-free characterization of mouse WBCs using optical diffraction tomography. 3D refractive index (RI) tomograms of individual WBCs are constructed from multiple two-dimensional quantitative phase images of samples illuminated at various angles of incidence. Measurements of the 3D RI tomogram of WBCs enable the separation of heterogeneous populations of WBCs using quantitative morphological and biochemical information. Time-lapse tomographic measurements also provide the 3D trajectory of micrometer-sized beads ingested by WBCs. These results demonstrate that optical diffraction tomography can be a useful and versatile tool for the study of WBCs. PMID:26504637

  14. Label-free characterization of white blood cells by measuring 3D refractive index maps.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, HyunJoo; Choi, Chulhee; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of white blood cells (WBCs) is crucial for blood analyses and disease diagnoses. However, current standard techniques rely on cell labeling, a process which imposes significant limitations. Here we present three-dimensional (3D) optical measurements and the label-free characterization of mouse WBCs using optical diffraction tomography. 3D refractive index (RI) tomograms of individual WBCs are constructed from multiple two-dimensional quantitative phase images of samples illuminated at various angles of incidence. Measurements of the 3D RI tomogram of WBCs enable the separation of heterogeneous populations of WBCs using quantitative morphological and biochemical information. Time-lapse tomographic measurements also provide the 3D trajectory of micrometer-sized beads ingested by WBCs. These results demonstrate that optical diffraction tomography can be a useful and versatile tool for the study of WBCs.

  15. Radionuclide-labeled red blood cell imaging of vascular malformations in children

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, G.M.; Bolton, L.L.; Miller, J.H.; Reinisch, J.F.; Nichter, L.S.

    1988-09-01

    Vascular malformations, particularly in the absence of cutaneous changes, can be difficult to distinguish from other soft tissue masses in children. We have used technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy to study 47 lesions in 43 children. Thirty-nine lesions showed increased flow and were, therefore, diagnosed as vascular malformations. Subsequent biopsy of 10 of these lesions confirmed that diagnosis. The other 29 lesions with increased flow were followed for 10 months to 5 years and the clinical course was consistent with vascular malformation in every case. Eight lesions showed no increased flow on technetium scan. One of these subsequently proved to be a hemangioma. The others have turned out not to be vascular malformations. Therefore, in our experience, the technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell scan has had 98% sensitivity and 100% specificity in diagnosing vascular malformations in children.

  16. Photoaffinity labeling of regulatory subunits of protein kinase A in cardiac cell fractions of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mednieks, M. I.; Popova, I.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling in heart tissue of rats flown on Cosmos 2044 was used to measure the regulatory (R) subunits of adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase. A significant decrease of RII subunits in the particulate cell fraction extract (S2; P less than 0.05 in all cases) was observed when extracts of tissue samples from vivarium controls were compared with those from flight animals. Photoaffinity labeling of the soluble fraction (S1) was observed to be unaffected by spaceflight or any of the simulation conditions. Proteins of the S2 fraction constitute a minor (less than 10 percent) component of the total, whereas the S1 fraction contained most of the cell proteins. Changes in a relatively minor aspect of adenosine monophosphate-mediated reactions are considered to be representative of a metabolic effect.

  17. Dose dependent side effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle labeling on cell motility in two fetal stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Diana, Valentina; Bossolasco, Patrizia; Moscatelli, Davide; Silani, Vincenzo; Cova, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells (SCs) could substitute damaged cells and also rescue degeneration through the secretion of trophic factors able to activate the endogenous SC compartment. Therefore, fetal SCs, characterized by high proliferation rate and devoid of ethical concern, appear promising candidate, particularly for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide nanoparticles (SPIOn), routinely used for pre-clinical cell imaging and already approved for clinical practice, allow tracking of transplanted SCs and characterization of their fate within the host tissue, when combined with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In this work we investigated how SPIOn could influence cell migration after internalization in two fetal SC populations: human amniotic fluid and chorial villi SCs were labeled with SPIOn and their motility was evaluated. We found that SPIOn loading significantly reduced SC movements without increasing production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Moreover, motility impairment was directly proportional to the amount of loaded SPIOn while a chemoattractant-induced recovery was obtained by increasing serum levels. Interestingly, the migration rate of SPIOn labeled cells was also significantly influenced by a degenerative surrounding. In conclusion, this work highlights how SPIOn labeling affects SC motility in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, shedding the light on an important parameter for the creation of clinical protocols. Establishment of an optimal SPIOn dose that enables both a good visualization of grafted cells by MRI and the physiological migration rate is a main step in order to maximize the effects of SC therapy in both animal models of neurodegeneration and clinical studies.

  18. In-Vivo Imaging Of Transplanted Human Hepatic Stem Cells: Negative Contrast Labeling And 7t Micro-MRI Tracking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    The goals of the current study are to develop effective procedures for labeling stem cells with contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...ms, 2 averages) were obtained. For the fixed whole mouse experiments, a 4.0 cm-diameter birdcage RF coil was used, and interleaved multislice...stem cells, EpCAM+ cells, were labeled to induce magnetic resonance imaging contrast by either magnetodendrimers or a novel microbead-antibody

  19. Manganese-impregnated mesoporous silica nanoparticles for signal enhancement in MRI cell labelling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet-Nicolas, Rémy; Laprise-Pelletier, Myriam; Nair, Mahesh M.; Chevallier, Pascale; Lagueux, Jean; Gossuin, Yves; Laurent, Sophie; Kleitz, Freddy; Fortin, Marc-André

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are used in drug delivery and cell tracking applications. As Mn2+ is already implemented as a ``positive'' cell contrast agent in preclinical imaging procedures (in the form of MnCl2 for neurological studies), the introduction of Mn in the porous network of MSNs would allow labelling cells and tracking them using MRI. These particles are in general internalized in endosomes, an acidic environment with high saline concentration. In addition, the available MSN porosity could also serve as a carrier to deliver medical/therapeutic substances through the labelled cells. In the present study, manganese oxide was introduced in the porous network of MCM-48 silica nanoparticles (Mn-M48SNs). The particles exhibit a narrow size distribution (~140 nm diam.) and high porosity (~60% vol.), which was validated after insertion of Mn. The resulting Mn-M48SNs were characterized by TEM, N2 physisorption, and XRD. Evidence was found with H2-TPR, and XPS characterization, that Mn(ii) is the main oxidation state of the paramagnetic species after suspension in water, most probably in the form of Mn-OOH. The colloidal stability as a function of time was confirmed by DLS in water, acetate buffer and cell culture medium. In NMR data, no significant evidence of Mn2+ leaching was found in Mn-M48SNs in acidic water (pH 6), up to 96 hours after suspension. High longitudinal relaxivity values of r1 = 8.4 mM-1 s-1 were measured at 60 MHz and 37 °C, with the lowest relaxometric ratios (r2/r1 = 2) reported to date for a Mn-MSN system. Leukaemia cells (P388) were labelled with Mn-M48SNs and nanoparticle cell internalization was confirmed by TEM. Finally, MRI contrast enhancement provided by cell labelling with escalated incubation concentrations of Mn-M48SNs was quantified at 1 T. This study confirmed the possibility of efficiently confining Mn into M48SNs using incipient wetness, while maintaining an open porosity and relatively high pore volume. Because

  20. Small-molecule-based protein-labeling technology in live cell studies: probe-design concepts and applications.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Shin; Hori, Yuichiro; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2014-01-21

    The use of genetic engineering techniques allows researchers to combine functional proteins with fluorescent proteins (FPs) to produce fusion proteins that can be visualized in living cells, tissues, and animals. However, several limitations of FPs, such as slow maturation kinetics or issues with photostability under laser illumination, have led researchers to examine new technologies beyond FP-based imaging. Recently, new protein-labeling technologies using protein/peptide tags and tag-specific probes have attracted increasing attention. Although several protein-labeling systems are com mercially available, researchers continue to work on addressing some of the limitations of this technology. To reduce the level of background fluorescence from unlabeled probes, researchers have pursued fluorogenic labeling, in which the labeling probes do not fluoresce until the target proteins are labeled. In this Account, we review two different fluorogenic protein-labeling systems that we have recently developed. First we give a brief history of protein labeling technologies and describe the challenges involved in protein labeling. In the second section, we discuss a fluorogenic labeling system based on a noncatalytic mutant of β-lactamase, which forms specific covalent bonds with β-lactam antibiotics such as ampicillin or cephalosporin. Based on fluorescence (or Förster) resonance energy transfer and other physicochemical principles, we have developed several types of fluorogenic labeling probes. To extend the utility of this labeling system, we took advantage of a hydrophobic β-lactam prodrug structure to achieve intracellular protein labeling. We also describe a small protein tag, photoactive yellow protein (PYP)-tag, and its probes. By utilizing a quenching mechanism based on close intramolecular contact, we incorporated a turn-on switch into the probes for fluorogenic protein labeling. One of these probes allowed us to rapidly image a protein while avoiding washout. In

  1. Label-free magnetic resonance imaging to locate live cells in three-dimensional porous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Abarrategi, A; Fernandez-Valle, M E; Desmet, T; Castejón, D; Civantos, A; Moreno-Vicente, C; Ramos, V; Sanz-Casado, J V; Martínez-Vázquez, F J; Dubruel, P; Miranda, P; López-Lacomba, J L

    2012-09-07

    Porous scaffolds are widely tested materials used for various purposes in tissue engineering. A critical feature of a porous scaffold is its ability to allow cell migration and growth on its inner surface. Up to now, there has not been a method to locate live cells deep inside a material, or in an entire structure, using real-time imaging and a non-destructive technique. Herein, we seek to demonstrate the feasibility of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique as a method to detect and locate in vitro non-labelled live cells in an entire porous material. Our results show that the use of optimized MRI parameters (4.7 T; repetition time = 3000 ms; echo time = 20 ms; resolution 39 × 39 µm) makes it possible to obtain images of the scaffold structure and to locate live non-labelled cells in the entire material, with a signal intensity higher than that obtained in the culture medium. In the current study, cells are visualized and located in different kinds of porous scaffolds. Moreover, further development of this MRI method might be useful in several three-dimensional biomaterial tests such as cell distribution studies, routine qualitative testing methods and in situ monitoring of cells inside scaffolds.

  2. Label-free magnetic resonance imaging to locate live cells in three-dimensional porous scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Abarrategi, A.; Fernandez-Valle, M. E.; Desmet, T.; Castejón, D.; Civantos, A.; Moreno-Vicente, C.; Ramos, V.; Sanz-Casado, J. V.; Martínez-Vázquez, F. J.; Dubruel, P.; Miranda, P.; López-Lacomba, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Porous scaffolds are widely tested materials used for various purposes in tissue engineering. A critical feature of a porous scaffold is its ability to allow cell migration and growth on its inner surface. Up to now, there has not been a method to locate live cells deep inside a material, or in an entire structure, using real-time imaging and a non-destructive technique. Herein, we seek to demonstrate the feasibility of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique as a method to detect and locate in vitro non-labelled live cells in an entire porous material. Our results show that the use of optimized MRI parameters (4.7 T; repetition time = 3000 ms; echo time = 20 ms; resolution 39 × 39 µm) makes it possible to obtain images of the scaffold structure and to locate live non-labelled cells in the entire material, with a signal intensity higher than that obtained in the culture medium. In the current study, cells are visualized and located in different kinds of porous scaffolds. Moreover, further development of this MRI method might be useful in several three-dimensional biomaterial tests such as cell distribution studies, routine qualitative testing methods and in situ monitoring of cells inside scaffolds. PMID:22442095

  3. Detection of gastritis by /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red-blood-cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wilton, G.P.; Wahl, R.L.; Juni, J.E.; Froelich, J.W.

    1984-10-01

    Gastritis is a common condition, with a variety of causes, that is diagnosed most often by barium upper gastrointestinal tract series or endoscopy. The authors report a case in which gastritis without active bleeding was apparent in scintiscans obtained during the evaluation of GI bleeding using /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells (TcRBC). The scintigraphic findings that suggest gastritis are described.

  4. Label-free determination of the cell cycle phase in human embryonic stem cells by Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Konorov, Stanislav O; Schulze, H Georg; Piret, James M; Blades, Michael W; Turner, Robin F B

    2013-10-01

    The cell cycle is a series of integrated and coordinated physiological events that results in cell growth and replication. Besides observing the event of cell division it is not feasible to determine the cell cycle phase without fatal and/or perturbing invasive procedures such as cell staining, fixing, and/or dissociation. Raman microspectroscopy (RMS) is a chemical imaging technique that exploits molecular vibrations as a contrast mechanism; it can be applied to single living cells noninvasively to allow unperturbed analysis over time. We used RMS to determine the cell cycle phase based on integrating the composite 783 cm(-1) nucleic acid band intensities across individual cell nuclei. After correcting for RNA contributions using the RNA 811 cm(-1) band, the measured intensities essentially reflected DNA content. When quantifying Raman images from single cells in a population of methanol-fixed human embryonic stem cells, the histogram of corrected 783 cm(-1) band intensities exhibited a profile analogous to that obtained using flow-cytometry with nuclear stains. The two population peaks in the histogram occur at Raman intensities corresponding to a 1-fold and 2-fold diploid DNA complement per cell, consistent with a distribution of cells with a population peak due to cells at the end of G1 phase (1-fold) and a peak due to cells entering M phase (2-fold). When treated with EdU to label the replicating DNA and block cell division, cells with higher EdU-related fluorescence generally had higher integrated Raman intensities. This provides proof-of-principle of an analytical method for label-free RMS determination in situ of cell cycle phase in adherent monolayers or even single adherent cells.

  5. Label-free single cell analysis with a chip-based impedance flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Hebeisen, Monika; Mittag, Anja; Di Berardino, Marco; Tarnok, Attila

    2010-02-01

    For description of cellular phenotypes and physiological states new developments are needed. Axetris' impedance flow cytometer (IFC) (Leister) is a new promising label-free alternative to fluorescence-based flow cytometry (FCM). IFC measures single cells at various frequencies simultaneously. The frequencies used for signal acquisition range from 0.1 to 20 MHz. The impedance signal provides information about cell volume (< 1 MHz), membrane capacitance (~1-4 MHz) and cytoplasmic conductivity (4-10 MHz), parameters directly related to the physiological conditions of single cells. In MCF-7 cell viability experiments, cells were treated with cytotoxic agents to induce cell death. Impedance analysis showed discrimination between viable and dead cells. This was clearly visible at 4 MHz suggesting that differentiation was possible based on cell membrane capacitance. Changes in cell membrane potential were also analysed by IFC. RN22 cells were loaded with membrane potential sensitive dye (DiBAC4). The cells were then treated with the ionophore valinomycin. Changes in membrane potential were detectable at the level of cytoplasm conductivity (>4 MHz) and membrane capacitance (1-4 MHz). Our data indicate that IFC can be a valuable alternative to conventional FCM for various applications in the field of cell death and physiology. The work will be extended to address further potential applications of IFC in biotechnology and biomedical cell analysis, as well as in cell sorting.

  6. Neural progenitor cells labeling with microbubble contrast agent for ultrasound imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wenjin; Tavri, Sidhartha; Benchimol, Michael J.; Itani, Malak; Olson, Emilia S.; Zhang, Hong; Decyk, Marika; Ramirez, Rosemarie G.; Barback, Christopher V.; Kono, Yuko; Mattrey, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Tracking neuroprogenitor cells (NPCs) that are used to target tumors, infarction or inflammation, is paramount for cell-based therapy. We employed ultrasound imaging that can detect a single microbubble because it can distinguish its unique signal from those of surrounding tissues. NPCs efficiently internalized positively charged microbubbles allowing a clinical ultrasound system to detect a single cell at 7 MHz. When injected intravenously, labeled NPCs traversed the lungs to be imaged in the left ventricle and the liver where they accumulated. Internalized microbubbles were not only less sensitive to destruction by ultrasound, but remained visible in vivo for days as compared to minutes when given free. The extended longevity provides ample time to allow cells to reach their intended target. We were also able to transfect NPCs in vitro when microbubbles were preloaded with GFP plasmid only when cells were insonated. Transfection efficiency and cell viability were both greater than 90%. PMID:23578557

  7. High-Throughput, Single-Cell Analysis of Macrophage Interactions with Fluorescently Labeled Bacillus anthracis Spores▿

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovic, Bojana; Torres, Eric M.; Prouty, Angela M.; Patel, Hetal K.; Zhuang, Lefan; Koehler, Theresa M.; Ballard, Jimmy D.; Blanke, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    The engulfment of Bacillus anthracis spores by macrophages is an important step in the pathogenesis of inhalational anthrax. However, from a quantitative standpoint, the magnitude to which macrophages interact with and engulf spores remains poorly understood, in part due to inherent limitations associated with commonly used assays. To analyze phagocytosis of spores by RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells in a high-throughput, nonsubjective manner, we labeled B. anthracis Sterne 7702 spores prior to infection with an Alexa Fluor 488 amine-reactive dye in a manner that did not alter their germination, growth kinetics, and heat resistance. Using flow cytometry, large numbers of cells exposed to labeled spores were screened to concurrently discriminate infected from uninfected cells and surface-associated from internalized spores. These experiments revealed that spore uptake was not uniform, but instead, highly heterogeneous and characterized by subpopulations of infected and uninfected cells, as well as considerable variation in the number of spores associated with individual cells. Flow cytometry analysis of infections demonstrated that spore uptake was independent of the presence or absence of fetal bovine serum, a germinant that, while routinely used in vitro, complicates the interpretation of the outcome of infections. Two commonly used macrophage cell lines, RAW264.7 and J774A.1 cells, were compared, revealing significant disparity between these two models in the rates of phagocytosis of labeled spores. These studies provide the experimental framework for investigating mechanisms of spore phagocytosis, as well as quantitatively evaluating strategies for interfering with macrophage binding and uptake of spores. PMID:18552183

  8. Poly(L-lysine)-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for stem cell labeling.

    PubMed

    Babic, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Trchová, Miroslava; Jendelová, Pavla; Glogarová, Katerina; Lesný, Petr; Herynek, Vít; Hájek, Milan; Syková, Eva

    2008-03-01

    New surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles were developed by precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts with ammonium hydroxide and oxidation of the resulting magnetite with sodium hypochlorite, followed by the addition of poly( L-lysine) (PLL) solution. PLL of several molecular weights ranging from 146 ( L-lysine) to 579 000 was tested as a coating to boost the intracellular uptake of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, dynamic light scattering, FTIR, and ultrasonic spectrometry. TEM revealed that the particles were ca. 6 nm in diameter, while FTIR showed that their surfaces were well-coated with PLL. The interaction of PLL-modified iron oxide nanoparticles with DMEM culture medium was verified by UV-vis spectroscopy. Rat bone marrow stromal cells (rMSCs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) were labeled with PLL-modified iron oxide nanoparticles or with Endorem (control). Optical microscopy and TEM confirmed the presence of PLL-modified iron oxide nanoparticles inside the cells. Cellular uptake was very high (more than 92%) for PLL-modified nanoparticles that were coated with PLL (molecular weight 388 00) at a concentration of 0.02 mg PLL per milliliter of colloid. The cellular uptake of PLL-modified iron oxide was facilitated by its interaction with the negatively charged cell surface and subsequent endosomolytic uptake. The relaxivity of rMSCs labeled with PLL-modified iron oxide and the amount of iron in the cells were determined. PLL-modified iron oxide-labeled rMSCs were imaged in vitro and in vivo after intracerebral grafting into the contralateral hemisphere of the adult rat brain. The implanted cells were visible on magnetic resonance (MR) images as a hypointense area at the injection site and in the lesion. In comparison with Endorem, nanoparticles modified with PLL of an optimum molecular weight demonstrated a higher efficiency of intracellular uptake by MSC cells.

  9. In vivo dynamic MRI tracking of rat T-cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Yeh, T C; Zhang, W; Ildstad, S T; Ho, C

    1995-02-01

    Dynamic MRI tracking of rat T-cells in vivo is performed in rat testicles after labeling isolated rat T-cells in vitro with superparamagnetic dextran-coated iron-oxide particles, BMS180549. Tissue inflammation induced by the local injection of the calcium ionophore, A23187, is used to attract labeled T-cells. Gradient-echo MR images of rat testicles show a statistically significant decrease (4%) of the signal intensity in areas of injection of A23187 as early as 30 min after intravenous infusion of 2 x 10(8) labeled T-cells. The signal change reaches its maximum (6-7% decrease) at about 60-120 min after cell infusion. T2-mapping also shows a decrease of T2 in the areas with A23187. Image quantitation, which includes a chemical-shift effect, significantly enhances the sensitivity for detection of superparamagnetically labeled T-cells. Localization of labeled T-cells in rat testicles has been verified by fluorescence microscopy studies of T-cells co-labeled with a lipophilic fluorescent carbocyanine dye, 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyl-lindocarbocyanine perchlorate. These results represent the first successful demonstration of dynamic tracking of specific cells in vivo using MRI.

  10. Combining label-free cell phenotypic profiling with computational approaches for novel drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ye

    2015-04-01

    Drug discovery is a long and costly process. Innovations and paradigm shifts are essential for continuous improvement in the productivity of pharmaceutical R&D. The author reviews the progress of label-free cell phenotypic and computational approaches in early drug discovery since 2004 and proposes a novel paradigm, which combines both approaches. Label-free cell phenotypic profiling techniques offer an unprecedented and integrated approach to comprehend drug-target interactions in their native environments. However, these approaches have disadvantages associated with the lack of molecular details. Computational approaches, including ligand-, structure- and phenotype-based virtual screens, have become versatile tools in the early drug discovery process. However, these approaches mostly predict the binding of drug molecules to targets of interest and are limited to targets that are either well annotated for ligands or that are structurally resolved. Thus, combining label-free cell phenotypic profiling with computational approaches can provide a potential paradigm to accelerate novel drug discovery by taking advantages of the best of both approaches.

  11. An optimized method for measuring fatty acids and cholesterol in stable isotope-labeled cells.

    PubMed

    Argus, Joseph P; Yu, Amy K; Wang, Eric S; Williams, Kevin J; Bensinger, Steven J

    2017-02-01

    Stable isotope labeling has become an important methodology for determining lipid metabolic parameters of normal and neoplastic cells. Conventional methods for fatty acid and cholesterol analysis have one or more issues that limit their utility for in vitro stable isotope-labeling studies. To address this, we developed a method optimized for measuring both fatty acids and cholesterol from small numbers of stable isotope-labeled cultured cells. We demonstrate quantitative derivatization and extraction of fatty acids from a wide range of lipid classes using this approach. Importantly, cholesterol is also recovered, albeit at a modestly lower yield, affording the opportunity to quantitate both cholesterol and fatty acids from the same sample. Although we find that background contamination can interfere with quantitation of certain fatty acids in low amounts of starting material, our data indicate that this optimized method can be used to accurately measure mass isotopomer distributions for cholesterol and many fatty acids isolated from small numbers of cultured cells. Application of this method will facilitate acquisition of lipid parameters required for quantifying flux and provide a better understanding of how lipid metabolism influences cellular function. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Diagnosis of infection by preoperative scintigraphy with indium-labeled white blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wukich, D.K.; Abreu, S.H.; Callaghan, J.J.; Van Nostrand, D.; Savory, C.G.; Eggli, D.F.; Garcia, J.E.; Berrey, B.H.

    1987-12-01

    Scintigraphy with indium-labeled white blood cells has been reported to be sensitive and specific in the diagnosis of low-grade sepsis of the musculoskeletal system. We reviewed the records of fifty patients who had suspected osteomyelitis or suspected infection about a total joint prosthesis and who underwent scintigraphy with technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate and scintigraphy with indium-111 oxine-labeled white blood cells before an open surgical procedure. Any patient who received preoperative antibiotics was not included in the study. For all of the patients, gram-stain examination of smears, evaluation of a culture of material from the operative site, and histological examination were done. The patients were divided into two groups. Group I was composed of twenty-four patients, each of whom had a prosthesis in place and complained of pain. Group II was composed of twenty-six patients for whom a diagnosis of chronic osteomyelitis had to be considered. With the indium scans alone, there was only one false-negative result (in Group II), but there were eighteen false-positive results (eight patients in Group II and ten patients in Group I). Although scintigraphy with indium-labeled white blood cells is quite sensitive, it is not specific in detecting chronic osteomyelitis; a negative scan should be considered highly suggestive that osteomyelitis is not present. Specificity can be increased by interpreting the indium scan in conjunction with the technetium scan.

  13. Imaging viral RNA using multiply labeled tetravalent RNA imaging probes in live cells.

    PubMed

    Alonas, Eric; Vanover, Daryll; Blanchard, Emmeline; Zurla, Chiara; Santangelo, Philip J

    2016-04-01

    Viruses represent an important class of pathogens that have had an enormous impact on the health of the human race. They are extraordinarily diverse; viral particles can range in size from ∼80nm to ∼10μm in length, and contain genomes with RNA or DNA strands. Regardless of their genome type, RNA species are frequently generated as a part of their replication process, and for viruses with RNA genomes, their loading into the virion represents a critical step in the creation of infectious particles. RNA imaging tools represent a powerful approach to gain insight into fundamental viral processes, including virus entry, replication, and virion assembly. Imaging viral processes in live cells is critical due to both the heterogeneity of these processes on a per cell basis, and the inherent dynamics of these processes. There are a number of methods for labeling RNA in live cells; we'll introduce the myriad of methods and then focus on one approach for labeling viral RNA, using multiply-labeled tetravalent RNA imaging probes (MTRIPs), which do not require engineering of the target RNAs. We feel this approach is advantageous given many viral genomes may not tolerate large nucleotide insertions into their sequences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Indium 111-labeled white blood cell scans after vascular prosthetic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Sedwitz, M.M.; Davies, R.J.; Pretorius, H.T.; Vasquez, T.E.

    1987-11-01

    The clinical value of indium 111-labeled white blood cell (WBC) scanning done after vascular graft procedures was investigated to differentiate noninfectious postoperative inflammation associated with graft incorporation from early prosthetic graft infection. Indium 111-labeled WBC scans were initially obtained in 30 patients before discharge from the hospital and during the subsequent follow-up period (334 days). Fourteen of 30 patients (47%) had normal predischarge scans that included all 10 patients who had grafts confined to the abdomen and 4 of 20 patients (20%) who had grafts arising or terminating at the femoral arteries (p less than 0.05). Sixteen of 30 patients (53%) discharged with abnormal initial indium 111 WBC scans underwent serial scanning until the scan normalized or a graft complication developed. All of the 16 patients had grafts involving the groin region. Abnormal indium 111 uptake in the femoral region continued for a mean 114 days without the development of prosthetic graft infections. The sensitivity of indium 111-labeled WBC scans for detecting wound complications was 100%, whereas the specificity was 50%. Thus, the accuracy of the test was only 53%. We conclude that (1) abnormal indium 111 WBC scans are common after graft operations involving the groin region but are unusual after vascular procedures confined to the abdomen, and (2) in the absence of clinical suspicion, the indium 111-labeled WBC scan does not reliably predict prosthetic graft infection because of the low specificity of the test in the early postoperative period.

  15. Immunostaining for substance P receptor labels GABAergic cells with distinct termination patterns in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Acsády, L; Katona, I; Gulyás, A I; Shigemoto, R; Freund, T F

    1997-02-17

    A specific antiserum against substance P receptor (SPR) labels nonprincipal neurons in the cerebral cortex of the rat (T. Kaneko et al. [1994], Neuroscience 60:199-211; Y. Nakaya et al. [1994], J. Comp. Neurol. 347:249-274). In the present study, we aimed to identify the types of SPR-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampus according to their content of neurochemical markers, which label interneuron populations with distinct termination patterns. Markers for perisomatic inhibitory cells, parvalbumin and cholecystokinin (CCK), colocalized with SPR in pyramidallike basket cells in the dentate gyrus and in large multipolar or bitufted cells within all hippocampal subfields respectively. A dense meshwork of SPR-immunoreactive spiny dendrites in the hilus and stratum lucidum of the CA3 region belonged largely to inhibitory cells terminating in the distal dendritic region of granule cells, as indicated by the somatostatin and neuropeptide Y (NPY) content. In addition, SPR and NPY were colocalized in numerous multipolar interneurons with dendrites branching close to the soma. Twenty-five percent of the SPR-immunoreactive cells overlapped with calretinin-positive neurons in all hippocampal subfields, showing that interneurons specialized to contact other gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic cells may also contain SPR. On the basis of the known termination pattern of the colocalized markers, we conclude that SPR-positive interneurons are functionally heterogeneous and participate in different inhibitory processes: (1) perisomatic inhibition of principal cells (CCK-containing cells, and parvalbumin-positive cells in the dentate gyrus), (2) feedback dendritic inhibition in the entorhinal termination zone (somatostatin and NPY-containing cells), and (3) innervation of other interneurons (calretinin-containing cells).

  16. Choose Your Cell Model Wisely: The In Vitro Nanoneurotoxicity of Differentially Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Neural Cell Labeling.

    PubMed

    Joris, Freya; Valdepérez, Daniel; Pelaz, Beatriz; Wang, Tianqiang; Doak, Shareen H; Manshian, Bella B; Soenen, Stefaan J; Parak, Wolfgang J; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2017-03-31

    Currently, there is a large interest in the labeling of neural stem cells (NSCs) with iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) to allow MRI-guided detection after transplantation in regenerative medicine. For such biomedical applications, excluding nanotoxicity is key. Nanosafety is primarily evaluated in vitro where an immortalized or cancer cell line of murine origin is often applied, which is not necessarily an ideal cell model. Previous work revealed clear neurotoxic effects of PMA-coated IONPs in distinct cell types that could potentially be applied for nanosafety studies regarding neural cell labeling. Here, we aimed to assess if DMSA-coated IONPs could be regarded as a safer alternative for this purpose and how the cell model impacted our nanosafety optimization study. Hereto, we evaluated cytotoxicity, ROS production, calcium levels, mitochondrial homeostasis and cell morphology in six related neural cell types, namely neural stem cells, an immortalized cell line and a cancer cell line from human and murine origin. The cell lines mostly showed similar responses to both IONPs, which were frequently more pronounced for the PMA-IONPs. Of note, ROS and calcium levels showed opposite trends in the human and murine NSCs, indicating the importance of the species. Indeed, the human cell models were overall more sensitive than their murine counterpart. Despite the clear cell type-specific nanotoxicity profiles, our multiparametric approach revealed that the DMSA-IONPs outperformed the PMA-IONPs in terms of biocompatibility in each cell type. However, major cell type-dependent variations in the observed effects additionally warrant the use of relevant human cell models.

  17. Live-cell MRI with xenon hyper-CEST biosensors targeted to metabolically labeled cell-surface glycans.

    PubMed

    Witte, Christopher; Martos, Vera; Rose, Honor May; Reinke, Stefan; Klippel, Stefan; Schröder, Leif; Hackenberger, Christian P R

    2015-02-23

    The targeting of metabolically labeled glycans with conventional MRI contrast agents has proved elusive. In this work, which further expands the utility of xenon Hyper-CEST biosensors in cell experiments, we present the first successful molecular imaging of such glycans using MRI. Xenon Hyper-CEST biosensors are a novel class of MRI contrast agents with very high sensitivity. We designed a multimodal biosensor for both fluorescent and xenon MRI detection that is targeted to metabolically labeled sialic acid through bioorthogonal chemistry. Through the use of a state of the art live-cell bioreactor, it was demonstrated that xenon MRI biosensors can be used to image cell-surface glycans at nanomolar concentrations.

  18. Proliferation and migration of label-retaining cells of the kidney papilla.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Juan A; Klinakis, Apostolos; Cheema, Faisal H; Friedlander, Jonathan; Sampogna, Rosemary V; Martens, Timothy P; Liu, Charles; Efstratiadis, Argiris; Al-Awqati, Qais

    2009-11-01

    The kidney papilla contains a population of cells with several characteristics of adult stem cells, including the retention of proliferation markers during long chase periods (i.e., they are label-retaining cells [LRCs]). To determine whether the papillary LRCs generate new cells in the normal adult kidney, we examined cell proliferation throughout the kidney and found that the upper papilla is a site of enhanced cell cycling. Using genetically modified mice that conditionally expressed green fluorescence protein fused to histone 2B, we observed that the LRCs of the papilla proliferated only in its upper part, where they associate with "chains" of cycling cells. The papillary LRCs decreased in number with age, suggesting that the cells migrated to the upper papilla before entering the cell cycle. To test this directly, we marked papillary cells with vital dyes in vivo and found that some cells in the kidney papilla, including LRCs, migrated toward other parts of the kidney. Acute kidney injury enhanced both cell migration and proliferation. These results suggest that during normal homeostasis, LRCs of the kidney papilla (or their immediate progeny) migrate to the upper papilla and form a compartment of rapidly proliferating cells, which may play a role in repair after ischemic injury.

  19. Toward label-free Raman-activated cell sorting of cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascut, Flavius C.; Goh, Huey T.; George, Vinoj; Denning, Chris; Notingher, Ioan

    2011-04-01

    Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) has been recently proposed for label-free phenotypic identification of human embryonic stem cells (hESC)-derived cardiomyocytes. However, the methods used for measuring the Raman spectra led to acquisition times of minutes per cell, which is prohibitive for rapid cell sorting applications. In this study we evaluated two measurement strategies that could reduce the measurement time by a factor of more than 100. We show that sampling individual cells with a laser beam focused to a line could eliminate the need of cell raster scanning and achieve high prediction accuracies (>95% specificity and >96% sensitivity) with acquisition times ~5 seconds per cell. However, the use of commercially-available higher power lasers could potentially lead to sorting speeds of ~10 cells per s. This would start to progress RMS to the field of cell sorting for applications such as enrichment and purification of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes.

  20. Use of /sup 75/Se-labeled methionine to study the sequestration of senescent red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smedsrod, B.; Aminoff, D.

    1985-01-01

    Labeling red blood cells with Na/sub 2//sup 51/CrO/sub 4/ enabled us to study certain aspects of red cell survival and sequestration from the circulation. As a random labeling procedure, however, the /sup 51/Cr method has certain limitations. Therefore, we developed a cohort labeling method using /sup 75/Se-methionine as a two-rat procedure. This gives a clear pulse-labeled population of rat red cells to study the dynamics of sequestration. With this labeling procedure, it was possible to demonstrate that 1) there is an increase in the density of red cells with age, 2) a significant sequestration of red cells from the circulation is apparent at the end of 48 days and essentially is complete at the end of 60 days, 3) there is a corresponding uptake of senescent red cells in the spleen, which peaks at 55 days, and 4) the 60-day end point is sharper and is more definitive when the specific activity (cpm per red blood cell) of the labeled red cells in the spleen is compared to that of the red cells still in the circulation. Asialo red cells, obtained by removal of sialic acid with sialidase, frequently have been used as a model for the study of sequestration of senescent red cells. With the technique herein described, it was possible to show that while asialo red cells will inhibit the uptake of labeled asialo red cells, they have no effect on the sequestration of senescent red cells. Presumably, different sites and mechanisms of sequestration are involved.

  1. 2D light scattering static cytometry for label-free single cell analysis with submicron resolution.

    PubMed

    Xie, Linyan; Yang, Yan; Sun, Xuming; Qiao, Xu; Liu, Qiao; Song, Kun; Kong, Beihua; Su, Xuantao

    2015-11-01

    Conventional optical cytometric techniques usually measure fluorescence or scattering signals at fixed angles from flowing cells in a liquid stream. Here we develop a novel cytometer that employs a scanning optical fiber to illuminate single static cells on a glass slide, which requires neither microfluidic fabrication nor flow control. This static cytometric technique measures two dimensional (2D) light scattering patterns via a small numerical aperture (0.25) microscope objective for label-free single cell analysis. Good agreement is obtained between the yeast cell experimental and Mie theory simulated patterns. It is demonstrated that the static cytometer with a microscope objective of a low resolution around 1.30 μm has the potential to perform high resolution analysis on yeast cells with distributed sizes. The capability of the static cytometer for size determination with submicron resolution is validated via measurements on standard microspheres with mean diameters of 3.87 and 4.19 μm. Our 2D light scattering static cytometric technique may provide an easy-to-use, label-free, and flow-free method for single cell diagnostics. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  2. Label-Free Imaging of Umbilical Cord Tissue Morphology and Explant-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paesen, Rik; Gyselaers, Wilfried; Stinissen, Piet

    2016-01-01

    In situ detection of MSCs remains difficult and warrants additional methods to aid with their characterization in vivo. Two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (TPM) and second harmonic generation (SHG) could fill this gap. Both techniques enable the detection of cells and extracellular structures, based on intrinsic properties of the specific tissue and intracellular molecules under optical irradiation. TPM imaging and SHG imaging have been used for label-free monitoring of stem cells differentiation, assessment of their behavior in biocompatible scaffolds, and even cell tracking in vivo. In this study, we show that TPM and SHG can accurately depict the umbilical cord architecture and visualize individual cells both in situ and during culture initiation, without the use of exogenously applied labels. In combination with nuclear DNA staining, we observed a variance in fluorescent intensity in the vessel walls. In addition, antibody staining showed differences in Oct4, αSMA, vimentin, and ALDH1A1 expression in situ, indicating functional differences among the umbilical cord cell populations. In future research, marker-free imaging can be of great added value to the current antigen-based staining methods for describing tissue structures and for the identification of progenitor cells in their tissue of origin. PMID:27746820

  3. Label-free protein profiling of adipose-derived human stem cells under hyperosmotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Elizabeth S; Brown, Lewis M; Bulinski, J Chloë; Hung, Clark T

    2011-07-01

    Our previous work suggested that treatment of cells with hyperosmotic media during 2D passaging primes cells for cartilage tissue engineering applications. Here, we used label-free proteomic profiling to evaluate the effects of control and hyperosmotic treatment environments on the phenotype of multipotent adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) cultivated with a chondrogenic growth factor cocktail. Spectra were recorded in a data-independent fashion at alternate low (precursor) and high (product) fragmentation voltages (MS(E)). This method was supplemented with data mining of accurate mass and retention time matches in precursor ion spectra across the experiment. The results indicated a complex cellular response to osmotic treatment, with a number of proteins differentially expressed between control and treated cell groups. The roles of some of these proteins have been documented in the literature as characteristic of the physiological states studied, especially aldose reductase (osmotic stress). This protein acted as a positive control in this work, providing independent corroborative validation. Other proteins, including 5'-nucleotidase and transgelin, have been previously linked to cell differentiation state. This study demonstrates that label-free profiling can serve as a useful tool in characterizing cellular responses to chondrogenic treatment regimes, recommending its use in optimization of cell priming protocols for cartilage tissue engineering.

  4. An Integrated Microfluidic System with Chemiluminescence Detection for Single Cell Analysis after Intracellular Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shulin; Li, Xiangtang

    2009-01-01

    This work describes the first application of microchip electrophoresis with chemiluminescence detection (MCE-CL) in single cell analysis. Human red blood cells were assayed to determine intracellular content of glutathione (GSH). Intracellular GSH was first labeled by incubating cells with diazo-luminol, and then individual cells were injected, in-line lysed, and MCE separated. CL detection was based on the oxidation reaction of luminol - labeled GSH with NaBrO. The MCE-CL assay had a linear calibration curve over a range from 0.2~ 90 amol GSH injected with a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and a detection limit of 50 zmol or 3.6× 10−9 M (S/N = 3). The average content of GSH in individual human red blood cells was found 64.9 amol (n= 17). Compared with the MCE methods with laser induced fluorescence detection (LIF) reported so far for single cell analysis, the present MCE-CL assay of GSH is simple and about 100 times more sensitive. PMID:19382810

  5. On-chip integrated labelling, transport and detection of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Woods, Jane; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Haswell, Stephen J; Greenman, John

    2011-11-01

    Microflow cytometry represents a promising tool for the investigation of diagnostic and prognostic cellular cancer markers, particularly if integrated within a device that allows primary cells to be freshly isolated from the solid tumour biopsies that more accurately reflect patient-specific in vivo tissue microenvironments at the time of staining. However, current tissue processing techniques involve several sequential stages with concomitant cell losses, and as such are inappropriate for use with small biopsies. Accordingly, we present a simple method for combined antibody-labelling and dissociation of heterogeneous cells from a tumour mass, which reduces the number of processing steps. Perfusion of ex vivo tissue at 4°C with antibodies and enzymes slows cellular activity while allowing sufficient time for the diffusion of minimally active enzymes. In situ antibody-labelled cells are then dissociated at 37°C from the tumour mass, whereupon hydrogel-filled channels allow the release of relatively low cell numbers (<1000) into a biomimetic microenvironment. This novel approach to sample processing is then further integrated with hydrogel-based electrokinetic transport of the freshly liberated fluorescent cells for downstream detection. It is anticipated that this integrated microfluidic methodology will have wide-ranging biomedical and clinical applications.

  6. Label-retaining stromal cells in mouse endometrium awaken for expansion and repair after parturition.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mingzhu; Chan, Rachel W S; Yeung, William S B

    2015-03-15

    Human and mouse endometrium undergo dramatic cellular reorganization during pregnancy and postpartum. Somatic stem cells maintain homeostasis of the tissue by providing a cell reservoir for regeneration. We hypothesized that endometrial cells with quiescent properties (stem/progenitor cells) were involved in the regeneration of the endometrial tissue. Given that stem cells divide infrequently, they can retain the DNA synthesis label [bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] after a prolonged chase period. In this study, prepubertal mice were pulsed with BrdU and after a 6-week chase a small population of label-retaining stromal cells (LRSC) was located primarily beneath the luminal epithelium, adjacent to blood vessels, and near the endometrial-myometrial junction. Marker analyses suggested that they were of mesenchymal origin expressing CD44(+), CD90(+), CD140b(+), CD146(+), and Sca-1(+). During pregnancy, nonproliferating LRSC predominately resided at the interimplantation/placental loci of the gestational endometrium. Immediately after parturition, a significant portion of the LRSC underwent proliferation (BrdU(+)/Ki-67(+)) and expressed total and active β-catenin. The β-catenin expression in the LRSC was transiently elevated at postpartum day (PPD) 1. The proliferation of LRSC resulted in a significant decline in the proportion of LRSC in the postpartum uterus. The LRSC returned to dormancy at PPD7, and the percentage of LRSC remained stable thereafter until 11 weeks. This study demonstrated that LRSC can respond efficiently to physiological stimuli upon initiation of uterine involution and return to its quiescent state after postpartum repair.

  7. The effect of an external magnetic force on cell adhesion and proliferation of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As the strategy for tissue regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for transplantation, it is necessary that MSCs be accumulated and kept in the target area. To accumulate MSCs effectively, we developed a novel technique for a magnetic targeting system with magnetically labeled MSCs and an external magnetic force. In this study, we examined the effect of an external magnetic force on magnetically labeled MSCs in terms of cell adhesion and proliferation. Methods Magnetically labeled MSCs were plated at the bottom of an insert under the influence of an external magnetic force for 1 hour. Then the inserts were turned upside down for between 1 and 24 hours, and the number of MSCs which had fallen from the membrane was counted. The gene expression of MSCs affected magnetic force was analyzed with microarray. In the control group, the same procedure was done without the external magnetic force. Results At 1 hour after the inserts were turned upside down, the average number of fallen MSCs in the magnetic group was significantly smaller than that in the control group, indicating enhanced cell adhesion. At 24 hours, the average number of fallen MSCs in the magnetic group was also significantly smaller than that in control group. In the magnetic group, integrin alpha2, alpha6, beta3 BP, intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2), platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) were upregulated. At 1, 2 and 3 weeks after incubation, there was no statistical significant difference in the numbers of MSCs in the magnetic group and control group. Conclusions The results indicate that an external magnetic force for 1 hour enhances cell adhesion of MSCs. Moreover, there is no difference in cell proliferation after using an external magnetic force on magnetically labeled MSCs. PMID:20152029

  8. Connected components labeling for giga-cell multi-categorical rasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzel, Pawel; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    2013-09-01

    Labeling of connected components in an image or a raster of non-imagery data is a fundamental operation in fields of pattern recognition and machine intelligence. The bulk of effort devoted to designing efficient connected components labeling (CCL) algorithms concentrated on the domain of binary images where labeling is required for a computer to recognize objects. In contrast, in the Geographical Information Science (GIS) a CCL algorithm is mostly applied to multi-categorical rasters in order to either convert a raster to a shapefile, or for statistical characterization of individual clumps. Recently, it has become necessary to label connected components in very large, giga-cell size, multi-categorical rasters but performance of existing CCL algorithms lacks sufficient speed to accomplish such task. In this paper we present a modification to the popular two-scan CCL algorithm that enables labeling of giga-cell size, multi-categorical rasters. Our approach is to apply a divide-and-conquer technique coupled with parallel processing to a standard two-scan algorithm. For specificity, we have developed a variant of a standard CCL algorithm implemented as r.clump in GRASS GIS. We have established optimal values of data blocks (stemming from the divide-and-conquer technique) and optimal number of computational threads (stemming from parallel processing) for a new algorithm called r.clump3p. The performance of the new algorithm was tested on a series of rasters up to 160 Mcells in size; for largest size test raster a speed up over the original algorithm is 74 times. Finally, we have applied the new algorithm to the National Land Cover Dataset 2006 raster with 1.6×1010 cells. Labeling this raster took 39 h using two-processors, 16 cores computer and resulted in 221,718,501 clumps. Estimated speed up over the original algorithm is 450 times. The r.clump3p works within the GRASS environment and is available in the public domain.

  9. In-vitro Optimization of Nanoparticle-Cell Labeling Protocols for In-vivo Cell Tracking Applications.

    PubMed

    Betzer, Oshra; Meir, Rinat; Dreifuss, Tamar; Shamalov, Katerina; Motiei, Menachem; Shwartz, Amit; Baranes, Koby; Cohen, Cyrille J; Shraga-Heled, Niva; Ofir, Racheli; Yadid, Gal; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2015-10-28

    Recent advances in theranostic nanomedicine can promote stem cell and immune cell-based therapy. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been shown to be promising agents for in-vivo cell-tracking in cell-based therapy applications. Yet a crucial challenge is to develop a reliable protocol for cell upload with, on the one hand, sufficient nanoparticles to achieve maximum visibility of cells, while on the other hand, assuring minimal effect of particles on cell function and viability. Previous studies have demonstrated that the physicochemical parameters of GNPs have a critical impact on their efficient uptake by cells. In the current study we have examined possible variations in GNP uptake, resulting from different incubation period and concentrations in different cell-lines. We have found that GNPs effectively labeled three different cell-lines - stem, immune and cancer cells, with minimal impairment to cell viability and functionality. We further found that uptake efficiency of GNPs into cells stabilized after a short period of time, while GNP concentration had a significant impact on cellular uptake, revealing cell-dependent differences. Our results suggest that while heeding the slight variations within cell lines, modifying the loading time and concentration of GNPs, can promote cell visibility in various nanoparticle-dependent in-vivo cell tracking and imaging applications.

  10. In-vitro Optimization of Nanoparticle-Cell Labeling Protocols for In-vivo Cell Tracking Applications

    PubMed Central

    Betzer, Oshra; Meir, Rinat; Dreifuss, Tamar; Shamalov, Katerina; Motiei, Menachem; Shwartz, Amit; Baranes, Koby; Cohen, Cyrille J.; Shraga-Heled, Niva; Ofir, Racheli; Yadid, Gal; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in theranostic nanomedicine can promote stem cell and immune cell-based therapy. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been shown to be promising agents for in-vivo cell-tracking in cell-based therapy applications. Yet a crucial challenge is to develop a reliable protocol for cell upload with, on the one hand, sufficient nanoparticles to achieve maximum visibility of cells, while on the other hand, assuring minimal effect of particles on cell function and viability. Previous studies have demonstrated that the physicochemical parameters of GNPs have a critical impact on their efficient uptake by cells. In the current study we have examined possible variations in GNP uptake, resulting from different incubation period and concentrations in different cell-lines. We have found that GNPs effectively labeled three different cell-lines - stem, immune and cancer cells, with minimal impairment to cell viability and functionality. We further found that uptake efficiency of GNPs into cells stabilized after a short period of time, while GNP concentration had a significant impact on cellular uptake, revealing cell-dependent differences. Our results suggest that while heeding the slight variations within cell lines, modifying the loading time and concentration of GNPs, can promote cell visibility in various nanoparticle-dependent in-vivo cell tracking and imaging applications. PMID:26507853

  11. Metabolic labeling and membrane fractionation for comparative proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Witold G; Kierszniowska, Sylwia; Schulze, Waltraud X

    2013-09-28

    Plasma membrane microdomains are features based on the physical properties of the lipid and sterol environment and have particular roles in signaling processes. Extracting sterol-enriched membrane microdomains from plant cells for proteomic analysis is a difficult task mainly due to multiple preparation steps and sources for contaminations from other cellular compartments. The plasma membrane constitutes only about 5-20% of all the membranes in a plant cell, and therefore isolation of highly purified plasma membrane fraction is challenging. A frequently used method involves aqueous two-phase partitioning in polyethylene glycol and dextran, which yields plasma membrane vesicles with a purity of 95% (1). Sterol-rich membrane microdomains within the plasma membrane are insoluble upon treatment with cold nonionic detergents at alkaline pH. This detergent-resistant membrane fraction can be separated from the bulk plasma membrane by ultracentrifugation in a sucrose gradient (2). Subsequently, proteins can be extracted from the low density band of the sucrose gradient by methanol/chloroform precipitation. Extracted protein will then be trypsin digested, desalted and finally analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Our extraction protocol for sterol-rich microdomains is optimized for the preparation of clean detergent-resistant membrane fractions from Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures. We use full metabolic labeling of Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cell cultures with K(15)NO3 as the only nitrogen source for quantitative comparative proteomic studies following biological treatment of interest (3). By mixing equal ratios of labeled and unlabeled cell cultures for joint protein extraction the influence of preparation steps on final quantitative result is kept at a minimum. Also loss of material during extraction will affect both control and treatment samples in the same way, and therefore the ratio of light and heave peptide will remain constant. In the proposed method either labeled or

  12. Magnetic Labelling of Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Iron-Doped Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles as Tool for Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Panseri, Silvia; Montesi, Monica; Iafisco, Michele; Adamiano, Alessio; Ghetti, Martina; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Tampieri, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles offer several opportunities in nanomedicine and magnetic cell targeting. They are considered to be an extremely promising approach for the translation of cell-based therapies from the laboratory to clinical studies. In fact, after injection, the magnetic labeled cells could be driven by a static magnetic field and localized to the target site where they can perform their specific role. In this study, innovative iron-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (FeHA NPs) were tested with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as tools for cell therapy. Results showed that FeHA NPs could represent higher cell viability in'respect to commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) at four different concentrations ranging from 10 μg/ml up to 200 μg/ml and would also upregulate an early marker involved in commitment and differentiation of MSCs. Moreover, FeHA NPs were uptaken without negatively affecting the cell behavior and their ultrastructure. Thus obtained magnetic cells were easily guided by application of a static magnetic field. This work demonstrates the promising opportunities of FeHA NPs in MSCs labeling due to the unique features of fast degradation and very low iron content of FeHA NPs compared to SPIONs. Likewise, due to the intrinsic properties of FeHA NPs, this approach could be simply transferred to different cell types as an effective magnetic carrier of drugs, growth factors, miRNA, etc., offering favorable prospects in nanomedicine.

  13. Unsupervised unstained cell detection by SIFT keypoint clustering and self-labeling algorithm.

    PubMed

    Muallal, Firas; Schöll, Simon; Sommerfeldt, Björn; Maier, Andreas; Steidl, Stefan; Buchholz, Rainer; Hornegger, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel unstained cell detection algorithm based on unsupervised learning. The algorithm utilizes the scale invariant feature transform (SIFT), a self-labeling algorithm, and two clustering steps in order to achieve high performance in terms of time and detection accuracy. Unstained cell imaging is dominated by phase contrast and bright field microscopy. Therefore, the algorithm was assessed on images acquired using these two modalities. Five cell lines having in total 37 images and 7250 cells were considered for the evaluation: CHO, L929, Sf21, HeLa, and Bovine cells. The obtained F-measures were between 85.1 and 89.5. Compared to the state-of-the-art, the algorithm achieves very close F-measure to the supervised approaches in much less time.

  14. A method for double-labeling sputum cells for p53 and cytokeratin

    SciTech Connect

    Neft, R.E.; Tierney, L.A.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Molecular and immunological techniques may enhance the usefulness of sputum cytology as a screening tool for lung cancer. These techniques may also be useful in detecting and following the early progression of disease from metaplasia to dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, and finally to invasive carcinoma. Longitudinal information on the evolution of these malignant changes in the respiratory epithelium can be gained by prospective study of populations at high risk for lung cancer. This work is significant because double-labeling of cells in sputum with p53 and cytokeratin antibodies facilitates rapid screening of p53 positive neoplastic and preneoplastic lung cells by brightfield and fluorescence microscopy.

  15. Laser microbeam abalation of GFP-labeled nuclear organelles in a living cell.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMorte, Vickie J.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Evans, Ronald M.; Berns, Michael W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1997-05-01

    Cancer, development, cellular growth and differentiation are governed by gene expression. Recent molecular and cellular advances to visualize and perturb the pathways of transcriptional regulation, nascent RNA processing, and protein trafficking at the single cell level have been developed. More recently, applications utilizing the green fluorescent marker (GFP) from Aequorea victoria have facilitated visualization of these molecular events in a living cell. Specifically, we will describe a novel approach to perturb cellular processes by labeling discrete cellular components of interest with GFP and subsequently altering/ablating them with a laser microbeam.

  16. Commonly used mesenchymal stem cell markers and tracking labels: Limitations and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Shwun; Xin, Zhong-Cheng; Dai, Jican; Lue, Tom F

    2013-09-01

    Early observations that cultured mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could be induced to exhibit certain characteristics of osteocytes and chondrocytes led to the proposal that they could be transplanted for tissue repair through cellular differentiation. Therefore, many subsequent preclinical studies with transplanted MSCs have strived to demonstrate that cellular differentiation was the underlying mechanism for the therapeutic effect. These studies generally followed the minimal criteria set by The International Society for Cellular Therapy in assuring MSC identity by using CD70, CD90, and CD105 as positive markers and CD34 as a negative marker. However, the three positive markers are co-expressed in a wide variety of cells, and therefore, even when used in combination, they are certainly incapable of identifying MSCs in vivo. Another frequently used MSC marker, Stro-1, has been shown to be an endothelial antigen and whether it can identify MSCs in vivo remains unknown. On the other hand, the proposed negative marker CD34 has increasingly been shown to be expressed in native MSCs, such as in the adipose tissue. It has also helped establish that MSCs are likely vascular stem cells (VSCs) that reside in the capillaries and in the adventitia of larger blood vessels. These cells do not express CD31, CD104b, or α-SMA, and therefore are designated as CD34+CD31-CD140b-SMA-. Many preclinical MSC transplantation studies have also attempted to demonstrate cellular differentiation by using labeled MSCs. However, all commonly used labels have shortcomings that often complicate data interpretation. The β-gal (LacZ) gene as a label is problematic because many mammalian tissues have endogenous β-gal activities. The GFP gene is similarly problematic because many mammalian tissues are endogenously fluorescent. The cell membrane label DiI can be adsorbed by host cells, and nuclear stains Hoechst dyes and DAPI can be transferred to host cells. Thymidine analog BrdU is associated with

  17. Observation of the immune response of cells and tissue through multimodal label-free microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavillon, Nicolas; Smith, Nicholas I.

    2017-02-01

    We present applications of a label-free approach to assess the immune response based on the combination of interferometric microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, which makes it possible to simultaneously acquire morphological and molecular information of live cells. We employ this approach to derive statistical models for predicting the activation state of macrophage cells based both on morphological parameters extracted from the high-throughput full-field quantitative phase imaging, and on the molecular content information acquired through Raman spectroscopy. We also employ a system for 3D imaging based on coherence gating, enabling specific targeting of the Raman channel to structures of interest within tissue.

  18. Tc-99m Labeled HMPAO white Blood Cell Scintigraphy in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Funda; Kın Cengiz, Arzu; Güngör, Fırat

    2012-04-01

    (99m)Tc labeled hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) white blood cell (WBC) scintigraphy is a frequently used option for acute infection, particularly in pediatric patients. This scintigraphy is applied to detect sites of infection/inflammation in patients with fever of unknown origin, to find and follow up osteomyelitis, and to detect suspicion of acute appendicitis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the value of (99m)Tc-HMPAO labeled WBC scintigraphy in pediatric patients. The study was conducted between January 2006 and December 2008 and included 13 patients (5 boys, 8 girls; mean age 6.9±6.2 years). Those patients who had suspicion of bone infection (n=7), fever of unknown origin (n=3), and suspicion of acute appendicitis (n=3) were evaluated retrospectively. (99m)Tc-HMPAO labeled WBC scintigraphy imaging was performed to all patients. Diagnosis was done according to operation and pathological results or clinical follow-up. (99m)Tc-HMPAO labeled WBC scintigraphy has been found to be true positive in 6 cases, true negative in 6 cases, and false negative in one patient who had fewer unknown origin. The false negative case has been found to have encephalitis with MRI. Leukocyte scintigraphy has been described as a useful diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of suspicion of bone infection, fever of unknown origin and suspicion of acute appendicitis. (99m)Tc-HMPAO labeled WBC scintigraphy is a rapid and very accurate method for detecting those pathologies. Our results showed that WBC scintigraphy might be reliably used for diagnosis of suspected bone infection and acute appendicitis, fever of unknown origin, and acute appendicitis, in pediatric patient population. None declared.

  19. Temperature-induced labelling of Fluo-3 AM selectively yields brighter nucleus in adherent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Guixian; Pan, Leiting; Li, Cunbo; Hu, Fen; Shi, Xuechen; Lee, Imshik; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Zhang, Xinzheng; Xu, Jingjun

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •We detailedly examine temperature effects of Fluo-3 AM labelling in adherent cells. •4 °C Loading and 20 °C de-esterification of Fluo-3 AM yields brighter nuclei. •Brighter nuclei labelling by Fluo-3 AM also depends on cell adhesion quality. •A qualitative model of the brighter nucleus is proposed. -- Abstract: Fluo-3 is widely used to study cell calcium. Two traditional approaches: (1) direct injection and (2) Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading, often bring conflicting results in cytoplasmic calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}) and nuclear calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n}) imaging. AM loading usually yields a darker nucleus than in cytoplasm, while direct injection always induces a brighter nucleus which is more responsive to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} detection. In this work, we detailedly investigated the effects of loading and de-esterification temperatures on the fluorescence intensity of Fluo-3 in response to [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub n} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} in adherent cells, including osteoblast, HeLa and BV2 cells. Interestingly, it showed that fluorescence intensity of nucleus in osteoblast cells was about two times larger than that of cytoplasm when cells were loaded with Fluo-3 AM at 4 °C and allowed a subsequent step for de-esterification at 20 °C. Brighter nuclei were also acquired in HeLa and BV2 cells using the same experimental condition. Furthermore, loading time and adhesion quality of cells had effect on fluorescence intensity. Taken together, cold loading and room temperature de-esterification treatment of Fluo-3 AM selectively yielded brighter nucleus in adherent cells.

  20. [In vitro MR imaging of Fe(2)O(3)-PLL labelled rabbit peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells].

    PubMed

    Mai, Xiao-li; Teng, Gao-jun; Ma, Zhan-long; Sun, Jun-hui; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2007-09-01

    To perform in vitro magnetic resonance imaging on magnetic iron oxide (Fe(2)O(3)-PLL) labeled rabbit peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Fe(2)O(3) was incubated with PLL for 2 hours to form Fe(2)O(3)-PLL. Rabbit peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated and EPCs were selected by adherence method, expanded and incubated with Fe(2)O(3)-PLL. Intracellular iron was detected by Prussian blue stain and under electron microscope. MTT assay was used to evaluate cell survival and proliferation of Fe(2)O(3)-PLL labeled EPCs. Flow cytometry was used to analysis cell cycle and apoptosis. The cells underwent in vitro MR imaging with various sequences. Iron-containing intracytoplasmatic vesicles could be observed clearly with Prussian blue staining and electron microscope observation. Survival, life cycle and apoptosis values obtained by MTT and flow cytometry analysis were similar among unlabelled EPCs and EPCs labeled with various concentrations Fe(2)O(3)-PLL. The signal intensity on MRI was significantly decreased in labeled cells compared with that in unlabeled cells. The percentage change in signal intensity (DeltaSI) was most significant on T(2)*WI and DeltaSI was significantly lower in cells labeled for 7 days than that labeled for 1 day. The rabbit peripheral blood EPCs can be labeled with Fe(2)O(3)-PLL without significant change in viability and proliferation. The labeled EPCs can be imaged with standard 1.5 T MR equipment. The degree of MR signal decreasing may indirectly reflect the cells count, growth state and division.

  1. Automatic labeling of molecular biomarkers on a cell-by-cell basis in immunohistochemistry images using convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhzadeh, Fahime; Carraro, Anita; Korbelik, Jagoda; MacAulay, Calum; Guillaud, Martial; Ward, Rabab K.

    2016-03-01

    This paper addresses the problem of classifying cells expressing different biomarkers. A deep learning based method that can automatically localize and count the cells expressing each of the different biomarkers is proposed. To classify the cells, a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) was employed. Images of Immunohistochemistry (IHC) stained slides that contain these cells were digitally scanned. The images were taken from digital scans of IHC stained cervical tissues, acquired for a clinical trial. More than 4,500 RGB images of cells were used to train the CNN. To evaluate our method, the cells were first manually labeled based on the expressing biomarkers. Then we performed the classification on 156 randomly selected images of cells that were not used in training the CNN. The accuracy of the classification was 92% in this preliminary data set. The results have shown that this method has a good potential in developing an automatic method for immunohistochemical analysis.

  2. In Vivo Fluorescence Immunohistochemistry: Localization of Fluorescently Labeled Cetuximab in Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Esther; Warram, Jason M; Tucker, Matthew D; Hartman, Yolanda E; Moore, Lindsay S; de Jong, Johannes S; Chung, Thomas K; Korb, Melissa L; Zinn, Kurt R; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Rosenthal, Eben L; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret S

    2015-06-29

    Anti-EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) antibody based treatment strategies have been successfully implemented in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Unfortunately, predicting an accurate and reliable therapeutic response remains a challenge on a per-patient basis. Although significant efforts have been invested in understanding EGFR-mediated changes in cell signaling related to treatment efficacy, the delivery and histological localization in (peri-)tumoral compartments of antibody-based therapeutics in human tumors is poorly understood nor ever made visible. In this first in-human study of a systemically administered near-infrared (NIR) fluorescently labeled therapeutic antibody, cetuximab-IRDye800CW (2.5 mg/m(2), 25 mg/m(2), and 62.5 mg/m(2)), we show that by optical molecular imaging (i.e. denominated as In vivo Fluorescence Immunohistochemistry) we were able to evaluate localization of fluorescently labeled cetuximab. Clearly, optical molecular imaging with fluorescently labeled antibodies correlating morphological (peri-)tumoral characteristics to levels of antibody delivery, may improve treatment paradigms based on understanding true tumoral antibody delivery.

  3. Probing Xylan-Specific Raman Bands for Label-Free Imaging Xylan in Plant Cell Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yining; Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Tucker, Melvin P.; Vinzant, Todd; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-06-15

    Xylan constitutes a significant portion of biomass (e.g. 22% in corn stover used in this study). Xylan is also an important source of carbohydrates, besides cellulose, for renewable and sustainable energy applications. Currently used method for the localization of xylan in biomass is to use fluorescence confocal microscope to image the fluorescent dye labeled monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to xylan. With the rapid adoption of the Raman-based label-free chemical imaging techniques in biology, identifying Raman bands that are unique to xylan would be critical for the implementation of the above label-free techniques for in situ xylan imaging. Unlike lignin and cellulose that have long be assigned fingerprint Raman bands, specific Raman bands for xylan remain unclear. The major challenge is the cellulose in plant cell wall, which has chemical units highly similar to that of xylan. Here we report using xylanase to specifically remove xylan from feedstock. Under various degree of xylan removal, with minimum impact to other major cell wall components, i.e. lignin and cellulose, we have identified Raman bands that could be further tested for chemical imaging of xylan in biomass in situ.

  4. Tunable coating of gold nanostars: tailoring robust SERS labels for cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, B.; Taglietti, A.; Galinetto, P.; Marchesi, N.; Pascale, A.; Cabrini, E.; Pallavicini, P.; Dacarro, G.

    2016-07-01

    Surface modification of noble metal nanoparticles with mixed molecular monolayers is one of the most powerful tools in nanotechnology, and is used to impart and tune new complex surface properties. In imaging techniques based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), precise and controllable surface modifications are needed to carefully design reproducible, robust and adjustable SERS nanoprobes. We report here the attainment of SERS labels based on gold nanostars (GNSs) coated with a mixed monolayer composed of a poly ethylene glycol (PEG) thiol (neutral or negatively charged) that ensure stability in biological environments, and of a signalling unit 7-Mercapto-4-methylcoumarin as a Raman reporter molecule. The composition of the coating mixture is precisely controlled using an original method, allowing the modulation of the SERS intensity and ensuring overall nanoprobe stability. The further addition of a positively charged layer of poly (allylamine hydrocloride) on the surface of negatively charged SERS labels does not change the SERS response, but it promotes the penetration of GNSs in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. As an example of an application of such an approach, we demonstrate here the internalization of these new labels by means of visualization of cell morphology obtained with SERS mapping.

  5. Size-dependent property and cell labeling of semiconducting polymer dots.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Chen, Haobin; Wang, Lei; Yin, Shengyan; Wang, Haiyu; Xu, Gaixia; Chen, Danni; Zhang, Xuanjun; Wu, Changfeng; Qin, Weiping

    2014-07-09

    Semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) represent a new class of fluorescent nanoparticles for biological applications. In this study, we investigated their size-dependent fluorescence and cellular labeling properties. We demonstrate that the polymer conformation in solution phase largely affects the polymer folding and packing during the nanoparticle preparation process, resulting in solution-phase control over the fluorescence properties of semiconducting polymer nanoparticles. The resulting Pdots exhibit apparent size dependent absorption and emission, a characteristic feature of different chain packing behaviors due to the preparation conditions. Single-particle fluorescence imaging was employed to perform a side-by-side comparison on the Pdot brightness, indicating a quadratic dependence of single-particle brightness on particle size. Upon introducing a positively charged dye Nile blue, all the three type of Pdots were quenched very efficiently (Ksv > 1 × 10(7) M(-1)) in an applied quenching process at low dye concentrations, but exhibit apparent difference in quenching efficiency with increasing dye concentration. Furthermore, Pdots of different sizes were used for cell uptake and cellular labeling involving biotin-streptavidin interactions. Fluorescence imaging together with flow cytometry studies clearly showed size dependent labeling brightness. Small-sized Pdots appear to be more effective for immunolabeling of cell surface, whereas medium-sized Pdots exhibit the highest uptake efficiency. This study provides a concrete guidance for selecting appropriate particle size for biological imaging and sensing applications.

  6. Surface-labelling studies on skeletal-muscle cells in vitro. Heterogeneity of iodinated cell-surface proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Cates, G A; Holland, P C

    1980-01-01

    1. Two distinct classes of protein were detected at the surface of chick-embryo skeletal-muscle cells after iodination of the cells in monolayer culture. 2. The two classes of iodinated proteins differed in their ability to co-purify with a vesicular plasma-membrane fraction prepared from surface-labelled cells. 3. One class consisted of predominantly high-molecular-weight glycoproteins that co-purified with the plasma-membrane fraction, but showed no significant qualitative or quantitative alterations in labelling with 125I and lactoperoxidase during myogenesis. 4. A second class of predominantly lower-molecular-weight proteins showed reproducible quantitative alterations in 125I-labelling during myogenesis but failed to co-purify with the plasma-membrane fraction. 5. This second class of proteins may represent matrix proteins involved in intercellular adhesion or adhesion of cells to the substratum. They are unlikely to be directly required for the process of plasma-membrane fusion during myogenesis, since they do not copurify with a vesicular plasma-membrane fraction known to be capable of Ca2+-dependent fusion in vitro. PMID:7370009

  7. Planar Photonic Crystal Biosensor for Quantitative Label-Free Cell Attachment Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weili; Long, Kenneth D.; Kurniawan, Jonas; Hung, Margaret; Yu, Hojeong; Harley, Brendan A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a planar-surface photonic crystal (PC) biosensor for quantitative, kinetic, label-free imaging of cell–surface interactions is demonstrated. The planar biosensor surface eliminates external stimuli to the cells caused by substrate topography to more accurately reflect smooth surface environment encountered by many cell types in vitro. Here, a fabrication approach that combines nanoreplica molding and a horizontal dipping process is used to planarize the surface of the PC biosensor. The planar PC biosensor maintains a high detection sensitivity that enables the monitoring of live cell–substrate interactions with spatial resolution sufficient for observing intracellular attachment strength gradients and the extensions of filopodia from the cell body. The evolution of cell morphology during the attachment and spreading process of 3T3 fibroblast cells is compared between planar and grating-structured PC biosensors. The planar surface effectively eliminates the directionally biased cellular attachment behaviors that are observed on the grating-structured surface. This work represents an important step forward in the development of label-free techniques for observing cellular processes without unintended external environmental modulation. PMID:26877910

  8. Label-free optical detection of cells grown in 3D silicon microstructures.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Sabina; Carpignano, Francesca; Silva, Gloria; Aredia, Francesca; Scovassi, A Ivana; Mazzini, Giuliano; Surdo, Salvatore; Barillaro, Giuseppe

    2013-08-21

    We demonstrate high aspect-ratio photonic crystals that could serve as three-dimensional (3D) microincubators for cell culture and also provide label-free optical detection of the cells. The investigated microstructures, fabricated by electrochemical micromachining of standard silicon wafers, consist of periodic arrays of silicon walls separated by narrow deeply etched air-gaps (50 μm high and 5 μm wide) and feature the typical spectral properties of photonic crystals in the wavelength range 1.0-1.7 μm: their spectral reflectivity is characterized by wavelength regions where reflectivity is high (photonic bandgaps), separated by narrow wavelength regions where reflectivity is very low. In this work, we show that the presence of cells, grown inside the gaps, strongly affects light propagation across the photonic crystal and, therefore, its spectral reflectivity. Exploiting a label-free optical detection method, based on a fiberoptic setup, we are able to probe the extension of cells adherent to the vertical silicon walls with a non-invasive direct testing. In particular, the intensity ratio at two wavelengths is the experimental parameter that can be well correlated to the cell spreading on the silicon wall inside the gaps.

  9. Tracking epigenetic histone modifications in single cells using Fab-based live endogenous modification labeling.

    PubMed

    Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Yamagata, Kazuo; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Stasevich, Timothy J; Kainuma, Takashi; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Tachibana, Makoto; Shinkai, Yoichi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Nozaki, Naohito; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    Histone modifications play an important role in epigenetic gene regulation and genome integrity. It remains largely unknown, however, how these modifications dynamically change in individual cells. By using fluorescently labeled specific antigen binding fragments (Fabs), we have developed a general method to monitor the distribution and global level of endogenous histone H3 lysine modifications in living cells without disturbing cell growth and embryo development. Fabs produce distinct nuclear patterns that are characteristic of their target modifications. H3K27 trimethylation-specific Fabs, for example, are concentrated on inactive X chromosomes. As Fabs bind their targets transiently, the ratio of bound and free molecules depends on the target concentration, allowing us to measure changes in global modification levels. High-affinity Fabs are suitable for mouse embryo imaging, so we have used them to monitor H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation levels in mouse preimplantation embryos produced by in vitro fertilization and somatic cell nuclear transfer. The data suggest that a high level of H3K27 acetylation is important for normal embryo development. As Fab-based live endogenous modification labeling (FabLEM) is broadly useful for visualizing any modification, it should be a powerful tool for studying cell signaling and diagnosis in the future.

  10. Tomographic sensing and localization of fluorescently labeled circulating cells in mice in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, Eric; Swamy, Tushar; Runnels, Judith; Lin, Charles P.; Niedre, Mark

    2012-07-01

    Sensing and enumeration of specific types of circulating cells in small animals is an important problem in many areas of biomedical research. Microscopy-based fluorescence in vivo flow cytometry methods have been developed previously, but these are typically limited to sampling of very small blood volumes, so that very rare circulating cells may escape detection. Recently, we described the development of a ‘diffuse fluorescence flow cytometer’ (DFFC) that allows sampling of much larger blood vessels and therefore circulating blood volumes in the hindlimb, forelimb or tail of a mouse. In this work, we extend this concept by developing and validating a method to tomographically localize circulating fluorescently labeled cells in the cross section of a tissue simulating optical flow phantom and mouse limb. This was achieved using two modulated light sources and an array of six fiber-coupled detectors that allowed rapid, high-sensitivity acquisition of full tomographic data sets at 10 Hz. These were reconstructed into two-dimensional cross-sectional images using Monte Carlo models of light propagation and the randomized algebraic reconstruction technique. We were able to obtain continuous images of moving cells in the sample cross section with 0.5 mm accuracy or better. We first demonstrated this concept in limb-mimicking optical flow photons with up to four flow channels, and then in the tails of mice with fluorescently labeled multiple myeloma cells. This approach increases the overall diagnostic utility of our DFFC instrument.

  11. A New Method for Preparing Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Labeling with Ferumoxytol for Cell Tracking by MRI.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Tseng, Lanya; Ye, Qing; Wu, Yijen L; Bain, Daniel J; Ho, Chien

    2016-05-18

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are among the major stem cells used for cell therapy and regenerative medicine. In-vivo cell-tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is crucial for regenerative medicine, allowing verification that the transplanted cells reach the targeted sites. Cellular MRI combined with superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) contrast agents is an effective cell-tracking method. Here, we are reporting a new "bio-mimicry" method by making use of the "in-vivo environment" of MSCs to prepare native MSCs, so that (i) the phagocytic activity of cultured MSCs can be recovered and expanded MSCs can be ex-vivo labeled with Ferumoxytol, which is currently the only FDA approved SPIO nanoparticles for human use. Using our new method, 7-day cultured MSCs regain the capability to take up Ferumoxytol and exhibit an intracellular iron concentration of 2.50 ± 0.50 pg/MSC, comparable to that obtained by using Ferumoxytol-heparin-protamine nanocomplex; and (ii) cells can be re-sized to more native size, reducing from 32.0 ± 7.2 μm to 19.5 ± 5.2 μm. Our method can be very useful for expanding MSCs and labeling with Ferumoxytol, without the need for transfection agents and/or electroporation, allowing cell-tracking by MRI in both pre-clinical and clinical studies.

  12. A New Method for Preparing Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Labeling with Ferumoxytol for Cell Tracking by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Tseng, Lanya; Ye, Qing; Wu, Yijen L.; Bain, Daniel J.; Ho, Chien

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are among the major stem cells used for cell therapy and regenerative medicine. In-vivo cell-tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is crucial for regenerative medicine, allowing verification that the transplanted cells reach the targeted sites. Cellular MRI combined with superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) contrast agents is an effective cell-tracking method. Here, we are reporting a new “bio-mimicry” method by making use of the “in-vivo environment” of MSCs to prepare native MSCs, so that (i) the phagocytic activity of cultured MSCs can be recovered and expanded MSCs can be ex-vivo labeled with Ferumoxytol, which is currently the only FDA approved SPIO nanoparticles for human use. Using our new method, 7-day cultured MSCs regain the capability to take up Ferumoxytol and exhibit an intracellular iron concentration of 2.50 ± 0.50 pg/MSC, comparable to that obtained by using Ferumoxytol-heparin-protamine nanocomplex; and (ii) cells can be re-sized to more native size, reducing from 32.0 ± 7.2 μm to 19.5 ± 5.2 μm. Our method can be very useful for expanding MSCs and labeling with Ferumoxytol, without the need for transfection agents and/or electroporation, allowing cell-tracking by MRI in both pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:27188664

  13. Synthesis of water-dispersible zinc oxide quantum dots with antibacterial activity and low cytotoxicity for cell labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shan-hui; Lin, Ying Yi; Huang, Sherry; Lem, Kwok Wai; Huong Nguyen, Dinh; Lee, Dai Soo

    2013-11-01

    Typical photoluminescent semiconductor nanoparticles, called quantum dots (QDs), have potential applications in biological labeling. When used to label stem cells, QDs may impair the differentiation capacity of the stem cells. In this study, we synthesized zinc oxide (ZnO) QDs in methanol with an average size of ∼2 nm. We then employed two different types of polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules (SH-PEG-NH2 and NH2-PEG-NH2) to conjugate ZnO QDs and made them water-dispersible. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra indicated the attachment of PEG molecules on ZnO QDs. No obvious size alteration was observed for ZnO QDs after PEG conjugation. The water-dispersible ZnO QDs still retained the antibacterial activity and fluorescence intensity. The cytotoxicity evaluation revealed that ZnO QDs at higher concentrations decreased cell viability but were generally safe at 30 ppm or below. Cell lines of hepatocytes (HepG2), osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were successfully labeled by the water-dispersible ZnO QDs at 30 ppm. The ZnO QD-labeled MSCs maintained their stemness and differentiation capacity. Therefore, we conclude that the water-dispersible ZnO QDs developed in this study have antibacterial activity, low cytotoxicity, and proper labeling efficiency, and can be used to label a variety of cells including stem cells.

  14. Photodamage of Lipid Bilayers by Irradiation of a Fluorescently Labeled Cell-Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Meerovich, Igor; Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Johnson, Gregory A.; Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Fluorescently labeled cell-penetrating peptides can translocate into cells by endocytosis and upon light irradiation, lyse the endocytic vesicles. This photo-inducible endosomolytic activity of Fl-CPPs can be used to efficiently deliver macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids and other small organic molecules into the cytosol of live cells. The requirement of a light trigger to induce photolysis provides a more spatial and temporal control to the intracellular delivery process. Methods In this report, we examine the molecular level mechanisms by which cell-penetrating peptides such as TAT when labeled with small organic fluorophore molecules acquire a photo-induced lytic activity using a simplified model of lipid vesicles. Results The peptide TAT labeled with 5(6)-carboxy-tetramethylrhodamine binds to negatively charged phospholipids, thereby bringing the fluorophore in close proximity to the membrane of liposomes. Upon light irradiation, the excited fluorophore produces reactive oxygen species at the lipid bilayer and oxidation of the membrane is achieved. In addition, the fluorescent peptide causes aggregation of photo-oxidized lipids, an activity that requires the presence of arginine residues in the peptide sequence. Conclusions These results suggest that the cell penetrating peptide plays a dual role. On one hand, TAT targets a conjugated fluorophore to membranes. On the other hand, TAT participates directly in the destabilization of photosensitized membranes. Peptide and fluorophore therefore appear to act in synergy to destroy membranes efficiently. General Significance Understanding the mechanism behind Fl-CPP mediated membrane photodamage will help to design optimally photo-endosomolytic compounds. PMID:24135456

  15. Transformation of cell-derived microparticles into quantum-dot-labeled nanovectors for antitumor siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhu, Jun-Yi; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Wei; Ren, Jian-Gang; Wu, Min; Hong, Zheng-Yuan; Lv, Cheng; Pang, Dai-Wen; Zhao, Yi-Fang

    2015-01-12

    Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) have been recently recognized as critical intercellular information conveyors. However, further understanding of their biological behavior and potential application has been hampered by the limitations of current labeling techniques. Herein, a universal donor-cell-assisted membrane biotinylation strategy was proposed for labeling MPs by skillfully utilizing the natural membrane phospholipid exchange of their donor cells. This innovative strategy conveniently led to specific, efficient, reproducible, and biocompatible quantum dot (QD) labeling of MPs, thereby reliably conferring valuable traceability on MPs. By further loading with small interference RNA, QD-labeled MPs that had inherent cell-targeting and biomolecule-conveying ability were successfully employed for combined bioimaging and tumor-targeted therapy. This study provides the first reliable and biofriendly strategy for transforming biogenic MPs into functionalized nanovectors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Using Genetically Encodable Self-Assembling Gd(III) Spin Labels To Make In-Cell Nanometric Distance Measurements.

    PubMed

    Mascali, Florencia C; Ching, H Y Vincent; Rasia, Rodolfo M; Un, Sun; Tabares, Leandro C

    2016-09-05

    Double electron-electron resonance (DEER) can be used to study the structure of a protein in its native cellular environment. Until now, this has required isolation, in vitro labeling, and reintroduction of the protein back into the cells. We describe a completely biosynthetic approach that avoids these steps. It exploits genetically encodable lanthanide-binding tags (LBT) to form self-assembling Gd(III) metal-based spin labels and enables direct in-cell measurements. This approach is demonstrated using a pair of LBTs encoded one at each end of a 3-helix bundle expressed in E. coli grown on Gd(III) -supplemented medium. DEER measurements directly on these cells produced readily detectable time traces from which the distance between the Gd(III) labels could be determined. This work is the first to use biosynthetically produced self-assembling metal-containing spin labels for non-disruptive in-cell structural measurements.

  17. Distinct populations of quiescent and proliferative pancreatic β-cells identified by HOTcre mediated labeling

    PubMed Central

    Hesselson, Daniel; Anderson, Ryan M.; Beinat, Marine; Stainier, Didier Y. R.

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cells are critical regulators of glucose homeostasis, and they vary dramatically in their glucose stimulated metabolic response and levels of insulin secretion. It is unclear whether these parameters are influenced by the developmental origin of individual β-cells. Using HOTcre, a Cre-based genetic switch that uses heat-induction to precisely control the temporal expression of transgenes, we labeled two populations of β-cells within the developing zebrafish pancreas. These populations originate in distinct pancreatic buds and exhibit gene expression profiles suggesting distinct functions during development. We find that the dorsal bud derived β-cells are quiescent and exhibit a marked decrease in insulin expression postembryonically. In contrast, ventral bud derived β-cells proliferate actively, and maintain high levels of insulin expression compared with dorsal bud derived β-cells. Therapeutic strategies to regulate β-cell proliferation and function are required to cure pathological states that result from excessive β-cell proliferation (e.g., insulinoma) or insufficient β-cell mass (e.g., diabetes mellitus). Our data reveal the existence of distinct populations of β-cells in vivo and should help develop better strategies to regulate β-cell differentiation and proliferation. PMID:19706417

  18. Selective labeling of living cells by a photo-triggered click reaction.

    PubMed

    Poloukhtine, Andrei A; Mbua, Ngalle Eric; Wolfert, Margreet A; Boons, Geert-Jan; Popik, Vladimir V

    2009-11-04

    Phototriggering of the metal-free azide to acetylene cycloaddition reaction was achieved by masking the triple bond of dibenzocyclooctynes as cyclopropenone. Such masked cyclooctynes do not react with azides in the dark. Irradiation of cyclopropenones results in the efficient (Phi(355) = 0.33) and clean regeneration of the corresponding dibenzocyclooctynes, which then undergo facile catalyst-free cycloadditions with azides to give corresponding triazoles under ambient conditions. In situ light activation of a cyclopropenone linked to biotin made it possible to label living cells expressing glycoproteins containing N-azidoacetyl-sialic acid. The cyclopropenone-based phototriggered click chemistry offers exciting opportunities to label living organisms in a temporally and spatially controlled manner and may facilitate the preparation of microarrays.

  19. Dynamic analysis of CO₂ labeling and cell respiration using membrane-inlet mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tae Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Here, we introduce a mass spectrometry-based analytical method and relevant technical details for dynamic cell respiration and CO2 labeling analysis. Such measurements can be utilized as additional information and constraints for model-based (13)C metabolic flux analysis. Dissolved dynamics of oxygen consumption and CO2 mass isotopomer evolution from (13)C-labeled tracer substrates through different cellular processes can be precisely measured on-line using a miniaturized reactor system equipped with a membrane-inlet mass spectrometer. The corresponding specific rates of physiologically relevant gases and CO2 mass isotopomers can be quantified within a short-term range based on the liquid-phase dynamics of dissolved fermentation gases.

  20. Effect of HSA coated iron oxide labeling on human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanganeria, Purva; Chandra, Sudeshna; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Khanna, Aparna

    2015-03-01

    Human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are known for self-renewal and differentiation into cells of various lineages like bone, cartilage and fat. They have been used in biomedical applications to treat degenerative disorders. However, to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells, there is a requirement of sensitive non-invasive imaging techniques which will offer the ability to track transplanted cells, bio-distribution, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we have analyzed the efficacy of human serum albumin coated iron oxide nanoparticles (HSA-IONPs) on the differentiation of hUC-MSCs. The colloidal stability of the HSA-IONPs was tested over a long period of time (≥20 months) and the optimized concentration of HSA-IONPs for labeling the stem cells was 60 μg ml-1. Detailed in vitro assays have been performed to ascertain the effect of the nanoparticles (NPs) on stem cells. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay showed minimum release of LDH depicting the least disruptions in cellular membrane. At the same time, mitochondrial impairment of the cells was also not observed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed lesser generation of reactive oxygen species in HSA-IONPs labeled hUC-MSCs in comparison to bare and commercial IONPs. Transmission electron microscopy showed endocytic engulfment of the NPs by the hUC-MSCs. During the process, the gross morphologies of the actin cytoskeleton were found to be intact as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy. Also, the engulfment of the HSA-IONPs did not show any detrimental effect on the differentiation potential of the stem cells into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, thereby confirming that the inherent properties of stem cells were maintained.

  1. Label retaining cells (LRCs) with myoepithelial characteristic from the proximal acinar region define stem cells in the sweat gland.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yvonne; Kandyba, Eve; Chen, Yi-Bu; Ruffins, Seth; Kobielak, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Slow cycling is a common feature shared among several stem cells (SCs) identified in adult tissues including hair follicle and cornea. Recently, existence of unipotent SCs in basal and lumenal layers of sweat gland (SG) has been described and label retaining cells (LRCs) have also been localized in SGs; however, whether these LRCs possess SCs characteristic has not been investigated further. Here, we used a H2BGFP LRCs system for in vivo detection of infrequently dividing cells. This system allowed us to specifically localize and isolate SCs with label-retention and myoepithelial characteristics restricted to the SG proximal acinar region. Using an alternative genetic approach, we demonstrated that SG LRCs expressed keratin 15 (K15) in the acinar region and lineage tracing determined that K15 labeled cells contributed long term to the SG structure but not to epidermal homeostasis. Surprisingly, wound healing experiments did not activate proximal acinar SG cells to participate in epidermal healing. Instead, predominantly non-LRCs in the SG duct actively divided, whereas the majority of SG LRCs remained quiescent. However, when we further challenged the system under more favorable isolated wound healing conditions, we were able to trigger normally quiescent acinar LRCs to trans-differentiate into the epidermis and adopt its long term fate. In addition, dissociated SG cells were able to regenerate SGs and, surprisingly, hair follicles demonstrating their in vivo plasticity. By determining the gene expression profile of isolated SG LRCs and non-LRCs in vivo, we identified several Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) pathway genes to be up-regulated and confirmed a functional requirement for BMP receptor 1A (BMPR1A)-mediated signaling in SG formation. Our data highlight the existence of SG stem cells (SGSCs) and their primary importance in SG homeostasis. It also emphasizes SGSCs as an alternative source of cells in wound healing and their plasticity for regenerating

  2. Label Retaining Cells (LRCs) with Myoepithelial Characteristic from the Proximal Acinar Region Define Stem Cells in the Sweat Gland

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Yvonne; Kandyba, Eve; Chen, Yi-Bu; Ruffins, Seth; Kobielak, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Slow cycling is a common feature shared among several stem cells (SCs) identified in adult tissues including hair follicle and cornea. Recently, existence of unipotent SCs in basal and lumenal layers of sweat gland (SG) has been described and label retaining cells (LRCs) have also been localized in SGs; however, whether these LRCs possess SCs characteristic has not been investigated further. Here, we used a H2BGFP LRCs system for in vivo detection of infrequently dividing cells. This system allowed us to specifically localize and isolate SCs with label-retention and myoepithelial characteristics restricted to the SG proximal acinar region. Using an alternative genetic approach, we demonstrated that SG LRCs expressed keratin 15 (K15) in the acinar region and lineage tracing determined that K15 labeled cells contributed long term to the SG structure but not to epidermal homeostasis. Surprisingly, wound healing experiments did not activate proximal acinar SG cells to participate in epidermal healing. Instead, predominantly non-LRCs in the SG duct actively divided, whereas the majority of SG LRCs remained quiescent. However, when we further challenged the system under more favorable isolated wound healing conditions, we were able to trigger normally quiescent acinar LRCs to trans-differentiate into the epidermis and adopt its long term fate. In addition, dissociated SG cells were able to regenerate SGs and, surprisingly, hair follicles demonstrating their in vivo plasticity. By determining the gene expression profile of isolated SG LRCs and non-LRCs in vivo, we identified several Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) pathway genes to be up-regulated and confirmed a functional requirement for BMP receptor 1A (BMPR1A)-mediated signaling in SG formation. Our data highlight the existence of SG stem cells (SGSCs) and their primary importance in SG homeostasis. It also emphasizes SGSCs as an alternative source of cells in wound healing and their plasticity for regenerating

  3. Up-dated catalogue of HeLa cell proteins: percentages and characteristics of the major cell polypeptides labeled with a mixture of 16 /sup 14/C-labeled amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, R.; Celis, J.E.

    1982-04-01

    A total of 1357 polypeptides (946 acidic (isoelectric focusing) and 411 basic (nonequilibrium pH-gradient electrophoresis)) from human HeLa cells have been separated and catalogued with use of high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Of these polypeptides, 1266 were detected by labeling cells with (/sup 35/S)methionine, while the rest were revealed by silver staining or by labeling with a mixture of 16 /sup 14/C-labeled amino acids. For convenience, all these polypeptides have been numbered and are indicated in a large fold-out protein map. The percentages of the major /sup 14/C-labeled proteins have been determined, and for some we list a few characteristics such as: variation during the cell cycle; cellular distribution in cytoplasts and karyoplasts; presence in Triton- and salt-extracted cytoskeletons; and phosphorylation and sensitivity to neoplastic transformation.

  4. A rapid and fluorogenic TMP-AcBOPDIPY probe for covalent labeling of proteins in live cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Li, Fu; Chen, Xi; Hou, Jian; Yi, Long; Wu, Yao-Wen

    2014-03-26

    Protein labeling is enormously useful for characterizing protein function in cells and organisms. Chemical tagging methods have emerged as a new generation protein labeling strategy in live cells. Here we have developed a novel and versatile TMP-AcBOPDIPY probe for selective and turn-on labeling of proteins in live cells. A small monomeric tag, E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (eDHFR), was rationally designed to introduce a cysteine in the vicinity of the ligand binding site. Trimethoprim (TMP) that specifically binds to eDHFR was linked to the BOPDIPY fluorophore containing a mildly thiol-reactive acrylamide group. TMP-AcBOPDIPY rapidly labeled engineered eDHFR tags via a reaction termed affinity conjugation (a half-life of ca. 2 min), which is one of the top fast chemical probes for protein labeling. The probe displays 2-fold fluorescence enhancement upon labeling of proteins. We showed that the probe specifically labeled intracellular proteins in live cells without and with washing out the dye. We demonstrated its utility in visualizing intracellular processes by fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements.

  5. Near-infrared emitting fluorescent nanocrystals-labeled natural killer cells as a platform technology for the optical imaging of immunotherapeutic cells-based cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taik Lim, Yong; Cho, Mi Young; Noh, Young-Woock; Chung, Jin Woong; Chung, Bong Hyun

    2009-11-01

    This study describes the development of near-infrared optical imaging technology for the monitoring of immunotherapeutic cell-based cancer therapy using natural killer (NK) cells labeled with fluorescent nanocrystals. Although NK cell-based immunotherapeutic strategies have drawn interest as potent preclinical or clinical methods of cancer therapy, there are few reports documenting the molecular imaging of NK cell-based cancer therapy, primarily due to the difficulty of labeling of NK cells with imaging probes. Human natural killer cells (NK92MI) were labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated quantum dots (QD705) for fluorescence imaging. FACS analysis showed that the NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 have no effect on the cell viability. The effect of anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 labeling on the NK92MI cell function was investigated by measuring interferon gamma (IFN- γ) production and cytolytic activity. Finally, the NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated QD705 showed a therapeutic effect similar to that of unlabeled NK92MI cells. Images of intratumorally injected NK92MI cells labeled with anti-human CD56 antibody-coated could be acquired using near-infrared optical imaging both in vivo and in vitro. This result demonstrates that the immunotherapeutic cells labeled with fluorescent nanocrystals can be a versatile platform for the effective tracking of injected therapeutic cells using optical imaging technology, which is very important in cell-based cancer therapies.

  6. Labeling live cells by copper-catalyzed alkyne--azide click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hong, Vu; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Manchester, Marianne; Finn, M G

    2010-10-20

    The copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction, optimized for biological molecules in aqueous buffers, has been shown to rapidly label mammalian cells in culture with no loss in cell viability. Metabolic uptake and display of the azide derivative of N-acetylmannosamine developed by Bertozzi, followed by CuAAC ligation using sodium ascorbate and the ligand tris(hydroxypropyltriazolyl)methylamine (THPTA), gave rise to abundant covalent attachment of dye-alkyne reactants. THPTA serves both to accelerate the CuAAC reaction and to protect the cells from damage by oxidative agents produced by the Cu-catalyzed reduction of oxygen by ascorbate, which is required to maintain the metal in the active +1 oxidation state. This procedure extends the application of this fastest of azide-based bioorthogonal reactions to the exterior of living cells.

  7. Efficacy of astatine-211-labeled monoclonal antibody in treatment of murine T-cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, A.; Royle, L.

    1987-01-01

    The short-lived isotope /sup 211/At (half-life, 7.2 hr), an alpha particle-emitting halogen, has been attached to a monoclonal antibody (anti-thy 1.1, IgG1, OX7) and used in mice in the treatment of a thy 1.1 T-cell lymphoma (A120). Forty-eight hours after receiving an iv injection of 10(3) or 10(5) A120 cells, mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline, /sup 211/At-, antibody alone, or /sup 211/At conjugated to OX7. Treatment with the /sup 211/At-labeled OX7 conjugate increased the median survival time of mice and probably cured (survival at 200 days) 6 of the 15 mice given 10(5) cells and 21 of the 27 mice given 10(3) cells.

  8. Bone marrow long label-retaining cells reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic niche

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Yoshiaki; Takubo, Keiyo; Suda, Toshio

    2008-02-08

    In response to changing signals, quiescent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be induced to an activated cycling state and provide multi-lineage hematopoietic cells to the whole body via blood vessels. However, the precise localization of quiescent HSCs in bone marrow microenvironment is not fully characterized. Here, we performed whole-mount immunostaining of bone marrow and found that BrdU label-retaining cells (LRCs) definitively reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic zone distant from the 'vascular niche'. Although LRCs expressed very low level of a well-known HSC marker, c-kit in normal circumstances, myeloablation by 5-FU treatment caused LRCs to abundantly express c-kit and proliferate actively. These results demonstrate that bone marrow LRCs reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic niche, and function as a regenerative cell pool of HSCs.

  9. Labeling Live Cells by Copper-Catalyzed Alkyne-Azide Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Vu; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Manchester, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    The copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction, optimized for biological molecules in aqueous buffers, has been shown to rapidly label mammalian cells in culture with no loss in cell viability. Metabolic uptake and display of the azide derivative of N-acetylmannosamine developed by Bertozzi, followed by CuAAC ligation using sodium ascorbate and the ligand tris(hydroxypropyltriazolyl)methylamine (THPTA), gave rise to abundant covalent attachment of dye-alkyne reactants. THPTA serves both to accelerate the CuAAC reaction and to protect the cells from damage by oxidative agents produced by the Cu-catalyzed reduction of oxygen by ascorbate, which is required to maintain the metal in the active +1 oxidation state. This procedure extends the application of this fastest of azide-based bioorthogonal reactions to the exterior of living cells. PMID:20886827

  10. Label-free biochemical characterization of bovine sperm cells using Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, A. C.; Manago, S.; Ferrara, M. A.; Sirleto, L.; Puglisi, R.; Balduzzi, D.; Galli, A.; Rendina, I.; Ferraro, P.; Coppola, G.

    2013-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a label-free and non-invasive method that measures the inelastic scattered light from a sample giving insight into the vibration eigenmodes of the excited molecules. For these reasons, Raman spectroscopy has been used as a powerful tool to investigate different biological tissues and living cells. In this paper, we present a Raman spectroscopy-based method for sensitive biochemical characterization of bovine sperm cells. Importantly, by analysing separate Raman spectra from the nucleus, acrosomale vesicle and tail of single sperm cells, we are able to identify characteristic Raman features associated with DNA, protein and lipid molecular vibrations for discriminating among different locations inside the cell with sub-micrometric resolution (˜0.3 μm). We demonstrate that our Raman spectroscopy facilitates spectral assignment and increases detection sensitivity, opening the way for novel bio-imaging platforms.

  11. SERS imaging of cell-surface biomolecules metabolically labeled with bioorthogonal Raman reporters.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ming; Lin, Liang; Li, Zefan; Liu, Jie; Hong, Senlian; Li, Yaya; Zheng, Meiling; Duan, Xuanming; Chen, Xing

    2014-08-01

    Live imaging of biomolecules with high specificity and sensitivity as well as minimal perturbation is essential for studying cellular processes. Here, we report the development of a bioorthogonal surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging approach that exploits small Raman reporters for visualizing cell-surface biomolecules. The cells were cultured and imaged by SERS microscopy on arrays of Raman-enhancing nanoparticles coated on silicon wafers or glass slides. The Raman reporters including azides, alkynes, and carbondeuterium bonds are small in size and spectroscopically bioorthogonal (background-free). We demonstrated that various cell-surface biomolecules including proteins, glycans, and lipids were metabolically incorporated with the corresponding precursors bearing a Raman reporter and visualized by SERS microscopy. The coupling of SERS microscopy with bioorthogonal Raman reporters expands the capabilities of live-cell microscopy beyond the modalities of fluorescence and label-free imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Optical painting and fluorescence activated sorting of single adherent cells labelled with photoswitchable Pdots

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chun-Ting; Thompson, Alison M.; Gallina, Maria Elena; Ye, Fangmao; Johnson, Eleanor S.; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Mengxia; Yu, Jiangbo; Wu, I-Che; Fujimoto, Bryant; DuFort, Christopher C.; Carlson, Markus A.; Hingorani, Sunil R.; Paguirigan, Amy L.; Radich, Jerald P.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    The efficient selection and isolation of individual cells of interest from a mixed population is desired in many biomedical and clinical applications. Here we show the concept of using photoswitchable semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) as an optical ‘painting' tool, which enables the selection of certain adherent cells based on their fluorescence, and their spatial and morphological features, under a microscope. We first develop a Pdot that can switch between the bright (ON) and dark (OFF) states reversibly with a 150-fold contrast ratio on irradiation with ultraviolet or red light. With a focused 633-nm laser beam that acts as a ‘paintbrush' and the photoswitchable Pdots as the ‘paint', we select and ‘paint' individual Pdot-labelled adherent cells by turning on their fluorescence, then proceed to sort and recover the optically marked cells (with 90% recovery and near 100% purity), followed by genetic analysis. PMID:27118210

  13. Label-Free Imaging of Dynamic and Transient Calcium Signaling in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin; Li, Jinghong

    2015-11-09

    Cell signaling consists of diverse events that occur at various temporal and spatial scales, ranging from milliseconds to hours and from single biomolecules to cell populations. The pathway complexities require the development of new techniques that detect the overall signaling activities and are not limited to quantifying a single event. A plasmonic-based electrochemical impedance microscope (P-EIM) that can provide such data with excellent temporal and spatial resolution and does not require the addition of any labels for detection has now been developed. The highly dynamic and transient calcium signaling activities at the early stage of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation were thus studied. It could be shown that a subpopulation of cells is more responsive towards agonist stimulation, and the heterogeneity of the local distributions and the transient activities of the ion channels during agonist-activated calcium flux in single HeLa cells were investigated.

  14. Abcg2 labels multiple cell types in skeletal muscle and participates in muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Michelle J.; Zhou, Sheng; Tanaka, Kathleen Kelly; Pisconti, Addolorata; Farina, Nicholas H.; Sorrentino, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contains progenitor cells (satellite cells) that maintain and repair muscle. It also contains muscle side population (SP) cells, which express Abcg2 and may participate in muscle regeneration or may represent a source of satellite cell replenishment. In Abcg2-null mice, the SP fraction is lost in skeletal muscle, although the significance of this loss was previously unknown. We show that cells expressing Abcg2 increased upon injury and that muscle regeneration was impaired in Abcg2-null mice, resulting in fewer centrally nucleated myofibers, reduced myofiber size, and fewer satellite cells. Additionally, using genetic lineage tracing, we demonstrate that the progeny of Abcg2-expressing cells contributed to multiple cell types within the muscle interstitium, primarily endothelial cells. After injury, Abcg2 progeny made a minor contribution to regenerated myofibers. Furthermore, Abcg2-labeled cells increased significantly upon injury and appeared to traffic to muscle from peripheral blood. Together, these data suggest an important role for Abcg2 in positively regulating skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:21949413

  15. A Simple Method for Labeling Human Embryonic Stem Cells Destined to Lose Undifferentiated Potency

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Ayako; Suga, Mika; Yanagihara, Kana; Itoh, Yumi; Furue, Miho K.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is a major source of cellular ATP. Its usage as an energy source varies, not only according to the extracellular environment, but also during development and differentiation, as indicated by the reported changes in the flux ratio of glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. The fluorescent probe JC-1 allows visualization of changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential produced by oxidative phosphorylation. Strong JC-1 signals were localized in the differentiated cells located at the edge of H9 ES colonies that expressed vimentin, an early differentiation maker. The JC-1 signals were further intensified when individual adjacent colonies were in contact with each other. Time-lapse analyses revealed that JC-1-labeled H9 cells under an overconfluent condition were highly differentiated after subculture, suggesting that monitoring oxidative phosphorylation in live cells might facilitate the prediction of induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as ES cells, that are destined to lose their undifferentiated potency. Significance Skillful cell manipulation is a major factor in both maintaining and disrupting the undifferentiation potency of human embryonic stem (hES) cells. Staining with JC-1, a mitochondrial membrane potential probe, is a simple monitoring method that can be used to predict embryonic stem cell quality under live conditions, which might help ensure the future use of hES and human induced pluripotent stem cells after subculture. PMID:26819254

  16. In Vitro Osteogenic Potential of Green Fluorescent Protein Labelled Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Osteoprogenitors

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Gopu; Li, Mingming; Zou, Yu; Li, Lulu; Handral, Harish K.; Rosa, Vinicus; Cao, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapy using stem cells in bone regeneration has gained increasing interest. Various studies suggest the clinical utility of osteoprogenitors-like mesenchymal stem cells in bone regeneration. However, limited availability of mesenchymal stem cells and conflicting evidence on their therapeutic efficacy limit their clinical application. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are potentially an unlimited source of healthy and functional osteoprogenitors (OPs) that could be utilized for bone regenerative applications. However, limited ability to track hESC-derived progenies in vivo greatly hinders translational studies. Hence, in this study, we aimed to establish hESC-derived OPs (hESC-OPs) expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and to investigate their osteogenic differentiation potential in vitro. We fluorescently labelled H9-hESCs using a plasmid vector encoding GFP. The GFP-expressing hESCs were differentiated into hESC-OPs. The hESC-OPsGFP+ stably expressed high levels of GFP, CD73, CD90, and CD105. They possessed osteogenic differentiation potential in vitro as demonstrated by increased expression of COL1A1, RUNX2, OSTERIX, and OPG transcripts and mineralized nodules positive for Alizarin Red and immunocytochemical expression of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, and collagen-I. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that fluorescently labelled hESC-OPs can maintain their GFP expression for the long term and their potential for osteogenic differentiation in vitro. In future, these fluorescently labelled hESC-OPs could be used for noninvasive assessment of bone regeneration, safety, and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:28003831

  17. (18)F-FDG-labeled red blood cell PET for blood-pool imaging: preclinical evaluation in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsusaka, Yohji; Nakahara, Tadaki; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Iwabuchi, Yu; Nishime, Chiyoko; Kajimura, Mayumi; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-12-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) labeled with single-photon emitters have been clinically used for blood-pool imaging. Although some PET tracers have been introduced for blood-pool imaging, they have not yet been widely used. The present study investigated the feasibility of labeling RBCs with (18)F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) for blood-pool imaging with PET. RBCs isolated from venous blood of rats were washed with glucose-free phosphate-buffered saline and labeled with (18)F-FDG. To optimize labeling efficiency, the effects of glucose deprivation time and incubation (labeling) time with (18)F-FDG were investigated. Post-labeling stability was assessed by calculating the release fraction of radioactivity and identifying the chemical forms of (18)F in the released and intracellular components of (18)F-FDG-labeled RBCs incubated in plasma. Just after intravenous injection of the optimized autologous (18)F-FDG-labeled RBCs, dynamic PET scans were performed to evaluate in vivo imaging in normal rats and intraabdominal bleeding models (temporary and persistent bleeding). The optimal durations of glucose deprivation and incubation (labeling) with (18)F-FDG were 60 and 30 min, respectively. As low as 10% of (18)F was released as the form of (18)F-FDG from (18)F-FDG-labeled RBCs after a 60-min incubation. Dynamic PET images of normal rats showed strong persistence in the cardiovascular system for at least 120 min. In the intraabdominal bleeding models, (18)F-FDG-labeled RBC PET visualized the extravascular blood clearly and revealed the dynamic changes of the extravascular radioactivity in the temporary and persistent bleeding. RBCs can be effectively labeled with (18)F-FDG and used for blood-pool imaging with PET in rats.

  18. Label-free nonlinear optical microscopy detects early markers for osteogenic differentiation of human stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofemeier, Arne D.; Hachmeister, Henning; Pilger, Christian; Schürmann, Matthias; Greiner, Johannes F. W.; Nolte, Lena; Sudhoff, Holger; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Huser, Thomas; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    Tissue engineering by stem cell differentiation is a novel treatment option for bone regeneration. Most approaches for the detection of osteogenic differentiation are invasive or destructive and not compatible with live cell analysis. Here, non-destructive and label-free approaches of Raman spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy were used to detect and image osteogenic differentiation of human neural crest-derived inferior turbinate stem cells (ITSCs). Combined CARS and SHG microscopy was able to detect markers of osteogenesis within 14 days after osteogenic induction. This process increased during continued differentiation. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy showed significant increases of the PO43- symmetric stretch vibrations at 959 cm-1 assigned to calcium hydroxyapatite between days 14 and 21. Additionally, CARS microscopy was able to image calcium hydroxyapatite deposits within 14 days following osteogenic induction, which was confirmed by Alizarin Red-Staining and RT- PCR. Taken together, the multimodal label-free analysis methods Raman spectroscopy, CARS and SHG microscopy can monitor osteogenic differentiation of adult human stem cells into osteoblasts with high sensitivity and spatial resolution in three dimensions. Our findings suggest a great potential of these optical detection methods for clinical applications including in vivo observation of bone tissue-implant-interfaces or disease diagnosis.

  19. Anthracycline photoaffinity labeling of a mitochondrial polypeptide in P388 murine leukemic cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Averbuch, S.D.; Glover, C.J.; Felsted, R.L.

    1986-12-01

    N-(p-Azido(3,5-/sup 3/H)benzoyl)daunorubicin ((/sup 3/H)NABD), a radioactive photoactive anthracycline analogue, was used to photoaffinity label anthracycline binding polypeptides in P388 murine leukemic cell lines. Whole cell homogenates were mixed with 6 X 10(-8) M (/sup 3/H)NABD, exposed to ultraviolet light, and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for radiolabel incorporation. Autoradiofluorography showed incorporation of radioactivity into a Mr 18,000 component independent of polypeptides prominently stained with Coomassie blue. Photolabeling of subcellular fractions showed predominant mitochondrial localization of the Mr 18,000 radiolabel. The protein composition of the photolabeled constituents was confirmed by treatment with proteinase K, DNase and RNase, or by lipid extraction with organic solvent. (/sup 3/H)NABD photolabeling of homogenates from anthracycline sensitive and resistant cells resulted in Mr 18,000 radiolabel incorporation of 3966 +/- 355 and 6487 +/- 533 dpm per 50 micrograms cellular protein for anthracycline sensitive and resistant cells, respectively (P less than 0.005). These studies characterize the photoaffinity labeling of a low molecular weight mitochondrial polypeptide using a photoactive anthracycline analogue. The role for this polypeptide as a mediator of anthracycline activity remains to be determined.

  20. A system for automatically scanning tissue culture dishes to detect fluorescently labeled cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Seth R.; Guan-Xiong, Zhou; Siegel, Ruth E.; Brownstein, Michael J.

    1989-07-01

    A microprocessor-controlled system has been developed to automatically scan tissue culture dishes in order to detect and locate fluorescently labeled cell colonies for subsequent cloning. An X-Y recorder mechanism moves an 80-mm-diam dish in a raster scan through a stationary laser beam adjacent to a photomultiplier tube equipped with an emission filter. Front-end electronics processes the PMT signal to screen out small-scale fluorescent artifacts of selectable size (e.g., <0.2 mm). Appropriate signals are input to the computer which then interrupts the raster scan to perform a limited fine scan of the dish to accurately localize the fluorescent spot position. An additional artifact test using a different filter is then performed. The underside of the dish is scribed at the location of spots that pass this test. Using fluorescein as a label, fluorescence as low as 25% above intrinsic cell background fluorescence can be detected. The fluorescence signal level threshhold can be set (e.g., 70% above intrinsic cell background) to within an accuracy of approximately 15% of intrinsic cell background fluorescence, and the system will reliably find colonies with a signal exceeding that level. With the above typical values, the number of false positives is typically less than five per dish and the time to completely scan an 80-mm-diam tissue culture dish is 2-4 min.

  1. Quantifying size-dependent interactions between fluorescently labeled polystyrene nanoparticles and mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nanoparticles (NPs) are currently used in a wide variety of fields such as technology, medicine and industry. Due to the novelty of these applications and to ensure their success, a precise characterization of the interactions between NPs and cells is essential. Findings The current study explores the uptake of polystyrene NPs by 1321N1 human astrocytoma and A549 human lung carcinoma cell lines. In this work we show for the first time a comparison of the uptake rates of fluorescently labeled carboxylated polystyrene (PS) NPs of different sizes (20, 40 and 100 nm) in two different cell types, keeping the number of NPs per unit volume constant for all sizes. We propose a reliable methodology to control the dose of fluorescently labeled NPs, by counting individual NPs using automated particle detection from 3D confocal microscopy images. The possibility of detecting individual NPs also allowed us to calculate the size of each nanoparticle and compare the fluorescence of single NPs across different sizes, thereby providing a robust platform for normalization of NP internalization experiments as measured by flow cytometry. Conclusions Our findings show that 40 nm NPs are internalized faster than 20 nm or 100 nm particles in both cell lines studied, suggesting that there is a privileged size gap in which the internalization of NPs is higher. PMID:23006133

  2. Detecting molecules and cells labeled with magnetic particles using an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dindi; Ruangchaithaweesuk, Songtham; Yao, Li; Xu, Shoujun

    2012-09-01

    The detection of magnetically labeled molecules and cells involves three essential parameters: sensitivity, spatial resolution, and molecular specificity. We report on the use of atomic magnetometry and its derivative techniques to achieve high performance in terms of all these parameters. With a sensitivity of 80 fT/√Hz for dc magnetic fields, we show that 7,000 streptavidin-conjugated magnetic microparticles magnetized by a permanent magnet produce a magnetic field of 650 pT; this result predicts that a single such particle can be detected during one second of signal averaging. Spatial information is obtained using a scanning magnetic imaging scheme. The spatial resolution is 20 μm with a detection distance of more than 1 cm; this distance is much longer than that in previous reports. The molecular specificity is achieved using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy, which currently uses an atomic magnetometer for detection. As an example, we perform measurement of magnetically labeled human CD4+ T cells, whose count in the blood is the diagnostic criterion for human immunodeficiency virus infection. Magnetic particles that are specifically bound to the cells are resolved from nonspecifically bound particles and quantitatively correlate with the number of cells. The magnetic particles have an overall size of 2.8 μm, with a magnetic core in nanometer regime. The combination of our techniques is predicted to be useful in molecular and cellular imaging.

  3. Label-free nonlinear optical microscopy detects early markers for osteogenic differentiation of human stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hofemeier, Arne D.; Hachmeister, Henning; Pilger, Christian; Schürmann, Matthias; Greiner, Johannes F. W.; Nolte, Lena; Sudhoff, Holger; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Huser, Thomas; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering by stem cell differentiation is a novel treatment option for bone regeneration. Most approaches for the detection of osteogenic differentiation are invasive or destructive and not compatible with live cell analysis. Here, non-destructive and label-free approaches of Raman spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy were used to detect and image osteogenic differentiation of human neural crest-derived inferior turbinate stem cells (ITSCs). Combined CARS and SHG microscopy was able to detect markers of osteogenesis within 14 days after osteogenic induction. This process increased during continued differentiation. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy showed significant increases of the PO43− symmetric stretch vibrations at 959 cm−1 assigned to calcium hydroxyapatite between days 14 and 21. Additionally, CARS microscopy was able to image calcium hydroxyapatite deposits within 14 days following osteogenic induction, which was confirmed by Alizarin Red-Staining and RT- PCR. Taken together, the multimodal label-free analysis methods Raman spectroscopy, CARS and SHG microscopy can monitor osteogenic differentiation of adult human stem cells into osteoblasts with high sensitivity and spatial resolution in three dimensions. Our findings suggest a great potential of these optical detection methods for clinical applications including in vivo observation of bone tissue–implant-interfaces or disease diagnosis. PMID:27225821

  4. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jianwei; Yao, Peng; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Qunye

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs. Methods and Results Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye) could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela) and suspended cells (K562) even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein) to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it. Conclusions These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results. PMID

  5. In Vivo Labeling of Adult Neural Progenitors for MRI with Micron Sized Particles of Iron Oxide: Quantitation of Labeled Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, James P.; Shapiro, Erik M.; Maric, Dragan; Conroy, Richard; Koretsky, Alan P.

    2009-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is a continual source of neural progenitors throughout adulthood. Many of the animal models designed to study the migration of these cells from the ventricle to places of interest like the olfactory bulb or an injury site require histology to localize precursor cells. Here, it is demonstrated that up to 30% of the neural progenitors that migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) in an adult rodent can be labeled for MRI via intraventricular injection of micron sized particles of iron oxide (MPIOs). The precursors migrating from the SVZ along the RMS were found to populate the olfactory bulb with all three types of neural cells; neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes. In all cases 10-30% of these cells were labeled in the RMS en route to the olfactory bulb. Ara-C an anti-mitotic agent eliminated precursor cells at the SVZ, RMS, and olfactory bulb and also eliminated the MRI detection of the precursors. This indicates that MRI signal detected is due to progenitor cells that leave the SVZ and is not due to non-specific diffusion of MPIOs. Using MRI to visualize neural progenitor cell behavior in individual animals during plasticity or disease models should be a useful tool, especially in combination with other information that MRI can supply. PMID:18722534

  6. Novel MMP-9 substrates in cancer cells revealed by a label-free quantitative proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Danmei; Suenaga, Naoko; Edelmann, Mariola J; Fridman, Rafael; Muschel, Ruth J; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2008-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is implicated in tumor metastasis as well as a variety of inflammatory and pathological processes. Although many substrates for MMP-9, including components of the extracellular matrix, soluble mediators such as chemokines, and cell surface molecules have been identified, we undertook a more comprehensive proteomics-based approach to identify new substrates to further understand how MMP-9 might contribute to tumor metastasis. Previous proteomics approaches to identify protease substrates have depended upon differential labeling of each sample. Instead we used a label-free quantitative proteomics approach based on ultraperformance LC-ESI-high/low collision energy MS. Conditioned medium from a human metastatic prostate cancer cell line, PC-3ML, in which MMP-9 had been down-regulated by RNA interference was compared with that from the parental cells. From more than 200 proteins identified, 69 showed significant alteration in levels after depletion of the protease (>+/-2-fold), suggesting that they might be candidate substrates. Levels of six of these (amyloid-beta precursor protein, collagen VI, leukemia inhibitory factor, neuropilin-1, prostate cancer cell-derived growth factor (PCDGF), and protease nexin-1 (PN-1)) were tested in the conditioned media by immunoblotting. There was a strong correlation between results by ultraperformance LC-ESI-high/low collision energy MS and by immunoblotting giving credence to the label-free approach. Further information about MMP-9 cleavage was obtained by comparison of the peptide coverage of collagen VI in the presence and absence of MMP-9 showing increased sensitivity of the C- and N-terminal globular regions over the helical regions. Susceptibility of PN-1 and leukemia inhibitory factor to MMP-9 degradation was confirmed by in vitro incubation of the recombinant proteins with recombinant MMP-9. The MMP-9 cleavage sites in PN-1 were sequenced. This study provides a new label-free method for

  7. High Throughput Label Free Measurement of Cancer Cell Adhesion Kinetics Under Hemodynamic Flow.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Adrianne; Baker, Aaron B

    2016-01-27

    The kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and adherent cell monolayers plays a key role in many physiological and pathological processes including cancer metastasis. Within this process the presence of fluidic shear forces is a key regulator of binding equilibrium and kinetics of cell adhesion. Current techniques to examine the kinetics of cell adhesion are either performed in the absence of flow or are low throughput, limiting their application to pharmacological compound screening or the high throughput investigation of biological mechanisms. We developed a high throughput flow device that applies flow in a multi-well format and interfaced this system with electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system to allow label free detection of cell adhesion. We demonstrate that this combined system is capable of making real time measurements of cancer cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and immobilized platelets. In addition, we examined the dependence of the kinetics of binding of cancer cells on the level of shear stress and in the presence of small molecule inhibitors to adhesion-related pathways. This versatile system is broadly adaptable to the high throughput study of cell adhesion kinetics for many applications including drug screening and the investigation of the mechanisms of cancer metastasis.

  8. Noninvasive and label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Wei, Xunbin

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Circulating melanoma cell has high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC). PAFC is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. In our research, we developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting PA signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals were detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtained the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation. Our PAFC system is an efficient tool to monitor melanoma metastases, cancer recurrence and therapeutic efficacy.

  9. High Throughput Label Free Measurement of Cancer Cell Adhesion Kinetics Under Hemodynamic Flow

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Adrianne; Baker, Aaron B.

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and adherent cell monolayers plays a key role in many physiological and pathological processes including cancer metastasis. Within this process the presence of fluidic shear forces is a key regulator of binding equilibrium and kinetics of cell adhesion. Current techniques to examine the kinetics of cell adhesion are either performed in the absence of flow or are low throughput, limiting their application to pharmacological compound screening or the high throughput investigation of biological mechanisms. We developed a high throughput flow device that applies flow in a multi-well format and interfaced this system with electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system to allow label free detection of cell adhesion. We demonstrate that this combined system is capable of making real time measurements of cancer cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and immobilized platelets. In addition, we examined the dependence of the kinetics of binding of cancer cells on the level of shear stress and in the presence of small molecule inhibitors to adhesion-related pathways. This versatile system is broadly adaptable to the high throughput study of cell adhesion kinetics for many applications including drug screening and the investigation of the mechanisms of cancer metastasis. PMID:26816215

  10. Relation between clinical mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood and their spatial label free scattering patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Zhenxi; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Li

    2016-07-01

    A single living cell's light scattering pattern (LSP) in the horizontal plane, which has been denoted as the cell's "2D fingerprint," may provide a powerful label-free detection tool in clinical applications. We have recently studied the LSP in spatial scattering planes, denoted as the cell's "3D fingerprint," for mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood. The effects of membrane size, morphology, and the existence of the nucleus on the spatial LSP are discussed. In order to distinguish clinical label-free mature and immature lymphocytes, the special features of the spatial LSP are studied by statistical method in both the spatial and frequency domains. Spatial LSP provides rich information on the cell's morphology and contents, which can distinguish mature from immature lymphocyte cells and hence ultimately it may be a useful label-free technique for clinical leukemia diagnosis.

  11. Perylene-labeled silica nanoparticles: synthesis and characterization of three novel silica nanoparticle species for live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Blechinger, Julia; Herrmann, Rudolf; Kiener, Daniel; García-García, F Javier; Scheu, Christina; Reller, Armin; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2010-11-05

    The increasing exposure of humans to nanoscaled particles requires well-defined systems that enable the investigation of the toxicity of nanoparticles on the cellular level. To facilitate this, surface-labeled silica nanoparticles, nanoparticles with a labeled core and a silica shell, and a labeled nanoparticle network-all designed for live-cell imaging-are synthesized. The nanoparticles are functionalized with perylene derivatives. For this purpose, two different perylene species containing one or two reactive silica functionalities are prepared. The nanoparticles are studied by transmission electron microscopy, widefield and confocal fluorescence microscopy, as well as by fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with fluorescence anisotropy, in order to characterize the size and morphology of the nanoparticles and to prove the success and homogeneity of the labeling. Using spinning-disc confocal measurements, silica nanoparticles are demonstrated to be taken up by HeLa cells, and they are clearly detectable inside the cytoplasm of the cells.

  12. Cryopreservation of embryonic stem cell-derived multicellular neural aggregates labeled with micron-sized particles of iron oxide for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuanwei; Sart, Sébastien; Calixto Bejarano, Fabian; Muroski, Megan E; Strouse, Geoffrey F; Grant, Samuel C; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an effective approach to track labeled pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) for neurological disorder treatments after cell labeling with a contrast agent, such as an iron oxide derivative. Cryopreservation of pre-labeled neural cells, especially in three-dimensional (3D) structure, can provide a uniform cell population and preserve the stem cell niche for the subsequent applications. In this study, the effects of cryopreservation on PSC-derived multicellular NPC aggregates labeled with micron-sized particles of iron oxide (MPIO) were investigated. These NPC aggregates were labeled prior to cryopreservation because labeling thawed cells can be limited by inefficient intracellular uptake, variations in labeling efficiency, and increased culture time before use, minimizing their translation to clinical settings. The results indicated that intracellular MPIO incorporation was retained after cryopreservation (70-80% labeling efficiency), and MPIO labeling had little adverse effects on cell recovery, proliferation, cytotoxicity and neural lineage commitment post-cryopreservation. MRI analysis showed comparable detectability for the MPIO-labeled cells before and after cryopreservation indicated by T2 and T2* relaxation rates. Cryopreserving MPIO-labeled 3D multicellular NPC aggregates can be applied in in vivo cell tracking studies and lead to more rapid translation from preservation to clinical implementation.

  13. A label-free cytosensor for the enhanced electrochemical detection of cancer cells using polydopamine-coated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Rui; Zou, Lanfang; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2012-03-21

    An electrochemical, label-free method was developed to detect folate receptor positive tumor cells by specific recognition of a polydopamine-coated carbon nanotubes-folate nanoprobe to cell-surface folate receptors. This strategy offers great promise to extend its application in studying the interaction of ligand and cell-surface receptor.

  14. Improving the efficiency for generation of genome-edited zebrafish by labeling primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhangji; Dong, Xiaohua; Jia, Wenshang; Cao, Shasha; Zhao, Qingshun

    2014-10-01

    Although CRISPR/Cas, a new versatile genome-editing tool, has been widely used in a variety of species including zebrafish, an important vertebrate model animal for biomedical research, the low efficiency of germline transmission of induced mutations and particularly knockin alleles made subsequent screening for heritable offspring tedious, time-consuming, expensive and at times impossible. In this study, we reported a method for improving the efficiency of germline transmission screening for generation of genome-edited zebrafish mutants. Co-microinjecting yfp-nanos3 mRNA with Cas9 mRNA, sgRNA and single strand DNA donor to label the distribution of microinjected nucleotides in PGCs (primordial germ cells), we demonstrated that founders carrying labeled PGCs produced much higher numbers of knockin and knockout progeny. In comparison with the common practice of selecting founders by genotyping fin clips, our new strategy of selecting founders with tentatively fluorescent-labeled PGCs significantly increase the ease and speed of generating heritable knocking and knockout animals with CRISPR/Cas9.

  15. Protein organic chemistry and applications for labeling and engineering in live-cell systems.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Yousuke; Ojida, Akio; Hamachi, Itaru

    2013-04-08

    The modification of proteins with synthetic probes is a powerful means of elucidating and engineering the functions of proteins both in vitro and in live cells or in vivo. Herein we review recent progress in chemistry-based protein modification methods and their application in protein engineering, with particular emphasis on the following four strategies: 1) the bioconjugation reactions of amino acids on the surfaces of natural proteins, mainly applied in test-tube settings; 2) the bioorthogonal reactions of proteins with non-natural functional groups; 3) the coupling of recognition and reactive sites using an enzyme or short peptide tag-probe pair for labeling natural amino acids; and 4) ligand-directed labeling chemistries for the selective labeling of endogenous proteins in living systems. Overall, these techniques represent a useful set of tools for application in chemical biology, with the methods 2-4 in particular being applicable to crude (living) habitats. Although still in its infancy, the use of organic chemistry for the manipulation of endogenous proteins, with subsequent applications in living systems, represents a worthy challenge for many chemists. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. BrdU-label-retaining cells in rat eccrine sweat glands over time.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Mingjun; Li, Xuexue; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Bingna; Tang, Shijie; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-03-01

    Cell proliferation and turnover are fueled by stem cells. In a previous study, we demonstrated that rat eccrine sweat glands contained abundant bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-label-retaining cells (LRCs). However, morphological observations showed that eccrine sweat glands usually show little or no signs of homeostatic change. In this study, we account for why the homeostatic change is rare in eccrine sweat glands based on cytokinetic changes in BrdU-LRC turnover, and also determine the BrdU-labeled cell type. Thirty-six newborn SD rats, were injected intraperitoneally with 50mg/kg BrdU twice daily at a 2h interval for 4 consecutive days. After a chase period of 4, 6, 8, 12, 24 and 32 weeks, rats were euthanized, and the hind footpads were removed and processed for BrdU immunostaining, and BrdU/α-SMA and BrdU/K14 double-immunostaining. BrdU-LRCs were observed in the ducts, secretory coils and mesenchymal cells at all survival time points. The percentage of BrdU(+) cells in rat eccrine sweat glands averaged 4.2±1.2% after 4 weeks of chase, increased slightly by the 6th week, averaging 4.4±0.9%, and peaked at 8 weeks, averaging 5.3±1.0%. Subsequently, the average percentage of BrdU(+) cells declined to 3.2±0.8% by the 32nd week. There was no difference in the percentage of BrdU-LRCs among the different survival time points except that a significant difference in the percentage of BrdU-LRCs detected at 24 weeks versus 8 weeks, and 32 weeks versus 8 weeks, was observed. We concluded that the BrdU-LRCs turnover is slow in eccrine sweat glands.

  17. Dose Dependent Side Effect of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Labeling on Cell Motility in Two Fetal Stem Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Diana, Valentina; Bossolasco, Patrizia; Moscatelli, Davide; Silani, Vincenzo; Cova, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells (SCs) could substitute damaged cells and also rescue degeneration through the secretion of trophic factors able to activate the endogenous SC compartment. Therefore, fetal SCs, characterized by high proliferation rate and devoid of ethical concern, appear promising candidate, particularly for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide nanoparticles (SPIOn), routinely used for pre-clinical cell imaging and already approved for clinical practice, allow tracking of transplanted SCs and characterization of their fate within the host tissue, when combined with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In this work we investigated how SPIOn could influence cell migration after internalization in two fetal SC populations: human amniotic fluid and chorial villi SCs were labeled with SPIOn and their motility was evaluated. We found that SPIOn loading significantly reduced SC movements without increasing production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Moreover, motility impairment was directly proportional to the amount of loaded SPIOn while a chemoattractant-induced recovery was obtained by increasing serum levels. Interestingly, the migration rate of SPIOn labeled cells was also significantly influenced by a degenerative surrounding. In conclusion, this work highlights how SPIOn labeling affects SC motility in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, shedding the light on an important parameter for the creation of clinical protocols. Establishment of an optimal SPIOn dose that enables both a good visualization of grafted cells by MRI and the physiological migration rate is a main step in order to maximize the effects of SC therapy in both animal models of neurodegeneration and clinical studies. PMID:24244310

  18. A Recombinant Fungal Lectin for Labeling Truncated Glycans on Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hurbin, Amandine; Boos, Irene; Unverzagt, Carlo; Bouras, Mourad; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Coll, Jean-Luc; Varrot, Annabelle; Le Pendu, Jacques; Busser, Benoit; Imberty, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface glycoconjugates present alterations of their structures in chronic diseases and distinct oligosaccharide epitopes have been associated with cancer. Among them, truncated glycans present terminal non-reducing β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residues that are rare on healthy tissues. Lectins from unconventional sources such as fungi or algi provide novel markers that bind specifically to such epitopes, but their availability may be challenging. A GlcNAc-binding lectin from the fruiting body of the fungus Psathyrella velutina (PVL) has been produced in good yield in bacterial culture. A strong specificity for terminal GlcNAc residues was evidenced by glycan array. Affinity values obtained by microcalorimetry and surface plasmon resonance demonstrated a micromolar affinity for GlcNAcβ1-3Gal epitopes and for biantennary N-glycans with GlcNAcβ1-2Man capped branches. Crystal structure of PVL complexed with GlcNAcβ1-3Gal established the structural basis of the specificity. Labeling of several types of cancer cells and use of inhibitors of glycan metabolism indicated that rPVL binds to terminal GlcNAc but also to sialic acid (Neu5Ac). Analysis of glycosyltransferase expression confirmed the higher amount of GlcNAc present on cancer cells. rPVL binding is specific to cancer tissue and weak or no labeling is observed for healthy ones, except for stomach glands that present unique αGlcNAc-presenting mucins. In lung, breast and colon carcinomas, a clear delineation could be observed between cancer regions and surrounding healthy tissues. PVL is therefore a useful tool for labeling agalacto-glycans in cancer or other diseases. PMID:26042789

  19. CASFISH: CRISPR/Cas9-mediated in situ labeling of genomic loci in fixed cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wulan; Shi, Xinghua; Tjian, Robert; Lionnet, Timothée; Singer, Robert H

    2015-09-22

    Direct visualization of genomic loci in the 3D nucleus is important for understanding the spatial organization of the genome and its association with gene expression. Various DNA FISH methods have been developed in the past decades, all involving denaturing dsDNA and hybridizing fluorescent nucleic acid probes. Here we report a novel approach that uses in vitro constituted nuclease-deficient clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated caspase 9 (Cas9) complexes as probes to label sequence-specific genomic loci fluorescently without global DNA denaturation (Cas9-mediated fluorescence in situ hybridization, CASFISH). Using fluorescently labeled nuclease-deficient Cas9 (dCas9) protein assembled with various single-guide RNA (sgRNA), we demonstrated rapid and robust labeling of repetitive DNA elements in pericentromere, centromere, G-rich telomere, and coding gene loci. Assembling dCas9 with an array of sgRNAs tiling arbitrary target loci, we were able to visualize nonrepetitive genomic sequences. The dCas9/sgRNA binary complex is stable and binds its target DNA with high affinity, allowing sequential or simultaneous probing of multiple targets. CASFISH assays using differently colored dCas9/sgRNA complexes allow multicolor labeling of target loci in cells. In addition, the CASFISH assay is remarkably rapid under optimal conditions and is applicable for detection in primary tissue sections. This rapid, robust, less disruptive, and cost-effective technology adds a valuable tool for basic research and genetic diagnosis.

  20. Red blood cell (RBC) survival determined in humans using RBCs labeled at multiple biotin densities

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Donald M.; Matthews, Nell I.; Zhu, Shan; Strauss, Ronald G.; Schmidt, Robert L.; Nalbant, Demet; Cress, Gretchen A.; Widness, John A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Safe, accurate methods permitting simultaneous and/or repeated measurement of red blood cell (RBC) survival (RCS) are important to investigate pathophysiology and therapy of anemia. Methods using chromium 51 (51Cr) -labeled RBCs are unacceptable for infants, children, and pregnant women. We report RCS measured in vivo using RBCs labeled with several densities of biotin (BioRBCs). STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Aliquots of autologous RBCs from eight healthy adult subjects were labeled separately at four discrete biotin densities, mixed, and infused. The proportion of each population of BioRBCs circulating was determined serially by flow cytometry over 20 weeks. For each population, RCS was assessed by the following: 1) post-transfusion BioRBC recovery at 24 hour (PTR24); 2) time to decrease to 50% of the enrichment at 24 hours (T50); and 3) mean potential lifespan (MPL). RESULTS Among the four BioRBC densities, no significant differences in PTR24 were observed. T50 and MPL were similar for the two lowest BioRBC densities. In contrast, the two highest BioRBC densities demonstrated progressively decreased T50 and MPL. CONCLUSION RBCs labeled at four biotin densities can be used to independently and accurately measure PTR24 and two lowest biotin densities can accurately quantitate long-term RCS. This method provides a tool for investigating anemia in infants, fetuses, and pregnant women with the following advantages over the standard 51Cr method: 1) study subjects are not exposed to radiation; 2) small blood volumes (e.g., 20 μL) are required; and 3) multiple independent RCS measurements can be made simultaneously in the same individual. PMID:21062290

  1. CASFISH: CRISPR/Cas9-mediated in situ labeling of genomic loci in fixed cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wulan; Shi, Xinghua; Tjian, Robert; Lionnet, Timothée; Singer, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Direct visualization of genomic loci in the 3D nucleus is important for understanding the spatial organization of the genome and its association with gene expression. Various DNA FISH methods have been developed in the past decades, all involving denaturing dsDNA and hybridizing fluorescent nucleic acid probes. Here we report a novel approach that uses in vitro constituted nuclease-deficient clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated caspase 9 (Cas9) complexes as probes to label sequence-specific genomic loci fluorescently without global DNA denaturation (Cas9-mediated fluorescence in situ hybridization, CASFISH). Using fluorescently labeled nuclease-deficient Cas9 (dCas9) protein assembled with various single-guide RNA (sgRNA), we demonstrated rapid and robust labeling of repetitive DNA elements in pericentromere, centromere, G-rich telomere, and coding gene loci. Assembling dCas9 with an array of sgRNAs tiling arbitrary target loci, we were able to visualize nonrepetitive genomic sequences. The dCas9/sgRNA binary complex is stable and binds its target DNA with high affinity, allowing sequential or simultaneous probing of multiple targets. CASFISH assays using differently colored dCas9/sgRNA complexes allow multicolor labeling of target loci in cells. In addition, the CASFISH assay is remarkably rapid under optimal conditions and is applicable for detection in primary tissue sections. This rapid, robust, less disruptive, and cost-effective technology adds a valuable tool for basic research and genetic diagnosis. PMID:26324940

  2. When cells divide: Label-free multimodal spectral imaging for exploratory molecular investigation of living cells during cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jen-Fang; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Shigeto, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, molecular-level investigation of cytokinesis, the climax of the cell cycle, not only deepens our understanding of how life continues, but it will also open up new possibilities of diagnosis/prognosis of cancer cells. Although fluorescence-based methods have been widely employed to address this challenge, they require a fluorophore to be designed for a specific known biomolecule and introduced into the cell. Here, we present a label-free spectral imaging approach based on multivariate curve resolution analysis of Raman hyperspectral data that enables exploratory untargeted studies of mammalian cell cytokinesis