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Sample records for fermilab tevatron collider

  1. Implementation of Stochastic Cooling Hardware at Fermilab's Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    The invention of Stochastic cooling by Simon van der Meer made possible the increase in phase space density of charged particle beams. In particular, this feedback technique allowed the development of proton antiproton colliders at both CERN and Fermilab. This paper describes the development of hardware systems necessary to cool antiprotons at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider complex.

  2. Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.

    1994-08-01

    These lectures discuss a selection of QCD and Electroweak results from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider. Results are presently based on data samples of about 20 pb{sup {minus}1} at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. Results discussed include jet production, direct photon production, W mass and width measurements, the triboson coupling, and most exciting of all, evidence for top quark production.

  3. Search for quirks at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /NIKHEF, Amsterdam

    2010-08-01

    We report results of a search for particles with anomalously high ionization in events with a high transverse energy jet and large missing transverse energy in 2.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Production of such particles (quirks) is expected in scenarios with extra QCD-like SU(N) sectors, and this study is the first dedicated search for such signatures. We find no evidence of a signal and set a lower mass limit of 107 GeV for the mass of a charged quirk with strong dynamics scale {Lambda} in the range from 10 keV to 1 MeV.

  4. Progress in Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Drendel, Brian; Gollwitzer, Keith; Johnson, Stan; Lebedev, Valeri; Leveling, Anthony; Morgan, James; Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Peterson, Dave; Sondgeroth, Alan; Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Fermilab Collider Run II has been ongoing since 2001. During this time peak luminosities in the Tevatron have increased from approximately 10 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1} to 300 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup 02}sec{sup -1}. A major contributing factor in this remarkable performance is a greatly improved antiproton production capability. Since the beginning of Run II, the average antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 2 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr to about 24 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. Peak antiproton stacking rates presently exceed 28 x 10{sup 10}{anti p}/hr. The antiproton stacking rate has nearly doubled since 2005. It is this recent progress that is the focus of this paper. The process of transferring antiprotons to the Recycler Ring for subsequent transfer to the collider has been significantly restructured and streamlined, yielding additional cycle time for antiproton production. Improvements to the target station have greatly increased the antiproton yield from the production target. The performance of the Antiproton Source stochastic cooling systems has been enhanced by upgrades to the cooling electronics, accelerator lattice optimization, and improved operating procedures. In this paper, we will briefly report on each of these modifications.

  5. Electroweak and B physics results from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, K.T.

    2001-01-30

    This writeup is an introduction to some of the experimental issues involved in performing electroweak and b physics measurements at the Fermilab Tevatron. In the electroweak sector, we discuss W and Z boson cross section measurements as well as the measurement of the mass of the W boson. For b physics, we discuss measurements of B{sup 0}/{bar B}{sup 0} mixing and CP violation. This paper is geared towards nonexperts who are interested in understanding some of the issues and motivations for these measurements and how the measurements are carried out.

  6. Diffractive Higgs boson production at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    PubMed

    Enberg, R; Ingelman, G; Kissavos, A; Tîmneanu, N

    2002-08-19

    Improved possibilities to find the Higgs boson in diffractive events, having less hadronic activity, depend on whether the cross section is large enough. Based on the soft color interaction models that successfully describe diffractive hard scattering at DESY HERA and the Fermilab Tevatron, we find that only a few diffractive Higgs events may be produced at the Tevatron, but we predict a substantial rate at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  7. Model Independent Searches for New Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, Joel

    2009-06-01

    The standard model is a successful but limited theory. There is significant theoretical motivation to believe that new physics may appear at the energy scale of a few TeV, the lower end of which is currently probed by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The methods used to search for physics beyond the standard model in a model independent way and the results of theses searches based on 1.0 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector and 2.0 fb{sup -1} at the CDF detector are presented.

  8. A search for z boson pair production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, Chad Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation describes a search for Z/γ* boson pair production decaying into μμμμ, μμee, and eeee final states with approximately 1 fb-1 of data at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV. The small cross section times branching ratio for each channel mandated a thorough study of the acceptance and efficiencies. After optimization, 1.7 ± 0.1 events are expected for Standard Model production with a background of 0.13 ± 0.03 events. One event was found in the μμee channel. A cross section limit of 4.4 pb is determined at a 95% confidence level for Standard Model production. Additionally, one parameter and two parameter 95% C.L. limits are found for the anomalous neutral trilinear gauge couplings ZZZ* and ZZγ*. The one parameter 95% C.L. coupling limits with a form factor scale of 1.2 TeV are: -0.28 < f$Z\\atop{40}$ < 0.28, -0.31 < f$Z\\atop{50}$ < 0.29, -0.26 < f$γ\\atop{40}$ < 0.26, and -0.30 < f$γ\\atop{50}$ < 0.28.

  9. BTEV: a dedicated B physics detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.

    1996-11-01

    The capabilities of future Dedicated Hadron Collider B Physics experiments are discussed and compared to experiments that will run in the next few years. The design for such an experiment at the Tevatron Collider is presented and an evolutionary path for developing it is outlined. 9 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Operating Procedure Changes to Improve Antiproton Production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Drendel, B.; Morgan, J.P.; Vander Meulen, D.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Since the start of Fermilab Collider Run II in 2001, the maximum weekly antiproton accumulation rate has increased from 400 x 10{sup 10} Pbars/week to approximately 3,700 x 10{sup 10} Pbars/week. There are many factors contributing to this increase, one of which involves changes to operational procedures that have streamlined and automated Antiproton Source production. Automation has been added to the beam line orbit control, stochastic cooling power level management, and RF settings. In addition, daily tuning efforts have been streamlined by implementing sequencer driven tuning software.

  11. A search for the Higgs boson in the zh channel with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Heinmiller, James Matthew

    2006-01-01

    This analysis describes a search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson through the decay mode ZH → e+e-b$\\bar{b}$ in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data sample used in this analysis corresponds to 452 pb-1 of integrated luminosity accumulated with the D0 detector. Agreement between data and standard model predictions is observed. A 95% confidence level upper exclusion limit for the σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → ZH) x BR(H → b$\\bar{b}$) channel is set between 3.2-8.2 pb for Higgs masses of 105 to 145 GeV.

  12. Observation of exclusive dijet production at the Fermilab Tevatron pmacr p collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Azzurri, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Baroiant, S.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Belloni, A.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Berry, T.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bolshov, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooper, B.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lentdecker, G.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; de Pedis, D.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Forrester, S.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopolou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamilton, A.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; Iyutin, B.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeans, D.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Kerzel, U.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Klute, M.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lai, S.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, S. W.; Lefèvre, R.; Leonardo, N.; Leone, S.; Levy, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.; Lin, C. S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, M.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzemer, S.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Messina, A.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miles, J.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Oldeman, R.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Piedra, J.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Portell, X.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Salamanna, G.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyria, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soderberg, M.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spinella, F.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, H.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Tourneur, S.; Trischuk, W.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wagner, W.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, T.; Yang, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2008-03-01

    We present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in pmacr p interactions, pmacr p→ pmacr +dijet+p. Using a data sample of 310pb-1 collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at s=1.96TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy ETjet≥10GeV have been measured as a function of minimum ETjet. The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of expected dijet signal and background shapes. The simulated background distribution shapes are checked in a study of a largely independent data sample of 200pb-1 of b-tagged jet events, where exclusive dijet production is expected to be suppressed by the Jz=0 total angular momentum selection rule. Results obtained are compared with theoretical expectations, and implications for exclusive Higgs boson production at the pp Large Hadron Collider at s=14TeV are discussed.

  13. Observation of Exclusive Dijet Production at the Fermilab Tevatron p-pbar Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Gonzalez, B.Alvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The authors present the first observation and cross section measurement of exclusive dijet production in {bar p}p interactions, {bar p}p {yields} {bar p} + dijet + p. Using a data sample of 310 pb{sup -1} collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, exclusive cross sections for events with two jets of transverse energy E{sub T}{sup jet} {ge} 10 GeV have been measured as a function of minimum E{sub T}{sup jet}. The exclusive signal is extracted from fits to data distributions based on Monte Carlo simulations of expected dijet signal and background shapes. The simulated background distribution shapes are checked in a study of a largely independent data sample of 200 pb{sup -1} of b-tagged jet events, where exclusive dijet production is expected to be suppressed by the J{sub z} = 0 total angular momentum selection rule. Results obtained are compared with theoretical expectations, and implications for exclusive Higgs boson production at the pp Large Hadron Collider at {radical}s = 14 TeV are discussed.

  14. Data preservation at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE PAGES

    Amerio, S.; Behari, S.; Boyd, J.; ...

    2017-01-22

    The Fermilab Tevatron collider's data-taking run ended in September 2011, yielding a dataset with rich scientific potential. The CDF and D0 experiments each have approximately 9 PB of collider and simulated data stored on tape. A large computing infrastructure consisting of tape storage, disk cache, and distributed grid computing for physics analysis with the Tevatron data is present at Fermilab. The Fermilab Run II data preservation project intends to keep this analysis capability sustained through the year 2020 and beyond. To achieve this goal, we have implemented a system that utilizes virtualization, automated validation, and migration to new standards inmore » both software and data storage technology and leverages resources available from currently-running experiments at Fermilab. Lastly, these efforts have also provided useful lessons in ensuring long-term data access for numerous experiments, and enable high-quality scientific output for years to come.« less

  15. Data preservation at the Fermilab Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerio, S.; Behari, S.; Boyd, J.; Brochmann, M.; Culbertson, R.; Diesburg, M.; Freeman, J.; Garren, L.; Greenlee, H.; Herner, K.; Illingworth, R.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jonckheere, A.; Li, Q.; Naymola, S.; Oleynik, G.; Sakumoto, W.; Varnes, E.; Vellidis, C.; Watts, G.; White, S.

    2017-04-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron collider's data-taking run ended in September 2011, yielding a dataset with rich scientific potential. The CDF and D0 experiments each have approximately 9 PB of collider and simulated data stored on tape. A large computing infrastructure consisting of tape storage, disk cache, and distributed grid computing for physics analysis with the Tevatron data is present at Fermilab. The Fermilab Run II data preservation project intends to keep this analysis capability sustained through the year 2020 and beyond. To achieve this goal, we have implemented a system that utilizes virtualization, automated validation, and migration to new standards in both software and data storage technology and leverages resources available from currently-running experiments at Fermilab. These efforts have also provided useful lessons in ensuring long-term data access for numerous experiments, and enable high-quality scientific output for years to come.

  16. Data preservation at the Fermilab Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, J.; Herner, K.; Jayatilaka, B.; Roser, R.; Sakumoto, W.

    2015-12-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron collider's data-taking run ended in September 2011, yielding a dataset with rich scientific potential. The CDF and DO experiments each have nearly 9 PB of collider and simulated data stored on tape. A large computing infrastructure consisting of tape storage, disk cache, and distributed grid computing for physics analysis with the Tevatron data is present at Fermilab. The Fermilab Run II data preservation project intends to keep this analysis capability sustained through the year 2020 or beyond. To achieve this, we are implementing a system that utilizes virtualization, automated validation, and migration to new standards in both software and data storage technology as well as leveraging resources available from currently-running experiments at Fermilab. These efforts will provide useful lessons in ensuring long-term data access for numerous experiments throughout high-energy physics, and provide a roadmap for high-quality scientific output for years to come.

  17. Data preservation at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE PAGES

    Boyd, J.; Herner, K.; Jayatilaka, B.; ...

    2015-12-23

    The Fermilab Tevatron collider's data-taking run ended in September 2011, yielding a dataset with rich scientific potential. The CDF and DO experiments each have nearly 9 PB of collider and simulated data stored on tape. A large computing infrastructure consisting of tape storage, disk cache, and distributed grid computing for physics analysis with the Tevatron data is present at Fermilab. The Fermilab Run II data preservation project intends to keep this analysis capability sustained through the year 2020 or beyond. To achieve this, we are implementing a system that utilizes virtualization, automated validation, and migration to new standards in bothmore » software and data storage technology as well as leveraging resources available from currently-running experiments at Fermilab. Furthermore, these efforts will provide useful lessons in ensuring long-term data access for numerous experiments throughout high-energy physics, and provide a roadmap for high-quality scientific output for years to come.« less

  18. Data preservation at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.; Herner, K.; Jayatilaka, B.; Roser, R.; Sakumoto, W.

    2015-12-23

    The Fermilab Tevatron collider's data-taking run ended in September 2011, yielding a dataset with rich scientific potential. The CDF and DO experiments each have nearly 9 PB of collider and simulated data stored on tape. A large computing infrastructure consisting of tape storage, disk cache, and distributed grid computing for physics analysis with the Tevatron data is present at Fermilab. The Fermilab Run II data preservation project intends to keep this analysis capability sustained through the year 2020 or beyond. To achieve this, we are implementing a system that utilizes virtualization, automated validation, and migration to new standards in both software and data storage technology as well as leveraging resources available from currently-running experiments at Fermilab. Furthermore, these efforts will provide useful lessons in ensuring long-term data access for numerous experiments throughout high-energy physics, and provide a roadmap for high-quality scientific output for years to come.

  19. W+ jets production at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmann, J.R.; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

    1997-05-01

    The production properties of jets in W events have been measured using {radical}s = 1.8 TeV pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Experimental results from several CDF and D0 analyses are compared to leading-order and next-to-leading-order QCD predictions.

  20. A search for chargino-neutralino production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, Benn

    1997-12-01

    We have searched for evidence of supersymmetry with the Collider Detector at Fermilab using trilepton events in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV. In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), we expect trilepton events from chargino-neutralino ($\\tilde{χ}$±1$\\tilde{χ}$02) pair production, with subsequent decay into leptons. In all possible combinations of electron and muon channels, we observe no candidate events in 107 pb-1 of data. We present limits on chargino and neutralino production within the framework of a supergravity inspired MSSM: σ$\\tilde{χ}$±1$\\tilde{χ}$02 ∙ BR($\\tilde{χ}$±1$\\tilde{χ}$02 → 3l + X) < 0.34 pb and M$\\tilde{χ}$±1} > 81.5 GeV/c2 for tan β = 2, μ = -600 GeV/c2$\\tilde{q}$ = M$\\tilde{g}$. We also present limits on a SU(5) x U(1) supergravity model and a 4 and 1/2 parameter Minimal SUGRA model.

  1. Simulation of Hollow Electron Beam Collimation in the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, I.A.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    The concept of augmenting the conventional collimation system of high-energy storage rings with a hollow electron beam was successfully demonstrated in experiments at the Tevatron. A reliable numerical model is required for understanding particle dynamics in the presence of a hollow beam collimator. Several models were developed to describe imperfections of the electron beam profile and alignment. The features of the imperfections are estimated from electron beam profile measurements. Numerical simulations of halo removal rates are compared with experimental data taken at the Tevatron.

  2. Measurements of Transverse Beam Diffusion Rates in the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Johnson, T.R.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    The transverse beam diffusion rate vs. particle oscillation amplitude was measured in the Tevatron using collimator scans. All collimator jaws except one were retracted. As the jaw of interest was moved in small steps, the local shower rates were recorded as a function of time. By using a diffusion model, the time evolution of losses could be related to the diffusion rate at the collimator position. Preliminary results of these measurements are presented.

  3. Top physics at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Margaroli, Fabrizio; /Purdue U.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark has been discovered in 1995 at the CDF and DO experiments located in the Tevatron ring at the Fermilab laboratory. After more than a decade the Tevatron collider, with its center-of-mass energy collisions of 1.96 TeV, is still the only machine capable of producing such exceptionally heavy particle. Here I present a selection of the most recent CDF and DO measurements performed analyzing {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity.

  4. First measurements of inclusive W and Z cross sections from run II of the fermilab tevatron collider.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerri, C; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Frisch, H; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; Ncnulty, R; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Moulik, T; Movilla Fernandez, P A; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nicollerat, A-S; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reichold, A; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schemitz, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stefanini, A; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2005-03-11

    We report the first measurements of inclusive W and Z cross sections times leptonic branching ratios for pp collisions at square root[s]=1.96 TeV, based on their decays to electrons and muons. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 72 pb(-1) recorded with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We test e-mu universality in W decays, and we measure the ratio of leptonic W and Z rates from which the leptonic branching fraction B(W-->lnu) can be extracted as well as an indirect value for the total width of the W and the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element, |V(cs)|.

  5. Measurement of the production rate of the charm jet recoiling against the W boson using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan, Mahsana

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the rate of associated production of the W boson with the charm jet in the proton and anti-proton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement has direct sensitivity to the strange quark content inside the proton. A direct measurement of the momentum distribution of the strange quark inside the proton is essential for a reliable calculation of new physics signal as well as the background processes at the collider experiments. The identification of events containing a W boson and a charm jet is based on the leptonic decays of the W boson together with a tagging technique for the charm jet identification based on the semileptonic decay of the charm quark into the muon. The charm jet recoiling against the W boson must have a minimum transverse momentum of 20 GeV and an absolute value of pseudorapidity less than 2.5. This measurement utilizes the data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Collider. The measured rate of the charm jet production in association with the W boson in the inclusive jet production with the W boson is 0.074 ± 0.023, which is in agreement with the theoretical predictions at the leading order in Quantum Chromodynamics.

  6. A Tevatron collider beauty factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This document which is labeled a final report consists of several different items. The first is a proposal for a detector to be developed for beauty physics. The detector is proposed for the Fermilab Tevatron and would be designed to measure mixing reactions, rare decay modes, and even CP violation in hadron collider beauty production. The general outline of the work proposed is given, and an estimate of the time to actually design the detector is presented, along with proposed changes to the Tevatron to accommodate the system. A preliminary report on an experiment to verify a reported observation of a 17 keV neutrino in tritium decay is presented. The present results in the decay spectra actually showing a depression below expected levels, which is not consistent with a massive neutrino. Additional interest has been shown in finishing an electrostatic beta spectrometer which was started several years previously. The instrument uses hemispherical electrostatic electric fields to retard electrons emitted in tritium decay allowing measurement of integral spectra. The design goal has a 5 eV energy resolution, which may be achievable. A new PhD student is pursuing this experiment. Also the report contains a proposal for additional work in the field of non-perturbative quantum field theory by the theoretical group at OU. The work which is proposed will be applied to electroweak and strong interactions, as well as to quantum gravitational phenomena.

  7. Seismic studies for Fermilab future collider projects

    SciTech Connect

    Lauh, J.; Shiltsev, V.

    1997-11-01

    Ground motion can cause significant beam emittance growth and orbit oscillations in large hadron colliders due to a vibration of numerous focusing magnets. Larger accelerator ring circumference leads to smaller revolution frequency and, e.g. for the Fermilab Very Large Hadron Collider(VLHC) 50-150 Hz vibrations are of particular interest as they are resonant with the beam betatron frequency. Seismic measurements at an existing large accelerator under operation can help to estimate the vibrations generated by the technical systems in future machines. Comparison of noisy and quiet microseismic conditions might be useful for proper choice of technical solutions for future colliders. This article presents results of wide-band seismic measurements at the Fermilab site, namely, in the tunnel of the Tevatron and on the surface nearby, and in two deep tunnels in the Illinois dolomite which is though to be a possible geological environment of the future accelerators.

  8. Initial operation of the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.

    1987-03-01

    The Tevatron is now the highest energy proton synchrotron and the only accelerator made with superconducting magnets. Operating since 1983 as a fixed-target machine at energies up to 800 GeV, it has now been modified to operate as a 900 GeV antiproton-proton collider. This paper describes the initial operation of the machine in this mode. The new features of the Fermilab complex, including the antiproton source and the Main Ring injector with its two overpasses and new rf requirements, are discussed. Beam characteristics in the Tevatron (including lifetimes, emittances, luminosity, beam-beam tune shifts, backgrounds, and low beta complications), the coordination of the steps in the accelerator chain, and the commissioning history are also discussed. Finally, some plans for the improvement of the collider are presented.

  9. Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

  10. Diagnostics of the Fermilab Tevatron using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi

    2008-08-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy colliding beam facility. Its counter-rotating proton and antiproton beams collide at 2 TeV center-of-mass. Delivery of such intense beam fluxes to experiments has required improved knowledge of the Tevatron's beam optical lattice. An oscillating dipole magnet, referred to as an AC dipole, is one of such a tool to non-destructively assess the optical properties of the synchrotron. We discusses development of an AC dipole system for the Tevatron, a fast-oscillating (f ~ 20 kHz) dipole magnet which can be adiabatically turned on and off to establish sustained coherent oscillations of the beam particles without affecting the transverse emittance. By utilizing an existing magnet and a higher power audio amplifier, the cost of the Tevatron AC dipole system became relatively inexpensive. We discuss corrections which must be applied to the driven oscillation measurements to obtain the proper interpretation of beam optical parameters from AC dipole studies. After successful operations of the Tevatron AC dipole system, AC dipole systems, similar to that in the Tevatron, will be build for the CERN LHC. We present several measurements of linear optical parameters (beta function and phase advance) for the Tevatron, as well as studies of non-linear perturbations from sextupole and octupole elements.

  11. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from B Hadrons Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Bottom group studies the production and decay of B hadrons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  12. A simulation of modulational diffusion for the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Satogata, T. Fermi National Accelertor Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 ); Peggs, S. )

    1992-11-01

    A summary of the requirements for modulational (thick-layer) diffusion to exist in a particle synchrotron is presented and applied to a simple tune-modulated collider model of the Fermilab Tevatron where the only nonlinearities present are two beam-beam kicks. For certain realistic tune modulation parameters and single-particle base tunes, amplitude growth is observed over timescales appropriate to diffusive models. The character of this growth has qualitative features that are similar to those predicted by modulational diffusion models, but is significantly different in that the amplitude growth is exponential in time, not root-time as in classical diffusion. Some possible explanations for this effect are briefly noted, and impact of the possible existence of such a mechanism on future Fermilab collider upgrades is mentioned.

  13. Fermilab Tevatron and Pbar source status report

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, H.

    1986-08-01

    The antiproton production cycle is enumerated, and the commissioning of the antiproton source is described, giving milestones and major obstacles. The Tevatron collider operation is described, including procedure to load the Tevatron with three bunches of protons and three bunches of antiprotons. Commissioning of the Main Ring and Tevatron for collider operation is described. Development and accelerator studies in four areas were necessary: main ring RF manipulations; controls and applications software support; Tevatron storage and low-beta squeeze sequence; and study of various beam transfers, storage steps, and sequences. Final tests are described. A long range upgrade program is presently under evaluation to accomplish these goals: luminosity increase to 5 x 10/sup 31/ cm/sup -2/sec/sup -1/, production rates up to 4 x 10/sup 11/ antiprotons/hr, and intensity increase for fixed target operation. Beam quality is to be improved by the injector and main ring upgrades, and the luminosity goal is addressed by the Collider upgrade. (LEW)

  14. New particle signals at the SSC and at an upgraded Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, R.M.; Hollebeek, R.J.; White, A.P.; Yoh, J.; Baer, H.A.; Barnett, B.A.; Eichten, E.; Freeman, J.E.; Gamberini, G.; Grifols, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the production and detection of several types of new particles at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and at three possible upgrades of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We compare the physics potential of the SSC with that of an upgraded collider, and we discuss in depth the relative capabilities of the three Tevatron Collider upgrades. From a physics standpoint, we suggest that one of the proposed upgrades has several advantages. 34 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Fixed target experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Gaston; Reyes, Marco A.

    2014-11-10

    This paper presents a review of the study of Exclusive Central Production at a Center of Mass energy of √s = 40 GeV at the Fermilab Fixed Target program. In all reactions reviewed in this paper, protons with an energy of 800 GeV were extracted from the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab and directed to a Liquid Hydrogen target. The states reviewed include π⁺π⁻, K⁰s K⁰s, K⁰s K±π, φφ and D. Partial Wave Analysis results will be presented on the light states but only the cross-section will be reviewed in the diffractive production of D.

  16. Fixed target experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE PAGES

    Gutierrez, Gaston; Reyes, Marco A.

    2014-11-10

    This paper presents a review of the study of Exclusive Central Production at a Center of Mass energy of √s = 40 GeV at the Fermilab Fixed Target program. In all reactions reviewed in this paper, protons with an energy of 800 GeV were extracted from the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab and directed to a Liquid Hydrogen target. The states reviewed include π⁺π⁻, K⁰s K⁰s, K⁰s K±π∓, φφ and D*±. Partial Wave Analysis results will be presented on the light states but only the cross-section will be reviewed in the diffractive production of D*±.

  17. Search for Diphoton Events with Large Missing Transverse Energy in 6.3 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ Collisions using the D0 Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Mark Stephen

    2010-01-01

    A search for diphoton events with large missing transverse energy produced in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The data were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider between 2002 and 2010, and correspond to 6.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. The observed missing transverse energy distribution is well described by the Standard Model prediction, and 95% C.L. limits are derived on two realizations of theories beyond the Standard Model. In a gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking scenario, the breaking scale Λ is excluded for Λ < 124 TeV. In a universal extra dimension model including gravitational decays, the compactification radius Rc is excluded for Rc-1 < 477 GeV.

  18. Sonic helium detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years.

  19. Fermilab Tevatron high level RF accelerating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerns, Q.; Kerns, C.; Miller, H.; Tawser, S.; Reid, J.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

    1985-06-01

    Eight tuned RF cavities have been installed and operated in the F0 straight section of the Tevatron. Their mechanical placement along the beam line enables them to be operated for colliding beams as two independent groups of four cavities, group 1-4 accelerating antiprotons and group 5-8 accelerating protons. The only difference is that the spacing between cavities 4 and 5 was increased to stay clear of the F0 colliding point. The cavities can easily be rephased by switching cables in a low-level distribution system (fan-out) so that the full accelerating capability of all eight cavities can be used during a fixed target operations. Likewise, the cables from capacitive probes on each cavity gap can be switched to proper lengths and summed in a fan-back system to give an RF signal representing the amplitude and phase as seen by the beam separately for protons and antiprotons. Such signals have been used to phase lock the Tevatron to the Main Ring for synchronous transfer.

  20. Search for top quark at Fermilab Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Sliwa, K.; The CDF Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    The status of a search for the top quark with Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), based on a data sample recorded during the 1988--1989 run is presented. The plans for the next Fermilab Collider run in 1992--1993 and the prospects of discovering the top quark are discussed. 19 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Supersymmetry searches at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    D. Tsybychev

    2001-12-28

    This article presents the current experimental results of searches for Supersymmetry (SUSY) at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), using over 110 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data with {radical}s = 1800 GeV collected during the period 1992-1995. Since no signal was found, limits on the production of supersymmetric particles are derived. The prospects for supersymmetry searches at Run II of the Tevatron, that began in March 2001, are also discussed here.

  2. Correlations in bottom quark pair production at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Galyardt, Jason Edward

    2009-01-01

    I present an analysis of b$\\bar{b}$ pair production correlations, using dimuon-triggered data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV during Run II of the TeVatron. The leading order (LO) and next-to-leading order (NLO) b quark production processes are discriminated by the angular and momentum correlations between the b{bar b} pair. Track-level jets containing a muon are classified by b quark content and used to estimate the momentum vector of the progenitor b quark. The theoretical distributions given by the MC@NLO event generator are tested against the data.

  3. Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

  4. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from the Top Group's Top Quark Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Top group studies the properties of the top quark, the heaviest known fundamental particle. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  5. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Supersymmetry, New Phenomena Research of the CDF Exotics Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Exotics group searches for Supersymmetry and other New Phenomena. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  6. Tevatron physics

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-01-03

    These lectures form a personal, and not necessarily comprehensive, survey of physics at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. They cover detectors, analysis issues, and physics prospects for the current Tevatron run.

  7. The future collider physics program at Fermilab: Run II and TeV33

    SciTech Connect

    Signore, K.D.

    1998-07-01

    High luminosity collider running at Fermilab is scheduled to occur during the period 2000-2005. Requisite collider detector upgrades are underway. An outline of the physics that can be realized with the upgraded Tevatron and CDF/D0 detectors is presented.

  8. Increasing the energy of the Fermilab Tevatron accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J.D.; Theilacker, J.C.

    1994-07-01

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab has reached its eleventh year of operation since being commissioned in 1983. Last summer, four significant upgrades to the cryogenic system became operational which allow Tevatron operation at higher energy. This came after many years of R&D, power testing in sectors (one sixth) of the Tevatron, and final system installation. The improvements include the addition of cold helium vapor compressors, supporting hardware for subatmospheric operation, a new satellite refrigerator control system, and a higher capacity central helium liquefier. A description of each cryogenic upgrade, commissioning experience, and attempts to increase the energy of the Tevatron are presented.

  9. Minimax: Multiparticle physics at the TeVatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    The author and two dozen others are engaged in a small test/experiment in the Fermilab Tevatron collider. It is called Minimax, and its purpose is to explore large-cross-section physics in the forward direction. The primary goal of Minimax is search for events containing the residue of disoriented chiral condensate (dcc) produced in the primary collision. The theoretical ideas are very speculative. But if they are right, they could provide an interpretation of the Centauro/anti-Centauro anomalies claimed to have been seen in cosmic-ray events. In this paper, the history and status of Minimax is described.

  10. Prospects in CP violation measurements at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Diego Tonelli

    2004-06-22

    The Fermilab Tevatron Collider is currently the most copious source of b-hadrons, thanks to the large b{bar b} production cross-section in 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions. Recent detector upgrades allow for a wide range of CP violation and flavor-mixing measurements that are fully competitive (direct asymmetries in self-tagging modes) or complementary (asymmetries of B{sub s} and b-baryons decays) with B-factories. In this paper we review some recent CP violation results from the D0 and CDF II Collaborations and we discuss the prospects for future measurements.

  11. The dijet invariant mass at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Giannetti, P. )

    1990-05-09

    The differential cross section of the process p + pbar {yields} jet + jet + X as a function of the dijet invariant mass has been measured with the CDF detector at a center of mass energy of 1.8 TeV at the Tevatron Collider in Fermilab. The present analysis is based on the sample of events collected in the 1988/89 run, amounting to a total integrated luminosity of 4.2 pb{sup {minus}1}. A comparison to leading order QCD and quark compositeness predictions is presented as well as a study of the sensitivity of the mass spectrum to the gluon radiation. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  12. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for B Physics from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer

    ,

    The DZero b-Physics Working Group studies all issues related to the b-quark at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Topics we are working on include CP violation, measurements of B hadron properties (masses, lifetimes, decay branching ratios, production mechanisms), and searches for rare decays. The D0 (DZero) Experiment consists of a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter.

  13. Fully 3D Multiple Beam Dynamics Processes Simulation for the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2010-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron has been, until 2010, the premier high-energy physics collider in the world. The data collected over the last decade by high-energy physics experiments running at the Tevatron have been analyzed to make important measurements in fundamental areas such as B meson masses and flavor oscillation, searches for the Higgs boson, and supersymmetry. Collecting these data at the limits of detectability has required the Tevatron to operate reliably at high beam intensities to maximize the number of collisions to analyze. This impressive achievement has been assisted by the use of HPC resources and software provided through the SciDAC program. This paper describes the enhancements to the BeamBeam3d code to realistically simulate the Tevatron, the validation of these simulations, and the improvement in equipment reliability and personal safety achieved with the aid of simulations.

  14. The Tevatron Hadron Collider: A short history

    SciTech Connect

    Tollestrup, A.V.

    1994-11-01

    The subject of this presentation was intended to cover the history of hadron colliders. However this broad topic is probably better left to historians. I will cover a much smaller portion of this subject and specialize my subject to the history of the Tevatron. As we will see, the Tevatron project is tightly entwined with the progress in collider technology. It occupies a unique place among accelerators in that it was the first to make use of superconducting magnets and indeed the basic design now forms a template for all machines using this technology. It was spawned in an incredibly productive era when new ideas were being generated almost monthly and it has matured into our highest energy collider complete with two large detectors that provide the major facility in the US for probing high Pt physics for the coming decade.

  15. Probing neutrino mass with displaced vertices at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F. de; Eboli, O.J.P.; Magro, M.B.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D.; Valle, J.W.F.

    2005-04-01

    Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model exhibiting bilinear R-parity violation can generate naturally the observed neutrino mass spectrum as well as mixings. One interesting feature of these scenarios is that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is unstable, with several of its decay properties predicted in terms of neutrino mixing angles. A smoking gun of this model in colliders is the presence of displaced vertices due to LSP decays in large parts of the parameter space. In this work we focus on the simplest model of this type that comes from minimal supergravity with universal R-parity conserving soft breaking of supersymmetry augmented with bilinear R-parity breaking terms at the electroweak scale (RmSUGRA). We evaluate the potential of the Fermilab Tevatron to probe the RmSUGRA parameters through the analysis of events possessing two displaced vertices stemming from LSP decays. We show that requiring two displaced vertices in the events leads to a reach in m{sub 1/2} twice the one in the usual multilepton signals in a large fraction of the parameter space.

  16. Channeling collimation studies at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Richard A.; Drozhdin, Alexandr I.; Fliller, Raymond P., III; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Shiltsev, Vladimir D.; Still, Dean A.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Bent crystal channeling has promising advantages for accelerator beam collimation at high energy hadron facilities such as the LHC. This significance has been amplified by several surprising developments including multi-pass channeling and the observation of enhanced deflections over the entire arc of a bent crystal. The second effect has been observed both at RHIC and recently at the Tevatron. Results are reported showing channeling collimation of the circulating proton beam halo at the Tevatron. Parenthetically, this study is the highest energy proton channeling experiment ever carried out. The study is continuing.

  17. The upgraded data acquisition system for beam loss monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumbaugh, A.; Briegel, C.; Brown, B. C.; Capista, D.; Drennan, C.; Fellenz, B.; Knickerbocker, K.; Lewis, J. D.; Marchionni, A.; Needles, C.; Olson, M.; Pordes, S.; Shi, Z.; Still, D.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Utes, M.; Wu, J.

    2011-11-01

    A VME-based data acquisition system for beam-loss monitors has been developed and is in use in the Tevatron and Main Injector accelerators at the Fermilab complex. The need for enhanced beam-loss protection when the Tevatron is operating in collider-mode was the main driving force for the new design. Prior to the implementation of the present system, the beam-loss monitor system was disabled during collider operation and protection of the Tevatron magnets relied on the quench protection system. The new Beam-Loss Monitor system allows appropriate abort logic and thresholds to be set over the full set of collider operating conditions. The system also records a history of beam-loss data prior to a beam-abort event for post-abort analysis. Installation of the Main Injector system occurred in the fall of 2006 and the Tevatron system in the summer of 2007. Both systems were fully operation by the summer of 2008. In this paper we report on the overall system design, provide a description of its normal operation, and show a number of examples of its use in both the Main Injector and Tevatron.

  18. Longitudinal damping in the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.A.; Jackson, G.; Kerns, C.R.; Miller, H.; Reid, J.; Siemann, R.; Wildman, D.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes the damper design for 6 proton on 6 pbar bunches in the Tevatron collider. Signal pickup, transient phase detection, derivative networks, and phase correction via the high-level rf are covered. Each rf station is controlled by a slow feedback loop. In addition, global feedback loops control each set of four cavities, one set for protons and one set for antiprotons. Operational experience with these systems is discussed. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Search for $W'\\to t b $ in Events with Large Missing Transverse Energy and Jets with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Ludovico

    2012-01-01

    In the scope of the strong ongoing data analysis efforts of the CDF col- laboration at Fermilab, we present a search for the production of mas sive W1 bosons decaying to a top and a bottom quark in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. To perform this search, we select events with large Missing Transverse Energy plus two or three jets, in which the W generated from top decays leptonically, and either the e or µ is lost or the τ is reconstructed as a jet. A complete study of the selected sample is discussed, including the creation and subsequent optimization of a Neural Network-based multivariate tool to reject the QCD multijet background from the signal region. Finally, we perform a likelihood-based multichannel Bayesian fit procedure on the invariant transverse mass of the Missing Transverse Energy and jets to extract 95% CL limits on σ(p$\\bar{p}$ . → W') × B(W' → tb) for MW' = 200 GeV/c2

  20. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Koji

    2005-02-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass using tt pair creation events decaying into the lepton+jets channel in pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. The data sample used in this analysis was collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in Tevatron Run II during the period from March 2002 through August 2003.

  1. Operation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector with colliding beams at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bedeschi, F.; Bolognesi, V.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Galeotti, S.; Grieco, G.; Mariotti, M.; Menzione, A.; Punzi, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Ristori, L.; Tartarelli, F.; Turini, N.; Wenzel, H.; Zetti, F. ); Bailey, M.W.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Kruse, M.C.; Shaw, N.M. ); Carithers, W.C.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneide

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the main features of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) and discuss its performance during actual colliding beam operation at the Fermilab Tevatron. Details on S/N ratio, alignment, resolution and efficiency are given.

  2. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Standard Model and Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons Research of the Higgs Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Higgs group searches for Standard Model and Supersymmetric Higgs bosons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  3. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from the QCD Group's Research into Properties of the Strong Interaction

    DOE Data Explorer

    ,

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The QCD group studies the properties of the strong interaction. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  4. Vacuum control subsystem for the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Zagel, J.R.; Chapman, L.J.

    1981-06-01

    The CAMAC 170 module and CIA crate provide a convenient, cost effective method of interfacing any system requiring a large number of simple devices to be multiplexed into the Accelerator Control System. The system is ideal for relatively slowly changing systems where ten bit analog to digital conversions are sufficiently accurate. Together with vacuum interface CIA cards and prom-based software resident in the 170, this system is used to provide intelligent local monitoring and control for the Tevatron vacuum subsystems. Although not implemented in the vacuum interface, digital to analog converters could be included on the plug in modules as well, providing a total digital and analog multiplexing scheme. 2 refs.

  5. Search for resonant second generation slepton production at the Fermilab Tevatron.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Bihan, A-C Le; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Kooten, R Van; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Toerne, E Von; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2006-09-15

    We present a search for supersymmetry in the R-parity violating resonant production and decay of smuons and muon sneutrinos in the channels mu-->chi(1)(0)mu, mu-->chi(2,3,4)(0)mu, and nu(mu)-->chi(1,2)(+/-)mu. We analyzed 0.38 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected between April 2002 and August 2004 with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The observed number of events is in agreement with the standard model expectation, and we calculate 95% C.L. limits on the slepton production cross section times branching fraction to gaugino plus muon, as a function of slepton and gaugino masses. In the framework of minimal supergravity, we set limits on the coupling parameter lambda(211)('), extending significantly previous results obtained in Run I of the Tevatron and at the CERN LEP collider.

  6. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for QCD Physics from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer

    The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, at Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons at the highest available energies. It involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the QCD Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the same directories with their respective papers.

  7. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for Electroweak Physics from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer

    The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons and involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the Electroweak Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the directories with their respective papers.

  8. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for New Phenomena from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer

    The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons and involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the New Phenomena Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the same directories with their respective papers.

  9. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for Top Quark Physics from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer

    The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons and involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the Top Quark Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the directories with their respective papers.

  10. DZero (D0) Experiment Results for Higgs Physics from the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Data Explorer

    The D0 (DZero) Experiment is a worldwide collaboration of scientists conducting research on the fundamental nature of matter. The experiment is located at the Tevatron Collider, at Fermilab. The research is focused on precise studies of interactions of protons and antiprotons and involves an intense search for subatomic clues that reveal the character of the building blocks of the universe. This web page provides access to Run II research results of the Higgs Physics group, including preliminary, submitted, and published results. Figures and data plots are found in the directories with their respective papers.

  11. A tevatron collider beauty factory. [Final report, 1980--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This document which is labeled a final report consists of several different items. The first is a proposal for a detector to be developed for beauty physics. The detector is proposed for the Fermilab Tevatron, and would be designed to measure mixing reactions, rare decay modes, and even CP violation in hadron collider beauty production. The general outline of the work proposed is given, and an estimate of the time to actually design the detector is presented, along with proposed changes to the Tevatron to accommodate the system. A preliminary report on an experiment to verify a reported observation of a 17 keV neutrino in tritium decay is presented. The present results in the decay spectra actually show a depression below expected levels, which is not consistent with a massive neutrino. Additional interest has been shown in finishing an electrostatic beta spectrometer which was started several years previously. The instrument uses hemispherical electrostatic electric fields to retard electrons emitted in tritium decay, allowing measurement of integral spectra. The design goal has a 5 eV energy resolution, which may be achievable. A new PhD student is pursuing this experiment. Also the report contains a proposal for additional work in the field of non-perturbative quantum field theory by the theoretical group at OU. The work which is proposed will be applied to electroweak and strong interactions, as well as to quantum gravitational phenomena.

  12. Run II physics at the Fermilab Tevatron and advanced analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpalatha C Bhat

    2003-06-23

    The Fermilab Tevatron has the unique opportunity to explore physics at the electroweak scale with the highest ever proton-antiproton collision energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV and unprecedented luminosity. About 20 times more data is expected to be collected during the first phase of the collider Run II which is in its second year of data-taking. The second phase of Run II, expected to begin in 2005, will increase the integrated luminosity to about 10-15 fb{sup -1}. Discovering a low mass Higgs boson and evidence for Supersymmetry or for other new physics beyond the Standard Model are the main physics goals for Run II. It is widely recognized that the use of advanced analysis methods will be crucial to achieve these goals. I discuss the current status of Run II at the Tevatron, prospects and foreseen applications of advanced analysis methods.

  13. Online monitoring in the upcoming Fermilab Tevatron Run II

    SciTech Connect

    P. Canal et al.

    1999-09-08

    We describe the online event monitoring systems using ROOT [1] for the CDF and D0 collaborations in the upcoming Fermilab Tevatron runII. The CDF and D0 experiments consist of many detector subsystems and will run in a high rate large bandwidth data transfer environment. In the experiments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of each subsystem and the integrity of the data, in real time with minimal interruption. ROOT is used as the main analysis tool for the monitoring systems and its GUI is used to browse the results via socket, allowing multiple GUI client connections.

  14. Fermilab Tevatron I project target station for antiproton production

    SciTech Connect

    Hojvat, C.; Biallas, G.; Hanson, R.; Heim, J.; Lange, F.

    1983-03-01

    Production of 8-GeV antiprotons in the Fermilab Tevatron I project will utilize 120-GeV protons from the Main Ring. The Target Station consists of an entrance collimator, the target itself, a pulsed lithium lens for anti proton collection, a pulsed magnet for the separation of the 8-GeV secondaries, and a beam dump. These components are mounted on vertical modules within the Target Service Building. Allowance has been made for future improvements to increase the collected anti proton flux. The design of the Target Station and its components is discussed.

  15. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-01

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. However, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transverse beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics. Work supported by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.

  16. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transverse beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.

  17. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE PAGES

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Hahn, A.; ...

    2011-09-16

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. Therefore, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transversemore » beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.« less

  18. Cosmo-Particle Searches for Supersymmetry at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Toback, D.

    2009-11-01

    Some theories of particle physics are so compelling that it is worth doing a comprehensive and systematic set of experimental searches to see if they are realized in nature. Supersymmetry is one such theory. This review focuses on the motivation for a broad set of cosmology-inspired search strategies at the Tevatron and on their implementation and results at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) with the first few fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity of data.

  19. Perturbative QCD tests from the LEP, HERA, and TEVATRON colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlmann, S.

    1994-09-01

    A review of QCD tests from LEP, HERA and the TEVATRON colliders is presented. This includes jet production, quark/gluon jet separation, quark/gluon propagator spin, {alpha}{sub s} updates, photon production, and rapidity gap experiments.

  20. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from W, Z bosons and Drell Yan lepton pairs research of the CDF Electroweak Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Electroweak group studies production and properties of W, Z bosons and Drell Yan lepton pairs. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  1. A disoriented chiral condensate search at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Convery, Mary Elizabeth

    1997-05-01

    MiniMax (Fermilab T-864) was a small test/experiment at the Tevatron designed to search for disoriented chiral condensates (DCC) in the forward direction. Relativistic quantum field theory treats the vacuum as a medium, with bulk properties characterized by long-range order parameters. This has led to suggestions that regions of "disoriented vacuum" might be formed in high-energy collision processes. In particular, the approximate chiral symmetry of QCD could lead to regions of vacuum which have chiral order parameters disoriented to directions which have non-zero isospin, i.e. disoriented chiral condensates. A signature of DCC is the resulting distribution of the fraction of produced pions which are neutral. The MiniMax detector at the C0 collision region of the Tevatron was a telescope of 24 multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC`s) with a lead converter behind the eighth MWPC, allowing the detection of charged particles and photon conversions in an acceptance approximately a circle of radius 0.6 in pseudorapidity-azimuthal-angle space, centered on pseudorapidity η ≈ 4. An electromagnetic calorimeter was located behind the MWPC telescope, and hadronic calorimeters and scintillator were located in the upstream anti-proton direction to tag diffractive events.

  2. Challenging the standard model at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Filthaut, Frank; /Nijmegen U.

    2011-03-01

    Even at a time where the world's eyes are focused on the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which has reached the energy frontier in 2010, many important results are still being obtained from data analyses performed at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. This contribution discusses recent highlights in the areas of B hadron, electroweak, top quark, and Higgs boson physics. The standard model (SM) of particle physics forms the cornerstone of our understanding of elementary particles and their interactions, and many of its aspects have been investigated in great detail. Yet it is generally suspected to be incomplete (e.g. by not allowing for the incorporation of gravity in a field theoretical setting) and un-natural (e.g. the mass of the Higgs boson is not well protected against radiative corrections). In addition, it does not explain the dark matter and dark energy content of the Universe. It is therefore of eminent importance to test the limits of validity of the SM. In the decade since its upgrade to a centre-of-mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, the Tevatron p{bar p} collider has delivered an integrated luminosity of about 10 fb{sup -1}, up to 9 fb{sup -1} of which are available for analysis by its CDF and D0 collaborations. These large datasets allow for stringent tests of the SM in two areas: direct searches for particles or final states that are not very heavy but that suffer from small production cross sections (e.g. the Higgs boson), and searches for indirect manifestations of beyond-the-standard-model (BSM) effects through virtual effects. The latter searches can often be carried out by precise measurements of otherwise known processes. This contribution describes such tests of the SM carried out by the CDF and D0 collaborations. In particular, recent highlights in the areas of B hadron physics, electroweak physics, top quark physics, and Higgs boson physics are discussed. Recent results of tests of QCD and of direct searches for new phenomena are described in

  3. Determination of the jet energy scale at the collider detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, A.; Canelli, Florencia; Heinemann, B.; Adelman, J.; Ambrose, D.; Arguin, J.-F.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Budd, H.; Chung, Y.S.; Chung, K.; Cooper, B.; Currat, C.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, T.; Erbacher, R.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Gibson, A.; Hatakeyama, K.; Happacher, F.; Hoffman, D.; /Argonne /UCLA /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /LBL, Berkeley /Liverpool U. /University Coll. London /Michigan State U. /Toronto U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

    2005-10-01

    A precise determination of the energy scale of jets at the Collider Detector at Fermilab at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider is described. Jets are used in many analyses to estimate the energies of partons resulting from the underlying physics process. Several correction factors are developed to estimate the original parton energy from the observed jet energy in the calorimeter. The jet energy response is compared between data and Monte Carlo simulation for various physics processes, and systematic uncertainties on the jet energy scale are determined. For jets with transverse momenta above 50 GeV the jet energy scale is determined with a 3% systematic uncertainty.

  4. Performance of a beam monitor in the Fermilab Tevatron using synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Harry W.K. Cheung; Alan Hahn; Aimin Xiao

    2003-06-04

    Synclite, the beam monitor in the Fermilab Tevatron using synchrotron light is described. The calibration, monitoring and performance of the system is discussed. Observation of some effects of long range beam-beam interactions seen in the beam monitor will be presented as well as a measurement of DC beam in the Tevatron.

  5. Top and higgs physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre Savard

    2002-12-23

    We present a summary of our experimental understanding of the top quark and discuss the significant improvements expected in Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We also discuss prospects for a Higgs boson discovery at the Tevatron.

  6. Inclusive jet production at the tevatron collider in the Regge limit of quantum chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleev, V. A.; Shipilova, A. V.; Yatsenko, E. V.

    2012-03-01

    We consider the inclusive hadroproduction of jets, prompt photons, and b-quark jets in the quasimulti-Regge kinematics approach based on the hypothesis of gluon and quark reggeization in t-channel exchanges at high energies. The data taken by CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are well described in the region of x_T = 2p_T /sqrt s lesssim 0.1 without the introduction of any free parameters. In numeric calculations we use the Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription for unintegrated gluon and quark distribution functions with Martin-Roberts-Stirling-Thorne collinear parton distribution functions taken as input.

  7. High p{sub T} jet physics at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley-Geer, E.

    1996-09-01

    We present results on high {ital p{sub T}} jet physics from the CDF and D{null} experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Recent results on the inclusive jet cross-section at {radical}{ital s} = 1.8 TeV will be presented and compared with QCD. We will also present results on the dijet angular distribution. Limits on quark compositeness are presented from the CDF dijet angular distribution. Finally we will discuss the results on the inclusive jet cross section at {radical}{ital s} = 0.63 TeV and tests of scaling.

  8. Measurement of B(t --> Wb)/B(t--> Wq) at the collider detector at fermilab.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chuang, S; Chung, K; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Cijliak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Cruz, A; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; de Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Unel, M Karagoz; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P A Movilla; Muelmenstaedt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, M A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stanitzki, M; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2005-09-02

    We present a measurement of the ratio of top-quark branching fractions R = B(t --> Wb)/B(t --> Wq), where q can be a b, s, or a d quark, using lepton-plus-jets and dilepton data sets with an integrated luminosity of approximately 162 pb(-1) collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. The measurement is derived from the relative numbers of tt events with different multiplicity of identified secondary vertices. We set a lower limit of R > 0.61 at 95% confidence level.

  9. Multiple Parton Interactions in p$bar{p}$ Collisions in D0 Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Golovanov, Georgy

    2016-01-01

    The thesis is devoted to the study of processes with multiple parton interactions (MPI) in a ppbar collision collected by D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. The study includes measurements of MPI event fraction and effective cross section, a process-independent parameter related to the effective interaction region inside the nucleon. The measurements are done using events with a photon and three hadronic jets in the final state. The measured effective cross section is used to estimate background from MPI for WH production at the Tevatron energy

  10. Tevatron status

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, G.

    1989-03-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is both the world's highest energy accelerator system and first large-scale superconducting synchrotron. Since Tevatron commissioning in July 1983, the accelerator has operated in 1984, 1985 and 1987 with extracted beams of 800 GeV for three runs of fixed target physics, and in 1987, and 1988, with proton-antiproton colliding beams at 900 /times/ 900 GeV. This paper will focus on the collider operation of the Tevatron: its present status and the outlook for its longer-term future evolution. 18 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Prospects for MSSM Higgs searches at the Fermilab Tevatron.

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, P.; Liu, T.; Wagner, C. E. M.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the Tevatron reach for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric standard model, using current exclusion limits on the standard model Higgs. We study four common benchmark scenarios for the soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, including cases where the Higgs decays differ significantly from the standard model, and provide projections for the improvements in luminosity and efficiency required for the Tevatron to probe sizeable regions of the (m{sub A},tan-{beta}) plane.

  12. Prospects for MSSM Higgs boson searches at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, Patrick; Liu, Tao; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2009-08-01

    We analyze the Tevatron reach for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric standard model, using current exclusion limits on the standard model Higgs. We study four common benchmark scenarios for the soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, including cases where the Higgs decays differ significantly from the standard model, and provide projections for the improvements in luminosity and efficiency required for the Tevatron to probe sizeable regions of the (m{sub A},tan{beta}) plane.

  13. Top results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    E. Barberis

    2002-01-18

    This paper summarizes the latest measurements of the properties of the top quark as determined by the CDF and D0 collaborations during the first run of the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider (1992-1996). Prospects for future measurements of the top quark at the upgraded Tevatron collider are also presented.

  14. Looking for the top squark at the Fermilab Tevatron with four jets

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Debajyoti; Datta, Madhumita; Maity, Manas

    2006-03-01

    The scalar partner of the top quark is relatively light in many models of supersymmetry breaking. We study the production of top squarks (stops) at the Tevatron collider and their subsequent decay through baryon-number violating couplings such that the final state contains no leptons. Performing a detector-level analysis, we demonstrate that, even in the absence of leptons or missing energy, stop masses up to 210 GeV/c{sup 2} can be accessible at the Tevatron.

  15. Status of the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, P.F.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    The author presents the current operational status of the Fermilab Recycler Ring. Using a mix of stochastic and electron cooling, we prepare antiproton beams for the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program. Included are discussion of stashing and cooling performance, operational scenarios, and collider performance.

  16. Successful observation of Schottky signals at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, D.A.; Lambertson, G.R.

    1989-08-01

    We have constructed a Schottky detector for the Tevatron collider in the form of a high-Q ({approx}5000) cavity which operates at roughly 2 GHz, well above the frequency at which the Tevatron's single-bunch frequency spectrum begins to roll off. Initial spectra obtained from the detector show clearly observable Schottky betatron lines, free of coherent contaminants; also seen are the common-mode'' longitudinal signals due to the offset of the beam from the detector center. The latter signals indicate that at 2 GHz, the coherent single-bunch spectrum from the detector is reduced by >80 dB; therefore, in normal collider operation, the Schottky betatron lines are >40 dB greater than their coherent counterparts. We describe how the data we have obtained give information on transverse and longitudinal emittances, synchrotron frequency, and betatron tunes, as well as reveal what may be previously unobserved phenomena. Space limitations restrict us to presenting only as much data as should be necessary to convince even the skeptical reader of the validity of the claim made in the paper's title. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Issues and experience with controlling beam loss at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Annala, Gerald; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Controlling beam loss in the Tevatron collider is of great importance because of the delicate nature of the cryogenic magnet system and the collider detectors. Maximizing the physics potential requires optimized performance as well as protection of all equipment. The operating history of the Tevatron has significantly influenced the way losses are managed. The development of beam loss management in the Tevatron will be presented.

  18. Nonlinear dynamics studies in the Fermilab tevatron using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto,R.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M. J.; Kopp, S. E.

    2009-05-04

    An AC dipole magnet produces a sinusoidally oscillating dipole field with frequency close to betatron frequency and excites large sustained oscillations of beam particles circulating in a synchrotron. Observation of such oscillations with beam position monitors allows direct measurements of a synchrotron's nonlinear parameters. This paper presents experimental studies to measure perturbative effects of sextupole and octupole fields, performed in the Fermilab Tevatron using an ACdipole.

  19. Forward-Backward Asymmetry of Top Quark Pair Productionn at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Ziqing

    2015-12-01

    This dissertation presents the final measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry (AFB) of top quark-antiquark pair events (t t-) at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. The t t- events are produced in proton{anti-proton collisions with a center of mass energy of 1:96 TeV during the Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurements are performed with the full CDF Run II data (9.1 fb-1) in the final state that contain two charged leptons (electrons or muons, the dilepton final state), and are designed to con rm or deny the evidence-level excess in the AFB measurements in the final state with a single lepton and hadronic jets (lepton+jets final state) as well as the excess in the preliminary measurements in the dilepton final state with the first half of the CDF Run II data. New measurements include the leptonic AFB (AlFB), the lepton-pair AFB (All FB) and the reconstructed top AFB (At t FB). Each are combined with the previous results from the lepton+jets final state measured at the CDF experiment. The inclusive Al FB, All FB, and At t FB measured in the dilepton final state are 0.072 ± 0.060, 0.076 ± 0.081, and 0.12 ± 0.13, to be compared with the Standard Model (SM) predictions of 0.038 ± 0.003, 0.048 ± 0.004, and 0.010 ± 0.006, respectively. The CDF combination of AlFB and At t FB are 0.090+0:028 -0.026, and 0.160 ± 0.045, respectively. The overall results are consistent with the SM predictions.

  20. Modelling the Fermilab Collider to determine optimal running

    SciTech Connect

    McCrory, E.

    1994-12-01

    A Monte Carlo-type model of the Fermilab Collider has been constructed, the goal of which is to accurately represent the operation of the Collider, incorporating the aspects of the facility which affect operations in order to determine how to run optimally. In particular, downtime for the various parts of the complex are parameterized and included. Also, transfer efficiencies, emittance growths, changes in the luminosity lifetime and other effects are included and randomized in a reasonable manner. This Memo is an outgrowth of TM-1878, which presented an entirely analytical model of the Collider. It produced a framework for developing intuition on the way in which the major components of the collider affect the luminosity, like the stacking rate and the shot set-up time, for example. However, without accurately including downtime effects, it is not possible to say with certainty that the analytical approach can produce accurate guidelines for optimizing the performance of the Collider. This is the goal of this analysis. We first discuss the way the model is written, describing the object-oriented approach taken in C++. The parameters of the simulation are described. Then the potential criteria for ending stores are described and analyzed. Next, a typical store and a typical week are derived. Then, a final conclusion on the best end-of-store criterion is made. Finally, ideas for future analysis are presented.

  1. Photon and jet physics at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    J. Dittmann

    2002-10-25

    We summarize recent Run 1 photon and jet measurements from p{bar b} collisions at {radical}s = 0.63 TeV and 1.8 TeV using data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). First Run 2 results at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are also presented together with predictions of the kinematic reach accessible with 15 fb{sup -1} of Run 2 data. Data are compared to the predictions of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).

  2. Measurement of the Oscillation Frequency of Bs Mesons in the Hadronic Decay Mode Bs→ π Ds(Φ π)X with the D0 Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gernot August

    2009-03-01

    The standard model (SM) of particle physics is a theory, describing three out of four fundamental forces. In this model the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix describes the transformation between the mass and weak eigenstates of quarks. The matrix properties can be visualized as triangles in the complex plane. A precise measurement of all triangle parameters can be used to verify the validity of the SM. The least precisely measured parameter of the triangle is related to the CKM element |Vtd|, accessible through the mixing frequency (oscillation) of neutral B mesons, where mixing is the transition of a neutral meson into its anti-particle and vice versa. It is possible to calculate the CKM element |Vtd| and a related element |Vts| by measuring the mass differences Δmd(Δms) between neutral Bd and $\\bar{B}$d (Bs and $\\bar{B}$s) meson mass eigenstates. This measurement is accomplished by tagging the initial and final state of decaying B mesons and determining their lifetime. Currently the Fermilab Tevatron Collider (providing p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV) is the only place, where Bs oscillations can be studied. The first selection of the 'golden', fully hadronic decay mode Bs → πDs(Φπ)X at D0 is presented in this thesis. All data, taken between April 2002 and August 2007 with the D0 detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of integral Ldt = 2.8 fb-1 is used. The oscillation frequency Δms and the ratio |Vtd|/|Vts| are determined as Δms = (16.6-0.4+0.5(stat)-0.3+0.4(sys)) ps-1, |Vtd|/|Vts| = 0.213-0.003+0.004(exp) ± 0.008(theor). These results are consistent with the standard model expectations and no evidence for new physics is observable.

  3. Measurements of the Top Quark at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Cerrito, Lucio

    2007-01-01

    The authors present recent preliminary measurements of the top-antitop pair production cross section and determinations of the top quark pole mass, performed using the data collected by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Tevatron Collider. In the lepton plus jets final state, with semileptonic B decay, the pair production cross section has now been measured at CDF using {approx} 760 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. A measurement of the production cross section has also been made with {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of data in the all-jets final state by the CDF Collaboration. The mass of the top quark has now been measured using {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of collision data using all decay channels of the top quark pair, yielding the most precise measurements of the top mass to date.

  4. B Physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Manfred Paulini

    2004-02-10

    After a five year upgrade period, the Fermilab experiments CDF and D0 are taking high quality data in Run II of the Tevatron Collider. We report on the start-up of both detectors and present a selection of first B physics results from the Tevatron. We also compare different B hadron producers such as the {Upsilon}(4S) with the hadron collider environment and discuss general features of B physics at a hadron collider.

  5. Recent Electroweak Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Junjie; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2009-07-01

    W and Z bosons are mainly produced via quark-antiquark annihilations at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Precision measurements with these gauge bosons provide us with high precision tests of the Standard Model (SM) as well as indirect search for possible new physics beyond the SM. I present the recent electroweak measurements related to single W, Z boson and diboson productions from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  6. Phenomenological study of the atypical heavy flavor production observed at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, G.; Barone, M.; Fiori, I.; Giromini, P.; Happacher, F.; Miscetti, S.; Parri, A.; Ptohos, F.; /Frascati /Fermilab /INFN, Pisa /Cyprus U.

    2005-11-01

    The authors address known discrepancies between the heavy flavor properties of jets produced at the Tevatron collider and the prediction of conventional-QCD simulations. In this study, they entertain the possibility that these effects are real and due to new physics. They show that all anomalies can be simultaneously fitted by postulating the additional pair production of light bottom squarks with a 100% semileptonic branching fraction.

  7. Microwave Schottky diagnostic systems for the Fermilab Tevatron, Recycler, and CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; Jansson, Andreas; /ESS, Lund

    2011-02-01

    A means for non-invasive measurement of transverse and longitudinal characteristics of bunched beams in synchrotrons has been developed based on high sensitivity slotted waveguide pickups. The pickups allow for bandwidths exceeding hundreds of MHz while maintaining good beam sensitivity characteristics. Wide bandwidth is essential to allow bunch-by-bunch measurements by means of a fast gating system. The Schottky detector system is installed and successfully commissioned in the Fermilab Tevatron and Recycler and CERN LHC synchrotrons. Measurement capabilities include tune, chromaticity, and momentum spread of single or multiple beam bunches in any combination. With appropriate calibrations, emittance can also be measured by integrating the area under the incoherent tune sidebands.

  8. Longitudinal bunch monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector synchrotrons

    DOE PAGES

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Bhat, C.; Blokland, W.; ...

    2011-10-17

    The measurement of the longitudinal behavior of the accelerated particle beams at Fermilab is crucial to the optimization and control of the beam and the maximizing of the integrated luminosity for the particle physics experiments. Longitudinal measurements in the Tevatron and Main Injector synchrotrons are based on the analysis of signals from resistive wall current monitors. This study describes the signal processing performed by a 2 GHz-bandwidth oscilloscope together with a computer running a LabVIEW program which calculates the longitudinal beam parameters.

  9. The magnetic design and field measurement of Fermilab collider detectors: CDF (the Collider Detector at Fermilab) and D0

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.

    1990-02-01

    General magnetic characteristics of the CDF and D0 hadron collider detectors at Fermilab are described. The method and equipment for the field measurement for both detectors are described, and their field measurement data are presented. The magnetic field distribution inside the CDF solenoid magnet was measured extensively only at the boundaries, and the field values inside the volume were reconstructed. The effects due to the joints and the return conductor were measured and are discussed. The flux distribution inside the yokes and the fringing field of the D0 toroids were calculated and compared with measured data. A proposal to generate dipole magnetic field inside the D0 toroidal magnet is discussed. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Prospects for the Simultaneous Operation of the Tevatron Collider and pp Experiments in the Antiproton Source Accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Werkema, Steven J.; /Fermilab

    2001-06-07

    This document is a slightly expanded version of a portion of the Proton Driver design report. The Proton Driver group gets the credit for the original idea of running an Accumulator experiment in the BTeV era. The work presented here is a study of the feasibility of this idea. The addition of the Recycler Ring to the Fermilab accelerator complex provides an opportunity to continue the program of {bar p}p physics in the Antiproton Source Accumulator that was started by Fermilab experiments E760 and E835. The operational scenario presented here utilizes the Recycler Ring as an antiproton bank from which the colliders makes 'withdrawals' as needed to maintain the required luminosity in the Tevatron. The Accumulator is only needed to re-supply the bank in between withdrawals. When the {anti p} stacking rate is sufficiently high, and the luminosity requirements of the Collider experiments are sufficiently low, there will be time between Collider fills and subsequent refilling of the recycler to deliver beam to an experiment in the Accumulator. In the scenario envisioned here, the impact of the Accumulator experiment on the luminosity delivered to the Collider experiments is very small. If the Run II antiproton stacking rate goals are met, the operational conditions required for running Accumulator based experiments will be met during the BTeV era. A simple model of the operation of the Fermilab accelerator complex for BTeV and an experiment in the Accumulator has been developed. The model makes predictions of the rate at which luminosity is delivered to BTeV and an Accumulator experiment. This model was used to examine the impact of the proton driver on this experimental program.

  11. Reconciling open-charm production at the Fermilab Tevatron with QCD.

    PubMed

    Kniehl, B A; Kramer, G; Schienbein, I; Spiesberger, H

    2006-01-13

    We study the inclusive hadroproduction of D0, D+, D*+, and D(s)+ mesons at next-to-leading order in the parton model of quantum chromodynamics endowed with universal nonperturbative fragmentation functions fitted to e+e- annihilation data from CERN LEP1. Working in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme, we resum the large logarithms through the evolution of the fragmentation functions and, at the same time, retain the full dependence on the charm-quark mass without additional theoretical assumptions. In this way, the cross section distributions in transverse momentum recently measured by the CDF Collaboration in run II at the Fermilab Tevatron are described within errors.

  12. Measurement of the radiation field surrounding the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    K. Kordas et al.

    2004-01-28

    We present here the first direct and detailed measurements of the spatial distribution of the ionizing radiation surrounding a hadron collider experiment. Using data from two different exposures we measure the effect of additional shielding on the radiation field around the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Employing a simple model we parameterize the ionizing radiation field surrounding the detector.

  13. Twenty Years of Tevatron Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theilacker, J. C.

    2004-06-01

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has surpassed twenty years of operation. The Tevatron is still the highest energy particle accelerator in the world and will remain so until the commissioning of the LHC in Europe later this decade. The Tevatron has operated in a Fixed Target mode, accelerating a proton beam into stationary targets/detectors, as well as a Colliding Beam mode, continuously colliding counter rotating beams of protons and antiprotons. Upon completion, the Tevatron cryogenic system became the world's largest helium refrigeration system. In 1993, the Tevatron cryogenic system was given the designation of International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The operational history, experiences and statistics of the Tevatron, with an emphasis on the cryogenic system, is presented. Improvements, upgrades and current challenges of the cryogenic system are discussed.

  14. Twenty Years of Tevatron Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Jay C. Theilacker

    2004-07-15

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has surpassed twenty years of operation. The Tevatron is still the highest energy particle accelerator in the world and will remain so until the commissioning of the LHC in Europe later this decade. The Tevatron has operated in a Fixed Target mode, accelerating a proton beam into stationary targets/detectors, as well as a Colliding Beam mode, continuously colliding counter rotating beams of protons and antiprotons. Upon completion, the Tevatron cryogenic system became the world's largest helium refrigeration system. In 1993, the Tevatron cryogenic system was given the designation of International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The operational history, experiences and statistics of the Tevatron, with an emphasis on the cryogenic system, is presented. Improvements, upgrades and current challenges of the cryogenic system are discussed.

  15. Measurement of proton and anti-proton intensities in the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Pordes et al.

    2003-06-04

    This paper describes the techniques used to measure the intensities of the proton (p) and anti-proton ({bar p}) beams in the Tevatron collider. The systems provide simultaneous measurements of the intensity of the 36 proton and 36 antiproton bunches and their longitudinal profiles.

  16. A Search for Supersymmetry via Chargino-Neutralino Production in Low-$p_T$ Dimuon with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Rekovic, Vladimir

    2007-05-01

    We have searched for evidence of supersymmetry with 1 $fb^-1$ with collected with low-$p_T$ dimuon triggers of the Collider Detector on Tevatron Run II, at Fermilab. We looked for trilepton events in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV. In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) we expect chargino-neutralino pair production, with subsequent decay into three isolated leptons. We observe one event of three isolated muons, a possible hint of supersymmetry.

  17. CDF at the Tevatron Collider in Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbacher, R. D.

    2002-07-01

    Run 2 of the Tevatron began in early 2001 after extensive upgrades to both the machine and the CDF and DOaccent_mark detectors. For CDF, new tracking detectors, increased muon coverage, state-of-the-art front end electronics, pipelined triggering, and a complete overhaul of the DAQ have made it a very powerful tool to explore physics of all kinds. The status of CDF in Run 2 is presented, along with a first glimpse of CDF data.

  18. Proposed Fermilab fixed target experiment: Kaons at the Tevatron. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0898, evaluating the impacts associated with the proposed fixed target experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Femilab) in Batavia, Illinois, known as Kaons at the Tevatron (KTeV). The proposed KTeV project includes reconfiguration of an existing target station, enhancement of an existing beam transport system connected to existing utility facilities, and construction of a new experimental detector hall area. The study of the K meson, a type of subatomic particle, has been going on at Fermilab for 20 years. The proposed KTEV project advances the search for the origins of a violation of a fundamental symmetry of nature called charge parity (CP) violation. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  19. Measurement of the Strong Coupling Constant from Inclusive Jet Production at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Mesropian, Christina

    2000-06-01

    We present a measurement of the strong coupling constant from a single observable, the inclusive jet cross section. We use 86 pb-1 of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1800 GeV. The data was analyzed and experimental systematic uncertainties estimated.

  20. Diboson Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Iashvili, Ia; /SUNY, Buffalo

    2008-09-01

    We present the latest results on the production of WW, WZ, Wgamma, Zgamma and ZZ events at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The results are based on the analyses of 0.2 - 2 /fb of data collected in p pbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV by CDF and DO experiments during the Tevatron Run II. Analyses of the diboson production processes provide crucial test of the Standard Model, directly probing its predictions on the Trilinear Gauge Couplings.

  1. B(s) properties at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; /Cantabria U., Santander

    2005-11-01

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study B{sub s} mesons. In this paper they show a few selected topics from the CDF and D0 collaborations, giving special attention to the B{sub s} Mixing analyses. This note corresponds to the proceedings of the Hadron Collider Physics 2005 conference.

  2. Tevatron targets three-year extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Margaret

    2010-09-01

    Fermilab's Tevatron collider could get a new lease on life following a campaign to keep the facility running beyond the end of 2011, when the rival Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is scheduled to shut down for 15 months of repairs.

  3. Coupling in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, N.M.

    1994-12-01

    The performance of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at the commencement of run Ib was far below expectations. After a frustrating period of several months, a low-{beta} quad downstream of the interaction point at B0 was found to be rolled. This rolled quadrupole coupled the horizontal and vertical motion of the Tevatron beams. It also made matching the beam from the Main Ring to the Tevatron impossible, resulting in emittance blow up on injection. The net result of the roll was a significant reduction in the Tevatron luminosity. When the roll in the quadrupole was corrected the performance of the Tevatron improved dramatically. This note will discuss the experimental data indicating the presence of coupling and subsequent calculations which show how coupling an affect the luminosity. It is not intended to exhaust a discussion of coupling, which hopefully will be understood well enough to be discussed in a subsequent note.

  4. Measurements of top quark properties at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Margaroli, Fabrizio

    2011-05-01

    The discovery of the top quark in 1995 opened a whole new sector of investigation of the Standard Model; today top quark physics remains a key priority of the Tevatron program. Some of the measurements of top quark properties, for example its mass, will be a long-standing legacy. The recent evidence of an anomalously large charge asymmetry in top quark events suggests that new physics could couple preferably with top quarks. I will summarize this long chapter of particle physics history and discuss the road the top quark is highlighting for the LHC program.

  5. Quench performance of Fermilab/General Dynamics built full length SSC collider dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.; Orris, D.; Mazur, P.O.; Bleadon, M.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Delchamps, S.W.; Gourlay, S.; Hanft, R.; Koska, W.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.J.; Ozelis, J.; Wake, M.; Devred, A.; DiMarco, J.; Kuzminski, J.; Nah, W.; Ogitsu, T.; Puglisi, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Yu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Zheng, H.

    1992-04-01

    In this paper we present results of quench testing of full length SSC dipole magnets at Fermilab. The data are from the first six of a series of thirteen 15 m long, 50 mm aperture SSC dipole magnets which are being built and tested at Fermilab. These magnets were designed jointly by Fermilab, Brookhaven Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the SSC laboratory. Among the major goals for this series of magnets are to transfer magnet production technology to the lead vendor for the Collider Dipole Magnet, the General Dynamics Corporation, and to demonstrate industrial production by the vendor. The first magnet in the series, DCA311, was built by Fermilab technicians to establish assembly procedures. The second magnet, DCA312, was the ``technology transfer magnet`` and was built jointly by Fermilab and General Dynamics technicians. The next seven, DCA313- 319 are being built by General Dynamics personnel using Fermilab facilities and procedures. However, Fermilab personnel still operate the major tooling, provide the welders, perform assembly of items that would not be part of production magnets (e.g. voltage taps), and oversee the QA program. Five of these 7 GD-built magnets will be used in the Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) to be carried out in Dallas later this year. The last four magnets, DCA320-323, are being built by Fermilab alone.

  6. Quench performance of Fermilab/General Dynamics built full length SSC collider dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.; Orris, D.; Mazur, P.O.; Bleadon, M.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Delchamps, S.W.; Gourlay, S.; Hanft, R.; Koska, W.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.J.; Ozelis, J.; Wake, M. ); Devred, A.; DiMarco, J.; Kuzminski, J.; Nah, W.; Ogitsu, T.; Puglisi, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Yu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Zheng, H. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper we present results of quench testing of full length SSC dipole magnets at Fermilab. The data are from the first six of a series of thirteen 15 m long, 50 mm aperture SSC dipole magnets which are being built and tested at Fermilab. These magnets were designed jointly by Fermilab, Brookhaven Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the SSC laboratory. Among the major goals for this series of magnets are to transfer magnet production technology to the lead vendor for the Collider Dipole Magnet, the General Dynamics Corporation, and to demonstrate industrial production by the vendor. The first magnet in the series, DCA311, was built by Fermilab technicians to establish assembly procedures. The second magnet, DCA312, was the ''technology transfer magnet'' and was built jointly by Fermilab and General Dynamics technicians. The next seven, DCA313- 319 are being built by General Dynamics personnel using Fermilab facilities and procedures. However, Fermilab personnel still operate the major tooling, provide the welders, perform assembly of items that would not be part of production magnets (e.g. voltage taps), and oversee the QA program. Five of these 7 GD-built magnets will be used in the Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) to be carried out in Dallas later this year. The last four magnets, DCA320-323, are being built by Fermilab alone.

  7. Single event effects and their mitigation for the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarek, Richard J.; D'Auria, Saverio; Dong, Peter; Hocker, Andy; Kordas, Kostas; McGimpsey, Susan; Nicolas, Ludovic; Wallny, Rainer; Schmitt, Wayne; Worm, Steven; /Fermilab /Toronto U. /Glasgow U. /Rutherford /UCLA

    2005-11-01

    We present an overview of radiation induced failures and operational experiences from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). In our summary, we examine single event effects (SEE) in electronics located in and around the detector. We present results of experiments to identify the sources and composition of the radiation and steps to reduce the rate of SEEs in our electronics. Our studies have led to a better, more complete understanding of the radiation environment in a modern hadron collider experiment.

  8. Tau identification at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Stephen; /Chicago U., EFI

    2005-07-01

    Methods for reconstructing and identifying the hadronic decays of tau leptons with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in Run II are described. Precision electroweak measurements of W and Z gauge boson cross sections are presented as well as results of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model with hadronically decaying tau leptons in the final state.

  9. Recent Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demorden, L.

    1998-06-01

    We review recent results from fixed-target and collider experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron. Among the topics discussed are jet production rates, {alpha}{sub S} measurements, the {anti d}/{anti u} ratio in the proton sea, diffraction, heavy quark physics and leptoquark searches.

  10. Overview of results from the Fermilab fixed target and collider experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, H.E.

    1997-06-01

    In this paper we present a review of recent QCD related results from Fermilab fixed target and collider experiments. Topics covered range from structure functions through W/Z production, heavy quark production and jet angular distributions. We also include the current state of knowledge about leptoquark pair production in hadronic collisions.

  11. Production of b-quark jets at the Tevatron Collider in the Regge limit of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Saleev, V. A. Shipilova, A. V.

    2011-01-15

    The production of b-quark jets is considered in the approach of quasi-multi-Regge kinematics. This approach is based on the hypothesis of the Reggeization of t-channel gluons and quarks at high energies. Experimental data obtained by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Tevatron Collider for various spectra of b-quark jets are described quite accurately without invoking free parameters.

  12. A search for B$0\\atop{S}$ oscillations at the Tevatron collider experiment D0

    SciTech Connect

    Krop, Dan N.

    2007-04-01

    We present a search for B$0\\atop{S}$ oscillations using semileptonic BS → DsμX (Ds → K$0\\atop{S}$K). The data were collected using the D0 detector from events produced in √s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron. The Tevatron is currently the only place in the world that produces B$0\\atop{S}$ mesons and will be until early 2008 when the Large Hadron Collider begins operating at CERN. One of the vital ingredients for the search for B s oscillations is the determination of the flavor of the B$0\\atop{S}$ candidate (B$0\\atop{S}$ or $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{S}$ ) at the time of its production, called initial state flavor tagging. We develop an likelihood based initial state flavor tagger that uses objects on the side of the event opposite to the reconstructed B meson candidate. To improve the performance of this flavor tagger, we have made it multidimensional so that it takes correlations between discriminants into account. This tagging is then certified by applying it to sample of semimuonic B(0,+) decays and measuring the well-known oscillation frequency Δmd. We obtain Δmd = 0.486 ± 0.021 ps-1, consistent with the world average. The tagging performance is characterized by the effective efficiency, ϵD2 = (1.90 ± 0.41)%. We then turn to the search for B$0\\atop{S}$ oscillations in the above-named channel. A special two-dimensional mass fitting procedure is developed to separate kinematic reflections from signal events. Using this mass fitting procedure in an unbinned likelihood framework, we obtain a 95% C.L. of Δms > 1.10 ps-1 and a sensitivity of 1.92 ps-1. This result is combined with other analyzed B$0\\atop{S}$ decay channels at D0 to obtain a combined 95% C.L. of Δms > 14.9 ps-1 and a sensitivity of 16.5 ps-1. The corresponding log likelihood scan has a preferred value of

  13. Low-cost hadron colliders at Fermilab: A discussion paper

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, G.W.; Malamud, E.

    1996-06-21

    New more economic approaches are required to continue the dramatic exponential rise in collider energies as represented by the well known Livingston plot. The old idea of low cost, low field iron dominated magnets in a small diameter pipe may become feasible in the next decade with dramatic recent advances in technology: (1) advanced tunneling technologies for small diameter, non human accessible tunnels, (2) accurate remote guidance systems for tunnel survey and boring machine steering, (3) high T{sub c} superconductors operating at liquid N{sub 2} or liquid H{sub 2} temperatures, (4) industrial applications of remote manipulation and robotics, (5) digitally multiplexed electronics to minimize cables, (6) achievement of high luminosities in p-p and p-{anti P} colliders. The goal of this paper is to stimulate continuing discussions on approaches to this new collider and to identify critical areas needing calculations, construction of models, proof of principle experiments, and full scale prototypes in order to determine feasibility and arrive at cost estimates.

  14. Top Quark Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the top quark in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron proton antiproton collider, precise measurements of its mass are ongoing. Using data recorded by the D0 and CDF experiment, corresponding to up to the full Tevatron data sample, top quark mass measurements performed in different final states using various extraction techniques are presented in this article. The recent Tevatron top quark mass combination yields m_t=173.20 +-0.87 GeV. Furthermore, measurements of the top antitop quark mass difference from the Tevatron are discussed.

  15. Searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Wade C.; Junk, Thomas R.

    2016-10-01

    During Run II of the Tevatron collider, which took place from 2001 until 2011, the CDF and D0 detectors each collected approximately 10 fb -1 of poverline p collision data at a center-of-mass energy of √ s = 1.96 TeV. This dataset allowed for tests for the presence of the SM Higgs boson in the mass range 90-200 GeV in the production modes gg → H, W/ZH, vector-boson fusion, and toverline tH, with H decay modes H → boverline b, H → W+W-, H → τ+τ-, H → γγ, and H → ZZ. This chapter summarizes the search methods and the results of the Higgs boson search at the Tevatron. The increased sophistication of the analysis techniques as the collider run progressed is discussed, covering the strategies used over time to improve the sensitivity and breadth of the analyses. Using the full Tevatron data sample for both experiments, the combined Higgs search in all channels observes an excess consistent with the predicted SM Higgs boson signal with mass of 125 GeV, with a significance of 3.0 standard deviations above the background prediction.

  16. Top Quark Pair Production Cross Section at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2015-09-25

    The top quark, discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at Fermilab, has undergone intense studies in the last 20 years. Currently, CDF and D0 converge on their measurements of top-antitop quark production cross sections using the full Tevatron data sample. In these proceedings, the latest results on inclusive and differential measurements of top-antitop quark production cross sections at the Tevatron are reported.

  17. Phase modulation of the bucket stops bunch oscillations at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; Burov, A.; /Fermilab

    2012-04-02

    Bunches in the Tevatron are known to exhibit longitudinal oscillations which persist indefinitely. These oscillations are colloquially called 'dancing bunches.' Although the dancing proton bunches do not cause single bunch emittance growth or beam loss at injection, they lead to bunch lengthening at collisions. In Tevatron operations, a longitudinal damper has been built which stops this dance and damps out coupled bunch modes. Recent theoretical work predicts that the dance can also be stopped by an appropriate change in the bunch distribution. This paper describes the Tevatron experiments which support this theory.

  18. Crystal extraction at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    Luminosity-driven channeling extraction was observed for the first time in a 900 GeV study at the Fermilab Tevatron carried out in the 1995-1996 period. This experiment, Fermilab E853, demonstrated that useful TeV level beams can be extracted from a superconducting accelerator during high luminosity collider operations without unduly affecting the background at the collider detectors. Multipass extraction was found to increase the efficiency of the process significantly. The beam extraction efficiency was in the range of 25%. The history of the experiment is reviewed. Special attention is paid to results related to collimation.

  19. High-luminosity primary vertex selection in top-quark studies using the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Buzatu, Adrian; /McGill U.

    2006-08-01

    Improving our ability to identify the top quark pair (t{bar t}) primary vertex (PV) on an event-by-event basis is essential for many analyses in the lepton-plus-jets channel performed by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) Collaboration. We compare the algorithm currently used by CDF (A1) with another algorithm (A2) using Monte Carlo simulation at high instantaneous luminosities. We confirm that A1 is more efficient than A2 at selecting the t{bar t} PV at all PV multiplicities, both with efficiencies larger than 99%. Event selection rejects events with a distance larger than 5 cm along the proton beam between the t{bar t} PV and the charged lepton. We find flat distributions for the signal over background significance of this cut for all cut values larger than 1 cm, for all PV multiplicities and for both algorithms. We conclude that any cut value larger than 1 cm is acceptable for both algorithms under the Tevatron's expected instantaneous luminosity improvements.

  20. Search for chargino and neutralino at Run II of the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Canepa, Anadi

    2006-08-01

    In this dissertation we present a search for the associated production of charginos and neutralinos, the supersymmetric partners of the Standard Model bosons. We analyze a data sample representing 745 pb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF experiment at the p$\\bar{p}$ Tevatron collider. We compare the Standard Model predictions with the observed data selecting events with three leptons and missing transverse energy. Finding no excess, we combine the results of our search with similar analyses carried out at CDF and set an upper limit on the chargino mass in SUSY scenarios.

  1. Considerations of bunch-spacing options for multi-bunch operation of the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, G.

    1989-12-14

    This discussion will consider a number of points relevant to limitations, advantages and disadvantages of various arrangements of bunches in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The considerations discussed here will be limited to: (a) bunch spacing symmetry and relation to the relative luminosity at B0 and D0 and the beam-beam interaction with separated beams; (b) bunch spacing constraints imposed by Main Ring RF coalescing and the optics of beam separation at B0 and D0; and (c) bunch spacing constraints imposed by injection and abort kicker timing requirements, and by the Antiproton Source RF unstacking process. 20 figs., 17 tabs.

  2. Searches for supersymmetry at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Mary R. M. Bishai

    2001-05-15

    We review current experimental results of searches for Supersymmetry (SUSY) at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider using the Run I data collected during 1992-1996. New results from the CDF detector in the jets + missing E{sub t} and lepton-photon channels are presented. Recent results from model independent searches at D0 using the SLEUTH algorithm are reviewed. We discuss the prospects for supersymmetry searches at Run II of the Tevatron, scheduled to start in March, 2001.

  3. End of an era as Tevatron closes down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2011-11-01

    After 26 years of colliding protons with antiprotons at energies as high as 1.96 TeV, physicists and dignitaries gathered at Fermilab on the outskirts of Chicago on 30 September to mark the final day of the Tevatron particle collider.

  4. First Observation of Vector Boson Pairs in a Hadronic Final State at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-05-01

    We present the first observation in hadronic collisions of the electroweak production of vector boson pairs (VV, V = W,Z) where one boson decays to a dijet final state. The data correspond to 3.5 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 1516 {+-} 239(stat) {+-} 144(syst) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} VV + X) of 18.0 {+-} 2.8(stat) {+-} 2.4(syst) {+-} 1.1(lumi) pb, in agreement with the expectations of the standard model.

  5. First observation of vector boson pairs in a hadronic final state at the tevatron collider.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-08-28

    We present the first observation in hadronic collisions of the electroweak production of vector boson pairs (VV, V = W, Z) where one boson decays to a dijet final state. The data correspond to 3.5 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity of pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 1516 + or - 239(stat) + or - 144(syst) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section sigma(pp[over ]-->VV + X) of 18.0 + or - 2.8(stat) + or - 2.4(syst) + or -1.1(lumi) pb, in agreement with the expectations of the standard model.

  6. First Observation of Vector Boson Pairs in a Hadronic Final State at the Tevatron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-08-01

    We present the first observation in hadronic collisions of the electroweak production of vector boson pairs (VV, V=W, Z) where one boson decays to a dijet final state. The data correspond to 3.5fb-1 of integrated luminosity of p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 1516±239(stat)±144(syst) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section σ(p pmacr →VV+X) of 18.0±2.8(stat)±2.4(syst)±1.1(lumi)pb, in agreement with the expectations of the standard model.

  7. pp(macro)-->tt(macro)H: a discovery mode for the Higgs boson at the Fermilab Tevatron.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, J; Hill, C S; Incandela, J; Parke, S; Rainwater, D; Stuart, D

    2001-02-26

    The production of a standard model Higgs boson in association with a top quark pair at the upcoming high luminosity run ( 15 fb(-1) integrated luminosity) of the Fermilab Tevatron ( square root of s = 2.0 TeV) is revisited. For Higgs masses below 140 GeV we demonstrate that the production cross section times branching ratio for H-->bb macro decays yields a significant number of events and that this mode is competitive with and complementary to the searches using pp(macro) -->WH,ZH associated production. For higher mass Higgs bosons the H-->W(+)W(-) decays are more difficult but have the potential to provide a few spectacular events.

  8. Measurement of the B meson Lifetimes with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Uozumi, Satoru

    2006-01-01

    The lifetimes of the B-, $\\bar{B}$0 and $\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ mesons are measured using partially reconstructed semileptonic decays. Following semileptonic decay processes and their charge conjugates are used for this analysis: B-/B0 → ℓ-vD0X; B-/B0 → ℓ-vD*+X; B$0\\atop{s}$ → ℓ-vD $+\\atop{s}$x, where ℓ- denotes either a muon or electron. The data are collected during 2002-2004 by the 8 GeV single lepton triggers in CDF Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Corresponding integrated luminosity is about 260 and 360 pbℓ-1 used for the B-/B0 and B$0\\atop{s}$ lifetime analyses, respectively. With the single lepton triggers, events which contain a muon or electron with a transverse momentum greater than 8 GeV/c are selected. For these lepton candidates, further lepton identification cuts are applied to improve purity of the B semileptonic decay signal. After the lepton selection, three types of charm mesons associated with the lepton candidates are reconstructed. Following exclusive decay modes are used for the charm meson reconstruction: D0 → K-π+; D*+ → D0π$+\\atop{s}$, followed by D0→ K-π+; D$+\\atop{s}$ → Φπ++K-. Here π$+\\atop{s}$ denotes a slow pion from D*+ decay. Species of the reconstructed charm meson identify the parent B meson species. However in the B-/B0 semileptonic decays, both mesons decay into the identical lepton + D0 final state. To solve this mixture of the B components in the D0 sample, they adopt the following method: First among the inclusive D0 sample, they look for the D*+ → D0 π$+\\atop{s}$ signal. The inclusive D

  9. A Measurement of the W Boson Mass at the Fermilab pp¯ Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grim, G.; Grinstein, S.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Lander, R.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnenmann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamanda, R.; Yamin, P.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1998-04-01

    We report a measurement of the W boson mass based on an integrated luminosity of 82 pb-1 from pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV recorded in 1994-1995 by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We identify W bosons by their decays to eν and extract the mass by fitting the transverse mass spectrum from 28 323 W boson candidates. A sample of 3563 dielectron events, mostly due to Z-->ee decays, constrains models of W boson production and the detector. We measure MW = 80.44+/-0.10\\(stat\\)+/-0.07\\(syst\\) GeV. By combining this measurement with our result form the 1992-1993 data set, we obtain MW = 80.43+/-0.11 GeV.

  10. The Fermilab PBAR-P Collider: Present status and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.

    1988-11-01

    The Tevatron Collider is performing beyond expectations for its first physics run. The peak luminosity is already 1.6 times the design goal of 10/sup 30/ cm/sup /minus/2/ s/sup /minus/1/. The anticipated integrated luminosity recorded by the major detector, CDF, is 3 inverse picobarns which should be sufficient to see the top quark if its mass is less than 110 GeV. The next two Collider runs will have improved performance with luminosity approaching 10/sup 31/ at two interaction regions. In the years between 1993 and 2000, the Collider energy will be increased by using the highest field superconducting magnets then available, where 8.8 T would give 2 TeV on 2 TeV pbar-p collisions with a luminosity above 10/sup 31/. To facilitate this possibility and to improve the general Collider capabilities, a new 150 GeV Main Injector is now being designed. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Searches for gauge mediated supersymmetry at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Pierre; /Saclay

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of searches for new physics in events with two photons and large missing transverse energy collected with both detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Several models of physics beyond the Standard Model motivate searches in this final state, in particular supersymmetry (SUSY) with gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. The D0 collaboration interprets also its search in the framework of universal extra dimensions (UED) with gravity-mediated Kaluza-Klein excitation decays. The results presented use 2.6 fb{sup -1} (CDF) and 6.3 fb{sup -1} (D0) of data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  12. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  13. Review of recent Tevatron operations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.S.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider continues to improve its luminosity performance at the energy frontier {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The recent Tevatron operation will be reviewed and notable tasks leading to advancements will be highlighted. The topics to be covered include: work performed during the 14-week shutdown in 2006, improved helical orbits, automatic orbit stabilization during high-energy physics (HEP) stores, optics corrections, improvements in the quench protection system, and avenues to maximizing the integrated luminosity delivered to the CDF and D0 experiments.

  14. Study of the heavy flavor content of jets produced in W events at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    G. Apollinari

    2002-08-01

    We present a detailed study of the heavy flavor content in the W + jet data sample collected with the CDF detector during the 1992-1995 collider run at Fermilab. Rates of heavy flavor jets, identified via the observation of secondary vertices or semileptonic decays of b and c quarks, are in good agreement with a standard model simulation including production of the top quark. An exception is the number of events in which a single jet has both a secondary vertex and a semileptonic decay tag. In the W + 2,3 jet data, we expect 4.4 {+-} 0.6 and we find 13 such events. The kinematic properties of this small sample of events are statistically difficult to reconcile with the simulation of standard model processes.

  15. Support of hadroproduction of bottom using the 800 GeV/c primary proton beam at the Fermilab tevatron. Final performance report, June 14, 1988--May 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, D.J.

    1992-05-14

    The High Energy Physics (HEP) group at Prairie View A&M University is a collaborator with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), and the universities listed below. The purpose of this collaboration is to contribute to the understanding of heavy quark hadroproduction. Our efforts began in the early 1980`s at Fermilab with the study of the charmonium states, J/{psi} and {chi}, (DE-FG-86ER-40297) and presently with the continued studies of the charmonium system and direct photon production (Fermilab experiment E705) and new studies on bottom production (Fermilab experiment E771) in the High Intensity Laboratory (Proton-West Area) of Fermilab. The Prairie View group will, as a part of their task, be directly responsible for a major part of the PWC system upgrade by developing the electronics for the readouts of the PWC pad chambers. Six in all, these chambers, are a part of new multilevel triggering scheme and represents a departure from the triggering methodology of the previous trigger processors in earlier experiments. The Prairie View group is also involved with the Bottom Collider Detector (BCD) Collaboration which is proposing to study bottom production at the Fermilab Collider and at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC).

  16. Kickers and power supplies for the Fermilab Tevatron I antiproton source

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, T.; Bartoszek, L.; Tilles, E.; Petter, J.; McCarthy, J.

    1985-05-01

    The Fermilab Antiproton Source Accumulator and Debuncher rings require 5 kickers in total. These range in design from conventional ferrite delay line type magnets, with ceramic beam tubes to mechanically complex shuttered kickers situated entirely in the Accumulator Ring's 10/sup -10/ torr vacuum. Power supplies are thyratron switched pulse forming networks that produce microsecond width pulses of several kiloamps with less than 30 nanoseconds rise and fall times. Kicker and power supply design requirements for field strength, vacuum, rise and fall time, timing and magnetic shielding of the stacked beam in the accumulator by the eddy current shutter will be discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Model-independent analysis of the Fermilab Tevatron turn-by-turn beam position monitor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Petrenko, A.V.; Valishev, A.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Coherent transverse beam oscillations in the Tevatron were analyzed with the model-independent analysis (MIA) technique. This allowed one to obtain the model-independent values of coupled betatron amplitudes, phase advances, and dispersion function around the ring from a single dipole kick measurement. In order to solve the MIA mode mixing problem which limits the accuracy of determination of the optical functions, we have developed a new technique of rotational MIA mode untangling. The basic idea is to treat each beam position monitor (BPM) as two BPMs separated in a ring by exactly one turn. This leads to a simple criterion of MIA mode separation: the betatron phase advance between any BPM and its counterpart shifted by one turn should be equal to the betatron tune and therefore should not depend on the BPM position in the ring. Furthermore, we describe a MIA-based technique to locate vibrating magnets in a storage ring.

  18. Coherent production of pions and rho mesons in neutrino charged current interactions on neon nuclei at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Willocq, S.

    1992-05-01

    The coherent production of single pions and and {rho} mesons in charged current interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos on neon nuclei has been studied. The data were obtained using the Fermilab 15-foot Bubble Chamber, filled with a heavy Ne-H{sub 2} mixture and exposed to the Quadrupole Triplet neutrino beam produced by 800 GeV protons from the Tevatron. The average beam energy was 86 GeV. In a sample of 330000 frames, 1032 two-prong {nu}{sub {mu}} + {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} charged current interactions were selected. The goal of this study was to investigate the low Q{sup 2} high {nu} region where the hadron dominance model can be tested. In this model, the vector and axial-vector parts of the weak hadronic current are dominated by the {rho} and a{sub 1} mesons respectively. Moreover, the Partially Conserved Axial Current (PCAC) hypothesis can be tested by studying the coherent production of single pions.

  19. AC loss measurements of model and full size 50mm SSC collider dipole magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Ozelis, J.P.; Delchamps, S.W.; Gourlay, S.; Jaffery, T.; Kinney, W.; Koska, W.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.J.; Mazur, P.O.; Orris, D.; Strait, J.; Wake, M. ); Dimarco, J.; Kuzminski, J.; Zheng, H. )

    1992-09-01

    Tests have recently been performed at Fermilab in order to measure the energy losses due to eddy currents and iron and superconductor magnetization. These measurements were performed on six 1.5m long model magnets and eight 15m long full scale collider dipole magnets. AC losses were measured as a function of ramp rate using sawtooth ramps from 500, to 5000 Amps for both types of magnets, while bipolar studies were additionally performed on some of the short magnets. The measured magnet voltage and current for a complete cycle are digitally integrated to yield the energy loss per cycle. Measurement reproducibility is typically 5%, with good agreement between long magnet measurements and extrapolations from short magnet measurement results. Magnetization loss measurements among similar magnet types agree to within experimental error, while eddy current losses correlate strongly with the observed dependence of quench current on ramp rate.

  20. Recent results on direct photons from CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab)

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.M.

    1990-06-01

    We report on preliminary measurements of direct photons in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV from the 1988--89 run of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The inclusive direct photon cross section, measured for photon transverse momentum in the range 13 < P{sub t} < 68 GeV, has an excess at low P{sub t} compared to recent Quantum Chromodynamic (QCD) calculations. The pseudorapidity distribution of the away-side jet, for events with 27 < P{sub t} < 33 GeV, agrees with QCD predictions. Measurements of the K{sub t} kick in photon-jet events are also presented. 8 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Recent Results of Top Quark Physics from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R. Y.

    2015-07-09

    Twenty years after its discovery in 1995 by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab, the top quark still undergoes intensive studies at the Tevatron and the LHC at CERN. In this article, recent top quark physics results from CDF and D0 are reported. In particular, measurements of single top quark and double top quark production, the $t\\bar{t}$ forward-backward asymmetry and the top quark mass are discussed.

  2. Fermilab R and D test facility for SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.; Bleadon, M.; Hanft, R.; Lamm, M.; McGuire, K.; Mantsch, P.; Mazur, P.O.; Orris, D.; Pachnik, J.

    1989-02-01

    The test facility used for R and D testing of full scale development dipole magnets for the SSC is described. The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility, originally built for production testing of Tevatron magnets, has been substantially modified to allow testing also of SSC magnets. Two of the original six test stands have been rebuilt to accommodate testing of SSC magnets at pressures between 1.3 Atm and 4 Atm and at temperatures between 1.8 K and 4.8 K and the power system has been modified to allow operation to at least 8 kA. Recent magnets have been heavily instrumented with voltage taps to allow detailed study of quench location and propagation and with strain gage based stress, force and motion transducers. A data acquisition system has been built with a capacity to read from each SSC test stand up to 220 electrical quench signals, 32 dynamic pressure, temperature and mechanical transducer signals during quench and up to 200 high precision, low time resolution, pressure, temperature and mechanical transducer signals. The quench detection and protection systems is also described. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Combination of the top-quark mass measurements from the Tevatron collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Álvarez González, B.; Alverson, G.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Bose, T.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Brucken, E.; Bu, X. B.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Cihangir, S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Croc, A.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; Dagenhart, D.; Das, A.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; d'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernandez, J. P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, M.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hewamanage, S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, A. W.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kasper, P. A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Landsberg, G.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lee, S. W.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lincoln, D.; Lindgren, M.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Maravin, Y.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neustroev, P.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patrick, J.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penning, B.; Penzo, A.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ranjan, N.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo, I.; Renkel, P.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Roser, R.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A. S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schlobohm, S.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, K. J.; Snider, F. D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Soha, A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; Squillacioti, P.; Denis, R. St.; Stancari, M.; Stark, J.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varganov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verdier, P.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wahl, H. D.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W. C., III; White, A.; Whiteson, D.; Wick, F.; Wicke, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, W.-C.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yin, H.; Yi, K.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-11-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known elementary particle, with a mass about 40 times larger than the mass of its isospin partner, the bottom quark. It decays almost 100% of the time to a W boson and a bottom quark. Using top-antitop pairs at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, the CDF and D0 Collaborations have measured the top quark’s mass in different final states for integrated luminosities of up to 5.8fb-1. This paper reports on a combination of these measurements that results in a more precise value of the mass than any individual decay channel can provide. It describes the treatment of the systematic uncertainties and their correlations. The mass value determined is 173.18±0.56(stat)±0.75(syst)GeV or 173.18±0.94GeV, which has a precision of ±0.54%, making this the most precise determination of the top-quark mass.

  4. Review of physics results from the Tevatron: Heavy flavor physics

    DOE PAGES

    Lewis, Jonathan; van Kooten, Rick

    2015-02-28

    In this study, we present a review of heavy flavor physics results from the CDF and DØ Collaborations operating at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. A summary of results from Run 1 is included, but we concentrate on legacy results of charm and b physics from Run 2, including results up to Summer 2014.

  5. Experimental Study of W Z Intermediate Bosons Associated Production with the CDF Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzobon, Nicola; /Pisa U.

    2007-09-01

    Studying WZ associated production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider is of great importance for two main reasons. On the one hand, this process would be sensitive to anomalies in the triple gauge couplings such that any deviation from the value predicted by the Standard Model would be indicative of new physics. In addition, by choosing to focus on the final state where the Z boson decays to b{bar b} pairs, the event topology would be the same as expected for associated production of a W and a Standard Model light Higgs boson (m{sub H} {approx}< 135 GeV) which decays into b{bar b} pairs most of times. The process WH {yields} W b{bar b} has an expected {sigma} {center_dot} B about five times lower than WZ {yields} Wb{bar b} for m{sub H} {approx_equal} 120 GeV. Therefore, observing this process would be a benchmark for an even more difficult search aiming at discovering the light Higgs in the WH {yields} Wb{bar b} process. After so many years of Tevatron operation only a weak WZ signal was recently observed in the full leptonic decay channel, which suffers from much less competition from background. Searching for the Z in the b{bar b} decay channel in this process is clearly a very challenging endeavour. In the work described in this thesis, WZ production is searched for in a final state where the W decays leptonically to an electron-neutrino pair or a muon-neutrino pair, with associated production of a jet pair consistent with Z decays. A set of candidate events is obtained by applying appropriate cuts to the parameters of events collected by wide acceptance leptonic triggers. To improve the signal fraction of the selected events, an algorithm was used to tag b-flavored jets by means of their content of long lived b-hadrons and corrections were developed to the jet algorithm to improve the b-jet energy resolution for a better reconstruction of the Z mass. In order to sense the presence of a signal one needs to estimate the amount of background. The relative content of

  6. Inclusive double-pomeron exchange at the fermilab tevatron p p collider.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; De Cecco, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fan, Q; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Gresele, A; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hou, S; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Issever, C; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Kang, J; Unel, M Karagoz; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lannon, K; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Niell, F; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, H; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Solodsky, A; Speer, T; Spezziga, M; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M; Tannenbaum, B; Tecchio, M; Tesarek, R J; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thurman-Keup, R; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Toyoda, H; Trischuk, W; de Troconiz, J F; Tseng, J; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Vaiciulis, T; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Vucinic, D; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wan, Z; Wang, C; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Watanabe, T; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilkes, T; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Winn, D; Wolbers, S; Wolinski, D; Wolinski, J; Wolinski, S; Wolter, M; Worm, S; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyss, J; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yeh, P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yosef, C; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zucchelli, S

    2004-10-01

    We report results from a study of events with a double-Pomeron exchange topology produced in p p collisions at sqrt[s]=1800 GeV. The events are characterized by a leading antiproton and a large rapidity gap on the outgoing proton side. We find that the differential production cross section agrees in shape with predictions based on Regge theory and factorization, and that the ratio of double-Pomeron exchange to single diffractive production rates is relatively unsuppressed as compared to the O(10) suppression factor previously measured in single diffractive production.

  7. Operations aspects of the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Geynisman, M.G.; Makara, J.N.

    1995-03-01

    The Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility consists of helium and nitrogen reliquefier plants operated 24 hours-a-day to supply LHe at 4.6{degrees}K and LN{sub 2} for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider ring and to recover warm return gases. Operating aspects of CHL, including different equipment and systems reliability, availability, maintenance experience, safety concerns, and economics aspects are discussed.

  8. Physics overview of the Fermilab Low Energy Antiproton Facility Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1986-05-01

    A physics overview is presented of the Fermilab workshop to consider a possible high flux, low energy antiproton facility that would use cooled antiprotons from the accumulator ring of the Tevatron collider. Two examples illustrate the power of each a facility to produce narrow states at high rates. Physics topics to which such a facility may be applied are reviewed.

  9. Hydro static water level systems at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, J.T.; Guerra, J.A.; Hansen, S.U.; Kiper, T.E.; Jostlein, H.; Shiltsev, V.; Chupyra, A.; Kondaurov, M.; Singatulin, S.

    2006-09-01

    Several Hydrostatic Water Leveling systems (HLS) are in use at Fermilab. Three systems are used to monitor quadrupoles in the Tevatron and two systems are used to monitor ground motion for potential sites for the International Linear Collider (ILC). All systems use capacitive sensors to determine the water level of water in a pool. These pools are connected with tubing so that relative vertical shifts between sensors can be determined. There are low beta quadrupoles at the B0 and D0 interaction regions of Tevatron accelerator. These quadrupoles use BINP designed and built sensors and have a resolution of 1 micron. All regular lattice superconducting quadrupoles (a total of 204) in the Tevatron use a Fermilab designed system and have a resolution of 6 microns. Data on quadrupole motion due to quenches, changes in temperature will be presented. In addition data for ground motion for ILC studies caused by natural and cultural factors will be presented.

  10. Simultaneous Heavy Flavor Fractions and Top Cross Section Measurement at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, Mark J.

    2010-04-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the top pair production cross section, using data from proton–antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, with 2.7 ± 0.2 fb-1 of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Background contributions are measured concurrently with the top cross section in the b-tagged lepton-plus-jets sample using a kinematic fit, which simultaneously determines the cross sections and normalizations of t$\\bar{t}$, W + jets, QCD, and electroweak processes. This is the first application of a procedure of this kind. The top cross section is measured to be σt$\\bar{t}$ = 7.64±0.57(stat + syst)±0.45(lumi) pb and the Monte Carlo simulation scale factors KWb$\\bar{b}$ = 1.57±0.25, KW$\\bar{c}$ = 0.94±0.79, KWc = 1.9 ± 0.3, and KWq$\\bar{q}$ = 1.1 ± 0.3. These results are consistent with existing measurements using other procedures. More data will reduce the systematic uncertainties and will lead to the most precise of any single analysis to date.

  11. Test results from Fermilab 1.5 m model SSC collider dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Koska, W.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Coulter, K.J.; Delchamps, S.; Gourlay, S.; Jaffery, T.S.; Kinney, W.; Lamm, M.J.; Ozelis, J.P.; Strait, J.; Wake, M.

    1991-09-01

    We will present results from tests of 1.5 m model SSC collider dipole magnets. These R&D magnets are identical to the 15 m full length dipoles currently being assembled at Fermilab in all important aspects except length. Because of their small size they can be built faster and tested more extensively than the long magnets. The model magnets are used to optimize design parameters for, and to indicate the performance which can be expected from, the 15 m magnets. The are instrumented with voltage taps over the first two current blocks for quench localization and with several arrays of strain gauge transducers for the study of mechanical behavior. The stress at the poles of the inner and outer coils is monitored during construction and, along with end force and shell strain, during excitation. Magnetic measurements are made several times during each magnet`s lifetime, including at operating temperature and field. We will report on studies of the quench performance, mechanical behavior and magnetic field of these magnets.

  12. $B$ mixing and lifetimes at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Piedra, J.

    2006-04-01

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of b-hadrons. Both the D0 and CDF experiments have collected a sample of about 1 fb{sup -1}. they report results on three topics: b-hadron lifetimes, polarization amplitudes and the decay width difference in B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}, and B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing.

  13. Twenty years of diffraction at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.; /Rockefeller U.

    2005-10-01

    Results on diffractive particle interactions from the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider are placed in perspective through a QCD inspired phenomenological approach, which exploits scaling and factorization properties observed in data. The results discussed are those obtained by the CDF Collaboration from a comprehensive set of single, double, and multigap soft and hard diffraction processes studied during the twenty year period since 1985, when the CDF diffractive program was proposed and the first Blois Workshop was held.

  14. Di-boson production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    De Lentdecker, Gilles; /Rochester U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present some precision measurements on electroweak physics performed at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. Namely they report on the boson-pair production cross sections and on triple gauge boson couplings using proton anti-proton collisions collected by the CDF and D0 experiments at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of up to 324 pb{sup -1}.

  15. Non SUSY Searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Cortabitarte, R. Vilar

    2004-08-26

    The Fermilab Tevatron collider experiments, CDF and D0, have collected {approx} 200 pb{sup -1} of data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV since March 2002 (RunII). Both experiments have investigated physics beyond the standard model; this paper reviews some of the recent results on the searches for new phenomena, concentrating on Z', extra dimensions, excited electrons and lepto quarks. No signal was observed, therefore stringent limits on the signatures and models were derived.

  16. Searches for new physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, K. Wyatt

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes searches at the Fermilab Tevatron for a wide variety of signatures for physics beyond the Standard Model. These include searches for supersymmetric particles, in the two collider detectors and in one fixed target experiment. Also covered are searches for leptoquarks, dijet resonances, heavy gauge bosons, and particles from a fourth generation, as well as searches for deviations from the Standard Model predictions in dijet angular distributions, dilepton mass distributions, and trilinear gauge boson couplings.

  17. Rare B Meson Decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Rare B meson decays are an excellent probe for beyond the Standard Model physics. Two very sensitive processes are the b {yields} s{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sub s,d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays. We report recent results at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV from CDF II using 7 fb{sup -1} at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider.

  18. Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Stephen D.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    As the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program draws to a close, a strategy has emerged of an experimental program built around the high intensity frontier. The centerpiece of this program is a superconducting H- linac that will support world leading programs in long baseline neutrino experimentation and the study of rare processes. Based on technology shared with the International Linear Collider, Project X will provide multi-MW beams at 60-120 GeV from the Main Injector, simultaneous with very high intensity beams at lower energies. Project X also supports development of a Muon Collider as a future facility at the energy frontier.

  19. Search for (W/Z → jets) + γ Events in Proton-Antiproton Collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bocci, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    We present a study of the p¯p → W(Z)γ → γq¯q process at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV using data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The analysis is based on the selection of low transverse momentum photons produced in association with at least two jets. A modification of an existing photon trigger was studied and implemented in the data acquisition system to enhance the sensitivity of this analysis. The data presented are from approximately 184 pb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by this new trigger. A preliminary event sample is obtained requiring a central photon with ET > 12 GeV and two jets with ET > 15 GeV. The corresponding efficiency is studied using a Monte Carlo simulation of the W(Z)γ → γq¯q based on Standard Model predictions. Monte Carlo estimation of the background is not necessary as it is measured from the data. A more advanced selection based on a Neural Network method improves the signal-to-noise ratio from 1/333 to 1/71, and further optimization of the dijet mass search region increases the ratio to its final value of 1/41. No evidence of a W/Z → q¯q peak in the dijet mass distribution is visible when the background contribution is subtracted. Using a fully Bayesian approach, the 95% confidence level upper limit on σ(p¯p → Wγ) x Β(W → q¯q) + σ(p¯p → Zγ) x Β(Z → q¯q) is calculated to be 54 pb, which is consistent with the Standard Model prediction of 20.5 pb.

  20. Fermilab Tevatron quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.E.; Fisk, H.E.; Gross, D.A.; Lundy, R.A.; Schmidt, E.E.; Turkot, F.

    1983-03-01

    Details on the design, construction, and performance tests of Energy Saver/Doubler quadrupoles are presented along with recent data from the test of a special high gradient low beta prototype quadrupole.

  1. Preparations for Muon Experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.; Popovic, M.; Prebys, E.; Ankenbrandt, C.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    The use of existing Fermilab facilities to provide beams for two muon experiments--the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) and the New g-2 Experiment--is under consideration. Plans are being pursued to perform these experiments following the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration.

  2. Update to Proposal for an Experiment to Measure Mixing, CP Violation and Rare Decays in Charm and Beauty Particle Decays at the Fermilab Collider - BTeV

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Joel; Stone, Sheldon

    2002-03-01

    We have been requested to submit an update of the BTeV plan to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, where to save money the detector has only one arm and there is no new interaction region magnet construction planned. These are to come from a currently running collider experiment at the appropriate time. The "Physics Case" section is complete and updated with the section on the "New Physics" capabilites of BTeV greatly expanded. We show that precise measurements of rare flavor-changing neutral current processes and CP violation are and will be complementary to the Tevatron and LHC in unraveling the electroweak breaking puzzle. We include a revised summary of the physics sensitivities for the one-arm detector, which are not simply taking our proposal numbers and dividing by two, because of additional improvements. One important change resulted from an improved understanding of just how important the RJCH detector is to muon and electron identification, that we can indeed separate electrons from pions and muons from pions, especially at relatively large angles beyond the physical aperture of the EM calorimeter or the Muon Detector. This is documented in the "Physics Sensitivities" section. The section on the detector includes the motivation for doing b and c physics at a hadron collider, and shows the changes in the detector since the proposal based on our ongoing R&D program. We do not here include a detailed description of the entire detector. That is available in the May, 2000 proposal. We include a summary of our R&D activities for the entire experiment. Finally, we also include a fully updated cost estimate for the one-arm system.

  3. Search for WH associated production in 5.3 fb-1 of pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D0 Collaboration; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; Backusmayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de, K.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Devaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hossain, S.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jamin, D.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero Y Garzón, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padilla, M.; Pangilinan, M.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pol, M.-E.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Spurlock, B.; Stark, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strom, D.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Tanasijczuk, A.; Taylor, W.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Tuts, P. M.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vint, P.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yang, W.-C.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Zelitch, S.; Zhao, T.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2011-03-01

    We present a search for associated production of Higgs and W bosons in pp¯ collisions at a center of mass energy of s=1.96 TeV in 5.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity recorded by the D0 experiment. Multivariate analysis techniques are applied to events containing one lepton, an imbalance in transverse energy, and one or two b-tagged jets to discriminate a potential WH signal from Standard Model backgrounds. We observe good agreement between data and expected backgrounds, and set an upper limit of 4.5 (at 95% confidence level and for m=115 GeV) on the ratio of the WH cross section multiplied by the branching fraction of H→bb¯ to its Standard Model prediction, which is consistent with an expected limit of 4.8.KeywordsTevatronStandard ModelHiggs bosonElectroweak symmetry breakingReferencesALEPH CollaborationDELPHI CollaborationL3 CollaborationOPAL CollaborationLEP Working Group for Higgs Boson SearchesPhys. Lett. B565200361LEP Electroweak Working Grouphttp://lepewwg.web.cern.ch/LEPEWWG/T.AaltonenCDF CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.1042010061803V.M.AbazovD0 CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.1042010061804T.AaltonenCDF CollaborationD0 CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.1042010061802T. Aaltonen, et al., CDF Collaboration, D0 Collaboration, FERMILAB-CONF-10-257-E, 2010.V.M.AbazovD0 CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.942005091802V.M.AbazovD0 CollaborationPhys. Lett. B663200826V.M.AbazovD0 CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.1022009051803D.AcostaCDF CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.942005091802T.AaltonenCDF CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.1002008041801T.AaltonenCDF CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.1032009101802V.M.AbazovD0 CollaborationNucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A5652006463Pseudorapidity η=-ln[tanθ2], where θ is the polar angle as measured from the beam axis; ϕ is the azimuthal angle. The separation between two objects in η, ϕ space is ΔR=(Δ+(Δ.S.AbachiNucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A3381994185R.AngstadtNucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A6222010298M.AbolinsNucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A

  4. Summary of Fermilab's Recycler Electron Cooler Operation and Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-15

    Fermilab's Recycler ring was used as a storage ring for accumulation and subsequent manipulations of 8 GeV antiprotons destined for the Tevatron collider. To satisfy these missions, a unique electron cooling system was designed, developed and successfully implemented. The most important features that distinguish the Recycler cooler from other existing electron coolers are its relativistic energy, 4.3 MV combined with 0.1-0.5 A DC beam current, a weak continuous longitudinal magnetic field in the cooling section, 100 G, and lumped focusing elsewhere. With the termination of the Tevatron collider operation, so did the cooler. In this article, we summarize the experience of running this unique machine.

  5. Test results of Post-ASST design Fermilab built 1. 5 meter, SSC collider model dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffery, T.S.; Carson, J.; Delchamps, S.W.; Kinney, W.; Koska, W.; Lamm, M.J.; Ozelis, J.P.; Strait, J.; Wake, M.

    1992-09-01

    A series of 1.5 meter long and 50 mm aperture model SSC collider dipole magnets have been successfully built and tested at Fermilab. Later models have been built to test several extensions to the Fermilab design and variations in the manufacturing parameters. Some of the variations tested included conductor insulation scheme, alternate materials for coil end parts and coil winding. The coils are instrumented with voltage taps for the purposes of quench localization and with strain gages to measure the stresses and deflections in the coil and magnets support structure. Data from the quench performance, coil stress, end force and harmonics are presented and compared with design expectations and correlated with changes in the magnet design and assembly methods.

  6. Bs Mixing at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-04-01

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of B{sub s} mesons. B{sub s} Mixing is the most important analysis within the B Physics program of both experiments. In this paper they summarize the most recent results on this topic from both D0 and CDF experiments. There were very important updates in both experiments after his last talk, hence the organizers warmly recommended me to include the latest available results on B{sub s} mixing, instead of what he presents there.

  7. The Search for physics beyond the standard model in the $B\\bar{B}$ spectrum observed in tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Kara Dion

    1998-01-01

    Many extensions have been proposed to the Standard Model of fundamental particles and interactions, therefore we have conducted a general search with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) for particles which would be expected to appear as a resonance in the b$\\bar{b}$ mass spectrum produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  8. Measurement of the B(s) lifetime using semileptonic decays with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun

    the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory during Run II of the Tevatron Collider. The corresponding integrated luminosity is approximately 1 fb-1 . The lepon+SVT triggers select events which contain a muon or an electron with a transverse momentum greater than 4 GeV/c and a displaced track. For these lepton and SVT displaced tracks candidates, further identification requirements are imposed to improve the purity of the B0s semileptonic decay signal. From the lepton+charm pairs, we measure the B0s meson decay lengths to extract the lifetime. Since the B0s meson momentum, necessary to calculate the B0s decay time, is not fully reconstructed in semileptonic decays, we use Monte Carlo simulation to correct for the missing momentum. The Monte Carlo simulation is also used for determining the ct efficiency curve, which is affected strongly by the displaced track requirement. Contributions from various backgrounds are also considered. From these data, the B0s meson lifetimes is measured to be ctB0s fs=436.6+/-5.4+/-13.1m m or tB0s fs=1.456+/-0.018+/-0.044p s where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic, respectively.

  9. Discovery and measurement of excited b hadrons at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Pursley, Jennifer Marie

    2007-08-01

    This thesis presents evidence for the B**0 and Σ$(*)±\\atop{b}$ hadrons in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. In the search for B**0 → B± π, two B± decays modes are reconstructed: B± → J/ΨK±, where J/Ψ → μ+μ-, and B± → $\\bar{D}$0π±, where $\\bar{D}$0 → K± π±. Both modes are reconstructed using 370 ± 20 pb-1 of data. Combining the B± meson with a charged pion to reconstruct B**0 led to the observation and measurement of the masses of the two narrow B**0 states, B$1\\atop{0}$ and B$*0\\atop{2}$, of m(B$1\\atop{0}$) = 5734 ± 3(stat.) ± 2(syst.) MeV/c2; m(B$*0\\atop{2}$) = 5738 ± 5(stat.) ± 1(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. In the search for Σ$(*)±\\atop{b}$ → Λ$0\\atop{b}$π±, the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ is reconstructed in the decay mode Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → Λ$+\\atop{c}$π-, where Λ$+\\atop{c}$→ pK- π+, using 1070 ± 60 pb-1 of data. Upon combining the Λ$0\\atop{b}$ candidate with a charged pion, all four of the Σ$(*)±\\atop{b}$ states are observed and their masses measured to be: m(Σ$+\\atop{b}$) = 5807.8$+2.0\\atop{-2.2}$(stat.) ± 1.7(syst.) MeV/c2; m(Σ$+\\atop{b}$) = 5815.2 ± 1.0(stat.) ± 1.7(syst.) MeV/c2; m(Σ$*+\\atop{b}$) = 5829.0$+1.6\\atop{-1.8}$(stat.)$+1.7\\atop{-1.8}$(syst.) MeV/c 2; M(Σ$*-±\\atop{b}$) - 5836.4 ± 2.0(stat.)$+1.8\\atop{-1.7}$(syst.) MeV/c2. This is the first observation of Σ$(*)±\\atop{b}$ baryons.

  10. Future hadron physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    Today, hadron physics research occurs at Fermilab as parts of broader experimental programs. This is very likely to be the case in the future. Thus, much of this presentation focuses on our vision of that future--a future aimed at making Fermilab the host laboratory for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Given the uncertainties associated with the ILC--the level of needed R&D, the ILC costs, and the timing--Fermilab is also preparing for other program choices. I will describe these latter efforts, efforts focused on a Proton Driver to increase the numbers of protons available for experiments. As examples of the hadron physics which will be coming from Fermilab, I summarize three experiments: MIPP/E907 which is running currently, and MINERvA and Drell-Yan/E906 which are scheduled for future running periods. Hadron physics coming from the Tevatron Collider program will be summarized by Arthur Maciel in another talk at Hadron05.

  11. Proposed Fermilab upgrade main injector project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate a Fermilab Main Injector'' (FMI), a 150 GeV proton injector accelerator, at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois. The purpose and need for this action are given of this Environmental Assessment (EA). A description of the proposed FMI and construction activities are also given. The proposed FMI would be housed in an underground tunnel with a circumference of approximately 2.1 miles (3.4 kilometers), and the construction would affect approximately 135 acres of the 6,800 acre Fermilab site. The purpose of the proposed FMI is to construct and bring into operation a new 150 GeV proton injector accelerator. This addition to Fermilab's Tevatron would enable scientists to penetrate ever more deeply into the subatomic world through the detection of the super massive particles that can be created when a proton and antiproton collide head-on. The conversion of energy into matter in these collisions makes it possible to create particles that existed only an instant after the beginning of time. The proposed FMI would significantly extend the scientific reach of the Tevatron, the world's first superconducting accelerator and highest energy proton-antiproton collider.

  12. Search for the Resonant Production of Top Anititop Pairs Decaying Into Multi-Jets at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Oksuzian, Yuri Artur

    2009-01-01

    We performed a search for“non-standard model tt resonances in the all jets final state channel.” The main goal was to examine top-antitop invariant mass spectrum for the presence of narrow resonant states. The data analysis used 2.8fb-1 of CDF data; events were produced at the Tevatron collider in pp collisions with center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. 2086 data events were analyzed and compared to Standard Model expectation. No evidence for new tt resonant production mechanisms was found. Upper limits were placed on the cross-section times branching ratio for resonance production at 805 GeV/c2. For signal modeling we considered leptophobic Z’ boson in a topcolor-assisted technicolor model with the width of Γ = 1.2%MX0.

  13. Development of 3D beam-beam simulation for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P.; Valishev, A.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-06-01

    We present status of development of a 3D Beam-Beam simulation code for simulating the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The essential features of the code are 3D particle-in-cell Poisson solver for calculating the Beam-Beam electromagnetic interactions with additional modules for linear optics, machine impedance and chromaticity, and multiple bunch tracking. The simulations match synchrobetatron oscillations measured at the VEPP-2M collider. The impedance calculations show beam instability development consistent with analytic expressions.

  14. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Top Quark Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Cecilia E.; Vellidis, Costas

    2014-09-17

    We present results on top quark physics from the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron proton anti-proton collider. These include legacy results from Run II that were published or submitted for publication before mid-2014, as well as a summary of Run I results. The historical perspective of the discovery of the top quark in Run I is also described.

  15. Evidence for Single Top Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Supriya; /Oklahoma U.

    2008-05-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Both D0 and CDF experiments have measured the single top production cross section with a 3-standard-deviation significance using 0.9 fb{sup -1} and 2.2 fb{sup -1} of lepton+jets data, respectively. A direct measurement of the CKM matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling is also performed for the first time.

  16. Intensity Frontier Computing at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wolbers, Stephen

    2013-10-11

    The Intensity Frontier (IF) experiments at Fermilab require computing, software, data handling, and infrastructure development for detector and beamline design and to extract maximum scientific output from the data. The emphasis of computing at Fermilab for many years has been on the Tevatron collider Run 2 experiments and CMS. Using the knowledge and experience gained from those experiments as well as new computing developments, preparations for computing for IF experiments are ramping up. There are many challenges in IF computing. These include event generators and detector simulation, beamline simulation, detector design and optimization, data acquisition, data handling, data analysis, and all of the associated services required. In this presentation the computing challenges and requirements will be described and the approaches being taken to address them will be shown.

  17. Project X: A Multi-MW Proton Source at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Stephen D.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    As the Fermilab Tevatron Collider program draws to a close a strategy has emerged of an experimental program built around the high intensity frontier. The centerpiece of this program is a superconducting H- linac that will support world leading programs in long baseline neutrino experimentation and he study of rare processes. Based on technology shared with the International Linear Collider (ILC), Project X will provide multi-MW beams at 60-120 GeV from the Main Injector, simultaneous with very high intensity beams at lower energies. Project X will also support development of a Muon Collider as a uture facility at the energy frontier.

  18. Tevatron Electron Lenses: Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kozub, Sergei; Kufer, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Martinez, Alexander; Olson, Marvin; Pfeffer, Howard; Saewert, Greg; Scarpine, Vic; Seryi, Andrei; Solyak, Nikolai; Sytnik, Veniamin; Tiunov, Mikhail; Tkachenko, Leonid; Wildman, David; Wolff, Daniel; Zhang, Xiao-Long; /Fermilab

    2011-09-12

    Fermilab's Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy accelerator in which tightly focused beams of 980 GeV protons and antiprotons collide at two dedicated interaction points (IPs). Both beams share the same beam pipe and magnet aperture and, in order to avoid multiple detrimental head-on collisions, the beams are placed on separated orbits everywhere except the main IPs by using high-voltage (HV) electrostatic separators. The electromagnetic beam-beam interaction at the main IPs together with the long-range interactions between separated beams adversely affect the collider performance, reducing the luminosity integral per store (period of continuous collisions) by 10-30%. Tuning the collider operation for optimal performance becomes more and more cumbersome as the beam intensities and luminosity increase. The long-range effects which (besides being nonlinear) vary from bunch to bunch are particularly hard to mitigate. A comprehensive review of the beam-beam effects in the Tevatron Collider Run II can be found in Ref. [1]. The beam-beam effects have been the dominating sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider [1]. Electron lenses were originally proposed for compensation of electromagnetic long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions of proton and antiproton beams [2]. Results of successful employment of two electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron are reported in [3,4,5]. In this paper we present design features of the Tevatron electron lenses (TELs), discuss the generation of electron beams, describe different modes of operation and outline the technical parameters of various subsystems.

  19. Preliminary design for a 20 TeV Collider in a deep tunnel at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-12

    The Reference Design Study for a 20 TeV Collider demonstrated the technical and cost feasibility of a 20 TeV superconducting collider facility. Based on magnets of 3T, 5T, and 6.5T the Main Ring of the Collider would have a circumference of 164 km, 113 km, or 90 km. There would be six collision regions, of which four would be developed intially. The 5T and 6.5T rings would have twelve major refrigeration stations, while the 3T design would have 24 major refrigeration stations.

  20. Recent top quark physics results at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Valls, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    The evidence of top quark pair production in pp collisions has been firmly established by both the CDF and the D{O} collaborations at Fermilab. In this paper the latest top quark physics results from both experiments at the Tevatron Collider are presented. The experimental analyses have concentrated in improving the accuracy of top quark production and decay measurements like cross sections, mass and, branching fractions. The results shown correspond to the final data set collected with both detectors during the complete Tevatron Run L. This represents a total recorded integrated luminosity of {approximately}110 pb{sup -1} for CDF and {approximately}100 pb{sup -1} for D{O}.

  1. Search for Centauro events in the DO Detector at Fermilab collider

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.V.S.; DO Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    We report preliminary results of a Monte Carlo study to search for Centauro events in the DO Detector at Fermilab. Montecarlo simulation of minimum bias events are being carried out using the ISAJET and DOGEANT packages to study the detector response for low energy particles and to understand the background. Preliminary indications are that the detector is capable of resolving individual particles. Further work on developing reconstruction algorithms for individual particles is in progress.

  2. Accelerator Preparations for Muon Physics Experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The use of existing Fermilab facilities to provide beams for two muon experiments - the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) and the New g-2 Experiment - is under consideration. Plans are being pursued to perform these experiments following the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration. Operating scenarios being investigated and anticipated accelerator improvements or reconfigurations will be presented.

  3. Physics at an upgraded proton driver at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Geer

    2004-07-28

    The accelerator-based particle physics program in the US is entering a period of transition. This is particularly true at Fermilab which for more than two decades has been the home of the Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider, the World's highest energy hadron collider. In a few years time the energy frontier will move to the LHC at CERN. Hence, if an accelerator-based program is to survive at Fermilab, it must evolve. Fermilab is fortunate in that, in addition to hosting the Tevatron Collider, the laboratory also hosts the US accelerator-based neutrino program. The recent discovery that neutrino flavors oscillate has opened a new exciting world for us to explore, and has created an opportunity for the Fermilab accelerator complex to continue to address the cutting-edge questions of particle physics beyond the Tevatron Collider era. The presently foreseen neutrino oscillation experiments at Fermilab (MiniBooNE [1] and MINOS [2]) will enable the laboratory to begin contributing to the Global oscillation physics program in the near future, and will help us better understand the basic parameters describing the oscillations. However, this is only a first step. To be able to pin down all of the oscillation parameters, and hopefully make new discoveries along the way, we will need high statistics experiments, which will require a very intense neutrino beam, and one or more very massive detectors. In particular we will require new MW-scale primary proton beams and perhaps ultimately a Neutrino Factory [3]. Plans to upgrade the Fermilab Proton Driver are presently being developed [4]. The upgrade project would replace the Fermilab Booster with a new 8 GeV accelerator with 0.5-2 MW beam power, a factor of 15-60 more than the current Booster. It would also make the modifications needed to the Fermilab Main Injector (MI) to upgrade it to simultaneously provide 120 GeV beams of 2 MW. This would enable a factor of 5-10 increase in neutrino beam intensities at the MI, while also

  4. Search for the Production of Gluinos and Squarks with the CDF II Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    De Lorenzo, Gianluca

    2010-05-19

    This thesis reports on two searches for the production of squarks and gluinos, supersymmetric partners of the Standard Model (SM) quarks and gluons, using the CDF detector at the Tevatron √s = 1.96 TeV p$\\bar{p}$ collider. An inclusive search for squarks and gluinos pair production is performed in events with large ET and multiple jets in the final state, based on 2 fb-1 of CDF Run II data. The analysis is performed within the framework of minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) and assumes R-parity conservation where sparticles are produced in pairs. The expected signal is characterized by the production of multiple jets of hadrons from the cascade decays of squarks and gluinos and large missing transverse energy ET from the lightest supersymmetric particles (LSP). The measurements are in good agreement with SM predictions for backgrounds. The results are translated into 95% confidence level (CL) upper limits on production cross sections and squark and gluino masses in a given mSUGRA scenario. An upper limit on the production cross section is placed in the range between 1 pb and 0.1 pb, depending on the gluino and squark masses considered. The result of the search is negative for gluino and squark masses up to 392 GeV/c2 in the region where gluino and squark masses are close to each other, gluino masses up to 280 GeV/c2 regardless of the squark mass, and gluino masses up to 423 GeV=c2 for squark masses below 378 GeV/c2. These results are compatible with the latest limits on squark/gluino production obtained by the D0 Collaboration and considerably improve the previous exclusion limits from direct and indirect searches at LEP and the Tevatron. The inclusive search is then extended to a scenario where the pair production of sbottom squarks is dominant. The new search is performed in a generic MSSM scenario with R-parity conservation. A specific SUSY particle mass hierarchy is assumed such that the

  5. Numerical Simulations of Transverse Beam Diffusion Enhancement by the Use of Electron Lens in the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Previtali, V.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    Transverse beam diffusion for the Tevatron machine has been calculated using the Lifetrac code. The following effects were included: random noise (representing residual gas scattering, voltage noise in the accelerating cavities) lattice nonlinearities and beam-beam interactions. The time evolution of particle distributions with different initial amplitudes in Hamiltonian action has been simulated for 6 million turns, corresponding to a time of about 2 minutes. For each particle distribution, several cases have been considered: a single beam in storage ring mode, the collider case and the effects of a hollow electron beam collimator. The diffusion coefficient for some representative points in the amplitude space has been calculated by fitting the time evolution of delta-like particle distributions using the diffusion equation, for different machine conditions. The results confirm a strong efficiency of the electron lens as an halo diffusive enhancer, leading to diffusion coefficients which are at least a factor 10K higher than the values obtained for the collision case. This result is confirmed by the Frequency Map Analysis, which shows a clear intensification of resonance lines for particle amplitudes larger than the electron lens inner radius. If compared with past experiments, the simulations successfully reproduce the diffusion coefficients for the beam core, but still present a large discrepancy for halo particles, still under investigation.

  6. Tests of 1. 5 meter model 50mm SSC collider dipoles at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wake, M.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Coulter, K.; Delchamps, S.; Gourlay, S.; Jaffery, T.S.; Kinney, W.; Koska, W.; Lamm, M.J.; Strait, J. ); Sims, R.; Winters, M. )

    1991-05-01

    A series of 50mm diameter 1.5m model magnets have been constructed. The test of these magnets gave convincing results concerning the design of the 50mm cross section of the SSC collider dipoles. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Recent QCD results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Pickarz, Henryk; CDF and DO collaboration

    1997-02-01

    Recent QCD results from the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider are presented. An outlook for future QCD tests at the Tevatron collider is also breifly discussed. 27 refs., 11 figs.

  8. Proposed Fermilab upgrade main injector project. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate a ``Fermilab Main Injector`` (FMI), a 150 GeV proton injector accelerator, at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois. The purpose and need for this action are given of this Environmental Assessment (EA). A description of the proposed FMI and construction activities are also given. The proposed FMI would be housed in an underground tunnel with a circumference of approximately 2.1 miles (3.4 kilometers), and the construction would affect approximately 135 acres of the 6,800 acre Fermilab site. The purpose of the proposed FMI is to construct and bring into operation a new 150 GeV proton injector accelerator. This addition to Fermilab`s Tevatron would enable scientists to penetrate ever more deeply into the subatomic world through the detection of the super massive particles that can be created when a proton and antiproton collide head-on. The conversion of energy into matter in these collisions makes it possible to create particles that existed only an instant after the beginning of time. The proposed FMI would significantly extend the scientific reach of the Tevatron, the world`s first superconducting accelerator and highest energy proton-antiproton collider.

  9. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  10. Prompt photon production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashish; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2009-07-01

    Prompt photon production has been studied by the CDF and D0{sup -} experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in p{bar p} collisions at the centre of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavor jet, and diphoton production cross sections are discussed. The analyses use data sample corresponding to integrated luminosity between 0.2 fb{sup -1} and 1.02 fb{sup -1}. The results are compared to the next to leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations.

  11. Present state of Tevatron lower temperature operation

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, B.L.

    1996-09-01

    Fermilab continues to work on raising the particle energy of the Tevatron by lowering magnet temperatures using cold vapor compressors. In 1995, another two rounds of power tests were completed. These power tests, although showing significant improvement over the initial tests of 1993-94, have led to the conclusion that 1000 GeV operation cannot be attained without replacing/rearranging magnets with lower quench currents before the next Collider Run in 1999. Development of more cold compressor control strategies also continues.

  12. Rare B meson decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Walter; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-01

    Rare B meson decays are an excellent probe for beyond the Standard Model physics. Two very sensitive processes are the B{sub s,d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and b {yields} s{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays. We report recent results at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV from the CDF II and D0 collaborations using between 3.7 fb{sup -1} and 6.9 fb{sup -1} taken during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider.

  13. Single Top Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhenbin; /Baylor U.

    2012-05-01

    We present recent results of single top quark production in the lepton plus jet final state, performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations based on 7.5 and 5.4 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data collected at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV from the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Multivariate techniques are used to separate the single top signal from the backgrounds. Both collaborations present measurements of the single top quark cross section and the CKM matrix element |V{sub tb}|. A search for anomalous Wtb coupling from D0 is also presented.

  14. Searching for SUSY at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bortoletto, Daniela; /Purdue U.

    2004-12-01

    An overview of recent experimental searches for SUSY particles is presented. These searches are based on data collected by the CDF and the D0 experiments operating at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The review focuses on searches for squarks and gluinos in final states with missing transverse energy and jets. Emphasis will be given to the search for the gluino decaying into a sbottom and b quark with each sbottom decaying into a b quark and a neutralino. This scenario yields events containing 4 b-jets and missing transverse energy.

  15. Experimental study of magnetically confined hollow electron beams in the Tevatron as collimators for intense high-energy hadron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable losses. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and tested at Fermilab for this purpose. It was installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses in the summer of 2010. We present the results of the first experimental tests of the hollow-beam collimation concept on 980-GeV antiproton bunches in the Tevatron.

  16. Straw man 900-1000 GeV crystal extraction test beam for Fermilab collider operation

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    A design for a 900-1000 GeV, 100 khz parasitic test beam for use during collider operations has been developed. The beam makes use of two bent crystals, one for extraction and the other one for redirecting the beam in to the present Switchyard beam system. The beam requires only a few modifications in the A0 area and largely uses existing devices. It should be straight-forward to modify one or two beam lines in the fixed target experimental areas to work above 800 GeV. Possibilities for improvements to the design,to operate at higher fluxes are discussed.

  17. An Improved W Boson Mass Measurement Using the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The mass of the W boson is one of the most important parameters in the Standard Model. A precise measurement of the W boson mass, together with a precise measurement of the top quark mass, can constrain the mass of the undiscovered Higgs boson within the Standard Model framework or give a hint for physics beyond the Standard Model. This dissertation describes a measurement of the W boson mass through its decay into a muon and a neutrino using ~ 2.2 fb-1 of √ s = 1.96 TeV p$\\bar{p}$ data taken with the CDF II detector at Fermilab. We measure the W boson mass to be (80.374 ± 0.015stat. ± 0.016syst.) GeV/c2. This result, when combined with the W mass measurement in the electron channel, leads to the single most precise mW value and greatly constrains the possible mass range of the undiscovered Higgs boson. iv

  18. Limits on the kappa parameter ({kappa}) of the W boson at the collider detector at Fermilab (CDF)

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, M.A.; Li, G.; Sinha, N.; Sundaresan, M.K.; Sinha, R. |

    1995-06-01

    Recently we obtained bounds on the magnetic moment of the W boson from preliminary results from the collider detector at Fermilab. These results were based on 4.3 pb{sup {minus}1} of data, from which three W{gamma} events and three radiative W decays were found. Within the next 2 years they expect to have almost 100 pb{sup {minus}1} of data. In this paper we consider the bounds one will be able to obtain from these data, under two scenarios: (1) the expected Standard Model (SM) results are obtained. (2) The relative number of events observed is the same as in the previous run. We estimate that one will be able to obtain a 95% C.L. bound for K, perhaps as good as -1.9 {le} K {le} 4.2. These bounds would come from the total number of events. When the number of events increases sufficiently, one will be able to obtain an angular distribution for W{gamma} and an energy distribution for radiative W decay. Then one could observe the radiation amplitude zero and obtain a precise value for K.

  19. Optimization of integrated luminosity in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gattuso, C.; Convery, M.; Syphers, M.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    We present the strategy which has been used recently to optimize the performance of the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. We use a relatively simple heuristic model based on the antiproton production rate, which optimizes the number of antiprotons in a store in order to maximize the integrated luminosity. A store is terminated as soon as the target number of antiprotons is reached and the Tevatron quickly resets to load another store. Since this procedure was implemented, the integrated luminosity has improved by {approx} 35%. Other recent operational improvements include decreasing the shot setup time, and reducing beam-beam effects by making the proton and antiproton brightness more compatible, for example by scraping protons to smaller emittances.

  20. Measurements of the top quark mass at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Oleg; /Gottingen U., II. Phys. Inst.

    2012-04-01

    The mass of the top quark (m{sub top}) is a fundamental parameter of the standard model (SM). Currently, its most precise measurements are performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We review the most recent of those measurements, performed on data samples of up to 8.7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The Tevatron combination using up to 5.8 fb{sup -1} of data results in a preliminary world average top quark mass of m{sub top} = 173.2 {+-} 0.9 GeV. This corresponds to a relative precision of about 0.54%. We conclude with an outlook of anticipated precision the final measurement of m{sub top} at the Tevatron.

  1. Single top at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Taffard, Anyes; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-11-01

    The authors review the status of the search for the electroweak production of single top quarks by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider using Run II data. With a dataset of approximately 160 pb{sup -1} for CDF and 230 pb{sup -1} for D0, neither experiment finds evidence for single top production and sets 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross-sections. The CDF limits are 10.1 pb for the t channel, 13.6 pb for the s channel and 17.8 pb for the combined production cross-sections of s and t channel. The D0 limits are 5.0 pb for the t channel, 6.4 pb for the s-channel production cross-sections. Both experiments investigate the prospect for a 3{sigma} evidence and a 5{sigma} discovery.

  2. Soft QCD at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Rangel, Murilo; /Orsay, LAL

    2010-06-01

    Experimental studies of soft Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at Tevatron are reported in this note. Results on inclusive inelastic interactions, underlying events, double parton interaction and exclusive diffractive production and their implications to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) physics are discussed.

  3. Measurement of the $B \\to J/\\psi X$ inclusive cross-section at the collider detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Waschke, Simon

    2004-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a multi-purpose detector designed to study proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 1.96 TeV/c2. One of the most importatn components of CDF is the silicon tracking detector. A detailed description of the testing and construction of the CDF silicon tracker is presented. Measurements of the tracking efficiency of the completed detector are also provided. Using 36 pb-1 of the J/Ψ data sample collected by CDF between February and October 2002, the inclusive B → J/Ψ X cross-section is measured in p$\\bar{p}$ interactions at √s = 1.96 TeV/c2. The fraction of J/Ψ events arising from the decay of b hadrons is extracted using an unbinned maximum likelihood fit to the decay length of the J/Ψ candidates. The pT dependent differential cross section for inclusive B → J/Ψ X events with rapidity |y| < 0.6 is obtained by combining the B-fraction result with a measurement of the J/Ψ differential cross-section. For 2.0 < pT(J/Ψ) < 17.0 GeV/c, the integrated B → J/Ψ X cross-section is measured to be σ(J/Ψ, B) • β(J/Ψ → μμ) = 16.02 ± 0.24(stat)$+2.26\\atop{-2.20}$(syst) nb.

  4. Forward-Backward Asymmetries in Top-Antitop Quark Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, Timo, A.

    2016-09-21

    We present the combined results on inclusive forward-backward asymmetries in the production of top-antitop quark pairs and their decay leptons. The analysis is based on measurements by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab $p\\bar{p}$ Tevatron collider using all the data collected at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1:96 TeV. The measured asymmetries are in agreement with standard model predictions.

  5. First Evidence of WW/WZ ---> l nu qq at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Haley, Joseph; /Princeton U.

    2009-07-01

    We present the first evidence from a hadron collider of WW + WZ production with semileptonic decays. The data were recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to 1.07 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity obtained in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The cross section observed for WW + WZ production is 20.2 {+-} 4.5 pb with a significance of 4.4 standard deviations.

  6. Higgs radiation off top quarks at the Tevatron and the LHC.

    PubMed

    Beenakker, W; Dittmaier, S; Krämer, M; Plümper, B; Spira, M; Zerwas, P M

    2001-11-12

    Higgs bosons can be searched for in the channels pp macro/pp-->tt macro H + X at the Fermilab Tevatron and the Cern Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We have calculated the QCD corrections to these processes in the standard model at next-to-leading order. The higher-order corrections reduce the renormalization and factorization scale dependence considerably and stabilize the theoretical predictions for the cross sections. At the central scale mu = (2m(t)+M(H))/2 the properly defined K factors are slightly below unity for the Tevatron (K approximately 0.8) and slightly above unity for the LHC (K approximately 1.2).

  7. Physics at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R.

    2008-10-01

    The theme of the XXXIV International Meeting on Fundamental Physics on April 27, 2006 was "From HERA and the TEVATRON to the LHC". At that meeting I presented four lectures on "Physics at the Tevatron". This is a summary of two lectures on "Physics at the Tevatron: IMFP06 IMFP08" presented at the XXXVI International Meeting on Fundamental Physics held in Baeza, Spain on February 4-8, 2008. These two lectures are an attempt to highlight what we have learned at the Tevatron since my lectures in 2006. I will also look back at the "old days" of Feynman-Field collider phenomenology.

  8. Initial performance of upgraded Tevatron cryogenic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, B.L.

    1996-09-01

    Fermilab began operating a re-designed satellite refrigerator systems in November 1993. Upgrades were installed to operate the Tevatron at a magnet temperature of 3.5 K, approximately 1K lower than the original design. Refrigerator upgrades included new valve boxes, larger reciprocating expanders, the installation of cold vapor compressors, new sub-atmospheric instrumentation and an entirely new distributed controls system. Cryogenic system reliability data for Colliding Physics Run 1B is presented emphasizing a failure analysis for each aspect of the upgrade. Comparison to data for Colliding Physics Run 1A (previous to upgrade) is presented to show the impact of a major system overhaul. New operational problems and their solutions are presented in detail.

  9. Diffraction at the Tevatron: CDF results

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-11-01

    The diffractive program of the CDF Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider is reviewed with emphasis on recent results from Run II at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Updated results on the x{sub B{sub j}} and Q{sup 2} dependence of the diffractive structure function obtained from dijet production, and on the slope parameter of the t-distribution of diffractive events as a function of Q{sup 2} in the range 1 GeV{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 10{sup 4} GeV{sup 2}, are presented and compared with theoretical expectations. Results on cross sections for exclusive dijet and diphoton production are also presented and used to calibrate theoretical estimates for exclusive Higgs production at the Large Hadron Collider.

  10. Commissioning of Fermilab's electron cooling system for 8-GeV antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, A.; Carlson, K.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Kramper, B.; Kroc, T.; Leibfritz, J.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Saewert, G.; Schmidt, C.W.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tupikov, V.; Warner, A.; Seletsky, S.; Gai, W.; Kazakevich, Grigory M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2005-05-01

    A 4.3-MeV electron cooling system [1] has been installed at Fermilab in the Recycler antiproton storage ring and is currently being commissioned. The cooling system is designed to assist accumulation of 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. This paper reports on the progress of the electron beam commissioning effort as well as on detailed plans of demonstrating the cooling of antiprotons.

  11. Applications of barrier bucket RF systems at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, the barrier rf systems have become important tools in a variety of beam manipulation applications at synchrotrons. Four out of six proton synchrotrons at Fermilab are equipped with broad-band barrier rf systems. All of the beam manipulations pertaining to the longitudinal phase space in the Fermilab Recycler (synchrotron used for antiproton storage) are carried out using a barrier system. Recently, a number of new applications of barrier rf systems have been developed- the longitudinal momentum mining, longitudinal phase-space coating, antiproton stacking, fast bunch compression and more. Some of these techniques have been critical for the recent spectacular success of the collider performance at the Fermilab Tevatron. Barrier bunch coalescing to produce bright proton bunches has a high potential to increase proton antiproton luminosity significantly. In this paper, I will describe some of these techniques in detail. Finally, I make a few general remarks on issues related to barrier systems.

  12. Longitudinal momentum mining of antiprotons at the Fermilab Recycler: past, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; Chase, B.E.; Gattuso, C.; Joireman, P.W.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The technique of longitudinal momentum mining (LMM)[1] in the Fermilab Recycler was adopted in early 2005 to extract thirty-six equal intensity and equal 6D-emittance antiproton bunches for proton-antiproton collider operation in the Tevatron. Since that time, several improvements have been made in the Recycler and the mining technique to handle higher intensity beams. Consequently, the Recycler has become a key contributor to the increased luminosity performance observed during Tevatron Run IIb. In this paper, we present an overview of the improvements and the current status of the momentum mining technique.

  13. Fermilab's SC Accelerator Magnet Program for Future U.S. HEP Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, Michael; Zlobin, Alexander; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The invention of SC accelerator magnets in the 1970s opened wide the possibilities for advancing the energy frontier of particle accelerators, while limiting the machine circumference and reducing their energy consumption. The successful development of SC accelerator magnets based on NbTi superconductor have made possible a proton-antiproton collider (Tevatron) at Fermilab, an electron-proton collider (HERA) at DESY, a relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at BNL and recently a proton-proton collider (LHC) at CERN. Further technological innovations and inventions are required as the US HEP looks forward towards the post-LHC energy or/and intensity frontiers. A strong, goal oriented national SC accelerator magnet program must take on this challenge to provide a strong base for the future of HEP in the U.S. The results and experience obtained by Fermilab during the past 30 years will allow us to play a leadership role in the SC accelerator magnet development in the U.S., in particular, focusing on magnets for a Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory [1]-[2]. In this paper, we summarize the required Muon Collider magnet needs and challenges, summarize the technology advances in the Fermilab accelerator magnet development over the past few years, and present and discuss our vision and long-term plans for these Fermilab-supported accelerator initiatives.

  14. Searching for doubly-charged Higgs bosons at future colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Gunion, J.F.; Loomis, C.; Pitts, K.T.

    1996-10-01

    Doubly-charged Higgs bosons ({Delta}{sup --}/{Delta}{sup ++}) appear in several extensions to the Standard Model and can be relatively light. We review the theoretical motivation for these states and present a study of the discovery reach in future runs of the Fermilab Tevatron for pair-produced doubly-charged Higgs bosons decaying to like-sign lepton pairs. We also comment on the discovery potential at other future colliders. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Prospects for the upgraded Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.

    1995-07-01

    Plans and prospects for the next Fermilab collider running period, Run II (beginning in 1999), are described. The upgrades to the accelerator are discussed in the context of expected achievable instantaneous and integrated luminosity. Upgrades to the two collider detectors, CDF and D0, along with physics potential for Run II are also described. Options for Fermilab beyond Run II are mentioned.

  16. Summary of Single top quark production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, R.; CDF, on the

    2014-01-01

    The production of single-top quarks occurs via the weak interaction at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. Single top quark events are selected in the lepton+jets final state by CDF and D0 and in the missing transverse energy plus jets final state by CDF. Multivariate classifiers separate the s-channel and t-channel single-top signals from the large backgrounds. The combination of CDF and D0 results leads to the first observation of the s-channel mode of single top quark production. The t-channel and single top combined cross sections have also been measured.

  17. Review of physics results from the Tevatron: QCD physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mesropian, Christina; Bandurin, Dmitry

    2015-02-17

    We present a summary of results from studies of quantum chromodynamics at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by the CDF and the D0 experiments. These include Run II results for the time period up to the end of Summer 2014. A brief description of Run I results is also given. This review covers a wide spectrum of topics, and includes measurements with jet and vector boson final states in the hard (perturbative) energy regime, as well as studies of soft physics such as diffractive and elastic scatterings, underlying and minimum bias events, hadron fragmentation, and multiple parton interactions.

  18. Top production at the Tevatron: The antiproton awakens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Kenneth; CDF D0 Collaborations

    2017-07-01

    A long time ago, at a laboratory far, far away, the Fermilab Tevatron collided protons and antiprotons at √{s} = 1.96{ TeV} . The CDF and D0 experiments each recorded datasets of about 10fb-1. As such experiments may never be repeated, these are unique datasets that allow for unique measurements. This presentation describes recent results from the two experiments on top-quark production rates, spin orientations, and production asymmetries, which are all probes of the pbar{p} initial state.

  19. Detector-accelerator interface studies at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1998-04-10

    A summary of studies is presented towards minimization of beam loss in the critical locations at the Fermilab Tevatron to reduce background rates in the collider detectors and to protect machine components. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, measures have been proposed and incorporated in the machine to reduce accelerator-related instantaneous and residual background levels in the D0 and CDF detectors. Measurements performed are in good agreement with the predictions. Most recent results on acceptance and background rates in the D0 and CDF forward detectors are presented and discussed in detail.

  20. E710, Proton, Antiproton Elastic Scattering at Tevatron Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadr, Sasan

    Experiment E710, located at site E0 of the Tevatron collider at Fermilab, was conceived in order to measure pp elastic scattering. The measured parameters were: the total cross section sigma_{t }, the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward scattering amplitude rho, the nuclear slope parameter B, the nuclear curvature parameter C, the total elastic cross section sigma _{el}, and the single diffractive cross section sigma_{sd} . These measurements were taken at center-of-mass energies of sqrt{s}=1.02 and 1.8 TeV.

  1. Studies of top quark properties at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shary, Viatcheslav

    2012-05-01

    An overview of the recent measurements of the top quark properties in proton antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. These measurements are based on 5.4-8.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 and CDF experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The top quark mass and width measurements, studies of the spin correlation in top quark pair production, W boson helicity measurement, searches for anomalous top quark couplings and Lorentz invariance violation are discussed.

  2. Resonant second generation slepton production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Autermann, Christian Tobias

    2006-12-01

    A search for R-parity violating supersymmetry with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$-collider is presented. Assuming a non-zero LQ$\\bar{d}$ coupling λ$'\\atop{2jk}$ leads to final state with two muons and jets. A total integrated luminosity of 375 pb-1 collected between April 2002 and August 2004 is utilized. The observed number of events is in agreement with the Standard Model expectation, and limits on Rp supersymmetry are derived.

  3. QCD aspects of W/Z production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Guglielmo, G.; CDF and D0 Collaborations

    1997-07-01

    Hadron colliders are providing valuable opportunities for studying the influence of the strong force on electroweak interactions in both the perturbative and non-perturbative regions. At the Fermilab Tevatron, analysis by CDF and D0 of p{anti p} {yields} W/Z + X events at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV have been used to test a variety of leading order and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. Among the many promising benefits are improvements of parton distribution functions at high Q{sup 2} , demonstration of soft gluon radiation patterns which survive hadronization, and tests of perturbative QCD and resummation calculations.

  4. Non-SUSY Searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Strologas, John; /New Mexico U.

    2011-08-01

    We present recent results from searches for new physics beyond supersymmetry performed at the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab. The CDF and D0 analyses presented here utilized data of integrated luminosity up to 6 fb{sup -1}. We cover leptonic and bosonic resonances interpreted in the Randall-Sundrum graviton and new-boson models, rare final states, and the search for vector-like quarks. The search for new phenomena beyond the weak-scale supersymmetry is a vital part of the Fermilab program. Both CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron collider actively look for signals not expected by the standard model (SM) or minimal supersymmetric models. The searches can be sorted in three categories: (a) searches for generic resonances that can be interpreted in several new-physics models; (b) searches for exotic combinations of final-state objects or abnormal kinematics (not necessarily predicted by current theories); and (c) model-dependent searches that test a particular theory. We present here latest results from all these categories: searches for new dilepton and diboson resonances (interpreted as gravitons and new gauge bosons), searches for anomalous {gamma} + E{sub T} + X production, and searches for vector-like quarks.

  5. Measurement of the intensity of the beam in the abort gap at the Tevatron utilizing synchrotron light

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Lorman, E.; Meyer, T.; Pordes, S.; De Santis, S.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2005-05-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of abort gap beam intensity monitoring at the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. There are two somewhat independent monitors which measure the intensity of the synchrotron light emitted by particles in the abort gaps. One system uses a gated Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) to measure the light intensity, and the other system uses a single lens telescope, gated image intensifier, and Charge Injection Device (CID) camera to image the beam.

  6. Control system for Fermilab`s low temperature upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, B.L.

    1996-09-01

    Fermilab recently upgraded the Tevatron Cryogenic Systems to allow for lower temperature operation. This Lower Temperature Upgrade grew out of a desire to increase the Colliding Beam Physics energy from 900 GeV to 1000 GeV. A key element in achieving this goal is the new cryogenic control system designed at Fermilab and installed in 24 satellite refrigerators and 8 compressor buildings. The cryogenic improvements and addition hardware like cold compressors exceeded the capability of the original distributed controls package. The new distributed controls package uses a Multibus II platform and Intel`s 80386 microprocessor. Token Ring is used as the link to the systems 6 primary crate locations with Arcnet used as the connection to the systems numerous I/O crates. I/0 capabilities are double the capabilities of the original system. Software has also been upgraded with the introduction of more flexible control loop strategies and Finite State Machines used for automatic sequential control, like quench recovery or cold compressor pump down.

  7. Fast Bunch Integrators at Fermilab During Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Thomas; Briegel, Charles; Fellenz, Brian; Vogel, Greg; /Fermilab

    2011-07-13

    The Fast Bunch Integrator is a bunch intensity monitor designed around the measurements made from Resistive Wall Current Monitors. During the Run II period these were used in both Tevatron and Main Injector for single and multiple bunch intensity measurements. This paper presents an overview of the design and use of these systems during this period. During the Run II era the Fast Bunch integrators have found a multitude of uses. From antiproton transfers to muti-bunch beam coalescing, Main Injector transfers to halo scraping and lifetime measurements, the Fast Bunch Integrators have proved invaluable in the creation and maintenance of Colliding Beams stores at Fermilab.

  8. Physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Rick; /Florida U.

    2006-04-01

    The theme of the XXXIV International Meeting on Fundamental Physics held in El Escorial, Spain on April 2-7, 2006 was ''From HERA and the TEVATRON to the LHC''. This is a summary of the four lectures I presented on ''Physics at the Tevatron''. Heavy quark production and the production of photons, bosons, and jets at the Tevatron are discussed. Also, a detailed study at the ''underlying event'' at CDF is presented together with a discussion of PYTHIA 6.2 tunes. A look back at the ''old days'' of Feynman-Field collider phenomenology is included.

  9. Measurements of beam halo diffusion and population density in the Tevatron and in the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio

    2015-03-01

    Halo dynamics influences global accelerator performance: beam lifetimes, emittance growth, dynamic aperture, and collimation efficiency. Halo monitoring and control are also critical for the operation of high-power machines. For instance, in the high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC, the energy stored in the beam tails may reach several megajoules. Fast losses can result in superconducting magnet quenches, magnet damage, or even collimator deformation. The need arises to measure the beam halo and to remove it at controllable rates. In the Tevatron and in the LHC, halo population densities and diffusivities were measured with collimator scans by observing the time evolution of losses following small inward or outward collimator steps, under different experimental conditions: with single beams and in collision, and, in the case of the Tevatron, with a hollow electron lens acting on a subset of bunches. After the LHC resumes operations, it is planned to compare measured diffusivities with the known strength of transverse damper excitations. New proposals for nondestructive halo population density measurements are also briefly discussed.

  10. P-986 Letter of Intent: Medium-Energy Antiproton Physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Phillips, Thomas J.; Apollinari, Giorgio; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; Christian, David C.; Derwent, Paul; Gollwitzer, Keith; Hahn, Alan; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Stefanski, Ray; /Fermilab /INFN, Ferrara /Hbar Technol., West Chicago /IIT, Chicago /CHEP, Taegu /Luther Coll. /Michigan U. /Northwestern U. /Notre Dame U. /St. Xavier U., Chicago

    2009-02-05

    Fermilab has long had the world's most intense antiproton source. Despite this, the opportunities for medium-energy antiproton physics at Fermilab have been limited in the past and - with the antiproton source now exclusively dedicated to serving the needs of the Tevatron Collider - are currently nonexistent. The anticipated shutdown of the Tevatron in 2010 presents the opportunity for a world-leading medium-energy antiproton program. We summarize the current status of the Fermilab antiproton facility and review some physics topics for which the experiment we propose could make the world's best measurements. Among these, the ones with the clearest potential for high impact and visibility are in the area of charm mixing and CP violation. Continued running of the Antiproton Source following the shutdown of the Tevatron is thus one of the simplest ways that Fermilab can restore a degree of breadth to its future research program. The impact on the rest of the program will be minor. We request a small amount of effort over the coming months in order to assess these issues in more detail.

  11. Study of the heavy flavour fractions in z+jets events from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at energy √s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrandrea, Paolo

    2008-06-01

    to provide collisions for the experiments at the end of 2008. In the meanwhile the only running accelerator able to provide collisions suitable for the search of the Higgs boson is the Tevatron at Fermilab, a proton-antiproton collider with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV working at 3 • 1032cm-2s-1 peak luminosity. These features make the Tevatron able for the direct search of the Higgs boson in the 115-200 GeV mass range. Since the coupling of the Higgs boson is proportional to the masses of the particles involved, the decay in b{bar b} has the largest branching ratio for Higgs mass < 135 GeV and thus the events Z/W + $b\\bar{b}$ are the main background to the Higgs signal in the most range favored by Standard Model fits. In this thesis a new technique to identify Heavy Flavour quarks inside high - PT jets is applied to events with a reconstructed Z boson to provide a measurement of the Z+b and Z+c inclusive cross sections. The study of these channels represent also a test of QCD in high transferred momentum regime, and can provide information on proton pdf. This new Heavy Flavour identication technique (tagger) provides an increased statistical separation between b, c and light flavours, using a new vertexing algorithm and a chain of artificial Neural Networks to exploit as much information as possible in each event. For this work I collaborated with the Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' group working in the CDF II experiment at Tevatron, that has at first developed this tagger. After a brief theoretical introduction (chapter 1) and a description of the experimental apparatus (chapter 2), the tagger itself and its calibration procedure are described in chapter 3 and 4. The chapter 5 is dedicated to the event selection and the chapter 6 contains the results of the measurement and the study of the systematic errors.

  12. Top differential cross section measurements (Tevatron)

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Andreas W.

    2012-01-01

    Differential cross sections in the top quark sector measured at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are presented. CDF used 2.7 fb{sup -1} of data and measured the differential cross section as a function of the invariant mass of the t{bar t} system. The measurement shows good agreement with the standard model and furthermore is used to derive limits on the ratio {kappa}/M{sub Pl} for gravitons which decay to top quarks in the Randall-Sundrum model. D0 used 1.0 fb{sup -1} of data to measure the differential cross section as a function of the transverse momentum of the top-quark. The measurement shows a good agreement to the next-to-leading order perturbative QCD prediction and various other standard model predictions.

  13. Higgs boson studies at the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Herner, Kenneth

    2016-05-31

    We present the combination of searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV , using the full Run 2 dataset collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We also present combined measurements of Higgs Boson production cross sections, branching ratios, and couplings to fermions and bosons. Lastly, we present tests of different spin and parity hypotheses for a particle H of mass 125 GeV produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a pair of b quarks, and place constraints on such hypotheses using the D0 data.

  14. Higgs boson studies at the tevatron

    DOE PAGES

    Herner, Kenneth

    2016-05-31

    We present the combination of searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV , using the full Run 2 dataset collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We also present combined measurements of Higgs Boson production cross sections, branching ratios, and couplings to fermions and bosons. Lastly, we present tests of different spin and parity hypotheses for a particle H of mass 125 GeV produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a pair of b quarks, and place constraints on such hypotheses using the D0more » data.« less

  15. Tevatron electron lens magnetic system

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Shiltsev et al.

    2001-07-12

    In the framework of collaboration between IHEP and FNAL, a magnetic system of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) has been designed and built. The TEL is currently installed in the superconducting ring of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider and used for experimental studies of beam-beam compensation [1].

  16. Status of antiproton accumulation and cooling at Fermilab's Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Bhat, C.M.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, A.; Carlson, K.; Crisp, J.; Derwent, P.; Eddy, N.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Pruss, S.; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    The Recycler ring is an 8 GeV permanent magnet storage ring where antiprotons are accumulated and prepared for Fermilab's Tevatron Collider program. With the goal of maximizing the integrated luminosity delivered to the experiments, storing, cooling and extracting antiprotons with high efficiency has been pursued. Over the past two years, while the average accumulation rate doubled, the Recycler continued to operate at a constant level of performance thanks to changes made to the Recycler Electron Cooler (energy stability and regulation, electron beam optics), RF manipulations and operating procedures. In particular, we discuss the current accumulation cycle in which {approx} 400 x 10{sup 10} antiprotons are accumulated and extracted to the Tevatron every {approx}15 hours.

  17. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass by Dynamical Likelihood Method using the Lepton + Jets Events with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Taichi

    2008-02-01

    We have measured the top quark mass with the dynamical likelihood method. The data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.7fb-1 was collected in proton antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV with the CDF detector at Fermilab Tevatron during the period March 2002-March 2007. We select t$\\bar{t}$ pair production candidates by requiring one high energy lepton and four jets, in which at least one of jets must be tagged as a b-jet. In order to reconstruct the top quark mass, we use the dynamical likelihood method based on maximum likelihood method where a likelihood is defined as the differential cross section multiplied by the transfer function from observed quantities to parton quantities, as a function of the top quark mass and the jet energy scale(JES). With this method, we measure the top quark mass to be 171.6 ± 2.0 (stat.+ JES) ± 1.3(syst.) = 171.6 ± 2.4 GeV/c2.

  18. Measurement of the Λ0b lifetime in Λ0b → Λ+cπ- decays at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mumford, Jonathan Reid

    2008-09-01

    The lifetime of the Λ0b baryon (consisting of u, d and b quarks) is the theoretically most interesting of all b-hadron lifetimes. The lifetime of Λ0b probes our understanding of how baryons with one heavy quark are put together and how they decay. Experimentally however, measurements of the Λ0b lifetime have either lacked precision or have been inconsistent with one another. This thesis describes the measurement of Λ0b lifetime in proton-antiproton collisions with center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. Using 1070 ± 60pb-1 of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), a clean sample of about 3,000 fully-reconstructed Λ0b →Λc+π- decays (with Λ+c subsequently decaying via Λ+c → p+ K- π+) is used to extract the lifetime of the Λ0b baryon, which is found to be cτ(Λ0b) = 422.8 ± 13.8(stat) ± 8.8(syst)μm. This is the most precise measurement of its kind, and is even better than the current world average. It also settles the recent controversy regarding the apparent inconsistency between CDF's other measurement and the rest of the world.

  19. [Support of HadroProduction of bottom using the 800 GeV/c primary photon beam at the Fermilab tevatron]. 1993 E771 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This report is a proposal from the group at Prairie View A&M University for an extension of their involvement with the E771 experiment at Fermilab. They describe their work on data analysis of this experiment, and effort involved in porting analysis codes from different work stations. This analysis is ongoing. They also propose to be a part of the extension of the E771 experiment (P867), which is proposed for the next fixed target run, in 1994/1995.

  20. Fermilab recycler stochastic cooling commissioning and performance

    SciTech Connect

    D. Broemmelsiek; Ralph Pasquinelli

    2003-06-04

    The Fermilab Recycler is a fixed 8 GeV kinetic energy storage ring located in the Fermilab Main Injector tunnel near the ceiling. The Recycler has two roles in Run II. First, to store antiprotons from the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator so that the antiproton production rate is no longer compromised by large numbers of antiprotons stored in the Accumulator. Second, to receive antiprotons from the Fermilab Tevatron at the end of luminosity periods. To perform each of these roles, stochastic cooling in the Recycler is needed to preserve and cool antiprotons in preparation for transfer to the Tevatron. The commissioning and performance of the Recycler stochastic cooling systems will be reviewed.

  1. Tevatron Top-Quark Combinations and World Top-Quark Mass Combination

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne

    2014-11-04

    Almost 20 years after its discovery, the top quark is still an interesting particle, undergoing precise investigation of its properties. For many years, the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at Fermilab was the only place to study top quarks in detail, while with the recent start of the LHC proton proton collider a top quark factory has opened. An important ingredient for the full understanding of the top quark is the combination of measurements from the individual experiments. In particular, the Tevaton combinations of single top-quark cross sections, the ttbar production cross section, the W helicity in top-quark decays as well as the Tevatron and the world combination of the top-quark mass are discussed.

  2. HTS power lead testing at the Fermilab magnet test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01

    The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility has tested high-temperature superconductor (HTS) power leads for cryogenic feed boxes to be placed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) interaction regions and at the new BTeV C0 interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron. A new test facility was designed and operated, successfully testing 20 pairs of HTS power leads for the LHC and 2 pairs of HTS power leads for the BTeV experiment. This paper describes the design and operation of the cryogenics, process controls, data acquisition, and quench management systems. Results from the facility commissioning are included, as is the performance of a new insulation method to prevent frost accumulation on the warm ends of the power leads.

  3. Flying wires at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, J.; Crawford, C.; Finley, D.; Flora, R.; Groves, T.; MacPherson, M.

    1989-03-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement systems called ''Flying Wires'' have been installed and made operational in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron accelerators. These devices are used routinely to measure the emittance of both protons and antiprotons throughout the fill process, and for emittance growth measurements during stores. In the Tevatron, the individual transverse profiles of six proton and six antiproton bunches are obtained simultaneously, with a single pass of the wire through the beam. Essential features of the hardware, software, and system operation are explained in the rest of the paper. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Alignment of the Fermilab D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Babatunde O'Sheg Oshinowo

    2001-07-20

    The Fermilab D0 detector was used for the discovery of the top quark during Run I in 1996. It is currently being upgraded to exploit the physics potential to be presented by the Main Injector and the Tevatron Collider during Run II in the Fall of 2000. Some of the essential elements of this upgrade is the upgrade of the Solenoid Magnet, the Central Fiber Tracker, the Preshower Detectors, the Calorimeter System, and the Muon System. This paper discusses the survey and alignment of the these detectors with emphasis on the Muon detector system. The alignment accuracy is specified as better than 0.5mm. A combination of the Laser Tracker, BETS, and V-STARS systems are used for the survey.

  5. Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Corrections to tt+jet Production at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmaier, S.; Uwer, P.; Weinzierl, S.

    2007-06-29

    We report on the calculation of the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the production of top-quark-top-antiquark pairs in association with a hard jet at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We present results for the tt+jet cross section and the forward-backward charge asymmetry. The corrections stabilize the leading-order prediction for the cross section. The charge asymmetry receives large corrections.

  6. Next-to-Leading-Order QCD Corrections to WW+Jet Production at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmaier, S.; Kallweit, S.; Uwer, P.

    2008-02-15

    We report on the calculation of the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the production of W-boson pairs in association with a hard jet at the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN Large Hadron Collider, which is an important source of background for Higgs boson and new-physics searches. The corrections stabilize the leading-order prediction for the cross section considerably, in particular, if a veto against the emission of a second hard jet is applied.

  7. Magnetic field data on Fermilab Energy-Saver quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E.E.; Brown, B.C.; Cooper, W.E.; Fisk, H.E.; Gross, D.A.; Hanft, R.; Ohnuma, S.; Turkot, F.T.

    1983-03-01

    The Fermilab Energy Saver/Doubler (Tevatron) accelerator contains 216 superconducting quadrupole magnets. Before installation in the Tevatron ring, these magnets plus an additional number of spares were extensively tested at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility (MTF). Details on the results of the tests are presented here.

  8. Collider and detector protection at beam accidents

    SciTech Connect

    I. L. Rakhno; N. V. Mokhov; A. I. Drozhdin

    2003-12-10

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section.

  9. QCD corrections to associated production of tt{gamma} at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Pengfei; Ma Wengan; Zhang Renyou; Han Liang; Guo Lei; Wang Shaoming

    2009-07-01

    We report on the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD computation of top-quark pair production in association with a photon at the Fermilab Tevatron RUN II and CERN Large Hadron Collider. We describe the impact of the complete NLO QCD radiative corrections to this process, and provide the predictions of the leading order (LO) and NLO integrated cross sections, distributions of the transverse momenta of the top quark and photon for the LHC and Tevatron, and the LO and NLO forward-backward top-quark charge asymmetries for the Tevatron. We investigate the dependence of the LO and NLO cross sections on the renormalization/factorization scale, and find the scale dependence of the LO cross section is obviously improved by the NLO QCD corrections. The K-factor of the NLO QCD correction is 0.977(1.524) for the Tevatron (LHC)

  10. The Fermilab Antiproton Source Design Report April, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1981-04-01

    The purpose of the Fermilab Antiproton source is to provide at least $10^{11}$ cooled, accumulated antiprotons for acceleration in the Main Ring and Tevatron for colliding-beams experiments with 1-TeV protons. This will provide the highest available energy in the world for particle-physics experiments through at least the 1980's. Collisions at 2 TeV in the center of mass will provide a unique experimental tool in a new energy range. The design of the Antiproton Source has been carried out by the Colliding Beams Department of the Accelerator Division in collaboration with Argonne National Laborator.y, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the Institute of Nuclear Physics at Novosibirsk, and the University of Wisconsin...

  11. Experimental Physics Investigations using Colliding Beam Detectors at Fermilab and the LHC & Nonperturbative Quantum Field Theory: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Skubic, P.; Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Strauss, M.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kao, C.; Milton, K. A.

    2004-07-01

    Task A: during the past three years, the D collaboration has gone from a period that has concentrated on the analysis of Run I data and the construction of the Run II detector, to the commissioning of the Run II detector and the start of Run II analysis with ≈214 pb₋1 data recorded so far. During the coming years, we expect to collect a factor of 30 to 60 times more data than we did during Run I. This data will be used to test the limits of the standard model (SM), search for new phenomena, and possibly see hints of the Higgs boson. Task B: A major thrust for the past eight years has been based on our experimental project to search for magnetic monopoles produced at Fermilab. Although the experiment has now been concluded, with a nal paper submitted to Physical Review D, theoretically much work remains to be done. A proper interpretation of the experimental results requires improved calculations, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, of the binding of monopoles to atomic nuclei through the anomalous magnetic moment interaction. Improved calculations of the production of monopoles through the Drell-Yan process are also being carried out.

  12. Fermilab R{ampersand}D program in medium energyelectron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Fermilab began an R & D program in medium energy electron cooling in April 1995 with the object of cooling 8 GeV antiprotons in a new 3.3 km permanent magnet storage ring (Recycler) to be built in the same tunnel as the Main Injector (MI). The MI is to be completed in 1998, and it is planned to install the Recycler by the end of 1997 to reduce interference during the final rush of MI installation. Although the Recycler will employ stochastic cooling initially, its potential for contributing an order of magnitude to Tevatron collider luminosity is tied to electron cooling. The short time scale and Fermilab`s limited familiarity with low energy electron beams has given rise to a two-phase development plan. The first phase is to build a cooling system based on an electron beam of {ge} 200 mA before year 2000. The second phase of about 3 years is planned to reach electron current of 2 A or more. This report describes the general scheme for high luminosity collider operation as well as the R & D plan and progress to date. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. A simultaneous measurement of the $b$-tagging efficiency scale factor and the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Nazim; /McGill U.

    2011-07-01

    The ability to compare results between Monte Carlo and data is imperative in modern experimental high-energy physics analyses. The b-tagging efficiency Scale Factor (SF) allows for an accurate comparison of b quark identification in data samples and Monte Carlo. This thesis presents a simultaneous measurement of the SF for the SecVtx algorithm and the t{bar t} production cross section using 5.6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. The t{bar t} cross section was measured to be 7.26 {+-} 0.47 pb, consistent with prior CDF analyses. The tight SF value was measured to be 0.925 {+-} 0.032 and the loose SF value was measured at 0.967 {+-} 0.033. These are the most precise SF SecVtx measurements to be performed at CDF to date.

  14. Title I Design Report: Fermilab Linac Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Fermilab,

    1990-02-01

    The Fermilab Linac Upgrade Project is motivated by the requirement to increase Collider luminosity which will increase the physics discovery potential of the Tevatron Collider. The Linac Upgrade is one of several steps which will increase the Collider luminosity. The basic accelerator physics motivation for the project is the following chain of logic. The existing Main Ring Accelerator has a fixed, relatively small admittance for 8 GeV protons injected from the Booster Accelerator. While it is demonstrably p088ible to increase the number of protons accelerated in the Booster, space charge effects at injection into the Booster from the Linac increase the emittance of the beam delivered from the Booster to the Main Ring beyond the available admittance of the Main Ring. An increase in the energy of the protons injected into the Booster, however, will reduce the emittance growth due to the space charge effects at injection. Therefore, for a given admittance into the Main Ring, a greater number of protons will be accelerated in the Booster with a matching emittance if the injection energy is raised. The goal of the Linac Upgrade is to double the output energy of the Linac from 200MeV to 400MeV.

  15. Study of sequential semileptonic decays of b hadrons produced at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, G.; Fiori, I.; Giromini, P.; Happacher, F.; Miscetti, S.; Parri, A.; Ptohos, F.; /Frascati /Fermilab /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

    2005-07-01

    The authors present a study of rates and kinematical properties of lepton pairs contained in central jets with transverse energy E{sub T} {ge} 15 GeV that re produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. They compare the data to a QCD prediction based on the HERWIG and QQ Monte Carlo generator programs. They find that the data are poorly described by the simulation, in which sequential semileptonic decays of single b quarks (b {yields} l c X with c {yields} l s X) are the major source of such lepton pairs.

  16. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Searches for New Particles and Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Toback, David; ŽIvković, Lidija

    2015-02-17

    We present a summary of results for searches for new particles and interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by the CDF and the D0 experiments. These include results from Run I as well as Run II for the time period up to July 2014. We focus on searches for supersymmetry, as well as other models of new physics such as new fermions and bosons, various models of excited fermions, leptoquarks, technicolor, hidden-valley model particles, long-lived particles, extra dimensions, dark matter particles, and signature-based searches.

  17. B, Lambda{sub b} and charm results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    F. Azfar

    2003-09-18

    Recent results on B{sub d}, B{sub u}{sup {+-}}, B{sub s}, {Lambda}{sub b} and Charm hadrons are reported from {approx} 75 pb{sup -1} and {approx} 40 pb{sup -1} of data accumulated at the upgraded CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}-p collider, during Run-II. These include lifetime and mass measurements of B and Charm hadrons, searches for rare decays in charm and B hadrons and CP-violation in Charm decays. Results relevant to CP-violation in B-decays are also reported.

  18. Report of the Fermilab ILC Citizens' Task Force

    SciTech Connect

    2008-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory convened the ILC Citizens' Task Force to provide guidance and advice to the laboratory to ensure that community concerns and ideas are included in all public aspects of planning and design for a proposed future accelerator, the International Linear Collider. In this report, the members of the Task Force describe the process they used to gather and analyze information on all aspects of the proposed accelerator and its potential location at Fermilab in northern Illinois. They present the conclusions and recommendations they reached as a result of the learning process and their subsequent discussions and deliberations. While the Task Force was charged to provide guidance on the ILC, it became clear during the process that the high cost of the proposed accelerator made a near-term start for the project at Fermilab unlikely. Nevertheless, based on a year of extensive learning and dialogue, the Task Force developed a series of recommendations for Fermilab to consider as the laboratory develops all successor projects to the Tevatron. The Task Force recognizes that bringing a next-generation particle physics project to Fermilab will require both a large international effort and the support of the local community. While the Task Force developed its recommendations in response to the parameters of a future ILC, the principles they set forth apply directly to any large project that may be conceived at Fermilab, or at other laboratories, in the future. With this report, the Task Force fulfills its task of guiding Fermilab from the perspective of the local community on how to move forward with a large-scale project while building positive relationships with surrounding communities. The report summarizes the benefits, concerns and potential impacts of bringing a large-scale scientific project to northern Illinois.

  19. Final Report - The Decline and Fall of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    RIORDAN, MICHAEL

    2011-11-29

    In October 1993 the US Congress terminated the Superconducting Super Collider — at the time the largest pure-science project ever attempted, with a total cost estimated to exceed $10 billion. It was a stunning loss for the US highenergy physics community, which until that moment had perched for decades at the pinnacle of American science. Ever since 1993, this once-dominant scientific community has been in gradual decline. With the 2010 startup of research on the CERN Large Hadron Collider and the 2011 shutdown of the Fermilab Tevatron, world leadership in elementary-particle physics has crossed the Atlantic and returned to Europe.

  20. Conceptual Design Report: Fermilab Upgrade: Main Injector - Technical Components and Civil Construction, January 1990 (Rev. 2)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1990-01-10

    This report contains a description of the design and cost estimate of a new 150 GeV accelerator, designated the Main Injector, which will be required to support the upgrade of the Fermilab Accelerator Complex. The construction of this accelerator will simultaneously result in significant enhancements to both the Fermilab collider and fixed target programs. The Main Injector (MI) is to be located south of the Antiproton Source and tangent to the Tevatron ring at the FO straight section as shown in Figure 1-1. The MI will perform all duties currently required of the existing Main Ring. Thus, operation of the Main Ring will cease following commissioning of the MI, with a concurrent reduction in background rates as seen in the colliding beam detectors. The performance of the MI, as measured in terms of protons per second delivered to the antiproton production target or total protons delivered to the Tevatron, is expected to exceed that of the Main Ring by a factor of two to three. In addition the MI will provide high duty factor 120 GeV beam to the experimental areas during collider operation, a capability which does not presently exist in the Main Ring.

  1. Conceptual Design Report: Fermilab Upgrade. Main Injector. Technical Components and Civil Construction, January, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1989-01-12

    This report contains a description of the design and cost estimate of a new 150 GeV accelerator, designated the Main Injector, which will be required to support the upgrade of the Fermilab Collider. The construction of this accelerator will simultaneously result in significant enhancements to the Fermilab fixed target program. The Main Injector (MI) is to be located south of the Antiproton Source and tangent to the Tevatron ring at the FO straight section as shown in Figure 1-1. The MI will perform all duties currently required of the existing Main Ring. Thus, operation of the Main Ring will cease following commissioning of the MI, with a concurrent reduction in background rates as seen in the colliding beam detectors. The performance of the MI, as measured in terms of protons per second delivered to the antiproton production target or total protons delivered to the Tevatron, is expected to exceed that of the Main Ring by a factor of two to three. In addition the MI will provide high duty factor 120 GeV beam to the experimental areas during collider operation, a capability which does not presently exist in the Main Ring.

  2. QCD results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    C. Mesropian

    2002-07-12

    The Tevatron hadron collider provides the unique opportunity to study Quantum Chromodynamics, QCD, at the highest energies. The results summarized in this talk, although representing different experimental objects, as hadronic jets and electromagnetic clusters, serve to determine the fundamental input ingredients of QCD as well as to search for new physics. The authors present results from QCD studies at the Tevatron from Run 1 data, including jet and direct photon production, and a measurement of the strong coupling constant.

  3. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, J.

    1986-08-01

    The topics discussed are the stochastic cooling systems in use at Fermilab and some of the techniques that have been employed to meet the particular requirements of the anti-proton source. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab became of paramount importance about 5 years ago when the anti-proton source group at Fermilab abandoned the electron cooling ring in favor of a high flux anti-proton source which relied solely on stochastic cooling to achieve the phase space densities necessary for colliding proton and anti-proton beams. The Fermilab systems have constituted a substantial advance in the techniques of cooling including: large pickup arrays operating at microwave frequencies, extensive use of cryogenic techniques to reduce thermal noise, super-conducting notch filters, and the development of tools for controlling and for accurately phasing the system.

  4. Recent results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Vellidis, Costas; Bravina, L.; Foka, Y.; Kabana, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collider was shut down in 2011, after 10 years of high performance operation at a center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV in Run II. The two experiments, CDF and DZero, continue to analyze the collected data, aiming to extract all possible information regarding studies of the standard model and searches for new physics. A short review of some of the recent measurements at the Tevatron, and of the impact of the Tevatron program to high energy physics, is presented.

  5. Measurement of BR(Bu to phi K)/BR(Bu to J/psi K) at the collider detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Napora, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis presents evidence for the decay mode B± → ΦK± in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using (120 ± 7)pb-1 of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). This signal is then used to measure the branching ratio relative to the decay mode B± → J/ΨK±. The measurement starts from reconstructing the two decay modes: B± → ΦK±, where Φ → K+K- and B± → J/ΨK±, where J/Ψ → μ+μ-. The measurement yielded 23 ± 7 B± → ΦK± events, and 406 ± 26 B± → J/ΨK± events. The fraction of B± → J/ΨK± events where the J/Ψ subsequently decayed to two muons (as opposed to two electrons) was found to be fμμ = 0.839 ± 0.066. The relative branching ratio of the two decays is then calculated based on the equation: BR(B± → ΦK±)/BR(B± → J/ΨK±) = N ΦK/NΨK • fμμ BR(J/Ψ → μ+μ-)/BR(Φ → K+K-) ϵμμK/ϵKKK R(ϵiso). The measurement finds BR(B± → ΦK±)/BR(B± → J/ΨK±) = 0.0068 ± 0.0021(stat.) ± 0.0007(syst.). The B± → ΦK± branching ratio is then found to be BR(B± → ΦK±) = [6.9 ± 2.1(stat.) ± 0.8(syst.)] x 10-6. This value is consistent with similar measurements reported by the e+e- collider experiments BaBar[1], Belle[2], and CLEO[3].

  6. Mathematical modeling of a Fermilab helium liquefier coldbox

    SciTech Connect

    Geynisman, M.G.; Walker, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility is operated 24 hours-a-day to supply 4.6{degrees}K for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider Ring and to recover warm return gases. The centerpieces of the CHL are two independent cold boxes rated at 4000 and 5400 liters/hour with LN{sub 2} precool. These coldboxes are Claude cycle and have identical heat exchangers trains, but different turbo-expanders. The Tevatron cryogenics demand for higher helium supply from CHL was the driving force to investigate an installation of an expansion engine in place of the Joule-Thompson valve. A mathematical model was developed to describe the thermo- and gas-dynamic processes for the equipment included in the helium coldbox. The model is based on a finite element approach, opposite to a global variables approach, thus providing for higher accuracy and conversion stability. Though the coefficients used in thermo- and gas-dynamic equations are unique for a given coldbox, the general approach, the equations, the methods of computations, and most of the subroutines written in FORTRAN can be readily applied to different coldboxes. The simulation results are compared against actual operating data to demonstrate applicability of the model.

  7. SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) dipole coil production tooling

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.A.; Barczak, E.J.; Bossert, R.C.; Brandt, J.S.; Smith, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    Superconducting Super Collider dipole coils must be produced to high precision to ensure uniform prestress and even conductor distribution within the collared coil assembly. Tooling is being prepared at Fermilab for the production of high precision 1M and 16.6M SSC dipole coils suitable for mass production. The design and construction methods builds on the Tevatron tooling and production experience. Details of the design and construction methods and measured coil uniformity of 1M coils will be presented. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section at the Fermilab Tevatron p pmacr collider using a cone-based jet algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C. S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlok, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wagner, W.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2008-09-01

    We present a measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV based on data collected by the CDF II detector with an integrated luminosity of 1.13fb-1. The measurement was made using the cone-based midpoint jet clustering algorithm in the rapidity region of |y|<2.1. The results are consistent with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD predictions based on recent parton distribution functions (PDFs), and are expected to provide increased precision in PDFs at high parton momentum fraction x. The results are also compared to the recent inclusive jet cross section measurement using the kT jet clustering algorithm, and we find that the ratio of the cross sections measured with the two algorithms is in agreement with theoretical expectations over a large range of jet transverse momentum and rapidity.

  9. Search for resonant second generation slepton production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-05-01

    The authors present a search for supersymmetry in the R-parity violating resonant production and decay of smuons and muon-sneutrinos in the channels {tilde {mu}} {yields} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} {mu}, {tilde {mu}} {yields} {tilde {chi}}{sub 2,3,4}{sup 0} {mu}, and {tilde {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1,2}{sup {+-}} {mu}. They analyzed 0.38 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected between April 2002 and August 2004 with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The observed number of events is in agreement with the standard model expectation, and we calculate 95% C.L. limits on the slepton production cross section times branching fraction to gaugino plus muon, as a function of slepton and gaugino masses. In the framework of minimal supergravity, we set limits on the coupling parameter {lambda}'{sub 211}, extending significantly previous results obtained in Run I of the Tevatron and at the CERN LEP collider.

  10. Operation and maintenance of Fermilab`s satellite refrigerator expansion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Soyars, W.M.

    1996-09-01

    Fermilab`s superconducting Tevatron accelerator is cooled to liquid helium temperatures by 24 satellite refrigerators, each of which uses for normal operations a reciprocating `wet` expansion engine. These expanders are basically Process System (formerly Koch) Model 1400 expanders installed in standalone cryostats designed by Fermilab. This paper will summarize recent experience with operations and maintenance of these expansion engines. Some of the statistics presented will include total engine hours, mean time between major and minor maintenance, and frequent causes of major maintenance.

  11. Digitral Down Conversion Technology for Tevatron Beam Line Tuner at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Schappert, W.; Lorman, E.; Scarpine, V.; Ross, M.C.; Sebek, J.; Straumann, T.; /Fermilab /SLAC

    2008-03-17

    Fermilab is presently in Run II collider operations and is developing instrumentation to improve luminosity. Improving the orbit matching between accelerator components using a Beam Line Tuner (BLT) can improve the luminosity. Digital Down Conversion (DDC) has been proposed as a method for making more accurate beam position measurements. Fermilab has implemented a BLT system using a DDC technique to measure orbit oscillations during injections from the Main Injector to the Tevatron. The output of a fast ADC is downconverted and filtered in software. The system measures the x and y positions, the intensity, and the time of arrival for each proton or antiproton bunch, on a turn-by-turn basis, during the first 1024 turns immediately following injection. We present results showing position, intensity, and time of arrival for both injected and coasting beam. Initial results indicate a position resolution of {approx}20 to 40 microns and a phase resolution of {approx}25 ps.

  12. Search for single top production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard; /Michigan State U.

    2004-11-01

    Searches for the electroweak production of single top quarks have been started at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider using Run II data by both the D0 and CDF collaborations. Using a dataset of approximately 160pb{sup -1}, neither experiment finds evidence for Single Top production and sets 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section. The D0 limits are 19pb on the s-channel production, 25pb on the t-channel production, and 23pb on the combined s+t-channel production. The CDF limits are 8.5pb on the t-channel production and 13.7pb on the combined s+t-channel production.

  13. The special applications of Tevatron electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaolong Zhang et al.

    2003-08-11

    Besides the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) runs as a R and D project for Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation, it is used daily as a Beam Abort Gap Cleaner for collider operations. It can also be served as beam exciter for beam dynamics measurements and slow proton or antiproton bunch remover. This report describes all these applications and observations.

  14. Vacuum technology issues for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Joestlein, H.

    1989-10-23

    The Superconducting Super Collider, to be built in Texas, will provide an energy of 40 TeV from colliding proton beams. This energy is twenty times higher than currently available from the only other cryogenic collider, the Fermilab Tevatron, and will allow experiments that can lead to a better understanding of the fundamental properties of matter. The energy scale and the size of the new machine pose intriguing challenges and opportunities for the its vacuum systems. The discussion will include the effects of synchrotron radiation on cryogenic beam tubes, cold adsorption pumps for hydrogen, methods of leak checking large cryogenic systems, the development of cold beam valves, and radiation damage to components, especially electronics. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Combination of Tevatron searches for the standard model Higgs boson in the W+W- decay mode

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Gregores, E.M.; Mercadante, P.G.; Hebbeker, T.; Kirsch, M.; Meyer, A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Avila, C.; Gomez, B.; Mendoza, L.; /Andes U., Bogota /Argonne /Arizona U. /Athens U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /Bonn U. /Boston U. /Brandeis U.

    2010-01-01

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a Higgs boson decaying to W{sup +}W{sup -}. The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 4.8 (CDF) and 5.4 (D0) fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No excess is observed above background expectation, and resulting limits on Higgs boson production exclude a standard-model Higgs boson in the mass range 162-166 GeV at the 95% C.L.

  16. Combination of Tevatron Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the W+W- Decay Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Adelman, J.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Álvarez González, B.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Ancu, L. S.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Backusmayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Barfuss, A.-F.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barreto, J.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bauer, G.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Behari, S.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benitez, J. A.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Blocker, C.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boisvert, V.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Bose, T.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brubaker, E.; Bu, X. B.; Buchholz, D.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Calfayan, P.; Calpas, B.; Calvet, S.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Cammin, J.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Carrera, E.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudhary, B.; Christoudias, T.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Cihangir, S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Clutter, J.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Cutts, D.; Ćwiok, M.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Das, A.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; Davies, T.; de, K.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Dell'Orso, M.; de Lorenzo, G.; Deluca, C.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; D'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Devaughan, K.; di Canto, A.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dorland, T.; Dube, S.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Eno, S.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Fuess, S.; Furic, I.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gillberg, D.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gómez, B.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Guo, F.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Haefner, P.; Hagopian, S.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hall, I.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, M.; Hedin, D.; Hegeman, J. G.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirosky, R.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hossain, S.; Houben, P.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Huske, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; James, E.; Jamin, D.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jesik, R.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, W.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kar, D.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kaushik, V.; Kehoe, R.; Kephart, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kirsch, L.; Kirsch, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lam, D.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Landsberg, G.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebrun, P.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lellouch, J.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lovas, L.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lysak, R.; Lys, J.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Mal, P. K.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Maravin, Y.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mättig, P.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Mendoza, L.; Menezes, D.; Menzione, A.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Moulik, T.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Muanza, G. S.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mundal, O.; Mundim, L.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Neustroev, P.; Nielsen, J.; Nilsen, H.; Nodulman, L.; Nogima, H.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Obrant, G.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Onoprienko, D.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Osterberg, K.; Otec, R.; Otero Y Garzón, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padilla, M.; Padley, P.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Pangilinan, M.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A. A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.-J.; Park, S. K.; Parks, B.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penning, B.; Penzo, A.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Piegaia, R.; Pinera, L.; Piper, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pol, M.-E.; Polozov, P.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Protopopescu, S.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ranjan, N.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo, I.; Renkel, P.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Rich, P.; Richter, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robinson, S.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sirotenko, V.; Sisakyan, A.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Soha, A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Somalwar, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sorin, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Spurlock, B.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Stark, J.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strandberg, J.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Ströhmer, R.; Strologas, J.; Strom, D.; Strycker, G. L.; Stutte, L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Svoisky, P.; Taffard, A.; Takahashi, M.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tanasijczuk, A.; Tang, J.; Taylor, W.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tiller, B.; Tipton, P.; Titov, M.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tsybychev, D.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tuchming, B.; Tu, Y.; Tully, C.; Turini, N.; Tuts, P. M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unalan, R.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; van den Berg, P. J.; van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; van Remortel, N.; Varelas, N.; Varganov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vint, P.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wahl, H. D.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, P.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Yacoob, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, W.-C.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yoo, H. D.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zelitch, S.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, T.; Zheng, Y.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

    2010-02-01

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a Higgs boson decaying to W+W-. The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 4.8 (CDF) and 5.4 (D0) fb-1 of pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No excess is observed above background expectation, and resulting limits on Higgs boson production exclude a standard model Higgs boson in the mass range 162-166 GeV at the 95% C.L.

  17. Combination of Tevatron searches for the standard model Higgs boson in the W+W- decay mode.

    PubMed

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Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Neustroev, P; Nielsen, J; Nilsen, H; Nodulman, L; Nogima, H; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Obrant, G; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Onoprienko, D; Orava, R; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Osterberg, K; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Pangilinan, M; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramanov, A A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parks, B; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Patwa, A; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penning, B; Penzo, A; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Piegaia, R; Pinera, L; Piper, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pondrom, L; Popov, A V; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Protopopescu, S; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ranjan, N; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Redondo, I; Renkel, P; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Rich, P; Richter, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimondi, F; Ripp-Baudot, I; Ristori, L; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Rominsky, M; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sakumoto, W K; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savage, G; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schlabach, P; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwanenberger, C; Schwarz, T; Schwienhorst, R; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Sekaric, J; Semenov, A; Severini, H; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shabalina, E; Shalhout, S Z; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shivpuri, R K; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Simak, V; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sirotenko, V; Sisakyan, A; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Soha, A; Söldner-Rembold, S; Somalwar, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sorin, V; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Stark, J; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strologas, J; Strom, D; Strycker, G L; Stutte, L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Svoisky, P; Taffard, A; Takahashi, M; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tanasijczuk, A; Tang, J; Taylor, W; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tiller, B; Tipton, P; Titov, M; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tokmenin, V V; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tsybychev, D; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tuchming, B; Tu, Y; Tully, C; Turini, N; Tuts, P M; Ukegawa, F; Unalan, R; Uozumi, S; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; van Remortel, N; Varelas, N; Varganov, A; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilanova, D; Vilar, R; Vint, P; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wahl, H D; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, M H L S; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Warchol, J; Waters, D; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Wetstein, M; White, A; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicke, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wilson, P; Wimpenny, S J; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wobisch, M; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolfe, H; Wood, D R; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yagil, A; Yamada, R; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, W-C; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoh, J; Yoo, H D; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Youn, S W; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, J; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zeng, Y; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zheng, Y; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zucchelli, S; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2010-02-12

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a Higgs boson decaying to W+W-. The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 4.8 (CDF) and 5.4 (D0) fb(-1) of pp collisions at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No excess is observed above background expectation, and resulting limits on Higgs boson production exclude a standard model Higgs boson in the mass range 162-166 GeV at the 95% C.L.

  18. QCD measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurin, Dmitry; /Florida State U.

    2011-12-01

    Selected quantum chromodynamics (QCD) measurements performed at the Fermilab Run II Tevatron p{bar p} collider running at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV by CDF and D0 Collaborations are presented. The inclusive jet, dijet production and three-jet cross section measurements are used to test perturbative QCD calculations, constrain parton distribution function (PDF) determinations, and extract a precise value of the strong coupling constant, {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) = 0.1161{sub -0.0048}{sup +0.0041}. Inclusive photon production cross-section measurements reveal an inability of next-to-leading-order (NLO) perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations to describe low-energy photons arising directly in the hard scatter. The diphoton production cross-sections check the validity of the NLO pQCD predictions, soft-gluon resummation methods implemented in theoretical calculations, and contributions from the parton-to-photon fragmentation diagrams. Events with W/Z+jets productions are used to measure many kinematic distributions allowing extensive tests and tunes of predictions from pQCD NLO and Monte-Carlo (MC) event generators. The charged-particle transverse momenta (p{sub T}) and multiplicity distributions in the inclusive minimum bias events are used to tune non-perturbative QCD models, including those describing the multiple parton interactions (MPI). Events with inclusive production of {gamma} and 2 or 3 jets are used to study increasingly important MPI phenomenon at high p{sub T}, measure an effective interaction cross section, {sigma}{sub eff} = 16.4 {+-} 2.3 mb, and limit existing MPI models.

  19. Diboson physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, Mark S.; /UC, San Diego

    2006-05-01

    At the Fermilab Tevatron, the CDF and D0 detectors are being used to study diboson production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The authors summarize recent measurements of the W{gamma}, Z{gamma}, and WW cross-sections and limits on WZ and ZZ production. Limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings are also presented.

  20. B States at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Paulini, Manfred; /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2009-06-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments have produced a wealth of heavy flavor physics results since the beginning of RunII of the Fermilab Tevatron. They review recent measurements of B hadron states including excited B states (B**, B{sub s}**) and the B{sub c}{sup +} meson. They also summarize the discoveries of the {Sigma}{sub b} baryon states and the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} baryon.

  1. Survey of the Fermilab D0 detector collision hall

    SciTech Connect

    Babatunde O'Sheg Oshinowo

    2001-07-20

    The Fermilab D0 detector was used for the discovery of the top quark during Run I in 1996. It had been upgraded to exploit the physics potential to be presented by the Main Injector and the Tevatron Collider during Run II. The upgrade of the D0 detector was fully commissioned on March 1, 2001, and thus marked the official start of the Run II experiment. The detector which weighs about 5500 tons, was assembled in the Assembly Hall. Prior to moving the detector into the Collision Hall, the existing survey monuments were densified in the Collision Hall with new monuments. This paper discusses the survey of the Collision Hall using a combination of the Laser Tracker, BETS, V-Stars, and other Optical systems to within the specified accuracy of {+-}0.5mm.

  2. Power tests of the Fermilab Lithium Lens for antiproton collection

    SciTech Connect

    Biallas, G.; Dugan, G.; Hangst, J.; Hanson, R.; Hojvat, C.; Lange, F.; Lennox, A.J.; McCarthy, J.

    1983-08-01

    A prototpye Lithium Lens to be used for the collection of antiprotons in the Fermilab Tevatron I project has been constructed. Some of the fabrication details, the procedure for lithium filling and the results of the initial operation are discussed.

  3. State of hadron collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Grannis, P.D. |

    1993-12-01

    The 9th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics in Tsukuba Japan demonstrated clearly the enormous breadth of physics accessible in hadron cowders. Although no significant chinks were reported in the armor of the Standard Model, new results presented in this meeting have expanded our knowledge of the electroweak and strong interactions and have extended the searches for non-standard phenomena significantly. Much of the new data reported came from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab cowder. Superb operation of the Tevatron during the 1992-1993 Run and significant advances on the detector fronts -- in particular, the emergence of the new D0 detector as a productive physics instrument in its first outing and the addition of the CDF silicon vertex detector -- enabled much of this advance. It is noteworthy however that physics from the CERN collider experiments UA1 and UA4 continued to make a large impact at this meeting. In addition, very interesting summary talks were given on new results from HERA, cosmic ray experiments, on super-hadron collider physics, and on e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments at LEP and TRISTAN. These summaries are reported in elsewhere in this volume.

  4. Jet properties at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    D'Onofrio, Monica; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2006-07-01

    The RunII physics program at the Tevatron started in spring 2001 with protons and antiprotons colliding at an energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. More than 1 fb{sup -1} of data have been collected by both the CDF and D0 experiments. In this contribution, some of the new QCD results are presented.

  5. Recent QCD Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Vellidis, Costas

    2015-10-10

    Four years after the shutdown of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, the two Tevatron experiments, CDF and DZero, continue producing important results that test the theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The experiments exploit the advantages of the data sample acquired during the Tevatron Run II, stemming from the unique pp initial state, the clean environment at the relatively low Tevatron instantaneous luminosities, and the good understanding of the data sample after many years of calibrations and optimizations. A summary of results using the full integrated luminosity is presented, focusing on measurements of prompt photon production, weak boson production associated with jets, and non-perturbative QCD processes.

  6. Conceptual Design Report: Fermilab Main Injector - Technical Components and Civil Construction, April 1992 (Rev. 3.1)

    SciTech Connect

    1992-04-01

    This report contains a description of the design and cost estimate of a new 150 GeV accelerator, designated the Fermilab Main Injector (FMI). The construction of this accelerator will simultaneously result in significant enhancements to both the Fermilab collider and fixed target programs. The FMI is to be located south of the Antiproton Source and tangent to the Tevatron ring at the FO straight section as shown in Figure 1-1. The FMI will perform all duties currently required of the existing Main Ring. Thus, operation of the Main Ring will cease following commissioning of the FMI, with a concurrent reduction in background rates as seen in the colliding beam detectors. The performance of the FMI, as measured in terms of protons per second delivered to the antiproton production target or total protons delivered to the Tevatron, is expected to exceed that of the Main Ring by a factor of two-tothree. In addition the FMI will provide high duty factor 120 GeV beam to the experimental areas during collider operation, a capability which does not presently exist in the Main Ring.

  7. Supersymmetry at the Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lammel, S.

    1998-02-01

    These lectures contain an introduction to the search for supersymmetry at hadron colliders. The Tevatron is one of high-energy physics most sophisticated tools. The high center-of-mass energy of its proton-antiproton collisions makes it an ideal place to search for physics beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry. Two experiments, CDF and D0, completed a long data taking period in summer of 1995, yielding over 100 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton interactions. The data recorded by the experiments are still being analyzed. The lectures outline the strategies in the search for supersymmetry at the Tevatron and examine the major analyses in detail. Results obtained by the two experiments are included where available.

  8. Top quark physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, P.C.

    1998-04-01

    The authors review the analyses of t{bar t} candidate events in various decay channels, carried out using the p{bar p} collider data at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measurements of the top quark mass (m{sub t}) using lepton+jets channel yield m{sub t} = 173.3 {+-} 7.8 GeV/c{sup 2} from D0 analysis and m{sub t} = 175.9 {+-} 6.9 GeV/c{sup 2} from CDF analysis. The production cross section is measured to be {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.6{sub -1.5}{sup +1.8} pb by CDF and {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 5.6 {+-} 1.8 pb by D0. Further investigations using t{bar t} decays and future prospects are briefly discussed.

  9. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a W Boson in the isolated-track charged-lepton channel using the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Buzatu, Adrian

    2011-08-01

    The Higgs boson is the only elementary particle predicted by the Standard Model (SM) that has not yet been observed experimentally. If it exists, it explains the spontaneous electroweak symmetry breaking and the origin of mass for gauge bosons and fermions. We test the validity of the SM by performing a search for the associated production of a Higgs boson and a W boson in the channel where the Higgs boson decays to a bottom-antibottom quark pair and the W boson decays to a charged lepton and a neutrino (the WH channel). We study a dataset of proton-antiproton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Tevatron accelerator, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb-1, and recorded using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF).We select events consistent with the signature of exactly one charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy due to the undetected neutrino (MET) and two collimated streams of particles (jets), at least one of which is required to be identified as originating from a bottom quark. We improve the discrimination of Higgs signal from backgrounds through the use of an artificial neural network. Using a Bayesian statistical inference approach, we set for each hypothetical Higgs boson mass in the range 100-150 GeV/c2 with 5 GeV/c2 increments a 95% credibility level (CL) upper limit on the ratio between the Higgs production cross section times branching fraction and the SM prediction. Our main original contributions are the addition of a novel charged lepton reconstruction algorithm with looser requirements (ISOTRK) with respect the electron or muon tight criteria (TIGHT), as well as the introduction of a novel trigger-combination method that allows to maximize the event yield while avoiding trigger correlations and that is used for the ISOTRK category. The ISOTRK candidate is a high-transverse-momentum good-quality track isolated from other activity in the tracking

  10. New particle searches at Tevatron (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Kamon, T.; CDF and D0 Collaborations

    1996-05-01

    Various recent results of new particle searches at the Fermilab Tevatron are presented. No evidence is found for supersymmetric particles (chargino, gluino), leptoquark bosons and heavy gauge bosons in {ital p{anti P}} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. Excluded mass regions for each particle are determined.

  11. WW and WZ production at the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Fuess, T.A.

    1995-04-01

    Direct limits are set on WWZ and WW{gamma} three-boson couplings in a search for WW and WZ production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV using the D(0) and CDF detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron.

  12. Tevatron Higgs Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Aaron

    2009-12-17

    We present the latest results of searches for the production of Higgs bosons at the Tevatron collider in the D0 and CDF experiments. Cross section times branching ratios have been measured in many different topologies and have been interpreted in both the standard model and other models. No evidence for the production of Higgs bosons has been observed, but limits have been set. The D0 and CDF searches in the standard model have been combined and for the first time we exclude part of the possible mass range, 160 GeV to 170 GeV at the 95% confidence level.

  13. Supersymmetric QCD one-loop effects in (un)polarized top-pair production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, Stefan; Hollik, Wolfgang; Mosle, Wolf M.; Wackeroth, Doreen

    2007-08-01

    We study the effects of O({alpha}{sub s}) supersymmetric QCD (SQCD) corrections on the total production rate and kinematic distributions of polarized and unpolarized top-pair production in pp and pp collisions. At the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider, top-quark pairs are mainly produced via quark-antiquark annihilation, qq{yields}tt, while at the CERN LHC pp collider gluon-gluon scattering, gg{yields}tt, dominates. We compute the complete set of O({alpha}{sub s}) SQCD corrections to both production channels and study their dependence on the parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. In particular, we discuss the prospects for observing strong, loop-induced SUSY effects in top-pair production at the Tevatron run II and the LHC.

  14. Supporting multiple control systems at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The Fermilab control system, ACNET, is used for controlling the Tevatron and all of its pre-accelerators. However, other smaller experiments at Fermilab have been using different controls systems, in particular DOOCS and EPICS. This paper reports some of the steps taken at Fermilab to integrate support for these outside systems. We will describe specific tools that we have built or adapted to facilitate interaction between the architectures. We also examine some of the difficulties that arise from managing this heterogeneous environment. Incompatibilities as well as common elements will be described.

  15. Expectations for old and new physics at high energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, R.N.

    1982-12-01

    During the past year, the first data from the SPS collider at CERN have become available. The initial results are only a glimpse at a new energy regime and we can reasonably expect an increase in the extent of the data by a factor of 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 5/. Moreover, within a few years, the Fermilab Tevatron Collider will be in operation with a center of mass energy nearly four times as great as that at CERN. Beyond these machines are other possibilities: a high luminosity pp machine at Brookhaven with a center of mass energy of 0.8 TeV; a p anti p or pp machine in the LEP tunnel at CERN; a desetron in the southwestern United States with many TeV in the center of mass. The purpose of these lectures is to provide an orientation for the wealth of data that these machines will provide.

  16. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Previtali, Valentina; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  17. Design study for a staged Very Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Peter J. Limon et al.

    2001-06-26

    Advancing accelerator designs and technology to achieve the highest energies has enabled remarkable discoveries in particle physics. This report presents the results of a design study for a new collider at Fermilab that will create exceptional opportunities for particle physics--a two-stage very large hadron collider. In its first stage, the machine provides a facility for energy-frontier particle physics research, at an affordable cost and on a reasonable time scale. In a second-stage upgrade in the same tunnel, the VLHC offers the possibility of reaching 100 times the collision energy of the Tevatron. The existing Fermilab accelerator complex serves as the injector, and the collision halls are on the Fermilab site. The Stage-1 VLHC reaches a collision energy of 40 TeV and a luminosity comparable to that of the LHC, using robust superferric magnets of elegant simplicity housed in a large-circumference tunnel. The Stage-2 VLHC, constructed after the scientific potential of the first stage has been fully realized, reaches a collision energy of at least 175 TeV with the installation of high-field magnets in the same tunnel. It makes optimal use of the infrastructure developed for the Stage-1 machine, using the Stage-1 accelerator itself as the injector. The goals of this study, commissioned by the Fermilab Director in November 2000, are: to create reasonable designs for the Stage-1 and Stage-2 VLHC in the same tunnel; to discover the technical challenges and potential impediments to building such a facility at Fermilab; to determine the approximate costs of the major elements of the Stage-1 VLHC; and to identify areas requiring significant R and D to establish the basis for the design.

  18. CDF evidence for the top quark & B physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Weiming

    1997-02-01

    We present the first direct evidence for the top quark with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in a sample of {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s=1.8 TeV with an integrated luminosity of 19.3 pb{sup -1}. The recent B physics results at Fermilab from both collider and fixed target experiments are reviewed.

  19. Measurement of σ(p$\\bar{p}$ -> t$\\bar{t}$) in the τ + jets channel by the D0 experiment at Run II of the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Arov, Mikhail

    2008-07-01

    The top quark is the heaviest and most mysterious of the known elementary particles. Therefore, careful study of its production rate and other properties is of utmost importance for modern particle physics. The Tevatron is the only facility currently capable of studying top quark properties by on-shell production. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section is one of the major goals of the Tevatron Run II physics program. It provides an excellent test of QCD at energies exceeding 100 GeV. We report on a new measurement of p$\\bar{p}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ production at √s = 1.96 TeV using 350 pb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector between 2002 and 2005. We focus on the final state where a W boson from one of the top quarks decays into a τ lepton and its associated neutrino, while the other decays into a quark-antiquark pair. We aim to select those events in which the τ lepton subsequently decays to one or three charged hadrons, zero or more neutral hadrons and a tau neutrino (the charge conjugate processes are implied in all of the above). The observable signature thus consists of a narrow calorimeter shower with associated track(s) characteristic of a hadronic tau decay, four or more jets, of which two are initiated by b quarks accompanying the W's in the top quark decays, and a large net missing momentum in the transverse plane due to the energetic neutrino-antineutrino pair that leave no trace in the detector media. The preliminary result for the measured cross section is: σ(t$\\bar{t}$) = 5.1$+4.3\\atop{-3.5}$(stat) $+0.7\\atop{-0.7}$(syst) ± 0.3 (lumi.) pb.

  20. Search for $WZ/ZZ$ Production in the Lepton(s) + MET + Jets Channel with the CDF Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Trovato, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we present a search for the WZ and ZZ production in a final state ("W+2 jets") with a leptonically-decaying W and two energetic jets. We use the full dataset ( ∫ Ldt = 8:9 fb-1) recorded with the CDF detector at Fermilab. The challenge consists in extracting the small Z-hadronic peak from the large amount of background processes. Those processes also include the WW, whose hadronic peak cannot be distinguished from the Z peak, due to the poor calorimeter resolution. In the past such a signature was used to measure the diboson cross section, which is highly dominated by the WW cross section.

  1. Tevatron Electron Lenses: Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, Vsevolod; Kozub, Sergei; Kufer, Matthew; Kuznetsov, Gennady; Martinez, Alexander; Olson, Marvin; Pfeffer, Howard; Saewert, Greg; Scarpine, Vic; /Fermilab /SLAC /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Novosibirsk, IYF /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    The beam-beam effects have been the dominating sources of beam loss and lifetime limitations in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider [1]. Electron lenses were originally proposed for compensation of electromagnetic long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions of proton and antiproton beams [2]. Results of successful employment of two electron lenses built and installed in the Tevatron are reported in [3,4,5]. In this paper we present design features of the Tevatron electron lenses (TELs), discuss the generation of electron beams, describe different modes of operation and outline the technical parameters of various subsystems.

  2. Entwicklungsarbeit am Spurendetektor fur das CDF Experiment am Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, Frank

    2000-02-01

    Silicon, the element, which revolutionized the development of electronics, is known as an important and multiusable material, dominating todays electronic technology. It's properties are well investigated and today well known. Silicon is used in solar cells, computers and telecommunications. Since the Sixties semiconductors have been used as particle detectors. Initially they were operated in fixed- target experiments as calorimeters and as detectors with a high precision track reconstruction. Since the Eighties they are widely used in collider experiments as silicon microstrip or silicon pixel detectors near the primary vertex. Silicon sensors have a very good intrinsic energy resolution: for every 3.6 eV released by a particle crossing the medium, one electron-hole pair is produced. Compared to 30 eV required to ionize a gas molecule in a gaseous detector, one gets 10 times the number of particles. The average energy loss and high ionized particle number with 390 e V / μm ~ 108 (electron - hole pairs)/ μm is effectively high due to the high density of silicon. These detectors allow a high precision reconstruction of tracks, primary and secondary vertices, which are especially important for b flavour tagging. The Tevatron and its detectors are being upgraded for the next data taking run starting in 2001 (RUN II). The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) [2] for the upcoming Run II and its upgraded components are described in chapter 2. The main upgrade project is the design and construction of a completely new inner tracking system.

  3. Higgs searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    L. Moneta

    2001-06-22

    This paper describes the searches for the Higgs boson performed by the CDF and DO collaborations at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider using the data collected in the 1992-95 run. Searches for standard model Higgs and as well for neutral and charged minimal SUSY Higgs bosons are also presented. No signal has been observed and limits are set for production cross sections.

  4. Supersymmetry Searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, C.

    2008-11-23

    Supersymmetry predicts a range of new phenomena with a variety of experimental signatures. Searches for supersymmetry at the Fermilab Tevatron accelerator fall into three broad categories: generic sparticle searches; specialized searches for sparticles with unusual properties; and model-independent searches probing for discrepancies between the data and the standard model. Searches performed by the CDF and DOe experiments with up to 2 fb{sup -1} of {radical}(s) = 1.96 TeV pp-bar data have yet to turn up any evidence for supersymmetry.

  5. Electroweak measurements from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, U.; D0 Collaboration; CDF Collaboration

    1996-06-01

    The two detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron, D0 and CDF, have collected large samples of W and Z decays. With these data measurements of the properties of the W boson have been performed. From the ratio of the W and Z production cross sections a measurement of the W boson width of 2.062 {+-} 0.059 GeV has been obtained. The W boson mass has been measured to be 80.34 {+-} 0.15 GeV. Both detectors have observed diboson production and measured the triple gauge boson couplings. No deviations from Standard Model predictions have been observed.

  6. Top quark mass measurement at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; /Harvard U.

    2004-12-01

    The authors report on the latest experimental measurements of the top quark mass by the CDF and D0 Collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron. They present a new top mass measurement using the t{bar t} events collected by the D0 Collaboration in Run I between 1994 and 1996. This result is combined with previous measurements to yield a new world top mass average. They also describe several preliminary results using up to 193 pb{sup -1} of t{bar t} events produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV during the Run II of the Tevatron.

  7. Recent electroweak measurements from the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.G.

    1997-10-01

    Preliminary electroweak results are discussed from the Fermilab experiments, CDF and DO, based on Tevatron run 1b data. These include an updated precision measurement of the W mass which when combined with previous Tevatron, CERN S{bar p}S, and LEP-II results gives a combined world average M{sub W} = 80.40 {+-} 0.08 GeV/c{sup 2}. Also presented are new limits on anomalous gauge boson self-couplings, measurement of the W charge asymmetry, {sigma}{center_dot}B(W{yields} {tau}{nu}{sub {tau}}), and limits on quark/lepton compositeness from high mass Drell-Yan production.

  8. Single Z Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Thomas J.

    2012-05-01

    The production of single Z bosons has been studied at Fermilab's Tevatron by the CDF and D0 collaborations. Measurements include the weak mixing angle, vector and axial-vector couplings between Z bosons and light quarks, and angular coefficients in electronic decays which are sensitive to the spin of the gluon. The collaborations have looked for and indication of new physics above the mass scale that can be directly produced at the Tevatron by studying the interference between Z and photon propagators. All measurements are consistent with Standard Model expectations.

  9. Top quark mass measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, S. W.

    2014-03-01

    We present recent measurements of the mass of the top quark performed at the Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ collider at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. These measurements use the full Run II data samples corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 9.3 fb$^{-1}$. We also report the first world combination of the measurements from the Large Hadron Collider and Tevatron experiments resulting in a top mass of 173.34 {\\pm} 0.76 GeV with a relative precision of 0.44\\%.

  10. Tevatron results

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, R.; /Barcelona, Autonoma U.

    2005-01-01

    Recent results obtained by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron Run II are presented. A first part is dedicated to QCD physics where inclusive jet production, dijet azimuthal decorrelations and jet shapes measurements are reported. Electroweak physics is then discussed relating measurements of the W and Z bosons productions, of the forward-backward charge asymmetry in W production, of the W width and of the top quarks mass. The extensive Run II exploration program is finally approached reporting about searches for neutral supersymmetric Higgs bosons in multijet events and for sbottom quark from gluino decays.

  11. Fermilab Steering Group Report

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, Eugene; Butler, Joel; Dawson, Sally; Edwards, Helen; Himel, Thomas; Holmes, Stephen; Kim, Young-Kee; Lankford, Andrew; McGinnis, David; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    in the U.S. and creating an engineering opportunity for ILC cost reductions. It offers an early and tangible application for ILC R&D in superconducting technology, attracting participation from accelerator scientists worldwide and driving forward the technology for still higher-energy accelerators of the future, such as a muon collider. To prepare for a future decision, the Fermilab Steering Group recommends that the laboratory seek R&D support for Project X, in order to produce an overall design of Project X and to spur the R&D and industrialization of ILC linac components needed for Project X. Advice from the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel will guide any future decision to upgrade the Fermilab accelerator complex, taking into account developments affecting the ILC schedule and the continuing evaluation of scientific priorities for U.S. particle physics. Fermilab should also work toward increased resources for longer-term future accelerators such as a muon collider, aiming at higher energies than the ILC would provide.

  12. Fermilab Steering Group Report

    SciTech Connect

    Steering Group, Fermilab; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    in the U.S. and creating an engineering opportunity for ILC cost reductions. It o.ers an early and tangible application for ILC R&D in superconducting technology, attracting participation from accelerator scientists worldwide and driving forward the technology for still higher-energy accelerators of the future, such as a muon collider. To prepare for a future decision, the Fermilab Steering Group recommends that the laboratory seek R&D support for Project X, in order to produce an overall design of Project X and to spur the R&D and industrialization of ILC linac components needed for Project X. Advice from the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel will guide any future decision to upgrade the Fermilab accelerator complex, taking into account developments a.ecting the ILC schedule and the continuing evaluation of scientific priorities for U.S. particle physics. Fermilab should also work toward increased resources for longer-term future accelerators such as a muon collider, aiming at higher energies than the ILC would provide.

  13. Search for neutral Higgs bosons in events with multiple bottom quarks at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Álvarez González, B.; Alverson, G.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Bose, T.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Bu, X. B.; Budd, H. S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Cihangir, S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Croc, A.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; Dagenhart, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Das, A.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; d'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernandez, J. P.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia, J. E.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Gomez, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, M.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hewamanage, S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Joshi, J.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, A. W.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasmi, A.; Kasper, P. A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kiselevich, I.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Landsberg, G.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lebrun, P.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Limosani, A.; Lincoln, D.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lysak, R.; Lys, J.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Maravin, Y.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Miconi, F.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neu, C.; Neustroev, P.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Nunnemann, T.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Ortolan, L.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Pal, A.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patrick, J.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penning, B.; Penzo, A.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ranjan, N.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo, I.; Renkel, P.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Roser, R.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santi, L.; Santos, A. S.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schlobohm, S.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, K. J.; Snider, F. D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Soha, A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, H.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sorin, V.; Soustruznik, K.; Squillacioti, P.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stark, J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stelzer, B.; Stentz, D.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varganov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verdier, P.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wahl, H. D.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warburton, A.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Wester, W. C., III; White, A.; Whiteson, D.; Wick, F.; Wicke, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, W.-C.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-11-01

    The combination of searches performed by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider for neutral Higgs bosons produced in association with b quarks is reported. The data, corresponding to 2.6fb-1 of integrated luminosity at CDF and 5.2fb-1 at D0, have been collected in final states containing three or more b jets. Upper limits are set on the cross section multiplied by the branching ratio varying between 44 pb and 0.7 pb in the Higgs boson mass range 90 to 300 GeV, assuming production of a narrow scalar boson. Significant enhancements to the production of Higgs bosons can be found in theories beyond the standard model, for example, in supersymmetry. The results are interpreted as upper limits in the parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric standard model in a benchmark scenario favoring this decay mode.

  14. Physics History Books in the Fermilab Library

    SciTech Connect

    Sara Tompson.

    1999-09-17

    Fermilab is a basic research high-energy physics laboratory operated by Universities Research Association, Inc. under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. Fermilab researchers utilize the Tevatron particle accelerator (currently the worlds most powerful accelerator) to better understand subatomic particles as they exist now and as they existed near the birth of the universe. A collection review of the Fermilab Library monographs was conducted during the summers of 1998 and 1999. While some items were identified for deselection, the review proved most fruitful in highlighting some of the strengths of the Fermilab monograph collection. One of these strengths is history of physics, including biographies and astrophysics. A bibliography of the physics history books in the collection as of Summer, 1999 follows, arranged by author. Note that the call numbers are Library of Congress classification.

  15. Physics History Books in the Fermilab Library

    SciTech Connect

    Sara Tompson

    1999-09-17

    Fermilab is a basic research high-energy physics laboratory operated by Universities Research Association, Inc. under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. Fermilab researchers utilize the Tevatron particle accelerator (currently the world�s most powerful accelerator) to better understand subatomic particles as they exist now and as they existed near the birth of the universe. A collection review of the Fermilab Library monographs was conducted during the summers of 1998 and 1999. While some items were identified for deselection, the review proved most fruitful in highlighting some of the strengths of the Fermilab monograph collection. One of these strengths is history of physics, including biographies and astrophysics. A bibliography of the physics history books in the collection as of Summer, 1999 follows, arranged by author. Note that the call numbers are Library of Congress classification.

  16. Proton synchrotron radiation at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Thurman-Keup, Randy; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    While protons are not generally associated with synchrotron radiation, they do emit visible light at high enough energies. This paper presents an overview of the use of synchrotron radiation in the Tevatron to measure transverse emittances and to monitor the amount of beam in the abort gap. The latter is necessary to ensure a clean abort and prevent quenches of the superconducting magnets and damage to the silicon detectors of the collider experiments.

  17. Measurement of the Masses and Lifetimes of B Hadrons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Catastini, Pierluigi; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-05-01

    The latest results for the B Hadron sector at the Tevatron Collider are summarized. The properties of B hadrons can be precisely measured at the Tevatron. In particularly they will focus on the masses and lifetimes. The new Tevatron results for the CP violation in B Hadrons are also discussed.

  18. Hadron collider limits on anomalous WWγ couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Kevin R.; Reno, M. H.

    1995-01-01

    A next-to-leading log calculation of the reactions pp and pp¯-->W+/-γX is presented including a triboson gauge coupling from non-standard-model contributions. The additional term arises by considering the standard model as a low energy effective theory. Two approaches are made for comparison. The first approach considers the triboson WWγ coupling as being uniquely fixed by tree level unitarity at high energies to its standard model form and, consequently, suppresses the non-standard-model contributions with form factors. The second approach is to ignore such considerations and calculate the contributions to non-standard-model triboson gauge couplings without such suppressions, using the first term in the momentum expansion of an effective chiral Lagrangian. It is found that at Fermilab Tevatron energies the two approaches do not differ much in quantitative results, while at large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies the two approaches give significantly different predictions for production rates. At the Tevatron and LHC, however, the sensitivity limits on the anomalous coupling of WWγ are too weak to usefully constrain parameters in the chiral Lagrangian.

  19. Antiproton production for Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Azhgirey, I.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I. . Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij)

    1991-03-01

    Needs to improve the Fermilab Pbar Source for the Tevatron Upgrade and discrepancies in predictions of the antiproton yields have forced us to develop the production model based on the modern data and to incorporate this model to the current version of MARS10 code. The inclusive scheme of this code with the use of statistical weights allows the production of antiprotons to be enhanced within the phase space region of interest, which is extremely effective for optimization of Pbar Source parameters and for developing of such an idea as a beam sweeping system. Antiproton production model included in the modified version of our Monte Carlo program MARS10M for the inclusive simulation of hadronic cascades, as for other particles throughout the program, is based on a factorization approach for hadron-nucleus differential cross-section. To describe antiproton inclusive spectra in pp-collisions a phenomenological model has been used modified in the low-Pt region. The antiproton production in pion-nucleon interactions is described in the frame of our simple phenomenological model based on the modern data. In describing of the of antiproton production cross-sections ratio in hadron-nucleus and hadron-nucleon collisions the ideas of soft hadronization of color strings and all the present experimental data have been used. Some comparisons of our model with experimental data are presented in the wide intervals of initial momenta, antiproton kinematical variables and nuclei. In all the cases the agreement is pretty good what gives us an assurance in the consequent studies carried out for the Fermilab Pbar Source. The results of such study are presented in this paper.

  20. Recent QCD Studies at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Group, Robert Craig

    2008-04-01

    Since the beginning of Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron the QCD physics groups of the CDF and D0 experiments have worked to reach unprecedented levels of precision for many QCD observables. Thanks to the large dataset--over 3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity recorded by each experiment--important new measurements have recently been made public and will be summarized in this paper.

  1. Standard Model Higgs searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Herner, Kenneth; /Michigan U.

    2010-04-01

    We report results of searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson at the Fermilab Tevatron using up to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of data taken with the CDF and D0 detectors. There is no significant excess in the mass range of interest and the experiments set upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section, including an exclusion of the Standard Model Higgs in the mass range 162-166 GeV.

  2. Top quark physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    D. Gerdes

    2004-01-28

    Precision studies of the top quark are a prime goal of the Run II physics program at the Fermilab Tevatron. Since the start of Run II in early 2002, the CDF and D0 experiments have analyzed approximately 100 pb{sup -1} of data and have re-established the top quark signal. In this article the author summarizes recent measurements of the top production cross section and mass.

  3. Proposal for an Experiment to Measure Mixing, CP Violation and Rare Decays in Charm and Beauty Particle Decays at the Fermilab Collider - BTeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kulyavtsev, A.; Procario, M.; Russ, J.; You, J.; Cumalat, J.; Appel, J. A.; Brown, C. N.; Butler, J.; Cheung, H.; Christian, D.

    2000-05-01

    This proposal consists of five parts and two appendices. The first part provides a detailed physics justification for the BTe V experiment. The second part presents the considerations that drive the detector design, followed by a description of the detector itself. The third part summarizes our simulation results which demonstrate that the design does enable us to achieve our physics goals. The fourth part compares BTeV's physics reach to that of other experiments which will be active in B physics in the same time period. The fifth part gives a very brief, high level summary of the cost estimate for BTeV. Appendix A has additional technical details about many of the detector subsystems and R&D plans; it is intended to be read primarily by experts in each area. Appendix B contains a roadmap which describes the location in the proposal of the answers to questions posed to the BTeV collaboration by the Fermilab Program Advisory Committee in June of 1999.

  4. Electroweak and QCD Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Junjie

    2011-09-01

    The Tevatron collider has been remarkably successful and has so far delivered more than 11 fb{sup -1} of data to both the CDF and D0 experiments. Though the LHC has replaced the Tevatron as the world's most powerful collider, years of detector calibration, the huge size of the dataset and the nature of pp collisions will keep the Tevatron competitive in many selected topics in the near future. More than 10 fb{sup -1} of data has been collected by each experiment. Good understanding of the detector performance has been demonstrated by the high precision W boson mass ({Delta}M{sub W} = 31 MeV) and top quark mass ({Delta}M{sub t} = 1.06 GeV) measurements. We report the latest electroweak and QCD results from both experiments. Most analyses presented here used 4-6 fb{sup -1} of data.

  5. Commisioning of the second Tevatron electron lens and beam study results

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Fellenz, B.; Hively, R.; Kuznetsov, G.; Olson, M.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; Scarpine, V.; Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    In the framework of Fermilab's Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project, the 2nd Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL2) was installed in the Tevatron during Spring 2006 shutdown. It was successfully commissioned and a series of beam studies has been carried out in single bunch and all-bunch modes. The paper describes TEL2 commissioning and beam studies results.

  6. Searches for supersymmetry at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Lytken, Else; /Purdue U.

    2006-05-01

    The results for searches for Supersymmetry at the Tevatron Collider are summarized in this paper. They focus here on searches for chargino/neutralino and the lightest stop, as well as scenarios with R-parity violation and split supersymmetry. No significant excesses with respect to the Standard Model were observed and constraints are set on the SUSY parameter space.

  7. The Fermilab Main Injector: current status and future

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.

    1996-09-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector is a 8-150 GeV proton synchrotron being built as a high intensity injector to the Tevatron. The design incorporates many novel features to achieve {ital p{anti p}} luminosity in the Tevatron exceeding 8 x 10{sup 31} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1}. An overview of the Main Injector project, current status and future prospects will be discussed.

  8. Higgs searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrandrea, Paolo; /INFN, Siena

    2010-09-01

    The search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in p{bar p} collisions at 1.96 TeV performed by CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron collider is reported in this paper. The Higgs candidate events are reconstructed using different final states in order to optimize the sensitivity in the full range of the Higgs mass. The presented results use different statistical samples collected by the Tevatron up to 5.9 fb{sup -1}. Combining the most updated limits provided by the two experiments for all the final states analyzed, the Standard Model Higgs boson is excluded at 95% C.L. in the mass range 158-175 GeV/c{sup 2}, in good agreement with the prediction for the analyzed data sample.

  9. Gluon-gluon contributions to the production of continuum diphoton pairs at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadolsky, P. M.; Balázs, C.; Berger, E. L.; Yuan, C.-P.

    2007-07-01

    We compute the contributions to continuum photon pair production at hadron colliders from processes initiated by gluon-gluon and gluon-quark scattering into two photons through a four-leg virtual quark loop. Complete two-loop cross sections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are combined with contributions from soft parton radiation resummed to all orders in the strong coupling strength. The structure of the resummed cross section is examined in detail, including a new type of unintegrated parton distribution function affecting azimuthal angle distributions of photons in the pair’s rest frame. As a result of this analysis, we predict diphoton transverse-momentum distributions in gluon-gluon scattering in wide ranges of kinematic parameters at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  10. Light minimal supersymmetric standard model Higgs boson scenario and its test at hadron colliders.

    PubMed

    Belyaev, Alexander; Cao, Qing-Hong; Nomura, Daisuke; Tobe, Kazuhiro; Yuan, C-P

    2008-02-15

    We show that, in the minimal supersymmetric standard model, the possibility for the lightest CP-even Higgs boson to be lighter than Z boson (as low as about 60 GeV) is, contrary to the usual belief, not yet excluded by the CERN LEP2 Higgs search nor any direct searches for supersymmetric particles at high energy colliders. The characteristic of the light Higgs boson scenario (LHS) is that the ZZh coupling and the decay branching ratio Br(h/A-->bb) are simultaneously suppressed as a result of generic supersymmetric loop corrections. Consequently, the W(+/-)H(-/+)h coupling has to be large due to the sum rule of Higgs couplings to weak gauge bosons. We discuss the potential of the Fermilab Tevatron and B factories to test the LHS, and show that the associated neutral and charged Higgs boson production process, pp-->H(+/-)h(A), can completely probe the LHS at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  11. Tunneling beyond the Fermilab site

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.; Elwyn, A.; Lach, J.; Read, A.

    1983-07-01

    An accelerator that crosses the Fermilab site boundary must have a minimum effect on the surrounding environment and the people residing in the area. Unobstructed public access should be allowed above the ring except in relatively few areas such as the injection, dump, and experimental regions. The accelerator should be a benign and unobtrusive neighbor not only when it is completed but also in the construction period. For these reasons underground tunneling for all or most of the ring seems attractive. In this note we look into some questions raised by tunneling beyond the Fermilab site. Most of our discussion is of general applicability. However, we will use as examples two specific ring configurations. The examples have not been optimized from the point of view of physics output or accelerator technology but are just specific examples which allow us to study questions of tunneling. One is a ring of 5 km radius (5 TeV) tangent to the Tevatron and entirely east of the Fox River and fed by a beam from the Tevatron which crosses under the river. We assume that each of these machines will have 100 beam fills per year and we scale the maximum intensities with the accelerator radii. Thus we assume that there will be 1.0 E14 protons in each beam of the 20 TeV machine and 2.5 E13 for the 5 TeV machine.

  12. Fixed-target physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-03-01

    The Fermilab Energy Saver is now successfully commissioned and fixed-target experimentation at high energy (800 GeV) has begun. In addition, a number of new experiments designed to exploit the unique features of the Tevatron are yet to come on-line. In this talk, we will review recent accomplishments in the fixed-target program and describe experiments in progress and others yet to come.

  13. A search for the higgs boson and a search for dark-matter particle with jets and missing transverse energy at collider detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiuguang

    2013-05-01

    Finding the standard model Higgs boson and discovering beyond-standard model physics phenomena have been the most important goals for the high-energy physics in the last decades. In this thesis, we present two such searches. First is the search for the low mass standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a vector boson; second is the rst search for a dark-matter candidate (D) produced in association with a top quark (t) in particle colliders. We search in events with energetic jets and large missing transverse energy { a signature characterized by complicated backgrounds { in data collected by the CDF detector with proton-antiproton collisions at p s = 1:96 TeV. We discuss the techniques that have been developed for background modeling, for discriminating signal from background, and for reducing background resulting from detector e ects. In the Higgs search, we report the 95% con dence level upper limits on the pro- duction cross section across masses of 90 to 150 GeV/c2. The expected limits are improved by an average of 14% relative to the previous analysis. The Large Hadron Collider experiments reported a Higgs-like particle with mass of 125 GeV/c2 by study- ing the data collected in year 2011/12. At a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV/c2, our observed (expected) limit is 3.06 (3.33) times the standard model prediction, corre- sponding to one of the most sensitive searches to date in this nal state. In the dark matter search, we nd the data are consistent with the standard model prediction, thus set 95% con dence level upper limits on the cross section of the process p p ! t + D as a function of the mass of the dark-matter candidate. The xviii upper limits are approximately 0.5 pb for a dark-matter particle with masses in the range of 0 􀀀 150 GeV/c2.

  14. Antiproton cooling in the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Bolshakov, A.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Kazakevich, G.; Kramper, B.; Kroc, T.; Leibfritz, J.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Saewert, G; Schmidt, C.W.; Seletskiy, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tupikov, V.; Warner, A.; Zenkevich, P.; /Fermilab /Moscow, ITEP /Novosibirsk, IYF /Rochester U.

    2005-12-01

    The 8.9-GeV/c Recycler antiproton storage ring is equipped with both stochastic and electron cooling systems. These cooling systems are designed to assist accumulation of antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. In this paper we report on an experimental demonstration of electron cooling of high-energy antiprotons. At the time of writing this report, the Recycler electron cooling system is routinely used in collider operations. It has helped to set recent peak luminosity records.

  15. The Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, C.S.

    1992-11-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector is a new 150 GeV proton synchrotron, designed to replace the Main Ring and improve the high energy physics potential of Fermilab. The status of the Fermilab accelerator complex upgrade will be discussed.

  16. Heavy flavor at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, S.

    2016-07-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider have pioneered and established the role of hadron collisions in exploring flavor physics through a broad program that continues to offer competitive results. I report on latest results in the flavor sector obtained using the whole CDF and D0 data sets corresponding to {˜}10{ fb-1} of integrated luminosity; including B-mesons spectroscopy and production asymmetries, flavor specific decay bottom-strange mesons lifetime. I also present measurements of direct and indirect CP violation in bottom and charm meson decays.

  17. Measurement of the t$\\bar{t}$ cross section at the Run II Tevatron using Support Vector Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, Benjamin Eric

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation measures the t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section at the Run II CDF detector using data from early 2001 through March 2007. The Tevatron at Fermilab is a p$\\bar{p}$ collider with center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. This data composes a sample with a time-integrated luminosity measured at 2.2 ± 0.1 fb-1. A system of learning machines is developed to recognize t$\\bar{t}$ events in the 'lepton plus jets' decay channel. Support Vector Machines are described, and their ability to cope with a multi-class discrimination problem is provided. The t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section is then measured in this framework, and found to be σt$\\bar{t}$ = 7.14 ± 0.25 (stat)-0.86+0.61(sys) pb.

  18. Deterioration of the skew quadrupole moment in Tevatron dipoles over time

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.; Harding, D.J.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During the 20 years since it was first commissioned, the Fermilab Tevatron has developed strong coupling between the two transverse degrees of freedom. A circuit of skew quadrupole magnets is used to correct for coupling and, though capable, its required strength has increased since 1983 by more than an order of magnitude. In more recent years changes to the Tevatron for colliding beams operation have altered the skew quadrupole corrector distribution and strong local coupling become evident, often encumbering routine operation during the present physics run. Detailed magnet measurements were performed on each individual magnet during construction, and in early 2003 it was realized that measurements could be performed on the magnets in situ which could determine coil movements within the iron yoke since the early 1980's. It was discovered that the superconducting coils had become vertically displaced relative to their yokes since their construction. The ensuing systematic skew quadrupole field introduced by this displacement accounts for the required corrector settings and observed beam behavior. An historical account of the events leading to this discovery and progress toward its remedy are presented.

  19. Top and electroweak measurements at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoš, P.; CDF Collaboration; D0 Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark mass and electroweak measurements from the Tevatron. Since the world combination of top-quark mass measurements was done, CDF and D0 experiments improved the precision of several results. Some of them reach the relative precision below 1% for a single measurement. From the electroweak results, we report on the WW and WZ production cross-section, measurements of the weak mixing angle and indirect measurements of W boson mass. The Tevatron results of the weak mixing angle are still the most precise ones of hadron colliders.

  20. $B$ and $D$ Physics from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Squillacioti, Paola

    2011-10-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron pp collider established that extensive and detailed exploration of the b-quark dynamics is possible in hadron collisions, with results competitive and supplementary to B-factories. In this paper we review the current state of Tevatron's heavy flavor measurements considering two main categories: searches for non standard model physics (results on rare decays and CP-violation) and determinations of standard model parameters (annihilation in B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} decays and {gamma} angle measurement through B {yields} DK modes).

  1. Top and Electroweak Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bartos, P.

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we summarize the latest results of the top-quark mass and electroweak measurements from the Tevatron. Since the world combination of top-quark mass measurements was done, CDF and D0 experiments improved the precision of several results. Some of them reach the relative precition below 1% for a single measurement. From the electroweak results, we report on the WW and WZ production cross section, measurements of the weak mixing angle and indirect measurements of W boson mass. The Tevatron results of the weak mixing angle are still the most precise ones of hadron colliders.

  2. Results on the production and detection of $W$ bosons with the Collider Detector at Fermilab in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center - of - mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Stadie, Hartmut

    2003-07-01

    We studied W boson production and decay with the Collider Detector at Fermilab, CDF, in proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The first (55.5 ± 3.3) pb-1 of data collected since the start of Run II in summer 2001 were used. We limited ourselves to the decay of the W boson into an electron and neutrino pair. As a good electron identification is crucial to disentangle the signal from the large number of QCD events, we reevaluated the efficiency and purity of the standard CDF electron identification using tight cuts and compared it with a method based on an Artificial Neural Net. The net was trained with a signal and background sample obtained from data and offered a better discrimination power than the standard method. Using the standard tight cuts and two different cuts on the net output of the Artificial Neural Net, we measured the W boson cross-section in three analyses. To estimate the amount of background from fake electrons in the data samples, we created a background sample by selecting events with an electron candidate that has a small electron probability. This sample and a signal Monte Carlo sample were fitted to the missing transverse energy distribution of the data in order to obtain the background fraction of the data sample. The cross-section times branching ratio result for the tight cuts analysis is (2.74 ± 0.02(stat) ± 0.12(syst) ± 0.16(lum)) nb and one result for an analysis cutting on the net output is (2.76 ± 0.01(stat) ± 0.12(syst) ± 0.16(lum)) nb. The latter has a better statistical error due to the improved electron identification of the Artificial Neural Net. These results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions and the previous Run II measurement.

  3. Recent Fermilab results on hadroproduction of heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Garbincius, P.H.

    1993-08-01

    Recent results from various Fermilab experiments on the hadroproduction of states containing charm, bottom, and top quarks are discussed. These include observation of the spectra, lifetime, and production characteristics of charmonium, open charm states, and bottom particle production with both high energy fixed target and {bar p}-p collider facilities. The status of the search for the top quark by the Fermilab collider experiments is updated.

  4. A feedback microprocessor for hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Herrup, D.A.; Chapman, L.; Franck, A.; Groves, T.; Lublinsky, B.

    1992-12-01

    A feedback microprocessor has been built for the TEVATRON. It has been constructed to be applicable to hadron colliders in general. Its inputs are realtime accelerator measurements, data describing the state of the TEVATRON, and ramp tables. The microprocessor software includes a finite state machine. Each state corresponds to a specific TEVATRON operation and has a state-specific TEVATRON model. Transitions between states are initiated by the global TEVATRON clock. Each state includes a cyclic routine which is called periodically and where all calculations are performed. The output corrections are inserted onto a fast TEVATRON-wide link from which the power supplies will read the realtime corrections. We also store all of the input data and output corrections in a set of buffers which can easily be retrieved for diagnostic analysis. In this paper we will describe this device and its use to control the TEVATRON tunes as well as other possible applications.

  5. Observation of Central Exclusive Diphoton Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Brucken, Jens Erik

    2013-01-01

    We have observed exclusive γγ production in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron at √ s = 1.96 TeV. We use data corresponding to 1.11 ± 0.07 fb-1 integrated luminosity taken by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab, with a trigger requiring two electromagnetic showers, each with transverse energy ET > 2 GeV, and vetoing on hits in the forward beam shower counters. We select events with two electromagnetic showers, each with transverse energy ET > 2.5 GeV and pseudorapidity |η| < 1.0, with no other particles detected in -7.4 < η < +7.4. The two showers have similar ET and an azimuthal angle separation Δφ ~ π; we find 34 events with exactly two matching charged particle tracks, agreeing with expectations for the QED process p¯p → p+e+e- + ¯p by two photon exchange; and we find 43 events with no tracks. The latter are candidates for the exclusive process p¯p → p + γγ + ¯p by double pomeron exchange. We use the strip and wire chambers at the longitudinal shower maximum position within the calorimeter to measure a possible exclusive background from IP + IP → π0π0, and conclude that it is consistent with zero and is < 15 events at 95% C.L. The measured cross section is σγγ,excl(|η| < 1, ET (γ) > 2.5 GeV) = 2.48 +0.40 -0.35(stat) +0.40 -0.51(syst) pb and in agreement with the theoretical predictions. This process is closely related to exclusive Higgs boson production pp → p + H + p at the Large Hadron Collider. The observation of the exclusive production of diphotons shows that exclusive Higgs production can happen and could be observed with a proper experimental setup.

  6. A data handling system for modern and future Fermilab experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    Current and future Fermilab experiments such as Minerva, NOνA, and MicroBoone are now using an improved version of the Fermilab SAM data handling system. SAM was originally used by the CDF and D0 experiments for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron to provide file metadata and location cataloguing, uploading of new files to tape storage, dataset management, file transfers between global processing sites, and processing history tracking. However SAM was heavily tailored to the Run II environment and required complex and hard to deploy client software, which made it hard to adapt to new experiments. The Fermilab Computing Sector has progressively updated SAM to use modern, standardized, technologies in order to more easily deploy it for current and upcoming Fermilab experiments, and to support the data preservation efforts of the Run II experiments.

  7. A new high-gradient correction quadrupole for the Fermilab luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsch, P.; Carson, J.; Riddiford, A.; Lamm, M.J.

    1989-03-01

    Special superconducting correction quadrupoles are needed for the luminosity upgrade of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. These correctors are part of the low-beta system for the interaction regions at B/phi/ and D/phi/. The requirements are high gradient and low current. A quadrupole has been designed that meets the operating gradient of 0.63 T/cm at 1086 A. The one-layer quadrupole is wound with a cable consisting of five individually insulated rectangular strands. The five strands are overwrapped with Kapton and epoxy impregnated glass tape. The winding, curing and collaring of the magnet is accomplished in the same manner as Tevatron-like magnets using Rutherford style cable. Once the magnet is complete the five strands are connected in series. A prototype quadrupole has been assembled and tested. The magnet reached a plateau current of 1560 A corresponding to a gradient of 0.91 T/cm without training. The measured field harmonics are substantially better than required. 8 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Charm and beauty physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, R.

    1992-01-01

    The status of charm and beauty physics studies at Fermilab is reviewed. Data from fixed target experiments on charm production, semi-leptonic decay, and Cabibbo suppressed decays as well as charmonium studies in antiproton annihilation are described. In addition beauty results from CDF and E653 are reviewed and prospects for studies of B physics at collider detectors are discussed.

  9. Cryogenic Design of the D0 Liquid Argon Collider Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.T.; Krempetz, K.J.; Luther, R.D.; Wands, R.H.; Weber, K.J.; /Fermilab

    1987-11-04

    The superconducting Tevatron was added to Fermilab's 400 Gev Proton Accelerator, the main ring, in 1983. An antiproton source was added in 1985, and the system became a p-pbar, 1 Tev/I Tev, collider in 1987. A CoIIider Detector surrounding one of the points of the accelerator p-pbar beam crossings can measure virtually all the energy of the colliding interaction (Fig. I.) The measurement of all the energy is called hermetic calorimetry. Although there are other liquid argon calorimeters and other hermetic coIIider detectors, the D-Zero (named for the accelerator beam crossing location) liquid argon collider calorimeters will be the first of their kind (Fig. 2). The cryogenic aspects of the liquid argon calorimeter portion of the D-Zero detector are described here. The liquid argon serves as the particle detector ionizing media in a repetitive cell structure (Fig. 3) of argon, signal board, argon, and Uranium or copper absorber plate, with a superimposed electric field. Local signal board pads indicate location and the electric charge collected is proportional to the ionization and the ratio of the argon to plate absorption lengths. This arrangement provides a dense, intrinsically calibrated, drift-free calorimeter.

  10. A Novel method for modeling the recoil in W boson events at hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Ahsan, Mahsana; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-07-01

    We present a new method for modeling the hadronic recoil in W {yields} {ell}{nu} events produced at hadron colliders. The recoil is chosen from a library of recoils in Z {yields} {ell}{ell} data events and overlaid on a simulated W {yields} {ell}{nu} event. Implementation of this method requires that the data recoil library describe the properties of the measured recoil as a function of the true, rather than the measured, transverse momentum of the boson. We address this issue using a multidimensional Bayesian unfolding technique. We estimate the statistical and systematic uncertainties from this method for the W boson mass and width measurements assuming 1 fb{sup -1} of data from the Fermilab Tevatron. The uncertainties are found to be small and comparable to those of a more traditional parameterized recoil model. For the high precision measurements that will be possible with data from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron and from the CERN LHC, the method presented in this paper may be advantageous, since it does not require an understanding of the measured recoil from first principles.

  11. A Review of recent results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarelli, Giorgo; /INFN, Pisa

    2007-06-01

    The D0 and CDF experiments have been taking data at the Run 2 of the Tevatron Collider since 2001. We present a selection of recent results, most of them obtained with an integrated luminosity of {approx_equal} 1 fb{sup -1}. I will describe the most important facets of the physics programme and detail some results. Recent direct limits on standard model Higgs obtained at the Tevatron, and their their prospects will be also reviewed.

  12. CP Violation Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark .R.J.; /Lancaster U.

    2010-07-09

    The two colliding beam experiments at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, CDF and D0, continue to publish world-leading measurements of CP Violation parameters in the B meson sector. I will present several recent results from both experiments, including measurements of direct CP violating parameters in decays of B{sup +}{sub u}, B{sup 0}{sub d} and B{sup 0}{sub s} mesons; a new D0 measurement of a{sup s}{sub sl} using time-dependent analysis of B{sub s} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}D{sup -}{sub s}X decays; and the latest Tevatron combination of the CP violating phase {beta}{sub s}, measured in the 'golden mode' B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}.

  13. A review of the Fermilab fixed-target program

    SciTech Connect

    Rameika, R.

    1994-12-01

    All eyes are now on the Fermilab collider program as the intense search for the top quark continues. Nevertheless, Fermilab`s long tradition of operating a strong, diverse physics program depends not only on collider physics but also on effective use of the facilities the Laboratory was founded on, the fixed-target beamlines. In this talk the author presents highlights of the Fermilab fixed-target program from its (not too distant) past, (soon to be) present, and (hopefully, not too distant) future program. The author concentrates on those experiments which are unique to the fixed-target program, in particular hadron structure measurements which use the varied beams and targets available in this mode and the physics results from kaon, hyperon and high statistics charm experiments which are not easily accessible in high p{sub T} hadron collider detectors.

  14. Tevatron-for-LHC Report of the QCD Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, Michael G.; Begel, M.; Bourilkov, D.; Campanelli, M.; Chlebana, F.; De Roeck, A.; Dittmann, J.R.; Ellis, S.D.; Field, B.; Field, R.; Gallinaro, M.; /Fermilab /Rochester U. /Florida U. /Geneva U. /CERN /Baylor U. /Washington U., Seattle /Florida State U. /Rockefeller U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Michigan State U.

    2006-10-01

    The experiments at Run 2 of the Tevatron have each accumulated over 1 fb{sup -1} of high-transverse momentum data. Such a dataset allows for the first precision (i.e. comparisons between theory and experiment at the few percent level) tests of QCD at a hadron collider. While the Large Hadron Collider has been designed as a discovery machine, basic QCD analyses will still need to be performed to understand the working environment. The Tevatron-for-LHC workshop was conceived as a communication link to pass on the expertise of the Tevatron and to test new analysis ideas coming from the LHC community. The TeV4LHC QCD Working Group focused on important aspects of QCD at hadron colliders: jet definitions, extraction and use of Parton Distribution Functions, the underlying event, Monte Carlo tunes, and diffractive physics. This report summarizes some of the results achieved during this workshop.

  15. Characterizing luminosity evolution in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; McCrory, E.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    We derive an approximate form of a luminosity evolution in a high intensity hadron collider taking into account the most important phenomena of intrabeam scattering (IBS), beam burn-up due to luminosity and beam-beam effects. It is well known that an exponential decay does not describe luminosity evolution very well unless the lifetime is allowed to vary with time. However, a ''1/time'' evolution, which this derivation shows is a good approximation, fits data from the Tevatron well.

  16. Baryon Spectroscopy Results at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kooten, R.

    2010-08-05

    The Tevatron at Fermilab continues to collect data at high luminosity resulting in datasets in excess of 6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The high collision energies allow for the observation of new heavy quark baryon states not currently accessible at any other facility. In addition to the ground state Lb, the spectroscopy and properties of the new heavy baryon states {Omega}{sub b}, {Xi}{sub b}, and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)} as measured by the CDF and DOe Collaborations will be presented.

  17. Heavy Hadron Spectroscopy and Production at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelov, Igor V.; /New Mexico U.

    2011-10-01

    Using data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV recorded by the CDFII and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron, we present recent results on charm and bottom hadrons. The most recent CDF results on properties of the four bottom baryon resonant states {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)-}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)+}. New results on exotic {Upsilon}(4140) state observed by CDF are also reported. A precise measurement of production rates of the lowest lying bottom baryon, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}, produced in the D0 detector is presented.

  18. B Physics at the TeVatron

    SciTech Connect

    Morello, Michael Joseph; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2011-10-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider established that extensive and detailed exploration of the b-quark dynamics is possible in hadron collisions, with results competitive and supplementary to those from e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. This provides a rich, and highly rewarding program that is currently reaching full maturity. I report a few recent world-leading results on rare decays, CP-violation in B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing, b {yields} s penguin decays, and charm physics.

  19. Critical speed measurements in the Tevatron cold compressors

    SciTech Connect

    DeGraff, B.; Bossert, R.; Martinez, A.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, manufactured by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high energy operations. Nominal operating range for these compressors is 43,000 to 85,000 rpm. Past foil bearing failures prompted investigation to determine if critical speeds for operating compressors fall within operating range. Data acquisition hardware and software settings will be discussed for measuring liftoff, first critical and second critical speeds. Several tests provided comparisons between an optical displacement probe and accelerometer measurements. Vibration data and analysis of the 20 Tevatron ring cold compressors will be presented.

  20. Tevatron detector upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, R.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The D0 and CDF experiments are in the process of upgrading their detectors to cope with the high luminosities projected for the remainder of Tevatron Run II. They discuss the expected Tevatron environment through 2009, the detector challenges due to increasing luminosity in this period, and the solutions undertaken by the two experiments to mitigate detector problems and maximize physics results.

  1. Electron Lenses for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua, Belen

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. This project is moving towards a technical design in 2014, with the goal to build the devices in 2015-2017, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles.

  2. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg→H→W+W- and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Adelman, J.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Álvarez González, B.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Ancu, L. S.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Backusmayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Barfuss, A.-F.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barreto, J.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, G.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Behari, S.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benitez, J. A.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Blocker, C.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boisvert, V.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Bose, T.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brubaker, E.; Bu, X. B.; Buchholz, D.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Calfayan, P.; Calpas, B.; Calvet, S.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Cammin, J.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Carrera, E.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudhary, B.; Christoudias, T.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Cihangir, S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Clutter, J.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Croc, A.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Cutts, D.; Ćwiok, M.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Das, A.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; Davies, T.; de, K.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Dell'Orso, M.; de Lorenzo, G.; Deluca, C.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; D'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Devaughan, K.; di Canto, A.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dorland, T.; Dube, S.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Eno, S.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Fuess, S.; Furic, I.; Gadfort, T.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gillberg, D.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Guo, F.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Haefner, P.; Hagopian, S.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hall, I.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, M.; Hedin, D.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirosky, R.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hossain, S.; Houben, P.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Huske, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ito, A. S.; Ivanov, A.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; James, E.; Jamin, D.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jesik, R.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johns, K.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, W.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jonsson, P.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Kato, Y.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kephart, R.; Kermiche, S.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kirsch, L.; Kirsch, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kohli, J. M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurata, M.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lammers, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Landsberg, G.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebrun, P.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipeles, E.; Lipton, R.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lovas, L.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lungu, G.; Lyon, A. L.; Lysak, R.; Lys, J.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; MacQueen, D.; Madar, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Mal, P. K.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Maravin, Y.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McCarthy, R.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Menzione, A.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Mesropian, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Moulik, T.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Muanza, G. S.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulhearn, M.; Muller, Th.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Neustroev, P.; Nielsen, J.; Nilsen, H.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Obrant, G.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Onoprienko, D.; Orava, R.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Osterberg, K.; Otero Y Garzón, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padilla, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Pangilinan, M.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A. A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.-J.; Park, S. K.; Parks, B.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Patwa, A.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penning, B.; Penzo, A.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Piegaia, R.; Pinera, L.; Piper, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pol, M.-E.; Polozov, P.; Pondrom, L.; Popov, A. V.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Protopopescu, S.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ranjan, N.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Redondo, I.; Renkel, P.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Rich, P.; Richter, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Ristori, L.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Rominsky, M.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savage, G.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwarz, T.; Schwienhorst, R.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sekaric, J.; Semenov, A.; Severini, H.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simak, V.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sirotenko, V.; Sisakyan, A.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Soha, A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Somalwar, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sorin, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Spurlock, B.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Stark, J.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Ströhmer, R.; Strologas, J.; Strom, D.; Strycker, G. L.; Stutte, L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Svoisky, P.; Taffard, A.; Takahashi, M.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tanasijczuk, A.; Tang, J.; Taylor, W.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tiller, B.; Tipton, P.; Titov, M.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tsybychev, D.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tuchming, B.; Tu, Y.; Tully, C.; Turini, N.; Tuts, P. M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unalan, R.; Uozumi, S.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; van Remortel, N.; Varelas, N.; Varganov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilanova, D.; Vilar, R.; Vint, P.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wahl, H. D.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Warchol, J.; Waters, D.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, P.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wobisch, M.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wood, D. R.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Yacoob, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamada, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, W.-C.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Yoh, J.; Yoo, H. D.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, J.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zelitch, S.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, T.; Zheng, Y.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2010-07-01

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg→H→W+W- in pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at s=1.96TeV. With 4.8fb-1 of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 5.4fb-1 at D0, the 95% confidence level upper limit on σ(gg→H)×B(H→W+W-) is 1.75 pb at mH=120GeV, 0.38 pb at mH=165GeV, and 0.83 pb at mH=200GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% confidence level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 131 and 204 GeV.

  3. SUSY searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffre, Michel; /Orsay, LAL

    2012-02-01

    The Tevatron collider has provided the CDF and D0 collaborations with large datasets as input to a rich program of physics beyond the standard model. The results presented here are from recent searches for SUSY particles using up to 6 fb{sup -1} of data. Supersymmetry (SUSY) [1] is one of the most favored theories beyond the standard model (SM). Each SM particle is associated to a sparticle whose spin differs by one half unit. This boson-fermion symmetry is obviously broken by some unknown mechanism. Even in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the SM (MSSM [2]) there are a large number of free parameters. To reduce this number one can introduce new assumptions on the symmetry breaking mechanism and build models based on minimal supergravity (as mSUGRA [3]) or on a Gauge Mediated Symmetry Breaking scenario (GMSB [4]), a top-down approach. Another possibility is to make phenomenological assumptions to reduce the number of particles accessible to the experiment while keeping some of the properties of the above models (bottom-up approach). As the sparticles are heavy, to produce them one has to make collisions at the highest center of mass energy. The Tevatron was the best place for discovery until the start of LHC. In the near term, Tevatron experiments and their large datasets remain competitive in areas like production of third generation squarks and of non-coloured sparticles. I will report on recent results from the CDF and D0 collaborations, assuming R-parity is conserved, i.e the sparticles are produced in pairs, and the lightest of them (LSP) is stable, neutral, weakly interacting, and detected as missing transverse energy, E{sub T}.

  4. A search for WIMPs at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, Michael A.

    The fine-grained neutrino detector at Fermilab was instrumented with high-resolution scintillation timing counters to search by time-of-flight for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles in the Tevatron neutrino beam. In a recent exposure of about 5 x 10 to the 17th 800-GeV protons on target, a sample of nearly 100,000 fiducial interactions was accumulated and a comparable number of test-beam calibration interactions were recorded. This search experiment is described in detail, and a preliminary review of the detector performance is given.

  5. Search for a light fermiophobic Higgs boson produced via gluon fusion at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Guedes, R. B.; Santos, R.

    2008-10-01

    In this study, we propose new Higgs production mechanisms with multiphoton final states in the fermiophobic limit of the two Higgs doublet model. The processes are: gg{yields}hh, gg{yields}Hh followed by H{yields}hh and gg{yields}Ah followed by A{yields}hZ. In the fermiophobic limit, gg{yields}hh and gg{yields}Ah{yields}hhZ would give rise to 4{gamma} signature while gg{yields}Hh{yields}hhh can give a 6{gamma} final state. We show that both the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN's Large Hadron Collider can probe a substantial slice of the parameter space in this fermiophobic scenario of the two Higgs doublet model. If observed the above processes can give some information on the triple Higgs couplings involved.

  6. Search for a light fermiophobic Higgs boson produced via gluon fusion at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Guedes, R. B.; Santos, R.

    2008-10-01

    In this study, we propose new Higgs production mechanisms with multiphoton final states in the fermiophobic limit of the two Higgs doublet model. The processes are: gg→hh, gg→Hh followed by H→hh and gg→Ah followed by A→hZ. In the fermiophobic limit, gg→hh and gg→Ah→hhZ would give rise to 4γ signature while gg→Hh→hhh can give a 6γ final state. We show that both the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN’s Large Hadron Collider can probe a substantial slice of the parameter space in this fermiophobic scenario of the two Higgs doublet model. If observed the above processes can give some information on the triple Higgs couplings involved.

  7. Prospect for discovering a light higgs at the Tevatron in Run II

    SciTech Connect

    G. Velev

    2001-06-22

    The present upgrades of the CDF and DO detectors as well as of the Fermilab Tevatron have dramatically improved their sensitivity for Standard Model and minimal supersymmetry Higgs bosons searches in Run II. This paper reviews the recent estimates of this sensitivity in terms of Higgs discovery and exclusion reach based on a total expected Run II Tevatron luminosity of 15 fb{sup {minus}1} delivered to each experiment.

  8. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-05

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  9. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-05-17

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  10. Searches for BSM (non-SUSY) physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, Heather K.; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-11-01

    As of July 2005, the Tevatron at Fermilab has delivered {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of data to the CDF and D0 experiments. Each experiment has recorded more than 80% of the delivered luminosity. Results of searches for physics (non-SUSY and non-Higgs) beyond the Standard Model using 200 pb{sup -1} to 480 pb{sup -1} at D0 and CDF are presented.

  11. Selected Topics from Top Mass Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard

    2016-12-07

    The most recent results of the top-quark mass measurements at the Tevatron at Fermilab are presented. Data were collected in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV by the CDF and D0 experiments. Top quark mass measurements in the lepton+jets, dilepton and alljet final states as well as their combination and the extraction of the mass from the cross-section measurement are presented.

  12. Studies of QCD at the Tevatron with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.W.; D0 Collaboration

    1996-12-01

    QCD studies at Fermilab`s Tevatron encompass a rich variety of topics. We present some of the latest results from the D0 experiment including probes of the standard model given by the inclusive jet cross section, the dijet invariant mass spectrum and several studies with direct photons. To complement these probes, we also present new results from precision examinations of the color interactions including studies of color coherence and jet azimuthal decorrelation. 22 refs., 14 figs.

  13. Tevatron QCD for Cosmic-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Lars; /RWTH Aachen U.

    2010-12-01

    The two multi-purpose experiments D0 and CDF are operated at the Tevatron collider, where proton anti-proton collisions take place at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV in Run II. In the kinematic plane of Q{sup 2}-scale and (anti-)proton momentum fraction x, Tevatron jet measurements cover a wide range, with phase space regions in common and beyond the HERA ep-collider reach. The kinematic limit of the Auger experiment is given by a centre of mass energy of 100 TeV. Cosmic rays cover a large region of the kinematic phase space at low momenta x, corresponding to forward proton/diffractive physics and also at low scales, corresponding to the hadronization scale and the underlying event. Therefore of particular interest are exclusive and diffractive measurements as well as underlying event, double parton scattering and minimum bias measurements. The kinematic limit of the Tevatron corresponds to the PeV energy region below the knee of the differential cosmic particle flux energy distribution. The data discussed here are in general corrected for detector effects, such as efficiency and acceptance. Therefore they can be used directly for testing and improving existing event generators and any future calculations/models. Comparisons take place at the hadronic final state (particle level).

  14. Top quark physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio Sidoti

    2004-03-17

    After the successful Run I of the Tevatron (1992-1996),with the top quark discovery, both CDF and D0 experiments were extensively upgraded to meet the challenges of the Tevatron Run II collider. The energy of p{bar p} collisions at the Tevatron was increased from {radical}s = 1.8 TeV to {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. t{bar t} production cross section is expected to increase by a factor of {approx} 30%. Major upgrades in the Tevatron accelerator chain will increase the Run II instantaneous luminosity: the goal is to achieve L = 5 - 20 x 10{sup 31} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} while the highest luminosity reached up to now (September 2003) is 5.2 x 10{sup 31} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. In this paper we will present the top quark properties measured by both CDF and D0 with the first physics-quality data collected during the Run II (March 2002-January 2003). First we will review t{bar t} cross section measurements in the various decay channels; then top quark mass measurements will be presented.

  15. Surge Recovery Techniques for the Tevatron Cold Compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, A.; Klebaner, A. L.; Makara, J. N.; Theilacker, J. C.

    2006-04-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, made by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high-energy operations. The compressor is designed to pump 60 g/s of 3.6 K saturated helium vapor at a pressure ratio of 2.8, with an off-design range of 40 to 70 g/s and operating speeds between 40 and 95 krpm. Since initial commissioning in 1993, Tevatron transient conditions such as quench recovery have led to multiple-location machine trips as a result of the cold compressors entering the surge regime. Historically, compressors operating at lower inlet pressures and higher speeds have been especially susceptible to these machine trips and it was not uncommon to have multiple compressor trips during large multiple-house quenches. In order to cope with these events and limit accelerator down time, surge recovery techniques have been implemented in an attempt to prevent the compressors from tripping once the machine entered this surge regime. This paper discusses the different methods of surge recovery that have been employed. Data from tests performed at the Cryogenic Test Facility at Fermilab as well as actual Tevatron operational data were utilized. In order to aid in the determination of the surge region, a full mapping study was undertaken to characterize the entire pressure field of the cold compressor. These techniques were then implemented and tested at several locations in the Tevatron with some success.

  16. Surge recovery techniques for the Tevatron cold compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Klebaner, A.L.; Makara, J.N.; Theilacker, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, made by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high-energy operations [1]. The compressor is designed to pump 60 g/s of 3.6 K saturated helium vapor at a pressure ratio of 2.8, with an off-design range of 40 to 70 g/s and operating speeds between 40 and 95 krpm. Since initial commissioning in 1993, Tevatron transient conditions such as quench recovery have led to multiple-location machine trips as a result of the cold compressors entering the surge regime. Historically, compressors operating at lower inlet pressures and higher speeds have been especially susceptible to these machine trips and it was not uncommon to have multiple compressor trips during large multiple-house quenches. In order to cope with these events and limit accelerator down time, surge recovery techniques have been implemented in an attempt to prevent the compressors from tripping once the machine entered this surge regime. This paper discusses the different methods of surge recovery that have been employed. Data from tests performed at the Cryogenic Test Facility at Fermilab as well as actual Tevatron operational data were utilized. In order to aid in the determination of the surge region, a full mapping study was undertaken to characterize the entire pressure field of the cold compressor. These techniques were then implemented and tested at several locations in the Tevatron with some success.

  17. Direct measurements of beta-star in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.; Miyamoto, R.; /Texas U.

    2007-06-01

    Simultaneous turn-by-turn beam position measurements across collider detector long straight sections provide full phase space information of a free oscillation. For signals with enough coherence (typically 1-2000 revolutions) the amplitude function and its slope at the two BPM's can be directly measured. Results for the Tevatron low-{beta} regions with a few percent accuracy are described.

  18. Search for Higgs Bosons and Supersymmetry at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Buescher, Volker

    2007-11-20

    Since the start of Run II in March 2001 the Tevatron collider has delivered pp-bar collisions corresponding to about 3 fb{sup -1} to the CDF and DOe experiments. This report presents a brief summary of recent results based on this dataset from the searches for Higgs bosons and Supersymmetry.

  19. Tevatron direct photon results.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlmann, S.

    1999-09-21

    Tevatron direct photon results since DIS98 are reviewed. Two new CDF measurements are discussed, the Run Ib inclusive photon cross section and the photon + Muon cross section. Comparisons with the latest NLO QCD calculations are presented.

  20. Diffractive W and Z Production at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-07-01

    We report on a measurement of the fraction of events with a W or Z boson produced diffractively in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using data from 0.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector equipped with a Roman-pot spectrometer that detects the {bar p} from {bar p} + p {yields} {bar p}+[X+W/Z]. We find that (0.97 {+-} 0.11)% of Ws and (0.85 {+-} 0.22)% of Zs are produced diffractively in a region of (anti)proton fractional momentum loss {zeta} of 0.03 < {zeta} < 0.10 and 4-momentum transferred squared t of -1 < t < 0 (GeV/c){sup 2}. We also report on searches for W and Z production in double Pomeron exchange, p+{bar p} {yields} p+[X+W/z]+{bar p}, and on exclusive Z production, {bar p}p {yields} {bar p}+Z+p. No signal is seen above background for these processes, and comparisons are made with expectations.

  1. Report of the Fermilab Committee for Site Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Holmes, Vic Kuchler et. al.

    2001-09-10

    Fermilab is the flagship laboratory of the U.S. high-energy physics program. The Fermilab accelerator complex has occupied the energy frontier nearly continuously since its construction in the early 1970s. It will remain at the frontier until the Large Hadron Collider at CERN begins operating in 2006-7. A healthy future for Fermilab will likely require construction of a new accelerator in the post-LHC era. The process of identifying, constructing and operating a future forefront facility will require the support of the world high-energy-physics community, the governments and funding agencies of many nations and the people of surrounding communities. This report explores options for construction of a new facility on or near the existing Fermilab site. We began the study that forms the basis of this report with the idea that Fermilab, and the surrounding area of northeastern Illinois, possesses attributes that make it an attractive candidate for a new accelerator construction project: excellent geology; a Fermilab staff and local contractors who are experienced in subsurface construction; abundant energy supplies; good access to transportation networks; the presence of local universities with strong interest and participation in the Fermilab research program; Fermilab's demonstrated ability to mount large accelerator construction projects and operate complex accelerator facilities; and a surrounding community that is largely supportive of Fermilab's presence. Our report largely confirms these perceptions.

  2. Novel tune diagnostics for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    In the Tevatron collider, protons and antiprotons share the same beam pipe. This poses a challenge in the measurement of tunes for both species simultaneously because of the possibility of signal contamination from the other species. The tune of each bunch is also very different because of beam-beam effects from parasitic crossing points. This means that the tune diagnostics must be able to differentiate between protons and anti-protons, it also has to measure tunes from each bunch. There are three different tune pickups used in the Tevatron: 1.7 GHz Schottky pickups, 21.4 MHz Schottky pickups and baseband pickups. These devices will be discussed in detail in this paper.

  3. Magnetic performance of new Fermilab high gradient quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Hanft, R.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.A.; Gourlay, S.A.; Lamm, M.J.; McInturff, A.D.; Mokhtarani, A.; Riddiford, A.

    1991-05-01

    For the Fermilab Tevatron low beta insertions installed in 1990--1991 as part of a luminosity upgrade there were built approximately 35 superconducting cold iron quadrupoles utilizing a two layer cos 2{theta} coil geometry with 76 mm diameter aperature. The field harmonics and strengths of these magnets obtained by measurement at cryogenic conditions are presented. Evidence for a longitudinal periodic structure in the remnant field is shown. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. The Fermilab Accelerator control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogert, Dixon

    1986-06-01

    With the advent of the Tevatron, considerable upgrades have been made to the controls of all the Fermilab Accelerators. The current system is based on making as large an amount of data as possible available to many operators or end-users. Specifically there are about 100 000 separate readings, settings, and status and control registers in the various machines, all of which can be accessed by seventeen consoles, some in the Main Control Room and others distributed throughout the complex. A "Host" computer network of approximately eighteen PDP-11/34's, seven PDP-11/44's, and three VAX-11/785's supports a distributed data acquisition system including Lockheed MAC-16's left from the original Main Ring and Booster instrumentation and upwards of 1000 Z80, Z8002, and M68000 microprocessors in dozens of configurations. Interaction of the various parts of the system is via a central data base stored on the disk of one of the VAXes. The primary computer-hardware communication is via CAMAC for the new Tevatron and Antiproton Source; certain subsystems, among them vacuum, refrigeration, and quench protection, reside in the distributed microprocessors and communicate via GAS, an in-house protocol. An important hardware feature is an accurate clock system making a large number of encoded "events" in the accelerator supercycle available for both hardware modules and computers. System software features include the ability to save the current state of the machine or any subsystem and later restore it or compare it with the state at another time, a general logging facility to keep track of specific variables over long periods of time, detection of "exception conditions" and the posting of alarms, and a central filesharing capability in which files on VAX disks are available for access by any of the "Host" processors.

  5. The very large hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This paper reviews the purposes to be served by a very large hadron collider and the organization and coordination of efforts to bring it about. There is some discussion of magnet requirements and R&D and the suitability of the Fermilab site.

  6. Fermilab E791

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, S.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Costa, I.; de Mello Neto, J.R.T.; de Miranda, J.M.; Santoro, A.F.S.; Souza, M.H.G.; Blaylock, G.; Burchat, P.R.; Gagnon, P.; Sugano, K.; d`Oliveria, A.B.; Santha, A.; Sokologg, M.D.; Appel, J.A.; Banerjee, S.; Carter, T.; Denisenko, K.; Halling, M.; James, C.; Lundberg, B.; Thorne, K.; Burnstein, R.; Kasper, P.A.; Peng, K.C.; Rubin, H.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Aitala, E.M.; Gounder, K.; Rafatian, A.; Ramalho, A.J.; Reidy, J.J.; Summers, D.J.; Yi, D.; Granite, D.; Nguyen, A.; Reay, N.W.; Reibel, K.; Sidwell, R.A.; Stanton, N.; Tripathi, A.; Witchey, N.; Purohit, M.V.; Schwartz, A.; Wiener, J.; Almeida, F.M.L.; daSilva Carvalho, H.; Ashery, D.; Beck, S.; Gerzon, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Trumer, D.; Bracker, S.B.; Astroga, J.; Milburn, R.; Napier, A.; Radeztsky, S.; Sheaff, M.; Darling, C.; Slaughter, J.; Takach, S.; Wolin, E.

    1992-10-01

    Fermilab E791, a very high statistics charm particle experiment, recently completed its data taking at Fermilab`s Tagged Photon Laboratory. Over 20 billionevents were recorded through a loose transverse energy trigger and written to 8mm tape in the 1991--92 fixed target run at Fermilab. This unprecedented data sample containing charm is being analysis on many-thousand MIP RISC computing farms set up at sites in the collaboration. A glimpse of the data taking and analysis effort is presented. We also show some preliminary results for common charm decay modes. Our present analysis indicates a very rich yield of over 200K reconstructed charm decays.

  7. Higgs boson production at hadron colliders: Signal and background processes

    SciTech Connect

    David Rainwater; Michael Spira; Dieter Zeppenfeld

    2004-01-12

    We review the theoretical status of signal and background calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders. Particular emphasis is given to missing NLO results, which will play a crucial role for the Tevatron and the LHC.

  8. 1987 DOE review: First collider run operation

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, S.; Crawford, J.; Dugan, G.; Edwards, H.; Finley, D.A.; Fowler, W.B.; Harrison, M.; Holmes, S.; Makara, J.N.; Malamud, E.

    1987-05-01

    This review covers the operations of the first run of the 1.8 TeV superconducting super collider. The papers enclosed cover: PBAR source status, fixed target operation, Tevatron cryogenic reliability and capacity upgrade, Tevatron Energy upgrade progress and plans, status of the D0 low beta insertion, 1.8 K and 4.7 K refrigeration for low-..beta.. quadrupoles, progress and plans for the LINAC and booster, near term and long term and long term performance improvements.

  9. Search for super symmetry at the Tevatron using the trilepton signature

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, Sourabh Shishir

    2008-10-01

    This dissertation describes a search for the associated production of the supersymmetric particles, the chargino and the neutralino, through their R-parity conserving decays to three leptons and missing energy. This search is carried out using the data collected at the CDF experiment at the Tevatron √s = 1.96 TeV p$\\bar{p}$ collider at Fermilab. The results are obtained by combining five independent channels with varying signal to background ratio. Overall, a total of 6.4 ± 1.1 background events from standard model processes and 11.4 ± 1.1 signal events for a particular choice of mSUGRA model parameters are expected. The observation of 7 events in data is consistent with the standard model background expectation, and the mSUGRA model is constrained. Limits are set on the cross section of Chargino-Neutralino pair production, and a limit on the mass of the chargino is extracted. A method of obtaining model-independent results is also discussed.

  10. Search for a new resonance decaying into top-antitop at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Schwanenberger, Christian; /Bonn U.

    2006-02-01

    In this report a new search for a narrow-width heavy resonance decaying into top quark pairs (X {yields} t{bar t}) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV has been performed using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis considers t{bar t} candidate events in the lepton+jets channel using a lifetime tag to identify b-jets and the t{bar t} invariant mass distribution to search for evidence of resonant production. The analyzed dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 370 pb{sup -1}. Since no evidence for a t{bar t} resonance X is found, upper limits on {sigma}{sub x} x B(X {yields} t{bar t}) for different hypothesized resonance masses using a Bayesian approach are set. Within a topcolor-assisted technicolor model, the existence of a leptophobic Z' boson with M{sub Z'} < 680 GeV and width {Lambda}{sub Z'} = 0.012 M{sub Z'} can be excluded at 95% C.L.

  11. W mass measurements from D{circle_slash} and CDF experiments at TeVatron

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Chang Kee

    1994-10-01

    The authors present preliminary measurements of the W boson mass made by the D0 and CDF experiments using data collected at the Fermilab TeVatron {bar p}p collider operating at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. The result from the CDF W {yields} e{nu} data analysis is M{sub W} = 80.47 {+-} 0.15(stat) {+-} 0.25(sys) GeV/c{sup 2} and the result from the CDF W {yields} {mu}{nu} data analysis is M{sub W} = 80.29 {+-} 0.20(stat) {+-} 0.24(sys) GeV/c{sup 2}. The result from the D0 W {yields} e{nu} data analysis is M{sub W} = 79.86 {+-} 0.16(stat) {+-} 0.31(sys) GeV/c{sup 2}. When combined with the previous measurements, these results yield a world average value of M{sub W}, 80.23 {+-} 0.18 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  12. Physics at future hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    U. Baur et al.

    2002-12-23

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  13. Exclusive e+e-, di-photon and di-jet production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Terashi, Koji; /Rockefeller U.

    2007-05-01

    Results from studies on exclusive production of electron-position pair, di-photon, and dijet production at CDF in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron are presented. THe first observation and cross section measurements of exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and di-jet production in hadron-hadron collisions are emphasized.

  14. Fermilab Program and Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Denisov, Dmitri

    2014-01-01

    This article is a short summary of the talk presented at 2014 Instrumentation Conference in Novosibirsk about Fermilab's experimental program and future plans. It includes brief description of the P5 long term planning progressing in US as well as discussion of the future accelerators considered at Fermilab.

  15. B lifetimes and mixing at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bedeschi, Franco; /INFN, Pisa

    2005-05-01

    The authors present recent results on b-hadron lifetimes and mixing obtained from the analysis of the data collected at the Tevatron Collider by the CDF and D0 Collaborations in the period 2002-2004. Many lifetime measurements have been updated since the Summer 2004 conferences, sometimes improving significantly the accuracy. Likewise the measurement of the B{sub d} oscillation frequency has been updated. New limits on the B{sub s} oscillation frequency have been determined using for the first time Run II data.

  16. New diffractive results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2005-05-01

    Experimental results in diffractive processes are summarized and a few notable characteristics described in terms of Quantum Chromodynamics. Exclusive dijet production is used to establish a benchmark for future experiments in the quest for diffractive Higgs production at the Large Hadron Collider. Using new data from the Tevatron and dedicated diffractive triggers, no excess over a smooth falling distribution for exclusive dijet events could be found. Stringent upper limits on the exclusive dijet production cross section are presented. The quark/gluon composition of dijet final states is used to provide additional hints on exclusive dijet production.

  17. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurin, D.; Bernardi, G.; Gerber, C.; Junk, T.; Juste, A.; Kotwal, A.; Lewis, J.; Mesropian, C.; Schellman, H.; Sekaric, J.; Toback, D.; Van Kooten, R.; Vellidis, C.; Zivkovic, L.

    2015-02-27

    We present a comprehensive review of the physics results obtained by the CDF and D0 collaborations up to summer 2014, with emphasis on those achieved in the Run II of the Tevatron collider which delivered a total integrated luminosity of ~10 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96~{\\rm TeV}$. The results are presented in six main physics topics: QCD, Heavy Flavor, Electroweak, Top quark, Higgs boson and searches for New Particles and Interactions. The characteristics of the accelerator, detectors, and the techniques used to achieve these results are also briefly summarized.

  18. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2006-08-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices.

  19. B_s mixing at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchesi, Donatella; /Padua U.

    2006-08-01

    The measurement of the B{sub s} mixing oscillation frequency, {Delta}m{sup s}, has been the main goal for both experiments CDF and D0 which are running at the Tevatron collider. With 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected during the last four years D0 set a lower and upper limit on this frequency, 17 < {Delta}m{sub s} < 21 ps{sup -1}. CDF measured {Delta}m{sub s} with a precision better than 2% and the probability that the data could randomly fluctuate to mimic such a signature is 0.2%.

  20. Fermilab`s DART DA system

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, R.; Anderson, J.; Berg, D.; Black, D.; Forster, R.; Franzen, J.; Kent, S.; Kwarciany, R.; Meadows, J.; Moore, C.

    1994-04-01

    DART is the new data acquisition system designed and implemented for six Fermilab experiments by the Fermilab Computing Division and the experiments themselves. The complexity of the experiments varies greatly. Their data taking throughput and event filtering requirements range from a few (2-5) to tens (80) of CAMAC, FASTBUS and home built front end crates; from a few 100 KByte/sec to 160 MByte/sec front end data collection rates; and from 0-3000 Mips of level 3 processing. The authors report on the architecture and implementation of DART to this date, and the hardware and software components that are being developed and supported.

  1. Injury reduction at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Griffing, Bill; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    In a recent DOE Program Review, Fermilab's director presented results of the laboratory's effort to reduce the injury rate over the last decade. The results, shown in the figure below, reveal a consistent and dramatic downward trend in OSHA recordable injuries at Fermilab. The High Energy Physics Program Office has asked Fermilab to report in detail on how the laboratory has achieved the reduction. In fact, the reduction in the injury rate reflects a change in safety culture at Fermilab, which has evolved slowly over this period, due to a series of events, both planned and unplanned. This paper attempts to describe those significant events and analyze how each of them has shaped the safety culture that, in turn, has reduced the rate of injury at Fermilab to its current value.

  2. Tevatron AC dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  3. The Tevatron Chromaticity tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; /Fermilab

    2008-12-01

    The Tevatron chromaticity tracker (CT) has been successfully commissioned and is now operational. The basic idea behind the CT is that when the phase of the Tevatron RF is slowly modulated, the beam momentum is also modulated. This momentum modulation is coupled transversely via chromaticity to manifest as a phase modulation on the betatron tune. Thus by phase demodulating the betatron tune, the chromaticity can be recovered. However, for the phase demodulation to be successful, it is critical that the betatron tune be a coherent signal that can be easily picked up by a phase detector. This is easily done because the Tevatron has a phase locked loop (PLL) based tune tracker which coherently excites the beam at the betatron tune.

  4. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon production cross section at the Tevatron using the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect

    Deluca Silberberg, Carolina

    2009-04-01

    In this thesis we present the measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section with a total integrated luminosity of 2.5 fb-1 of data collected with the CDF Run II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The prompt photon cross section is a classic measurement to test perturbative QCD (pQCD) with potential to provide information on the parton distribution function (PDF), and sensitive to the presence of new physics at large photon transverse momentum. Prompt photons also constitute an irreducible background for important searches such as H → γγ, or SUSY and extra-dimensions with energetic photons in the final state. The Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, U.S.A.) is currently the hadron collider that operates at the highest energies in the world. It collides protons and antiprotons with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The CDF and the D0 experiments are located in two of its four interaction regions. In Run I at the Tevatron, the direct photon production cross section was measured by both CDF and DO, and first results in Run II have been presented by the DO Collaboration based on 380 pb-1. Both Run I and Run II results show agreement with the theoretical predictions except for the low pTγ region, where the observed and predicted shapes are different. Prompt photon production has been also extensively measured at fixed-target experiments in lower pTγ ranges, showing excess of data compared to the theory, particularly at high xT. From an experimental point of view, the study of the direct photon production has several advantages compared to QCD studies using jets. Electromagnetic calorimeters have better energy resolution than hadronic calorimeters, and the systematic uncertainty on the photon absolute energy scale is smaller. Furthermore, the determination of the photon kinematics does not require the use of jet algorithms. However, the measurements using photons

  5. Conceptual Design Report: Fermilab Upgrade: Main Injector - Technical Components and Civil Construction, January, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1989-01-12

    This report contains a description of the design and cost estimate of a new 150 GeV accelerator, designated the Main Injector, which will be required to support the upgrade of the Fermilab Collider. The construction of this accelerator will simultaneously result in significant enhancements to the Fermilab fixed target program.

  6. Measurement of direct CP violation parameters in B± → J/ψK± and B± → J/ψπ± decays with 10.4 fb-1 of Tevatron data.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Beattie, M; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hart, B; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Holzbauer, J; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lamont, I; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; Mason, N; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2013-06-14

    We present a measurement of the direct CP-violating charge asymmetry in B(±) mesons decaying to J/ψK(±) and J/ψπ(±) where J/ψ decays to μ(+) μ(-), using the full run II data set of 10.4 fb(-1) of proton-antiproton collisions collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. A difference in the yield of B(-) and B(+) mesons in these decays is found by fitting to the difference between their reconstructed invariant mass distributions resulting in asymmetries of A(J/ψK) = [0.59 ± 0.37]%, which is the most precise measurement to date, and A(J/ψπ) = [-4.2 ± 4.5]%. Both measurements are consistent with standard model predictions.

  7. Heavy flavor baryon states at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, Sally; /New Mexico U.

    2011-08-01

    Precision measurements of the masses and widths of the bottom baryon resonances {Sigma}{sub b} and {Sigma}*{sub b} and charm baryons {Lambda}{sub c}(2595), {Lambda}{sub c}(2625), {Sigma}{sub c}(2455), and {Sigma}{sub c}(2520) are reported. A new measurement of {Lambda}{sub b} production is described. The studies include the first measurement of the widths and isospin mass splittings of the members of the {Sigma}{sub b} family. The charm baryons are examined through their strong decays to the {Lambda}{sub c} ground state, and measurements of their mass differences relative to the ground state, and corresponding decay widths, are reported. The data were collected by the CDF and D0 detectors for 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions during Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron.

  8. Fermilab Cryogenic Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W. V.

    1980-06-18

    A workshop to discuss recent pressing problems experienced in the operation of helium refrigerators at the national laboratories was proposed by DOE. Early in 1980 it was decided that the workshop should be held at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The reasoning behind the selection of Fermilab included the proposed initial tests of the Central Liquefier, the recently experienced problems with refrigeration systems at Fermilab, and the fact that a previous workshop had been held at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, which, at present, would be the other logical choice for the workshop.

  9. Fermilab E791

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, S.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Costa, I.; de Mello Neto, J.R.T.; de Miranda, J.M.; Santoro, A.F.S.; Souza, M.H.G. , Rio de Janeiro, RJ ); Blaylock, G.; Burchat, P.R.; Gagnon, P.; Sugano, K. ); d'Oliveria, A.B.; Santha, A.; Sokologg, M.D. ); Appel, J.A.; Banerjee, S.

    1992-10-01

    Fermilab E791, a very high statistics charm particle experiment, recently completed its data taking at Fermilab's Tagged Photon Laboratory. Over 20 billionevents were recorded through a loose transverse energy trigger and written to 8mm tape in the 1991--92 fixed target run at Fermilab. This unprecedented data sample containing charm is being analysis on many-thousand MIP RISC computing farms set up at sites in the collaboration. A glimpse of the data taking and analysis effort is presented. We also show some preliminary results for common charm decay modes. Our present analysis indicates a very rich yield of over 200K reconstructed charm decays.

  10. Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-07-01

    Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron

  11. Impedances of Tevatron separators

    SciTech Connect

    K. Y. Ng

    2003-05-28

    The impedances of the Tevatron separators are revisited and are found to be negligibly small in the few hundred MHz region, except for resonances at 22.5 MHz. The later are contributions from the power cables which may drive head-tail instabilities if the bunch is long enough.

  12. Two Alternate High Gradient Quadrupoles; An Upgraded Tevatron IR and A"Pipe" Design

    SciTech Connect

    McInturff, A.D.; Oort, J.M. van; Scanlan, R.M.

    1995-04-01

    With the U.S. cancellation of the SSC project, the only large approved hadron accelerator project is CERN's LHC. One of the more critical elements in the performance of a collider is the quadrupole lens at the beam collision points. These quadrupoles, usually referred to as the 'insertion quads' normally form a set of triplets around the interaction region. Their focal power directly affects the luminosity available at the crossing point In order to achieve as high a gradient as possible, the CERN design team has proposed a very efficient high gradient quadrupole which is based on a graded four-layer winding structure. At Fermilab's Tevatron, an upgraded two layer winding quadrupole has been in operation since 1989, and has provided a 50% higher gradient than its predecessor. The quadrupole was basically state of the art when it was designed in 1985. Since then however, improvements have been made in cabling, conductor perfonnance, etc. Naturally, operation of a modernized version of this .design can provide higher capabilities. This improved two layer design can serve as an alternative to the more intricate graded four layer design now envisioned for the LHC, provided it can obtain the proposed gradient. A high gradient quadrupole with a 'pipe' layout can be considered as a possible candidate for future large collider insertion regions. It is possible to fine-tune the design to obtain a good field-quality, the conductor is well cooled in case of a large radiation heat load, and the overall structure is smaller than a conventional quadrupole with a comparable field gradient.

  13. Pressure field study of the Tevatron cold compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Klebaner, A.L.; Martinez, A.; Soyars, W.M.; Theilacker, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2003-01-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, manufactured by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high-energy operations [1]. The compressor is designed to pump 60 g/sec of 3.6 K saturated helium vapor at a pressure ratio of 2.8, with an off-design range of 40 to 70 g/sec. Operating speeds are between 40 and 95 krpm, with a speed of 80 krpm at the design point. Different heat loads and magnet quench performance of each of the twenty-four satellite refrigerators dictates different process pressure and flow rates of the cold compressors. Reducing the process flow rate can cause the centrifugal cold compressor to stop pumping and subsequently surge. Tests have been conducted at the Cryogenic Test Facility at Fermilab to map the pressure field and appropriate efficiency of the IHI hydrodynamic cold compressor. The information allows tuning of each of the twenty-four Tevatron satellite refrigerators to avoid cold compressor operation near the surge and choke lines. A new impeller has also been tested. The Tevatron cold compressor pressure field and efficiency data with the new impeller are presented in this paper.

  14. Central exclusive production at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrow, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab, CDF, observed for the first time in hadron-hadron collisions photon-photon (γ + γ → e+e-, μ+μ-) and photon-pomeron (γ + ℙ → J/ψ, ψ(2S)) interactions, as well as p+\\bar {p}-> p+χc+\\bar {p} by double pomeron exchange, ℙ + ℙ or DPE. Exclusive π+π- production was also measured at √ {s} = 900 GeV and 1960 GeV; resonance structures are discussed.

  15. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL.

  16. Fermilab recycler diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring is a permanent magnet storage ring for the storage and cooling of antiprotons. The following note describes the diagnostic tools currently available for commissioning, as well as the improvements and upgrades planned for the near future.

  17. Highlights from Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddone, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    DISCUSSION by CHAIRMAN: P.J. ODDONE, Scientific Secretaries: W. Fisher, A. Holzner Note from Publisher: The Slides of the Lecture: "Highlights from Fermilab" can be found at http://www.ccsem.infn.it/issp2007/

  18. Breakthrough: Fermilab Accelerator Technology

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    There are more than 30,000 particle accelerators in operation around the world. At Fermilab, scientists are collaborating with other laboratories and industry to optimize the manufacturing processes for a new type of powerful accelerator that uses superconducting niobium cavities. Experimenting with unique polishing materials, a Fermilab team has now developed an efficient and environmentally friendly way of creating cavities that can propel particles with more than 30 million volts per meter.

  19. Fermilab: Science at Work

    ScienceCinema

    Brendan Casey; Herman White; Craig Hogan; Denton Morris; Mary Convery; Bonnie Fleming; Deborah Harris; Dave Schmitz; Brenna Flaugher; Aron Soha

    2016-07-12

    Six days. Three frontiers. One amazing lab. From 2010 to 2012, a film crew followed a group of scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermilab and filmed them at work and at home. This 40-minute documentary shows the diversity of the people, research and work at Fermilab. Viewers catch a true behind-the-scenes look of the United States' premier particle physics laboratory while scientists explain why their research is important to them and the world.

  20. Physics at a new Fermilab proton driver

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01

    In 2004, motivated by the recent exciting developments in neutrino physics, the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee identified a new high intensity Proton Driver as an attractive option for the future. At the end of 2004 the APS ''Study on the Physics of Neutrinos'' concluded that the future US neutrino program should have, as one of its components, ''A proton driver in the megawatt class or above and neutrino superbeam with an appropriate very large detector capable of observing Cp violation and measuring the neutrino mass-squared differences and mixing parameters with high precision''. The presently proposed Fermilab Proton Driver is designed to accomplish these goals, and is based on, and would help develop, Linear Collider technology. In this paper the Proton Driver parameters are summarized, and the potential physics program is described.

  1. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?

  2. Accelerators Beyond The Tevatron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Joseph

    2010-07-29

    Following the successful operation of the Fermilab superconducting accelerator three new higher energy accelerators were planned. They were the UNK in the Soviet Union, the LHC in Europe, and the SSC in the United States. All were expected to start producing physics about 1995. They did not. Why?.

  3. Visible Cascade Higgs Decays to Four Photons at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Spencer; Fox, Patrick J.; Weiner, Neal

    2007-03-01

    The presence of a new singlet scalar particle a can open up new decay channels for the Higgs boson, through cascades of the form h→2a→X, possibly making discovery through standard model channels impossible. If a is CP odd, its decays are particularly sensitive to new physics. Quantum effects from heavy fields can naturally make h→4g the dominant decay which is difficult to observe at hadron colliders, and is allowed by CERN LEP for mh>82GeV. However, there are usually associated decays, either h→2g2γ or h→4γ, which are more promising. The decay h→4γ is a clean channel that can discover both a and h. At the CERN LHC with 300fb-1 of luminosity, a branching ratio of order 10-4 is sufficient for discovery for a large range of Higgs boson masses. With total luminosity of ˜8fb-1, discovery at the Fermilab Tevatron requires more than 5×10-3 in branching ratio.

  4. Visible cascade Higgs decays to four photons at hadron colliders.

    PubMed

    Chang, Spencer; Fox, Patrick J; Weiner, Neal

    2007-03-16

    The presence of a new singlet scalar particle a can open up new decay channels for the Higgs boson, through cascades of the form h --> 2a --> X, possibly making discovery through standard model channels impossible. If a is CP odd, its decays are particularly sensitive to new physics. Quantum effects from heavy fields can naturally make h --> 4 g the dominant decay which is difficult to observe at hadron colliders, and is allowed by CERN LEP for m(h) > 82 GeV. However, there are usually associated decays, either h --> 2g2gamma or h --> 4gamma, which are more promising. The decay h-->4gamma is a clean channel that can discover both a and h. At the CERN LHC with 300 fb(-1) of luminosity, a branching ratio of order 10(-4) is sufficient for discovery for a large range of Higgs boson masses. With total luminosity of approximately 8 fb(-1), discovery at the Fermilab Tevatron requires more than 5 x 10(-3) in branching ratio.

  5. The Tevatron tune tracker pll - theory, implementation and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The Tevatron tune tracker is based on the idea that the transverse phase response of the beam can be measured quickly and accurately enough to allow us to track the betatron tune with a phase locked loop (PLL). The goal of this paper is to show the progress of the PLL project at Fermilab. We will divide this paper into three parts: theory, implementation and measurements. In the theory section, we will use a simple linear model to show that our design will track the betatron tune under conditions that occur in the Tevatron. In the implementation section we will break down and examine each part of the PLL and in some cases calculate the actual PLL parameters used in our system from beam measurements. And finally in the measurements section we will show the results of the PLL performance.

  6. The A0 abort system for the Tevatron upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.

    1989-03-01

    The installation of electrostatic separator modules at B48 and C17 in the Tevatron necessitates changes to the Tevatron abort system. There will no longer be room for either the proton or antiproton kicker magnets used in the present system. The kickers at C17 will be permanently removed. The kickers at B48 will be temporarily removed for collider operation and will be replaced for fixed target operation. The existing proton abort system will remain unchanged during fixed target operation. This note describes a proposed abort system for operation in the collider mode for 22 on 22 bunches and provides details of specifications for the required components. In certain cases, for example in the case of the pulsers for the magnets and the absorber assembly, system components are designed with the option of upgrading to 44 on 44 bunch operation in mind. 8 refs., 14 figs.

  7. Measurement of top anti-top cross section in proton - anti-proton collider at √s = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Mal, Prolay Kumar

    2005-04-01

    Discovery of the top quark in 1995 at the Fermilab Tevatron collider concluded a long search following the 1977 discovery of bottom (b) quark [1] and represents another triumph of the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particles. Top quark is one of the fundamental fermions in the Standard Model of electroweak interactions and is the weak-isospin partner of the bottom quark. A precise measurement of top pair production cross-section would be a test of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) prediction. Presently, Tevatron is the world's highest energy collider where protons (p) and anti-protons ($\\bar{p}$) collide at a centre of mass energy √s of 1.96 TeV. At Tevatron top (t) and anti-top ($\\bar{t}$) quarks are predominantly pair produced through strong interactions--quark annihilation (≅ 85%) and gluon fusion (≅ 15%). Due to the large mass of top quark, t or $\\bar{t}$ decays (~ 10-25 sec) before hadronization and in SM framework, it decays to a W boson and a b quark with ~ 100% branching ratio (BR). The subsequent decay of W boson determines the major signatures of t$\\bar{t}$ decay. If both W bosons (coming from t and $\\bar{t}$ decays) decay into leptons (viz., eve, μvμ or τcτ) the corresponding t$\\bar{t}$ decay is called dileptonic decay. Of all dileptonic decay modes of t$\\bar{t}$, the t$\\bar{t}$ → WWb$\\bar{b}$ → eveμvμb$\\bar{b}$ (eμ channel) decay mode has the smallest background contamination from Z0 production or Drell-Yan process; simultaneously, it has the highest BR (~ 3.16%) [2] amongst all dileptonic decay modes of t$\\bar{t}$. During Run I (1992-1996) of Tevatron, three eμ candidate events were detected by D0 experiment, out of 80 candidate events (inclusive of all decay modes of t$\\bar{t}$). Due to the rarity of the t$\\bar{t}$ events, the measured cross-section has large uncertainty in its value (viz., 5.69 ± 1.21(stat) ± 1.04(sys) pb {at} √s = 1.8 Te

  8. Fermilab silicon strip readout chip for BTev

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, Raymond; Hoff, Jim; Mekkaoui, Abderrezak; Manghisoni, Massimo; Re, Valerio; Angeleri, Valentina; Manfredi, Pier Francesco; Ratti, Lodovico; Speziali, Valeria; /Fermilab /Bergamo U. /INFN, Pavia /Pavia U.

    2005-05-01

    A chip has been developed for reading out the silicon strip detectors in the new BTeV colliding beam experiment at Fermilab. The chip has been designed in a 0.25 {micro}m CMOS technology for high radiation tolerance. Numerous programmable features have been added to the chip, such as setup for operation at different beam crossing intervals. A full size chip has been fabricated and successfully tested. The design philosophy, circuit features, and test results are presented in this paper.

  9. Recent ground motion studies at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Volk, J.; Singatulin, S.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-04-01

    Understanding slow and fast ground motion is important for the successful operation and design for present and future colliders. Since 2000 there have been several studies of ground motion at Fermilab. Several different types of HLS (hydro static level sensors) have been used to study slow ground motion (less than 1 hertz) seismometers have been used for fast (greater than 1 hertz) motions. Data have been taken at the surface and at locations 100 meters below the surface. Data of recent slow ground motion measurements with HLSs, many years of alignment data and results of the ATL-analysis are presented and discussed.

  10. QCD analysis of $W$- and $Z$-boson production at Tevatron

    DOE PAGES

    Camarda, S.; Belov, P.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; ...

    2015-09-28

    Recent measurements of the W-boson charge asymmetry and of the Z-boson production cross sections, performed at the Tevatron collider in Run II by the D0 and CDF collaborations, are studied using the HERAFitter framework to assess their impact on the proton parton distribution functions (PDFs). Thus, the Tevatron measurements, together with deep-inelastic scattering data from HERA, are included in a QCD analysis performed at next-to-leading order, and compared to the predictions obtained using other PDF sets from different groups. Good agreement between measurements and theoretical predictions is observed. The Tevatron data provide significant constraints on the d-valence quark distribution.

  11. Collider-Independent tt¯ Forward-Backward Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Juste, A.

    2012-11-01

    We introduce the forward-backward asymmetries Au, Ad corresponding to uu¯, dd¯→tt¯ production, respectively, at hadron colliders. These are collider and center-of-mass independent observables, directly related to the forward-backward and charge asymmetries measured at the Tevatron and the LHC, respectively. We discuss how to extract these asymmetries from data. Because these asymmetries are collider independent, their measurement at these two colliders could elucidate the nature of the anomalous forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron. Our framework also shows in a model independent fashion that a positive Tevatron asymmetry exceeding the standard model expectation is compatible with the small asymmetry measured at the LHC.

  12. Prospects for Higgs searches at the Tevatron and LHC in the MSSM with explicit CP violation.

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, P.; Liu, T.; Wagner, C. E. M.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the Tevatron and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) reach for the Higgs sector of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) in the presence of explicit CP violation. Using the most recent studies from the Tevatron and LHC collaborations, we examine the CPX benchmark scenario for a range of CP-violating phases in the soft trilinear and gluino mass terms and compute the exclusion/discovery potentials for each collider on the (MH+,tan{beta}) plane. Projected results from standard model (SM)-like, nonstandard, and charged Higgs searches are combined to maximize the statistical significance. We exhibit complementarity between the SM-like Higgs searches at the LHC with low luminosity and the Tevatron, and estimate the combined reach of the two colliders in the early phase of LHC running.

  13. OVERVIEW OF HIGGS BOSON STUDIES AT THE TEVATRON

    SciTech Connect

    Zivkovic, Lidija

    2014-05-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron p¯p Collider collected data between 2002 and 2011, accumulating up to 10 fb-1 of data. During that time, an extensive search for the standard model Higgs boson was performed. Combined results from the searches for the standard model Higgs boson with the final dataset are presented, together with results on the Higgs boson couplings and spin and parity.

  14. Precision measurements of the top quark mass at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteson, Daniel; /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-05-01

    We report precision measurements of the top quark mass using events collected by the D0 and CDF II detectors from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. Measurements are presented in multiple decay channels. In addition, we present a combination of the most precise measurements in each channel to date: M{sub top} = 172.5 {+-} 1.3{sub stat} {+-} 1.9{sub syst} GeV/c{sup 2}.

  15. BTeV - A dedicated B experiment at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    David C. Christian

    2002-12-17

    BTeV is a dedicated b-physics experiment that is expected to begin operation at the Fermilab Tevatron in 2008. BTeV is designed to take full advantage of the large production cross section of b particles (including B{sub S}) in high energy hadron collisions. A quick description of the BTeV spectrometer is given in this paper. Two unique aspects of BTeV, the pixel-based trigger and the high quality lead tungstate electromagnetic calorimeter, are described in slightly greater detail.

  16. Race for the Higgs hots up as Tevatron seeks extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-12-01

    With researchers at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) having circulated protons for the first time since last year's accident, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is requesting 25m so that the Tevatron collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois can run for an extra year until 2011. If the additional funding is granted, it would give physicists in the US an extra 12 months to close in on discovering the elusive Higgs boson. The DOE's request will now be reviewed before being part of President Barack Obama's 2011 budget request, which will be sent to Congress in February.

  17. Space charge measurements with a high intensity bunch at the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Seiya, K.; Chase, B.; Dey, J.; Joireman, P.; Kourbanis, I.; Yagodnitsyna, A.; /Novosibirsk State U.

    2011-03-01

    For Project X, the Fermilab Main Injector will be required to operate with 3 times higher bunch intensity. The plan to study the space charge effects at the injection energy with intense bunches will be discussed. A multi-MW proton facility has been established as a critical need for the U.S. HEP program by HEPAP and P5. Utilization of the Main Injector (MI) as a high intensity proton source capable of delivering in excess of 2 MW beam power will require a factor of three increase in bunch intensity compared to current operations. Instabilities associated with beam loading, space charge, and electron cloud effects are common issues for high intensity proton machines. The MI intensities for current operations and Project X are listed in Table 1. The MI provides proton beams for Fermilab's Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider and MINOS neutrino experiments. The proposed 2MW proton facility, Project X, utilizes both the Recycler (RR) and the MI. The RR will be reconfigured as a proton accumulator and injector to realize the factor 3 bunch intensity increase in the MI. Since the energy in the RR and the MI at injection will be 6-8 GeV, which is relatively low, space charge effects will be significant and need to be studied. Studies based on the formation of high intensity bunches in the MI will guide the design and fabrication of the RF cavities and space-charge mitigation devices required for 2 MW operation of the MI. It is possible to create the higher bunch intensities required in the MI using a coalescing technique that has been successfully developed at Fermilab. This paper will discuss a 5 bunch coalescing scheme at 8 GeV which will produce 2.5 x 10{sup 11} protons in one bunch. Bunch stretching will be added to the coalescing process. The required RF parameters were optimized with longitudinal simulations. The beam studies, that have a goal of 85% coalescing efficiency, were started in June 2010.

  18. Recent results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J. )

    1990-12-10

    This is a summary of some of the many recent results from the CERN and Fermilab colliders, presented for an audience of nuclear, medium-energy, and elementary particle physicists. The topics are jets and QCD at very high energies, precision measurements of electroweak parameters, the remarkably heavy top quark, and new results on the detection of the large flux of B mesons produced at these machines. A summary and some comments on the bright prospects for the future of hadron colliders conclude the talk. 39 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Fermilab and Latin America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederman, Leon M.

    2006-09-01

    As Director of Fermilab, starting in 1979, I began a series of meetings with scientists in Latin America. The motivation was to stir collaboration in the field of high energy particle physics, the central focus of Fermilab. In the next 13 years, these Pan American Symposia stirred much discussion of the use of modern physics, created several groups to do collaborative research at Fermilab, and often centralized facilities and, today, still provides the possibility for much more productive North-South collaboration in research and education. In 1992, I handed these activities over to the AAAS, as President. This would, I hoped, broaden areas of collaboration. Such collaboration is unfortunately very sensitive to political events. In a rational world, it would be the rewards, cultural and economic, of collaboration that would modulate political relations. We are not there yet.

  20. ASIC design at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, R.

    1991-06-01

    In the past few years, ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) design has become important at Fermilab. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the in-house ASIC design activity which has taken place. This design effort has added much value to the high energy physics program and physics capability at Fermilab. The two approaches to ASIC development being pursued at Fermilab are examined by looking at some of the types of projects where ASICs are being used or contemplated. To help estimate the cost of future designs, a cost comparison is given to show the relative development and production expenses for these two ASIC approaches. 5 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Some recent experimental results from Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, H.E.

    1994-02-01

    The aim of this talk was to give an impression of the tremendous range and depth of the data being produced by experiments at Fermilab, both fixed target and collider. Despite the generous allotment of time it was not possible to do more than scratch the surface of some subjects. The collider experiments, using the measurements of the W mass and with top search and mass limits, are approaching the situation where a statement about the Higgs mass, or a sensitive test of the consistency of the standard model become a possibility. Subjects discussed were: (1) cross-sections, QCD measurements; (2) decay physics; (3) W/Z physics; (4) searches for new physics; and (5) search for top quark.

  2. B Flavor Tagging Calibration and Search for B$0\\atop{s}$ Oscillations in Semileptonic Decays with the CDF Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Giurgiu, Gavril A.

    2005-09-01

    In this thesis we present a search for oscillations of B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons using semileptonic B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$ℓ+v decays. Data were collected with the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDFII) from events produced in collisions of 980 GeV protons and antiprotons accelerated in the Tevatron ring. The total proton-antiproton center-of-mass energy is 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is the unique source in the world for B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons, to be joined by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN after 2007. We establish a lower limit on the B$0\\atop{s}$ oscillation frequency Δms > 7.7 ps-1 at 95% Confidence Level. We also present a multivariate tagging algorithm that identifies semileptonic B → μX decays of the other B mesons in the event. Using this muon tagging algorithm as well as opposite side electron and jet charge tagging algorithms, we infer the B$0\\atop{s}$ flavor at production. The tagging algorithms are calibrated using high statistics samples of B0 and B+ semileptonic B0/+ → Dℓv decays. The oscillation frequency Δmd in semileptonic B0 → Dℓv decays is measured to be Δmd = (0.501 ± 0.029(stat.) ± 0.017(syst.)) ps-1.

  3. Search for supersymmetric partner of bottom quark at d0 at Tevatron. Studies on missing transverse energy

    SciTech Connect

    Calvet, Samuel Pierre

    2007-09-21

    Supersymmetry, extension of the Standard Model of Particle Physics (SM), is searched for by trying to observe the supersymmetric partner of bottom quark ($\\tilde{b}$). This search is performed using events with a final state comprising two acoplanar b-quark jets and missing transverse energy (MET) and coming from a sample of 992 pb-1 of data collected by the D0 detector at the Tevatron, the Fermilab p$\\bar{p}$ collider. The absence of an excess of events in comparison to MS expectations leads to exclude sb masses up to 201 GeV, neutralino masses up to 94 GeV. The MET has been studied under two points of view, because of its fundamental role in this search. First, at the level of the trigger system which allows the online selection candidate events, and then, within the framework of the ALPGEN generator, the simulation of the Z boson transverse momentum which appears as MET when the Z boson decays into neutrino.

  4. Research Activities at Fermilab for Big Data Movement

    SciTech Connect

    Mhashilkar, Parag; Wu, Wenji; Kim, Hyun W; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Dykstra, Dave; Slyz, Marko; DeMar, Phil

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation of 100GE Networking Infrastructure is the next step towards management of Big Data. Being the US Tier-1 Center for the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment and the central data center for several other large-scale research collaborations, Fermilab has to constantly deal with the scaling and wide-area distribution challenges of the big data. In this paper, we will describe some of the challenges involved in the movement of big data over 100GE infrastructure and the research activities at Fermilab to address these challenges.

  5. Conceptual Design Report: Fermilab Main Injector - Technical Components and Civil Construction, April 1992 (Rev. 3.1)

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1992-04-01

    This report contains a description of the design and cost estimation of a new 150 GeV accelerator, designated the Fermilab Main Injector (FMI). The construction of this accelerator will simulataneously result in significant enhancements to both the Fermilab collider and fixed target programs.

  6. B physics at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Troconiz, Jorge F.

    1998-10-01

    Precision B-physics results from the CDF and D0 Collaborations based on data collected during the Tevatron 1992-96 run are presented. In particular we discuss the measurement of the Bs meson lifetime, Bc meson observation, and B0-B0 mixing results obtained using time-evolution analyses. Prospects for the next Tevatron run, starting in 1999, are also reported.

  7. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-08-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested.

  8. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-11-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested.

  9. Gun and optics calculations for the Fermilab recirculation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.

    1997-10-01

    Fermilab is investigating electron cooling to recycle 8 Gev antiprotons recovered from the Tevatron. To do so, it is developing an experiment to recirculate 2 Mev electrons generated by a Pelletron at National Electrostatics Corporation. This paper reports on the optics calculations done in support of that work. We have used the computer codes EGN2 and MacTrace to represent the gun area and acceleration columns respectively. In addition to the results of our simulations, we discuss some of the problems encountered in interfacing the two codes.

  10. Impedances and beam stability issues of the Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, King-Yuen

    1996-04-01

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring (permanent magnets) will be built on top of the Fermilab Main Injector sharing the same tunnel; its main function is to recycle the anti-protons after a store in the Tevatron and to provide storage for them after after accumulation and cooling in the Accumulator. Estimates of coupling impedances show domination by space charge. Examination of longitudinal instabilities shows that microwave instability will not occur if there are only N = 2.53 x 10{sup 12} anti-protons in the beam. Longitudinal coupling-bunch instability during injection stacking does not appear possible because of long bunch lengths/short bunch gaps and lack of sharp resonances. Transverse instability, on the other hand, cannot be Landau damped by the momentum spread in the beam, but it can be cured by a small spread in the betatron tunes (either from space charge or an octupole).

  11. Recent heavy flavor results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigo, Mirco; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2012-05-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider have pioneered and established the role of flavor physics in hadron collisions. A broad program is now at its full maturity. We report on three new results sensitive to physics beyond the standard model, obtained using the whole CDF dataset: a measurement of the difference of CP asymmetries in K{sup +}K{sup -} and {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays of D{sup 0} mesons, new bounds on the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing phase and on the decay width difference of B{sub s}{sup 0} mass-eigenstates, and an update of the summer 2011 search for B{sub (s)}{sup 0} mesons decaying into pairs of muons. Finally, the D0 confirmation of the observation of a new hadron, the {chi}{sub b}(3P) state, is briefly mentioned.

  12. Z Boson Asymmetry Measurements at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, B.

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry (A_fb) in dilepton pair decays of Z bosons produced in ppbar collisions using the full Tevatron dataset. The CDF experiment extracts a value for the effective weak mixing angle parameter sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} of 0.2315 +/- 0.0010 from the A_fb distribution of dimuon events in 9.2 fb^{-1} of integrated luminosity. From dielectron events in 9.7 fb^{-1} of data, the D0 experiment finds sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} = 0.23106 +/- 0.00053, the world's most precise measurement of sin^{2}\\theta^{l}_{eff} from hadron colliders and with light quark couplings.

  13. Exotic colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1994-11-01

    The motivation, feasibility and potential for two unconventional collider concepts - the Gamma-Gamma Collider and the Muon Collider - are described. The importance of the development of associated technologies such as high average power, high repetition rate lasers and ultrafast phase-space techniques are outlined.

  14. Measurement of Beam Tunes in the Tevatron Using the BBQ System

    SciTech Connect

    Edstrom, Dean R.; /Indiana U.

    2009-04-01

    Measuring the betatron tunes in any synchrotron is of critical importance to ensuring the stability of beam in the synchrotron. The Base Band Tune, or BBQ, measurement system was developed by Marek Gasior of CERN and has been installed at Brookhaven and Fermilab as a part of the LHC Accelerator Research Program, or LARP. The BBQ was installed in the Tevatron to evaluate its effectiveness at reading proton and antiproton tunes at its flattop energy of 980 GeV. The primary objectives of this thesis are to examine the methods used to measure the tune using the BBQ tune measurement system, to incorporate the system into the Fermilab accelerator controls system, ACNET, and to compare the BBQ to existing tune measurement systems in the Tevatron.

  15. Collider searches for extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberg, Greg; /Brown U.

    2004-12-01

    Searches for extra spatial dimensions remain among the most popular new directions in our quest for physics beyond the Standard Model. High-energy collider experiments of the current decade should be able to find an ultimate answer to the question of their existence in a variety of models. Until the start of the LHC in a few years, the Tevatron will remain the key player in this quest. In this paper, we review the most recent results from the Tevatron on searches for large, TeV{sup -1}-size, and Randall-Sundrum extra spatial dimensions, which have reached a new level of sensitivity and currently probe the parameter space beyond the existing constraints. While no evidence for the existence of extra dimensions has been found so far, an exciting discovery might be just steps away.

  16. Fermilab Library projects

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, P.; Ritchie, D.

    1990-05-03

    Preprint database management as done at various centers -- the subject of this workshop -- is hard to separate from the overall activities of the particular center. We therefore present the wider context at the Fermilab Library into which preprint database management fits. The day-to-day activities of the Library aside, the dominant activity at present is that of the ongoing Fermilab Library Automation. A less dominant but relatively time-consuming activity is that of doing more online searches in commercial databases on behalf of laboratory staff and visitors. A related activity is that of exploring the benefits of end-user searching of similar sources as opposed to library staff searching of the same. The Library Automation Project, which began about two years ago, is about to go fully online.'' The rationale behind this project is described in the documents developed during the December 1988--February 1989 planning phase.

  17. Linux support at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    D.R. Yocum, C. Sieh, D. Skow, S. Kovich, D. Holmgren and R. Kennedy

    1998-12-01

    In January of 1998 Fermilab issued an official statement of support of the Linux operating system. This was the result of a ground swell of interest in the possibilities of a cheap, easily used platform for computation and analysis culminating with the successful demonstration of a small computation farm as reported at CHEP97. This paper will describe the current status of Linux support and deployment at Fermilab. The collaborative development process for Linux creates some problems with traditional support models. A primary example of this is that there is no definite OS distribution ala a CD distribution from a traditional Unix vendor. Fermilab has had to make a more definite statement about what is meant by Linux for this reason. Linux support at Fermilab is restricted to the Intel processor platform. A central distribution system has been created to mitigate problems with multiple distribution and configuration options. This system is based on the Red Hat distribution with the Fermi Unix Environment (FUE) layered above it. Deployment of Linux at the lab has been rapidly growing and by CHEP there are expected to be hundreds of machines running Linux. These include computational farms, trigger processing farms, and desktop workstations. The former groups are described in other talks and consist of clusters of many tens of very similar machines devoted to a few tasks. The latter group is more diverse and challenging. The user community has been very supportive and active in defining needs for Linux features and solving various compatibility issues. We will discuss the support arrangements currently in place.

  18. B0(S) mixing, lifetime difference and rare decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Burdin, Sergey; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Recent results on B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing, lifetime difference and rare decays obtained by the CDF and D0 collaborations using the data samples collected at the Tevatron Collider in the period 2002-2005 are presented.

  19. Recent results on QCD at the Tevatron (CDF and D0)

    SciTech Connect

    Meschi, E. |; CDF and D0 Collaborations

    1993-11-01

    In the last run the Tevatron collider delivered an integrated luminosity of 29.9 pb{sup {minus}1} to CDF and D0. We describe here some preliminary result from analyses of relevant QCD processes in the 1992--1993 data from the two experiments.

  20. SUSY searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Jane Nachtman

    2000-10-10

    Recent results of a variety of searches for Supersymmetry in the data collected by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron are presented. As no signal was found, limits on the signatures and models are derived.

  1. B physics at the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    Precision B-physics results from the CDF and D0 Collaborations based on data collected during the Tevatron 1992-96 run are presented. In particular we discuss the measurement of the B{sub s} meson lifetime, B{sub c} meson observation, and B{sup 0} - {anti B}{sup 0} mixing results obtained using time-evolution analyses. Prospects for the next Tevatron run, starting in 1999, are also reported.

  2. Updated overview of the Tevatron control system

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, P.

    1987-10-01

    A single unified control system is used for all of the Fermilab accelerators and storage rings, from the LINAC to the Tevatron and antiproton source. A review of the general features is given - these include a 'host' system consisting of a number of minicomputers integrated with many distributed microprocessors in a variety of subsystems, usage of an in-house developed protocol, GAS, for communication between the two classes of machines, and a Parameter Page program, designed in conjunction with the system database, which allows a wide variety of quantities to be read and set in a coherent fashion. Recent developments include the implementation of a block transfer and 'fast time plot' facility through CAMAC, inclusion of several new computers in the host, a better understanding of system throughput, greatly improved reliability, advent of programs which sequence a large number of independent operations, and the construction of new hardware subsystems. Possible future system upgrades will be briefly presented. A summary of the utilization of a quite large software staff, at a time when the system is no longer under construction, will be discussed.

  3. Muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B. |; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {micro}{sup +}{micro}{sup {minus}}colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  4. Muon colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. B.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Baltz, A. J.; Chen, P.; Cheng, W.-H.; Cho, Y.; Courant, E.; Fernow, R. C.; Gallardo, J. C.; Garren, A.; Green, M.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mills, F.; Mokhov, N.; Morgan, G.; Neuffer, D.; Noble, R.; Norem, J.; Popovic, M.; Schachinger, L.; Silvestrov, G.; Summers, D.; Stumer, I.; Syphers, M.; Torun, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Turner, W.; Van Ginneken, A.; Vsevolozhskaya, T.; Weggel, R.; Willen, E.; Winn, D.; Wurtele, J.

    1996-05-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity μ+μ- colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  5. Abort kicker power supply systems at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Krafczyk, G.; Dugan, G.; Harrison, M.; Koepke, K.; Tilles, E.

    1985-06-01

    Over the past several years, Fermilab has been operating with a single turn proton abort system in both the superconducting Tevatron and the conventional Main Ring. The abort kicker power supply for this system discharges a lumped capacitance into the inductive magnet load, causing the beam to enter the abort channel. The characteristics of this current waveform are defined by the requirements of the machine operation. The standard fixed target running mode calls for 12 booster batches of beam which leaves a rotating gap in the beams of approx.1.8 ..mu..s. The current waveform is required to rise to 90% of I/sub max/ in this time to avoid beam loss from partially deflected beam. Aperture limitations in both the accelerator and the abort channel demand that the current in the magnets stays above this 90% I/sub max/ for the 21 ..mu..s needed to ensure all the beam has left the machine. The 25 mm displacement needed to cleanly enter the abort channel at 1 TeV corresponds to a maximum current in each of the 4 modules of approx.20 kA. Similar constraints are needed for the Main Ring and Tevatron antiproton abort systems. A unique feature of this design is the high voltage, high current diode assembly used to clip the recharge of the capacitor bank. This allows the current to decay slowly with the L/R time constant of the magnet and diode series combination. Special attention is given to the diode characteristics needed for this passive switching element. Operational experience and proposed upgrades are given for the two operational systems. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. BTeV low-beta optics in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    John A. Johnstone

    2001-07-12

    A low-{beta} insertion has been designed for the BTeV experiment to be installed in the Tevatron C0 straight section. With {+-}12 m for detector space, a {beta}* of 0.5 m can be achieved using 170 T/m magnets in the final focus triplets. A half-crossing angle of 240 {micro}r keeps the beams separated by 5{sigma} at the 2nd parasitic crossing; 39.5 m from the IP. There are two possible low-{beta} Tevatron Collider operating modes: CDF and D0 with collisions, but not C0, and; C0 with collisions, but not B0 or D0.

  7. BMSSM Higgs Bosons at the Tevatron and the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, Marcela; Ponton, Eduardo; Zurita, Jose; /Zurich U.

    2010-05-01

    We study extensions of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with new degrees of freedom that couple sizably to the MSSM Higgs sector and lie in the TeV range. After integrating out the physics at the TeV scale, the resulting Higgs spectrum can significantly differ from typical supersymmetric scenarios, thereby providing a window Beyond the MSSM (BMSSM). Taking into account current LEP and Tevatron constraints, we perform an in-depth analysis of the Higgs collider phenomenology and explore distinctive characteristics of our scenario with respect to both the Standard Model and the MSSM. We propose benchmark scenarios to illustrate specific features of BMSSM Higgs searches at the Tevatron and the LHC.

  8. Searches for New Physics at the Tevatron and LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Wittich, Peter; /Cornell U., LEPP

    2011-11-01

    This is an auspicious moment in experimental particle physics - there are large data samples at the Tevatron and a new energy regime being explored at the Large Hadron Collider with ever larger data samples. The coincidence of these two events suggests that we will soon be able to address the question, what lies beyond the standard model? Particle physics's current understanding of the universe is embodied in it. The model has been tested to extreme precision - better than a part in ten thousand - but we suspect that it is only an approximation, and that physics beyond this standard model will appear in the data of the Tevatron and LHC in the near future. This brief review touches on the status of searches for new physics at the time of the conference.

  9. Fermilab Library directions

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, P.; Ritchie, D.

    1990-05-04

    In this document, we indicate our current thinking about the directions of the Fermilab Library. The ideas relate to the preprint management issue in a number of ways. The ideas are subject to revision as we come to understand what is possible as well as what is needed by the Laboratory community. This document should therefore be regarded as our personal view--the availability of off-the-shelf technology, of funding as well as feedback from the laboratory community about their needs will all affect how far we actually proceed in any of these directions.

  10. Neutrino Physics at Fermilab

    ScienceCinema

    Saoulidou, Niki

    2016-07-12

    Neutrino oscillations provide the first evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. I will briefly overview the neutrino "hi-story", describing key discoveries over the past decades that shaped our understanding of neutrinos and their behavior. Fermilab was, is and hopefully will be at the forefront of the accelerator neutrino experiments.  NuMI, the most powerful accelerator neutrino beam in the world has ushered us into the era of precise measurements. Its further upgrades may give a chance to tackle the remaining mysteries of the neutrino mass hierarchy and possible CP violation.

  11. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group. Progress report, March 1, 1992--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL.

  12. B-lifetime measurements at the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, H. |; CDF Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    During the run period from May 1992 to begin of June 1993 the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) has recorded {approx} 21.4 pb{sup {minus}1} of p{anti p} collider data at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. For this run the detector had been upgraded which significantly enhanced its b-physics capabilities. The upgrades include a high precision Silicon VerteX detector (SVX) which enables CDF to reconstruct the decay vertex and decay length of b-hadrons. In this article the author reports on several measurements of the lifetime of b-flavored hadrons. The determination of the average b-lifetime using inclusive J/{psi}`s, the measurement of the B{sup {+-}} and B{sup 0} lifetimes by reconstructing exclusive final states including a J/{psi} or {psi}(2S) and a measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson lifetime exploiting the decay: B{sub s} {yields} l{nu}D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} l{nu}{phi}{pi}{sup +} {yields} l{nu}K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}.

  13. The dijet invariant mass at the Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The differential cross section as a function of the dijet invariant mass has been measured in 1.8 TeV ppbar collisions. A comparison to leading order QCD predictions is presented as well as a study of the sensitivity of the mass spectrum to the gluon radiation. The need to take radiation into account requires the study of its spatial distribution and the comparison of the data to the predictions of shower Monte Carlo programs like Isajet and Herwig. 12 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Experimental Studies of Compensation of Beam-Beam Effects with Tevatron Electron Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Yu.; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; /Fermilab /Los Alamos /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN

    2008-02-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this article we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980-GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron Electron Lenses.

  15. Results of head-on beam-beam compensation studies at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Valishev, A.; Stancari, G.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At the Tevatron collider, we studied the feasibility of suppressing the antiproton head-on beam-beamtune spread using a magnetically confined 5-keV electron beam with Gaussian transverse profile overlapping with the circulating beam. When electron cooling of antiprotons is applied in regular Tevatron operations, the head-on beam-beam effect on antiprotons is small. Therefore, we first focused on the operational aspects, such as beam alignment and stability, and on fundamental observations of tune shifts, tune spreads, lifetimes, and emittances. We also attempted two special collider stores with only 3 proton bunches colliding with 3 antiproton bunches, to suppress long-range forces and enhance head-on effects. We present here the results of this study and a comparison between numerical simulations and observations, in view of the planned application of this compensation concept to RHIC.

  16. WAN emulation development and testing at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Bobyshev, A.; Rechenmacher, R.; Demar, P.; Ernst, M.; /DESY

    2004-12-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is scheduled to come on-line in 2007. Fermilab will act as the CMS Tier-1 centre for the US and make experiment data available to more than 400 researchers in the US participating in the CMS experiment. The US CMS Users Facility group, based at Fermilab, has initiated a project to develop a model for optimizing movement of CMS experiment data between CERN and the various tiers of US CMS data centres and to design a WAN emulation facility which will enable controlled testing of unmodified or modified CMS applications and TCP implementations locally under conditions that emulate WAN connectivity. The WAN emulator facility is configurable for latency, jitter, and packet loss. The initial implementation is based on the NISTnet software product. In this paper we will describe the status of this project to date, the results of validation and comparison of performance measurements obtained in emulated and real environment for different applications including multistreams GridFTP. We also will introduce future short term and intermediate term plans, as well as outstanding problems and issues.

  17. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg -> H -> W^+W^- and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Adelman, J.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys. /Dubna, JINR /Oklahoma U. /Michigan State U. /Tata Inst. /Illinois U., Chicago /Florida State U. /Chicago U., EFI /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /St. Petersburg, INP /Illinois U., Urbana /Sao Paulo, IFT /Munich U. /University Coll. London /Oxford U. /St. Petersburg, INP /Duke U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Chonnam Natl. U. /Florida U. /Osaka City U.

    2010-05-01

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.o6 TeV. With 4.8 fb{sup -1} of itnegrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 5.4 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% Confidence Level upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.75 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.38 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.83 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, they exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 131 and 204 Gev.

  18. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg{yields}H{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Artikov, A.; Budagov, J.; Chokheli, D.; Glagolev, V.; Golovanov, G.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Malyshev, V. L.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Semenov, A.; Simonenko, A.; Sisakyan, A.

    2010-07-01

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg{yields}H{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} in pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV. With 4.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 5.4 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% confidence level upper limit on {sigma}(gg{yields}H)xB(H{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.75 pb at m{sub H}=120 GeV, 0.38 pb at m{sub H}=165 GeV, and 0.83 pb at m{sub H}=200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% confidence level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 131 and 204 GeV.

  19. Prospects for 6 to 10 tesla magnets for a TEVATRON upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsch, Paul M.

    1988-07-08

    The first SSC physics is at least 10 years away. An upgrade of the Fermilab Tevatron will ensure the continuity of a vigorous high-energy physics program until the SSC turns on. Three basic proposals are under consideration: /bar p/p at 3 /times/ 10/sup 31/ --Increase luminosity by improvements to the p source. pp at 1 TeV and 2 /times/ 10/sup 32/--Move the main ring to a new tunnel, build a second Tevatron ring, and /bar p/p > 1.5 TeV and 7 /times/ 10/sup 30/--Replace the tevatron with a higher energy ring. The last two options requires about a hundred 6.6-tesla dipoles in addition to a ring of Tevatron strength (4.4 T) magnets. These higher-field magnets are necessary in both rings to lengthen the straight sections in order to realize the collision optics. The third option requires a ring of magnets of 6.6 T or slightly higher to replace the present Tevatron plus a number of special 8--9 tesla magnets. The viability of the high-energy option then depends on the practicality of sizable numbers of reliable 8--9 tesla dipoles as well as 800 6.6-tesla dipoles. The following develops a specification for an 8.8 T dipole, examines the design considerations and reviews the current state of high-field magnet development. 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Observations of strong transverse coupling in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, Michael J.; Annala, G.; Edwards, D.A.; Gelfand, N.; Johnstone, J.; Martens, M.A.; Sen, T.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During the beginning of Run II of the Tevatron Collider it became apparent that a large skew quadrupole source, or sources, had developed in the superconducting synchrotron. Efforts to locate the current source of coupling were undertaken, with the eventual discovery that the main magnets had developed a systematic skew quadrupole moment over their lifetime. Over the past year, the magnets have been altered in place in an attempt to restore the systematic skew quadrupole moment to zero. Beam observations and their interpretations are presented, and remedial measures are discussed.