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Sample records for ferric compounds

  1. Potential Role for Extracellular Glutathione-Dependent Ferric Reductase in Utilization of Environmental and Host Ferric Compounds by Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Michelle M.; Woods, Jon P.

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian host specifically limits iron during Histoplasma capsulatum infection, and fungal acquisition of iron is essential for productive infection. H. capsulatum expresses several iron acquisition mechanisms under iron-limited conditions in vitro. These components include hydroxamate siderophores, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase enzyme, extracellular nonproteinaceous ferric reductant(s), and cell surface ferric reducing agent(s). We examined the relationship between these mechanisms and a potential role for the extracellular ferric reductase in utilization of environmental and host ferric compounds through the production of free, soluble Fe(II). Siderophores and ferric reducing agents were coproduced under conditions of iron limitation. The H. capsulatum siderophore dimerum acid and the structurally similar basidiomycete siderophore rhodotorulic acid acted as substrates for the ferric reductase, and rhodotorulic acid removed Fe(III) bound by transferrin. The mammalian Fe(III)-binding compounds hemin and transferrin served both as substrates for the ferric reductase and as iron sources for yeast-phase growth at neutral pH. In the case of transferrin, there was a correlation between the level of iron saturation and efficacy for both of these functions. Our data are not consistent with an entirely pH-dependent mechanism of iron acquisition from transferrin, as has been suggested to occur in the macrophage phagolysosome. The foreign siderophore ferrioxamine B also acted as a substrate for the ferric reductase, while the foreign siderophore ferrichrome did not. Both ferrioxamine and ferrichrome served as iron sources for yeast- and mold-phase growth, the latter presumably by some other acquisition mechanism(s). PMID:11705947

  2. Ferric chloride graphite intercalation compounds prepared from graphite fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1994-01-01

    The reaction between graphite fluoride and ferric chloride was observed in the temperature range of 300 to 400 C. The graphite fluorides used for this reaction have an sp3 electronic structure and are electrical insulators. They can be made by fluorinating either carbon fibers or powder having various degrees of graphitization. Reaction is fast and spontaneous and can occur in the presence of air. The ferric chloride does not have to be predried. The products have an sp2 electronic structure and are electrical conductors. They contain first stage FeCl3 intercalated graphite. Some of the products contain FeCl2*2H2O, others contain FeF3 in concentrations that depend on the intercalation condition. The graphite intercalated compounds (GIC) deintercalated slowly in air at room temperature, but deintercalated quickly and completely at 370 C. Deintercalation is accompanied by the disappearing of iron halides and the formation of rust (hematite) distributed unevenly on the fiber surface. When heated to 400 C in pure N2 (99.99 vol %), this new GIC deintercalates without losing its molecular structure. However, when the compounds are heated to 800 C in quartz tube, they lost most of its halogen atoms and formed iron oxides (other than hematite), distributed evenly in or on the fiber. This iron-oxide-covered fiber may be useful in making carbon-fiber/ceramic-matrix composites with strong bonding at the fiber-ceramic interface.

  3. Chlorinated aromatic compounds in a thermal process promoted by oxychlorination of ferric chloride.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Takashi; Takaoka, Masaki; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2010-03-15

    The relationship between the formation of chlorinated aromatic (aromatic-Cl) compounds and ferric chloride in the solid phase during a thermal process motivated us to study the chemical characteristics of iron in a model solid sample, a mixture of FeCl(3) x 6H(2)O, activated carbon, and boron nitride, with increasing temperature. Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy revealed drastic changes in the chemical form of amorphous iron, consistent with other analytical methods, such as X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation (SR-XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Atomic-scale evidence of the chlorination of aromatic carbon was detected by Cl-K X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. These results showed the thermal formation mechanism of aromatic-Cl compounds in the solid phase with ferric chloride. We attribute the formation of aromatic-Cl compounds to the chlorination of carbon, based on the oxychlorination reaction of FeCl(3) at temperatures in excess of ca. 300 degrees C, when the carbon matrix is activated by carbon gasification, catalyzed by Fe(2)O(3), and surface oxygen complexes (SOC) generated by a catalytic cycle of FeCl(2) and FeOCl. Chemical changes of trace iron in a thermal process may offer the potential to generate aromatic-Cl compounds in the solid phase.

  4. Use of ferric sulfate: acid media for the desulfurization of model compounds of coal. [Dibenzothiophene, diphenyl sulfide, di-n-butyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Clary, L.R.; Vermeulen, T.; Lynn, S.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of this work has been to investigate the ability of ferric sulfate-acid leach systems to oxidize the sulfur in model compounds of coal. Ferric iron-acid leach systems have been shown to be quite effective at removal of inorganic sulfur in coal. In this study, the oxidative effect of ferric iron in acid-leach systems was studied using dibenzothiophene, diphenyl sulfide, and di-n-butyl sulfide as models of organic sulfur groups in coal. Nitrogen and oxygen, as well as various transition metal catalysts and oxidants, were utilized in this investigation. Dibenzothiophene was found to be quite refractory to oxidation, except in the case where metavanadate was added, where it appears that 40% oxidation to sulfone could have occurred per hour at 150/sup 0/C and mild oxygen pressure. Diphenyl sulfide was selectively oxidized to sulfoxide and sulfone in an iron and oxygen system. Approximately 15% conversion to sulfone occurred per hour under these conditions. Some of the di-n-butyl sulfide was cracked to 1-butene and 1-butanethiol under similar conditions. Zinc chloride and ferric iron were used at 200/sup 0/C in an attempt to desulfonate dibenzothiophene sulfone, diphenyl sulfone, and di-n-butyl sulfone. Di-n-butyl sulfone was completely desulfurized on one hour and fragmented to oxidized parafins, while dibenzothiophene sulfone and diphenyl sulfone were unaffected. These results suggest that an iron-acid leach process could only selectively oxidize aryl sulfides under mild conditions, representing only 20% of the organic sulfur in coal (8% of the total sulfur). Removal through desulfonation once selective sulfur oxidation had occurred was only demonstrated for alkyl sulfones, with severe oxidation of the fragmented paraffins also occurring in one hour.

  5. Assessment of mapping exposed ferrous and ferric iron compounds using Skylab-EREP data. [Pisgah Crater, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. (Principal Investigator); Wagner, H.; Pillars, W.; Bennett, C.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The S190B color photography is as useful as LANDSAT data for the mapping of color differences in the rocks and soils of the terrain. An S192 ratio of 0.79 - 0.89 and 0.93 - 1.05 micron bands produced an apparently successful delineation of ferrous, ferric, and other materials, in agreement with theory and ratio code studies. From an analysis of S191 data, basalt and dacite were separated on the basis of differences in spectral emissivity in the 8.3 - 12 micron region.

  6. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric citrate. 184.1298 Section 184.1298 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD... prepared from reaction of citric acid with ferric hydroxide. It is a compound of indefinite ratio of...

  7. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Reg. No. 2338-05-8) is prepared from reaction of citric acid with ferric hydroxide. It is a compound of indefinite ratio of citric acid and iron. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for...

  9. Ferric sulfates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the possible existence of ferric sulfato complexes and hydroxo ferric sulfate minerals in the permafrost of Mars. A sequential combination of ten unique conditions during the cooling history of Mars is suggested which is believed to have generated an environment within Martian permafrost that has stabilized Fe(3+)-SO4(2-)-bearing species. It is argued that minerals belonging to the jarosite and copiapite groups could be present in Martian regolith analyzed in the Viking XRF measurements at Chryse and Utopia, and that maghemite suspected to be coating the Viking magnet arrays is a hydrolysate of dissolved ferric sulfato complexes from exposed Martian permafrost.

  10. Ferric Tourmaline from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mason, B; Donnay, G; Hardie, L A

    1964-04-01

    Dark brown crystals, up to 10 mm long, occur in rhyolite at Mexquitic, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. They are short prismatic, showing {1120}, {3030}, {1011}, {0221}, with c/a 0.4521, measured with a goniometer, and distinct {1120} cleavage. With an unusual combination of cell dimensions, high density, high refractive indices, and extreme birefringence, this tourmaline falls outside the known elbaite-schorl and schorl-dravite series. A chemical analysis, recalculated on the basis of cell volume and density, gives close to the theoretical 150 atoms per cell, whether the iron is ferrous or ferric, but the physical properties indicate a ferric tourmaline. PMID:17729799

  11. Ferric Tourmaline from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mason, B; Donnay, G; Hardie, L A

    1964-04-01

    Dark brown crystals, up to 10 mm long, occur in rhyolite at Mexquitic, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. They are short prismatic, showing {1120}, {3030}, {1011}, {0221}, with c/a 0.4521, measured with a goniometer, and distinct {1120} cleavage. With an unusual combination of cell dimensions, high density, high refractive indices, and extreme birefringence, this tourmaline falls outside the known elbaite-schorl and schorl-dravite series. A chemical analysis, recalculated on the basis of cell volume and density, gives close to the theoretical 150 atoms per cell, whether the iron is ferrous or ferric, but the physical properties indicate a ferric tourmaline.

  12. 21 CFR 184.1307 - Ferric sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....1307 Ferric sulfate. (a) Ferric sulfate (iron (III) sulfate, Fe2(SO4)3 CAS Reg. No. 10028-22-5) is a yellow substance that may be prepared by oxidizing iron (II) sulfate or by treating ferric oxide...

  13. Structure and reactivity of As(III)- and As(V)-rich schwertmannites and amorphous ferric arsenate sulfate from the Carnoulès acid mine drainage, France: Comparison with biotic and abiotic model compounds and implications for As remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillot, Fabien; Morin, Guillaume; Juillot, Farid; Bruneel, Odile; Casiot, Corinne; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Wang, Yuheng; Lebrun, Sophie; Aubry, Emmanuel; Vlaic, Gilberto; Brown, Gordon E.

    2013-03-01

    Poorly ordered nanocrystalline hydroxysulfate minerals of microbial origin, such as schwertmannite, Fe8O8(OH)6SO4, are important arsenic scavengers in sulfate-rich acid mine drainage (AMD) environments. However, despite the fact that As(III) and As(V) have been shown to sorb on schwertmannite, little is known about the actual mechanism of arsenic scavenging processes after microbial Fe(II) oxidation in AMD environments. The major focus of the present study is to determine the molecular-level structure of poorly ordered As(III) and As(V) bearing Fe oxyhydroxysulfate minerals from the Carnoulès AMD, France, which exhibits exceptional As(III) concentrations. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy were used to compare field samples with a large set of synthetic analogs prepared via biotic or abiotic pathways, with As/Fe ratios typical of minerals and mineraloids ranging from nanocrystalline schwertmannite to amorphous hydroxysulfate compounds. Our results yield further evidence for the poisoning effect of As(V) in limiting the nucleation of schwertmannite. For initial dissolved As(V)/Fe(III) molar ratios ⩾0.2, amorphous Fe(III)-As(V) hydroxysulfate forms, with a local structure consistent with that of amorphous ferric arsenate. EXAFS data for this amorphous material are consistent with corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra to which AsO4 tetrahedra attach via double-corner 2C linkages. For As(V)/Fe(III) molar ratios lower than 0.2, As(V) binds to schwertmannite via 2C surface complexes. In contrast with the As(V)-containing samples, As(III) has a lower affinity for schwertmannite following its nucleation, as this mineral phase persists up to an initial As(III)/Fe(III) molar ratio of 0.6. EXAFS data indicate that during the precipitation process, As(III) forms dominantly 2C surface complexes on schwertmannite surfaces, likely on the sides of double-chains of Fe(III)(O,OH)6 octahedra, with a smaller proportion of edge

  14. 21 CFR 73.1299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ferrocyanide is a ferric hexacyanoferrate pigment characterized by the structual... ferrocyanide. (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with ferric ferrocyanide may contain only...

  15. 21 CFR 73.1299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ferrocyanide is a ferric hexacyanoferrate pigment characterized by the structual... ferrocyanide. (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with ferric ferrocyanide may contain only...

  16. 21 CFR 73.1299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ferrocyanide is a ferric hexacyanoferrate pigment characterized by the structual... ferrocyanide. (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with ferric ferrocyanide may contain only...

  17. 21 CFR 73.1299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ferrocyanide is a ferric hexacyanoferrate pigment characterized by the structual... ferrocyanide. (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with ferric ferrocyanide may contain only...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1307 - Ferric sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1307 Ferric sulfate. (a) Ferric sulfate (iron (III) sulfate, Fe2(SO4)3 CAS Reg. No. 10028-22-5) is a yellow substance that may be prepared by oxidizing iron (II) sulfate or by treating ferric oxide or ferric hydroxide with sulfuric acid. (b) The ingredient must be of a...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1307 - Ferric sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1307 Ferric sulfate. (a) Ferric sulfate (iron (III) sulfate, Fe2(SO4)3 CAS Reg. No. 10028-22-5) is a yellow substance that may be prepared by oxidizing iron (II) sulfate or by treating ferric oxide or ferric hydroxide with sulfuric acid. (b) The ingredient must be of a...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1307 - Ferric sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1307 Ferric sulfate. (a) Ferric sulfate (iron (III) sulfate, Fe2(SO4)3 CAS Reg. No. 10028-22-5) is a yellow substance that may be prepared by oxidizing iron (II) sulfate or by treating ferric oxide or ferric hydroxide with sulfuric acid. (b) The ingredient must be of a...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1307 - Ferric sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1307 Ferric sulfate. (a) Ferric sulfate (iron (III) sulfate, Fe2(SO4)3 CAS Reg. No. 10028-22-5) is a yellow substance that may be prepared by oxidizing iron (II) sulfate or by treating ferric oxide or ferric hydroxide with sulfuric acid. (b) The ingredient must be of a...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III)...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride. The pure... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III)...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III)...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Product. Ferric phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5304 Ferric pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Ferric pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5304 Ferric pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Ferric pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Product. Ferric phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Product. Ferric phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Product. Ferric phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5304 Ferric pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Ferric pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Product. Ferric phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5304 Ferric pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Ferric pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5304 Ferric pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Ferric pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, FePO4·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 10045-86-0) is an odorless, yellowish-white to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food...

  18. Arsenic removal by ferric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, J.G.; Chen, P.Y.; Wilkie, J.A.; Elimelech, M.; Liang, S.

    1996-04-01

    Bench-scale studies were conducted in model freshwater systems to investigate how various parameters affected arsenic removal during coagulation with ferric chloride and arsenic adsorption onto preformed hydrous ferric oxide. Parameters included arsenic oxidation state and initial concentration, coagulant dosage or adsorbent concentration, pH, and the presence of co-occurring inorganic solutes. Comparison of coagulation and adsorption experiments and of experimental results with predictions based on surface complexation modeling demonstrated that adsorption is an important (though not the sole) mechanism governing arsenic removal during coagulation. Under comparable conditions, better removal was observed with arsenic(V) [As(V)] than with arsenic(III) [As(III)] in both coagulation and adsorption experiments. Below neutral pH values, As(III) removal-adsorption was significantly decreased in the presence of sulfate, whereas only a slight decrease in As(V) removal-adsorption was observed. At high pH, removal-adsorption of As(V) was increased in the presence of calcium. Removal of As(V) during coagulation with ferric chloride is both more efficient and less sensitive than that of As(III) to variations in source water composition.

  19. 21 CFR 186.1300 - Ferric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1300 Ferric oxide. (a) Ferric oxide (iron (III) oxide, Fe2O3, CAS Reg. No... iron hydroxide oxide. The product is red-brown to black trigonal crystals. (b) In accordance with § 186... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric oxide. 186.1300 Section 186.1300 Food...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... colorless powder. It is prepared by reacting sodium pyrophosphate with ferric citrate. (b) The ingredient... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric pyrophosphate. 184.1304 Section 184.1304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  1. Ferric sulfate montmorillonites as Mars soil analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Burns, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses have shown that Fe(3+)-doped smectites prepared in the laboratory exhibit important similarities to the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite in these smectites has features in the visible to near-infrared region that resemble the energies and band-strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. Ferric - sulfate - montmorillonite samples have been prepared more recently because they are a good compositional match with the surface material on Mars as measured by Viking. Reflectance spectra of montmorillonite doped with ferric sulfate in the interlayer regions include a strong 3 micron band that persists under dry conditions. This is in contrast to spectra of similarly prepared ferric-doped montmorillonites, which exhibit a relatively weaker 3 micron band under comparable dry environmental conditions. Presented here are reflectance spectra of a suite of ferric-sulfate exchanged montmorillonites prepared with variable ferric sulfate concentrations and variable pH conditions.

  2. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  3. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1296 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Ferric ammonium citrate (iron (III) ammonium citrate) is prepared by the reaction of ferric hydroxide with citric...

  8. Ferric-Pyoverdine Recognition by Fpv Outer Membrane Proteins of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Hartney, Sierra L.; Mazurier, Sylvie; Girard, Maëva K.; Mehnaz, Samina; Davis, Edward W.; Gross, Harald; Lemanceau, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (previously called P. fluorescens Pf-5) produces two siderophores, enantio-pyochelin and a compound in the large and diverse pyoverdine family. Using high-resolution mass spectroscopy, we determined the structure of the pyoverdine produced by Pf-5. In addition to producing its own siderophores, Pf-5 also utilizes ferric complexes of some pyoverdines produced by other strains of Pseudomonas spp. as sources of iron. Previously, phylogenetic analysis of the 45 TonB-dependent outer membrane proteins in Pf-5 indicated that six are in a well-supported clade with ferric-pyoverdine receptors (Fpvs) from other Pseudomonas spp. We used a combination of phylogenetics, bioinformatics, mutagenesis, pyoverdine structural determinations, and cross-feeding bioassays to assign specific ferric-pyoverdine substrates to each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. We identified at least one ferric-pyoverdine that was taken up by each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. Functional redundancy of the Pf-5 Fpvs was also apparent, with some ferric-pyoverdines taken up by all mutants with a single Fpv deletion but not by a mutant having deletions in two of the Fpv-encoding genes. Finally, we demonstrated that phylogenetically related Fpvs take up ferric complexes of structurally related pyoverdines, thereby establishing structure-function relationships that can be employed in the future to predict the pyoverdine substrates of Fpvs in other Pseudomonas spp. PMID:23222724

  9. Ferric-pyoverdine recognition by Fpv outer membrane proteins of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

    PubMed

    Hartney, Sierra L; Mazurier, Sylvie; Girard, Maëva K; Mehnaz, Samina; Davis, Edward W; Gross, Harald; Lemanceau, Philippe; Loper, Joyce E

    2013-02-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (previously called P. fluorescens Pf-5) produces two siderophores, enantio-pyochelin and a compound in the large and diverse pyoverdine family. Using high-resolution mass spectroscopy, we determined the structure of the pyoverdine produced by Pf-5. In addition to producing its own siderophores, Pf-5 also utilizes ferric complexes of some pyoverdines produced by other strains of Pseudomonas spp. as sources of iron. Previously, phylogenetic analysis of the 45 TonB-dependent outer membrane proteins in Pf-5 indicated that six are in a well-supported clade with ferric-pyoverdine receptors (Fpvs) from other Pseudomonas spp. We used a combination of phylogenetics, bioinformatics, mutagenesis, pyoverdine structural determinations, and cross-feeding bioassays to assign specific ferric-pyoverdine substrates to each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. We identified at least one ferric-pyoverdine that was taken up by each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. Functional redundancy of the Pf-5 Fpvs was also apparent, with some ferric-pyoverdines taken up by all mutants with a single Fpv deletion but not by a mutant having deletions in two of the Fpv-encoding genes. Finally, we demonstrated that phylogenetically related Fpvs take up ferric complexes of structurally related pyoverdines, thereby establishing structure-function relationships that can be employed in the future to predict the pyoverdine substrates of Fpvs in other Pseudomonas spp. PMID:23222724

  10. Synthesis and phase transformations involving scorodite, ferric arsenate and arsenical ferrihydrite: Implications for arsenic mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paktunc, Dogan; Dutrizac, John; Gertsman, Valery

    2008-06-01

    Scorodite, ferric arsenate and arsenical ferrihydrite are important arsenic carriers occurring in a wide range of environments and are also common precipitates used by metallurgical industries to control arsenic in effluents. Solubility and stability of these compounds are controversial because of the complexities in their identification and characterization in heterogeneous media. To provide insights into the formation of scorodite, ferric arsenate and ferrihydrite, series of synthesis experiments were carried out at 70 °C and pH 1, 2, 3 and 4.5 from 0.2 M Fe(SO 4) 1.5 solutions also containing 0.02-0.2 M Na 2HAsO 4. The precipitates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption fine structure techniques. Ferric arsenate, characterized by two broad diffuse peaks on the XRD pattern and having the structural formula of FeAsO 4·4-7H 2O, is a precursor to scorodite formation. As defined by As XAFS and Fe XAFS, the local structure of ferric arsenate is profoundly different than that of scorodite. It is postulated that the ferric arsenate structure is made of single chains of corner-sharing Fe(O,OH) 6 octahedra with bridging arsenate tetrahedra alternating along the chains. Scorodite was precipitated from solutions with Fe/As molar ratios of 1 over the pH range of 1-4.5. The pH strongly controls the kinetics of scorodite formation and its transformation from ferric arsenate. The scorodite crystallite size increased from 7 to 33 nm by ripening and aggregation. Precipitates, resulting from continuous synthesis at pH 4.5 from solutions having Fe/As molar ratios ranging from 1 to 4 and resembling the compounds referred to as ferric arsenate, arsenical ferrihydrite and As-rich hydrous ferric oxide in the literature, represent variable mixtures of ferric arsenate and ferrihydrite. When the Fe/As ratio increases, the proportion of ferrihydrite increases at the expense of ferric arsenate. Arsenate adsorption appears to retard

  11. Hydrolysis of ferric chloride in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lussiez, G.; Beckstead, L.

    1996-11-01

    The Detox{trademark} process uses concentrated ferric chloride and small amounts of catalysts to oxidize organic compounds. It is under consideration for oxidizing transuranic organic wastes. Although the solution is reused extensively, at some point it will reach the acceptable limit of radioactivity or maximum solubility of the radioisotopes. This solution could be cemented, but the volume would be increased substantially because of the poor compatibility of chlorides and cement. A process has been developed that recovers the chloride ions as HCl and either minimizes the volume of radioactive waste or permits recycling of the radioactive chlorides. The process involves a two-step hydrolysis at atmospheric pressure, or preferably under a slight vacuum, and relatively low temperature, about 200{degrees}C. During the first step of the process, hydrolysis occurs according to the reaction below: FeCl{sub 3 liquid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} FeOCl{sub solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas} During the second step, the hot, solid, iron oxychloride is sprayed with water or placed in contact with steam, and hydrolysis proceeds to the iron oxide according to the following reaction: 2 FeOCl{sub solid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3 solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas}. The iron oxide, which contains radioisotopes, can then be disposed of by cementation or encapsulation. Alternately, these chlorides can be washed off of the solids and can then either be recycled or disposed of in some other way.

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies to Ferric Pseudobactin, the Siderophore of Plant Growth-Promoting Pseudomonas putida B10

    PubMed Central

    Buyer, Jeffrey S.; Sikora, Lawrence J.; Kratzke, Marian G.

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to ferric pseudobactin, the siderophore (microbial iron transport agent) of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida B10, have been developed. Three immunoglobulin G subclass 1-type monoclonal antibodies have been characterized. Each antibody appears to be unique on the basis of their reactions with ferric pseudobactin and with culture supernatants from other pseudomonads. None of the three cross-reacts with ferric pseudobactin-type siderophores produced by seven other pseudomonads. However, P. aeruginosa ATCC 15692 and P. fluorescens ATCC 17400 produced relatively high-molecular-mass compounds (mass greater than approximately 30,000 daltons) that did react with the antibodies. The compound from P. aeruginosa was not iron regulated, while the compound from P. fluorescens was produced only under iron-limiting conditions. A competitive assay using these antibodies has a detection limit of 5 × 10−12 mol of ferric pseudobactin. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of monoclonal antibodies reactive with siderophores. PMID:16348116

  13. 21 CFR 186.1300 - Ferric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric oxide. 186.1300 Section 186.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  14. 21 CFR 186.1300 - Ferric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric oxide. 186.1300 Section 186.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  15. 21 CFR 186.1300 - Ferric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric oxide. 186.1300 Section 186.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  16. 21 CFR 186.1300 - Ferric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric oxide. 186.1300 Section 186.1300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD... as the mineral hematite. It may be prepared synthetically by heating brown iron hydroxide oxide....

  17. 21 CFR 73.1299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric ferrocyanide. 73.1299 Section 73.1299 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric citrate. 184.1298 Section 184.1298 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric citrate. 184.1298 Section 184.1298 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric citrate. 184.1298 Section 184.1298 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing...

  5. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... color additive ferric ammonium citrate consists of complex chelates prepared by the interaction of ferric hydroxide with citric acid in the presence of ammonia. The complex chelates occur in brown...

  6. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  7. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5306 Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Ferric sodium pyrophosphate....

  8. Understanding Arsenate Reaction Kinetics with Ferric Hydroxides

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, James; Chaudhary, Binod K.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding arsenic reactions with ferric hydroxides is important in understanding arsenic transport in the environment and in designing systems for removing arsenic from potable water. Many experimental studies have shown that the kinetics of arsenic adsorption on ferric hydroxides is biphasic, where a fraction of the arsenic adsorption occurs on a time scale of seconds while full equilibrium may require weeks to attain. This research employed density functional theory modeling in order to understand the mechanisms contributing to biphasic arsenic adsorption kinetics. The reaction energies and activation barriers for three modes of arsenate adsorption to ferric hydroxides were calculated. Gibbs free energies of reaction depended on the net charge of the complexes, which is a function of the system pH value. Physical adsorption of arsenate to ferric hydroxide proceeded with no activation barrier, with Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −21 to −58 kJ/mol. The highest Gibbs free energies of reaction for physical adsorption resulted from negative charge assisted hydrogen bonding between H atoms on the ferric hydroxide and O atoms in arsenate. The conversion of physically adsorbed arsenate into monodentate surface complexes had Gibbs free energies of activation ranging from 62 to 73 kJ/mol, and Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −23 to −38 kJ/mol. The conversion of monodentate surface complexes to bidentate, binuclear complexes had Gibbs free energies of activation ranging from 79 to 112 kJ/mol, and Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −11 to −55 kJ/mol. For release of arsenate from uncharged bidentate complexes, energies of activation as high as 167 kJ/mol were encountered. Increasingly negative charges on the complexes lowered the activation barriers for desorption of arsenate, and in complexes with −2 charges, the highest activation barrier was 65 kJ/mol. This study shows that the slow kinetics associated with arsenic

  9. Niobium Uptake and Release by Bacterial Ferric Ion Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanbo; Harvey, Ian; Campopiano, Dominic; Sadler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Ferric ion binding proteins (Fbps) transport FeIII across the periplasm and are vital for the virulence of many Gram negative bacteria. Iron(III) is tightly bound in a hinged binding cleft with octahedral coordination geometry involving binding to protein side chains (including tyrosinate residues) together with a synergistic anion such as phosphate. Niobium compounds are of interest for their potential biological activity, which has been little explored. We have studied the binding of cyclopentadienyl and nitrilotriacetato NbV complexes to the Fbp from Neisseria gonorrhoeae by UV-vis spectroscopy, chromatography, ICP-OES, mass spectrometry, and Nb K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These data suggest that NbV binds strongly to Fbp and that a dinuclear NbV centre can be readily accommodated in the interdomain binding cleft. The possibility of designing niobium-based antibiotics which block iron uptake by pathogenic bacteria is discussed. PMID:20445753

  10. Desilication from DWPF Recycle using Ferric Flocculation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    2002-10-24

    The presence of silicate and glass-forming frit in the recycle waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility produces wastes that when combined with the traditional aluminate-bearing wastes stored in H-Tank farm can produce insoluble sodium aluminosilicates. Treatment to remove the silicon has been proposed to allow greater flexibility for processing these wastes in the Site's evaporators. The use of a ferric precipitation (flocculation) to remove the silicon has been tested using waste simulants.

  11. Ferric iron reduction and iron assimilation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Anderson, G J; Lesuisse, E; Dancis, A; Roman, D G; Labbe, P; Klausner, R D

    We have used the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism to study the role of ferric iron reduction in eucaryotic iron uptake. S. cerevisiae is able to utilize ferric chelates as an iron source by reducing the ferric iron to the ferrous form, which is subsequently internalized by the cells. A gene (FRE1) was identified which encodes a protein required for both ferric iron reduction and efficient ferric iron assimilation, thus linking these two activities. The predicted FRE1 protein appears to be a membrane protein and shows homology to the beta-subunit of the human respiratory burst oxidase. These data suggest that FRE1 is a structural component of the ferric reductase. Subcellular fractionation studies showed that the ferric reductase activity of isolated plasma membranes did not reflect the activity of the intact cells, implying that cellular integrity was necessary for function of the major S. cerevisiae ferric reductase. An NADPH-dependent plasma membrane ferric reductase was partially purified from plasma membranes. Preliminary evidence suggests that the cell surface ferric reductase may, in addition to mediating cellular iron uptake, help modulate the intracellular redox potential of the yeast cell.

  12. Transcriptional regulation by Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) in pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Bryan; Hassan, Hosni M

    2013-01-01

    In the ancient anaerobic environment, ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) was one of the first metal cofactors. Oxygenation of the ancient world challenged bacteria to acquire the insoluble ferric iron (Fe(3+)) and later to defend against reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the Fenton chemistry. To acquire Fe(3+), bacteria produce low-molecular weight compounds, known as siderophores, which have extremely high affinity for Fe(3+). However, during infection the host restricts iron from pathogens by producing iron- and siderophore-chelating proteins, by exporting iron from intracellular pathogen-containing compartments, and by limiting absorption of dietary iron. Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) is a transcription factor which utilizes Fe(2+) as a corepressor and represses siderophore synthesis in pathogens. Fur, directly or indirectly, controls expression of enzymes that protect against ROS damage. Thus, the challenges of iron homeostasis and defense against ROS are addressed via Fur. Although the role of Fur as a repressor is well-documented, emerging evidence demonstrates that Fur can function as an activator. Fur activation can occur through three distinct mechanisms (1) indirectly via small RNAs, (2) binding at cis regulatory elements that enhance recruitment of the RNA polymerase holoenzyme (RNAP), and (3) functioning as an antirepressor by removing or blocking DNA binding of a repressor of transcription. In addition, Fur homologs control defense against peroxide stress (PerR) and control uptake of other metals such as zinc (Zur) and manganese (Mur) in pathogenic bacteria. Fur family members are important for virulence within bacterial pathogens since mutants of fur, perR, or zur exhibit reduced virulence within numerous animal and plant models of infection. This review focuses on the breadth of Fur regulation in pathogenic bacteria.

  13. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... color additive ferric ammonium citrate consists of complex chelates prepared by the interaction...

  14. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... color additive ferric ammonium citrate consists of complex chelates prepared by the interaction...

  15. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... color additive ferric ammonium citrate consists of complex chelates prepared by the interaction...

  16. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF... color additive ferric ammonium citrate consists of complex chelates prepared by the interaction...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5306 Ferric...

  18. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride solution... solution must be lined with rubber, corrosion resistant plastic, or a material approved by the...

  19. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride solution... solution must be lined with rubber, corrosion resistant plastic, or a material approved by the...

  20. Energy transduction by anaerobic ferric iron respiration in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Pronk, J.T.; Liem, K.; Bos, P.; Kuenen, J.G. )

    1991-07-01

    Formate-grown cells of the obligately chemolithoautotrophic acidophile Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were capable of formate- and elemental sulfur-dependent reduction of ferric iron under anaerovic conditions. Under aerobic conditions, both oxygen and ferric iron could be simultaneously used as electron acceptors. To investigate whether anaerobic ferric iron respiration by T. ferrooxidans is an energy-transducing process, uptake of amino acids was studied. Glycine uptake by starved cells did not occur in the absence of an electron donor, neither under aerobic conditions nor under anaerobic conditions. Uptake of glycine could be driven by formate- and ferrous iron-dependent oxygen uptake. Under anaerobic conditions, ferric iron respiration with the electron donors formate and elemental sulfur could energize glycine uptake. Glycine uptake was inhibited by the uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. The results indicate that anaerobic ferric iron respiration can contribute to the energy budget of T. ferrooxidans.

  1. Nephrotoxicity of ferric nitrilotriacetate. An electron-microscopic and metabolic study.

    PubMed Central

    Hamazaki, S.; Okada, S.; Ebina, Y.; Fujioka, M.; Midorikawa, O.

    1986-01-01

    Repeated intraperitoneal injections of ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) induce nephrotoxic features such as proximal tubular necrosis and renal failure, an unexpected phenomenon for a ferric compound. The mechanism of Fe-NTA toxicity was investigated by electron microscopy and respiration studies of renal cortical mitochondria in rats. Four hours after a single intraperitoneal injection of Fe-NTA, 5 mg iron/kg body wt, loss of microvilli, increased number of cytoplasmic vacuoles, electron-dense cytoplasmic deposits, mitochondrial swelling, karyorrhexis, and rupture of cytoplasmic membrane were observed in proximal tubular epithelia. At 24 hours, an increased number of cells had become necrotic. Polarographic studies of mitochondria from renal cortex 4 hours after Fe-NTA treatment showed a significant decrease in State 3 respiration and DNP-uncoupled respiration, whereas little change was observed in State 4 respiration and ADP/O. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3706495

  2. Spectrophotometric ferric ion biosensor from Pseudomonas fluorescens culture.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Varun; Saharan, Krishna; Kumar, Lalit; Gupta, Roohi; Sahai, Vikram; Mittal, Aditya

    2008-06-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens cultures produce fluorescent siderophores. By utilizing optimal conditions for maximizing siderophore production in shake flask cultures of P. fluorescens, we report successful characterization of the culture broth supernatant as a robust ferric ions biosensor. For characterizing the ferric ions biosensor, we tested the effects of pH, buffers, different ferric salts and possible interference by ferrous ions under different solution conditions. We find that the biosensor is very specific to ferric ions only with sensitivity to concentrations as low as 10 microM. Further, the response time of the biosensor is the shortest (approximately 5 min or smaller) for citrate as the accompanying anion with ferric ions. While the response time is longer than that expected of normal biosensors, it is well compensated by the simplicity and economics of the biosensor production. Extremely low standard deviations in several experimental repeats also highlight the robustness of the ferric ions biosensor. Most importantly, the biosensor is extremely easy to use due to its straightforward spectrophotometric applications. We also show the utility of the biosensor with the high resolution technique of fluorescence microscopy. Finally, we report a novel mechanistic finding that siderophores present in the culture broth supernatants have two distinct optically active sites on them, which can be monitored independently in presence or absence of ferric ions. PMID:18080345

  3. Ferric chloride based downstream process for microalgae based biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Sung, Mina; Kim, Bohwa; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Dong Yeon; Han, Jong-In

    2015-04-01

    In this study, ferric chloride (FeCl3) was used to integrate downstream processes (harvesting, lipid extraction, and esterification). At concentration of 200 mg/L and at pH 3, FeCl3 exhibited an expected degree of coagulation and an increase in cell density of ten times (170 mg/10 mL). An iron-mediated oxidation reaction, Fenton-like reaction, was used to extract lipid from the harvested biomass, and efficiency of 80% was obtained with 0.5% H2O2 at 90 °C. The iron compound was also employed in the esterification step, and converted free fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters under acidic conditions; thus, the fatal problem of saponification during esterification with alkaline catalysts was avoided, and esterification efficiency over 90% was obtained. This study clearly showed that FeCl3 in the harvesting process is beneficial in all downstream steps and have a potential to greatly reduce the production cost of microalgae-originated biodiesel.

  4. Size fractionation characterisation of removed organics in reverse osmosis concentrates by ferric chloride.

    PubMed

    Bagastyo, A Y; Keller, J; Batstone, D J

    2011-01-01

    Reverse osmosis membrane separation is the leading method for manufacturing potable purified water. It also produces a concentrate stream, namely reverse osmosis concentrates (ROC), with 10-20% of the water, and almost all other compounds. One method for further treating this stream is by coagulation with ferric chloride. This study evaluates removed organics in ROC treated with ferric chloride. Fractionation with ultrafiltration membranes allows separation of organics based on a nominal molecular weight. A stirred cell system was applied for serial fractionation to classify organic compounds into six groups of < 0.5 kDa, 0.5-1 kDa, 1-3 kDa, 3-5 kDa, 5-10 kDa and > 10 kDa. The study found that raw ROC is rich in low molecular weight compounds (< 1 kDa) with almost 50% of the organics. These compounds include soluble microbial products (SMPs) and smaller humic and fulvic acids as indicated by fluorescence scanning. Conversely, colour was mostly contributed by medium to large molecules of humic and fulvic acids (> 0.5 kDa). Organics and colour were reduced in all molecular groups at an optimum treatment dose 1.48 mM FeCl3 and a pH of 5. However, ferric seemed to effectively remove colour in all size ranges while residual nitrogen was found mostly in the < 1 kDa sizes. Further, the fluorescence indicated that larger humic and fulvic acids were removed with considerable SMPs remaining in the < 0.5 kDa.

  5. Fe-heme conformations in ferric myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Longa, S D; Pin, S; Cortès, R; Soldatov, A V; Alpert, B

    1998-01-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra of ferric myoglobin from horse heart have been acquired as a function of pH (between 5.3 and 11.3). At pH = 11.3 temperature-dependent spectra (between 20 and 293 K) have been collected as well. Experimental data solve three main conformations of the Fe-heme: the first, at low pH, is related to high-spin aquomet-myoglobin (Mb+OH2). The other two, at pH 11.3, are related to hydroxymet-myoglobin (Mb+OH-), and are in thermal equilibrium, corresponding to high- and low-spin Mb+OH-. The structure of the three Fe-heme conformations has been assigned according to spin-resolved multiple scattering simulations and fitting of the XANES data. The chemical transition between Mb+OH2 and high-spin Mb+OH-, and the spin transition of Mb+OH-, are accompanied by changes of the Fe coordination sphere due to its movement toward the heme plane, coupled to an increase of the axial asymmetry. PMID:9826636

  6. Ferric Chloride-induced Murine Thrombosis Models.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Nieman, Marvin; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis (blood clot) is a common complication of many systemic diseases associated with chronic inflammation, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, obesity, cancer and chronic autoimmune rheumatologic disorders. Thrombi are the cause of most heart attacks, strokes and extremity loss, making thrombosis an extremely important public health problem. Since these thrombi stem from inappropriate platelet activation and subsequent coagulation, targeting these systems therapeutically has important clinical significance for developing safer treatments. Due to the complexities of the hemostatic system, in vitro experiments cannot replicate the blood-to-vessel wall interactions; therefore, in vivo studies are critical to understand pathological mechanisms of thrombus formation. To this end, various thrombosis models have been developed in mice. Among them, ferric chloride (FeCl3) induced vascular injury is a widely used model of occlusive thrombosis that reports platelet activation and aggregation in the context of an aseptic closed vascular system. This model is based on redox-induced endothelial cell injury, which is simple and sensitive to both anticoagulant and anti-platelets drugs. The time required for the development of a thrombus that occludes blood flow gives a quantitative measure of vascular injury, platelet activation and aggregation that is relevant to thrombotic diseases. We have significantly refined this FeCl3-induced vascular thrombosis model, which makes the data highly reproducible with minimal variation. Here we describe the model and present representative data from several experimental set-ups that demonstrate the utility of this model in thrombosis research. PMID:27684194

  7. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  8. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  9. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  10. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  11. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  12. The leaching of chalcopyrite with ferric sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirato, Tetsuji; Majima, Hiroshi; Awakura, Yasuhiro

    1987-09-01

    The leaching kinetics of natural chalcopyrite crystals with ferric sulfate was studied. The morphology of the leached chalcopyrite and the electrochemical properties of chalcopyrite electrodes also were investigated. The leaching of chalcopyrite showed parabolic-like kinetics initially and then showed linear kinetics. In the initial stage, a dense sulfur layer formed on the chalcopyrite surface. The growth of the layer caused it to peel from the surface, leaving a rough surface. In the linear stage, no thick sulfur layer was observed. In this investigation, chalcopyrite leaching in the linear stage was principally studied. The apparent activation energy for chalcopyrite leaching was found to range from 76.8 to 87.7 kJ mol-1, and this suggests that the leaching of chalcopyrite is chemically controlled. The leaching rate of chalcopyrite increases with an increase in Fe(SO4)1.5 concentration up to 0.1 mol dm-3, but a further increase of the Fe(SO4)1.5 concentration has little effect on the leaching rate. The dependency of the mixed potential upon Fe(SO4)1.5 concentration was found to be 79 mV decade-1 from 0.01 mol dm-3 to 1 mol dm-3 Fe(SO4)1.5. Both the leaching rate and the mixed potential decreased with an increased FeSO4 concentration. The anodic current of Fe(II) oxidation on the chalcopyrite surface in a sulfate medium was larger than that in a chloride medium.

  13. Hydrogen and Ferric Iron in Mars Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyar, Melinda D.

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of oxygen and hydrogen fugacity is of paramount importance in constraining phase equilibria and crystallization processes of melts, as well as understanding the partitioning of elements between the cope and silicate portions of terrestrial planets. H and Fe(3+) must both be analyzed in order to reconstruct hydrogen and oxygen fugacities on Mars. To date, SIMS data have elucidated D/H and H contents of hydrous phases in SNC meteorites, but until now anhydrous martian minerals have not been systematically examined for trace hydrogen. Ferric iron has been quantified using XANES in many martian phases, but integrated studies of both Fe(3+) and H on the same spots are really needed to address the H budget. Finally, the effects of shock on both Fe(3+) and H in hydrous and anhydrous phases must be quantified. Thus, the overall goal of this research was to understand the oxygen and hydrogen fugacities under which martian samples crystallized. In this research one-year project, we approached this problem by 1) characterizing Fe(3+) and H contents of SNC meteorites using both bulk (Mossbauer spectroscopy and uranium extraction, respectively) and microscale (synchrotron micro-XANES and SIMS) methods; 2) relating Fe(3+) and H contents of martian minerals to their oxygen and hydrogen fugacities through analysis of experimentally equilibrated phases (for pyroxene) and through study of volcanic rocks in which the oxygen and hydrogen fugacities can be independently constrained (for feldspar); and 3) studying the effects of shock processes on Fe(3+) and H contents of the phases of interest. Results have been used to assess quantitatively the distribution of H and Fe(3+) among phases in the martian interior, which will better constrain the geodynamic processes of the interior, as well as the overall hydrogen and water budgets on Mars. There were no inventions funded by this research.

  14. Kinetics of iron acquisition from ferric siderophores by Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, R J; Weimar, W R

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of iron accumulation by iron-starved Paracoccus denitrificans during the first 2 min of exposure to 55Fe-labeled ferric siderophore chelates is described. Iron is acquired from the ferric chelate of the natural siderophore L-parabactin in a process exhibiting biphastic kinetics by Lineweaver-Burk analysis. The kinetic data for 1 microM less than [Fe L-parabactin] less than 10 microM fit a regression line which suggests a low-affinity system (Km = 3.9 +/- 1.2 microM, Vmax = 494 pg-atoms of 55Fe min-1 mg of protein-1), whereas the data for 0.1 microM less than or equal to [Fe L-parabactin] less than or equal to 1 microM fit another line consistent with a high-affinity system (Km = 0.24 +/- 0.06 microM, Vmax = 108 pg-atoms of 55Fe min-1 mg of protein-1). The Km of the high-affinity uptake is comparable to the binding affinity we had previously reported for the purified ferric L-parabactin receptor protein in the outer membrane. In marked contrast, ferric D-parabactin data fit a single regression line corresponding to a simple Michaelis-Menten process with comparatively low affinity (Km = 3.1 +/- 0.9 microM, Vmax = 125 pg-atoms of 55Fe min-1 mg of protein-1). Other catecholamide siderophores with an intact oxazoline ring derived from L-threonine (L-homoparabactin, L-agrobactin, and L-vibriobactin) also exhibit biphasic kinetics with a high-affinity component similar to ferric L-parabactin. Circular dichroism confirmed that these ferric chelates, like ferric L-parabactin, exist as the lambda enantiomers. The A forms ferric parabactin (ferrin D- and L-parabactin A), in which the oxazoline ring is hydrolyzed to the open-chain threonyl structure, exhibit linear kinetics with a comparatively high Km (1.4 +/- 0.3 microM) and high Vmax (324 pg-atoms of 55Fe min-1 of protein-1). Furthermore, the marked stereospecificity seen between ferric D- and L-parabactins is absent; i.e., iron acquisition from ferric parabactin A is non stereospecific. The mechanistic

  15. Influence of the addition of sulphate and ferric ions in a methanogenic anaerobic packed-bed reactor treating gasoline-contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, B S; Chinalia, F A; Sarti, A; Silva, A J; Foresti, E; Zaiat, M

    2006-01-01

    Benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) are relatively soluble aromatic compounds of gasoline. Gasoline storage tank leakages generally lead to an extensive contamination of groundwater. In the natural environment for instance, these compounds might be biodegraded under a variety of reducing potentials. The objective of this work was to examine the influence of the addition of sulphate and Fe(OH)3 in a methanogenic horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized-biomass reactor treating gasoline-contaminated water. Three different conditions were evaluated: methanogenic, sulphidogenic and sulphidogenic with the addition of ferric ions. Methanogenic condition showed the higher BTX degradation rates and the addition of sulphate negatively affected BTX removal rates with the production of H2S. However, the addition of ferric ions resulted in the precipitation of sulphur, improving BTX degradation by the consortium. Metanosphaera sp., Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanosaeta concilii were identified in the consortium by means of 16S and directly related to the addition of ferric ions.

  16. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of nanophase ferric oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Iron oxide minerals are the prime candidates for Fe(III) signatures in remotely sensed Martian surface spectra. Magnetic, Mossbauer, and reflectance spectroscopy have been carried out in the laboratory in order to understand the mineralogical nature of Martian analog ferric oxide minerals of submicron or nanometer size range. Out of the iron oxide minerals studied, nanometer sized ferric oxides are promising candidates for possible Martian spectral analogs. 'Nanophase ferric oxide (np-Ox)' is a generic term for ferric oxide/oxihydroxide particles having nanoscale (less than 10 nm) particle dimensions. Ferrihydrite, superparamagnetic particles of hematite, maghemite and goethite, and nanometer sized particles of inherently paramagnetic lepidocrocite are all examples of nanophase ferric oxides. np-Ox particles in general do not give X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with well defined peaks and would often be classified as X-ray amorphous. Therefore, different np-Oxs preparations should be characterized using a more sensitive technique e.g., high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The purpose of this study is to report the particle size, morphology and crystalline order, of five np-Ox samples by HRTEM imaging and electron diffraction (ED).

  17. Chalcopyrite concentrate leaching with biologically produced ferric sulphate.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, P H-M; Heimala, S; Riekkola-Vanhanen, M-L; Puhakka, J A

    2006-09-01

    Biological ferric iron production was combined with ferric sulphate leaching of chalcopyrite concentrate and the effects of pH, Fe3+, temperature and solids concentration on the leaching were studied. The copper leaching rates were similar at pH of 1.0-1.8 and in the presence of 7-90 g L-1 Fe3+ despite massive iron precipitation with 90 g L-1 Fe3+. Increase of the leaching temperature from 50 degrees C to 86 degrees C and solids concentration from 1% to 10% increased the copper leaching rate. Increase in solids concentration from 1% to 10% decreased the copper yields from 80% to 40%. Stepwise addition of ferric iron did not improve the copper yields. CuFeS2, Ag and Cu1.96S potentials indicated the formation of a passivating layer, which consisted of jarosite and sulphur precipitates and which was responsible for the decreased leaching rates. PMID:16154742

  18. Hydrogen Reduction of Ferric Ions for Use in Copper Electrowinning

    SciTech Connect

    Karl S. Noah; Debby F. Bruhn; John E. Wey; Robert S. Cherry

    2005-01-01

    The conventional copper electrowinning process uses the water hydrolysis reaction as the anodic source of electrons. However this reaction generates acid mist and requires large quantities of energy. In order to improve energy efficiency and avoid acid mist, an alternative anodic reaction of ferrous ion oxidation has been proposed. This reaction does not involve evolution of acid mist and can be carried out at a lower cell voltage than the conventional process. However, because ferrous ions are converted to ferric ions at the anode in this process, there is a need for reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions to continue this process. The most promising method for this reduction is the use of hydrogen gas since the resulting byproduct acid can be used elsewhere in the process and, unlike other reductants, hydrogen does not introduce other species that need subsequent removal. Because the hydrogen reduction technology has undergone only preliminary lab scale testing, additional research is needed to evaluate its commercial potential. Two issues for this research are the potentially low mass transfer rate of hydrogen into the electrolyte stream because of its low solubility in water, and whether other gaseous reductants less expensive than hydrogen, such as natural gas or syngas, might work. In this study various reductants were investigated to carry out the reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions using a simulated electrolyte solution recycled through a trickle bed reactor packed with catalyst. The gases tested as reductants were hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and a 50/50 mixture of H2 and CO. Nitrogen was also tested as an inert control. These gases were tested because they are constituents in either natural gas or syngas. The catalysts tested were palladium and platinum. Two gas flow rates and five electrolyte flow rates were tested. Pure hydrogen was an effective reductant of ferric ion. The rates were similar with both palladium and platinum. The ferric

  19. Understanding Regeneration of Arsenate-Loaded Ferric Hydroxide-Based Adsorbents

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Binod Kumar; Farrell, James

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adsorbents comprising ferric hydroxide loaded on a variety of support materials are commonly used to remove arsenic from potable water. Although several studies have investigated the effects of support properties on arsenic adsorption, there have been no investigations of their effects on adsorbent regeneration. Furthermore, the effect of regenerant solution composition and the kinetics of regeneration have not been investigated. This research investigated the effects of adsorbent and regenerant solution properties on the kinetics and efficiency of regeneration of arsenate-loaded ferric hydroxide-based adsorbents. Solutions containing only 0.10–5.0 M NaOH or 0.10–1.0 M NaCl, as well as solutions containing both compounds, were used as regenerants. On all media, >99% of arsenate was adsorbed through complexation with ferric hydroxide. Arsenate recovery was controlled by both equilibrium and kinetic limitations. Adsorbents containing support material with weak base anion-exchange functionality or no anion-exchange functionality could be regenerated with NaOH solutions alone. Regeneration of media containing strong base anion (SBA)-exchange functionality was greatly enhanced by addition of 0.10 M NaCl to the NaOH regenerant solutions. Adsorbed silica had a significant effect on NaOH regeneration of media containing type I SBA-exchange functionality, but on other media, adsorbed silica had little impact on regeneration. On all media, 5–25% of arsenate was resistant to desorption in 1.0 M NaOH solutions. However, the use of 2.5–5.0 M NaOH solutions significantly reduced the desorption-resistant fraction. PMID:25873779

  20. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium ferrocyanide... manufacturing practice: Oxalic acid or its salts, not more than 0.1 percent. Water soluble matter, not more than 3 percent. Water soluble cyanide, not more than 10 parts per million. Volatile matter, not more...

  1. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium ferrocyanide... manufacturing practice: Oxalic acid or its salts, not more than 0.1 percent. Water soluble matter, not more than 3 percent. Water soluble cyanide, not more than 10 parts per million. Volatile matter, not more...

  2. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium ferrocyanide... manufacturing practice: Oxalic acid or its salts, not more than 0.1 percent. Water soluble matter, not more than 3 percent. Water soluble cyanide, not more than 10 parts per million. Volatile matter, not more...

  3. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium ferrocyanide... manufacturing practice: Oxalic acid or its salts, not more than 0.1 percent. Water soluble matter, not more than 3 percent. Water soluble cyanide, not more than 10 parts per million. Volatile matter, not more...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... citrate (iron (III) ammonium citrate) is prepared by the reaction of ferric hydroxide with citric acid... 18.5 percent iron, approximately 9 percent ammonia, and 65 percent citric acid and occurs as reddish... composed of 14.5 to 16 percent iron, approximately 7.5 percent ammonia, and 75 percent citric acid...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients...

  8. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... for drug use made with ferric ammonium ferrocyanide may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring drugs. (b) Specifications... manufacturing practice: Oxalic acid or its salts, not more than 0.1 percent. Water soluble matter, not more...

  9. Ligand Induced Spin Crossover in Penta-Coordinated Ferric Dithiocarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, P.; Iyer, R. M.

    1981-09-01

    On addition of lewis bases to Fe(dtc)2X, ligand exchange takes place through a SN2 mechanism, with a parallel spin crossover in the ferric ion. The two species (S = 3/2 and S = 5/2) formed are in dynamic chemical equilibrium, and a slow decomposition is then initiated.

  10. ESTCP DEMONSTRATION OF A BIOAVAILABLE FERRIC IRON TEST KIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioavailable ferric iron (BAFeIII) is used by iron-reducing bacteria as an electron acceptor during the oxidation of various organic contaminants such as vinyl chloride and benzene. Quantification of BAFeIII is important with respect to characterizing candidate natural attenuati...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS...

  14. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  15. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  16. Bacillus cereus iron uptake protein fishes out an unstable ferric citrate trimer

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Sia, Allyson K.; Allred, Benjamin E.; Nichiporuk, Rita; Zhou, Zhongrui; Andersen, Ulla N.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2012-01-01

    Citrate is a common biomolecule that chelates Fe(III). Many bacteria and plants use ferric citrate to fulfill their nutritional requirement for iron. Only the Escherichia coli ferric citrate outer-membrane transport protein FecA has been characterized; little is known about other ferric citrate-binding proteins. Here we report a unique siderophore-binding protein from the Gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Bacillus cereus that binds multinuclear ferric citrate complexes. We have demonstrated that B. cereus ATCC 14579 takes up 55Fe radiolabeled ferric citrate and that a protein, BC_3466 [renamed FctC (ferric citrate-binding protein C)], binds ferric citrate. The dissociation constant (Kd) of FctC at pH 7.4 with ferric citrate (molar ratio 1:50) is 2.6 nM. This is the tightest binding observed of any B. cereus siderophore-binding protein. Nano electrospray ionization–mass spectrometry (nano ESI-MS) analysis of FctC and ferric citrate complexes or citrate alone show that FctC binds diferric di-citrate, and triferric tricitrate, but does not bind ferric di-citrate, ferric monocitrate, or citrate alone. Significantly, the protein selectively binds triferric tricitrate even though this species is naturally present at very low equilibrium concentrations. PMID:23027976

  17. Bacillus cereus iron uptake protein fishes out an unstable ferric citrate trimer.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Sia, Allyson K; Allred, Benjamin E; Nichiporuk, Rita; Zhou, Zhongrui; Andersen, Ulla N; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2012-10-16

    Citrate is a common biomolecule that chelates Fe(III). Many bacteria and plants use ferric citrate to fulfill their nutritional requirement for iron. Only the Escherichia coli ferric citrate outer-membrane transport protein FecA has been characterized; little is known about other ferric citrate-binding proteins. Here we report a unique siderophore-binding protein from the gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Bacillus cereus that binds multinuclear ferric citrate complexes. We have demonstrated that B. cereus ATCC 14579 takes up (55)Fe radiolabeled ferric citrate and that a protein, BC_3466 [renamed FctC (ferric citrate-binding protein C)], binds ferric citrate. The dissociation constant (K(d)) of FctC at pH 7.4 with ferric citrate (molar ratio 1:50) is 2.6 nM. This is the tightest binding observed of any B. cereus siderophore-binding protein. Nano electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (nano ESI-MS) analysis of FctC and ferric citrate complexes or citrate alone show that FctC binds diferric di-citrate, and triferric tricitrate, but does not bind ferric di-citrate, ferric monocitrate, or citrate alone. Significantly, the protein selectively binds triferric tricitrate even though this species is naturally present at very low equilibrium concentrations.

  18. Recovery of scrap iron metal value using biogenerated ferric iron.

    PubMed

    Ballor, Nicholas R; Nesbitt, Carl C; Lueking, Donald R

    2006-04-20

    The utility of employing biogenerated ferric iron as an oxidant for the recycling of scrap metal has been demonstrated using continuously growing cells of the extremophilic organism Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. A ferric iron rich (70 mol%) lixiviant resulting from bioreactor based growth of A. ferrooxidans readily solubilized target scrap metal with the resultant generation of a leachate containing elevated ferrous iron levels and solubilized copper previously resident in the scrap metal. Recovery of the copper value was easily accomplished via a cementation reaction and the clarified leachate containing a replenished level of ferrous iron as growth substrate was shown to support the growth of A. ferrooxidans and be fully recyclable. The described process for scrap metal recycling and copper recovery was shown to be efficient and economically attractive. Additionally, the utility of employing the E(h) of the growth medium as a means for monitoring fluctuations in cell density in cultures of A. ferrooxidans is demonstrated.

  19. Drug insight: Safety of intravenous iron supplementation with sodium ferric gluconate complex.

    PubMed

    Michael, Beckie; Fishbane, Steven; Coyne, Daniel W; Agarwal, Rajiv; Warnock, David G

    2006-02-01

    Intravenous iron is necessary for optimal management of anemia in patients receiving hemodialysis and is utilized in the majority of these patients in the US. The availability of nondextran formulations of intravenous iron has significantly improved the safety of its use. The nondextran iron formulation sodium ferric gluconate complex (SFGC) has been extensively studied in the hemodialysis population, with two large phase IV trials documenting its safety. SFGC is efficacious and, at recommended doses, is associated with a low incidence of adverse events. There have been few comparative studies of the nondextran intravenous iron preparations; however, they are known to have different pharmacokinetic characteristics. There is also evidence to indicate that these compounds differ in terms of their cytotoxic and proinflammatory properties, and their propensity to induce oxidative stress. This paper reviews the current literature on the safety of SFGC and examines the emerging safety issues surrounding the use of intravenous iron.

  20. Paracoccidioides spp. ferrous and ferric iron assimilation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia L. C.; Lima, Patrícia de Sousa; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle G.; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Fernandes, Gabriel da Rocha; Kosman, Daniel J.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for almost all organisms, including fungi. Usually, fungi can uptake iron through receptor-mediated internalization of a siderophore or heme, and/or reductive iron assimilation (RIA). Traditionally, the RIA pathway consists of ferric reductases (Fres), ferroxidase (Fet3) and a high-affinity iron permease (Ftr1). Paracoccidioides spp. genomes do not present an Ftr1 homolog. However, this fungus expresses zinc regulated transporter homologs (Zrts), members of the ZIP family of membrane transporters that are able in some organisms to transport zinc and iron. A 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC)-overlay assay indicates that both Pb01 and Pb18 express a ferric reductase activity; however, 59Fe uptake assays indicate that only in Pb18 is this activity coupled to a reductase-dependent iron uptake pathway. In addition, Zrts are up-regulated in iron deprivation, as indicated by RNAseq and qRT-PCR using Pb01 transcripts. RNAseq strategy also demonstrated that transcripts related to siderophore uptake and biosynthesis are up-regulated in iron-deprived condition. The data suggest that the fungus could use both a non-classical RIA, comprising ferric reductases and Fe/Zn permeases (Zrts), and siderophore uptake pathways under iron-limited conditions. The study of iron metabolism reveals novel surface molecules that could function as accessible targets for drugs to block iron uptake and, consequently, inhibit pathogen's proliferation. PMID:26441843

  1. A purple acidophilic di-ferric DNA ligase from Ferroplasma.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshina, Olga V; Beloqui, Ana; Böttger, Lars H; Andreu, José M; Polaina, Julio; De Lacey, Antonio L; Trautwein, Alfred X; Timmis, Kenneth N; Golyshin, Peter N

    2008-07-01

    We describe here an extraordinary purple-colored DNA ligase, LigFa, from the acidophilic ferrous iron-oxidizing archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum, a di-ferric enzyme with an extremely low pH activity optimum. Unlike any other DNA ligase studied to date, LigFa contains two Fe(3+)-tyrosinate centers and lacks any requirement for either Mg(2+) or K(+) for activity. DNA ligases from closest phylogenetic and ecophysiological relatives have normal pH optima (6.0-7.5), lack iron, and require Mg(2+)/K(+) for activity. Ferric iron retention is pH-dependent, with release resulting in partial protein unfolding and loss of activity. Reduction of the Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) results in an 80% decrease in DNA substrate binding and an increase in the pH activity optimum to 5.0. DNA binding induces significant conformational change around the iron site(s), suggesting that the ferric irons of LigFa act both as structure organizing and stabilizing elements and as Lewis acids facilitating DNA binding at low pH.

  2. Magnetotactic bacteria form magnetite from a phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide via nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Jens; Morin, Guillaume; Menguy, Nicolas; Perez Gonzalez, Teresa; Widdrat, Marc; Cosmidis, Julie; Faivre, Damien

    2013-01-01

    The iron oxide mineral magnetite (Fe3O4) is produced by various organisms to exploit magnetic and mechanical properties. Magnetotactic bacteria have become one of the best model organisms for studying magnetite biomineralization, as their genomes are sequenced and tools are available for their genetic manipulation. However, the chemical route by which magnetite is formed intracellularly within the so-called magnetosomes has remained a matter of debate. Here we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures and transmission electron microscopic imaging techniques to chemically characterize and spatially resolve the mechanism of biomineralization in those microorganisms. We show that magnetite forms through phase transformation from a highly disordered phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide phase, consistent with prokaryotic ferritins, via transient nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates within the magnetosome organelle. This pathway remarkably resembles recent results on synthetic magnetite formation and bears a high similarity to suggested mineralization mechanisms in higher organisms. PMID:23980143

  3. Magnetotactic bacteria form magnetite from a phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide via nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Jens; Morin, Guillaume; Menguy, Nicolas; Perez Gonzalez, Teresa; Widdrat, Marc; Cosmidis, Julie; Faivre, Damien

    2013-09-10

    The iron oxide mineral magnetite (Fe3O4) is produced by various organisms to exploit magnetic and mechanical properties. Magnetotactic bacteria have become one of the best model organisms for studying magnetite biomineralization, as their genomes are sequenced and tools are available for their genetic manipulation. However, the chemical route by which magnetite is formed intracellularly within the so-called magnetosomes has remained a matter of debate. Here we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures and transmission electron microscopic imaging techniques to chemically characterize and spatially resolve the mechanism of biomineralization in those microorganisms. We show that magnetite forms through phase transformation from a highly disordered phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide phase, consistent with prokaryotic ferritins, via transient nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates within the magnetosome organelle. This pathway remarkably resembles recent results on synthetic magnetite formation and bears a high similarity to suggested mineralization mechanisms in higher organisms.

  4. Magnetotactic bacteria form magnetite from a phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide via nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Jens; Morin, Guillaume; Menguy, Nicolas; Perez Gonzalez, Teresa; Widdrat, Marc; Cosmidis, Julie; Faivre, Damien

    2013-09-10

    The iron oxide mineral magnetite (Fe3O4) is produced by various organisms to exploit magnetic and mechanical properties. Magnetotactic bacteria have become one of the best model organisms for studying magnetite biomineralization, as their genomes are sequenced and tools are available for their genetic manipulation. However, the chemical route by which magnetite is formed intracellularly within the so-called magnetosomes has remained a matter of debate. Here we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures and transmission electron microscopic imaging techniques to chemically characterize and spatially resolve the mechanism of biomineralization in those microorganisms. We show that magnetite forms through phase transformation from a highly disordered phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide phase, consistent with prokaryotic ferritins, via transient nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates within the magnetosome organelle. This pathway remarkably resembles recent results on synthetic magnetite formation and bears a high similarity to suggested mineralization mechanisms in higher organisms. PMID:23980143

  5. Ferric citrate controls phosphorus and delivers iron in patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Julia B; Sika, Mohammed; Koury, Mark J; Chuang, Peale; Schulman, Gerald; Smith, Mark T; Whittier, Frederick C; Linfert, Douglas R; Galphin, Claude M; Athreya, Balaji P; Nossuli, A Kaldun Kaldun; Chang, Ingrid J; Blumenthal, Samuel S; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven; Kant, Kotagal S; Olivero, Juan Jose; Greene, Tom; Dwyer, Jamie P

    2015-02-01

    Patients on dialysis require phosphorus binders to prevent hyperphosphatemia and are iron deficient. We studied ferric citrate as a phosphorus binder and iron source. In this sequential, randomized trial, 441 subjects on dialysis were randomized to ferric citrate or active control in a 52-week active control period followed by a 4-week placebo control period, in which subjects on ferric citrate who completed the active control period were rerandomized to ferric citrate or placebo. The primary analysis compared the mean change in phosphorus between ferric citrate and placebo during the placebo control period. A sequential gatekeeping strategy controlled study-wise type 1 error for serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, and intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent usage as prespecified secondary outcomes in the active control period. Ferric citrate controlled phosphorus compared with placebo, with a mean treatment difference of -2.2±0.2 mg/dl (mean±SEM) (P<0.001). Active control period phosphorus was similar between ferric citrate and active control, with comparable safety profiles. Subjects on ferric citrate achieved higher mean iron parameters (ferritin=899±488 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=39%±17%) versus subjects on active control (ferritin=628±367 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=30%±12%; P<0.001 for both). Subjects on ferric citrate received less intravenous elemental iron (median=12.95 mg/wk ferric citrate; 26.88 mg/wk active control; P<0.001) and less erythropoietin-stimulating agent (median epoetin-equivalent units per week: 5306 units/wk ferric citrate; 6951 units/wk active control; P=0.04). Hemoglobin levels were statistically higher on ferric citrate. Thus, ferric citrate is an efficacious and safe phosphate binder that increases iron stores and reduces intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent use while maintaining hemoglobin. PMID:25060056

  6. Reaction mechanism for the ferric chloride leaching of sphalerite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, G. W.; Henein, H.; Jin, Zuo-Mei

    1985-12-01

    Reaction mechanisms for the ferric chloride leaching of sphalerite are proposed based on data obtained in leaching and dual cell experiments presented in this work and in a previous study. The results from the leaching experiments show that at low concentrations the rate is proportional to [Fe3+]T 0.5 and [Cl-]T 0.43 but at higher concentrations the reaction order with respect to both [Fe3+]T and [Cl-]T decreases. Using dual cell experiments which allow the half cell reactions to be separated, increased rates are observed when NaCl is added to the anolyte and to the catholyte. The increase in rate is attributed to a direct, anodic electrochemical reaction of Cl- with the mineral. When NaCl is added only to the catholyte, a decrease in the rate is observed due to a decrease in the E 0 of the cathode which is attributed to the formation of ferric-chloro complexes. Several possible electrochemical mechanisms and mathematical models based on the Butler-Volmer relation are delineated, and of these, one model is selected which accounts for the experimentally observed changes in reaction order for both Fe3+ and Cl-. This analysis incorporates a charge transfer process for each ion and an adsorption step for ferric and chloride ions. The inhibiting effect of Fe2+ noted by previous investigators is also accounted for through a similar model which includes back reaction kinetics for Fe2+. The proposed models successfully provide a theoretical basis for describing the role of Cl-, Fe3+, and Fe2+ as well as their interrelationship in zinc sulfide leaching reactions. Possible applications of these results to chloride leaching systems involving other sulfides or complex sulfides are considered.

  7. Acidibacter ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov.: an acidophilic ferric iron-reducing gammaproteobacterium.

    PubMed

    Falagán, Carmen; Johnson, D Barrie

    2014-11-01

    An acidophilic gammaproteobacterium, isolated from a pit lake at an abandoned metal mine in south-west Spain, was shown to be distantly related to all characterized prokaryotes, and to be the first representative of a novel genus and species. Isolate MCF85 is a Gram-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped mesophilic bacterium with a temperature growth optimum of 32-35 °C (range 8-45 °C). It was categorized as a moderate acidophile, growing optimally at pH 3.5-4.0 and between pH 2.5 and 4.5. Under optimum conditions its culture doubling time was around 75 min. Only organic electron donors were used by MCF85, and the isolate was confirmed to be an obligate heterotroph. It grew on a limited range of sugars (hexoses and disaccharides, though not pentoses) and some other small molecular weight organic compounds, and growth was partially or completely inhibited by small concentrations of some aliphatic acids. The acidophile grew in the presence of >100 mM ferrous iron or aluminium, but was more sensitive to some other metals, such as copper. It was also much more tolerant of arsenic (V) than arsenic (III). Isolate MCF85 catalysed the reductive dissolution of the ferric iron mineral schwertmannite when incubated under micro-aerobic or anaerobic conditions, causing the culture media pH to increase. There was no evidence, however, that the acidophile could grow by ferric iron respiration under strictly anoxic conditions. Isolate MCF85 is the designated type strain of the novel species Acidibacter ferrireducens (=DSM 27237(T) = NCCB 100460(T)).

  8. U-EXTRACTION--IMPROVEMENTS IN ELIMINATION OF Mo BY USE OF FERRIC ION

    DOEpatents

    Clark, H.M.; Duffey, D.

    1958-06-10

    An improved solvent extraction process is described whereby U may be extracted by a water immiscible organic solvent from an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate. It has been found that Mo in the presence of phosphate ions appears to form a complex with the phosphate which extracts along with the U. This extraction of Mo may be suppressed by providing ferric ion in the solution prior to the extraction step. The ferric ion is preferably provided in the form of ferric nitrate.

  9. Ferric hydroxamate transport without subsequent iron utilization in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed Central

    Arceneaux, J E; Byers, B R

    1976-01-01

    Iron transport and utilization were examined in Bacillus megaterium Ard1, a mutant that is resistant to the hydroxymate antibiotic A22765 and whose growth is inhibited by the structurally similar hydroxamate Desferal. Rapid, low-level uptake of Desferal-50Fe was observed; such uptake was temperature and energy independent. Gel filtration chromatography of the cytoplasmic fraction of protoplasts labeled with Desferal-55Fe for 30 to 120 s demonstrated only unchanged esferal-55Fe in the cytoplasm. Although B. megaterium Ard1 showed transport of Desferal-59Fe by a process that resembles facilitated diffusion, this organism was unable to transfer iron from this chelate to cellular macromolecules for metabolic use. High-level transport of the ferric hydroxamate schizokinen-59Fe by B. megaterium Ard1 was both temperature and energy dependent. Within 30 s, protoplasts labeled with schizokinen-55Fe contained iron associated with certain macromolecules and in an apparent "pool" of schizokinen-55Fe in the cytoplasmic fraction. Prior transport of Dseferal-55Fe by protoplasts of strain Ard1 did not interfere with subsequent transport and utilization of schizokinen-59Fe. These studies suggest that transport of ferric hydroxamates may occur by a facilitated diffusion-type process; transfer of iron to cellular macromolecules may drive high-level transport of the chelate and may be the step at which energy is required in the iron transport-assimilation process. PMID:821926

  10. Particulate and THM precursor removal with ferric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, A.E.; Vrijenhoek, E.M.; Elimelech, M.; Tanaka, T.S.; Beuhler, M.D.

    1999-11-01

    Pilot-scale experiments were performed to investigate the effectiveness of enhanced coagulation in removing particles and trihalomethane (THM) precursors from two surface source waters: California State Project water and Colorado River water. The removal of suspended particles and natural organic matter at various ferric chloride doses and coagulation pHs was assessed through source water and filter effluent measurements of turbidity, particle count. UV{sub 254}, TOC, and THM formation potential. Overall, it was found that optimal removal of particles and THM precursors by enhanced coagulation with ferric chloride is obtained at high coagulant doses and low pH conditions. Generally, turbidity removal is more efficient and head loss is more moderate at ambient pH compared with pH 5.5. Additionally, filter effluent particle counts were found to be consistent with residual turbidity data. The removal of THM precursors by enhanced coagulation is significantly enhanced at pH 5.5 compared with ambient pH. The reduction in THM formation potential is consistent with the trends observed for the THM precursor removal data. Furthermore, specific UV absorbance was used to estimate the proportion of humic substances in the raw waters. Enhanced coagulation was found to be less effective for the source water with the lower specific UV absorbance.

  11. Functional characterization of the chloroplast ferric chelate oxidoreductase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Solti, Adám; Müller, Brigitta; Czech, Viktória; Sárvári, Éva; Fodor, Ferenc

    2014-05-01

    Iron (Fe) has an essential role in the biosynthesis of chlorophylls and redox cofactors, and thus chloroplast iron uptake is a process of special importance. The chloroplast ferric chelate oxidoreductase (cFRO) has a crucial role in this process but it is poorly characterized. To study the localization and mechanism of action of cFRO, sugar beet (Beta vulgaris cv Orbis) chloroplast envelope fractions were isolated by gradient ultracentrifugation, and their purity was tested by western blotting against different marker proteins. The ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity of envelope fractions was studied in the presence of NAD(P)H (reductants) and FAD coenzymes. Reduction of Fe(III)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was monitored spectrophotometrically by the Fe(II)-bathophenanthroline disulfonate complex formation. FCR activity, that is production of free Fe(II) for Fe uptake, showed biphasic saturation kinetics, and was clearly associated only to chloroplast inner envelope (cIE) vesicles. The reaction rate was > 2.5 times higher with NADPH than with NADH, which indicates the natural coenzyme preference of cFRO activity and its dependence on photosynthesis. FCR activity of cIE vesicles isolated from Fe-deficient plants also showed clear biphasic kinetics, where the KM of the low affinity component was elevated, and thus this component was down-regulated.

  12. Mechanistic insights on the ortho-hydroxylation of aromatic compounds by non-heme iron complex: a computational case study on the comparative oxidative ability of ferric-hydroperoxo and high-valent Fe(IV)═O and Fe(V)═O intermediates.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Azaj; Kaushik, Abhishek; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2013-03-20

    ortho-Hydroxylation of aromatic compounds by non-heme Fe complexes has been extensively studied in recent years by several research groups. The nature of the proposed oxidant varies from Fe(III)-OOH to high-valent Fe(IV)═O and Fe(V)═O species, and no definitive consensus has emerged. In this comprehensive study, we have investigated the ortho-hydroxylation of aromatic compounds by an iron complex using hybrid density functional theory incorporating dispersion effects. Three different oxidants, Fe(III)-OOH, Fe(IV)═O, and Fe(V)═O, and two different pathways, H-abstraction and electrophilic attack, have been considered to test the oxidative ability of different oxidants and to underpin the exact mechanism of this regiospecific reaction. By mapping the potential energy surface of each oxidant, our calculations categorize Fe(III)-OOH as a sluggish oxidant, as both proximal and distal oxygen atoms of this species have prohibitively high barriers to carry out the aromatic hydroxylation. This is in agreement to the experimental observation where Fe(III)-OOH is found not to directly attack the aromatic ring. A novel mechanism for the explicit generation of non-heme Fe(IV)═O and Fe(V)═O from isomeric forms of Fe(III)-OOH has been proposed where the O···O bond is found to cleave via homolytic (Fe(IV)═O) or heterolytic (Fe(V)═O) fashion exclusively. Apart from having favorable formation energies, the Fe(V)═O species also has a lower barrier height compared to the corresponding Fe(IV)═O species for the aromatic ortho-hydroxylation reaction. The transient Fe(V)═O prefers electrophilic attack on the benzene ring rather than the usual aromatic C-H activation step. A large thermodynamic drive for the formation of a radical intermediate is encountered in the mechanistic scene, and this intermediate substantially diminishes the energy barrier required for C-H activation by the Fe(V)═O species. Further spin density distribution and the frontier orbitals of

  13. Comparison of the effiency of aluminium and ferric sulphate in the removal of natural organic matter during drinking water treatment process.

    PubMed

    Matilainen, A; Lindqvist, N; Tuhkanen, T

    2005-08-01

    The removal of natural organic matter by coagulation in the drinking water treatment train was studied for a period of two years. In the middle of the study, the coagulation/flotation process was modified by replacing the aluminium sulphate by ferric sulphate. At the same time, the filtration unit was enhanced by adding a sand filter unit before the activated carbon filtration and by changing new carbons on to the activated carbon filters. A special aim was to compare the efficiency of the aluminium and ferric coagulants in the organic matter removal by several methods, including high-performance size-exclusion chromatography. A comparison of quantity and characteristics of organic matter in treated water before and after treatment process modification provided an insight into process performance. Approximately 95% of high molar mass organic substances were removed in the process with both coagulation agents. The greatest difference between the coagulants occurred in the removal of organic matter having molar masses of 1000-4000 g mol(-1). These intermediate molar mass organic compounds were removed 25% more efficiently with iron-based coagulant than with aluminium-based. Low molar mass material was poorly removed regardless of the coagulant. On average, only 10% of this fraction was removed. According to different measuring techniques used in the study, the ferric sulphate coagulation was 10% more efficient in the overall organic matter removal compared to the aluminium sulphate coagulation. Turbidity removal was more efficient with aluminium than with ferric sulphate. Turbidity even increased during winter in ferric sulphate coagulation. However, turbidity was effectively removed in filtrations.

  14. Ferric and cobaltous hydroacid complexes for forward osmosis (FO) processes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qingchun; Fu, Fengjiang; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2014-07-01

    Cupric and ferric hydroacid complexes have proven their advantages as draw solutes in forward osmosis in terms of high water fluxes, negligible reverse solute fluxes and easy recovery (Ge and Chung, 2013. Hydroacid complexes: A new class of draw solutes to promote forward osmosis (FO) processes. Chemical Communications 49, 8471-8473.). In this study, cobaltous hydroacid complexes were explored as draw solutes and compared with the ferric hydroacid complex to study the factors influencing their FO performance. The solutions of the cobaltous complexes produce high osmotic pressures due to the presence of abundant hydrophilic groups. These solutes are able to dissociate and form a multi-charged anion and Na(+) cations in water. In addition, these complexes have expanded structures which lead to negligible reverse solute fluxes and provide relatively easy approaches in regeneration. These characteristics make the newly synthesized cobaltous complexes appropriate as draw solutes. The FO performance of the cobaltous and ferric-citric acid (Fe-CA) complexes were evaluated respectively through cellulose acetate membranes, thin-film composite membranes fabricated on polyethersulfone supports (referred as TFC-PES), and polybenzimidazole and PES dual-layer (referred as PBI/PES) hollow fiber membranes. Under the conditions of DI water as the feed and facing the support layer of TFC-PES FO membranes (PRO mode), draw solutions at 2.0 M produced relatively high water fluxes of 39-48 LMH (L m(-2) hr(-1)) with negligible reverse solute fluxes. A water flux of 17.4 LMH was achieved when model seawater of 3.5 wt.% NaCl replaced DI water as the feed and 2.0 M Fe-CA as the draw solution under the same conditions. The performance of these hydroacid complexes surpasses those of the synthetic draw solutes developed in recent years. This observation, along with the relatively easy regeneration, makes these complexes very promising as a novel class of draw solutes.

  15. Ferric and cobaltous hydroacid complexes for forward osmosis (FO) processes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qingchun; Fu, Fengjiang; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2014-07-01

    Cupric and ferric hydroacid complexes have proven their advantages as draw solutes in forward osmosis in terms of high water fluxes, negligible reverse solute fluxes and easy recovery (Ge and Chung, 2013. Hydroacid complexes: A new class of draw solutes to promote forward osmosis (FO) processes. Chemical Communications 49, 8471-8473.). In this study, cobaltous hydroacid complexes were explored as draw solutes and compared with the ferric hydroacid complex to study the factors influencing their FO performance. The solutions of the cobaltous complexes produce high osmotic pressures due to the presence of abundant hydrophilic groups. These solutes are able to dissociate and form a multi-charged anion and Na(+) cations in water. In addition, these complexes have expanded structures which lead to negligible reverse solute fluxes and provide relatively easy approaches in regeneration. These characteristics make the newly synthesized cobaltous complexes appropriate as draw solutes. The FO performance of the cobaltous and ferric-citric acid (Fe-CA) complexes were evaluated respectively through cellulose acetate membranes, thin-film composite membranes fabricated on polyethersulfone supports (referred as TFC-PES), and polybenzimidazole and PES dual-layer (referred as PBI/PES) hollow fiber membranes. Under the conditions of DI water as the feed and facing the support layer of TFC-PES FO membranes (PRO mode), draw solutions at 2.0 M produced relatively high water fluxes of 39-48 LMH (L m(-2) hr(-1)) with negligible reverse solute fluxes. A water flux of 17.4 LMH was achieved when model seawater of 3.5 wt.% NaCl replaced DI water as the feed and 2.0 M Fe-CA as the draw solution under the same conditions. The performance of these hydroacid complexes surpasses those of the synthetic draw solutes developed in recent years. This observation, along with the relatively easy regeneration, makes these complexes very promising as a novel class of draw solutes. PMID:24768702

  16. Functional analysis of the ferric uptake requlator gene, fur, in Xanthomonas vesicatoria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron is essential for the growth and survival of many organisms. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron toxicity. The ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) regulates the high-affinity ferric uptake system in many bacteria. To investigate the f...

  17. Riboflavin Phototransformation on the Changes of Antioxidant Capacities in Phenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Song, Juhee; Seol, Nam Gyu; Kim, Mi-Ja; Lee, JaeHwan

    2016-08-01

    Eight phenolic compounds including: p-coumaric acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, trolox, quercetin, curcumin, and resveratrol were treated with riboflavin (RF) photosensitization and in vitro antioxidant capacities of the mixtures were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2' azino bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Mixtures containing p-coumaric acid and vanillic acid under RF photosensitization showed increases in ferric ion reducing ability and radical scavenging activity of DPPH, whereas mixtures of other compounds had decreases in both radical scavenging ability and ferric reducing antioxidant power. Hydroxycoumaric acid and conjugated hydroxycoumaric and coumaric acids were tentatively identified from RF photosensitized p-coumaric acid, whereas dimmers of vanillic acid were tentatively identified from RF photosensitized vanillic acid. RF photosensitization may be a useful method to enhance antioxidant properties like ferric ion reducing abilities of some selected phenolic compounds.

  18. Riboflavin Phototransformation on the Changes of Antioxidant Capacities in Phenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Song, Juhee; Seol, Nam Gyu; Kim, Mi-Ja; Lee, JaeHwan

    2016-08-01

    Eight phenolic compounds including: p-coumaric acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, trolox, quercetin, curcumin, and resveratrol were treated with riboflavin (RF) photosensitization and in vitro antioxidant capacities of the mixtures were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2' azino bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Mixtures containing p-coumaric acid and vanillic acid under RF photosensitization showed increases in ferric ion reducing ability and radical scavenging activity of DPPH, whereas mixtures of other compounds had decreases in both radical scavenging ability and ferric reducing antioxidant power. Hydroxycoumaric acid and conjugated hydroxycoumaric and coumaric acids were tentatively identified from RF photosensitized p-coumaric acid, whereas dimmers of vanillic acid were tentatively identified from RF photosensitized vanillic acid. RF photosensitization may be a useful method to enhance antioxidant properties like ferric ion reducing abilities of some selected phenolic compounds. PMID:27387389

  19. Ferric oxide quantum dots in stable phosphate glass system and their magneto-optical study

    SciTech Connect

    Garaje, Sunil N.; Apte, Sanjay K.; Kumar, Ganpathy; Panmand, Rajendra P.; Naik, Sonali D.; Mahajan, Satish M.; Chand, Ramesh; Kale, Bharat B.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: We report synthesis of ferric oxide embedded low melting phosphate glass nanocomposite and also the effect of ferric oxide nanoparticles (NCs) content on the optical and magneto-optical properties of the glasses. Faraday rotation of the glass nanocomposites was measured and showed variation in Verdet constant with concentration of ferric oxide. Interestingly, the host glass itself showed fairly good Verdet constant (11.5°/T cm) and there is a threefold enhancement in the Verdet constant of ferric oxide quantum dot-glass nanocomposite. Highlights: ► We synthesize ferric oxide embedded low melting stable phosphate glass nanocomposite. ► Glasses doped with 0.25 and 2% ferric oxide show particle size in the range of 4–12 nm. ► The host phosphate glass itself shows fairly good Verdet constant (11.5°/T cm). ► Glasses doped with 0.25% ferric oxide show high Verdet constant (30.525°/T cm). ► The as synthesis glasses may have potential application in magneto optical devices. -- Abstract: Herein, we report the synthesis of ferric oxide embedded low melting phosphate glass nanocomposite and also the effect of ferric oxide nanoparticles content on the optical and magneto-optical properties of the glasses. The optical study clearly showed red shift in optical cut off with increasing ferric oxide concentration. The band gap of the host glass was observed to be 3.48 eV and it shifted to 3.14 eV after doping with ferric oxide. The glasses doped with 0.25 and 2% ferric oxide showed particle size of 4–6 nm and 8–12 nm, respectively. Faraday rotation of the glass nanocomposites was measured and showed variation in the Verdet constant as per increasing concentration of ferric oxide. Interestingly, the host glass itself showed fairly good Verdet constant (11.5°/T cm) and threefold enhancement was observed in the Verdet constant of ferric oxide quantum dot-glass nanocomposite.

  20. Synchrotron Characterization of Hydrogen and Ferric Iron in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyar, Melinda D.

    2003-01-01

    The hydrogen budget of the Martian interior is distributed among several phases: melts, hydrous minerals, and nominally anhydrous minerals like olivine, pyroxene, and garnet. All these phases are vulnerable to loss of hydrogen during shock, excavation and transport via the mechanism of dehydrogenation, in which the charge on the H protons is left behind as polarons on Fe atoms. Thus, both H and F(3x) must be analyzed in order to reconstruct hydrogen and oxygen fugacities on Mars. To date, SIMS data have elucidated D/H and H contents of hydrous phases in SNC meteorites, but anhydrous martian minerals have not been systematically examined for trace hydrogen. Ferric iron has been quantified using XANES in many marital phases, but integrated studies of both Fe(3x) and H on the same spots are really needed to address the H budget. Here, we measure and profile H and Fe(3x) abundances in and across individual grains of glass and silicates in Martian meteorites. We use the new technology of synchrotron microFI'lR spectroscopy to measure the hydrogen contents of hydrous and nominally anhydrous minerals in martian meteorites on 30-100 microns thick, doubly polished thin sections on spots down to 3 x 3 microns. Synchrotron microXANES was used to analyze Fe(3x) on the same scale, and complementary SIMS D/H data will be collected where possible, though at a slightly larger scale. Development of this combination of techniques is critical because future sample return missions will generate only microscopic samples for study. Results have been used to quantitatively assess the distribution of hydrogen and ferric iron among phases in the martian interior, which will better constrain the geodynamic processes of the interior, as well as the overall hydrogen and water budgets on Mars.

  1. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates.

    PubMed

    Ahoranta, Sarita H; Kokko, Marika E; Papirio, Stefano; Özkaya, Bestamin; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of acidic solution containing 5g/L of Fe(II) and 10mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7h, 96-98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pH<2.4. As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the system. In shake flask experiments, As(V) sorbed onto jarosite better than As(III). Moreover, the sorption capacity of biogenic jarosite was significantly higher than that of synthetic jarosite. The developed bioprocess simultaneously and efficiently removes iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment. PMID:26705889

  2. Glyphosate inhibition of ferric reductase activity in iron deficient sunflower roots.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Levent; Yazici, Atilla; Eker, Selim; Gokmen, Ozgur; Römheld, Volker; Cakmak, Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is increasingly being observed in cropping systems with frequent glyphosate applications. A likely reason for this is that glyphosate interferes with root uptake of Fe by inhibiting ferric reductase in roots required for Fe acquisition by dicot and nongrass species. This study investigated the role of drift rates of glyphosate (0.32, 0.95 or 1.89 mm glyphosate corresponding to 1, 3 and 6% of the recommended herbicidal dose, respectively) on ferric reductase activity of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) roots grown under Fe deficiency conditions. Application of 1.89 mm glyphosate resulted in almost 50% inhibition of ferric reductase within 6 h and complete inhibition 24 h after the treatment. Even at lower rates of glyphosate (e.g. 0.32 mm and 0.95 mm), ferric reductase was inhibited. Soluble sugar concentration and the NAD(P)H oxidizing capacity of apical roots were not decreased by the glyphosate applications. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the effects of glyphosate on ferric reductase activity. The nature of the inhibitory effect of glyphosate on ferric reductase could not be identified. Impaired ferric reductase could be a major reason for the increasingly observed Fe deficiency in cropping systems associated with widespread glyphosate usage.

  3. Degradation of the ferric chelate of EDTA by a pure culture of an Agrobacterium sp

    SciTech Connect

    Lauff, J.J.; Coogan, L.A.; Breitfeller, J.M. ); Steele, D.B. )

    1990-11-01

    A pure culture of an Agrobacterium sp. (deposited as ATCC 55002) the mineralizes the ferric chelate of EDTA (ferric-EDTA) was isolated by selective enrichment from a treatment facility receiving industrial waste containing ferric-EDTA. The isolated grew on ferric-EDTA as the sole carbon source at concentrations exceeding 100 mM. As the degradation proceeded, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and an unidentified metabolite(s) were produced; the pH increased, and iron was precipitated from solution. The maximum rate of degradation observed with sodium ferric-EDTA as the substrate was 24 mM/day. At a substrate concentration of 35 mM, 90% of the substrate was degraded in 3 days and 70% of the associated chemical oxygen demand was removed from solution. Less than 15% of the carbon initially present was incorporated into the cell mass. Significant growth of this strain was not observed with uncomplexed EDTA as the sole carbon source at comparable concentrations; however, the ferric chelate of propylenediaminetetraacetic acid (ferric-PDTA) did support growth.

  4. [Characteristic of natural organic matter removal by ferric and aluminium coagulation].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Yong-Ji; Sun, Li-Hua; Li, Gui-Bai

    2008-05-01

    Natural organic matter removal efficiency and characteristic by ferric chloride and aluminium sulphate were studied. Results showed that ferric chloride was effective in natural organic matter removal when coagulant dosage was higher than 15 mg/L, while aluminium was effective at lower dosage. The TOC of water was reduced to 4.19 mg/L and 9 mg/L at a dosage of 10 mg/L for aluminium sulphate and ferric chloride respectively, while TOC was reduced to 2.44 mg/L and 1.69 mg/L at the dosage of 20 mg/L. Ferric chloride decreased pH sharply than aluminium sulphate which made hydrolysate more positive and attachable for natural organic matter. UV254 and SUVA results showed that ferric chloride removed more conjugate structure materials and unsaturated band contents than aluminium. Ferric chloride was more effective in reducing lower molecular weight organic matter and hydrophilic substances than aluminium, when the dosage of coagulant was 20 mg/L, the removal efficiency of relative molecular weight below 10 000 was 16.4% and 6.1% respectively, while aluminum was more effective in high molecular weight matter removal than ferric chloride.

  5. Near the Ferric Pseudobrookite Composition (Fe2TiO5).

    PubMed

    Seitz, Guillaume; Penin, Nicolas; Decoux, Léa; Wattiaux, Alain; Duttine, Mathieu; Gaudon, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    Because of a very low thermodynamic stability, obtaining a pure monophasic compound of ferric pseudobrookite is quite difficult to achieve. Indeed, the low reticular energy of this phase leads easily to its decomposition and the occurrence of the secondary phases: hematite (Fe2O3) and/or rutile (TiO2). Samples with global composition Fe2-xTi1+xO5 (x = 0, 0.05, and 0.10) have been synthesized by the Pechini route and, thereafter, thermally treated at different temperatures. The concentrations of Fe2O3 and TiO2 secondary phases were accurately determined and correlated with the target compositions and the synthesis parameters, especially the thermal treatment temperature. As revealed by Mössbauer spectroscopy, all iron ions are at the III+ oxidation state. Thus, the formation of hematite or rutile as a secondary phase may be related to the occurrence of cationic vacancies within the pseudobrookite structure, with the amount of vacancies depending on the annealing temperature. In light of the presented results, it appears unreasonable to propose a "fixed" binary phase diagram for such a complex system. Furthermore, the occurrence of cationic vacancies induces a coloration change (darkening), preventing any industrial use of this reddish-brown pseudobrookite as a ceramic pigment. PMID:26866894

  6. Kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of adsorption of arsenic onto granular ferric hydroxide (GFH).

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kashi; Amy, Gary L; Prevost, Michele; Nour, Shokoufeh; Jekel, Martin; Gallagher, Paul M; Blumenschein, Charles D

    2008-07-01

    Relatively limited information is available regarding the impacts of temperature on the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium capacities of granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) for arsenic (V) and arsenic (III) in an aqueous solution. In general, very little information is available on the kinetics and thermodynamic aspects of adsorption of arsenic compounds onto other iron oxide-based adsorbents as well. In order to gain an understanding of the adsorption process kinetics, a detailed study was conducted in a controlled batch system. The effects of temperature and pH on the adsorption rates of arsenic (V) and arsenic (III) were investigated. Reaction rate constants were calculated at pH levels of 6.5 and 7.5. Rate data are best described by a pseudo first-order kinetic model at each temperature and pH condition studied. At lower pH values, arsenic (V) exhibits greater removal rates than arsenic (III). An increase in temperature increases the overall adsorption reaction rate constant values for both arsenic (V) and arsenic (III). An examination of thermodynamic parameters shows that the adsorption of arsenic (V) as well as arsenic (III) by GFH is an endothermic process and is spontaneous at the specific temperatures investigated.

  7. Mössbauer and infrared spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for the characterization of ferric tannates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, Juan A.; Navarro, César

    2009-07-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy are use for the characterization and qualitative analysis of hydrolysable and condensed tannates. The two classes of tannates may be differentiated from the characteristic IR pattern. Mössbauer proof that a mixture of mono- and bis-type ferric tannate complexes, and an iron(II)-tannin complex are obtained from the interaction of hydrolysable tannins (tannic acid and chestnut tannin) and condensed tannins (mimosa and quebracho) with a ferric nitrate solution. At pH 7, a partially hydrolyzed ferric tannate complex was also obtained.

  8. Ferric Phosphate Hydroxide Microstructures Affect Their Magnetic Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junhong; Zhang, Youjuan; Run, Zhen; Li, Pengwei; Guo, Qifei; Pang, Huan

    2015-06-01

    Uniformly sized and shape-controlled nanoparticles are important due to their applications in catalysis, electrochemistry, ion exchange, molecular adsorption, and electronics. Several ferric phosphate hydroxide (Fe4(OH)3(PO4)3) microstructures were successfully prepared under hydrothermal conditions. Using controlled variations in the reaction conditions, such as reaction time, temperature, and amount of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), the crystals can be grown as almost perfect hyperbranched microcrystals at 180 °C (without CTAB) or relatively monodisperse particles at 220 °C (with CTAB). The large hyperbranched structure of Fe4(OH)3(PO4)3 with a size of ∼19 μm forms with the "fractal growth rule" and shows many branches. More importantly, the magnetic properties of these materials are directly correlated to their size and micro/nanostructure morphology. Interestingly, the blocking temperature (T B) shows a dependence on size and shape, and a smaller size resulted in a lower T B. These crystals are good examples that prove that physical and chemical properties of nano/microstructured materials are related to their structures, and the precise control of the morphology of such functional materials could allow for the control of their performance.

  9. Dietary bioavailability of Cu adsorbed to colloidal hydrous ferric oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, Daniel J.; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The dietary bioavailability of copper (Cu) adsorbed to synthetic colloidal hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was evaluated from the assimilation of 65Cu by two benthic grazers, a gastropod and a larval mayfly. HFO was synthesized, labeled with 65Cu to achieve a Cu/Fe ratio comparable to that determined in naturally formed HFO, and then aged. The labeled colloids were mixed with a food source (the diatom Nitzschia palea) to yield dietary 65Cu concentrations ranging from 211 to 2204 nmol/g (dry weight). Animals were pulse fed the contaminated diet and assimilation of 65Cu from HFO was determined following 1–3 days of depuration. Mass transfer of 65Cu from HFO to the diatom was less than 1%, indicating that HFO was the source of 65Cu to the grazers. Estimates of assimilation efficiency indicated that the majority of Cu ingested as HFO was assimilated (values >70%), implying that colloidal HFO potentially represents a source of dietary Cu to benthic grazers, especially where there is active formation and infiltration of these particles into benthic substrates.

  10. Defluoridation from aqueous solutions by granular ferric hydroxide (GFH).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Eva; Bhatnagar, Amit; Ji, Minkyu; Jung, Woosik; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Sun-Joon; Lee, Giehyeon; Song, Hocheol; Choi, Jae-Young; Yang, Jung-Seok; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2009-02-01

    This research was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) for fluoride removal from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments were performed to study the influence of various experimental parameters such as contact time (1 min-24h), initial fluoride concentration (1-100 mgL(-1)), temperature (10 and 25 degrees C), pH (3-12) and the presence of competing anions on the adsorption of fluoride on GFH. Kinetic data revealed that the uptake rate of fluoride was rapid in the beginning and 95% adsorption was completed within 10 min and equilibrium was achieved within 60 min. The sorption process was well explained with pseudo-first-order and pore diffusion models. The maximum adsorption capacity of GFH for fluoride removal was 7.0 mgg(-1). The adsorption was found to be an endothermic process and data conform to Langmuir model. The optimum fluoride removal was observed between pH ranges of 4-8. The fluoride adsorption was decreased in the presence of phosphate followed by carbonate and sulphate. Results from this study demonstrated potential utility of GFH that could be developed into a viable technology for fluoride removal from drinking water.

  11. Localized corrosion of candidate container materials in ferric chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, D L; Lum, B Y; Roy, A K

    1998-10-01

    Localized corrosion behavior of candidate inner and outer container materials of currently-designed nuclear waste package was evaluated in aqueous solutions of various concentrations of ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) at 30 C, 60 C and 90 C using the electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique. Materials tested include A 5 16 carbon steel and high-performance alloys 825, G-3, G-30, C-4, 625. C-22, and Ti Gr-12. A 516 steel suffered from severe general and localized attack including pitting and crevice corrosion. High-nickel alloys 825 and G-3 also became susceptible to severe pitting and crevice corrosion. The extent of localized attack was less pronounced in alloys G-30 and C-4. Alloy 625 experienced severe surface degradation including general corrosion, crevice corrosion and intergranular attack. In contrast, only a slight crevice corrosion tendency was observed with nickel-base alloy C-22 in solutions containing higher concentrations of FeCl{sub 3} at 60 C and 90 C. Ti Gr-12 was immune to localized attack in all tested environments. The test solutions showed significant amount of precipitated particles during and after testing especially at higher temperatures.

  12. Exfoliation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Ferric Chloride Intercalation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana; Rogers, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) was used as an activation agent to successfully intercalate ferric chloride (FeCl3) into hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). This reaction caused the hBN mass to increase by approx.100 percent, the lattice parameter c to decrease from 6.6585 to between 6.6565 and 6.6569 ?, the x-ray diffraction (XRD) (002) peak to widen from 0.01deg to 0.05deg of the full width half maximum value, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum's broad band (1277/cm peak) to change shape, and new FTIR bands to emerge at 3700 to 2700 and 1600/cm. This indicates hBN's structural and chemical properties are significantly changed. The intercalated product was hygroscopic and interacted with moisture in the air to cause further structural and chemical changes (from XRD and FTIR). During a 24-h hold at room temperature in air with 100 percent relative humidity, the mass increased another 141 percent. The intercalated product, hydrated or not, can be heated to 750 C in air to cause exfoliation. Exfoliation becomes significant after two intercalation-air heating cycles, when 20-nm nanosheets are commonly found. Structural and chemical changes indicated by XRD and FTIR data were nearly reversed after the product was placed in hydrochloric acid (HCl), resulting in purified, exfoliated, thin hBN products.

  13. Total X-ray scattering, EXAFS, and Mössbauer spectroscopy analyses of amorphous ferric arsenate and amorphous ferric phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Christian; Schröder, Christian; Marc Michel, F.

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous ferric arsenate (AFA, FeAsO4·xH2O) is an important As precipitate in a range of oxic As-rich environments, especially acidic sulfide-bearing mine wastes. Its structure has been proposed to consist of small polymers of single corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra (rFe-Fe ∼3.6 Å) to which arsenate is attached as a monodentate binuclear 2C complex (‘chain model’). Here, we analyzed the structure of AFA and analogously prepared amorphous ferric phosphates (AFP, FePO4·xH2O) by a combination of high-energy total X-ray scattering, Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of total X-ray scattering data revealed that the coherently scattering domain size of AFA and AFP is about 8 Å. The PDFs of AFA lacked Fe-Fe pair correlations at r ∼3.6 Å indicative of single corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra, which strongly supports a local scorodite (FeAsO4·2H2O) structure. Likewise, the PDFs and Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure data of AFP were consistent with a local strengite (FePO4·2H2O) structure of isolated FeO6 octahedra being corner-linked to PO4 tetrahedra (rFe-P = 3.25(1) Å). Mössbauer spectroscopy analyses of AFA and AFP indicated a strong superparamagnetism. While AFA only showed a weak onset of magnetic hyperfine splitting at 5 K, magnetic ordering of AFP was completely absent at this temperature. Mössbauer spectroscopy may thus offer a convenient way to identify and quantify AFA and AFP in mineral mixtures containing poorly crystalline Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides. In summary, our results imply a close structural relationship between AFA and AFP and suggest that these amorphous materials serve as templates for the formation of scorodite and strengite (phosphosiderite) in strongly acidic low-temperature environments.

  14. An investigation of carbonaceous materials reducing ferric ions in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, A. V.; Chilton, J. P.; Fray, D. J.

    1988-10-01

    By substituting the ferrous to ferric oxidation for anodic oxygen evolution in an electrowinning cell, it is possible to reduce the cell voltage by about 1 V. However, it is then necessary to reduce the ferric back to ferrous and, depending on the circumstances, acid needs to be cogenerated. Various possible reductants are discussed, and experiments are described on the use of lignite and other carbonaceous materials to reduce the ferric ion. It was found that lignite was able to reduce the ferric ion, in situ in the electrowinning cell, but that the rate of reduction was compatible only with a maximum current density of about 40 Am-2. The efficiency was increased by periodically interrupting the current flow.

  15. Granulation and ferric oxides loading enable biochar derived from cotton stalk to remove phosphate from water.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing; Li, Nan; Li, Lei; An, Jing-Kun; Zhao, Lin; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2015-02-01

    Granulation of biochar powder followed by immobilization of ferric oxides on the macroporous granular biochar (Bg-FO-1) substantially enhanced phosphate removal from water. BET analysis confirmed that both granulation and ferric oxides loading can increase the surface areas and pore volumes effectively. Bg-FO-1 was proven to be a favorable adsorbent for phosphate. The phosphate adsorption capacity was substantially increased from 0 mg/g of raw biochar powder to 0.963 mg/g (Bg-FO-1). When the ferric oxides loading was prior to granulation, the adsorption capacity was decreased by 59-0.399 mg/g, possibly due to the decrease of micropore and mesopore area as well as the overlaying of binders to the activated sites produced by ferric oxides.

  16. Ferrous versus Ferric Oral Iron Formulations for the Treatment of Iron Deficiency: A Clinical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Palacios

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia represents a major public health problem, particularly in infants, young children, pregnant women, and females with heavy menses. Oral iron supplementation is a cheap, safe, and effective means of increasing haemoglobin levels and restoring iron stores to prevent and correct iron deficiency. Many preparations are available, varying widely in dosage, formulation (quick or prolonged release), and chemical state (ferrous or ferric form). The debate over the advantages of ferrous versus ferric formulations is ongoing. In this literature review, the tolerability and efficacy of ferrous versus ferric iron formulations are evaluated. We focused on studies comparing ferrous sulphate preparations with ferric iron polymaltose complex preparations, the two predominant forms of iron used. Current data show that slow-release ferrous sulphate preparations remain the established and standard treatment of iron deficiency, irrespective of the indication, given their good bioavailability, efficacy, and acceptable tolerability demonstrated in several large clinical studies. PMID:22654638

  17. Graphene-supported ferric porphyrin as a peroxidase mimic for electrochemical DNA biosensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanbo; Lei, Jianping; Deng, Shengyuan; Zhang, Lei; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-01-30

    A novel peroxidase mimic was designed by loading ferric porphyrin and streptavidin onto graphene, which was used to recognize a biotinylated molecular beacon for specific electrochemical detection of DNA down to attomolar levels.

  18. Syzyguim guineense Extracts Show Antioxidant Activities and Beneficial Activities on Oxidative Stress Induced by Ferric Chloride in the Liver Homogenate

    PubMed Central

    Pieme, Constant Anatole; Ngoupayo, Joseph; Khou-Kouz Nkoulou, Claude Herve; Moukette Moukette, Bruno; Njinkio Nono, Borgia Legrand; Ama Moor, Vicky Jocelyne; Ze Minkande, Jacqueline; Yonkeu Ngogang, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro antioxidant activity, free radical scavenging property and the beneficial effects of extracts of various parts of Syzygium guineense in reducing oxidative stress damage in the liver. The effects of extracts on free radicals were determined on radicals DPPH, ABTS, NO and OH followed by the antioxidant properties using Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assay (FRAP) and hosphomolybdenum (PPMB). The phytochemical screening of these extracts was performed by determination of the phenolic content. The oxidative damage inhibition in the liver was determined by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase. Overall, the bark extract of the ethanol/water or methanol showed the highest radical scavenging activities against DPPH, ABTS and OH radicals compared to the other extracts. This extract also contained the highest phenolic content implying the potential contribution of phenolic compounds towards the antioxidant activities. However, the methanol extract of the root demonstrated the highest protective effects of SOD and CAT against ferric chloride while the hydro-ethanol extract of the leaves exhibited the highest inhibitory effects on lipid peroxidation. These findings suggest that antioxidant properties of S. guineense extracts could be attributed to phenolic compounds revealed by phytochemical studies. Thus, the present results indicate clearly that the extracts of S. guineense possess antioxidant properties and could serve as free radical inhibitors or scavengers, acting possibly as primary antioxidants. The antioxidant properties of the bark extract may thus sustain its various biological activities. PMID:26785075

  19. [Arsenic (V) removal from drinking water by ferric salt and aluminum salt coagulation/microfiltration process].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-bo; Wu, Shui-bo; Gu, Ping

    2007-10-01

    Two lab-scale coagulation/microfiltration membrane reactors were used to compare the arsenic removal from drinking water by ferric salt and aluminum salt coagulation/microfiltration process. FeCl3 and Al2(SO4)3 were appointed as the coagulants. The results show that the arsenic removal efficiency of the two processes are almost equal. Arsenic concentration can be lowered from about 100 microg/L to below 10 microg/L and the lowest is 1.68 microg x L(-1). All of the turbidity of the treated water is less than 0.1 NTU. The concentrations of ferric, aluminum and SO4(2-) of the treated water are entirely satisfied the standard of drinking water. After treated by ferric salt process, pH value of the treated water is increased about 0.5. However, aluminum salt process does not change pH of the drinking water. The concentration ratio of the ferric salt process is 1,791 which is about 2.54 times of the aluminum salt process. Arsenic concentration of the sludge of ferric salt process is also higher greatly than that of the aluminum salt process. Therefore, the volume of the sludge produced by the ferric salt process is smaller than that of the aluminum salt process when equal amount of drinking water was treated. Accordingly, ferric salt process should be used when only high concentration arsenic existed in drinking water. On the other hand, fluoride also can be removed simultaneously while arsenic was removed by aluminum salt process. The amount of coagulant needed is the amount of coagulant required to remove fluoride separately. Fluoride can not be removed from drinking water by the ferric salt process. It was concluded that aluminum salt process should be used to remove arsenic and fluoride simultaneously from high arsenic and high fluoride coexisted drinking water.

  20. Method of treating inflammatory diseases using a radiolabeled ferric hydroxide calloid

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1992-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  1. Ferric gluconate reduces epoetin requirements in hemodialysis patients with elevated ferritin.

    PubMed

    Kapoian, Toros; O'Mara, Neeta B; Singh, Ajay K; Moran, John; Rizkala, Adel R; Geronemus, Robert; Kopelman, Robert C; Dahl, Naomi V; Coyne, Daniel W

    2008-02-01

    The Dialysis Patients Response to IV Iron with Elevated Ferritin (DRIVE) study demonstrated the efficacy of intravenous ferric gluconate to improve hemoglobin levels in anemic hemodialysis patients who were receiving adequate epoetin doses and who had ferritin levels between 500 and 1200 ng/ml and transferrin saturation (TSAT) < or = 25%. The DRIVE-II study reported here was a 6-wk observational extension designed to investigate how ferric gluconate impacted epoetin dosage after DRIVE. During DRIVE-II, treating nephrologists and anemia managers adjusted doses of epoetin and intravenous iron as clinically indicated. By the end of observation, patients in the ferric gluconate group required significantly less epoetin than their DRIVE dose (mean change of -7527 +/- 18,021 IU/wk, P = 0.003), whereas the epoetin dose essentially did not change for patients in the control group (mean change of 649 +/- 19,987 IU/wk, P = 0.809). Mean hemoglobin, TSAT, and serum ferritin levels remained higher in the ferric gluconate group than in the control group (P = 0.062, P < 0.001, and P = 0.014, respectively). Over the entire 12-wk study period (DRIVE plus DRIVE-II), the control group experienced significantly more serious adverse events than the ferric gluconate group (incidence rate ratio = 1.73, P = 0.041). In conclusion, ferric gluconate maintains hemoglobin and allows lower epoetin doses in anemic hemodialysis patients with low TSAT and ferritin levels up to 1200 ng/ml. PMID:18216316

  2. The substitution of Fe2+ ions by Ni2+ ions in green rust one compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refait, Ph.; Drissi, H.; Marie, Y.; Génin, J.-M. R.

    1994-12-01

    The oxidation of Fe(OH)2 in the presence of Cl- or CO{3/2-} ions leads, in the first stage of the reaction, to chloride-containing green rust one (GR1), 3Fe(OH)2· Fe(OH)2Cl· nH2O, or carbonate-containing GR1, 4Fe(OH)2·Fe2(OH)4CO3·nH2O, respectively. These GR1 compounds give the ferric oxyhydroxides by further oxidation. If a hydroxide Ni x Fe1- x (OH)2 is initially precipitated, the reaction leads to a nickelous-ferric compound isomorphous to the ferrous-ferric GR1, but stable with respect to the oxidizing action of air. Similarly, the oxidation of a nickelous-ferrous hydroxide, in the presence of excess OH- ions, leads to a nickelous-ferric GR1, a layered hydroxide with anionic interlayers made of OH- ions and water molecules. The Mössbauer spectra of these nickelousferric GR1 display two ferric doublets, D0 with IS=0.34 mm/s and QS=0.45 mm/s and D1 with IS=0.36 mm/s and QS=0.86 mm/s. The existence of a ferrous-ferric GR1 incorporating OH- ions, a compound never observed so far, is strongly suspected.

  3. Concentration of MS2 phage in river water by a combined ferric colloid adsorption and foam separation-based method, with MS2 phage leaching from ferric colloid.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Takumi; Nishiyama, Masateru; Kono, Tomoya

    2016-08-01

    The concentration of MS2 phage as a model RNA virus in river water using a combined ferric colloid adsorption and foam separation-based method was examined. The MS2 phage concentrations were determined by the plaque-forming unit (PFU) method and reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis. When ferric colloid adsorption was performed prior to foam separation, MS2 phage was effectively removed from river water and concentrated in the generated foam within 7 min. The removal efficiency was >99% at the optimum iron and casein concentrations of 5 mg-Fe/L and 10 mg/L, respectively. Furthermore, based on the analysis of the collected ferric colloid dissolved using deferoxamine, the MS2 concentration in the colloid-dissolved solution was 190-fold higher than that found in raw water according to RT-qPCR analysis. This is a novel method for concentrating RNA viruses to facilitate their detection in river water using coagulation and foam separation combined with chelate dissolution of ferric flocs.

  4. Concentration of MS2 phage in river water by a combined ferric colloid adsorption and foam separation-based method, with MS2 phage leaching from ferric colloid.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Takumi; Nishiyama, Masateru; Kono, Tomoya

    2016-08-01

    The concentration of MS2 phage as a model RNA virus in river water using a combined ferric colloid adsorption and foam separation-based method was examined. The MS2 phage concentrations were determined by the plaque-forming unit (PFU) method and reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis. When ferric colloid adsorption was performed prior to foam separation, MS2 phage was effectively removed from river water and concentrated in the generated foam within 7 min. The removal efficiency was >99% at the optimum iron and casein concentrations of 5 mg-Fe/L and 10 mg/L, respectively. Furthermore, based on the analysis of the collected ferric colloid dissolved using deferoxamine, the MS2 concentration in the colloid-dissolved solution was 190-fold higher than that found in raw water according to RT-qPCR analysis. This is a novel method for concentrating RNA viruses to facilitate their detection in river water using coagulation and foam separation combined with chelate dissolution of ferric flocs. PMID:26868517

  5. Growth, spectroscopic and physicochemical properties of bis mercury ferric chloride tetra thiocyanate: A nonlinear optical crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, V.; Shihabuddeen Syed, A.; Jagannathan, K.; Rajarajan, K.

    2013-05-01

    Single crystal of bis mercury ferric chloride tetra thiocyanate [Hg2FeCl3(SCN)4; (MFCTC)] was grown from ethanol-water (3:1) mixed solvent using slow evaporation solvent technique (SEST) for the first time. The cell parameters of the grown crystal were confirmed by single crystal XRD. The coordination of transition metal ions with the SCN ligand is well-identified using FT-IR spectral analysis. The chemical composition of MFCTC was confirmed using CHNS elemental test. The ESR spectral profile of MFCTC was recorded from 298 K to 110 K, which strongly suggests the incorporation of Fe3+ ion and its environment with respect to SCN ligand. The HPLC chromatogram of MFCTC highlights the purity of the compound. The UV-Vis-NIR studies revealed the ultra violet cut-off wavelength of MFCTC in ethanol as 338 nm. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the sample were studied as a function of frequency and temperature. The TGA-DTA and DSC thermal analysis show that the sample is thermally stable up to 234.31 °C, which is comparatively far better than the thermal stability of Hg3CdCl2(SCN)6; (171.3 °C) and other metal-organic coordination complex crystals such as CdHg(SCN)4 (198.5 °C), Hg(N2H4CS)4Mn(SCN)4 (199.06 °C) and Hg(N2H4CS)4Zn(SCN)4 (185 °C). The SHG conversion efficiency of MFCTC is found to be higher than KDP.

  6. Effect of ferric and ferrous iron addition on phosphorus removal and fouling in submerged membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenghua; Wang, Yuan; Leslie, Greg L; Waite, T David

    2015-02-01

    The effect of continuously dosing membrane bioreactors (MBRs) with ferric chloride (Fe(III)) and ferrous sulphate (Fe(II)) on phosphorus (P) removal and membrane fouling is investigated here. Influent phosphorus concentrations of 10 mg/L were consistently reduced to effluent concentrations of less than 0.02 mg/L and 0.03-0.04 mg/L when an Fe(III)/P molar ratio of 4.0 and Fe/P molar ratio (for both Fe(II) and Fe(III)) of 2.0 were used, respectively. In comparison, effluent concentrations did not decrease below 1.35 mg/L in a control reactor to which iron was not added. The concentrations of supernatant organic compounds, particularly polysaccharides, were reduced significantly by iron addition. The sub-critical fouling time (tcrit) after which fouling becomes much more severe was substantially shorter with Fe(III) dosing (672 h) than with Fe(II) dosing (1200-1260 h) at Fe/P molar ratios of 2.0 while the control reactor (no iron dosing) exhibited a tcrit of 960 h. Not surprisingly, membrane fouling was substantially more severe at Fe/P ratios of 4. Fe(II) doses yielding Fe/P molar ratios of 2 or less with dosing to the aerobic chamber were found to be optimal in terms of P removal and fouling mitigation performance. In long term operation, however, the use of iron for maintaining appropriately low effluent P concentrations results in more severe irreversible fouling necessitating the application of an effective membrane cleaning regime.

  7. Quantitative determination of cesium binding to ferric hexacyanoferrate: Prussian blue.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Patrick J; Yang, Yongsheng; Progar, Joseph J; Brownell, Charles R; Sadrieh, Nakissa; May, Joan C; Leutzinger, Eldon; Place, David A; Duffy, Eric P; Houn, Florence; Loewke, Sally A; Mecozzi, Vincent J; Ellison, Christopher D; Khan, Mansoor A; Hussain, Ajaz S; Lyon, Robbe C

    2008-05-12

    Ferric hexacyanoferrate (Fe4III[FeII(CN)6]3), also known as insoluble Prussian blue (PB) is the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of the drug product, Radiogardase. Radiogardase is the first FDA approved medical countermeasure for the treatment of internal contamination with radioactive cesium (Cs) or thallium in the event of a major radiological incident such as a "dirty bomb". A number of pre-clinical and clinical studies have evaluated the use of PB as an investigational decorporation agent to enhance the excretion of metal cations. There are few sources of published in vitro data that detail the binding capacity of cesium to insoluble PB under various chemical and physical conditions. The study objective was to determine the in vitro binding capacity of PB APIs and drug products by evaluating certain chemical and physical factors such as medium pH, particle size, and storage conditions (temperature). In vitro experimental conditions ranged from pH 1 to 9, to cover the range of pH levels that PB may encounter in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in humans. Measurements of cesium binding were made between 1 and 24h, to cover gastric and intestinal tract residence time using a validated atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) method. The results indicated that pH, exposure time, storage temperature (affecting moisture content) and particle size play significant roles in the cesium binding to both the PB API and the drug product. The lowest cesium binding was observed at gastric pH of 1 and 2, whereas the highest cesium binding was observed at physiological pH of 7.5. It was observed that dry storage conditions resulted in a loss of moisture from PB, which had a significant negative effect on the PB cesium binding capacity at time intervals consistent with gastric residence. Differences were also observed in the binding capacity of PB with different particle sizes. Significant batch to batch differences were also observed in the binding capacity of some PB API and

  8. Quantitative determination of cesium binding to ferric hexacyanoferrate: Prussian blue.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Patrick J; Yang, Yongsheng; Progar, Joseph J; Brownell, Charles R; Sadrieh, Nakissa; May, Joan C; Leutzinger, Eldon; Place, David A; Duffy, Eric P; Houn, Florence; Loewke, Sally A; Mecozzi, Vincent J; Ellison, Christopher D; Khan, Mansoor A; Hussain, Ajaz S; Lyon, Robbe C

    2008-05-12

    Ferric hexacyanoferrate (Fe4III[FeII(CN)6]3), also known as insoluble Prussian blue (PB) is the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of the drug product, Radiogardase. Radiogardase is the first FDA approved medical countermeasure for the treatment of internal contamination with radioactive cesium (Cs) or thallium in the event of a major radiological incident such as a "dirty bomb". A number of pre-clinical and clinical studies have evaluated the use of PB as an investigational decorporation agent to enhance the excretion of metal cations. There are few sources of published in vitro data that detail the binding capacity of cesium to insoluble PB under various chemical and physical conditions. The study objective was to determine the in vitro binding capacity of PB APIs and drug products by evaluating certain chemical and physical factors such as medium pH, particle size, and storage conditions (temperature). In vitro experimental conditions ranged from pH 1 to 9, to cover the range of pH levels that PB may encounter in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in humans. Measurements of cesium binding were made between 1 and 24h, to cover gastric and intestinal tract residence time using a validated atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) method. The results indicated that pH, exposure time, storage temperature (affecting moisture content) and particle size play significant roles in the cesium binding to both the PB API and the drug product. The lowest cesium binding was observed at gastric pH of 1 and 2, whereas the highest cesium binding was observed at physiological pH of 7.5. It was observed that dry storage conditions resulted in a loss of moisture from PB, which had a significant negative effect on the PB cesium binding capacity at time intervals consistent with gastric residence. Differences were also observed in the binding capacity of PB with different particle sizes. Significant batch to batch differences were also observed in the binding capacity of some PB API and

  9. Modeling ferrous ferric iron chemistry with application to martian surface geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, Giles M.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Catling, David C.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Exploration Rover, and Mars Express missions have stimulated considerable thinking about the surficial geochemical evolution of Mars. Among the major recent mission findings are the presence of jarosite (a ferric sulfate salt), which requires formation from an acid-sulfate brine, and the occurrence of hematite and goethite on Mars. Recent ferric iron models have largely focused on 25 °C, which is a major limitation for models exploring the geochemical history of cold bodies such as Mars. Until recently, our work on low-temperature iron-bearing brines involved ferrous but not ferric iron, also obviously a limitation. The objectives of this work were to (1) add ferric iron chemistry to an existing ferrous iron model (FREZCHEM), (2) extend this ferrous/ferric iron geochemical model to lower temperatures (<0 °C), and (3) use the reformulated model to explore ferrous/ferric iron chemistries on Mars. The FREZCHEM model is an equilibrium chemical thermodynamic model parameterized for concentrated electrolyte solutions using the Pitzer approach for the temperature range from <-70 to 25 °C and the pressure range from 1 to 1000 bars. Ferric chloride and sulfate mineral parameterizations were based, in part, on experimental data. Ferric oxide/hydroxide mineral parameterizations were based exclusively on Gibbs free energy and enthalpy data. New iron parameterizations added 23 new ferrous/ferric minerals to the model for this Na-K-Mg-Ca-Fe(II)-Fe(III)-H-Cl-SO 4-NO 3-OH-HCO 3-CO 3-CO 2-O 2-CH 4-H 2O system. The model was used to develop paragenetic sequences for Rio Tinto waters on Earth and a hypothetical Martian brine derived from acid weathering of basaltic minerals. In general, model simulations were in agreement with field evidence on Earth and Mars in predicting precipitation of stable iron minerals such as jarosites, goethite, and hematite. In addition, paragenetic simulations for Mars suggest that other iron minerals such as

  10. Reflectance spectroscopy of ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites as Mars soil analog materials.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J L; Pieters, C M; Burns, R G; Edwards, J O; Mancinelli, R L; Fröschl, H

    1995-09-01

    Spectroscopic analyses have shown that smectites enhanced in the laboratory with additional ferric species exhibit important similarities to those of the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite in these chemically treated smectites has features in the visible to near-infrared region that resemble the energies and band strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. New samples have been prepared with sulfate as well, because S was found by Viking to be a major component in the surface material on Mars. A suite of ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites, prepared with variable Fe3+ and S concentrations and variable pH conditions, has been analyzed using reflectance spectroscopy in the visible and infrared regions, Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature and 4 K, differential thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. These analyses support the formation of ferrihydrite of variable crystallinity in the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonites and a combination of schwertmannite and ferrihydrite in the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites. Small quantities of poorly crystalline or nanophase forms of other ferric materials may also be present in these samples. The chemical formation conditions of the ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites influence the character of the low temperature Mössbauer sextets and the visible reflectance spectra. An absorption minimum is observed at 0.88-0.89 micrometers in spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing samples, and at 0.89-0.92 micrometers in spectra of the ferrihydrate-bearing montmorillonites. Mössbauer spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites indicate variable concentrations of ferrihydrite and schwertmannite in the interlaminar spaces and along grain surfaces. Dehydration under reduced atmospheric pressure conditions induces a greater effect on the adsorbed and interlayer water in ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite than on the

  11. Reflectance spectroscopy of ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites as Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Burns, R. G.; Edwards, J. O.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Froschl, H.

    1995-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses have shown that smectites enhanced in the laboratory with additional ferric species exhibit important similarities to those of the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite in these chemically treated smectites has features in the visible to near-infrared region that resemble the energies and band strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. New samples have been prepared with sulfate as well, because S was found by Viking to be a major component in the surface material on Mars. A suite of ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites, prepared with variable Fe3+ and S concentrations and variable pH conditions, has been analyzed using reflectance spectroscopy in the visible and infrared regions, Mossbauer spectroscopy at room temperature and 4 K, differential thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. These analyses support the formation of ferrihydrite of variable crystallinity in the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonites and a combination of schwertmannite and ferrihydrite in the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites. Small quantities of poorly crystalline or nanophase forms of other ferric materials may also be present in these samples. The chemical formation conditions of the ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites influence the character of the low temperature Mossbauer sextets and the visible reflectance spectra. An absorption minimum is observed at 0.88-0.89 micrometers in spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing samples, and at 0.89-0.92 micrometers in spectra of the ferrihydrate-bearing montmorillonites. Mossbauer spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites indicate variable concentrations of ferrihydrite and schwertmannite in the interlaminar spaces and along grain surfaces. Dehydration under reduced atmospheric pressure conditions induces a greater effect on the adsorbed and interlayer water in ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite than on the water

  12. Ferric ion mediated photodecomposition of aqueous perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) under UV irradiation and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ling; Zhang, Pengyi; Shao, Tian; Zhao, Shiliang

    2014-04-30

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) recently has received much attention due to its global distribution, environmental persistence and bioaccumulation. The methods for PFOS decomposition are very limited due to its inertness. In this report we first found the photodecomposition of PFOS under UV was greatly accelerated by addition of ferric ions. In the presence of ferric ion (100 μM), PFOS (20 μM) decreased to below the detection limit within 48 h, with the rate constant of 1.67 d(-1), which was 50 times higher than that by direct photolysis (0.033 d(-1)). Besides fluoride and sulfate ions, C2-C8 perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) were identified as the main intermediates. It was found that addition of PFOS into the FeCl3 aqueous solution led to reduction of UV absorption, and the presence of ferric ion reduced the response of PFOS as analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS, which indicated that PFOS formed a complex with ferric ion. The ESR detection indicated that the electronic state of Fe(3+)-PFOS complex changed during reaction. And the role of oxygen and hydroxyl radical on the defluorination of PFOS was investigated. Accordingly the mechanism for PFOS photodecomposition in the presence of ferric ion was proposed. PMID:24583810

  13. Interaction of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with brain nerve terminals and blood platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticles of ferric oxide are the components of Lunar and Martian soil simulants. The observations suggest that exposure to Lunar soli simulant can be deleterious to human physiology and the components of lunar soil may be internalized by lung epithelium and may overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of nanoparticles of ferric oxide on the functional state of rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and rabbit blood platelets. Using photon correlation spectroscopy, we demonstrated the binding of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with nerve terminals and platelets. Nanoparticles did not depolarize the plasma membrane of nerve terminals and platelets that was shown by fluorimetry with potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G. Using pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange, we revealed that the acidification of synaptic vesicles of nerve terminals and secretory granules of platelets did not change in the presence of nanoparticles. The initial velocity of uptake of excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate was not influenced by nanoparticles of ferric oxide, whereas glutamate binding to nerve terminals was altered. Thus, it was suggested that nanoparticles of ferric oxide might disturb glutamate transport in the mammalian CNS.

  14. Use of Moessbauer spectroscopy to study reaction products of polyphenols and iron compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, J. ); Suwalski, J. )

    1994-05-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study parameters of the reaction products of iron compounds (Fe[sup III]) and polyphenols with hydroxyl (OH) groups in ortho positions. Polyphenols used in the reaction were catechol, pyrogallol, gallic acid, and oak tannin. The Fe-containing compounds were hydrated ferric sulfate (Fe[sub 2][SO[sub 4

  15. Energy cascades, excited state dynamics, and photochemistry in cob(III)alamins and ferric porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Rury, Aaron S; Wiley, Theodore E; Sension, Roseanne J

    2015-03-17

    Porphyrins and the related chlorins and corrins contain a cyclic tetrapyrrole with the ability to coordinate an active metal center and to perform a variety of functions exploiting the oxidation state, reactivity, and axial ligation of the metal center. These compounds are used in optically activated applications ranging from light harvesting and energy conversion to medical therapeutics and photodynamic therapy to molecular electronics, spintronics, optoelectronic thin films, and optomagnetics. Cobalt containing corrin rings extend the range of applications through photolytic cleavage of a unique axial carbon-cobalt bond, permitting spatiotemporal control of drug delivery. The photochemistry and photophysics of cyclic tetrapyrroles are controlled by electronic relaxation dynamics including internal conversion and intersystem crossing. Typically the electronic excitation cascades through ring centered ππ* states, ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) states, metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states, and metal centered states. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for the investigation of the electronic state dynamics in metal containing tetrapyrroles. The UV-visible spectrum is sensitive to the oxidation state, electronic configuration, spin state, and axial ligation of the central metal atom. Ultrashort broadband white light probes spanning the range from 270 to 800 nm, combined with tunable excitation pulses, permit the detailed unravelling of the time scales involved in the electronic energy cascade. State-of-the-art theoretical calculations provide additional insight required for precise assignment of the states. In this Account, we focus on recent ultrafast transient absorption studies of ferric porphyrins and corrin containing cob(III)alamins elucidating the electronic states responsible for ultrafast energy cascades, excited state dynamics, and the resulting photoreactivity or photostability of these compounds. Iron

  16. Equilibrium Iron Isotopic Fractionation Among Ferric Chloride Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, P. S.; Schauble, E. A.

    2006-12-01

    Four sets of ab initio models, including Unrestricted Hartree Fock (UHF) and hybrid Density Function Theory (DFT) were calculated for each species in a series of aqueous ferric chloride complexes: (FeH2O)6{3+, FeCl(H2O)5{2+, FeCl2(H2O)4{+, FeCl3(H2O)3, FeCl3(H2O)2, FeCl4{-, FeCl5H2O{2-, FeCl5{2-, FeCl6{^{3-}) in order to determine the relative isotopic fractionation among the complexes, to compare the results of different models for the same complexes, and to examine factors that influence the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation. Relative to Fe(H2O)6{3+, all models show a nearly linear decrease in the isotopic fractionation factor as the number of Cl{- ions per Fe{3+ ion increases, with slopes of -0.8‰ to - 1.0‰ per Cl-. At 20°C, 1000 ln β56-54 (β = reduced partition function ratio relative to a dissociated Fe atom) values range from 8.93 to 9.73‰ for Fe(H2O)6{3+, 8.04 to 9.12‰ for FeCl(H2O)5{2+, 7.61 to 8.73‰ for FeCl2(H2O)4{+, 7.14 to 8.25‰ for FeCl4{-, and 3.09 to 4.41‰ for FeCl6{^{3-}. The fractionation between Fe(H2O)6{3+ and FeCl4{- ranges from 1.48 to 2.45‰, depending on the model; this is comparable to fractionation effects due to iron redox reactions. β56-54 values from the UHF models are consistently higher than those from the hybrid DFT models. Theoretical studies predict isotopic fractionation due to differences in ligand bond stiffness, coordination number, bond length, and the frequency of the asymmetric Fe-X stretching vibrational mode (Schauble et al., 2001, Geochim. et Cosmochim. Acta, 65, 15, 2487-2497; Schauble, 2004, in Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry, 55, 65-111). Complexes with more Fe-OH2 bonds (see above) and/or smaller coordination numbers have higher fractionation factors (7.43‰, 4.91‰, 3.94‰ for FeCl4{-, FeCl5{2-, FeCl6{^{3-} respectively from the UHF model). The length of the Fe-Cl bonds increases as the number of chloride ligands increases while the Fe-O bond lengths decrease as the number of H2O

  17. Iron metabolism in aerobes: managing ferric iron hydrolysis and ferrous iron autoxidation.

    PubMed

    Kosman, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Aerobes and anaerobes alike express a plethora of essential iron enzymes; in the resting state, the iron atom(s) in these proteins are in the ferrous state. For aerobes, ferric iron is the predominant environmental valence form which, given ferric iron's aqueous chemistry, occurs as 'rust', insoluble, bio-inert polymeric ferric oxide that results from the hydrolysis of [Fe(H(2)O)(6)](3+). Mobilizing this iron requires bio-ferrireduction which in turn requires managing the rapid autoxidation of the resulting Fe(II) which occurs at pH > 6. This review examines the aqueous redox chemistry of iron and the mechanisms evolved in aerobes to suppress the 'rusting out' of Fe(III) and the ROS-generating autoxidation of Fe(II) so as to make this metal ion available as the most ubiquitous prosthetic group in metallobiology. PMID:23264695

  18. Removal of nickel and cadmium from battery waste by a chemical method using ferric sulphate.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Umesh U; Hocheng, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The removal of nickel (Ni) and cadmium (Cd) from spent batteries was studied by the chemical method. A novel leaching system using ferric sulphate hydrate was introduced to dissolve heavy metals in batteries. Ni-Cd batteries are classified as hazardous waste because Ni and Cd are suspected carcinogens. More efficient technologies are required to recover metals from spent batteries to minimize capital outlay, environmental impact and to respond to increased demand. The results obtained demonstrate that optimal conditions, including pH, concentration of ferric sulphate, shaking speed and temperature for the metal removal, were 2.5, 60 g/L, 150 rpm and 30 degrees C, respectively. More than 88 (+/- 0.9) and 84 (+/- 2.8)% of nickel and cadmium were recovered, respectively. These results suggest that ferric ion oxidized Ni and Cd present in battery waste. This novel process provides a possibility for recycling waste Ni-Cd batteries in a large industrial scale. PMID:24701923

  19. Sequence diversity and enzyme activity of ferric-chelate reductase LeFRO1 in tomato.

    PubMed

    Kong, Danyu; Chen, Chunlin; Wu, Huilan; Li, Ye; Li, Junming; Ling, Hong-Qing

    2013-11-20

    Ferric-chelate reductase which functions in the reduction of ferric to ferrous iron on root surface is a critical protein for iron homeostasis in strategy I plants. LeFRO1 is a major ferric-chelate reductase involved in iron uptake in tomato. To identify the natural variations of LeFRO1 and to assess their effect on the ferric-chelate reductase activity, we cloned the coding sequences of LeFRO1 from 16 tomato varieties collected from different regions, and detected three types of LeFRO1 (LeFRO1(MM), LeFRO1(Ailsa) and LeFRO1(Monita)) with five amino acid variations at the positions 21, 24, 112, 195 and 582. Enzyme activity assay revealed that the three types of LeFRO1 possessed different ferric-chelate reductase activity (LeFRO1(Ailsa) > LeFRO1(MM) > LeFRO1(Monita)). The 112th amino acid residue Ala of LeFRO1 is critical for maintaining the high activity of ferric-chelate reductase, because modification of this amino acid resulted in a significant reduction of enzyme activity. Further, we showed that the combination of the amino acid residue Ile at the site 24 with Lys at the site 582 played a positive role in the enzyme activity of LeFRO1. In conclusion, the findings are helpful to understand the natural adaptation mechanisms of plants to iron-limiting stress, and may provide new knowledge to select and manipulate LeFRO1 for improving the iron deficiency tolerance in tomato.

  20. Colour and stability assessment of blue ferric anthocyanin chelates in liquid pectin-stabilised model systems.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, M; Brauch, J; Carle, R; Kammerer, D R

    2013-06-01

    The formation of blue coloured ferric anthocyanin chelates and their colour stability during storage and thermal treatment were monitored in a pH range relevant to food (3.6-5.0). Liquid model systems were composed of different types of Citrus pectins, juices (J) and the respective phenolic extracts (E) from elderberry (EB), black currant (BC), red cabbage (RC) and purple carrot (PC) in the presence of ferric ions. For EB, BC and PC, pure blue colours devoid of a violet tint were exclusively observed for the phenolic extracts and at pH values ≥ 4.5 in model systems containing high methoxylated and amidated pectins, respectively. Colour and its stability strongly depended on the amount of ferric ions and the plant source; however, colour decay could generally be described as a pseudo-first-order kinetics. Despite optimal colour hues for RC-E and RC-J, storage and heat stabilities were poor. Highest colour intensities and best stabilities were observed for model systems containing PC-E at a molar anthocyanin:ferric ion ratio of 1:2. Ascorbic and lactic acids interfered with ferric ions, thus significantly affecting blue colour evolution and stability. Colour loss strongly depended on heat exposure with activation energies ranging between 60.5 and 78.4 kJ/mol. The comprehensive evaluation of the interrelationship of pigment source, pH conditions and pectin type on chelate formation and stability demonstrated that ferric anthocyanin chelates are promising natural blue food colourants.

  1. A novel mode of ferric ion coordination by the periplasmic ferric ion-binding subunit FbpA of an ABC-type iron transporter from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shipeng; Ogata, Misaki; Horita, Shoichiro; Ohtsuka, Jun; Nagata, Koji; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Crystal structures of FbpA, the periplasmic ferric ion-binding protein of an iron-uptake ABC transporter, from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtFbpA) have been solved in apo and ferric ion-bound forms at 1.8 and 1.7 Å resolution, respectively. The latter crystal structure shows that the bound ferric ion forms a novel six-coordinated complex with three tyrosine side chains, two bicarbonates and a water molecule in the metal-binding site. The results of gel-filtration chromatography and dynamic light scattering show that TtFbpA exists as a monomer in solution regardless of ferric ion binding and that TtFbpA adopts a more compact conformation in the ferric ion-bound state than in the apo state in solution.

  2. A turn-on fluorescent probe based on hydroxylamine oxidation for detecting ferric ion selectively in living cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Yu, Fabiao; Liu, Ping; Chen, Lingxin

    2012-05-28

    We have described a turn on fluorescent probe BOD-NHOH based on hydroxylamine oxidation for detecting intracellular ferric ions. The probe comprises a signal transducer of BODIPY dye and a Fe(3+)-response modulator of hydroxylamine. It is readily employed for assessing intracellular ferric ion levels, and confocal imaging is achieved successfully.

  3. Relationship between reaction rate constants of organic pollutants and their molecular descriptors during Fenton oxidation and in situ formed ferric-oxyhydroxides.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lijuan; Shen, Zhemin; Su, Pingru

    2016-05-01

    Fenton oxidation is a promising water treatment method to degrade organic pollutants. In this study, 30 different organic compounds were selected and their reaction rate constants (k) were determined for the Fenton oxidation process. Gaussian09 and Material Studio software sets were used to carry out calculations and obtain values of 10 different molecular descriptors for each studied compound. Ferric-oxyhydroxide coagulation experiments were conducted to determine the coagulation percentage. Based upon the adsorption capacity, all of the investigated organic compounds were divided into two groups (Group A and Group B). The percentage adsorption of organic compounds in Group A was less than 15% (wt./wt.) and that in the Group B was higher than 15% (wt./wt.). For Group A, removal of the compounds by oxidation was the dominant process while for Group B, removal by both oxidation and coagulation (as a synergistic process) took place. Results showed that the relationship between the rate constants (k values) and the molecular descriptors of Group A was more pronounced than for Group B compounds. For the oxidation-dominated process, EHOMO and Fukui indices (f(0)x, f(-)x, f(+)x) were the most significant factors. The influence of bond order was more significant for the synergistic process of oxidation and coagulation than for the oxidation-dominated process. The influences of all other molecular descriptors on the synergistic process were weaker than on the oxidation-dominated process.

  4. Relationship between reaction rate constants of organic pollutants and their molecular descriptors during Fenton oxidation and in situ formed ferric-oxyhydroxides.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lijuan; Shen, Zhemin; Su, Pingru

    2016-05-01

    Fenton oxidation is a promising water treatment method to degrade organic pollutants. In this study, 30 different organic compounds were selected and their reaction rate constants (k) were determined for the Fenton oxidation process. Gaussian09 and Material Studio software sets were used to carry out calculations and obtain values of 10 different molecular descriptors for each studied compound. Ferric-oxyhydroxide coagulation experiments were conducted to determine the coagulation percentage. Based upon the adsorption capacity, all of the investigated organic compounds were divided into two groups (Group A and Group B). The percentage adsorption of organic compounds in Group A was less than 15% (wt./wt.) and that in the Group B was higher than 15% (wt./wt.). For Group A, removal of the compounds by oxidation was the dominant process while for Group B, removal by both oxidation and coagulation (as a synergistic process) took place. Results showed that the relationship between the rate constants (k values) and the molecular descriptors of Group A was more pronounced than for Group B compounds. For the oxidation-dominated process, EHOMO and Fukui indices (f(0)x, f(-)x, f(+)x) were the most significant factors. The influence of bond order was more significant for the synergistic process of oxidation and coagulation than for the oxidation-dominated process. The influences of all other molecular descriptors on the synergistic process were weaker than on the oxidation-dominated process. PMID:27155432

  5. RATES OF HYDROUS FERRIC OXIDE CRYSTALLIZATION AND THE INFLUENCE ON COPRECIPITATED ARSENATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate coprecipitated with hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was stabilized against dissolution during transformation of HFO to more crystalline iron (hydr)oxides. The rate of arsenate stabilization approximately coincided with the rate of HFO transformation at pH 6 and 40 ?C. Compa...

  6. Martian weathering/alteration scenarios from spectral studies of ferric and ferrous minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James F., III; Adams, John B.; Morris, Richard V.

    1992-01-01

    We review the major aspects of our current knowledge of martian ferric and ferrous mineralogy based on the available ground-based telescopic and spacecraft data. What we know and what we don't know are used to constrain various weathering/alteration models and to identify key future measurements and techniques that can distinguish between these models.

  7. TRANSFORMATION AND MOBILIZATION OF ARSENIC ADSORBED ON GRANULAR FERRIC HYDROXIDE UNDER BIO-REDUCTIVE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotic and abiotic reduction of arsenic (V) and iron (III) influences the partioning of arsenic (As) between the solid and aqueous phases in soils, sediments and wastes. In this study, laboratory experiments on arsenic adsorbed on granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) was performed to ...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1302 - Sodium Ferric Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1302 Section 180.1302 Protection of... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of sodium ferric EDTA in or on all food commodities when applied as...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1302 - Sodium Ferric Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1302 Section 180.1302 Protection of... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of sodium ferric EDTA in or on all food commodities when applied as...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1302 - Sodium Ferric Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1302 Section 180.1302 Protection of... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of sodium ferric EDTA in or on all food commodities when applied as...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1302 - Sodium Ferric Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1302 Section 180.1302 Protection of... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of sodium ferric EDTA in or on all food commodities when applied as...

  12. ANALYSIS OF FERRIC AND FERROUS IONS IN SOIL EXTRACTS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method using ion chromatography (IC) for the analysis of ferrous (Fe 2+) and ferric (Fe 3+) ions in soil extracts has been developed. This method uses an ion exchange column with detection at 520 nm after post-column derivatization. Selectivity is achieved by using an anionic...

  13. ELECTRODE MEASUREMENT OF REDOX POTENTIAL IN ANAEROBIC FERRIC/FERROUS CHLORIDE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behaviour of two inert redox electrodes (Pt and wax-impregnated graphite) was investigated in anaerobic ferrous and ferric chloride solutions in order to establish if these electrodes respond to the Fe3+/Fe2+ couple in a Nernstian manner. A new method fo...

  14. Biogenic iron mineralization accompanying the dissimilatory reduction of hydrous ferric oxide by a groundwater bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Dong, Hailang; Onstott, Tullis C.; Hinman, Nancy W.; Li, Shu-mei

    1998-10-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) couple the oxidation of organic matter or H 2 to the reduction of iron oxides. The factors controlling the rate and extent of these reduction reactions and the resulting solid phases are complex and poorly understood. Batch experiments were conducted with amorphous hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and the DIRB Shewanella putrefaciens, strain CN32, in well-defined aqueous solutions to investigate the reduction of HFO and formation of biogenic Fe(II) minerals. Lactate-HFO solutions buffered with either bicarbonate or 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonic acid (PIPES) containing various combinations of phosphate and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), were inoculated with S. putrefaciens CN32. AQDS, a humic acid analog that can be reduced to dihydroanthraquinone by CN32, was included because of its ability to function as an electron shuttle during microbial iron reduction and as an indicator of pe. Iron reduction was measured with time, and the resulting solids were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). In HCO 3- buffered medium with AQDS, HFO was rapidly and extensively reduced, and the resulting solids were dominated by ferrous carbonate (siderite). Ferrous phosphate (vivianite) was also present in HCO 3- medium containing P, and fine-grained magnetite was present as a minor phase in HCO 3- medium with or without P. In the PIPES-buffered medium, the rate and extent of reduction was strongly influenced by AQDS and P. With AQDS, HFO was rapidly converted to highly crystalline magnetite whereas in its absence, magnetite mineralization was slower and the final material less crystalline. In PIPES with both P and AQDS, a green rust type compound [Fe (6-x)IIFe xIII(OH) 12] x+[(A 2-) x/2 · yH 2O] x- was the dominant solid phase formed; in the absence of AQDS a poorly

  15. Antioxidant potential of green and black tea determined using the ferric reducing power (FRAP) assay.

    PubMed

    Langley-Evans, S C

    2000-05-01

    Tea is one of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world and is rich in polyphenolic compounds collectively known as the tea flavonoids. Tea flavonoids possess antioxidant properties in vitro and have been proposed as key protective dietary components, reducing risk of coronary heart disease and some cancers. The present study aimed to evaluate the possible effects of different preparation methods on the antioxidant properties of green and black tea. Antioxidant potentials of tea infusates were assessed using an assay based upon the reduction of ferric chloride linked to a chromophore. Green tea, black leaf tea and black tea in tea bags were infused with water at 90 degrees C for time periods ranging from 0.25 to 15 min. Green tea infusates possessed approximately 2.5-fold greater antioxidant capacity than both types of black tea infusates. Both green and black teas released significant levels of antioxidants into the hot water within 2 min of infusion. Preparation of teas across a range of temperatures between 20 and 90 degrees C revealed that although antioxidants were liberated from the leaves into the water in cooler infusions, increasing the temperature could increase antioxidant potential by 4 to 9.5-fold. Black tea prepared using tea bags had significantly lower antioxidant capacity than black leaf tea at temperatures between 20 and 70 degrees C, suggesting that tea bag materials may prevent some extraction of flavonoids into the tea solution. The addition of milk appeared to diminish the antioxidant potential of black tea preparations. This effect was greatest where whole cow's milk was used and appeared to be primarily related to the fat content of the added milk. These experiments have considered the effects of commonly used domestic methods of preparation on the in vitro antioxidant potential of tea. It is concluded that maximum antioxidant capacity and hence maximal health benefit may be derived from green tea or from black leaf tea prepared by

  16. The biostimulation of anaerobic digestion with (semi)conductive ferric oxides: their potential for enhanced biomethanation.

    PubMed

    Baek, Gahyun; Kim, Jaai; Cho, Kyungjin; Bae, Hyokwan; Lee, Changsoo

    2015-12-01

    The effect of biostimulation with ferric oxides, semiconductive ferric oxyhydroxide, and conductive magnetite on the anaerobic digestion of dairy wastewater was examined in a batch mode. The reactors supplemented with ferric oxyhydroxide (R2) and magnetite (R3) showed significantly enhanced biomethanation performance compared with the control (R1). The removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) after 30 days was 31.9, 59.3, and 82.5% in R1, R2, and R3, respectively. The consumed COD was almost fully recovered as biogas in R2 and R3, while only 79% was recovered in R1. The total energy production as biogas was accordingly 32.2, 71.0, and 97.7 kJ in R1, R2, and R3, respectively. The reactors also differed in the acid formation profile with more propionate and butyrate found in R1 and more acetate found in R3. The enhanced biomethanation seems to be associated with variations in the bacterial community structure supposedly induced by the ferric oxides added. In contrast, no evident variation was observed in the archaeal community structure among the reactors. The potential electric syntrophy formed between Methanosaeta concilii-like methanogens and electroactive iron-reducing bacteria, particularly Trichococcus, was likely responsible for the enhanced performance. The stimulated growth of fermentative iron reducers may also have contributed by altering the metabolic characteristics of the bacterial communities to produce more favorable acidogenic products for methanogenesis. The overall results suggest the potential of biostimulation with (semi)conductive ferric oxides to enhance the rate and efficiency of the biomethanation of organic wastes. This seems to be potentially attractive, as increasing attention is being paid to the energy self-sufficiency of waste/wastewater treatment processes today. PMID:26272096

  17. Visible Wavelength Spectroscopy of Ferric Minerals: A Key Tool for Identification of Ancient Martian Aqueous Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchie, Scott L.; Bell, J. F., III; Morris, Richard V.

    2000-01-01

    The mineralogic signatures of past aqueous alteration of a basaltic Martian crust may include iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, zeolites, carbonates, phyllosilicates, and silica. The identities, relative abundances, and crystallinities of the phases formed in a particular environment depend on physicochemical conditions. At one extreme, hot spring environments may be characterized by smectite-chlorite to talc-kaolinite silicate assemblages, plus crystalline ferric oxides dominated by hematite. However, most environments, including cold springs, pedogenic layers, and ponded surface water, are expected to deposit iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, carbonates, and smectite-dominated phyllosilicates. A substantial fraction of the ferric iron is expected to occur in nanophase form, with the exact mineralogy strongly influenced by Eh-pH conditions. Detection of these phases has been an objective of a large body of terrestrial telescopic, Mars orbital, and landed spectral investigations and in situ compositional measurements. However, clear identifications of many of these phases is lacking. Neither carbonate nor silica has been unequivocally detected by any method. Although phyllosilicates may occur near the limit of detection by remote sensing, in general they appear to occur in only poorly crystalline form. In contrast, compelling evidence for ferric iron minerals has been gathered by recent telescopic investigations, the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP), and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). These data yield two crucial findings: (1) In the global, high spatial resolution TES data set, highly crystalline ferric iron (as coarse-grained 'gray' hematite) has been recognized but with only very limited spatial occurrence and (2) Low-resolution telescopic reflectance spectroscopy, very limited orbital reflectance spectroscopy, and landed multispectral imaging provide strong indications that at least two broad classes of ferric iron minerals

  18. Oxidation of thiamine on reaction with nitrogen dioxide generated by ferric myoglobin and hemoglobin in the presence of nitrite and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Stepuro, I I; Oparin, A Yu; Stsiapura, V I; Maskevich, S A; Titov, V Yu

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that nitrogen dioxide oxidizes thiamine to thiamine disulfide, thiochrome, and oxodihydrothiochrome (ODTch). The latter is formed during oxidation of thiochrome by nitrogen dioxide. Nitrogen dioxide was produced by incubation of nitrite with horse ferric myoglobin and human hemoglobin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. After addition of tyrosine or phenol to aqueous solutions containing oxoferryl forms of the hemoproteins, thiamine, and nitrite, the yield of thiochrome greatly increased, whereas the yield of ODTch decreased. In the presence of high concentrations of tyrosine or phenol compounds ODTch was not formed at all. The neutral form of thiamine with the closed thiazole cycle and minor tricyclic form of thiamine do not enter the heme pocket of the protein and do not interact with the oxoferryl heme complex Fe(IV=O) or porphyrin radical. The tricyclic form of thiamine is oxidized to thiochrome by tyrosyl radicals located on the surface of the hemoprotein. The thiol form of thiamine is oxidized to thiamine disulfide by both hemoprotein tyrosyl radicals and oxoferryl heme complexes. Nitrite and also tyrosine, tyramine, and phenol readily penetrate into the heme pocket of the protein and reduce the oxyferryl complex to ferric cation. These reactions yield nitrogen dioxide as well as tyrosyl and phenoxyl radicals of tyrosine molecules and phenol compounds, respectively. Tyrosyl and phenoxyl radicals of low molecular weight compounds oxidize thiamine only to thiochrome and thiamine disulfide. The effect of oxoferryl forms of myoglobin and hemoglobin, nitrogen dioxide, and phenol on thiamine oxidative transformation as well as antioxidant properties of the hydrophobic thiamine metabolites thiochrome and ODTch are discussed.

  19. Reaction of nitric oxide with heme proteins and model compounds of hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V.S.; Traylor, T.G.; Gardiner, R.; Mizukami, H.

    1987-06-30

    Rates for the reaction of nitric oxide with several ferric heme proteins and model compounds have been measured. The NO combination rates are markedly affected by the presence or absence of distal histidine. Elephant myoglobin in which the E7 distal histidine has been replaced by glutamine reacts with NO 500-1000 times faster than do the native hemoglobins or myoglobins. By contrast, there is not difference in the CO combination rate constants of sperm whale and elephant myoglobins. Studies on ferric model compounds for the R and T states of hemoglobin indicate that their NO combination rate constants are similar to those observed for the combination of CO with the corresponding ferro derivatives. The last observation suggests that the presence of an axial water molecule at the ligand binding site of ferric hemoglobin A prevents it from exhibiting significant cooperativity in its reactions with NO.

  20. Iron bioavailability in 8-24-month-old Thai children from a micronutrient-fortified quick-cooking rice containing ferric ammonium citrate or a mixture of ferrous sulphate and ferric sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Chavasit, Visith; Porasuphatana, Suparat; Suthutvoravut, Umaporn; Zeder, Christroph; Hurrell, Richard

    2015-12-01

    A quick-cooking rice, produced from broken rice, is a convenient ingredient for complementary foods in Thailand. The rice is fortified with micronutrients including iron during the processing procedure, which can cause unacceptable sensory changes. A quick-cooking rice fortified with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) or a mixture of ferrous sulphate (FeSO4 ) and ferric sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (NaFeEDTA), with a 2:1 molar ratio of iron from FeSO4  : iron from NaFeEDTA (FeSO4  + NaFeEDTA), gave a product that was organoleptically acceptable. The study compared iron absorption by infants and young children fed with micronutrient-fortified quick-cooking rice containing the test iron compounds or FeSO4 . Micronutrient-fortified quick-cooking rice prepared as a traditional Thai dessert was fed to two groups of 15 8-24-month healthy Thai children. The iron fortificants were isotopically labelled with (57) Fe for the reference FeSO4 or (58) Fe for the tested fortificants, and iron absorption was quantified based on erythrocyte incorporation of the iron isotopes 14 days after feeding. The relative bioavailability of FAC and of the FeSO4  + NaFeEDTA was obtained by comparing their iron absorption with that of FeSO4 . Mean fractional iron absorption was 5.8% [±standard error (SE) 1.9] from FAC and 10.3% (±SE 1.9) from FeSO4  + NaFeEDTA. The relative bioavailability of FAC was 83% (P = 0.02). The relative bioavailability of FeSO4  + NaFeEDTA was 145% (P = 0.001). Iron absorption from the rice containing FAC or FeSO4  + NaFeEDTA was sufficiently high to be used in its formulation, although iron absorption from FeSO4  + NaFeEDTA was significantly higher (P < 0.00001).

  1. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Robin Gerlach; Erin K. Field; Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel; Al B. Cunningham

    2011-09-01

    Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

  2. Influence of carbon sources and electron shuttles on ferric iron reduction by Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Robin; Field, Erin K; Viamajala, Sridhar; Peyton, Brent M; Apel, William A; Cunningham, Al B

    2011-09-01

    Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

  3. Direct inhibition by nitric oxide of the transcriptional ferric uptake regulation protein via nitrosylation of the iron

    PubMed Central

    D'Autréaux, Benoît; Touati, Danièle; Bersch, Beate; Latour, Jean-Marc; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle

    2002-01-01

    Ferric uptake regulation protein (Fur) is a bacterial global regulator that uses iron as a cofactor to bind to specific DNA sequences. The function of Fur is not limited to iron homeostasis. A wide variety of genes involved in various mechanisms such as oxidative and acid stresses are under Fur control. Flavohemoglobin (Hmp) is an NO-detoxifying enzyme induced by NO and nitrosothiol compounds. Fur recently was found to regulate hmp in Salmonella typhimurium, and in Escherichia coli, the iron-chelating agent 2,2′-dipyridyl induces hmp expression. We now establish direct inhibition of E. coli Fur activity by NO. By using chromosomal Fur-regulated lacZ reporter fusion in E. coli, Fur activity is switched off by NO at micromolar concentration. In vitro Fur DNA-binding activity, as measured by protection of restriction site in aerobactin promoter, is directly sensitive to NO. NO reacts with FeII in purified FeFur protein to form a S = 1/2 low-spin FeFur–NO complex with a g = 2.03 EPR signal. Appearance of the same EPR signal in NO-treated cells links nitrosylation of the iron with Fur inhibition. The nitrosylated Fur protein is still a dimer and is stable in anaerobiosis but slowly decays in air. This inhibition probably arises from a conformational switch, leading to an inactive dimeric protein. These data establish a link between control of iron metabolism and the response to NO effects. PMID:12475930

  4. Optical Study of Cuprous Oxide and Ferric Oxide Based Materials for Applications in Low Cost Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Than, Thi Cuc; Bui, Bao Thoa; Wegmuller, Benjamin; Nguyen, Minh Hieu; Hoang Ngoc, Lam Huong; Bui, Van Diep; Nguyen, Quoc Hung; Hoang, Chi Hieu; Nguyen-Tran, Thuat

    2016-05-01

    One of the interesting forms of cuprous oxide and ferric oxide based materials is CuFeO2 which can be a delafossite-type compound and is a well known p-type semiconductor. This compound makes up an interesting family of materials for technological applications. CuFeO2 thin films recently gained renewed interest for potential applications in solar cell devices especially as absorption layers. One of the interesting facts is that CuFeO2 is made from cheap materials such as copper and iron. In this study, CuFeO2 thin films are intentionally deposited on corning glass and silicon substrates by the radio-frequency and direct current sputtering method with complicated and well developed co-sputtering recipes. The deposition was performed at room temperature which leads to an amorphous phase with extremely low roughness and high density. The films also were annealed at 500°C in 5% H2 in Ar for the passivation. A detailed optical study was performed on these thin films by spectroscopic ellipsometry and by ultra-violet visible near infrared spectroscopy. Depending on sputtering conditions, the direct band gap was extrapolated to be from 1.96 eV to 2.2 eV and 2.92 eV to 2.96 eV and the indirect band gap is about 1.22 eV to 1.42 eV. A good electrical conduction is also observed which is suitable for solar cell applications. In future more study on the structural properties will be carried out in order to fully understand these materials.

  5. Electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry: a tool to characterize synthetic polyaminocarboxylate ferric chelates used as fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Orera, Irene; Orduna, Jesús; Abadía, Javier; Alvarez-Fernández, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Fertilizers based on synthetic polyaminocarboxylate ferric chelates have been known since the 1950s to be successful in supplying Fe to plants. In commercial Fe(III)-chelate fertilizers, a significant part of the water-soluble Fe-fraction consists of still uncharacterized Fe byproducts, whose agronomical value is unknown. Although collision-induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is a valuable tool for the identification of such compounds, no fragmentation data have been reported for most Fe(III)-chelate fertilizers. The aim of this study was to characterize the CID-MS(2) fragmentation patterns of the major synthetic Fe(III)-chelates used as Fe-fertilizers, and subsequently use this technique for the characterization of commercial fertilizers. Quadrupole-time-of-flight (QTOF) and spherical ion trap mass analyzers equipped with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source were used. ESI-CID-MS(2) spectra obtained were richer when using the QTOF device. Specific differences were found among Fe(III)-chelate fragmentation patterns, even in the case of positional isomers. The analysis of a commercial Fe(III)-chelate fertilizer by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to ESI-MS(QTOF) revealed two previously unknown, Fe-containing compounds, that were successfully identified by a comprehensive comparison of the ESI-CID-MS(2)(QTOF) spectra with those of pure chelates. This shows that HPLC/ESI-CID-MS(2)(QTOF), along with the Fe(III)-chelate fragmentation patterns, could be a highly valuable tool to directly characterize the water-soluble Fe fraction in Fe(III)-chelate fertilizers. This could be of great importance in issues related to crop Fe-fertilization, both from an agricultural and an environmental point of view.

  6. Flocculation properties of several microalgae and a cyanobacterium species during ferric chloride, chitosan and alkaline flocculation.

    PubMed

    Lama, Sanjaya; Muylaert, Koenraad; Karki, Tika Bahadur; Foubert, Imogen; Henderson, Rita K; Vandamme, Dries

    2016-11-01

    Flocculation holds great potential as a low-cost harvesting method for microalgae biomass production. Three flocculation methods (ferric chloride, chitosan, and alkaline flocculation) were compared in this study for the harvesting of 9 different freshwater and marine microalgae and one cyanobacterium species. Ferric chloride resulted in a separation efficiency greater than 90% with a concentration factor (CF) higher than 10 for all species. Chitosan flocculation worked generally very well for freshwater microalgae, but not for marine species. Alkaline flocculation was most efficient for harvesting of Nannochloropsis, Chlamydomonas and Chlorella sp. The concentration factor was highly variable between microalgae species. Generally, minimum flocculant dosages were highly variable across species, which shows that flocculation may be a good harvesting method for some species but not for others. This study shows that microalgae and cyanobacteria species should not be selected solely based on their productivity but also on their potential for low-cost separation. PMID:27611030

  7. Functional Analysis of the Ferric Uptake Regulator Gene fur in Xanthomonas vesicatoria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiqin; Dong, Chunling; Zhao, Tingchang; Han, Jucai; Wang, Tieling; Wen, Xiangzhen; Huang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and survival of many organisms. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron toxicity. The ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) regulates the high-affinity ferric uptake system in many bacteria. To investigate the function of the fur gene in Xanthomonas vesicatoria (Xv), we generated a fur mutant strain, fur-m, by site-directed mutagenesis. Whereas siderophore production increased in the Xv fur mutant, extracellular polysaccharide production, biofilm formation, swimming ability and quorum sensing signals were all significantly decreased. The fur mutant also had significantly reduced virulence in tomato leaves. The above-mentioned phenotypes significantly recovered when the Xv fur mutation allele was complemented with a wild-type fur gene. Thus, Fur either negatively or positively regulates multiple important physiological functions in Xv. PMID:26910324

  8. Functional Analysis of the Ferric Uptake Regulator Gene fur in Xanthomonas vesicatoria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiqin; Dong, Chunling; Zhao, Tingchang; Han, Jucai; Wang, Tieling; Wen, Xiangzhen; Huang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and survival of many organisms. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron toxicity. The ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) regulates the high-affinity ferric uptake system in many bacteria. To investigate the function of the fur gene in Xanthomonas vesicatoria (Xv), we generated a fur mutant strain, fur-m, by site-directed mutagenesis. Whereas siderophore production increased in the Xv fur mutant, extracellular polysaccharide production, biofilm formation, swimming ability and quorum sensing signals were all significantly decreased. The fur mutant also had significantly reduced virulence in tomato leaves. The above-mentioned phenotypes significantly recovered when the Xv fur mutation allele was complemented with a wild-type fur gene. Thus, Fur either negatively or positively regulates multiple important physiological functions in Xv.

  9. Electrical and optical properties of ferric doped PVA-PVP-PPy composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ravikumar V.; Ranganath, M. R.; Lobo, Blaise

    2013-02-01

    The analysis of experimental optical spectra & electrical properties of PVA-PVP-PPy composite films is discussed in this paper. The optical parameters like activation energy of optical transitions and the optical band gap for direct and indirect allowed transitions were determined for PVA-PVP-PPy composite films doped with different concentrations of ferric chloride. The optical band gap showed best fit for indirect allowed transitions, and there is a decrease in the optical band gap with increase in concentration of ferric chloride. The DC electrical properties of these films indicated agreement with Mott's Variable Range Hopping Model in three dimensions. The width of the forbidden band gap was determined from the Arrhenius relation after experimentally studying in-situ, the variation of DC electrical conductivity with temperature.

  10. Flocculation properties of several microalgae and a cyanobacterium species during ferric chloride, chitosan and alkaline flocculation.

    PubMed

    Lama, Sanjaya; Muylaert, Koenraad; Karki, Tika Bahadur; Foubert, Imogen; Henderson, Rita K; Vandamme, Dries

    2016-11-01

    Flocculation holds great potential as a low-cost harvesting method for microalgae biomass production. Three flocculation methods (ferric chloride, chitosan, and alkaline flocculation) were compared in this study for the harvesting of 9 different freshwater and marine microalgae and one cyanobacterium species. Ferric chloride resulted in a separation efficiency greater than 90% with a concentration factor (CF) higher than 10 for all species. Chitosan flocculation worked generally very well for freshwater microalgae, but not for marine species. Alkaline flocculation was most efficient for harvesting of Nannochloropsis, Chlamydomonas and Chlorella sp. The concentration factor was highly variable between microalgae species. Generally, minimum flocculant dosages were highly variable across species, which shows that flocculation may be a good harvesting method for some species but not for others. This study shows that microalgae and cyanobacteria species should not be selected solely based on their productivity but also on their potential for low-cost separation.

  11. Functional Analysis of the Ferric Uptake Regulator Gene fur in Xanthomonas vesicatoria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiqin; Dong, Chunling; Zhao, Tingchang; Han, Jucai; Wang, Tieling; Wen, Xiangzhen; Huang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and survival of many organisms. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron toxicity. The ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) regulates the high-affinity ferric uptake system in many bacteria. To investigate the function of the fur gene in Xanthomonas vesicatoria (Xv), we generated a fur mutant strain, fur-m, by site-directed mutagenesis. Whereas siderophore production increased in the Xv fur mutant, extracellular polysaccharide production, biofilm formation, swimming ability and quorum sensing signals were all significantly decreased. The fur mutant also had significantly reduced virulence in tomato leaves. The above-mentioned phenotypes significantly recovered when the Xv fur mutation allele was complemented with a wild-type fur gene. Thus, Fur either negatively or positively regulates multiple important physiological functions in Xv. PMID:26910324

  12. Using Crystal Structure Groups to Understand Mössbauer parameters of Ferric Sulfates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Sklute, E. C.; Lane, M. D.; Bishop, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    A Mössbauer doublet assigned to ferric sulfate (Fe3D2) was identified in Paso Robles, Mars, spectra by Morris et al. (2006), who noted that its parameters are not diagnostic of any specific mineral because a number of different sulfates with varying parageneses might be responsible for this doublet. Work by Lane et al. (2008) used a multi-instrument approach based on Fe3+ sulfate spectra acquired with VNIR and midinfrared reflectance, mid-infrared emission and Mössbauer spectrometers to narrow down the possible ferric sulfate phases present at Paso Robles to ferricopiapite possibly mixed with other ferric sulfates such as butlerite, parabutlerite, fibroferrite, or metahomanite. Thus, we explore here the crystal-chemical rationale behind these interpretations of the Mössbauer results, using similarities and difference among mineral structures to explore which phases might have similar coordination polyhedra around the Fe atoms in sulfates. Work by Hawthorne et al. (2000) organizes the sulfate minerals into groups with analogous crystal structures. Mössbauer doublets assigned to ferric sulfates ubiquitously have isomer shifts (IS) of 0.40-53 mm/s so that IS is non-diagnostic. However, quadrupole splitting of doublets in these mineral groups has a wide range (0-1.4 mm/s) and the variation can be systematically correlated with different structure types. Members of the hydration series Fe2(SO4)3 · n H2O, which includes quenstedtite, coquimbite, paracoquimbite, kornelite, and lausenite have Mössbauer spectra that closely resemble singlets because of their near-zero QS. These minerals share structures involving finite clusters of sulfate tetrahedral and Fe octahedral or chains of depolymerized clusters, and all mineral species with these structures share similar Mössbauer parameters. At the other extreme, ferric sulfates with structures based on infinite sheets (hydrotalcite, alunite, jarosite), tend to have large electric field gradients at the nucleus of the Fe3

  13. Structure of Hemoglobin M Boston, a Variant with a Five-Coordinated Ferric Heme

    PubMed Central

    Pulsinelli, P. D.; Perutz, M. F.; Nagel, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    X-ray analysis of the natural valency hybrid α2+M Bostonβ2deoxy shows that the ferric iron atoms in the abnormal α subunits are bonded to the phenolate side chains of the tyrosines that have replaced the distal histidines; the iron atoms are displaced to the distal side of the porphyrin ring and are not bonded to the proximal histidines. The resulting changes in tertiary structure of the α subunits stabilize the hemoglobin tetramer in the quaternary deoxy structure, which lowers the oxygen affinity of the normal β subunits and causes cyanosis. The strength of the bond from the ferric iron to the phenolate oxygen appears to be the main factor responsible for the many abnormal properties of hemoglobin M Boston. Images PMID:4521212

  14. Repeat radiation synovectomy with dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates in rheumatoid knees unresponsive to initial injection

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, M.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Shortkroff, S.; Venkatesan, P.; Sledge, C.B.

    1988-06-01

    Because of failure to fully respond to an initial intraarticular injection of dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates, 17 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis underwent repeat radiation synovectomy using this agent. Of the 13 patients who were evaluated 1 year later, 54% (7 knees) had good results, 31% (4 knees) had fair results, and 15% (2 knees) had poor results. The initial lack of significant benefit from radiation synovectomy did not appear to preclude a favorable response to a second injection.

  15. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions.

    PubMed

    Root, Robert A; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-11-19

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 days, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially coprecipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75-81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53-68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multienergy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide coprecipitate formation. PMID:24102155

  16. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions

    PubMed Central

    Root, Robert A.; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-01-01

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 d, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially co-precipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75–81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53–68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multi-energy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide co-precipitate formation. PMID:24102155

  17. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions.

    PubMed

    Root, Robert A; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-11-19

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 days, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially coprecipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75-81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53-68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multienergy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide coprecipitate formation.

  18. Sulfates, Ferric Oxides and Al-OH Bearing Minerals in Aram Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, M.; Bourgeois, O.; Le Mouelic, S.; Le Deit, L.; Verpoorter, C.; Combe, J.; Sotin, C.; Bibring, J.; Gondet, B.; Langevin, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Aram Chaos is a 280 km wide Martian crater centered at 2.5N, 338.5E. This crater is filled by chaotic terrains, overlain by a presently dome-shaped layered, 900 m thick formation, displaying spectral signatures of ferric oxides and sulfates on TES and OMEGA data (Glotch et al. 2005, JGR 110, E09006). In a previous study (Masse et al. 2008, JGR in press), using OMEGA, MOLA, MOC, TES, THEMIS and CTX data, we proposed that the presently dome-shaped formation is composed of a bright material that contains both monohydrated sulfates and ferric oxides. After its emplacement, this formation has been grooved down to various depths by large aeolian erosion corridors. The borders of the corridors are steep linear cliffs where the bright, layered, sulfate-rich material crops out. These cliffs are also partially covered by dark debris fans, which originate from the bright formation itself and which feed dark sand sheets covering the lowest stratigraphic levels of the bright formation. We therefore infer that the dark ferric oxide sand sheets and debris fans are erosional products of the bright formation. We therefore infer that the dark ferric oxide sand sheets and debris fans are erosional products of the bright formation. Due to the relatively low spatial resolution of OMEGA, it is not possible to analyse the exact composition of the cliffs. The aim of the present work is to refine these results and to compare them with newly acquired, high resolution, hyperspectral data from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). CRISM data confirm the mineralogical conclusions made with OMEGA data. Moreover, CRISM data allow the detection of a new layer, containing an Al-OH bearing mineral, at the bottom of this dome-shaped formation.

  19. Phosphorous removal in batch systems using ferric chloride in the presence of activated sludges.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, Alejandro H; Contreras, Edgardo M; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2010-05-15

    The objectives of this work were: (a) to analyze the effect of alkalinity, pH and initial Fe:P molar ratio (Fe(0):P(0)) on the precipitation of orthophosphate using ferric chloride in the presence of activated sludge in order to represent conditions of simultaneous precipitation, and in exhausted wastewater to simulate conditions of post-precipitation, (b) to compare the experimental results with predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium model, and (c) to propose a mechanistic model to determine the dose of coagulant required to achieve a given orthophosphate removal degree at constant pH. Results showed that the presence of biomass did not affect the orthophosphate precipitation; however, addition of ferric chloride caused a drop of pH to values not compatible with the normal activity of activated sludges. For this reason, the wastewater was supplemented with NaHCO(3); when 1gL(-1) NaHCO(3) was added, orthophosphate removals higher than 97% and pH above 6.2 were obtained using Fe(0):P(0)=1.9. Precipitation assays at constant pH showed that Fe(III) hydrolysis and FePO(4) precipitation reaction compete with each other. Calculations using a chemical equilibrium model (CHEAQS) predicted that ferric phosphate precipitation should not take place if pH is higher than about 7.8. However, experimental results showed that ferric phosphate precipitation occurred even at pH 9. For this reason, a mechanistic model was proposed to predict orthophosphate concentrations as a function of Fe(0):P(0) at constant pH. The model can be applied to calculate the minimum Fe(III) concentration required to achieve a given discharge limit for orthophosphate as a function of its initial concentration and pH.

  20. The ferric enterobactin transporter Fep is required for persistent Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Toni A; Moreland, Sarah M; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; Detweiler, Corrella S

    2013-11-01

    Most bacterial pathogens require iron to grow and colonize host tissues. The Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes a natural systemic infection of mice that models acute and chronic human typhoid fever. S. Typhimurium resides in tissues within cells of the monocyte lineage, which limit pathogen access to iron, a mechanism of nutritional immunity. The primary ferric iron import system encoded by Salmonella is the siderophore ABC transporter FepBDGC. The Fep system has a known role in acute infection, but it is unclear whether ferric iron uptake or the ferric iron binding siderophores enterobactin and salmochelin are required for persistent infection. We defined the role of the Fep iron transporter and siderophores in the replication of Salmonella in macrophages and in mice that develop acute followed by persistent infections. Replication of wild-type and iron transporter mutant Salmonella strains was quantified in cultured macrophages, fecal pellets, and host tissues in mixed- and single-infection experiments. We show that deletion of fepB attenuated Salmonella replication and colonization within macrophages and mice. Additionally, the genes required to produce and transport enterobactin and salmochelin across the outer membrane receptors, fepA and iroN, are needed for colonization of all tissues examined. However, salmochelin appears to be more important than enterobactin in the colonization of the spleen and liver, both sites of dissemination. Thus, the FepBDGC ferric iron transporter and the siderophores enterobactin and salmochelin are required by Salmonella to evade nutritional immunity in macrophages and cause persistent infection in mice.

  1. Orthophosphate removal from a synthetic wastewater using lime, alum, and ferric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Sisk, L.; Benefield, L.; Reed, B.

    1987-01-01

    Lime, alum, and ferric chloride were evaluated using a series of jar tests to determine their effectiveness in orthophosphate precipitation from synthetic wastewaters. Calcium phosphate precipitation was most efficient at pH 11.0 and a total carbonate to phosphorus, C/sub T/:P, molar ratio of 15.0. For these conditions, a residual total orthophosphate concentration of 0.12 mg/L-P was observed. The Mg:P molar ratio had little effect on orthophosphate removal from the synthetic wastewater. When alum was used, the minimum residual total orthophosphate concentration observed was 0.21 mg/L-P for an Al:P molar ratio of 3.0 and a pH of 6.0 when pH was adjusted before and during alum addition. When ferric chloride was used, it was found that an Fe:P molar ratio of 3.0 and a pH of 6.0 resulted in the lowest residual total orthophosphate concentration. This value was 0.19 mg/L-P when pH was adjusted before and during iron addition. A multiple regression analysis produced mathematical relationships which can be used to predict residual soluble and residual total orthophosphate concentration for lime, alum, and ferric chloride treatment.

  2. Effect of ferric and bromide ions on the formation and speciation of disinfection byproducts during chlorination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaogang; Zhu, Zhiliang; Qiu, Yanling; Zhao, Jianfu

    2011-01-01

    The effects of ferric ion, pH, and bromide on the formation and distribution of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during chlorination were studied. Two raw water samples from Huangpu River and Yangtze River, two typical drinking water sources of Shanghai, were used for the investigation. Compared with the samples from Huangpu River, the raw water samples from Yangtze River had lower content of total organic carbon (TOC) and ferric ions, but higher bromide concentrations. Under controlled chlorination conditions, four trihalomethanes (THMs), nine haloacetic acids (HAAs), total organic halogen (TOX) and its halogen species fractions, including total organic chlorine (TOC1) and total organic bromide (TOBr), were determined. The results showed that co-existent ferric and bromide ions significantly promoted the formation of total THMs and HAAs for both raw water samples. Higher concentration of bromide ions significantly changed the speciation of the formed THMs and HAAs. There was an obvious shift to brominated species, which might result in a more adverse influence on the safety of drinking water. The results also indicated that high levels of bromide ions in raw water samples produced higher percentages of unknown TOBr.

  3. Potential of Alginate Encapsulated Ferric Saccharate Microemulsions to Ameliorate Iron Deficiency in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mukhija, Kimmi; Singhal, Kirti; Angmo, Stanzin; Yadav, Kamalendra; Yadav, Hariom; Sandhir, Rajat; Singhal, Nitin Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most prominent mineral deficiencies around the world, which especially affects large population of women and children. Development of new technologies to combat iron deficiency is on high demand. Therefore, we developed alginate microcapsule with encapsulated iron that had better oral iron bioavailability. Microcapsules containing iron with varying ratios of sodium alginate ferric(III)-saccharide were prepared using emulsification method. In vitro studies with Caco-2 cells suggested that newly synthesized microemulsions had better iron bioavailability as compared to commercially available iron dextran formulations. Ferrozine in vitro assay showed that alginate-encapsulated ferric galactose microemulsion (AFGM) had highest iron bioavailability in comparison to other four ferric saccharate microemulsions, namely AFGlM, AFMM, AFSM, and AFFM synthesized in our laboratory. Mice studies also suggested that AFGM showed higher iron absorption as indicated by increased serum iron, hemoglobin, and other hematopoietic measures with almost no toxicity at tested doses. Development of iron-loaded microemulsions leads to higher bioavailability of iron and can provide alternative strategies to treat iron deficiency. PMID:26637994

  4. Immobilization of arsenite and ferric iron by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and its relevance to acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Duquesne, K; Lebrun, S; Casiot, C; Bruneel, O; Personné, J-C; Leblanc, M; Elbaz-Poulichet, F; Morin, G; Bonnefoy, V

    2003-10-01

    Weathering of the As-rich pyrite-rich tailings of the abandoned mining site of Carnoulès (southeastern France) results in the formation of acid waters heavily loaded with arsenic. Dissolved arsenic present in the seepage waters precipitates within a few meters from the bottom of the tailing dam in the presence of microorganisms. An Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain, referred to as CC1, was isolated from the effluents. This strain was able to remove arsenic from a defined synthetic medium only when grown on ferrous iron. This A. ferrooxidans strain did not oxidize arsenite to arsenate directly or indirectly. Strain CC1 precipitated arsenic unexpectedly as arsenite but not arsenate, with ferric iron produced by its energy metabolism. Furthermore, arsenite was almost not found adsorbed on jarosite but associated with a poorly ordered schwertmannite. Arsenate is known to efficiently precipitate with ferric iron and sulfate in the form of more or less ordered schwertmannite, depending on the sulfur-to-arsenic ratio. Our data demonstrate that the coprecipitation of arsenite with schwertmannite also appears as a potential mechanism of arsenite removal in heavily contaminated acid waters. The removal of arsenite by coprecipitation with ferric iron appears to be a common property of the A. ferrooxidans species, as such a feature was observed with one private and three collection strains, one of which was the type strain. PMID:14532077

  5. Highly covalent ferric-thiolate bonds exhibit surprisingly low mechanical stability.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peng; Li, Hongbin

    2011-05-01

    Depending on their nature, different chemical bonds show vastly different stability with covalent bonds being the most stable ones that rupture at forces above nanonewton. Studies have revealed that ferric-thiolate bonds are highly covalent and are conceived to be of high mechanical stability. Here, we used single molecule force spectroscopy techniques to directly determine the mechanical strength of such highly covalent ferric-thiolate bonds in rubredoxin. We observed that the ferric-thiolate bond ruptures at surprisingly low forces of ∼200 pN, significantly lower than that of typical covalent bonds, such as C-Si, S-S, and Au-thiolate bonds, which typically ruptures at >1.5 nN. And the mechanical strength of Fe-thiolate bonds is observed to correlate with the covalency of the bonds. Our results indicated that highly covalent Fe-thiolate bonds are mechanically labile and display features that clearly distinguish themselves from typical covalent bonds. Our study not only opens new avenues to investigating this important class of chemical bonds, but may also shed new lights on our understanding of the chemical nature of these metal thiolate bonds.

  6. Removal of Silicon from High Level Waste Streams via Ferric Flocculation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    2004-04-07

    The presence of silicate from glass-forming frit in the recycle waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) produces wastes that when combined with the traditional aluminate-bearing wastes stored in Savannah River Site's tank farms can produce insoluble sodium aluminosilicates. Currently, aluminum-bearing wastes and silicon-bearing wastes are processed in separate evaporators. This, however, limits operational flexibility. Therefore, treatment to remove silicon has been proposed to allow greater flexibility for processing these wastes in the Site's evaporators. The use of a ferric precipitation (flocculation) to remove the silicon has been tested using waste simulants. Ferric precipitation following ferric nitrate addition to two different alkaline DWPF recycle waste simulants was effective at removing silicon to levels below concern for processing in the any of the Savannah River Site's evaporators. Removal of silicon was rapid with removal complete in 2 hours. Elevated temperatures were tested and found to be not required. Capacities of the resultant iron flocculent were approximately 0.1 g of silicon per gram of iron at a final silicon concentration of 50 mg/L. Moreover, the silicon removal obeys a classical Freundlich adsorption isotherm.

  7. Evolution of the Ferric Reductase Domain (FRD) Superfamily: Modularity, Functional Diversification, and Signature Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Xenarios, Ioannis; Soldati, Thierry; Boeckmann, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    A heme-containing transmembrane ferric reductase domain (FRD) is found in bacterial and eukaryotic protein families, including ferric reductases (FRE), and NADPH oxidases (NOX). The aim of this study was to understand the phylogeny of the FRD superfamily. Bacteria contain FRD proteins consisting only of the ferric reductase domain, such as YedZ and short bFRE proteins. Full length FRE and NOX enzymes are mostly found in eukaryotic cells and all possess a dehydrogenase domain, allowing them to catalyze electron transfer from cytosolic NADPH to extracellular metal ions (FRE) or oxygen (NOX). Metazoa possess YedZ-related STEAP proteins, possibly derived from bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. Phylogenetic analyses suggests that FRE enzymes appeared early in evolution, followed by a transition towards EF-hand containing NOX enzymes (NOX5- and DUOX-like). An ancestral gene of the NOX(1-4) family probably lost the EF-hands and new regulatory mechanisms of increasing complexity evolved in this clade. Two signature motifs were identified: NOX enzymes are distinguished from FRE enzymes through a four amino acid motif spanning from transmembrane domain 3 (TM3) to TM4, and YedZ/STEAP proteins are identified by the replacement of the first canonical heme-spanning histidine by a highly conserved arginine. The FRD superfamily most likely originated in bacteria. PMID:23505460

  8. Ferric coagulant recovered from coagulation sludge and its recycle in chemically enhanced primary treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, G R; Yan, Z C; Wang, N; Li, G B

    2009-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the feasibility of ferric coagulant recovery from chemical sludge and its recycle in chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) to make the process more cost-effective, as well as reduce sludge volume. The optimum conditions and efficiency of the acidification for ferric coagulant recovery from coagulation sludge were investigated. Experimental results showed that the recovered coagulants can be used in CEPT and the pollutants removal efficiency is similar to that of fresh coagulant, and for some aspects the effect of recovered coagulants is better than that of fresh ones, such as turbidity removal. Although some substances will be enriched during recycle, they have little effect on treated wastewater quality. Acidification condition also had significant influence on reduction of sludge volume. The efficiency of coagulant recovery had a linear relationship with sludge reduction. Experiments verify that it would be a sustainable and cost-effective way to recover ferric coagulant from coagulation sludge in water treatment and chemical wastewater treatment, and then recycle it to CEPT, as well as reduce sludge volume.

  9. Experimental determination of the phase boundary between kornelite and pentahydrated ferric sulfate at 0.1MPa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kong, W.G.; Wang, A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Recent findings of various ferric sulfates on Mars emphasize the importance of understanding the fundamental properties of ferric sulfates at temperatures relevant to that of Martian surface. In this study, the phase boundary between kornelite (Fe2(SO4)3.7H2O) and pentahydrated ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3.5H2O) was experimentally determined using the humidity-buffer technique together with gravimetric measurements and Raman spectroscopy at 0.1MPa in the 36-56??C temperature range. Through the thermodynamic analysis of our experimental data, the enthalpy change (-290.8??0.3kJ/mol) and the Gibbs free energy change (-238.82??0.02kJ/mol) for each water molecule of crystallization in the rehydration of pentahydrated ferric sulfate to kornelite were obtained. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Immobilization of strontium during iron biomineralization coupled to dissimilatory hydrous ferric oxide reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Eric E.; Leonardo, Michael R.; Ferris, F. Grant

    2002-09-01

    The potential for incorporation of strontium (Sr) into biogenic Fe(II)-bearing minerals formed during microbial reduction of synthetic hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was investigated in circumneutral bicarbonate-buffered medium containing SrCl 2 at concentrations of 10 μM, 100 μM, or 1.0 mM. CaCl 2 (10 mM) was added to some experiments to simulate a Ca-rich groundwater. In Ca-free systems, 89 to 100% of total Sr was captured in solid-phase compounds formed during reduction of 30 to 40 mmol Fe(III) L -1 over a 1-month period. A smaller fraction of total Sr (25 to 34%) was incorporated into the solid phase in cultures amended with 10 mM CaCl 2. X-ray diffraction identified siderite and ferroan ankerite as major end products of HFO reduction in Ca-free and Ca-amended cultures, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy revealed the presence of Sr associated with carbonate phases. Selective extraction of HFO reduction end products indicated that 46 to 100% of the solid-phase Sr was associated with carbonates. The sequestration of Sr into carbonate phases in the Ca-free systems occurred systematically according to a heterogeneous (Doerner-Hoskins) partition coefficient (D D-H) of 1.81 ± 0.15. This D D-H value was 2 to 10 times higher than values determined for incorporation of Sr (10 μM) into FeCO 3(s) precipitated abiotically at rates comparable to or greater than rates observed during HFO reduction, and fivefold higher than theoretical partition coefficients for equilibrium Fe(Sr)CO 3 solid solution formation. Surface complexation and entrapment of Sr by rapidly growing siderite crystals (and possibly other biogenic Fe(II) solids) provides an explanation for the intensive scavenging of Sr in the Ca-free systems. The results of abiotic siderite precipitation experiments in the presence and absence of excess Ca indicate that substitution of Ca for Sr at foreign element incorporation sites (mass action effect) on growing FeCO 3(s

  11. Immobilization of strontium during iron biomineralization coupled to dissimilatory hydrous ferric oxide reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, Eric E.; Leonardo, Michael R.; Ferris, F. G.

    2002-08-15

    Abstract: The potential for incorporation of strontium (Sr) into biogenic Fe(II)-bearing minerals formed during microbial reduction of synthetic hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was investigated in circumneutral bicarbonate-buffered medium containing SrCl2 at concentrations of 10 muM, 100 muM, or 1.0 mM. CaCl2 (10 mM) was added to some experiments to simulate a Ca-rich groundwater. In Ca-free systems, 89 to 100% of total Sr was captured in solid-phase compounds formed during reduction of 30 to 40 mmol Fe(III) L-1 over a 1-month period. A smaller fraction of total Sr (25 to 34%) was incorporated into the solid phase in cultures amended with 10 mM CaCl2. X-ray diffraction identified siderite and ferroan ankerite as major end products of HFO reduction in Ca-free and Ca-amended cultures, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy revealed the presence of Sr associated with carbonate phases. Selective extraction of HFO reduction end products indicated that 46 to 100% of the solid-phase Sr was associated with carbonates. The sequestration of Sr into carbonate phases in the Ca-free systems occurred systematically according to a heterogeneous (Doerner-Hoskins) partition coefficient (DD-H) of 1.81+/-0.15. This DD-H value was 2 to 10 times higher than values determined for incorporation of Sr (10 muM) into FeCO3(S) precipitated abiotically at rates comparable to or greater than rates observed during HFO reduction, and fivefold higher than theoretical partition coefficients for equilibrium Fe(Sr)CO3 solid solution formation. Surface complexation and entrapment of Sr by rapidly growing siderite crystals (and possibly other biogenic Fe(II) solids) provides an explanation for the intensive scavenging of Sr in the Ca-free systems. The results of abiotic siderite precipitation experiments in the presence and absence of excess Ca indicate that substitution of Ca for Sr at foreign element incorporation sites (mass action effect) on growing FeCO3(S

  12. Ferric Citrate

    PubMed Central

    Cada, Dennis J.; Cong, Jasen; Baker, Danial E.

    2015-01-01

    Each month, subscribers to The Formulary Monograph Service receive 5 to 6 well-documented monographs on drugs that are newly released or are in late phase 3 trials. The monographs are targeted to Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committees. Subscribers also receive monthly 1-page summary monographs on agents that are useful for agendas and pharmacy/nursing in-services. A comprehensive target drug utilization evaluation/medication use evaluation (DUE/MUE) is also provided each month. With a subscription, the monographs are sent in print and are also available on-line. Monographs can be customized to meet the needs of a facility. A drug class review is now published monthly with The Formulary Monograph Service. Through the cooperation of The Formulary, Hospital Pharmacy publishes selected reviews in this column. For more information about The Formulary Monograph Service, call The Formulary at 800-322-4349. The February 2015 monograph topics are netupitant/palonosetron, naltrxone SR/bupropion SR, nintedanib, pirfenidone, and ivabradine. The Safety MUE is on netupitant/palonosetron. PMID:25717210

  13. Evaluation of different iron compounds in chlorotic Italian lemon trees (Citrus lemon).

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Patricio Rivera; Castro Meza, Blanca I; de la Garza Requena, Francisco R; Flores, Guillermo Mendoza; Etchevers Barra, Jorge D

    2007-05-01

    The severe deficiency of iron or ferric chlorosis is a serious problem of most citrus trees established in calcareous soils, as a result of the low availability of iron in these soils and the poor uptake and limited transport of this nutrient in trees. The objective of this study was to evaluate the response of chlorotic Italian lemon trees (Citrus lemon) to the application of iron compounds to roots and stems. On comparing the effects of aqueous solutions of ferric citrate, ferrous sulphate and FeEDDHA chelate, applied to 20% of the roots grown in soil and sand, of trees that were planted in pots containing calcareous soil, it was observed that the chelate fully corrected ferric chlorosis, while citrate and sulphate did not solve the problem. EDDHA induced the root uptake of iron as well as the movement of the nutrient up to the leaves. With the use of injections of ferric solutions into the secondary stem of adult trees, ferric citrate corrected chlorosis but ferrous sulphate did not. The citrate ion expanded the mobility of iron within the plant, from the injection points up to the leaves, whereas the sulphate ion did not sufficiently improve the movement of iron towards the leaf mesophyll.

  14. Coordination versatility of tridentate pyridyl aroylhydrazones towards iron: tracking down the elusive aroylhydrazono-based ferric spin-crossover molecular materials.

    PubMed

    Shongwe, Musa S; Al-Rahbi, Sumaiya H; Al-Azani, Mariam A; Al-Muharbi, Abdulaziz A; Al-Mjeni, Faizah; Matoga, Dariusz; Gismelseed, Abbasher; Al-Omari, Imaddin A; Yousif, Ali; Adams, Harry; Morris, Michael J; Mikuriya, Masahiro

    2012-02-28

    The two potentially tridentate and monoprotic Schiff bases acetylpyridine benzoylhydrazone (HL(1)) and acetylpyridine 4-tert-butylbenzoylhydrazone (HL(2)) demonstrate remarkable coordination versatility towards iron on account of their propensity to undergo tautomeric transformations as imposed by the metal centre. Each of the pyridyl aroylhydrazone ligands complexes with the ferrous or ferric ion under strictly controlled reaction conditions to afford three six-coordinate mononuclear compounds [Fe(II)(HL)(2)](ClO(4))(2), [Fe(II)L(2)] and [Fe(III)L(2)]ClO(4) (HL = HL(1) or HL(2)) displaying distinct colours congruent with their intense CT visible absorptions. The synthetic manoeuvres rely crucially on the stoichiometry of the reactants, the basicities of the reaction mixtures and the choice of solvent. Electrochemically, each of these iron compounds exhibits a reversible metal-centred redox process. By all appearances, [Fe(III)(L(1))(2)]ClO(4) is one of only two examples of a crystallographically elucidated iron(III) bis-chelate compound of a pyridyl aroylhydrazone. Several pertinent physical measurements have established that each of the Schiff bases stabilises multiple spin states of iron; the enolate form of these ligands exhibits greater field strength than does the corresponding neutral keto tautomer. To the best of our knowledge, [Fe(III)(L(1))(2)]ClO(4) and [Fe(III)(L(2))(2)]ClO(4) are the first examples of ferric spin crossovers of aroylhydrazones. Whereas in the former the spin crossover (SCO) is an intricate gradual process, in the latter the (6)A(1)↔(2)T(2) transition curve is sigmoidal with T(½)∼280 K and the SCO is virtually complete. As regards [Fe(III)(L(1))(2)]ClO(4), Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopic techniques have revealed remarkable dependence of the spin transition on sample type and extent of solvation. In frozen MeOH solution at liquid nitrogen temperature, both iron(III) compounds exist wholly in the doublet ground state. PMID:22216420

  15. Treatment of wastewater phosphate by reductive dissolution of iron: use of ferric oxyhydroxide media.

    PubMed

    Robertson, W D; Lombardo, P S

    2011-01-01

    In smaller wastewater treatment systems such as septic systems, there is an interest in the development of passive phosphorus (P) removal methods. This study tested fixed-bed filters containing ferric oxyhydroxide media for wastewater P removal in a laboratory column test and in a full-scale domestic septic system. In the column test, during 30 mo of dosing with domestic wastewater, reductive iron dissolution reactions delivered consistent moderate concentrations of Fe into solution (2.9 ± 1.6 mg L), and influent PO-P of 3.7 ± 1.0 mg L was attenuated to 0.09 + 0.04 mg L in the column effluent (98% removal). Phosphorus breakthrough at successive locations along the column indicated that in addition to sorption, mineral precipitation reactions probably also played an important role in the observed P attenuation. This was supported by electron microprobe analyses, which showed the presence of thick (20 μm) secondary Fe-rich coatings containing P on the primary ferric media grains. Assays of NaHCO-leachable and acid-extractable P on the column solids showed accumulation of up to 5.4 mg g acid-extractable P near the column inlet, but <5% of this amount was easily desorbable, further indicating P attenuation from processes other than sorption. Over 19 mo of operation, the domestic septic system also showed generally consistent increased Fe in the filter effluent (2.6 ± 1.7 mg L) and achieved 99% P removal to 0.03 ± 0.02 mg L when the effluent was subsequently oxidized in a sand filter. Ferric iron filters could be attractive options for P removal in smaller wastewater systems because of their passive nature.

  16. Arsenate sorption by hydrous ferric oxide incorporated onto granular activated carbon with phenol formaldehyde resins coating.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, J M; Hobenshield, E; Walsh, T

    2008-04-01

    A simple and effective method was developed using phenol formaldehyde (PF) resins to immobilize hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) onto granular activated carbon (GAC). The resulting sorbent possesses advantages for both the ferric oxide and the GAC, such as a great As-affinity of ferric oxide, large surface area of GAC, and enhanced physical strength. The studies showed that within one hour this sorbent was able to remove 85% of As(V) from water containing an initial As(V) concentration of 1.74 mg l(-1). The As(V) adsorption onto the sorbent was found to follow a pseudo-second order kinetics model. The adsorption isotherms were interpreted in terms of the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The equilibrium data fitted very well to both models. Column tests showed that this sorbent was able to achieve residual concentrations of As(V) in a range of 0.1-2.0 microg l(-1) while continuously treating about 180 bed volume (BV, 130 ml-BV) of arsenate water with an initial As(V) concentration of 1886 microg l(-1) at a filtration rate of 13.5 ml min(-1), i.e., an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 9.6 min and a gram sorbent contact time (GSCT) of 0.15 min. After passing 635 BV of arsenate water, the exhausted sorbent was then tested by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP, US EPA Method 1311) test, and classified as non-hazardous for disposal. Hence, this HFO-PF-coated GAC has the capability to remove As(V) from industrial wastewater containing As(V) levels of about 2 mg l(-1). PMID:18619145

  17. Carcinogenic and cocarcinogenic effects of inhaled synthetic smog and ferric oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Nettesheim, P; Creasia, D A; Mitchell, T J

    1975-07-01

    The carcinogenic and cocarcinogenic activity of synthetic smog, ferric oxide (Fe2O3) dust, and a mixture of the two air contaminants was determined in a long-term inhalation study with Syrian hamsters. Inhaled Fe2O3 particles definitely enhanced diethylnitrosamine tumorigenicity in the peripheral lung. Synthetic smog did not. When tested at a concentration of 40 ppm methane equivalents or 40 mg/m3, respectively, neither air pollutant by itself appeared carcinogenic. Fe2O3 caused pulmonary fibrosis and synthetic smog caused alveolar bronchiolization in many of the exposed animals.

  18. Solute-Solvent Interactions and High Spin ⇌ Low Spin Transitions in Ferric Dithiocarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, P.

    1985-01-01

    The HS ⇌ LS transition in ferric dithiocarbamates in a number of solvents has been investigated using NMR and is interpreted in terms of preferential solvation or second co-ordination sphere reorganisation effects. These studies clearly demonstrate that neglect of pseudo contact shifts can lead to erroneous conclusions about the spin delocalisation mechanisms. The spin derealization in these systems is by direct σ-delocalization along the alkyl chain. The As values of 2T2 and 6A1 states have the same sign.

  19. Ferric ion as a scavenging agent in a solvent extraction process

    DOEpatents

    Bruns, Lester E.; Martin, Earl C.

    1976-01-01

    Ferric ions are added into the aqueous feed of a plutonium scrap recovery process that employs a tributyl phosphate extractant. Radiolytic degradation products of tributyl phosphate such as dibutyl phosphate form a solid precipitate with iron and are removed from the extraction stages via the waste stream. Consequently, the solvent extraction characteristics are improved, particularly in respect to minimizing the formation of nonstrippable plutonium complexes in the stripping stages. The method is expected to be also applicable to the partitioning of plutonium and uranium in a scrap recovery process.

  20. Ameliorative effect of polyphenols from Padina boergesenii against ferric nitrilotriacetate induced renal oxidative damage: With inhibition of oxidative hemolysis and in vitro free radicals.

    PubMed

    Rajamani, Karthikeyan; Renju, V C; Sethupathy, S; Thirugnanasambandan, Somasundaram S

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant activities of diethyl ether (DEE) and methanol (M) extracts from brown alga Padina boergesenii using in vitro and in vivo antioxidant assay, which may help to relate the antioxidant properties with the possible outline of its ameliorative effect. M extract showed higher radical scavenging activity through ferric reducing antioxidant power 139.11 µmol tannic acid equivalent/g; DPPH 71.32 ± 0.56%; deoxyribose radical 88.31 ± 0.47%, and total antioxidant activity 0.47 ± 0.02 mg ascorbic acid equivalents/g. Oxidative red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis inhibition rate was significantly higher in M extract (150 mg/kg body weight) in reference to total phenolic content (r = 0.935). Rats administered with DEE and M extracts (150 mg/kg body weight) for seven days before the administration of ferric nitrilotriacetate (9 mg of Fe/mg/kg bodyweight). Rats pretreated with extracts significantly changed the level of renal microsomal lipid peroxidation, glutathione, and antioxidant enzymes in post-mitochondrial supernatant (P < 0.05). Ameliorative effect of extracts against renal oxidative damage was evident in rat kidney through changes in necrotic and epithelial cells. HPTLC technique has identified the presence of rutin with reference to retardation factor (Rf ) in both the extracts. These findings support the source of polyphenols (rutin) from P. boergesenii had potent antioxidant activity; further work on isolation of bioactive compounds can be channeled to develop as a natural antioxidant.

  1. Regulation of ferric iron transport in Escherichia coli K12: isolation of a constitutive mutant.

    PubMed

    Hantke, K

    1981-01-01

    The lac genes were inserted with phage Mu(Ap, lac) into the fhuA, fepA, cir and tonB genes which specify components of iron uptake systems. The expression of lac in all these operon fusions was controlled by the availability of iron to the cells, thereby facilitating a quick and simple measurement of the expression of the genes listed above. In an iron rich medium under anaerobic conditions all systems were strongly repressed. fhuA was depressed at higher iron concentration than was fepA or cir, and tonB was repressed only under anaerobic conditions and could be induced by iron limitation. Mutants constitutive for the expression of beta-galactosidase were selected in a fhuA-lac fusion strain. The outer membrane proteins Cir, FhuA, FecA, 76K and 83K were made constitutively in such mutant strains. Therefore, they were termed fur mutants. In these fur mutant strains, the synthesis of a 19K protein was reduced. Furthermore, it was found that transport of ferric enterochelin and ferrichrome was also constitutive in the fur mutant cells, and that ferric citrate uptake could be induced by only 10 microM citrate in the growth medium in contrast to wild-type cells in which at least 100 microM citrate was necessary. The fepA gene was concluded to be under an additional control, because it was not fully derepressed by the fur mutation. PMID:7026976

  2. Synovectomy of the rheumatoid knee using intra-articular injection of dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Sledge, C.B.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Shortkroff, S.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Venkatesan, P.; Snyder, M.A.; Barrett, W.P.

    1987-09-01

    One hundred and eleven patients who had seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and persistent synovitis of the knee were treated with intra-articular injection of 270 millicuries of dysprosium-165 bound to ferric hydroxide macroaggregates. A two-year follow-up was available for fifty-nine of the treated knees. Thirty-nine had a good result; nine, a fair result; and eleven, a poor result. Of the twenty-five knees that had Stage-I radiographic changes, nineteen had a good result. Of the thirty-four knees that had Stage-II radiographic changes, twenty showed a good result. Systemic spread of the radioactivity from the injected joint was minimum. The mean whole-body dose was calculated to be 0.3 rad and that to the liver twenty-four hours after injection, 3.2 rads. The results indicated that dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregate is an effective agent for performing radiation synovectomy, particularly in knees that have Stage-I radiographic changes. Because of the minimum rate of systemic spread of the dysprosium-165, it offers a definite advantage over agents that previously have been used.

  3. Treatment of rheumatoid synovitis of the knee with intraarticular injection of dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Sledge, C.B.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Atcher, R.W.; Shortkroff, S.; Lionberger, D.R.; Rose, H.A.; Hurson, B.J.; Lankenner, P.A. Jr.; Anderson, R.J.

    1986-02-01

    One hundred eight knees of 93 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and persistent synovitis of the knee were treated with an intraarticular injection of 270 mCi of dysprosium 165 bound to ferric hydroxide macroaggregate. Leakage of radioactivity from the injected joint was minimal. Mean leakage to the venous blood 3 hours after injection was 0.11% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean whole body dose of 0.2 rads. Mean leakage to the liver 24 hours after injection was 0.64% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean liver dose of 3.2 rads. In 7 additional patients examined, there was negligible or near negligible activity found in the draining inguinal lymph nodes. One-year followup was possible for 74 knees (63 patients). Sixty-one percent of the knees had good results, 23% had fair results, and 16% had poor results. There was a direct correlation between the radiographic stage and response to treatment. In knees with stage I radiographic changes, 72% showed good results; 93% showed improvement. In knees with stage II changes, 59% showed good results; 81% showed improvement. These preliminary results indicate that dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregate is an effective agent for radiation synovectomy. The low leakage rates observed offer a definite advantage over agents previously used.

  4. Concerted loop motion triggers induced fit of FepA to ferric enterobactin.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Chuck R; Jordan, Lorne; Trinh, Vy; Schuerch, Daniel W; Gala, Amparo; Hanson, Mathew; Hanson, Matthew; Shipelskiy, Yan; Majumdar, Aritri; Newton, Salete M C; Klebba, Phillip E

    2014-07-01

    Spectroscopic analyses of fluorophore-labeled Escherichia coli FepA described dynamic actions of its surface loops during binding and transport of ferric enterobactin (FeEnt). When FeEnt bound to fluoresceinated FepA, in living cells or outer membrane fragments, quenching of fluorophore emissions reflected conformational motion of the external vestibular loops. We reacted Cys sulfhydryls in seven surface loops (L2, L3, L4, L5, L7 L8, and L11) with fluorophore maleimides. The target residues had different accessibilities, and the labeled loops themselves showed variable extents of quenching and rates of motion during ligand binding. The vestibular loops closed around FeEnt in about a second, in the order L3 > L11 > L7 > L2 > L5 > L8 > L4. This sequence suggested that the loops bind the metal complex like the fingers of two hands closing on an object, by individually adsorbing to the iron chelate. Fluorescence from L3 followed a biphasic exponential decay as FeEnt bound, but fluorescence from all the other loops followed single exponential decay processes. After binding, the restoration of fluorescence intensity (from any of the labeled loops) mirrored cellular uptake that depleted FeEnt from solution. Fluorescence microscopic images also showed FeEnt transport, and demonstrated that ferric siderophore uptake uniformly occurs throughout outer membrane, including at the poles of the cells, despite the fact that TonB, its inner membrane transport partner, was not detectable at the poles.

  5. Arsenic removal from high-arsenic water by enhanced coagulation with ferric ions and coarse calcite.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Lopez-Valdivieso, A; Hernandez-Campos, D J; Peng, C; Monroy-Fernandez, M G; Razo-Soto, I

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic removal from high-arsenic water in a mine drainage system has been studied through an enhanced coagulation process with ferric ions and coarse calcite (38-74 microm) in this work. The experimental results have shown that arsenic-borne coagulates produced by coagulation with ferric ions alone were very fine, so micro-filtration (membrane as filter medium) was needed to remove the coagulates from water. In the presence of coarse calcite, small arsenic-borne coagulates coated on coarse calcite surfaces, leading the settling rate of the coagulates to considerably increase. The enhanced coagulation followed by conventional filtration (filter paper as filter medium) achieved a very high arsenic removal (over 99%) from high-arsenic water (5mg/l arsenic concentration), producing a cleaned water with the residual arsenic concentration of 13 microg/l. It has been found that the mechanism by which coarse calcite enhanced the coagulation of high-arsenic water might be due to attractive electrical double layer interaction between small arsenic-borne coagulates and calcite particles, which leads to non-existence of a potential energy barrier between the heterogeneous particles.

  6. Arsenic and antimony removal from drinking water by adsorption on granular ferric oxide.

    PubMed

    Sazakli, Eleni; Zouvelou, Stavroula V; Kalavrouziotis, Ioannis; Leotsinidis, Michalis

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic and antimony occur in drinking water due to natural weathering or anthropogenic activities. There has been growing concern about their impact on health. The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency of a granular ferric oxide adsorbent medium to remove arsenic and antimony from drinking water via rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs). Three different water matrices - deionized, raw water treated with a reverse osmosis domestic device and raw water - were spiked with arsenic and/or antimony to a concentration of 100 μg L⁻¹. Both elements were successfully adsorbed onto the medium. The loadings until the guideline value was exceeded in the effluent were found to be 0.35-1.63 mg g⁻¹ for arsenic and 0.12-2.11 mg g⁻¹ for antimony, depending on the water matrix. Adsorption of one element was not substantially affected by the presence of the other. Aeration did not affect significantly the adsorption capacity. Granular ferric oxide could be employed for the simultaneous removal of arsenic and antimony from drinking water, whereas full-scale systems should be assessed via laboratory tests before their implementation.

  7. Are there multiple mechanisms of anaerobic sulfur oxidation with ferric iron in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans?

    PubMed

    Kucera, Jiri; Pakostova, Eva; Lochman, Jan; Janiczek, Oldrich; Mandl, Martin

    2016-06-01

    To clarify the pathway of anaerobic sulfur oxidation coupled with dissimilatory ferric iron reduction in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain CCM 4253 cells, we monitored their energy metabolism gene transcript profiles. Several genes encoding electron transporters involved in aerobic iron and sulfur respiration were induced during anaerobic growth of ferrous iron-grown cells. Most sulfur metabolism genes were either expressed at the basal level or their expression declined. However, transcript levels of genes assumed to be responsible for processing of elemental sulfur and other sulfur intermediates were elevated at the beginning of the growth period. In contrast, genes with predicted functions in formation of hydrogen sulfide and sulfate were significantly repressed. The main proposed mechanism involves: outer membrane protein Cyc2 (assumed to function as a terminal ferric iron reductase); periplasmic electron shuttle rusticyanin; c4-type cytochrome CycA1; the inner membrane cytochrome bc1 complex I; and the quinone pool providing connection to the sulfur metabolism machinery, consisting of heterodisulfide reductase, thiosulfate:quinone oxidoreductase and tetrathionate hydrolase. However, an alternative mechanism seems to involve a high potential iron-sulfur protein Hip, c4-type cytochrome CycA2 and inner membrane cytochrome bc1 complex II. Our results conflict with findings regarding the type strain, indicating strain- or phenotype-dependent pathway variation.

  8. [Mechanism of groundwater As(V) removal with ferric flocculation and direct filtration].

    PubMed

    Kang, Ying; Duan, Jin-Ming; Jing, Chuan-Yong

    2015-02-01

    The As removal process and mechanism from groundwater using ferric flocculation-direct filtration system was investigated using batch, field pilot tests, extended X-ray absorption fine structure ( EXAFS) spectroscopy, and charge-distribution multisite complexation (CD-MUSIC) model. The results showed that arsenate [As(V)] was the dominant As species in the groundwater with a concentration of 40 μg x L(-1). The treatment system could supply 64 984 L As-safe drinking water (< 10 μg L(-1)) using Fe 1.5 mg x L(-1). Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) demonstrated that the leachate As was 3.4 μg x L(-1), much lower than the EPA regulatory concentration (5 mg x L(-1)). EXAFS and CD-MUSIC model indicated that As(V) was adsorbed onto ferric hydroxide via bidentate binuclear complexes in the pH range of 3 to 9.5, while formation of precipitate with Ca or Mg dominated the As removal at pH > 9.5.

  9. Combining Ferric Salt and Cactus Mucilage for Arsenic Removal from Water.

    PubMed

    Fox, Dawn I; Stebbins, Daniela M; Alcantar, Norma A

    2016-03-01

    New methods to remediate arsenic-contaminated water continue to be studied, particularly to fill the need for accessible methods that can significantly impact developing communities. A combination of cactus mucilage and ferric (Fe(III)) salt was investigated as a flocculation-coagulation system to remove arsenic (As) from water. As(V) solutions, ferric nitrate, and mucilage suspensions were mixed and left to stand for various periods of time. Visual and SEM observations confirmed the flocculation action of the mucilage as visible flocs formed and settled to the bottom of the tubes within 3 min. The colloidal suspensions without mucilage were stable for up to 1 week. Sample aliquots were tested for dissolved and total arsenic by ICP-MS and HGAFS. Mucilage treatment improved As removal (over Fe(III)-only treatment); the system removed 75-96% As in 30 min. At neutral pH, removal was dependent on Fe(III) and mucilage concentration and the age of the Fe(III) solution. The process is fast, achieving maximum removal in 30 min, with the majority of As removed in 10-15 min. Standard jar tests with 1000 μg/L As(III) showed that arsenic removal and settling rates were pH-dependent; As removal was between 52% (high pH) and 66% (low pH). PMID:26824141

  10. The effect of cupric and ferric ions on antioxidant properties of human serum albumi.

    PubMed

    Rezaei Behbehani, Gholamreza; Gonbadi, Katayon; Eslami, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of both ferric (Fe³⁺) and cupric (Cu²⁺) ions with human serum albumin (HSA) was assayed at a temperature of 27°C in aqueous solution using isothermal titration calorimetry. The association equilibrium constant and the molar enthalpy for one binding is 1.7 × 10⁵ M-1 and -31.37 kJ • M⁻¹, respectively. To obtain the binding parameters of metal ion-protein interaction over the whole range of Fe³⁺ concentrations, the extended solvation model was applied. The solvation parameters obtained from this model were attributed to the structural change of HSA. The binding parameters obtained from the extended solvation model indicate that the stability of HSA was decreased as a result of its binding with ferric ions, which cause dampening the antioxidant property of HSA. Cuperic ion increases the stability of HSA considerably, indicating that the antioxidant property of human serum albumin are increased as a result of its interaction with cupric ion.

  11. Are there multiple mechanisms of anaerobic sulfur oxidation with ferric iron in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans?

    PubMed

    Kucera, Jiri; Pakostova, Eva; Lochman, Jan; Janiczek, Oldrich; Mandl, Martin

    2016-06-01

    To clarify the pathway of anaerobic sulfur oxidation coupled with dissimilatory ferric iron reduction in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain CCM 4253 cells, we monitored their energy metabolism gene transcript profiles. Several genes encoding electron transporters involved in aerobic iron and sulfur respiration were induced during anaerobic growth of ferrous iron-grown cells. Most sulfur metabolism genes were either expressed at the basal level or their expression declined. However, transcript levels of genes assumed to be responsible for processing of elemental sulfur and other sulfur intermediates were elevated at the beginning of the growth period. In contrast, genes with predicted functions in formation of hydrogen sulfide and sulfate were significantly repressed. The main proposed mechanism involves: outer membrane protein Cyc2 (assumed to function as a terminal ferric iron reductase); periplasmic electron shuttle rusticyanin; c4-type cytochrome CycA1; the inner membrane cytochrome bc1 complex I; and the quinone pool providing connection to the sulfur metabolism machinery, consisting of heterodisulfide reductase, thiosulfate:quinone oxidoreductase and tetrathionate hydrolase. However, an alternative mechanism seems to involve a high potential iron-sulfur protein Hip, c4-type cytochrome CycA2 and inner membrane cytochrome bc1 complex II. Our results conflict with findings regarding the type strain, indicating strain- or phenotype-dependent pathway variation. PMID:26924114

  12. The fate of iron on Mars: Mechanism of oxidation of basaltic minerals to ferric-bearing assemblages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1992-01-01

    Perhaps the most conspicuous indication that chemical weathering has occurred on the surface of Mars is the overall color of the red planet and the spectroscopic features that identify ferric-bearing assemblages in the martian regolith. Apparently, Fe(2+) ions in primary minerals in parent igneous rocks on the martian surface have been oxidized to ferric iron, which occurs in degradation products that now constitute the regolith. The mineralogy of the unweathered igneous rocks prior to weathering on the martian surface is reasonably well constrained, mainly as a result of petrographic studies of the SNC meteorites. However, the alteration products resulting from oxidative weathering of these rocks are less well-constrained. The topics covered include the following: primary rocks subjected to chemical weathering; dissolution processes; oxidation of dissolved Fe(2+); mechanism of polymerization of hydrous ferric oxides; terrestrial occurrences of ferromagnesian smectites; and dehydroxylated Mg-Fe smectites on Mars.

  13. Effect of ionic strength on ligand exchange kinetics between a mononuclear ferric citrate complex and siderophore desferrioxamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Fujii, Manabu; Masago, Yoshifumi; Waite, T. David; Omura, Tatsuo

    2015-04-01

    The effect of ionic strength (I) on the ligand exchange reaction between a mononuclear ferric citrate complex and the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFB), was examined in the NaCl concentration range of 0.01-0.5 M, particularly focusing on the kinetics and mechanism of ligand exchange under environmentally relevant conditions. Overall ligand exchange rate constants were determined by spectrophotometrically measuring the time course of ferrioxamine B formation at a water temperature of 25 °C, pH 8.0, and citrate/Fe molar ratios of 500-5000. The overall ligand exchange rate decreased by 2-11-fold (depending on the citrate/Fe molar ratios) as I increased from approximately 0.01 to 0.5 M. In particular, a relatively large decrease was observed at lower I (<0.1 M). A ligand exchange model describing the effect of I on the ligand exchange rate via disjunctive and adjunctive pathways was developed by considering the pseudo-equilibration of ferric citrate complexes and subsequent ferrioxamine formation on the basis of the Eigen-Wilkins metal-ligand complexation theory. The model and experimental data consistently suggest that the adjunctive pathway (i.e., direct association of DFB with ferric mono- and di-citrate complexes following dissociation of citrate from the parent complexes) dominates in ferrioxamine formation under the experimental conditions used. The model also predicts that the higher rate of ligand exchange at lower I is associated with the decrease in the ferric dicitrate complex stability because of the relatively high electrical repulsion between ferric monocitrate and free citrate at lower I (note that the reactivity of ferric dicitrate with DFB is smaller than that for the monocitrate complex). Overall, the findings of this study contribute to the understanding of the potential effect of I on ligand exchange kinetics in natural waters and provide fundamental knowledge on iron transformation and bioavailability.

  14. Radical-Scavenging Activity and Ferric Reducing Ability of Juniperus thurifera (L.), J. oxycedrus (L.), J. phoenicea (L.) and Tetraclinis articulata (L.).

    PubMed

    El Jemli, Meryem; Kamal, Rabie; Marmouzi, Ilias; Zerrouki, Asmae; Cherrah, Yahia; Alaoui, Katim

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this work is to study and compare the antioxidant properties and phenolic contents of aqueous leaf extracts of Juniperus thurifera, Juniperus oxycedrus, Juniperus Phoenicea, and Tetraclinis articulata from Morocco. Methods. Antioxidant activities of the extracts were evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging ability, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Also the total phenolic and flavonoids contents of the extracts were determined spectrophotometrically. Results. All the extracts showed interesting antioxidant activities compared to the standard antioxidants (butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), quercetin, and Trolox). The aqueous extract of Juniperus oxycedrus showed the highest antioxidant activity as measured by DPPH, TEAC, and FRAP assays with IC50 values of 17.91 ± 0.37 μg/mL, 19.80 ± 0.55 μg/mL, and 24.23 ± 0.07 μg/mL, respectively. The strong correlation observed between antioxidant capacities and their total phenolic contents indicated that phenolic compounds were a major contributor to antioxidant properties of these plants extracts. Conclusion. These results suggest that the aqueous extracts of Juniperus thurifera, Juniperus oxycedrus, Juniperus phoenicea, and Tetraclinis articulata can constitute a promising new source of natural compounds with antioxidants ability.

  15. Radical-Scavenging Activity and Ferric Reducing Ability of Juniperus thurifera (L.), J. oxycedrus (L.), J. phoenicea (L.) and Tetraclinis articulata (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Rabie; Marmouzi, Ilias; Zerrouki, Asmae; Cherrah, Yahia; Alaoui, Katim

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this work is to study and compare the antioxidant properties and phenolic contents of aqueous leaf extracts of Juniperus thurifera, Juniperus oxycedrus, Juniperus Phoenicea, and Tetraclinis articulata from Morocco. Methods. Antioxidant activities of the extracts were evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging ability, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Also the total phenolic and flavonoids contents of the extracts were determined spectrophotometrically. Results. All the extracts showed interesting antioxidant activities compared to the standard antioxidants (butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), quercetin, and Trolox). The aqueous extract of Juniperus oxycedrus showed the highest antioxidant activity as measured by DPPH, TEAC, and FRAP assays with IC50 values of 17.91 ± 0.37 μg/mL, 19.80 ± 0.55 μg/mL, and 24.23 ± 0.07 μg/mL, respectively. The strong correlation observed between antioxidant capacities and their total phenolic contents indicated that phenolic compounds were a major contributor to antioxidant properties of these plants extracts. Conclusion. These results suggest that the aqueous extracts of Juniperus thurifera, Juniperus oxycedrus, Juniperus phoenicea, and Tetraclinis articulata can constitute a promising new source of natural compounds with antioxidants ability. PMID:27293428

  16. Effects of nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and ferric ions on the corrosion of mild steel in concentrated sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Terrell N.; Vanorden, Naola; Schlitt, W. Joseph

    1980-08-01

    Effects of nitrate ions, nitrous acid, sulfur dioxide, and ferric ions on the corrosion of mild steel in unstirred, concentrated sulfuric acid were determined in laboratory tests. Nitrate and nitrous acid at levels up to 1000 ppm accelerate corrosion. At concentrations greater than 1000 ppm nitrate passivates the steel. Sulfur dioxide and ferric ions have no detectable influence on the corrosion. Reaction mechanisms are presented to explain the observed effects. The impact of nitrogen oxides on the storage and handling of sulfide smelter by-product acid is discussed.

  17. [Pathway of aqueous ferric hydroxide catalyzed ozone decomposition and ozonation of trace nitrobenzene].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Zhong-lin; Sui, Ming-hao; Li, Xue-yan

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, the decomposition rate of ozone in water was measured over GAC and ferric hydroxide/GAC (FeOOH/GAC) catalyst and the mechanism of ozone catalytic decomposition was discussed. The catalytic ozonation activity of trace nitrobenzene in water was determined on several metal oxides and correlated with their surface density of hydroxyl groups and pHzpc,(pH of zero point of charge). The results show that: 1) The pseudo-first order rate of ozone decomposition increased by 68 and 108 percent for GAC and FeOOH/GAC catalysts respectively; 2) When t-butanol was added, the rate constant decreased by 9 % for GAC and 20% for FeOOH/GAC; 3) There was no direct correlation between surface density of hydroxyl groups and the activity of catalytic ozonation of nitrobenzene; 4) The oxide surface at nearly zero charged point was favorable for the catalytic ozonation of nitrobenzene.

  18. Enhanced dark hydrogen fermentation by addition of ferric oxide nanoparticles using Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Liu, Min; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-05-01

    Ferric oxide nanoparticles (FONPs) were used to facilitate dark hydrogen fermentation using Enterobacter aerogenes. The hydrogen yield of glucose increased from 164.5±2.29 to 192.4±1.14mL/g when FONPs concentration increased from 0 to 200mg/L. SEM images of E. aerogenes demonstrated the existence of bacterial nanowire among cells, suggesting FONPs served as electron conduits to enhance electron transfer. TEM showed cellular internalization of FONPs, indicating hydrogenase synthesis and activity was potentially promoted due to the released iron element. When further increasing FONPs concentration to 400mg/L, the hydrogen yield of glucose decreased to 147.2±2.54mL/g. Soluble metabolic products revealed FONPs enhanced acetate pathway of hydrogen production, but weakened ethanol pathway. This shift of metabolic pathways allowed more nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide for reducing proton to hydrogen.

  19. Enhanced dark hydrogen fermentation by addition of ferric oxide nanoparticles using Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Liu, Min; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-05-01

    Ferric oxide nanoparticles (FONPs) were used to facilitate dark hydrogen fermentation using Enterobacter aerogenes. The hydrogen yield of glucose increased from 164.5±2.29 to 192.4±1.14mL/g when FONPs concentration increased from 0 to 200mg/L. SEM images of E. aerogenes demonstrated the existence of bacterial nanowire among cells, suggesting FONPs served as electron conduits to enhance electron transfer. TEM showed cellular internalization of FONPs, indicating hydrogenase synthesis and activity was potentially promoted due to the released iron element. When further increasing FONPs concentration to 400mg/L, the hydrogen yield of glucose decreased to 147.2±2.54mL/g. Soluble metabolic products revealed FONPs enhanced acetate pathway of hydrogen production, but weakened ethanol pathway. This shift of metabolic pathways allowed more nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide for reducing proton to hydrogen. PMID:26890796

  20. Protective effect of butylated hydroxytoluene on ferric nitrilotriacetate induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Ansar, S; Tabassum, H; Al Jameil, N

    2013-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the possible ameliorating effect of butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT), associated with ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA)-induced oxidative stress and liver injury in mice. The treatment of mice with Fe-NTA alone enhances ornithine decarboxylase activity to 4.6 folds, protein carbonyl formation increased up to 2.9 folds and DNA synthesis expressed in terms of [(3)H] thymidine incorporation increased to 3.2 folds, and antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes decreased to 1.8-2.5 folds, compared with the corresponding saline-treated controls. These changes were reversed significantly (p < 0.001) in animals receiving a pretreatment of BHT. Our data show that BHT can reciprocate the toxic effects of Fe-NTA and can serve as a potent chemopreventive agent.

  1. Concerted loop motion triggers induced fit of FepA to ferric enterobactin

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Chuck R.; Jordan, Lorne; Trinh, Vy; Schuerch, Daniel W.; Gala, Amparo; Hanson, Mathew; Shipelskiy, Yan; Majumdar, Aritri; Newton, Salete M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses of fluorophore-labeled Escherichia coli FepA described dynamic actions of its surface loops during binding and transport of ferric enterobactin (FeEnt). When FeEnt bound to fluoresceinated FepA, in living cells or outer membrane fragments, quenching of fluorophore emissions reflected conformational motion of the external vestibular loops. We reacted Cys sulfhydryls in seven surface loops (L2, L3, L4, L5, L7 L8, and L11) with fluorophore maleimides. The target residues had different accessibilities, and the labeled loops themselves showed variable extents of quenching and rates of motion during ligand binding. The vestibular loops closed around FeEnt in about a second, in the order L3 > L11 > L7 > L2 > L5 > L8 > L4. This sequence suggested that the loops bind the metal complex like the fingers of two hands closing on an object, by individually adsorbing to the iron chelate. Fluorescence from L3 followed a biphasic exponential decay as FeEnt bound, but fluorescence from all the other loops followed single exponential decay processes. After binding, the restoration of fluorescence intensity (from any of the labeled loops) mirrored cellular uptake that depleted FeEnt from solution. Fluorescence microscopic images also showed FeEnt transport, and demonstrated that ferric siderophore uptake uniformly occurs throughout outer membrane, including at the poles of the cells, despite the fact that TonB, its inner membrane transport partner, was not detectable at the poles. PMID:24981231

  2. ENDOR investigation of the liganding environment of mixed-spin ferric cytochrome c'.

    PubMed

    Usov, Oleg M; Choi, Peter S-T; Shapleigh, James P; Scholes, Charles P

    2005-07-01

    The electronic structure of the 5-coordinate quantum-mechanically mixed-spin (sextet-quartet) heme center in cytochrome c' was investigated by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR), a technique not previously applied to this mixed-spin system. Cytochrome c' was obtained from overexpressing variants of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.3. ENDOR for this study was done at the g(//) = 2.00 extremum where single-crystal-like, well-resolved spectra prevail. The heme meso protons of cytochrome c' showed a contact interaction that implied spin delocalization arising from the heme (d(z)(2)) orbital enhanced by iron out-of-planarity. An exchangeable proton ENDOR feature appeared from the proximal His123 Ndelta hydrogen. This Ndelta hydrogen, which crystallographically has no hydrogen-bonding partner and thus belongs to a neutral imidazole, showed a larger hyperfine coupling than the corresponding hydrogen-bonded Ndelta proton from metmyoglobin. The unique residue Phe14 occludes binding of a sixth ligand in cytochrome c', and ENDOR from a proton of the functionally important Phe14 ring, approximately 3.3 A away from the heme iron, was detected. ENDOR of the nitrogen ligand hyperfine structure is a direct probe into the sigma-antibonding (d(z)(2)) and (d(x)(2)-d(y)(2)) orbitals whose energies alter the relative stability and admixture of sextet and quartet states and whose electronic details were thus elucidated. ENDOR frequencies showed for cytochrome c' larger hyperfine couplings to the histidine nitrogen and smaller hyperfine couplings to the heme nitrogens than for high-spin ferric hemes. Both of these findings followed from the mixed-spin ground state, which has less (d(x)(2)-d(y)(2)) character than have fully high-spin ferric heme systems.

  3. Binding of ferric heme by the recombinant globin from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, J T; Scott, N L; Vu, B C; Falzone, C J

    2001-05-29

    The product of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 gene slr2097 is a 123 amino acid polypeptide chain belonging to the truncated hemoglobin family. Recombinant, ferric heme-reconstituted Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 hemoglobin is a low-spin complex whose endogenous hexacoordination gives rise to optical and NMR characteristics reminiscent of cytochrome b(5) [Scott, N. L., and Lecomte, J. T. J. (2000) Protein Sci. 9, 587-597]. In this work, the sequential assignments using (15)N-(13)C-labeled protein, (1)H nuclear Overhauser effects, and longitudinal relaxation data identified His70 as the proximal histidine and His46 as the sixth ligand to the iron ion. It was also found that one of two possible heme orientations within the protein matrix is highly preferred (>90%) and that this orientation is the same as in vertebrate myoglobins. The rate constant for the 180 degrees rotation of the heme within a protein cage to produce the favored isomer was 0.5 h(-1) at 25 degrees C, approximately 35 times faster than in sperm whale myoglobin. Variable temperature studies revealed an activation energy of 132 +/- 4 kJ mol(-1), similar to the value in metaquomyoglobin at the same pH. The rate constant for heme loss from the major isomer was estimated to be 0.01 h(-1) by optical spectroscopy, close to the value for myoglobin and decades slower than in the related Nostoc commune cyanoglobin. The slow heme loss was attributed in part to the additional coordination bond to His46, whereas the relatively fast rate of heme reorientation suggested that this bond was weaker than the proximal His70-Fe bond. The standard reduction potential of the hexacoordinated protein was measured with and without poly-L-lysine as a mediator and found to be approximately -150 mV vs SHE, indicating a stabilization of the ferric state compared to most hemoglobins and b(5) cytochromes. PMID:11371218

  4. Sorption of ferric iron from ferrioxamine B to synthetic and biogenic layer type manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Bargar, John R.; Sposito, Garrison

    2008-07-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments that increase the bioavailability of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but scant information appears to be available about the potential roles of layer type manganese oxides, which are relatively abundant in soils and the oligotrophic marine water column. To probe the effects of layer type manganese oxides on the stability of aqueous Fe-siderophore complexes, we studied the sorption of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB +, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] to two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III,IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida GB-1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB + at pH 8. Analysis of Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that a dominant fraction of Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to the mineral structure at multiple sites, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that layer type manganese oxides, including biogenic minerals, may sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes. We conclude that the sorption of iron-siderophore complexes may play a significant role in the bioavailability and biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  5. Sorption of Ferric Iron from Ferrioxamine B to Synthetic and Biogenic Layer Type Manganese Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, O.; John, B.; Sposito, G.

    2006-12-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments to increase the bioavailablity of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but no information appears to be available about the effect of solid-phase Mn(IV). To probe the effects of predominantly Mn(IV) oxides, we studied the sorption reaction of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB+, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] with two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III, IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida MnB1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB+ over at pH 8. After 72 hours equilibration time, the sorption behavior for the synthetic birnessites could be accurately described by a Langmuir isotherm; for the biogenic oxide, a Freundlich isotherm was best utilized to model the sorption data. To study the molecular nature of the interaction between the Fe(III)HDFOB+ complex and the oxide surface, Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed. Analysis of the EXAFS spectra indicated that Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to into the mineral structure at multiple sites with no evidence of DFOB complexation, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that manganese oxides, including biominerals, may strongly sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes and thus may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  6. Involvement of superoxide radical in extracellular ferric reduction by iron-deficient bean roots. [Phadeolus vulgaris L. var Prelude

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak, I.; van de Wetering, D.A.M.; Marschner, H.; Bienfait, H.F.

    1987-09-01

    The recent proposal of Tipton and Thowsen that iron-deficient plants reduce ferric chelates in cell walls by a system dependent on the leakage of malate from root cells was tested. Results are presented showing that this mechanism could not be responsible for the high rates of ferric reduction shown by roots of iron-deficient bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Prelude) plants. The role of O/sub 2/ in the reduction of ferric chelates by roots of iron-deficient bean plants was also tested. The rate of Fe(III) reduction was the same in the presence and in the absence of O/sub 2/. However, in the presence of O/sub 2/ the reaction was partially inhibited by superoxide dismutase (SOD), which indicates a role for the superoxide radical, O/sub 2//sup -/, as a facultative intermediate electron carrier. The inhibition by SOD increased with substrate pH and with decrease in concentration of the ferrous scavenger bathophenanthroline-disulfonate. The results are consistent with a mechanism for transmembrane electron in which a flavin or quinone is the final electron carrier in the plasma membrane. The results are discussed in relation to the ecological importance that O/sub 2//sup -/ may have in the acquisition of ferric iron by dicotyledonous plants.

  7. Managing hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic kidney disease on dialysis with ferric citrate: latest evidence and clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Fadem, Stephen Z.; Kant, Kotagal S.; Bhatt, Udayan; Sika, Mohammed; Lewis, Julia B.; Negoi, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Ferric citrate is a novel phosphate binder that allows the simultaneous treatment of hyperphosphatemia and iron deficiency in patients being treated for end-stage renal disease with hemodialysis (HD). Multiple clinical trials in HD patients have uniformly and consistently demonstrated the efficacy of the drug in controlling hyperphosphatemia with a good safety profile, leading the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014 to approve its use for that indication. A concurrent beneficial effect, while using ferric citrate as a phosphate binder, is its salutary effect in HD patients with iron deficiency being treated with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent (ESA) in restoring iron that becomes available for reversing chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related anemia. Ferric citrate has also been shown in several studies to diminish the need for intravenous iron treatment and to reduce the requirement for ESA. Ferric citrate is thus a preferred phosphate binder that helps resolve CKD-related mineral bone disease and iron-deficiency anemia. PMID:26336594

  8. Viewing the Valence Electronic Structure of Ferric and Ferrous Hexacyanide in Solution from the Fe and Cyanide Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Zhang, Wenkai; Delcey, Mickaël G; Pinjari, Rahul V; Miedema, Piter S; Schreck, Simon; Quevedo, Wilson; Schröder, Henning; Föhlisch, Alexander; Gaffney, Kelly J; Lundberg, Marcus; Odelius, Michael; Wernet, Philippe

    2016-07-28

    The valence-excited states of ferric and ferrous hexacyanide ions in aqueous solution were mapped by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Fe L2,3 and N K edges. Probing of both the central Fe and the ligand N atoms enabled identification of the metal- and ligand-centered excited states, as well as ligand-to-metal and metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excited states. Ab initio calculations utilizing the RASPT2 method were used to simulate the Fe L2,3-edge RIXS spectra and enabled quantification of the covalencies of both occupied and empty orbitals of π and σ symmetry. We found that π back-donation in the ferric complex is smaller than that in the ferrous complex. This is evidenced by the relative amounts of Fe 3d character in the nominally 2π CN(-) molecular orbital of 7% and 9% in ferric and ferrous hexacyanide, respectively. Utilizing the direct sensitivity of Fe L3-edge RIXS to the Fe 3d character in the occupied molecular orbitals, we also found that the donation interactions are dominated by σ bonding. The latter was found to be stronger in the ferric complex, with an Fe 3d contribution to the nominally 5σ CN(-) molecular orbitals of 29% compared to 20% in the ferrous complex. These results are consistent with the notion that a higher charge at the central metal atom increases donation and decreases back-donation. PMID:27380541

  9. Formation of Green Rust and Immobilization of Nickel in Response to Bacterial Reduction of Hydrous Ferric Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Parmar, N.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F G.

    2001-04-01

    This investigation documents the formation of Green Rust (GR) and immobilization of Ni2+ in response to bacterial reduction of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) reduction experiments provided evidence that the solid-phase partitioning of Ni2+ in GR extended from equilibrium solid-solution behavior.

  10. Studying Equilibrium in the Chemical Reaction between Ferric and Iodide Ions in Solution Using a Simple and Inexpensive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolaychuk, Pavel Anatolyevich; Kuvaeva, Alyona Olegovna

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment on the study of the chemical equilibrium based on the reaction between ferric and iodide ions in solution with the formation of ferrous ions, free iodine, and triiodide ions is developed. The total concentration of iodide and triiodide ions in the reaction mixture during the reaction is determined by the argentometric…

  11. Effect of Fe-chelating complexes on a novel M2FC performance with ferric chloride and ferricyanide catholytes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyungmi; Lee, Ilgyu; Han, Jong-In

    2012-01-01

    As an effort to better utilize the microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology, we previously proposed an innovative MFC system named M2FC consisting of ferric-based MFC part and ferrous-based fuel cell (FC) part. In this reactor, ferric ion, the catholyte in the MFC part, was efficiently regenerated by the FC part with the generation of additional electricity. When both units were operated separately, the ferric-based MFC part produced approximately 1360 mW m(-2) of power density with FeCl(3) as catholyte and Fe-citrate as anolyte. The ferrous-based FC part with FeCl(3) as catholyte and Fe-EDTA as anolyte displayed the highest power density (1500 mW m(-2)), while that with ferricyanide as catholyte and Fe-noligand as anolyte had the lowest power density (380 mW m(-2)). The types of catholytes and chelating complexes as anolyte were found to play important roles in the reduction of ferric ions and oxidation of ferrous ion. Linear sweep voltammetry results supported that the cathode electrolytes were electrically active and these agreed well with the M2FC reactor performance. These results clearly showed that ligands played critical role in the efficiency and rate for recycling iron ion and thus the M2FC performance.

  12. The reevaluation of the ferric thiocyanate assay for lipid hydroperoxides with special considerations of the mechanistic aspects of the response.

    PubMed

    Mihaljević, B; Katusin-Razem, B; Razem, D

    1996-01-01

    The mechanistic aspects of the spectrophotometric method of analysis of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) based on the oxidation of ferrous to ferric ion and subsequent complexation of the latter by thiocyanate are considered. The method of analysis, as revised by us, was carried out in the same solvent that had been used for the extraction of lipids from the sample, a deoxygenated chloroform:methanol or a dichloromethane:methanol (2:1, v/v) mixture, and used a single solution containing both reagents, Fe2+ and SCN-, for developing the response. In that solvent, total lipids up to 5 mg/ml did not interfere, and linear increase of the absorbance of ferric thiocyanate complex was obtained up to 2 x 10(-5) M LOOH. Molar absorptivity of the ferric thiocyanate complex expressed per mol of LOOH was determined as 58,440 M-1 cm-1, based on the average of four ferric ions produced by each LOOH molecule. The estimated lowest detectable limit was about 170 pmol LOOH/ml of analyzed solution, which corresponded to about 50 mumol LOOH/kg lipid in complex natural mixtures. In addition to good sensitivity, and in contrast to some other more popular spectrophotometric assays for LOOH, the method is responsive also to hydroperoxides of mono- and di-unsaturated fatty acids. The method, thus, provides an easy, rapid, sensitive, and complete measure of hydroperoxidation of lipids. PMID:8791093

  13. Managing hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic kidney disease on dialysis with ferric citrate: latest evidence and clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Yagil, Yoram; Fadem, Stephen Z; Kant, Kotagal S; Bhatt, Udayan; Sika, Mohammed; Lewis, Julia B; Negoi, Dana

    2015-09-01

    Ferric citrate is a novel phosphate binder that allows the simultaneous treatment of hyperphosphatemia and iron deficiency in patients being treated for end-stage renal disease with hemodialysis (HD). Multiple clinical trials in HD patients have uniformly and consistently demonstrated the efficacy of the drug in controlling hyperphosphatemia with a good safety profile, leading the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014 to approve its use for that indication. A concurrent beneficial effect, while using ferric citrate as a phosphate binder, is its salutary effect in HD patients with iron deficiency being treated with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent (ESA) in restoring iron that becomes available for reversing chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related anemia. Ferric citrate has also been shown in several studies to diminish the need for intravenous iron treatment and to reduce the requirement for ESA. Ferric citrate is thus a preferred phosphate binder that helps resolve CKD-related mineral bone disease and iron-deficiency anemia. PMID:26336594

  14. Comparative Evaluation of Aluminum Sulfate and Ferric Sulfate-Induced Coagulations as Pretreatment of Microfiltration for Treatment of Surface Water.

    PubMed

    Song, Yali; Dong, Bingzhi; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang

    2015-06-12

    Two coagulants, aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride, were tested to reduce natural organic matter (NOM) as a pretreatment prior to polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration (MF) membranes for potable water treatment. The results showed that the two coagulants exhibited different treatment performance in NOM removal. Molecular weight (MW) distributions of NOM in the tested surface raw water were concentrated at 3-5 kDa and approximately 0.2 kDa. Regardless of the coagulant species and dosages, the removal of 0.2 kDa NOM molecules was limited. In contrast, NOM at 3-5 kDa were readily removed with increasing coagulant dosages. In particular, aluminum sulfate favorably removed NOM near 5 kDa, whereas ferric chloride tended to reduce 3 kDa organic substances. Although aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride could improve the flux of the ensuing MF treatment, the optimal coagulant dosages to achieve effective pretreatment were different: 2-30 mg/L for aluminum sulfate and >15 mg/L for ferric chloride. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of the membrane-filtered coagulated raw water showed that coagulation efficiency dramatically affected membrane flux and that good coagulation properties can reduce membrane fouling.

  15. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Wertsching, Alan K.; Orme, Christopher J.; Luther, Thomas A.; Jones, Michael G.

    2010-08-10

    A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

  16. Polybenzimidazole compounds

    DOEpatents

    Klaehn, John R.; Peterson, Eric S.; Orme, Christopher J.; Jones, Michael G.; Wertsching, Alan K.; Luther, Thomas A.; Trowbridge, Tammy L.

    2011-11-22

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

  17. Possible Association of Ferrous Phosphates and Ferric Sulfates in S-rich Soil on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Schroeder, C.; Haderlein, S.

    2012-12-01

    NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit explored Gusev Crater to look for signs of ancient aqueous activity, assess past environmental conditions and suitability for life. Spirit excavated light-toned, S-rich soils at several locations. These are likely of hydrothermal, possibly fumarolic origin. At a location dubbed Paso Robles the light-toned soil was also rich in P - a signature from surrounding rock. While S is mainly bound in ferric hydrated sulfates [1], the mineralogy of P is ill-constrained [2]. P is a key element for life and its mineralogy constrains its availability. Ferrous phases observed in Paso Robles Mössbauer spectra may represent olivine and pyroxene from surrounding basaltic soil [1] or ferrous phosphate minerals [3]. Phosphate is well-known to complex and stabilize Fe 2+ against oxidation to Fe 3+ . Schröder et al. [3] proposed a formation pathway of ferrous phosphate/ferric sulfate associations: sulfuric acid reacts with basalt containing apatite, forming CaSO4 and phosphoric acid. The phosphoric and/or excess sulfuric acid reacts with olivine, forming Fe2+-phosphate and sulfate. The phosphate is less soluble and precipitates. Ferrous sulfate remains in solution and is oxidized as pH increases. To verify this pathway, we dissolved Fe2+-chloride and Na-phosphate salts in sulfuric acid inside an anoxic glovebox. The solution was titrated to pH 6 by adding NaOH when a first precipitate formed, which was ferrous phosphate according to Mössbauer spectroscopy (MB). At that point the solution was removed from the glovebox and allowed to evaporate in the presence of atmospheric oxygen, leading to the oxidation of Fe2+. The evaporation rate was controlled by keeping the suspensions at different temperatures; pH was monitored during the evaporation process. The final precipitates were analyzed by MB and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), comparable to MER MB and Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer instrument datasets, and complementary techniques such as X

  18. Application of granular ferric hydroxides for removal elevated concentrations of arsenic from mine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlachta, Małgorzata; Włodarczyk, Paweł; Wójtowicz, Patryk

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic is naturally occurring element in the environment. Over three hundred minerals are known to contain some form of arsenic and among them arsenopyrite is the most common one. Arsenic-bearing minerals are frequently associated with ores containing mined metals such as copper, tin, nickel, lead, uranium, zinc, cobalt, platinum and gold. In the aquatic environment arsenic is typically present in inorganic forms, mainly in two oxidation states (+5, +3). As(III) is dominant in more reduced conditions, whereas As(V) is mostly present in an oxidizing environment. However, due to certain human activities the elevated arsenic levels in aquatic ecosystems are arising to a serious environmental problem. High arsenic concentrations found in surface and groundwaters, in some regions originate from mining activities and ore processing. Therefore, the major concern of mining industry is to maintain a good quality of effluents discharged in large volumes. This requires constant monitoring of effluents quality that guarantee the efficient protection of the receiving waters and reacting to possible negative impact of contamination on local communities. A number of proven technologies are available for arsenic removal from waters and wastewaters. In the presented work special attention is given to the adsorption method as a technically feasible, commonly applied and effective technique for the treatment of arsenic rich mine effluents. It is know that arsenic has a strong affinity towards iron rich materials. Thus, in this study the granular ferric hydroxides (CFH 12, provided by Kemira Oyj, Finland) was applied to remove As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions. The batch adsorption experiments were carried out to assess the efficiency of the tested Fe-based material under various operating parameters, including composition of treated water, solution pH and temperature. The results obtained from the fixed bed adsorption tests demonstrated the benefits of applying granular

  19. Suppressive effects of dietary curcumin on the increased activity of renal ornithine decarboxylase in mice treated with a renal carcinogen, ferric nitrilotriacetate.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Yasumasa; Iqbal, Mohammad; Okada, Shigeru

    2005-06-10

    Curcumin, a natural, biologically active compound extracted from rhizomes of Curcuma species, has been shown to act as a biological response modifier in various disorders. We have reported previously that the dietary supplementation of curcumin enhances the activities of antioxidant and phase II metabolizing enzymes in mice (M. Iqbal, S.D. Sharma, Y. Okazaki, M. Fujisawa, S. Okada, Dietary supplementation of curcumin enhances antioxidant and phase II metabolizing enzymes in ddY mice: possible role in protection against chemical carcinogenesis and toxicity, Pharmacol and Toxicol. 92 (2003) 33_38.) and inhibits ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) induced oxidative injury of lipids and DNA in vitro (M. Iqbal, Y. Okazaki, S. Okada, In vitro curcumin modulates Ferric Nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced peroxidation of microsomal membrane lipids and DNA damage, Teratogenesis Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis Supplement 23 (2003) 151-160.). In our present study, Fe-NTA, a known complete renal carcinogen, which generate ROS in vivo, was given intraperitoneally to mice and curcumin was tested for its ability to inhibits oxidative stress and the activity of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) as well as histopathological changes in the kidney. Substantial changes in glutathione, antioxidant enzymes as well as changes in phase II metabolizing enzymes were observed in the kidney at 12 h after treatment with Fe-NTA (9.0 mg Fe/kg body weight). Effect of oxidative stress induced by Fe-NTA were also demonstrated by the increase in lipid peroxidation as monitored by formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE)-modified proteins in kidney. Likewise, the level of protein carbonyl contents, an indicator of protein oxidation was also increased after Fe-NTA administration. However, the changes in these parameters were restored to normal in curcumin-pretreated mice. The ODC activity in the kidney was significantly increased by Fe

  20. The Phosphate Binder Ferric Citrate and Mineral Metabolism and Inflammatory Markers in Maintenance Dialysis Patients: Results From Prespecified Analyses of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Van Buren, Peter N.; Lewis, Julia B.; Dwyer, Jamie P.; Greene, Tom; Middleton, John; Sika, Mohammed; Umanath, Kausik; Abraham, Josephine D.; Arfeen, Shahabul S.; Bowline, Isai G.; Chernin, Gil; Fadem, Stephen Z.; Goral, Simin; Koury, Mark; Sinsakul, Marvin V.; Weiner, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Phosphate binders are the cornerstone of hyperphosphatemia management in dialysis patients. Ferric citrate is an iron-based oral phosphate binder that effectively lowers serum phosphorus levels. Study Design 52-week, open-label, phase 3, randomized, controlled trial for safety-profile assessment. Setting & Participants Maintenance dialysis patients with serum phosphorus levels ≥6.0 mg/dL after washout of prior phosphate binders. Intervention 2:1 randomization to ferric citrate or active control (sevelamer carbonate and/or calcium acetate). Outcomes Changes in mineral bone disease, protein-energy wasting/inflammation, and occurrence of adverse events after 1 year. Measurements Serum calcium, intact parathyroid hormone, phosphorus, aluminum, white blood cell count, percentage of lymphocytes, serum urea nitrogen, and bicarbonate. Results There were 292 participants randomly assigned to ferric citrate, and 149, to active control. Groups were well matched. For mean changes from baseline, phosphorus levels decreased similarly in the ferric citrate and active control groups (−2.04 ± 1.99 [SD] vs −2.18 ± 2.25 mg/dL, respectively; P = 0.9); serum calcium levels increased similarly in the ferric citrate and active control groups (0.22 ± 0.90 vs 0.31 ± 0.95 mg/dL; P = 0.2). Hypercalcemia occurred in 4 participants receiving calcium acetate. Parathyroid hormone levels decreased similarly in the ferric citrate and active control groups (−167.1 ± 399.8 vs −152.7 ± 392.1 pg/mL; P = 0.8). Serum albumin, bicarbonate, serum urea nitrogen, white blood cell count and percentage of lymphocytes, and aluminum values were similar between ferric citrate and active control. Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were lower in participants receiving sevelamer than those receiving ferric citrate and calcium acetate. Fewer participants randomly assigned to ferric citrate had serious adverse events compared with active control. Limitations Open

  1. Multipurpose Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Specially formulated derivatives of an unusual basic compound known as Alcide may be the answer to effective treatment and prevention of the disease bovine mastitis, a bacterial inflammation of a cow's mammary gland that results in loss of milk production and in extreme cases, death. Manufactured by Alcide Corporation the Alcide compound has killed all tested bacteria, virus and fungi, shortly after contact, with minimal toxic effects on humans or animals. Alcide Corporation credits the existence of the mastitis treatment/prevention products to assistance provided the company by NERAC, Inc.

  2. The regulatory role of ferric uptake regulator (Fur) during anaerobic respiration of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-Wei; He, Ying; Xu, Jun; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Feng-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is a global regulator that controls bacterial iron homeostasis. In this study, a fur deletion mutant of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 was constructed. Physiological studies revealed that the growth rate of this mutant under aerobic conditions was only slightly lower than that of wild type (WT), but severe growth defects were observed under anaerobic conditions when different electron acceptors (EAs) were provided. Comparative transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that Fur is involved not only in classical iron homeostasis but also in anaerobic respiration. Fur exerted pleiotropic effects on the regulation of anaerobic respiration by controlling anaerobic electron transport, the heme biosynthesis system, and the cytochrome c maturation system. Biochemical assays demonstrated that levels of c-type cytochromes were lower in the fur mutant, consistent with the transcriptional profiling. Transcriptomic analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed a primary regulation network for Fur in WP3. These results suggest that Fur may act as a sensor for anoxic conditions to trigger and influence the anaerobic respiratory system.

  3. Metal-responsive promoter DNA compaction by the ferric uptake regulator.

    PubMed

    Roncarati, Davide; Pelliciari, Simone; Doniselli, Nicola; Maggi, Stefano; Vannini, Andrea; Valzania, Luca; Mazzei, Luca; Zambelli, Barbara; Rivetti, Claudio; Danielli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Short-range DNA looping has been proposed to affect promoter activity in many bacterial species and operator configurations, but only few examples have been experimentally investigated in molecular detail. Here we present evidence for a metal-responsive DNA condensation mechanism controlled by the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator (Fur), an orthologue of the widespread Fur family of prokaryotic metal-dependent regulators. H. pylori Fur represses the transcription of the essential arsRS acid acclimation operon through iron-responsive oligomerization and DNA compaction, encasing the arsR transcriptional start site in a repressive macromolecular complex. A second metal-dependent regulator NikR functions as nickel-dependent anti-repressor at this promoter, antagonizing the binding of Fur to the operator elements responsible for the DNA condensation. The results allow unifying H. pylori metal ion homeostasis and acid acclimation in a mechanistically coherent model, and demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of a selective metal-responsive DNA compaction mechanism controlling bacterial transcriptional regulation. PMID:27558202

  4. Mechanistic insights into metal ion activation and operator recognition by the ferric uptake regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zengqin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Manfeng; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Feng, Chong; Zhang, Qi; Yu, Lin; Qi, Lei; Zheng, Jiangge; Wang, Xu; Huo, Xinmei; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Li, Xiaorong; Wu, Wei; Rohs, Remo; Li, Ying; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-07-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of prokaryotes, such as bacterial pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms and structural basis of Fur-DNA binding remain incompletely understood. Here, we report high-resolution structures of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 Fur in four different states: apo-Fur, holo-Fur, the Fur-feoAB1 operator complex and the Fur-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fur box complex. Apo-Fur is a transition metal ion-independent dimer whose binding induces profound conformational changes and confers DNA-binding ability. Structural characterization, mutagenesis, biochemistry and in vivo data reveal that Fur recognizes DNA by using a combination of base readout through direct contacts in the major groove and shape readout through recognition of the minor-groove electrostatic potential by lysine. The resulting conformational plasticity enables Fur binding to diverse substrates. Our results provide insights into metal ion activation and substrate recognition by Fur that suggest pathways to engineer magnetotactic bacteria and antipathogenic drugs.

  5. Granular ferric hydroxide adsorbent for phosphate removal: demonstration preparation and field study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bei; Zhang, Yu; Dou, Xiaomin; Yuan, Hongying; Yang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Ferric hydroxide (FHO), which has high phosphate adsorption capacity, was prepared by precipitation at industrial scale and then fabricated via the drum granulation method with cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) as the binder. The optimum binder/FHO powder ratio was 0.6 for producing a granular adsorbent with a high phosphate adsorption capacity and stability. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacities of powder and granular FHOs were 74.07 mg g⁻¹ and 56.18 mg g(-1) at pH 7.0 ± 0.2, respectively, which were higher than those of other reported phosphate adsorbents under neutral or acidic conditions. Phosphate-loaded granular FHO could be regenerated by NaOH solution. Columns containing the granular FHO were used for phosphate removal from ozonated secondary effluents of a municipal wastewater treatment plant at space velocity (SV) of 2 and 5 h⁻¹. During more than 2 months' operation, the average removal percentage of PO(4)(3-) was more than 90% and the turbidity and concentration of CODMn in the effluents were lower than in the influents. In addition, energy dispersive X-ray results suggested that active sites inside the granular FHO were available for phosphate removal. The results demonstrated that granular FHO can be applied as an assist technology for phosphate removal from secondary effluents.

  6. Characteristics and kinetics of phosphate adsorption on dewatered ferric-alum residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Guo, Wei; Tian, Binghui; Pei, Yuansheng; Zhang, Kejiang

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics and kinetics of phosphate (P) adsorption on dewatered ferric-alum water treatment residuals (Fe-Al-WTRs) have been investigated. The existence of both aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) in the residuals can result in significantly high P adsorption capacities. The P adsorption kinetics of Fe-Al-WTRs exhibited an initial rapid phase, followed by a slower phase. This could be described by three models, including a pseudo-first-order equation, a pseudo-second-order equation, and a double-constant rate equation. The latter was especially good for those runs with initial P concentrations of 500 and 1000 mg L(-1). Both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms fit the experimental data well, particularly the Freundlich isotherm, which had a correlation coefficient of 0.9930. The maximum measured P adsorption capacity of Fe-Al-WTRs was 45.42 mg g(-1), which is high when compared to those of most WTRs, as well as other reported adsorbents. The results also show that the P adsorption is a spontaneous endothermic process. Highest P adsorption capacities of Fe-Al-WTRs were measured at low pHs and a particle size range of 0.6 to 0.9 mm.

  7. Differential responses of soil nematode community to pig manure application levels in Ferric Acrisols

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Ru; Li, Xiao-Gang; Zhou, Zhi-Gao; Zhang, Tao-Lin; Wang, Xing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Excessive pig manure application probably degrades arable soil quality in some intensive pig farming areas. The responses of the nematode community to dosages of pig manure were investigated in Ferric Acrisols under 3-season peanut monoculture. Varying dosages of manure (1.75, 3.5, 7, 14 and 28 t·ha−1·yr−1) in combination with chemical fertilizer were applied to field plots, and chemical fertilizer alone was also applied as a control. With increasing manure application, the abundance of bacterivores and omnivores-predators increased, the abundance of plant parasites decreased, and fungivores abundance exhibited hump-shaped variation. Simpson diversity index and plant parasite index/maturity index of the nematode communities increased to a maximum level at a manure application rate of 3.5 t·ha−1·yr−1 and then sharply decreased. The changes in the soil nematode community were further determined to be correlated with chemical properties; available phosphorus had the strongest quadratic correlation with the two indices, implying that available phosphorus had a better indicative effect than other soil properties to nematode community. Available phosphorus in soil was deduced from 49 to 64 mg·kg−1 with the best nematode communities. Our results emphasized the importance of regular applications of manure in agriculture field to balance nematode diversity and build healthy agro-ecosystems. PMID:27734955

  8. Ultrafast Heme Dynamics of Ferric Cytochrome c in Different Environments: Electronic, Vibrational, and Conformational Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Venugopal

    2015-12-21

    The excited-state dynamics of ferric cytochrome c (Cyt c), an important electron-transfer heme protein, in acidic to alkaline medium and in its unfolded form are investigated by using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy, exciting the heme and Tryptophan (Trp) to understand the electronic, vibrational, and conformational relaxation of the heme. At 390 nm excitation, the electronic relaxation of heme is found to be ≈150 fs at different pH values, increasing to 480 fs in the unfolded form. Multistep vibrational relaxation dynamics of the heme, including fast and slow processes, are observed at pH 7. However, in the unfolded form and at pH 2 and 11, fast phases of vibrational relaxation dominate, revealing the energy dissipation occurring through the covalent bond interaction between the heme and the nearest amino acids. A significant shortening of the excited-state lifetime of Trp is observed at various pH values at 280 nm excitation due to resonance energy transfer to the heme. The longer time constant (25 ps) observed in the unfolded form is attributed to a complete global conformational relaxation of Cyt c.

  9. Investigations of the low frequency modes of ferric cytochrome c using vibrational coherence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Venugopal; Sun, Yuhan; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Champion, Paul M

    2014-06-12

    Femtosecond vibrational coherence spectroscopy is used to investigate the low frequency vibrational dynamics of the electron transfer heme protein, cytochrome c (cyt c). The vibrational coherence spectra of ferric cyt c have been measured as a function of excitation wavelength within the Soret band. Vibrational coherence spectra obtained with excitation between 412 and 421 nm display a strong mode at ~44 cm(-1) that has been assigned to have a significant contribution from heme ruffling motion in the electronic ground state. This assignment is based partially on the presence of a large heme ruffling distortion in the normal coordinate structural decomposition (NSD) analysis of the X-ray crystal structures. When the excitation wavelength is moved into the ~421-435 nm region, the transient absorption increases along with the relative intensity of two modes near ~55 and 30 cm(-1). The intensity of the mode near 44 cm(-1) appears to minimize in this region and then recover (but with an opposite phase compared to the blue excitation) when the laser is tuned to 443 nm. These observations are consistent with the superposition of both ground and excited state coherence in the 421-435 nm region due to the excitation of a weak porphyrin-to-iron charge transfer (CT) state, which has a lifetime long enough to observe vibrational coherence. The mode near 55 cm(-1) is suggested to arise from ruffling in a transient CT state that has a less ruffled heme due to its iron d(6) configuration.

  10. Multidomain Human Peroxidasin 1 Is a Highly Glycosylated and Stable Homotrimeric High Spin Ferric Peroxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Soudi, Monika; Paumann-Page, Martina; Delporte, Cedric; Pirker, Katharina F.; Bellei, Marzia; Edenhofer, Eva; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Obinger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Human peroxidasin 1 (hsPxd01) is a multidomain heme peroxidase that uses bromide as a cofactor for the formation of sulfilimine cross-links. The latter confers critical structural reinforcement to collagen IV scaffolds. Here, hsPxd01 and various truncated variants lacking nonenzymatic domains were recombinantly expressed in HEK cell lines. The N-glycosylation site occupancy and disulfide pattern, the oligomeric structure, and unfolding pathway are reported. The homotrimeric iron protein contains a covalently bound ferric high spin heme per subunit with a standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple of −233 ± 5 mV at pH 7.0. Despite sequence homology at the active site and biophysical properties similar to human peroxidases, the catalytic efficiency of bromide oxidation (kcat/KMapp) of full-length hsPxd01 is rather low but increased upon truncation. This is discussed with respect to its structure and proposed biosynthetic function in collagen IV cross-linking. PMID:25713063

  11. Analysis of a ferric uptake regulator (Fur) knockout mutant in Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida.

    PubMed

    Ebanks, Roger O; Goguen, Michel; Knickle, Leah; Dacanay, Andrew; Leslie, Andrew; Ross, Neil W; Pinto, Devanand M

    2013-03-23

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is the etiological agent of furunculosis; a serious infectious disease in aquaculture raised salmonids. Iron acquisition has been shown to be critical for the survival of pathogenic bacteria during the course of infection. Previous work has demonstrated that A. salmonicida expresses iron-repressible IROMP proteins, suggesting the presence of iron acquisition systems that are under the control of a ferric uptake regulator (Fur). In this study, the A. salmonicida fur has been sequenced and a fur deletion strain generated. The A. salmonicida fur gene has an open reading frame of 428 bp, coding for a protein of 143 amino acids, and with high homology to previously described Fur proteins. The Fur protein product had a 94% sequence identity and 96% sequence similarity to the Aeromonas hydrophila Fur protein product. Transcription of the A. salmonicida fur gene was not regulated by the iron status of the bacterium and is not autoregulated, as in Escherichia coli. Proteomic analysis of the A. salmonicida fur mutant, fails to repress iron-regulated outer membrane proteins in the presence of iron. The A. salmonicida fur::KO mutant shows significantly reduced pathogenicity compared to the wild-type parental strain. In addition, the A. salmonicida fur mutant provides an important tool for further investigation of the iron acquisition mechanisms utilized by A. salmonicida.

  12. Factors influencing the mechanism of surfactant catalyzed reaction of vitamin C-ferric chloride hexahydrate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrukh, Muhammad Akhyar; Kauser, Robina; Adnan, Rohana

    2013-09-01

    The kinetics of vitamin C by ferric chloride hexahydrate has been investigated in the aqueous ethanol solution of basic surfactant viz. octadecylamine (ODA) under pseudo-first order conditions. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant was determined by surface tension measurement. The effect of pH (2.5-4.5) and temperature (15-35°C) in the presence and absence of surfactant were investigated. Activation parameters, Δ E a, Δ H #, Δ S #, Δ G ≠, for the reaction were calculated by using Arrhenius and Eyring plot. Surface excess concentration (Γmax), minimum area per surfactant molecule ( A min), average area occupied by each molecule of surfactant ( a), surface pressure at the CMC (Πmax), Gibb's energy of micellization (Δ G M°), Gibb's energy of adsorption (Δ G ad°), were calculated. It was found that the reaction in the presence of surfactant showed faster oxidation rate than the aqueous ethanol solution. Reaction mechanism has been deduced in the presence and absence of surfactant.

  13. ATR-FTIR spectroscopic studies of boric acid adsorption on hydrous ferric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peak, Derek; Luther, George W.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2003-07-01

    Boron is an important micronutrient for plants, but high B levels in soils are often responsible for toxicity effects in plants. It is therefore important to understand reactions that may affect B availability in soils. In this study, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was employed to investigate mechanisms of boric acid (B(OH) 3) and borate (B(OH) 4-) adsorption on hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). On the HFO surface, boric acid adsorbs via both physical adsorption (outer-sphere) and ligand exchange (inner-sphere) reactions. Both trigonal (boric acid) and tetrahedral (borate) boron are complexed on the HFO surface, and a mechanism where trigonal boric acid in solution reacts to form either trigonal or tetrahedral surface complexes is proposed based upon the spectroscopic results. The presence of outer-sphere boric acid complexes can be explained based on the Lewis acidity of the B metal center, and this complex has important implications for boron transport and availability. Outer-sphere boric acid is more likely to leach downward in soils in response to water flow. Outer-sphere boron would also be expected to be more available for plant uptake than more strongly bound boron complexes, and may more readily return to the soil solution when solution concentrations decrease.

  14. Removal of Arsenic from Water Using Granular Ferric Hydroxide: Macroscopic and Microscopic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Guan,X.; Wang, J.; Chusuei, C.

    2008-01-01

    Removal of arsenate from water using granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) was investigated under different pH and As(V) loading conditions, using batch equilibrium adsorption, FTIR, and EXAFS methods. The arsenate adsorption envelopes on GFH exhibited broad adsorption maxima when the initial As(V) concentration was less than 500 mg/L at sorbent concentration of 10 g/L. As the initial As(V) concentration increased to 500, 1000 or 2000 mg/L for the same sorbent concentration, distinct adsorption maxima appeared and shifted to lower pH. Acidimetric-alkalimetric titration and arsenic adsorption isotherm data indicated that the surface of GFH is high heterogeneous. FTIR spectra revealed that complexes of two different structures, bidentate and monodentate, were formed upon the adsorption of arsenate on GFH, and bidentate complexes were only observed at pH values greater than 6. The EXAFS analyses confirmed that arsenate form bidentate binuclear complexes with GFH at pH 7.4 as evidenced by an average Fe-As(V) bond distance of 3.32 Angstroms.

  15. The effect of solids residence time on phosphorus adsorption to hydrous ferric oxide floc.

    PubMed

    Conidi, Daniela; Parker, Wayne J

    2015-11-01

    The impact of solids residence time (SRT) on phosphate adsorption to hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) floc when striving for ultra-low P concentrations was characterized and an equilibrium model that describes the adsorption of P onto HFO floc of different ages was developed. The results showed that fresh HFO had a higher adsorption capacity in comparison to aged (2.8, 7.4, 10.8 and 22.8 days) HFO and contributed substantially to P removal at steady state. P adsorption onto HFO solids was determined to be best described by the Freundlich isotherm. P desorption from HFO solids was negligible supporting the hypothesis that chemisorption is the mechanism of P adsorption on HFO solids. A model that included the contribution of different classes of HFO solids (i.e. High, Low or Old, containing high concentration, low concentration or no active surface sites, respectively) to adsorption onto HFO from a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system was found to adequately describe P adsorption onto HFO solids of different ages. From the model it was determined that the fractions of High and Low HFO decreased with SRT while the fraction of Old HFO increased with SRT. The transformation of High HFO to Low HFO did not limit the overall production of Old HFO and the fresh HFO solids contributed more to P removal at steady state than the aged solids.

  16. Ferric ion-assisted in situ synthesis of silver nanoplates on polydopamine-coated silk.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Zhang, Huihui; Mao, Cuiping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ling; Lu, Zhisong

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, a ferric ion (Fe(3+))-assisted in situ synthesis approach was developed to grow silver (Ag) nanoplates on the polydopamine (PDA)-coated silk without the use of additional reductants. The essential role of Fe(3+) in the formation of Ag nanoplates is revealed by comparing the morphologies of Ag nanostructures prepared on the silk-coated PDA film with/without Fe(3+) doping. Scanning electron micrographs show that high-density Ag nanoplates could be synthesized in the reaction system containing 50μg/mL FeCl3 and 50mM AgNO3. The size of the Ag nanoplate could be tuned by adjusting the reaction duration. Based on the data, a mechanism involving the Fe(3+)-selected growth of Ag atoms along the certain crystal faces was proposed to explain the fabrication process. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry indicate that the Ag nanoplates possess good crystalline structures. Raman spectra demonstrate that the nanoplates could strongly enhance the Raman scattering of the PDA molecules. The Ag nanoplate-coated silk could be utilized as a flexible substrate for the development of surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. PMID:27390855

  17. Glutathione-dependent extracellular ferric reductase activities in dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zarnowski, Robert; Woods, Jon P.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase (GSH-FeR) activities in different dimorphic zoopathogenic fungal species were characterized. Supernatants from Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in their yeast form were able to reduce iron enzymically with glutathione as a cofactor. Some variations in the level of reduction were noted amongst the strains. This activity was stable in acidic, neutral and slightly alkaline environments and was inhibited when trivalent aluminium and gallium ions were present. Using zymography, single bands of GSH-FeRs with apparent molecular masses varying from 430 to 460 kDa were identified in all strains. The same molecular mass range was determined by size exclusion chromatography. These data demonstrate that dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi produce and secrete a family of similar GSH-FeRs that may be involved in the acquisition and utilization of iron. Siderophore production by these and other fungi has sometimes been considered to provide a full explanation of iron acquisition in these organisms. Our work reveals an additional common mechanism that may be biologically and pathogenically important. Furthermore, while some characteristics of these enzymes such as extracellular location, cofactor utilization and large size are not individually unique, when considered together and shared across a range of fungi, they represent an important novel physiological feature. PMID:16000713

  18. The FUR (ferric uptake regulator) superfamily: diversity and versatility of key transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Fillat, María F

    2014-03-15

    Control of metal homeostasis is essential for life in all kingdoms. In most prokaryotic organisms the FUR (ferric uptake regulator) family of transcriptional regulators is involved in the regulation of iron and zinc metabolism through control by Fur and Zur proteins. A third member of this family, the peroxide-stress response PerR, is present in most Gram-positives, establishing a tight functional interaction with the global regulator Fur. These proteins play a pivotal role for microbial survival under adverse conditions and in the expression of virulence in most pathogens. In this paper we present the current state of the art in the knowledge of the FUR family, including those members only present in more reduced numbers of bacteria, namely Mur, Nur and Irr. The huge amount of work done in the two last decades shows that FUR proteins present considerable diversity in their regulatory mechanisms and interesting structural differences. However, much work needs to be done to obtain a more complete picture of this family, especially in connection with the roles of some members as gas and redox sensors as well as to fully characterize their participation in bacterial adaptative responses.

  19. Ferric Chloride-induced Thrombosis Mouse Model on Carotid Artery and Mesentery Vessel.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Thomas; Hagemeyer, Christoph E

    2015-06-29

    Severe thrombosis and its ischemic consequences such as myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism and stroke are major worldwide health issues. The ferric chloride injury is now a well-established technique to rapidly and accurately induce the formation of thrombi in exposed veins or artery of small and large diameter. This model has played a key role in the study of the pathophysiology of thrombosis, in the discovery and validation of novel antithrombotic drugs and in the understanding of the mechanism of action of these new agents. Here, the implementation of this technique on a mesenteric vessel and carotid artery in mice is presented. The method describes how to label circulating leukocytes and platelets with a fluorescent dye and to observe, by intravital microscopy on the exposed mesentery, their accumulation at the injured vessel wall which leads to the formation of a thrombus. On the carotid artery, the occlusion caused by the clot formation is measured by monitoring the blood flow with a Doppler probe.

  20. Ferric ion-assisted in situ synthesis of silver nanoplates on polydopamine-coated silk.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Zhang, Huihui; Mao, Cuiping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ling; Lu, Zhisong

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, a ferric ion (Fe(3+))-assisted in situ synthesis approach was developed to grow silver (Ag) nanoplates on the polydopamine (PDA)-coated silk without the use of additional reductants. The essential role of Fe(3+) in the formation of Ag nanoplates is revealed by comparing the morphologies of Ag nanostructures prepared on the silk-coated PDA film with/without Fe(3+) doping. Scanning electron micrographs show that high-density Ag nanoplates could be synthesized in the reaction system containing 50μg/mL FeCl3 and 50mM AgNO3. The size of the Ag nanoplate could be tuned by adjusting the reaction duration. Based on the data, a mechanism involving the Fe(3+)-selected growth of Ag atoms along the certain crystal faces was proposed to explain the fabrication process. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry indicate that the Ag nanoplates possess good crystalline structures. Raman spectra demonstrate that the nanoplates could strongly enhance the Raman scattering of the PDA molecules. The Ag nanoplate-coated silk could be utilized as a flexible substrate for the development of surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors.

  1. Effect of ferrous and ferric ions on copigmentation in model solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunsági-Máté, Sándor; Ortmann, Erika; Kollár, László; Szabó, Kornélia; Nikfardjam, Martin Pour

    2008-11-01

    The thermodynamics of the molecular association process between malvidin-3- O-glucoside and ellagic acid (so-called "copigmentation") was studied in model wine solutions in the presence and absence, respectively, of ferrous and ferric ions. The Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy values of the complexation process were determined by means of a spectrofluorometric method. A combination of the Job's method with the van't Hoff theory was used for data evaluation. The results show the generally exothermic character of the process. The free enthalpy changes obtained during formation of malvidin-3- O-glucoside-ellagic acid complexes increase from -17.8 kJ/mol to -40.5 kJ/mol in the presence of Fe(II) ions. The increased free enthalpy is a consequence of the drastic reduction of entropy change due to the slight "swinging" movement of the interacting malvidin and ellagic acid molecules in the complexes stabilized by the ferrous ions. These results are also supported by the findings of other authors stating that iron ions play an important role in the stabilization of color in the plant kingdom and various plant products.

  2. CIPK23 is involved in iron acquisition of Arabidopsis by affecting ferric chelate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiuying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yang, An; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the major limiting factors affecting quality and production of crops in calcareous soils. Numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors have been demonstrated to play a regulatory role in adaptation of plants to iron deficiency. However, the mechanisms underlying the iron deficiency-induced physiological processes remain to be fully dissected. Here, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CIPK23 was involved in iron acquisition. Lesion of CIPK23 rendered Arabidopsis mutants hypersensitive to iron deficiency, as evidenced by stronger chlorosis in young leaves and lower iron concentration than wild-type plants under iron-deficient conditions by down-regulating ferric chelate reductase activity. We found that iron deficiency evoked an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and the elevated Ca(2+) would bind to CBL1/CBL9, leading to activation of CIPK23. These novel findings highlight the involvement of calcium-dependent CBL-CIPK23 complexes in the regulation of iron acquisition. Moreover, mutation of CIPK23 led to changes in contents of mineral elements, suggesting that CBL-CIPK23 complexes could be as "nutritional sensors" to sense and regulate the mineral homeostasis in Arabisopsis.

  3. Metal-responsive promoter DNA compaction by the ferric uptake regulator

    PubMed Central

    Roncarati, Davide; Pelliciari, Simone; Doniselli, Nicola; Maggi, Stefano; Vannini, Andrea; Valzania, Luca; Mazzei, Luca; Zambelli, Barbara; Rivetti, Claudio; Danielli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Short-range DNA looping has been proposed to affect promoter activity in many bacterial species and operator configurations, but only few examples have been experimentally investigated in molecular detail. Here we present evidence for a metal-responsive DNA condensation mechanism controlled by the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator (Fur), an orthologue of the widespread Fur family of prokaryotic metal-dependent regulators. H. pylori Fur represses the transcription of the essential arsRS acid acclimation operon through iron-responsive oligomerization and DNA compaction, encasing the arsR transcriptional start site in a repressive macromolecular complex. A second metal-dependent regulator NikR functions as nickel-dependent anti-repressor at this promoter, antagonizing the binding of Fur to the operator elements responsible for the DNA condensation. The results allow unifying H. pylori metal ion homeostasis and acid acclimation in a mechanistically coherent model, and demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of a selective metal-responsive DNA compaction mechanism controlling bacterial transcriptional regulation. PMID:27558202

  4. Indirect spectrophotometric determination of arbutin, whitening agent through oxidation by periodate and complexation with ferric chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsoom, B. N.; Abdelsamad, A. M. E.; Adib, N. M.

    2006-07-01

    A simple and accurate spectrophotometric method for the determination of arbutin (glycosylated hydroquinone) is described. It is based on the oxidation of arbutin by periodate in presence of iodate. Excess periodate causes liberation of iodine at pH 8.0. The unreacted periodate is determined by measurement of the liberated iodine spectrophotometrically in the wavelength range (300-500 nm). A calibration curve was constructed for more accurate results and the correlation coefficient of linear regression analysis was -0.9778. The precision of this method was better than 6.17% R.S.D. ( n = 3). Regression analysis of Bear-Lambert plot shows good correlation in the concentration range 25-125 ug/ml. The identification limit was determined to be 25 ug/ml a detailed study of the reaction conditions was carried out, including effect of changing pH, time, temperature and volume of periodate. Analyzing pure and authentic samples containing arbutin tested the validity of the proposed method which has an average percent recovery of 100.86%. An alternative method is also proposed which involves a complexation reaction between arbutin and ferric chloride solution. The produced complex which is yellowish-green in color was determined spectophotometrically.

  5. Optimization of ferric hydroxide coprecipitation process for selenium removal from petroleum refinery stripped four water

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, M.B.; Marrs, D.R.; Roehl, R.

    1996-12-31

    Iron coprecipitation was used in bench-scale tests to remove selenium from stripped sour water generated by two petroleum refineries. Chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide were found to convert selenocyanate in the stripped sour water to selenite, which can be removed by iron coprecipitation. An iodometric titration procedure was developed to determine the required oxidant dose. Iron coprecipitation reduced selenium concentrations by 40 to 99 percent in stripped sour water after chlorine dioxide pretreatment Removal was less effective with hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant: total selenium concentrations were reduced by 28 to 92 percent in stripped sour water after hydrogen peroxide pretreatment. Highest removals were obtained at the highest oxidant and iron doses. Sludges produced in coprecipitation tests were hazardous under California regulations. Ozone oxidized selenocyanate but prevented ferric hydroxide precipitation or coagulation. Air was ineffective at selenocyanate oxidation. Repeatedly contacting iron hydroxide with stripped sour water pretreated with hydrogen peroxide, in a simulation of a countercurrent adsorption process, increased the selenium adsorbed on the solids from 32 to 147 pg selenium per mg of iron, but some of the adsorbed selenite was oxidized to selenate and desorbed back into solution.

  6. Hydrous ferric oxide doped alginate beads for fluoride removal: Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujana, M. G.; Mishra, A.; Acharya, B. C.

    2013-04-01

    A new biopolymer beads, composite of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and alginate were synthesised, characterised and studied for its fluoride efficiency from water. The beads were characterised by chemical analysis, BET surface area, pHPZC and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The optimum conditions for fluoride removal were determined by studying operational variables viz. pH, contact time, initial F- concentration, bead dose and temperature. Presence of other anions like SO42-, PO43-, NO3-, Cl- and HCO3- effect on fluoride removal efficiency of prepared beads was also tested. The beads were 0.8-0.9 mm in size and contain 32-33% Fe (III) and showed specific surface area of 25.80 m2 g-1 and pHPZC of 5.15. Modified beads demonstrated Langmuir F- adsorption capacity of 8.90 mg g-1 at pH 7.0. The adsorption kinetics were best described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model followed by intra-particle diffusion as the rate determining step. It was found that about 80% of the adsorbed fluoride could be desorbed by using 0.05 M HCl. The FTIR, Raman and SEM-EDAX analysis were used to study the fluoride adsorption mechanisms on beads. Studies were also conducted to test the potential application of beads for F- removal from drinking water and the treated water quality.

  7. Adsorption of phosphonate antiscalant from reverse osmosis membrane concentrate onto granular ferric hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Boels, Luciaan; Keesman, Karel J; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2012-09-01

    Adsorptive removal of antiscalants offers a promising way to improve current reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate treatment processes and enables the reuse of the antiscalant in the RO desalination process. This work investigates the adsorption and desorption of the phosphonate antiscalant nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) from RO membrane concentrate onto granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), a material that consists predominantly of akaganéite. The kinetics of the adsorption of NTMP onto GFH was predicted fairly well with two models that consider either combined film-pore or combined film-surface diffusion as the main mechanism for mass transport. It is also demonstrated that NTMP is preferentially adsorbed over sulfate by GFH at pH 7.85. The presence of calcium causes a transformation in the equilibrium adsorption isotherm from a Langmuir type to a Freundlich type with much higher adsorption capacities. Furthermore, calcium also increases the rate of adsorption substantially. GFH is reusable after regeneration with sodium hydroxide solution, indicating that NTMP can be potentially recovered from the RO concentrate. This work shows that GFH is a promising adsorbent for the removal and recovery of NTMP antiscalant from RO membrane concentrates.

  8. Overproduction in Escherichia coli and Characterization of a Soybean Ferric Leghemoglobin Reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ji, L.; Becana, M.; Sarath, G.; Shearman, L.; Klucas, R. V.

    1994-01-01

    We previously cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding soybean ferric leghemoglobin reductase (FLbR), an enzyme postulated to play an important role in maintaining leghemoglobin in a functional ferrous state in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. This cDNA was sub-cloned into an expression plasmid, pTrcHis C, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant FLbR protein, which was purified by two steps of column chromatography, was catalytically active and fully functional. The recombinant FLbR cross-reacted with antisera raised against native FLbR purified from soybean root nodules. The recombinant FLbR, the native FLbR purified from soybean (Glycine max L.) root nodules, and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases from pig heart and yeast had similar but not identical ultraviolet-visible absorption and fluorescence spectra, cofactor binding, and kinetic properties. FLbR shared common structural features in the active site and prosthetic group binding sites with other pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductases such as dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases, but displayed different microenvironments for the prosthetic groups. PMID:12232320

  9. Adsorption of phosphonate antiscalant from reverse osmosis membrane concentrate onto granular ferric hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Boels, Luciaan; Keesman, Karel J; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2012-09-01

    Adsorptive removal of antiscalants offers a promising way to improve current reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate treatment processes and enables the reuse of the antiscalant in the RO desalination process. This work investigates the adsorption and desorption of the phosphonate antiscalant nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) from RO membrane concentrate onto granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), a material that consists predominantly of akaganéite. The kinetics of the adsorption of NTMP onto GFH was predicted fairly well with two models that consider either combined film-pore or combined film-surface diffusion as the main mechanism for mass transport. It is also demonstrated that NTMP is preferentially adsorbed over sulfate by GFH at pH 7.85. The presence of calcium causes a transformation in the equilibrium adsorption isotherm from a Langmuir type to a Freundlich type with much higher adsorption capacities. Furthermore, calcium also increases the rate of adsorption substantially. GFH is reusable after regeneration with sodium hydroxide solution, indicating that NTMP can be potentially recovered from the RO concentrate. This work shows that GFH is a promising adsorbent for the removal and recovery of NTMP antiscalant from RO membrane concentrates. PMID:22873428

  10. Characterization of ferric and ferrous iron transport systems in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Elizabeth E; Mey, Alexandra R; Leimbach, Andreas; Fisher, Carolyn F; Payne, Shelley M

    2006-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae has multiple iron acquisition systems, including TonB-dependent transport of heme and of the catechol siderophore vibriobactin. Strains defective in both of these systems grow well in laboratory media and in the infant mouse intestine, indicating the presence of additional iron acquisition systems. Previously uncharacterized potential iron transport systems, including a homologue of the ferrous transporter Feo and a periplasmic binding protein-dependent ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport system, termed Fbp, were identified in the V. cholerae genome sequence. Clones encoding either the Feo or the Fbp system exhibited characteristics of iron transporters: both repressed the expression of lacZ cloned under the control of a Fur-regulated promoter in Escherichia coli and also conferred growth on a Shigella flexneri mutant that has a severe defect in iron transport. Two other ABC transporters were also evaluated but were negative by these assays. Transport of radioactive iron by the Feo system into the S. flexneri iron transport mutant was stimulated by the reducing agent ascorbate, consistent with Feo functioning as a ferrous transporter. Conversely, ascorbate inhibited transport by the Fbp system, suggesting that it transports ferric iron. The growth of V. cholerae strains carrying mutations in one or more of the potential iron transport genes indicated that both Feo and Fbp contribute to iron acquisition. However, a mutant defective in the vibriobactin, Fbp, and Feo systems was not attenuated in a suckling mouse model, suggesting that at least one other iron transport system can be used in vivo.

  11. Ferric ions involved in the flower color development of the Himalayan blue poppy, Meconopsis grandis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kumi; Kitahara, Sayoko; Ito, Daisuke; Kondo, Tadao

    2006-05-01

    The Himalayan blue poppy, Meconopsis grandis, has sky blue-colored petals, although the anthocyanidin nucleus of the petal pigment is cyanidin. The blue color development in this blue poppy involving ferric ions was therefore studied. We analyzed the vacuolar pH, and the organic and inorganic components of the colored cells. A direct measurement by a proton-selective microelectrode revealed that the vacuolar pH value was 4.8. The concentrations of the total anthocyanins in the colored cells were around 5mM, and ca. three times more concentrated flavonols were detected. Fe was detected by atomic analysis of the colored cells, and the ratio of Fe to anthocyanins was ca. 0.8 eq. By mixing the anthocyanin, flavonol and metal ion components in a buffered aq. solution at pH 5.0, we were able to reproduce the same blue color; the visible absorption spectrum and CD were identical to those in the petals, with Fe(3+), Mg(2+) and flavonol being essential for the blue color. The blue pigment in Meconopsis should be a new type of metal complex pigment that is different from a stoichiometric supramolecular pigment such as commelinin or protocyanin.

  12. Indirect spectrophotometric determination of arbutin, whitening agent through oxidation by periodate and complexation with ferric chloride.

    PubMed

    Barsoom, B N; Abdelsamad, A M E; Adib, N M

    2006-07-01

    A simple and accurate spectrophotometric method for the determination of arbutin (glycosylated hydroquinone) is described. It is based on the oxidation of arbutin by periodate in presence of iodate. Excess periodate causes liberation of iodine at pH 8.0. The unreacted periodate is determined by measurement of the liberated iodine spectrophotometrically in the wavelength range (300-500 nm). A calibration curve was constructed for more accurate results and the correlation coefficient of linear regression analysis was -0.9778. The precision of this method was better than 6.17% R.S.D. (n=3). Regression analysis of Bear-Lambert plot shows good correlation in the concentration range 25-125 ug/ml. The identification limit was determined to be 25 ug/ml a detailed study of the reaction conditions was carried out, including effect of changing pH, time, temperature and volume of periodate. Analyzing pure and authentic samples containing arbutin tested the validity of the proposed method which has an average percent recovery of 100.86%. An alternative method is also proposed which involves a complexation reaction between arbutin and ferric chloride solution. The produced complex which is yellowish-green in color was determined spectophotometrically. PMID:16458577

  13. Effect of saccharated ferric oxide and iron dextran on the metabolism of phosphorus in rats.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Toru; Oochi, Nobuaki; Okada, Mitsuo; Imamura, Kenzaburo; Okuda, Seiya; Iida, Mitsuo

    2005-07-01

    As a means of investigating the physiologic damage to and histologic deterioration of the kidney caused by saccharated ferric oxide (SFO) and iron dextran (ID), we administered these substances intraperitoneally to rats. The rats were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 rats ( n = 7) were given SFO, 28 mg/kg for 9 days and 20 mg/kg for 19 days. Group 2 rats ( n = 5) were given ID, 28 mg/kg for 9 days and 20 mg/kg for 19 days. Group 3 rats (control, n = 9) were given normal saline solution. After 28 days, serum calcium, total protein, and albumin concentrations were significantly lower in the SFO group than in the ID group. Serum phosphorus concentrations were significantly lower in the SFO group than in the control group. Serum iron concentrations were significantly higher in the ID group than in the SFO group or the control, and the fractional excretion of sodium was significantly lower in the ID group than in the control group. The percent tubular reabsorption of phosphorus was significantly greater in the ID group than in the SFO group or the control group, and the theoretical threshold concentration of phosphorus was also significantly lower in the SFO group than in the ID or the control group. Histologic examination of the kidney after treatment revealed neither iron in the tubules nor any structural damage to the tubules. ID was not found to induce hypophosphatemia, whereas SFO did. We believe that the cause of such hypophosphatemia is impaired tubular reabsorption.

  14. Preloading hydrous ferric oxide into granular activated carbon for arsenic removal.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min; Chen, Weifang; Cannon, Fred S

    2008-05-01

    Arsenic is of concern in water treatment because of its health effects. This research focused on incorporating hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) into granular activated carbon (GAC) for the purpose of arsenic removal. Iron was incorporated into GAC via incipient wetness impregnation and cured at temperatures ranging from 60 to 90 degrees C. X-ray diffractions and arsenic sorption as a function of pH were conducted to investigate the effect of temperature on final iron oxide (hydroxide) and their arsenic removal capabilities. Results revealed that when curing at 60 degrees C, the procedure successfully created HFO in the pores of GAC, whereas at temperatures of 80 and 90 degrees C, the impregnated iron oxide manifested a more crystalline form. In the column tests using synthetic water, the HFO-loaded GAC prepared at 60 degrees C also showed higher sorption capacities than media cured at higher temperatures. These results indicated that the adsorption capacity for arsenic was closely related to the form of iron (hydr)oxide for a given iron content For the column test using a natural groundwater, HFO-loaded GAC (Fe, 11.7%) showed an arsenic sorption capacity of 26 mg As/g when the influent contained 300 microg/L As. Thus, the preloading of HFO into a stable GAC media offered the opportunity to employ fixed carbon bed reactors in water treatment plants or point-of-use filters for arsenic removal. PMID:18522120

  15. Study on sulfadimethoxine removal from aqueous solutions by hydrous ferric oxides.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Weixiao; Wang, Jianduo; Wang, Yili; Wang, Hongjie

    2016-01-01

    Significant concerns have been raised over the presence of antibiotics including sulfadimethoxine (SDMO) in aquatic environments. This study investigated the removal capability and mechanism involved in the removal of SDMO by hydrous ferric oxides (HFO). Results showed that SDMO removal was highly pH and ionic strength dependent. The pseudo-first-order model fitted well the kinetic results, and the value of the calculated activation energy for SDMO adsorption onto HFO was 8.6 kJ mol(-1). Adsorption isotherms at varied temperatures were well described by the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic parameters (change in enthalpy > 0, change in entropy > 0, and change in Gibbs free energy < 0) calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption data revealed spontaneous and endothermic process. The exchange of the surface hydroxyl groups of HFO and the negative anions of SDMO(-) and the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged surface of HFO and the deprotonated imino (-N(-)-) accounted for the uptake of SDMO by HFO. PMID:27642833

  16. Impaired myelination and reduced brain ferric iron in the mouse model of mucolipidosis IV.

    PubMed

    Grishchuk, Yulia; Peña, Karina A; Coblentz, Jessica; King, Victoria E; Humphrey, Daniel M; Wang, Shirley L; Kiselyov, Kirill I; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2015-12-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal transient receptor potential ion channel mucolipin-1 (TRPML1). MLIV causes impaired motor and cognitive development, progressive loss of vision and gastric achlorhydria. How loss of TRPML1 leads to severe psychomotor retardation is currently unknown, and there is no therapy for MLIV. White matter abnormalities and a hypoplastic corpus callosum are the major hallmarks of MLIV brain pathology. Here, we report that loss of TRPML1 in mice results in developmental aberrations of brain myelination as a result of deficient maturation and loss of oligodendrocytes. Defective myelination is evident in Mcoln1(-/-) mice at postnatal day 10, an active stage of postnatal myelination in the mouse brain. Expression of mature oligodendrocyte markers is reduced in Mcoln1(-/-) mice at postnatal day 10 and remains lower throughout the course of the disease. We observed reduced Perls' staining in Mcoln1(-/-) brain, indicating lower levels of ferric iron. Total iron content in unperfused brain is not significantly different between Mcoln1(-/-) and wild-type littermate mice, suggesting that the observed maturation delay or loss of oligodendrocytes might be caused by impaired iron handling, rather than by global iron deficiency. Overall, these data emphasize a developmental rather than a degenerative disease course in MLIV, and suggest that there should be a stronger focus on oligodendrocyte maturation and survival to better understand MLIV pathogenesis and aid treatment development.

  17. Effect of ferric iron on siderophore production and pyrene degradation by Pseudomonas fluorescens 29L.

    PubMed

    Husain, Saleha

    2008-10-01

    The effect of ferric iron [Fe(III)] on pyrene degradation and siderophore production was studied in Pseudomonas fluorescens 29L. In the presence of 0.5 microM of Fe(III) and 50 mg of pyrene per liter of medium as a carbon source, 2.2 mg of pyrene was degraded per liter of medium per day and 25.3 microM of 2,3-DHBA (2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid) equivalent of siderophores was produced per day. However, the pyrene degradation rate was 1.3 times higher and no siderophores were produced with the addition of 1 microM of Fe(III). Similar trends were seen with 50 mg of succinate per liter of medium as a carbon source, although the growth of strain 29L and the succinate degradation rate were higher. In the absence of siderophore production, pyrene and succinate continued to be biodegraded. This indicates that Fe(III) and not siderophore production affects the hydrocarbon degradation rate. Only 18% of strain 29L mutants capable of growth on pyrene produced siderophores, while among the mutants capable of growth on succinate, only 10% produced siderophores. This indicates that siderophores are not required for pyrene biodegradation. Fe(III) enhances pyrene degradation in Pseudomonas fluorescens 29L but it may be utilized by mechanisms other than siderophores. PMID:18626691

  18. Mechanistic insights into metal ion activation and operator recognition by the ferric uptake regulator

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zengqin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Manfeng; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Feng, Chong; Zhang, Qi; Yu, Lin; Qi, Lei; Zheng, Jiangge; Wang, Xu; Huo, XinMei; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Li, Xiaorong; Wu, Wei; Rohs, Remo; Li, Ying; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-01-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of prokaryotes, such as bacterial pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms and structural basis of Fur–DNA binding remain incompletely understood. Here, we report high-resolution structures of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 Fur in four different states: apo-Fur, holo-Fur, the Fur–feoAB1 operator complex and the Fur–Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fur box complex. Apo-Fur is a transition metal ion-independent dimer whose binding induces profound conformational changes and confers DNA-binding ability. Structural characterization, mutagenesis, biochemistry and in vivo data reveal that Fur recognizes DNA by using a combination of base readout through direct contacts in the major groove and shape readout through recognition of the minor-groove electrostatic potential by lysine. The resulting conformational plasticity enables Fur binding to diverse substrates. Our results provide insights into metal ion activation and substrate recognition by Fur that suggest pathways to engineer magnetotactic bacteria and antipathogenic drugs. PMID:26134419

  19. Differential responses of soil nematode community to pig manure application levels in Ferric Acrisols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi-Ru; Li, Xiao-Gang; Zhou, Zhi-Gao; Zhang, Tao-Lin; Wang, Xing-Xiang

    2016-10-01

    Excessive pig manure application probably degrades arable soil quality in some intensive pig farming areas. The responses of the nematode community to dosages of pig manure were investigated in Ferric Acrisols under 3-season peanut monoculture. Varying dosages of manure (1.75, 3.5, 7, 14 and 28 t·ha‑1·yr‑1) in combination with chemical fertilizer were applied to field plots, and chemical fertilizer alone was also applied as a control. With increasing manure application, the abundance of bacterivores and omnivores-predators increased, the abundance of plant parasites decreased, and fungivores abundance exhibited hump-shaped variation. Simpson diversity index and plant parasite index/maturity index of the nematode communities increased to a maximum level at a manure application rate of 3.5 t·ha‑1·yr‑1 and then sharply decreased. The changes in the soil nematode community were further determined to be correlated with chemical properties; available phosphorus had the strongest quadratic correlation with the two indices, implying that available phosphorus had a better indicative effect than other soil properties to nematode community. Available phosphorus in soil was deduced from 49 to 64 mg·kg‑1 with the best nematode communities. Our results emphasized the importance of regular applications of manure in agriculture field to balance nematode diversity and build healthy agro-ecosystems.

  20. Low-temperature carbonization and more effective degradation of carbohydrates induced by ferric trichloride.

    PubMed

    Xia, Juan; Song, Le Xin; Dang, Zheng

    2012-07-01

    The present work is devoted to an attempt to understand the effect of an inorganic salt such as ferric trichloride (FeCl(3)) on the carbonization and degradation of carbohydrates such as β-cyclodextrin (CD), amylose, and cellulose. Our data revealed two important observations. First, the presence of FeCl(3) led to the occurrence of a low carbonization temperature of 373 K. This is a rare phenomenon, in which carbonization improvement is present even if a small amount of FeCl(3) was added. Experimental results had provided evidence for the fact that a redox process was started during the low-temperature carbonization of β-CD, causing the reduction of FeCl(3) to ferrous chloride (FeCl(2)) by carbon materials formed in the carbonization process in air. However, the reduction process of FeCl(3) produced the in situ composite nanomaterial of Fe-FeCl(2) combination in nitrogen. Second, a molecule-ion interaction emerged between FeCl(3) and the carbohydrates in aqueous solution, resulting in a more effective degradation of the carbohydrates. Moreover, our results demonstrated that FeCl(3) played the role of a catalyst during the degradation of the carbohydrates in solution. We believe that the current work not only has a significant potential application in disposal of waste carbohydrates but also could be helpful in many fields such as environmental protection, biomass energy development, and inorganic composite nanomaterials.

  1. Ferric Chloride-induced Thrombosis Mouse Model on Carotid Artery and Mesentery Vessel.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Thomas; Hagemeyer, Christoph E

    2015-01-01

    Severe thrombosis and its ischemic consequences such as myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism and stroke are major worldwide health issues. The ferric chloride injury is now a well-established technique to rapidly and accurately induce the formation of thrombi in exposed veins or artery of small and large diameter. This model has played a key role in the study of the pathophysiology of thrombosis, in the discovery and validation of novel antithrombotic drugs and in the understanding of the mechanism of action of these new agents. Here, the implementation of this technique on a mesenteric vessel and carotid artery in mice is presented. The method describes how to label circulating leukocytes and platelets with a fluorescent dye and to observe, by intravital microscopy on the exposed mesentery, their accumulation at the injured vessel wall which leads to the formation of a thrombus. On the carotid artery, the occlusion caused by the clot formation is measured by monitoring the blood flow with a Doppler probe. PMID:26167713

  2. Energy distributions at the high-spin ferric sites in myoglobin crystals.

    PubMed Central

    Fiamingo, F G; Brill, A S; Hampton, D A; Thorkildsen, R

    1989-01-01

    The orientation and temperature dependence (4.2-2.5 K) of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) power saturation and spin-lattice relaxation rate, and the orientation dependence of signal linewidth, were measured in single crystals of the aquo complex of ferric sperm whale skeletal muscle myoglobin. The spin-packet linewidth was found to be temperature independent and to vary by a factor of seven within the heme plane. An analysis is presented which enables one to arrive at (a) hyperfine component line-widths and, from the in-plane angular variation of the latter, at (b) the widths of distributions in energy differences between low-lying electronic levels and (c) the angular spread in the in-plane principal g-directions. The values of the energy level distributions in crystals obtained from the measurements and analysis reported here are compared with those obtained by a different method for the same protein complex in frozen solution. The spread in the rhombic energy splitting is significantly greater in solution than in the crystal. PMID:2539208

  3. Real-time monitoring of arsenic filtration by granular ferric hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Fleming, David E B; Eddy, Isadel S; Gherase, Mihai R; Gibbons, Meaghan K; Gagnon, Graham A

    2010-01-01

    Contamination of drinking water by arsenic is a serious public health issue in many parts of the world. One recent approach to this problem has been to filter out arsenic by use of granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), an adsorbent developed specifically for the selective removal of arsenic from water. Previous studies have documented the efficiency and high treatment capacity of this approach. We present a novel X-ray fluorescence method to monitor the accumulation of arsenic within a specially designed GFH column, as both a function of time (or water volume) and location along the column. Using a miniature X-ray tube and silicon PiN diode detector, X-ray fluorescence is used to detect characteristic X-rays of arsenic excited from within the GFH. Trials were performed using a water flow rate of approximately 1.5 L per hour, with an added arsenic concentration of approximately 1000 microg per litre. In this paper, trial results are presented and potential applications described. PMID:19850486

  4. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong J.; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Zhaohui; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-15

    Ferritins are nano-scale globular protein cages encapsulating a ferric core. They widely exist in animals, plants, and microbes, playing indispensable roles in iron homeostasis. Interestingly, our study clearly demonstrates that ferritin has an enzyme-mimic activity derived from its ferric nano-core, but not the protein cage. Further study revealed that the mimic-enzyme activity of ferritin is more thermally stable and pH-tolerant compared with horseradish peroxidase. Considering the abundance of ferritin in numerous organisms, this finding may indicate a new role of ferritin in antioxidant and detoxification metabolisms. In addition, as a natural protein-caged nanoparticle with an enzyme-mimic activity, ferritin is readily conjugated with biomolecules to construct nano-biosensors, thus holds promising potential for facile and biocompatible labeling for sensitive and robust bioassays in biomedical applications.

  5. Spectral study of the interaction between 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde-p-phenyldihydrazone and ferric iron and its analytical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Quanying; Liu, Weizhou; Chang, Lin; Chen, Fang

    2012-06-01

    The synthesis and spectral characterization of a schiff base, 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde-p-phenylenedihydrazone (short for 2PC-PPH), were described. It was found that ferric ion (Fe3+) could selectively quench the fluorescence of 2PC-PPH, whereas many other metal ions, such as Mn2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, K+, Al3+, Ca2+, Ni2+, Co2+, Cr3+ and Fe2+, could not quench its fluorescence. Based on this, a sensitive method for ferric ion selective detection was established. Under the optimum conditions, the decreasing fluorescence intensity of 2PC-PPH is proportional to the concentration of Fe3+ within the range of 6.0 × 10-7-1.0 × 10-5 mol L-1. The detection limit (3σ) for Fe3+ determination is 3.6 × 10-7 mol L-1. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine iron in tea and milk powder.

  6. Perfluorinated Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds such as the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and their derivatives are important man-made chemicals that have wide consumer and industrial applications. They are relatively contemporary chemicals, being in use only since the 1950s, and until recently, have be...

  7. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 63% of US magnesium compounds production during 2000. Premier Services in Florida, Dow Chemical in Michigan, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from seawater. And Premier Services' recoveries, in Nevada, were from magnasite.

  8. Free gp70 from FeLV: enrichment from cell culture fluid by ferric oxide-agarose chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zelikman, I; Akerblom, L; Hjertèn, S; Morein, B

    1989-04-01

    A new chromatographic material based on beads of macroporous crosslinked agarose containing ferric oxide particles was used for enrichment of gp70--the envelope glycoprotein of feline leukemia virus (FeLV). Free gp70 was purified from cell culture fluid in one step with a recovery of 50 to 60% and a purification of about 60 times. The described procedure is a suitable first step for the purification of gp70 from large volumes of cell culture fluid.

  9. [Study on the hydrolysis distribution of ferric saline by infrared spectrophotometry and single crystal X-ray diffraction method].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huai-Li; Xie, Li-Guo; Gao, Chao-Yong; Sun, Xiu-Ping; Yang, You; Tang, Xue

    2009-02-01

    The hydrolytic stability of Fe(a), Fe(b) and Fe(c) in different pH values of poly-ferric-flocculants was studied by using Fe-ferron time by time complexation colorimetry. The research results showed that Fe(b) was unstable, and all Fe(b) was transformed to Fe(c) after 10-15 d placement. The content of Fe(c) tended towards stability after 10-15 d. Also, the content of Fe(a) tended towards stability after 10 d. The single crystal was synthesized by the method of direct crystallization in Fe(III)-SO4(2-) water solution at normal temperature and its structure characteristic was studied by single crystal X ray diffraction method and IR (infrared spectrophotometry). The research results showed that there was no group of Fe-OH-Fe, Fe-OH and binary ferric complexed with two hydroxyl groups in the single crystal synthesized from the ferric aqueous solution in low pH (pH was about 0.5). The form of Fe in single crystal was all Fe(III). The chemical formula of the single crystal was Fe(H2O)6 (SO4)2NH4 x 6H2O when the ammonia water was used as the alkalinizing agent. One reason was that with the evaporation of water, these single crystals were synthesized at pH 0. 5 despite of different initial pH and different initial alkalinizing agents. Another reason was that the hydrolysis distribution of ferric saline was unstable. Therefore, it was not easy to obtain the single crystal of Fe(III)-hydroxy complexes or Fe(III)-polymer at low pH value. The study showed that infrared spectrophotometry and single crystal X ray diffraction method have a good prospect in the research on hydrolysis distribution of flocculants.

  10. Potential of fruit wastes as natural resources of bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gui-Fang; Shen, Chen; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Kuang, Ru-Dan; Guo, Ya-Jun; Zeng, Li-Shan; Gao, Li-Li; Lin, Xi; Xie, Jie-Feng; Xia, En-Qin; Li, Sha; Wu, Shan; Chen, Feng; Ling, Wen-Hua; Li, Hua-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Fruit wastes are one of the main sources of municipal waste. In order to explore the potential of fruit wastes as natural resources of bioactive compounds, the antioxidant potency and total phenolic contents (TPC) of lipophilic and hydrophilic components in wastes (peel and seed) of 50 fruits were systematically evaluated. The results showed that different fruit residues had diverse antioxidant potency and the variation was very large. Furthermore, the main bioactive compounds were identified and quantified, and catechin, cyanidin 3-glucoside, epicatechin, galangin, gallic acid, homogentisic acid, kaempferol, and chlorogenic acid were widely found in these residues. Especially, the values of ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and TPC in the residues were higher than in pulps. The results showed that fruit residues could be inexpensive and readily available resources of bioactive compounds for use in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  11. Potential of Fruit Wastes as Natural Resources of Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gui-Fang; Shen, Chen; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Kuang, Ru-Dan; Guo, Ya-Jun; Zeng, Li-Shan; Gao, Li-Li; Lin, Xi; Xie, Jie-Feng; Xia, En-Qin; Li, Sha; Wu, Shan; Chen, Feng; Ling, Wen-Hua; Li, Hua-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Fruit wastes are one of the main sources of municipal waste. In order to explore the potential of fruit wastes as natural resources of bioactive compounds, the antioxidant potency and total phenolic contents (TPC) of lipophilic and hydrophilic components in wastes (peel and seed) of 50 fruits were systematically evaluated. The results showed that different fruit residues had diverse antioxidant potency and the variation was very large. Furthermore, the main bioactive compounds were identified and quantified, and catechin, cyanidin 3-glucoside, epicatechin, galangin, gallic acid, homogentisic acid, kaempferol, and chlorogenic acid were widely found in these residues. Especially, the values of ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and TPC in the residues were higher than in pulps. The results showed that fruit residues could be inexpensive and readily available resources of bioactive compounds for use in the food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:22942704

  12. Evidence of Nitrogen Loss from Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Coupled with Ferric Iron Reduction in an Intertidal Wetland.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yanling; Yin, Guoyu; Lin, Xianbiao; Cheng, Lv; Li, Ye; Hu, Xiaoting

    2015-10-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled with nitrite reduction is an important microbial pathway of nitrogen removal in intertidal wetlands. However, little is known about the role of anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled with ferric iron reduction (termed Feammox) in intertidal nitrogen cycling. In this study, sediment slurry incubation experiments were combined with an isotope-tracing technique to examine the dynamics of Feammox and its association with tidal fluctuations in the intertidal wetland of the Yangtze Estuary. Feammox was detected in the intertidal wetland sediments, with potential rates of 0.24-0.36 mg N kg(-1) d(-1). The Feammox rates in the sediments were generally higher during spring tides than during neap tides. The tidal fluctuations affected the growth of iron-reducing bacteria and reduction of ferric iron, which mediated Feammox activity and the associated nitrogen loss from intertidal wetlands to the atmosphere. An estimated loss of 11.5-18 t N km(-2) year(-1) was linked to Feammox, accounting for approximately 3.1-4.9% of the total external inorganic nitrogen transported into the Yangtze Estuary wetland each year. Overall, the co-occurrence of ferric iron reduction and ammonium oxidation suggests that Feammox can act as an ammonium removal mechanism in intertidal wetlands.

  13. Evidence of Nitrogen Loss from Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Coupled with Ferric Iron Reduction in an Intertidal Wetland.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yanling; Yin, Guoyu; Lin, Xianbiao; Cheng, Lv; Li, Ye; Hu, Xiaoting

    2015-10-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled with nitrite reduction is an important microbial pathway of nitrogen removal in intertidal wetlands. However, little is known about the role of anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled with ferric iron reduction (termed Feammox) in intertidal nitrogen cycling. In this study, sediment slurry incubation experiments were combined with an isotope-tracing technique to examine the dynamics of Feammox and its association with tidal fluctuations in the intertidal wetland of the Yangtze Estuary. Feammox was detected in the intertidal wetland sediments, with potential rates of 0.24-0.36 mg N kg(-1) d(-1). The Feammox rates in the sediments were generally higher during spring tides than during neap tides. The tidal fluctuations affected the growth of iron-reducing bacteria and reduction of ferric iron, which mediated Feammox activity and the associated nitrogen loss from intertidal wetlands to the atmosphere. An estimated loss of 11.5-18 t N km(-2) year(-1) was linked to Feammox, accounting for approximately 3.1-4.9% of the total external inorganic nitrogen transported into the Yangtze Estuary wetland each year. Overall, the co-occurrence of ferric iron reduction and ammonium oxidation suggests that Feammox can act as an ammonium removal mechanism in intertidal wetlands. PMID:26360245

  14. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, seawater and natural brines accounted for 51% of US magnesium compounds production. World magnesia production was estimated to be 14.5 Mt. Most of the production came from China, North Korea, Russia and Turkey. Although no specific production figures are available, Japan and the United States are estimated to account for almost one-half of the world's capacity from seawater and brines.

  15. Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankland, Kenneth

    For many years, powder X-ray diffraction was used primarily as a fingerprinting method for phase identification in the context of molecular organic materials. In the early 1990s, with only a few notable exceptions, structures of even moderate complexity were not solvable from PXRD data alone. Global optimisation methods and highly-modified direct methods have transformed this situation by specifically exploiting some well-known properties of molecular compounds. This chapter will consider some of these properties.

  16. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production during 2002. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida. They were also recovered from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And they were recovered from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals.

  17. Prevention of Acid Mine Drainage Through Complexation of Ferric Iron by Soluble Microbial Growth Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, S.; Yacob, T. W.; Silverstein, J.; Rajaram, H.; Minchow, K.; Basta, J.

    2011-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a widespread environmental problem with deleterious impacts on water quality in streams and watersheds. AMD is generated largely by the oxidation of metal sulfides (i.e. pyrite) by ferric iron. This abiotic reaction is catalyzed by conversion of ferrous to ferric iron by iron and sulfur oxidizing microorganisms. Biostimulation is currently being investigated as an attempt to inhibit the oxidation of pyrite and growth of iron oxidizing bacteria through addition of organic carbon. This may stimulate growth of indigenous communities of acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria to compete for oxygen. The goal of this research is to investigate a secondary mechanism associated with carbon addition: complexation of free Fe(III) by soluble microbial growth products (SMPs) produced by microorganisms growing in waste rock. Exploratory research at the laboratory scale examined the effect of soluble microbial products (SMPs) on the kinetics of oxidation of pure pyrite during shaker flask experiments. The results confirmed a decrease in the rate of pyrite oxidation that was dependent upon the concentration of SMPs in solution. We are using these data to verify results from a pyrite oxidation model that accounts for SMPs. This reactor model involves differential-algebraic equations incorporating total component mass balances and mass action laws for equilibrium reactions. Species concentrations determined in each time step are applied to abiotic pyrite oxidation rate expressions from the literature to determine the evolution of total component concentrations. The model was embedded in a parameter estimation algorithm to determine the reactive surface area of pyrite in an abiotic control experiment, yielding an optimized value of 0.0037 m2. The optimized model exhibited similar behavior to the experiment for this case; the root mean squared of residuals for Fe(III) was calculated to be 7.58 x 10-4 M, which is several orders of magnitude less than the actual

  18. Photoexcitation dynamics of NO-bound ferric myoglobin investigated by femtosecond vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaeheung; Lee, Taegon; Park, Jaehun; Lim, Manho

    2013-03-14

    Femtosecond vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the photoexcitation dynamics of NO-bound ferric myoglobin (Mb(III)NO) in D2O solution at 294 K after excitation with a 575 nm pulse. The stretching mode of NO in Mb(III)NO consists of a major band at 1922 cm(-1) (97.7%) and a minor band at 1902 cm(-1) (2.3%), suggesting that Mb(III)NO in room temperature solution has two conformational substates. The time-resolved spectra show small but significant new absorption features at the lower-energy side of the main band (1920-1800 cm(-1)). One new absorption feature in the region of 1920-1880 cm(-1) exhibits the (15)NO isotope shift (37 cm(-1)) the same as that of the NO band in the ground electronic state of Mb(III)NO. This absorption shifts toward higher energy and narrows with a time constant of 2.4 ps, indicating that it evolves with rapid electronic and thermal relaxation of the photoexcited Mb(III)NO without photodeligation of the NO from the heme. Absorption features assigned to proteins undergoing thermal relaxation without NO deligation add up to 14 ± 1% of the total bleach, implying that the photolysis quantum yield of Mb(III)NO with a Q-band excitation is ≤0.86 ± 0.01. The remaining absorption bands peaked near 1867, 1845, and 1815 cm(-1), each showing the (15)NO isotope shift the same as that of the free NO radical (33 cm(-1)), were assigned to the vibrational band of the photodeligated NO, the NO band of Mb(III)NO in an intermediate electronic state with low-spin Fe(III)-NO(radical) character (denoted as the R state), and the NO band of the vibrationally excited NO in the R state, respectively. A kinetics model successfully reproducing the time-dependent intensity changes of the transient bands suggests that every rebound NO forms the R state that eventually relaxes into the ground electronic state nonexponentially. Most of the photodissociated NO undergoes fast geminate recombination (GR), and the rebinding kinetics depends on the conformation

  19. Formation of ferric iron crusts in Quaternary sediments of Lake Baikal, Russia, and implications for paleoclimate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deike, R.G.; Granina, L.; Callender, E.; McGee, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Phosphate-bearing, ferric iron and siliceous crusts ranging in age from Recent to approximately 65,000 yr B.P. are observed in sediments of Lake Baikal. In younger sediments the crusts are at the base of a spectrum of secondary iron and manganese oxides that accumulate near the sediment/water interface in the zone of positive oxidation potential beneath an oxygenated water column. In areas where the average Quaternary sedimentation rates have been slow (e.g. 0.026 mm/yr), the crusts are more common, and span a wider range of ages. No crusts have been found where the Quaternary sedimentation mode has been deltaic and rapid (0.15 mm/yr). Independent core correlation based on magnetic properties of the sediment suggests that crusts can be correlated over most of Academician Ridge, an area that is particularly sensitive to climatic events affecting the concentration of suspended sediment. These crusts may be indicative of periods of low suspended sediment concentration, which occur during sustained transitions from glacial periods of high detrital input, to interglacial periods of high diatom sedimentation. The crusts are dominated by iron-rich and siliceous amorphous mineral phases, with an FeO:SiO2 by weight of 3:1. Regardless of age or location in the lake the Fe phase always includes Ca, P and Mn. Extensive microprobe data for these four elements recast as normalized elemental weight percent reveal linear trends of Ca:P and Fe:P. With increasing P, Ca also increases such that the two elements maintain a linear relationship passing very close to the origin and with a mean molar Ca:P=0.3 (too low for well-characterized apatite). Conversely, with increasing P, Fe decreases (mean molar Fe:P=3.4). There is no correlation between Mn and P. Molar Fe:P ratios for vivianite (an Fe(II) phosphate mineral observed in sediments closely below some crusts) are clustered around a stoichiometric composition. The covariant increase in Ca:P and the corresponding decrease in Fe:P may

  20. EXAFS Analyses of Innersphere Surface Complexations of Arsenate and Silicate on Natural Hydrous Ferric Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommaseo, C. E.; Kersten, M.

    2002-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) was used to determine the near range order of three elements (Fe, As, Si) on the surface of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) from thermal water scales. Fe K-edge EXAFS analyses of the 2nd shell show a better fit including Si as backscattering neighbor. Validation of the Si-Fe bond was obtained by Si K-edge EXAFS spectra, where the light absorber element is surrounded favourably by much heavier second-shell elements. Least-squares fitting of the second-shell Fourier-filtered EXAFS spectrum in the k-range of 5-11 Å-1 yields in a Si-Fe distance of 3.10-3.13Å, and a Si-Si distance of 3.00Å. Both these interatomic distances and the coordination number N = 2 obtained for the Si-Fe shell are consistent with the formation of a corner-bridging bidentate binuclear (2C) surface complex on the HFO surface. The Si-Si bonds and existance of a vibrational band at 964 cm-1 in the infrared spectrum indicate polymerisation of the silicate on the HFO surface (Tommaseo and Kersten). As K-edge XANES analyses showed the As present in form of arsenate scavenged by the HFO phase. As and Si K-edge EXAFS analyses revealed both elements to compete for 2C surface complexation sites. A mean As-Fe distance of 3.03Å indicate an approx. equal distribution of arsenate between 2C (3.24Å) and another 1E (bidentate mononuclear surface complexation) sites (2.84Å). The average Fe-(O,OH) bond length of 2.09Å is compatible with a high proportion of distorted surficial FeIII(O,OH)6 octahedra in the colloidal HFO precipitates of the scale deposits. The slight distortion of the FeIII(O,OH)6 octahedra is consistent with the apparent strong binding of the 1E arsenate surface complexes (Manceau, 1995). The adverse effect of silicate would therefore be overpredicted without surface complexation models constructed to account for both surface functional groups. The Si K-edge EXAFS data provide also a basis for explaining at the molecular level the poisoning of HFO particle

  1. Hydrous ferric oxide precipitation in the presence of nonmetabolizing bacteria: Constraints on the mechanism of a biotic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rancourt, Denis G.; Thibault, Pierre-Jean; Mavrocordatos, Denis; Lamarche, Gilles

    2005-02-01

    We have used room temperature and cryogenic 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD), mineral magnetometry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to study the synthetic precipitation of hydrous ferric oxides (HFOs) prepared either in the absence (abiotic, a-HFO) or presence (biotic, b-HFO) of nonmetabolizing bacterial cells ( Bacillus subtilis or Bacillus licheniformis, ˜10 8 cells/mL) and under otherwise identical chemical conditions, starting from Fe(II) (10 -2, 10 -3, or 10 -4 mol/L) under open oxic conditions and at different pH (6-9). We have also performed the first Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements of bacterial cell wall ( Bacillus subtilis) surface complexed Fe, where Fe(III) (10 -3.5-10 -4.5 mol/L) was added to a fixed concentration of cells (˜10 8 cells/mL) under open oxic conditions and at various pH (2.5-4.3). We find that non-metabolic bacterial cell wall surface complexation of Fe is not passive in that it affects Fe speciation in at least two ways: (1) it can reduce Fe(III) to sorbed-Fe 2+ by a proposed steric and charge transfer effect and (2) it stabilizes Fe(II) as sorbed-Fe 2+ against ambient oxidation. The cell wall sorption of Fe occurs in a manner that is not compatible with incorporation into the HFO structure (different coordination environment and stabilization of the ferrous state) and the cell wall-sorbed Fe is not chemically bonded to the HFO particle when they coexist (the sorbed Fe is not magnetically polarized by the HFO particle in its magnetically ordered state). This invalidates the concept that sorption is the first step in a heterogeneous nucleation of HFO onto bacterial cell walls. Both the a-HFOs and the b-HFOs are predominantly varieties of ferrihydrite (Fh), often containing admixtures of nanophase lepidocrocite (nLp), yet they show significant abiotic/biotic differences: Biotic Fh has less intraparticle (including surface region) atomic order (Mössbauer quadrupole splitting), smaller primary

  2. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth.

    PubMed

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J; Downing, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Comolli, Luis R; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-02-01

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III)-bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Furthermore, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA, close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated two- and three-dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The outer membranes of most cells were decorated with aggregates up to 150 nm in diameter composed of ∼3 nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well-studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L(2,3) absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed-valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  3. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth

    PubMed Central

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J; Downing, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Comolli, Luis R; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III)-bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Furthermore, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA, close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated two- and three-dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The outer membranes of most cells were decorated with aggregates up to 150 nm in diameter composed of ∼3 nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well-studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)–Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed-valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension. PMID:23038172

  4. Determination of ferric iron chelators by high-performance liquid chromatography using luminol chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Tomoko; Imura, Yuki; Suzuki, Michio; Yoshimura, Etsuro

    2016-03-01

    Iron is an essential element for higher plants, and its acquisition and transportation is one of the greatest limiting factors for plant growth because of its low solubility in normal soil pHs. Higher plants biosynthesize ferric iron [Fe(III)] chelator (FIC), which solubilizes the iron and transports it to the rhizosphere. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) post-column method has been developed for the analysis of FICs using the luminol/H2O2 system for chemiluminescence (CL) detection. A size-exclusion column was the most suited in terms of column efficiency and CL detection efficiency. Mixing of the luminol with H2O2 in a post-column reaction was feasible, and a two-pump system was used to separately deliver the luminol and H2O2 solutions. The luminol and H2O2 concentrations were optimized using Fe(III)-EDTA and Fe(III)-citrate (Cit) solutions as analytes. A strong CL intensity was obtained for Fe(III)-Cit when EDTA was added to the luminol solution, probably because of an exchange of Cit with EDTA after separation on the HPLC column; CL efficiency was much higher for Fe(III)-EDTA than for Fe(III)-Cit with the luminol/H2O2 system. The present method can detect minute levels of Fe(III)-FICs; the detection limits of Fe(III)-EDTA, Fe(III)-Cit and Fe(III)-nicotianamine were 0.77, 2.3 and 1.1pmol, respectively. PMID:26874881

  5. The Campylobacter jejuni Ferric Uptake Regulator Promotes Acid Survival and Cross-Protection against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Askoura, Momen; Sarvan, Sabina; Couture, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. The mechanisms by which C. jejuni survives stomach acidity remain undefined. In the present study, we demonstrated that the C. jejuni ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays an important role in C. jejuni acid survival and acid-induced cross-protection against oxidative stress. A C. jejuni Δfur mutant was more sensitive to acid than the wild-type strain. Profiling of the acid stimulon of the C. jejuni Δfur mutant allowed us to uncover Fur-regulated genes under acidic conditions. In particular, Fur was found to upregulate genes involved in flagellar and cell envelope biogenesis upon acid stress, and mutants with deletions of these genes were found to be defective in surviving acid stress. Interestingly, prior acid exposure of C. jejuni cross-protected against oxidative stress in a catalase (KatA)- and Fur-dependent manner. Western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed increased expression of KatA upon acid stress. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated that the binding affinity between Fur and the katA promoter is reduced in vitro under conditions of low pH, rationalizing the higher levels of expression of katA under acidic conditions. Strikingly, the Δfur mutant exhibited reduced virulence in both human epithelial cells and the Galleria mellonella infection model. Altogether, this is the first study showing that, in addition to its role in iron metabolism, Fur is an important regulator of C. jejuni acid responses and this function cross-protects against oxidative stress. Moreover, our results clearly demonstrate Fur's important role in C. jejuni pathogenesis. PMID:26883589

  6. Calcein as a fluorescent probe for ferric iron. Application to iron nutrition in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Thomas, F; Serratrice, G; Béguin, C; Aman, E S; Pierre, J L; Fontecave, M; Laulhère, J P

    1999-05-01

    The recent use of calcein (CA) as a fluorescent probe for cellular iron has been shown to reflect the nutritional status of iron in mammalian cells (Breuer, W., Epsztejn, S., and Cabantchik, Z. I. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 24209-24215). CA was claimed to be a chemosensor for iron(II), to measure the labile iron pool and the concentration of cellular free iron(II). We first study here the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of iron binding by CA. Chelation of a first iron(III) involves one aminodiacetic arm and a phenol. The overall stability constant log beta111 of FeIIICAH is 33. 9. The free metal ion concentration is pFeIII = 20.3. A (FeIII)2 CA complex can be formed. A reversible iron(III) exchange from FeIIICAH to citrate and nitrilotriacetic acid is evidenced when these ligands are present in large excess. The kinetics of iron(III) exchange by CA is compatible with metabolic studies. The low reduction potential of FeIIICAH shows that the ferric form is highly stabilized. CA fluorescence is quenched by 85% after FeIII chelation but by only 20% using FeII. Real time iron nutrition by Arabidopsis thaliana cells has been measured by fluorimetry, and the iron buffer FeIIICAH + CA was used as source of iron. As a siderophore, FeIIICAH promotes cell growth and regreening of iron-deficient cells more rapidly than FeIIIEDTA. We conclude that CA is a good chemosensor for iron(III) in cells and biological fluids, but not for Fe(II). We discuss the interest of quantifying iron buffers in biochemical studies of iron, in vitro as well as in cells.

  7. Surface complexation modeling of Cu(II) adsorption on mixtures of hydrous ferric oxide and kaolinite

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Tracy J; Koretsky, Carla M; Landry, Christopher J; Schaller, Melinda S; Das, Soumya

    2008-01-01

    Background The application of surface complexation models (SCMs) to natural sediments and soils is hindered by a lack of consistent models and data for large suites of metals and minerals of interest. Furthermore, the surface complexation approach has mostly been developed and tested for single solid systems. Few studies have extended the SCM approach to systems containing multiple solids. Results Cu adsorption was measured on pure hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), pure kaolinite (from two sources) and in systems containing mixtures of HFO and kaolinite over a wide range of pH, ionic strength, sorbate/sorbent ratios and, for the mixed solid systems, using a range of kaolinite/HFO ratios. Cu adsorption data measured for the HFO and kaolinite systems was used to derive diffuse layer surface complexation models (DLMs) describing Cu adsorption. Cu adsorption on HFO is reasonably well described using a 1-site or 2-site DLM. Adsorption of Cu on kaolinite could be described using a simple 1-site DLM with formation of a monodentate Cu complex on a variable charge surface site. However, for consistency with models derived for weaker sorbing cations, a 2-site DLM with a variable charge and a permanent charge site was also developed. Conclusion Component additivity predictions of speciation in mixed mineral systems based on DLM parameters derived for the pure mineral systems were in good agreement with measured data. Discrepancies between the model predictions and measured data were similar to those observed for the calibrated pure mineral systems. The results suggest that quantifying specific interactions between HFO and kaolinite in speciation models may not be necessary. However, before the component additivity approach can be applied to natural sediments and soils, the effects of aging must be further studied and methods must be developed to estimate reactive surface areas of solid constituents in natural samples. PMID:18783619

  8. Impaired myelination and reduced brain ferric iron in the mouse model of mucolipidosis IV

    PubMed Central

    Grishchuk, Yulia; Peña, Karina A.; Coblentz, Jessica; King, Victoria E.; Humphrey, Daniel M.; Wang, Shirley L.; Kiselyov, Kirill I.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal transient receptor potential ion channel mucolipin-1 (TRPML1). MLIV causes impaired motor and cognitive development, progressive loss of vision and gastric achlorhydria. How loss of TRPML1 leads to severe psychomotor retardation is currently unknown, and there is no therapy for MLIV. White matter abnormalities and a hypoplastic corpus callosum are the major hallmarks of MLIV brain pathology. Here, we report that loss of TRPML1 in mice results in developmental aberrations of brain myelination as a result of deficient maturation and loss of oligodendrocytes. Defective myelination is evident in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10, an active stage of postnatal myelination in the mouse brain. Expression of mature oligodendrocyte markers is reduced in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10 and remains lower throughout the course of the disease. We observed reduced Perls' staining in Mcoln1−/− brain, indicating lower levels of ferric iron. Total iron content in unperfused brain is not significantly different between Mcoln1−/− and wild-type littermate mice, suggesting that the observed maturation delay or loss of oligodendrocytes might be caused by impaired iron handling, rather than by global iron deficiency. Overall, these data emphasize a developmental rather than a degenerative disease course in MLIV, and suggest that there should be a stronger focus on oligodendrocyte maturation and survival to better understand MLIV pathogenesis and aid treatment development. PMID:26398942

  9. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  10. Ferric Citrate Reduces Intravenous Iron and Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent Use in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Diana I.; Greco, Barbara A.; Umeukeje, Ebele M.; Reisin, Efrain; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven; Negoi, Dana G.; Hiremath, Anand N.; Blumenthal, Samuel S.; Sika, Mohammed; Niecestro, Robert; Koury, Mark J.; Ma, Khe-Ni; Greene, Tom; Lewis, Julia B.; Dwyer, Jamie P.

    2015-01-01

    Ferric citrate (FC) is a phosphate binder with shown efficacy and additional effects on iron stores and use of intravenous (iv) iron and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). We provide detailed analyses of changes in iron/hematologic parameters and iv iron/ESA use at time points throughout the active control period of a phase 3 international randomized clinical trial. In all, 441 subjects were randomized (292 to FC and 149 to sevelamer carbonate and/or calcium acetate [active control (AC)]) and followed for 52 weeks. Subjects on FC had increased ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT) levels compared with subjects on AC by week 12 (change in ferritin, 114.1±29.35 ng/ml; P<0.001; change in TSAT, 8.62%±1.57%; P<0.001). Change in TSAT plateaued at this point, whereas change in ferritin increased through week 24, remaining relatively stable thereafter. Subjects on FC needed less iv iron compared with subjects on AC over 52 weeks (median [interquartile range] dose=12.9 [1.0–28.9] versus 26.8 [13.4–47.6] mg/wk; P<0.001), and the percentage of subjects not requiring iv iron was higher with FC (P<0.001). Cumulative ESA over 52 weeks was lower with FC than AC (median [interquartile range] dose=5303 [2023–9695] versus 6954 [2664–12,375] units/wk; P=0.04). Overall, 90.3% of subjects on FC and 89.3% of subjects on AC experienced adverse events. In conclusion, treatment with FC as a phosphate binder results in increased iron parameters apparent after 12 weeks and reduces iv iron and ESA use while maintaining hemoglobin over 52 weeks, with a safety profile similar to that of available binders. PMID:25736045

  11. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates ferric chloride-induced arterial thrombosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi-Ren; You, Shou-Jiang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qian; Wang, Xian-Hui; Wang, Fen; Hu, Li-Fang; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel gaseous transmitter, regulating a multitude of biological processes in the cardiovascular and other systems. However, it remains unclear whether it exerts any effect on arterial thrombosis. In this study, we examined the effect of H2S on ferric chloride (FeCl3)-induced thrombosis in the rat common carotid artery (CCA). The results revealed a decrease of the H2S-producing enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) expression and H2S production that persisted until 48 h after FeCl3 application. Intriguingly, administration with NaHS at appropriate regimen reduced the thrombus formation and enhanced the blood flow, accompanied with the alleviation of CSE and CD31 downregulation, and endothelial cell apoptosis in the rat CCA following FeCl3 application. Moreover, the antithrombotic effect of H2S was also observed in Rose Bengal photochemical model in which the development of thrombosis is contributed by oxidative injury to the endothelium. The in vitro study demonstrated that the mRNA and protein expression of CSE, as well as H2S production, was decreased in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-treated endothelial cells. Exogenous supplement of NaHS and CSE overexpression consistently alleviated the increase of cleaved caspase-3 and endothelial cell damage caused by H2O2. Taken together, our findings suggest that endogenous H2S generation in the endothelium may be impaired during arterial thrombosis and that modulation of H2S, either exogenous supplement or boost of endogenous production, may become a potential venue for arterial thrombosis therapy.

  12. The kinetics of the oxidation of pyrite by ferric ions and dissolved oxygen: An electrochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, P.R.; Crundwell, F.K.

    2000-01-01

    The dissolution of pyrite is important in the geochemical cycling of iron and sulphur, in the formation of acid mine drainage, and in the extraction of metals by bacterial leaching. Many researchers have studied the kinetics of dissolution, and the rate of dissolution has often been found to be half-order in ferric ions or oxygen. Previous work has not adequately explained the kinetics of dissolution of pyrite. The dissolution of pyrite is an oxidation-reduction reaction. The kinetics of the oxidation and reduction half-reactions was studied independently using electrochemical techniques of voltammetry. The kinetics of the overall reaction was studied by the electrochemical technique of potentiometry, which consisted of measuring the mixed potential of a sample of corroding pyrite in solutions of different compositions. The kinetics of the half reactions are related to the kinetics of the overall dissolution reaction by the condition that there is no accumulation of charge. This principle is used to derive expressions for the mixed potential and the rate of dissolution, which successfully describe the mixed potential measurements and the kinetics of dissolution reported in the literature. It is shown that the observations of half-order kinetics and that the oxygen in the sulphate product arises from water are both a direct consequence of the electrochemical mechanism. Thus it is concluded that the electrochemical reaction steps occurring at the mineral-solution interface control the rate of dissolution. Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze reaction products formed on the pyrite surface. The results indicated that small amounts of polysulphides form on the surface of the pyrite. However, it was also found that the mixed (corrosion) potential does not change over a 14-day leaching period. This indicates that even though polysulphide material is present on the surface, it does not influence the rate of the reactions occurring at the surface. Measurement of the

  13. Analysis of lapine cartilage matrix after radiosynovectomy with holmium-166 ferric hydroxide macroaggregate

    PubMed Central

    Makela, O; Lammi, M; Uusitalo, H; Hyttinen, M; Vuorio, E; Helminen, H; Tulamo, R

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the short and long term effects of radiosynovectomy on articular cartilage in growing and mature rabbits. Methods: The articular cartilage of the distal femurs of rabbits was examined four days, two months, and one year after radiosynovectomy with holmium-166 ferric hydroxide macroaggregate ([166Ho]FHMA). Arthritic changes were evaluated from histological sections by conventional and polarised light microscopy, and glycosaminoglycan measurements using safranin O staining, digital densitometry, and uronic acid determination. Proteoglycan synthesis was studied by metabolic [35]sulphate labelling followed by autoradiography, and electrophoretic analysis of extracted proteoglycans. Northern analyses were performed to determine the mRNA levels of type II collagen, aggrecan, and Sox9 in cartilage samples. Results: Radiosynovectomy had no major effect on the histological appearance of articular cartilage in mature rabbits, whereas more fibrillation was seen in [166Ho]FHMA radiosynovectomised knee joints of growing rabbits two months after treatment, but not after one year. Radiosynovectomy did not cause changes in the glycosaminoglycan content of cartilage or in the synthesis or chemical structure of proteoglycans. No radiosynovectomy related changes were seen in the mRNA levels of type II collagen, whereas a transient down regulation of aggrecan and Sox9 mRNA levels was seen in young rabbits two months after [166Ho]FHMA radiosynovectomy. Conclusions: [166Ho]FHMA radiosynovectomy caused no obvious chondrocyte damage or osteoarthritic changes in mature rabbits, but in growing rabbits some transient radiation induced effects were seen—for example, mild cartilage fibrillation and down regulation of cartilage-specific genes. PMID:12480668

  14. The Helicobacter pylori homologue of the ferric uptake regulator is involved in acid resistance.

    PubMed

    Bijlsma, Jetta J E; Waidner, Barbara; Vliet, Arnoud H M van; Hughes, Nicky J; Häg, Stephanie; Bereswill, Stefan; Kelly, David J; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Kist, Manfred; Kusters, Johannes G

    2002-02-01

    The only known niche of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori is the gastric mucosa, where large fluctuations of pH occur, indicating that the bacterial response and resistance to acid are important for successful colonization. One of the few regulatory proteins in the H. pylori genome is a homologue of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur). In most bacteria, the main function of Fur is the regulation of iron homeostasis. However, in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Fur also plays an important role in acid resistance. In this study, we determined the role of the H. pylori Fur homologue in acid resistance. Isogenic fur mutants were generated in three H. pylori strains (1061, 26695, and NCTC 11638). At pH 7 there was no difference between the growth rates of mutants and the parent strains. Under acidic conditions, growth of the fur mutants was severely impaired. No differences were observed between the survival of the fur mutant and parent strain 1061 after acid shock. Addition of extra iron or removal of iron from the growth medium did not improve the growth of the fur mutant at acidic pH. This indicates that the phenotype of the fur mutant at low pH was not due to increased iron sensitivity. Transcription of fur was repressed in response to low pH. From this we conclude that Fur is involved in the growth at acidic pH of H. pylori; as such, it is the first regulatory protein implicated in the acid resistance of this important human pathogen. PMID:11796589

  15. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth

    SciTech Connect

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C.; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Comolli, Luis R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-02-04

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III) bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Further, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated 2- and 3- dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Most cells had their outer membranes decorated with up to 150 nm diameter aggregates composed of a few nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell-surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  16. Investigations of the Low Frequency Modes of Ferric Cytochrome c Using Vibrational Coherence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond vibrational coherence spectroscopy is used to investigate the low frequency vibrational dynamics of the electron transfer heme protein, cytochrome c (cyt c). The vibrational coherence spectra of ferric cyt c have been measured as a function of excitation wavelength within the Soret band. Vibrational coherence spectra obtained with excitation between 412 and 421 nm display a strong mode at ∼44 cm–1 that has been assigned to have a significant contribution from heme ruffling motion in the electronic ground state. This assignment is based partially on the presence of a large heme ruffling distortion in the normal coordinate structural decomposition (NSD) analysis of the X-ray crystal structures. When the excitation wavelength is moved into the ∼421–435 nm region, the transient absorption increases along with the relative intensity of two modes near ∼55 and 30 cm–1. The intensity of the mode near 44 cm–1 appears to minimize in this region and then recover (but with an opposite phase compared to the blue excitation) when the laser is tuned to 443 nm. These observations are consistent with the superposition of both ground and excited state coherence in the 421–435 nm region due to the excitation of a weak porphyrin-to-iron charge transfer (CT) state, which has a lifetime long enough to observe vibrational coherence. The mode near 55 cm–1 is suggested to arise from ruffling in a transient CT state that has a less ruffled heme due to its iron d6 configuration. PMID:24823442

  17. Safety and Efficacy of Ferric Carboxymaltose in Anemic Pregnant Women: A Retrospective Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Pels, Anouk; Ganzevoort, Wessel

    2015-01-01

    Background. Anemia during pregnancy is commonly caused by iron deficiency and can have severe consequences for both the mother and the developing fetus. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the safety and efficacy of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) in pregnant women. Methods. All women treated with FCM for anemia during pregnancy between 2010 and 2012 at our institution were included. A matched control group was selected, including women who either were nonanemic or had anemia but were not considered for intravenous iron. Main outcome measures were maternal safety and pregnancy outcomes. Results. The study included 128 patients (FCM: 64; control: 64). Median FCM dose was 1000 mg and median gestational age at the time of first treatment was 34 weeks and 6 days. Median Hb increased from 8.4 g/dL (interquartile range 7.7; 8.9 g/dL) at the first FCM administration to 10.7 g/dL (9.8; 11.5 g/dL; n = 46 with available Hb at delivery) at the time of delivery, achieving levels similar to those in the control group (10.8 g/dL [9.8; 11.8 g/dL; n = 48]). No treatment-related adverse events were reported and no statistically significant differences in pregnancy outcomes were observed between groups. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this case control study, FCM was a safe and efficient treatment of anemia during pregnancy. PMID:26688686

  18. Emergency do not consume/do not use concentrations for ferric chloride in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Willhite, C C; Ball, G L; Bhat, V S

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Congress [PL 107-188] amended the Safe Drinking Water Act and required each community water system serving more than 3,000 people to conduct vulnerability assessments. These assessments address potential circumstances that could compromise the safety and reliability of municipal water. Ferric chloride is used in coagulation and flocculation, and it is used to treat raw water with high viral loads, elevated dissolved solids or high bromide. Iron is an essential nutrient, but elevated concentrations of FeCl3 are corrosive as a result of hydrolysis to HCl. Based on a no-observed-adverse effect level (NOAEL) of 0.5% FeCl3 • 6H2O administered in drinking water to male and female F344 rats for up to 2 years, a do not consume concentration of 200 mg FeCl3 /L can be derived. Since instillation of 0.3 M (48.7 g/L) FeCl3 in saline to rodent vagina failed to elicit damage, a topical do not use concentration of 2000 mg FeCl3/L (600 mg Fe/L) can be assigned. The only FeCl3 data available to quantify ocular toxicity involved a pH 1 solution in rabbit eyes, but HCl instillation (pH 2.5) to rabbit eyes found permanent corneal ulceration after 10 min. The pH of FeCl3 in water at the do not use limit (2.4-2.6) is near the pH (2.0) considered corrosive by regulatory agencies. As direct eye contact with water at pH 4.5 or below increases complaints of ocular discomfort, emergency response plans that address FeCl3 in drinking water must account for Fe levels and the pH of the affected water. PMID:23111879

  19. [Effectiveness of arsenite adsorption by ferric and alum water treatment residuals with different grain sizes].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lu; Xu, Jia-Rui; Wu, Hao; Wang, Chang-Hui; Pei, Yuan-Sheng

    2013-07-01

    Effectiveness of arsenite adsorption by ferric and alum water treatment residuals (FARs) with different grain sizes was studied. The results indicated that the content of active Fe and Al, the specific surface area and pore volume in FARs with different grain sizes were in the range of 523.72-1 861.72 mmol x kg(-1), 28.15-265.59 m2 x g(-1) and 0.03-0.09 cm3 x g(-1), respectively. The contents of organic matter, fulvic acid, humic acid and humin were in the range of 46.97-91.58 mg x kg(-1), 0.02-32.27 mg x kg(-1), 22.27-34.09 mg x kg(-1) and 10.76-34.22 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Results of SEM and XRD analysis further demonstrated that FARs with different grain sizes were amorphousness. Batch experiments suggested that both the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equations could well describe the kinetics adsorption processes of arsenite by FARs. Moreover, the contents of arsenite absorbed by FARs increased with the increase of arsenite concentrations. The theoretical saturated adsorption capacities calculated from Langmuir isotherm model were in the range of 6.72-21.79 mg x g(-1). Interestingly, pH showed little effect on the arsenite adsorption capability of FARs. The capability of FARs had a close relationship with their physicochemical properties. Correlation analysis showed that the active Fe and Al contents and pore volume had major effects on the arsenite adsorption capability of FARs.

  20. [Characteristics of orthophosphate adsorption on ferric-alum residuals (FARs) from drinking water treatment plant].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Hui; Pei, Yuan-Sheng

    2011-08-01

    Batch tests have been used to investigate the characteristics of orthophosphate adsorption on ferric-alum residuals (FARs) from drinking water treatment plant. ICP, SEM and XRD analyses confirm that the FARs enriched in Fe and Al elements and presented amorphism structure. Orthophosphate sorption by the FARs can be described by the pseudo-second-order kinetics equation. Fine adsorption effects of the FARs were found under lower pH values, particularly a 40.13% drop of the adsorptive capacity from pH 4.6 to pH 7.6. The FARs with grain sizes of 0.6-0.9 mm had the highest adsorption capacity of orthophosphate. Experimental data could be better fitted by the isotherm models of Langmuir (R2 = 0.9736) and Freundlich (R2 = 0.9916). The maximal adsorptive capacity reached 45.45 mg x g(-1) estimated from Langmuir isotherm model. Compared with other natural and industrial materials, FARs has relatively higher adsorption capacity. Under similar testing conditions, it was found that only about 10% orthophosphate could be desorbed from the FARs. Further study demonstrated that the mean energy of orthophosphate sorption on the FARs was 13.36 kJ x mol(-1) and the deltaH0 > 0, deltaS0 > 0 and deltaG0 < 0, which indicated that orthophosphate sorption on the FARs was a spontaneously endothermic chemical reaction. It can be therefore highly valued that the FARs may be applied to phosphate removal from wastewater and surface water.

  1. Comparison of different phosphate species adsorption by ferric and alum water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Gao, Sijia; Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2013-05-01

    As safe byproducts of drinking water treatment processes, ferric and alum water treatment residuals (FARs) have the potential to be new phosphate (P) immobilization materials. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate and compare the adsorption characteristics of three P species by FARs. The results showed that the kinetic processes of different P species' adsorption by FARs could be described by a pseudo second-order model. The ranking list of the initial adsorption rates with respect to different phosphates was pyrophosphate, phytate, orthophosphate, hexametaphosphate and glycerophosphate. Of the six models considered, the two-site Langmuir model most effectively described the adsorption characteristics of the various P species. Upon fitting the results, the maximum adsorption capacities were determined to be 40.24 mg/g for phytate, 18.04 mg/g for pyrophosphate, 17.14 mg/g for orthophosphate, 15.86 mg/g for hexametaphosphate and 10.81 mg/g for glycerophosphate. In addition, the adsorption processes of the different P species were spontaneous endothermic processes and were favored at lower pH values. The pH dependency was found to be especially true for orthophosphate, where the adsorption capacity decreased by 1.22 mg/g with an increase in pH from 5 to 9. Fractionation of the adsorbed P species from the FARs demonstrated that Al-P and Fe-P were the dominating forms, constituting approximately 80%-90% of the total P fractions, which indicated that the adsorbed P species had a low leaching risk and could stably exist in the FARs. Therefore, the FARs could be effective in controlling pollution in water caused by different P species.

  2. Ferric Citrate Reduces Intravenous Iron and Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent Use in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Umanath, Kausik; Jalal, Diana I; Greco, Barbara A; Umeukeje, Ebele M; Reisin, Efrain; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven; Negoi, Dana G; Hiremath, Anand N; Blumenthal, Samuel S; Sika, Mohammed; Niecestro, Robert; Koury, Mark J; Ma, Khe-Ni; Greene, Tom; Lewis, Julia B; Dwyer, Jamie P

    2015-10-01

    Ferric citrate (FC) is a phosphate binder with shown efficacy and additional effects on iron stores and use of intravenous (iv) iron and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). We provide detailed analyses of changes in iron/hematologic parameters and iv iron/ESA use at time points throughout the active control period of a phase 3 international randomized clinical trial. In all, 441 subjects were randomized (292 to FC and 149 to sevelamer carbonate and/or calcium acetate [active control (AC)]) and followed for 52 weeks. Subjects on FC had increased ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT) levels compared with subjects on AC by week 12 (change in ferritin, 114.1±29.35 ng/ml; P<0.001; change in TSAT, 8.62%±1.57%; P<0.001). Change in TSAT plateaued at this point, whereas change in ferritin increased through week 24, remaining relatively stable thereafter. Subjects on FC needed less iv iron compared with subjects on AC over 52 weeks (median [interquartile range] dose=12.9 [1.0-28.9] versus 26.8 [13.4-47.6] mg/wk; P<0.001), and the percentage of subjects not requiring iv iron was higher with FC (P<0.001). Cumulative ESA over 52 weeks was lower with FC than AC (median [interquartile range] dose=5303 [2023-9695] versus 6954 [2664-12,375] units/wk; P=0.04). Overall, 90.3% of subjects on FC and 89.3% of subjects on AC experienced adverse events. In conclusion, treatment with FC as a phosphate binder results in increased iron parameters apparent after 12 weeks and reduces iv iron and ESA use while maintaining hemoglobin over 52 weeks, with a safety profile similar to that of available binders. PMID:25736045

  3. Emergency do not consume/do not use concentrations for ferric chloride in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Willhite, C C; Ball, G L; Bhat, V S

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Congress [PL 107-188] amended the Safe Drinking Water Act and required each community water system serving more than 3,000 people to conduct vulnerability assessments. These assessments address potential circumstances that could compromise the safety and reliability of municipal water. Ferric chloride is used in coagulation and flocculation, and it is used to treat raw water with high viral loads, elevated dissolved solids or high bromide. Iron is an essential nutrient, but elevated concentrations of FeCl3 are corrosive as a result of hydrolysis to HCl. Based on a no-observed-adverse effect level (NOAEL) of 0.5% FeCl3 • 6H2O administered in drinking water to male and female F344 rats for up to 2 years, a do not consume concentration of 200 mg FeCl3 /L can be derived. Since instillation of 0.3 M (48.7 g/L) FeCl3 in saline to rodent vagina failed to elicit damage, a topical do not use concentration of 2000 mg FeCl3/L (600 mg Fe/L) can be assigned. The only FeCl3 data available to quantify ocular toxicity involved a pH 1 solution in rabbit eyes, but HCl instillation (pH 2.5) to rabbit eyes found permanent corneal ulceration after 10 min. The pH of FeCl3 in water at the do not use limit (2.4-2.6) is near the pH (2.0) considered corrosive by regulatory agencies. As direct eye contact with water at pH 4.5 or below increases complaints of ocular discomfort, emergency response plans that address FeCl3 in drinking water must account for Fe levels and the pH of the affected water.

  4. Spectrophotometric techniques to determine tranexamic acid: Kinetic studies using ninhydrin and direct measuring using ferric chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arayne, M. Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Siddiqui, Farhan Ahmed; Mirza, Agha Zeeshan; Zuberi, M. Hashim

    2008-11-01

    Two simple and sensitive spectrophotometric methods in ultraviolet and visible region are described for the determination of tranexamic acid in pure form and pharmaceutical preparations. The first method is based on the reaction of the drug with ninhydrin at boiling temperature and by measuring the increase in absorbance at 575 nm as a function of time. The initial rate, rate constant and fixed time (120 min) procedures were used for constructing the calibration graphs to determine the concentration of the drug, which showed a linear response over the concentration range 16-37 μg mL -1 with correlation coefficient " r" 0.9997, 0.996, 0.9999, LOQ 6.968, 7.138, 2.462 μgmL -1 and LOD 2.090, 2.141 and 0.739 μgmL -1, respectively. In second method tranexamic acid was reacted with ferric chloride solution, yellowish orange colored chromogen showed λ max at 375 nm showing linearity in the concentration range of 50-800 μg mL -1 with correlation coefficient " r" 0.9997, LOQ 6.227 μgmL -1 and LOD 1.868 μgmL -1. The variables affecting the development of the color were optimized and the developed methods were validated statistically and through recovery studies. These results were also verified by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The proposed methods have been successfully applied to the determination of tranexamic acid in commercial pharmaceutical formulation.

  5. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60% of US magnesium compounds production in 2001. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater in Florida by Premier Chemicals. They were also recovered from Michigan well brines by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And Premier Chemicals recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from magnesite in Nevada. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  6. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 40 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2009. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover, and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  7. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 54 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2010. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  8. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  9. Enhanced flue gas denitrification using ferrous EDTA and a polyphenolic compound having combined antioxidant and reducing properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Harkness, J.B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Previous work in this laboratory has involved studying the possibility of combined NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} scrubbing using various aqueous chemistries with a metal chelate additive. Recently, we have focused our work on the metal chelate ferrous*EDTA. A major problem encountered in the practical application of ferrous*EDTA is that the ferrous ion has been found to oxidize to the corresponding ferric species leading to a decrease of the NO{sub x} removal for the scrubbing solution containing the additive. We have found that addition of a polyphenolic compound leads to a sustained high NO{sub x} removal under various oxidizing conditions. We believe that the improved performance of ferrous*EDTA is due to the known capabilities of these organic compounds to both inhibit oxidation of ferrous chelates by dissolved oxygen and to rapidly reduce any ferric ions back to the original ferrous species. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Experimental Spinel Standards for Ferric Iron (Fe3+) Determination During Peridotite Partial Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenz, M. D.; Sorbadere, F.; Rosenthal, A.; Frost, D. J.; McCammon, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of ferric iron (Fe3+) in the mantle plays a significant role in the oxygen fugacity (fO2) of the Earth's interior. This has a wide range of implications for Earth related processes ranging from the composition of the atmosphere to magmatic phase relations during melting and crystallization processes [1]. A major source of Earth's mantle magmas is spinel peridotite. Despite its low abundance, spinel (Fe3+/ƩFe = 15-34%, [2]) is the main contributor of Fe3+to the melt upon partial melting. Analyses of Fe3+ on small areas of spinel and melt are required to study the Fe3+ behavior during partial melting of spinel peridotite. Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) combines both high precision and small beam size, but requires standards with a wide range of Fe3+ content to obtain good calibration. Glasses with varying Fe3+ content are easily synthesized [3, 4]. Spinel, however, presents a challenge for experimental standards due to the low diffusion of Cr and Al preventing compositional homogeneity. Natural spinel standards are often used, but only cover a narrow Fe3+ range. Thus, there is a need for better experimental spinel standards over a wider range of fO2. Our study involves making experimental mantle spinels with variable Fe3+ content. We used a sol-gel auto-combustion method to synthesize our starting material [5]. FMQ-2, FMQ+0, and air fO2 conditions were established using a gas mixing furnace. Piston cylinder experiments were performed at 1.5GPa, and 1310 -1370°C to obtain solid material for XANES. To maintain distinct oxidizing conditions, three capsules were used: graphite for reduced, Re for intermediate and AuPd for oxidized conditions. The spinels were analyzed by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Fe3+/ƩFe ranged from 0.3 to 0.6. These values are consistent with the Fe edge position obtained using XANES analyses, between 7130 and 7132 eV, respectively. Our spinels are thus suitable standards for Fe3+ measurements in peridotite

  11. Correlations among parameters that describe low-spin ferric heme complexes.

    PubMed

    Muhoberac, B B

    1984-09-01

    The g values from low-spin ferric hemes can be related through the t2g hole model to rhombic (V/lambda) and tetragonal (delta/lambda) ligand field components and to the lowest Kramer's doublet energy (E/lambda). The latter is also a measure of unpaired electron sharing among the iron 3d (t2g) orbitals. For a series of ligands (X), there is a monotonic increase in myoglobin complex (Mb . X) [E/lambda] values with nonheme hexacoordinate metal complex (M . X6) [eg-t2gPg] orbital separations. As the aqueous solution pKa values of the sulfurous or nitrogenous ligands in model heme complexes increase, values of V/lambda and delta/lambda increase linearly, but those of [E/lambda] decrease linearly. The greater the electron-acceptor ability of the ligand, as suggested by its position in the spectrochemical series or its pKa, the more the unpaired electron sharing among the heme t2g orbitals increases. The rate of change of [E/lambda] with V/lambda and the pKa is different with sulfurous and nitrogenous ligands, and the magnitude of both rates increases with two sulfurs less than sulfur and nitrogen less than two nitrogens bound to the heme. The maximum magnitude of this rate with V/lambda for cytochrome P-450 is four times less than that for myoglobin, which may explain, in part, the differences in ligand binding between these two hemeproteins. The perturbation of [E/lambda], V/lambda, and delta/lambda induced by strain of iron-ligand bonds is quantitated for several hemeproteins and heme models. In addition, energy level comparisons suggest that the largest-magnitude g value falls approximately along the iron-chlorin ring normal. This suggestion implies that the electron distribution of the iron at the catalytic sites of cytochrome P-450 and certain chlorin-containing enzymes is in some way similar, but distinct from that at the transport site of myoglobin.

  12. Ibuprofen Impairs Allosterically Peroxynitrite Isomerization by Ferric Human Serum Heme-Albumin*

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, Paolo; di Masi, Alessandra; Coletta, Massimo; Ciaccio, Chiara; Fanali, Gabriella; Nicoletti, Francesco P.; Smulevich, Giulietta; Fasano, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) participates in heme scavenging; in turn, heme endows HSA with myoglobin-like reactivity and spectroscopic properties. Here, the allosteric effect of ibuprofen on peroxynitrite isomerization to NO3− catalyzed by ferric human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe(III)) is reported. Data were obtained at 22.0 °C. HSA-heme-Fe(III) catalyzes peroxynitrite isomerization in the absence and presence of CO2; the values of the second order catalytic rate constant (kon) are 4.1 × 105 and 4.5 × 105 m−1 s−1, respectively. Moreover, HSA-heme-Fe(III) prevents peroxynitrite-mediated nitration of free added l-tyrosine. The pH dependence of kon (pKa = 6.9) suggests that peroxynitrous acid reacts preferentially with the heme-Fe(III) atom, in the absence and presence of CO2. The HSA-heme-Fe(III)-catalyzed isomerization of peroxynitrite has been ascribed to the reactive pentacoordinated heme-Fe(III) atom. In the absence and presence of CO2, ibuprofen impairs dose-dependently peroxynitrite isomerization by HSA-heme-Fe(III) and facilitates the nitration of free added l-tyrosine; the value of the dissociation equilibrium constant for ibuprofen binding to HSA-heme-Fe(III) (L) ranges between 7.7 × 10−4 and 9.7 × 10−4 m. Under conditions where [ibuprofen] is ≫L, the kinetics of HSA-heme-Fe(III)-catalyzed isomerization of peroxynitrite is superimposable to that obtained in the absence of HSA-heme-Fe(III) or in the presence of non-catalytic HSA-heme-Fe(III)-cyanide complex and HSA. Ibuprofen binding impairs allosterically peroxynitrite isomerization by HSA-heme-Fe(III), inducing the hexacoordination of the heme-Fe(III) atom. These results represent the first evidence for peroxynitrite isomerization by HSA-heme-Fe(III), highlighting the allosteric modulation of HSA-heme-Fe(III) reactivity by heterotropic interaction(s), and outlining the role of drugs in modulating HSA functions. The present results could be relevant for the drug-dependent protective role

  13. Comparative evaluation of Ferric Sulfate, Electrosurgical and Diode Laser on human primary molars pulpotomy: an “in-vivo” study

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, P; Indushekar, KR; Saraf, BG; Sheoran, N; Sardana, D

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Despite modern advances in the prevention of dental caries and increased understanding of the importance of maintaining the natural primary dentition, many teeth are still lost prematurely. This can lead to malocclusion with aesthetic, phonetic and functional problems that may be transient or permanent. Therefore, maintaining the integrity and health of the oral tissues is the primary objective of pulp treatment. Pulpotomy has remained an acceptable and mainstay treatment in preserving the vitality of primary tooth and prolonging its life till the permanent successor erupts. Various materials and techniques are available for pulpotomy on primary molars; all with some advantages and disadvantages. The present study was carried out on 45 primary molars to evaluate and compare the clinical and radiographic success of diode laser, electrosurgical and ferric sulfate pulpotomy over a period of 9 months. Materials (Subjects) and Methods: The forty five primary molars were randomly and equally divided into three treatment groups which were as follows: Group A: 15 primary molars treated with 15.5% Ferric sulfate Group B: 15 primary molars treated with electrosurgical unit and Group C: 15 primary molars treated with diode laser. All teeth in three categories were followed up clinically and radiographically at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months post treatment and the findings were recorded on the prepared proforma Results: Clinically, 86.6% success rate was found in ferric sulfate group whereas 100% success rate was found in electrosurgical and diode laser groups. Radiographically, 80% success rate was found in all the three groups at the end of 9 months with internal resorption being the most common cause of failure after pulpotomy. Conclusions: Thus, electrosurgery and diode lasers appear to be acceptable alternative to pharmacotherapeutic pulpotomy agents. PMID:24771970

  14. [Effects of bromide and ferric ions on formation of tri-halomethanes during disinfection of drinking water by chlorine].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Wang, Jing; Ge, Yuan-Xin; Ma, Hong-Mei; Zhao, Jian-Fu

    2007-06-01

    Effects of bromide and ferric ions on the formation and distribution of tri-halomethanes (THMs) have been investigated. As disinfection by-product (DBP) model precursors of natural water, humic acid solutions were used and a series of experiments were conducted. The results showed that bromide in this reaction system not only contributed to the increase of brominated species, but also the total tri-halomethanes. When the concentration of Br(-) was 1.0 mg/L, the total amount of produced THMs reached to 270% of that without bromide ions. In the presence of bromide, ferric ions decreased the production of THMs at pH 6, but increased the production of THMs at pH 8, especially for the amount of tri-bromomethanes. When the concentration of Fe3+ was 5 mg/L, the amount of produced tri-bromomethanes had an increment of 54% (from 51.7 microg/L to 79.4 microg/L), and the total amount of THMs increased from 113.49 microg/L to 162.09 microg/L. Bromide ions had a significant effect on carcinogenicity risk in disinfection of drinking water by chlorine, and the co-existence of ferric ion and bromide in alkalescent environment can result in the biggest challenge on carcinogenicity risk. Under the condition of 0.2 mg/L Br(-), 5 mg/L Fe3+ and pH 6, the carcinogenicity risk increased 2.5 times than that without Br(-) and Fe3+, and much higher increment of 5.1 times appeared when pH was 8.

  15. Spectroscopic evidence for a 5-coordinate oxygenic ligated high spin ferric heme moiety in the Neisseria meningitidis hemoglobin binding receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mokry, David Z.; Nadia-Albete, Angela; Johnson, Michael K.; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S.; Rodgers, Kenton R.; Lanzilotta, William N.

    2015-01-01

    Background For many pathogenic microorganisms, iron acquisition represents a significant stress during the colonization of a mammalian host. Heme is the single most abundant source of soluble iron in this environment. While the importance of iron assimilation for nearly all organisms is clear, the mechanisms by which heme is acquired and utilized by many bacterial pathogens, even those most commonly found at sites of infection, remain poorly understood. Methods An alternative protocol for the production and purification of the outer membrane hemoglobin receptor (HmbR) from the pathogen Neisseria meningitidis has facilitated a biophysical characterization of this outer membrane transporter by electronic absorption, circular dichroism, electron paramagnetic resonance, and resonance Raman techniques. Results HmbR co-purifies with 5-coordinate high spin ferric heme bound. The heme binding site accommodates exogenous imidazole as a sixth ligand, which results in a 6-coordinate, low-spin ferric species. Both the 5- and 6-coordinate complexes are reduced by sodium hydrosulfite. Four HmbR variants with a modest decrease in binding efficiency for heme have been identified (H87C, H280A, Y282A, and Y456C). These findings are consistent with an emerging paradigm wherein the ferric iron center of bound heme is coordinated by a tyrosine ligand. Conclusion In summary, this study provides the first spectroscopic characterization for any heme or iron transporter in Neisseria meningitidis, and suggests a coordination environment heretofore unobserved in a TonB-dependent hemin transporter. General Significance A detailed understanding of the nutrient acquisition pathways in common pathogens such as N. meningitidis provides a foundation for new antimicrobial strategies. PMID:24968987

  16. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, J.E.; Jamieson, D.R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula shown in the diagram wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] each independently is H, C[sub 1-4]-alkyl, C[sub 1-4]-alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1--3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1--3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  17. Bismaleimide compounds

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1986-01-14

    Bismaleimides of the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, C1 or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

  18. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  19. Filamentous hydrous ferric oxide biosignatures in a pipeline carrying acid mine drainage at Iron Mountain Mine, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Amy J.; Alpers, Charles N.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Campbell, Kate M.

    2016-01-01

    A pipeline carrying acidic mine effluent at Iron Mountain, CA, developed Fe(III)-rich precipitate caused by oxidation of Fe(II)aq. The native microbial community in the pipe included filamentous microbes. The pipe scale consisted of microbial filaments, and schwertmannite (ferric oxyhydroxysulfate, FOHS) mineral spheres and filaments. FOHS filaments contained central lumina with diameters similar to those of microbial filaments. FOHS filament geometry, the geochemical environment, and the presence of filamentous microbes suggest that FOHS filaments are mineralized microbial filaments. This formation of textural biosignatures provides the basis for a conceptual model for the development and preservation of biosignatures in other environments.

  20. Potentially Life-Threatening Phosphate Diabetes Induced by Ferric Carboxymaltose Injection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Vandemergel, Xavier; Vandergheynst, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 45-year-old female patient who developed phosphate diabetes after administration of ferric carboxymaltose. Ten days after the second dose, she complained of intense fatigue and blood analysis showed a phosphate plasma level of 0.93 mg/dL with phosphate excretion rate of 23%. She received phosphate supplementation which resulted in phosphate clearance improvement which persisted for two months. We reviewed other cases described in the literature and would draw attention to this rare but potentially life-threatening side effect. PMID:25478250

  1. Experimental serpentinization of dunite cores at 150-200ºC and 150 bar: Importance of open system dynamics for hydrogen generation and stabilization of ferric-rich serpentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Tutolo, B. M.; Bagley, B. C.; Mildner, D. F. R.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic processes often exhume mantle peridotite to environments near the Earth's surface, where serpentinization occurs and involves the hydration of peridotite at relatively low temperatures. This process oxidizes ferrous iron in olivine, which produces hydrogen (H2), creating environments that are conducive to abiotic synthesis of organic compounds and H2-based microbial communities. To understand better chemical and physical processes associated with serpentinization, two flow-through experiments (>30 days) were conducted at 150 and 200°C and 150 bar on intact dunite cores. Permeability decreased by a factor of 31 during the 200°C experiment, more than an order of magnitude larger than that at 150°C. Furthermore, H2 and methane concentrations exceeded 600 µmol/kg and 300 µmol/kg during the 200°C experiment, and were one and two orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than the 150°C experiment. H2 was primarily generated during the conversion of olivine to ferric serpentine at 200°C, since vibrating sample magnetometer analysis indicated little to no magnetite production. Secondary mineralization was identified on the core from this experiment, but X-ray computed tomography scans indicated little change. Furthermore, (ultra) small-angle neutron scattering datasets indicated that any change in nano-porosity and surface area was smaller than the natural variability of the dunite. Even though there was little evidence of alteration, the initial stage of serpentinization at 200°C was sufficient to produce a dramatic effect on flow fields in the core. Furthermore, this experiment generated significant dissolved H2 concentrations, while simulating open system dynamics. Thus, the experimental data provide insight on mass transfer processes in open geochemical systems, which effectively prevent highly elevated H2 concentrations due to continual loss. We speculate that this process is responsible for stabilizing unusually ferric-rich serpentine in nature.

  2. Effect of ferric oxyhydroxide grain coatings on the transport of bacteriophage PRD1 and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in saturated porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abudalo, R.A.; Bogatsu, Y.G.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Elimelech, M.

    2005-01-01

    To test the effect of geochemical heterogeneity on microorganism transport in saturated porous media, we measured the removal of two microorganisms, the bacteriophage PRD1 and oocysts of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, in flow-through columns of quartz sand coated by different amounts of a ferric oxyhydroxide. The experiments were conducted over ranges of ferric oxyhydroxide coating fraction of ?? = 0-0.12 for PRD1 and from ?? = 0-0.32 for the oocysts at pH 5.6-5.8 and 10-4 M ionic strength. To determine the effect of pH on the transport of the oocysts, experiments were also conducted over a pH range of 5.7-10.0 at a coating fraction of ?? = 0.04. Collision (attachment) efficiencies increased as the fraction of ferric oxyhydroxide coated quartz sand increased, from ?? = 0.0071 to 0.13 over ?? = 0-0.12 for PRD1 and from ?? = 0.059 to 0.75 over ?? = 0-0.32 for the oocysts. Increasing the pH from 5.7 to 10.0 resulted in a decrease in the oocyst collision efficiency as the pH exceeded the expected point of zero charge of the ferric oxyhydroxide coatings. The collision efficiencies correlated very well with the fraction of quartz sand coated by the ferric oxyhydroxide for PRD1 but not as well for the oocysts. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  3. A novel role of the ferric reductase Cfl1 in cell wall integrity, mitochondrial function, and invasion to host cells in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qilin; Dong, Yijie; Xu, Ning; Qian, Kefan; Chen, Yulu; Zhang, Biao; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2014-11-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic pathogen, causing both superficial mucosal infections and life-threatening systemic diseases. Iron acquisition is an important factor for pathogen-host interaction and also a significant element for the pathogenicity of this organism. Ferric reductases, which convert ferric iron into ferrous iron, are important components of the high-affinity iron uptake system. Sequence analyses have identified at least 17 putative ferric reductase genes in C. albicans genome. CFL1 was the first ferric reductase identified in C. albicans. However, little is known about its roles in C. albicans physiology and pathogenicity. In this study, we found that disruption of CFL1 led to hypersensitivity to chemical and physical cell wall stresses, activation of the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway, abnormal cell wall composition, and enhanced secretion, indicating a defect in CWI in this mutant. Moreover, this mutant showed abnormal mitochondrial activity and morphology, suggesting a link between ferric reductases and mitochondrial function. In addition, this mutant displayed decreased ability of adhesion to both the polystyrene microplates and buccal epithelial cells and invasion of host epithelial cells. These findings revealed a novel role of C. albicans Cfl1 in maintenance of CWI, mitochondrial function, and interaction between this pathogen and the host.

  4. A least-squares error minimization approach in the determination of ferric ion diffusion coefficient of Fricke-infused dosimeter gels

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Y.J.; Huang, S.-C.; Chu, W.C.

    2005-04-01

    A least-squares error minimization approach was adopted to assess ferric ion diffusion coefficient of Fricke-agarose gels. Ferric ion diffusion process was modeled as a Gaussian-shaped degradation kernel operating on an initial concentration distribution. Diffusion coefficient was iteratively determined by minimizing the error function defined as the difference between the theoretically calculated and the experimentally measured dose distributions. A rapid MR image-based differential gel dosimetry technique that time resolves the evolution of the ferric ion diffusion process minimizes smearing of the dose distribution. Our results showed that for a Fricke-agarose gel contained 1 mM ammonium ferrous sulfate, 1% agarose, 1 mM sodium chloride, and 50 mM sulfuric acid, its ferric ion diffusion coefficient is (1.59{+-}0.28)x10{sup -2} cm{sup 2} h{sup -1} at room temperature. This value falls within the 1.00-2.00x10{sup -2} cm{sup 2} h{sup -1} range previously reported under varying gelling ingredients and concentrations. This method allows a quick, nondestructive evaluation of the ferric ion diffusion coefficient that can be used in conjunction with the in situ gel dosimetry experiment to provide a practical diffusion characterization of the dosimeter gel.

  5. Influence of organic matter on the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a ferric oxyhydroxide-coated quartz sand saturated porous medium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abudalo, R.A.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Landkamer, L.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the effect of organic matter on the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a geochemically heterogeneous saturated porous medium, we measured the breakthrough and collision efficiencies of oocysts as a function of dissolved organic matter concentration in a flow-through column containing ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand. We characterized the surface properties of the oocysts and ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand using microelectrophoresis and streaming potential, respectively, and the amount of organic matter adsorbed on the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand as a function of the concentration of dissolved organic matter (a fulvic acid isolated from Florida Everglades water). The dissolved organic matter had no significant effect on the zeta potential of the oocysts. Low concentrations of dissolved organic matter were responsible for reversing the charge of the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand surface from positive to negative. The charge reversal and accumulation of negative charge on the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand led to increases in oocyst breakthrough and decreases in oocyst collision efficiency with increasing dissolved organic matter concentration. The increase in dissolved organic matter concentration from 0 to 20 mg L-1 resulted in a two-fold decrease in the collision efficiency. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Identification and characterization of a periplasmic trilactone esterase, Cee, revealed unique features of ferric enterobactin acquisition in Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ximin; Mo, Yiming; Xu, Fuzhou; Lin, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ferric enterobactin (FeEnt) acquisition is a highly efficient and conserved iron scavenging system in Gram-negative bacteria. Recently, we have characterized two FeEnt receptors (CfrA and CfrB) in Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli, the enteric human pathogens that do not produce any siderophores. In this study, whole genome sequencing and comparative genomic analysis identified a unique Ent trilactone esterase Cee (Cj1376) in C. jejuni. Genomic analysis and biochemical assay strongly suggested that Cee is the sole trilactone esterase in C. jejuni. Thin layer chromatography and HPLC analyses showed high efficiency of the purified Cee to hydrolyze Ent. Three Cee homologs previously characterized from other bacteria (IroE, IroD, and Fes) were also purified and analyzed together with Cee, indicating that Cee, Fes, and IroD displayed similar hydrolysis dynamics for both apo and ferric forms of Ent while IroE catalyzed Ent inefficiently. Unlike cytoplasmic Fes and IroD, Cee is localized in the periplasm as demonstrated by immunoblotting using Cee-specific antibodies. Genetic manipulation of diverse Campylobacter strains demonstrated that Cee is not only essential for CfrB-dependent FeEnt acquisition but also involved in CfrA-dependent pathway. Together, this study identified and characterized a novel periplasmic trilactone esterase and suggested a new model of FeEnt acquisition in Campylobacter. PMID:23278903

  7. Removal of arsenic from drinking water by ferric hydroxide microcapsule-loaded alginate beads in packed adsorption column.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Priyabrata; Pal, Priyabrata; Bhattacharyay, Dipankar; Banerjee, Suchanda

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we have presented a unique low cost arsenic removal technique using ferric hydroxide microcapsule-loaded alginate beads (FHMCA) as an adsorbent in a continuous packed column. The microencapsulated particles of ferric hydroxide were produced in a spray dryer and subsequently coated with calcium alginate to form spherical beads of about 2 mm diameter. Batch experiments were conducted with these beads to generate isotherm data. The loading capacity was found to be 3.8 mg arsenic/gm of adsorbent. The experimental data conformed to Freundlich adsorption isotherm. A generalized mathematical model was also developed and the visual basic codes run with the physical parameters of the adsorbent and isotherm data that were evaluated experimentally was achieved for a continuous 75 days' operation. The safe disposal of the spent adsorbent was confirmed by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results. With known set of physical parameters of the adsorbent, input water flow rate and its arsenic concentration, the model could predict the number of days the column would run with output below a specific arsenic concentration.

  8. Influence of H2SO4 and ferric iron on Cd bioleaching from spent Ni-Cd batteries.

    PubMed

    Velgosová, Oksana; Kaduková, Jana; Marcinčáková, Renáta; Palfy, Pavol; Trpčevská, Jarmila

    2013-02-01

    The paper is concerned with biohydrometallurgical methods of cadmium recovery from spent Ni-Cd batteries. Cd leaching efficiency from electrode material in different media (H(2)SO(4) and Fe(2)(SO(4))(3) solutions), at different Fe(III) concentrations and using the bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans were investigated. The main aim of this study was to understand which from the bioleaching products (sulphuric acid or ferric sulphate) play a main role in the bioleaching process of Cd recovery. The influence of Fe ions on Cd leachability was confirmed. The best leaching efficiency of Cd (100%) was reached by bioleaching and also by leaching in Fe(2)(SO(4))(3) solution. The results of X-ray diffraction confirmed that no cadmium was present in solid residuum obtained after the Cd bioleaching as well as Cd leaching using solely ferric iron. The use of H(2)SO(4) solution resulted in the lowest efficiency of Cd leachability, the presence of hydroxides in electrode materials caused neutralization of the leaching solution and inhibition of Cd leaching. PMID:23131752

  9. [Stabilization of Cadmium Contaminated Soils by Ferric Ion Modified Attapulgite (Fe/ATP)--Characterizations and Stabilization Mechanism].

    PubMed

    Rong, Yang; Li, Rong-bo; Zhou, Yong-li; Chen, Jing; Wang, Lin-ling; Lu, Xiao-hua

    2015-08-01

    Ferric ion modified attapulgite (Fe/ATP) was prepared by impregnation and its structure and morphology were characterized. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was used to evaluate the effect of Cadmium( Cd) stabilization in soil with the addition of attapulgite (ATP) and Fe/ATP. The stabilization mechanism of Cd was further elucidated by comparing the morphologies and structure of ATP and Fe/ATP before and after Cd adsorption. Fe/ATP exhibited much better adsorption capacity than ATP, suggesting different adsorption mechanisms occurred between ATP and Fe/ATP. The leaching concentrations of Cd in soil decreased by 45% and 91% respectively, with the addition of wt. 20% ATP and Fe/ATP. The former was attributed to the interaction between Cd2 and --OH groups by chemical binding to form inner-sphere complexes in ATP and the attachment between Cd2+ and the defect sites in ATP framework. Whereas Cd stabilization with Fe/ATP was resulted from the fact that the active centers (--OH bonds or O- sites) on ATP could react with Fe3+ giving Fe--O--Cd-- bridges, which helped stabilize Cd in surface soil. What'more, the ferric oxides and metal hydroxides on the surface of ATP could interact with Cd, probably by the formation of cadmium ferrite. In conclusion, Fe/ATP, which can be easily prepared, holds promise as a potential low-cost and environmental friendly stabilizing agent for remediation of soil contaminated with heavy metals.

  10. Ferric-pyoverdine recognition by Fpv outer-membrane proteins of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (previously called P. fluorescens Pf-5) produces two siderophores, enantio-pyochelin and a compound in the large and diverse pyoverdine family. Using high-resolution mass spectroscopy, we determined the structure of the pyoverdine produced by Pf-5. In ad...

  11. Ferric ion-specific sequestering agents. 7. Synthesis, iron-exchange kinetics, and stability constants of N-substituted, sulfonated catechoylamide analogs of enterobactin

    SciTech Connect

    Pecoraro, Vincent L.; Weit, Frederick L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    1981-08-01

    For treatment of chronic iron overload (as occurs in Cooley's anemia), ferric ion sequestering agents with specific properties are necessary. Two analogues of enterobactin [a microbial chelating agent with the greatest stability constant known for an Fe(III) complex] are reported which exhibit: i) hydrolytic stability; ii) water solubility; iii) N-substitution to block peptidase hydrolysis. The first compound, N,N',N"- trimethyl-N,N',N"-tris(2,3-dihydroxysulfobenzoyl)1,3,5-triaminomethyl- benzene, [Me3MECAMS, 6] was prepared from the amide of trimesloyl chloride (1) and MeNH2. The resulting amide was reduced to the triamine (3) and converted in three steps to the final product 6 in 6% overall yield. The proton-dependent formation constant (log K*) for the reaction: Fe3+ + H3L6- = FeL6- + 3H+ is 4.87, which gives an equilibrium concentration of [Fe3+] at pH 7.4 of 2 x 10-27 M for 10-5 M L (6) and 10-6 M total Fe3+. The estimated formation constant (log β110) is 40. At low pH the FeL6- complex undergoes a series of three, one-proton reactions which probably gives a tris-salicylate complex formed by the carbonyl and ortho-catechol oxygen of the 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl units (the same reaction that occurs with ferric enterobactin). After six hours in the presence of 6 mM ascorbate, Me3MECAMS (6.0 mM) removed 3.7% of the ferric ion initially sequestered by the iron storage protein, ferritin. The human iron transport protein transferrin gives up iron to Me3MECAMS with a pseudo first-order rate constant of 1.9 x 10-3min-1 (ligand concentration 2 X 10-4 M). This rate is comparable to that of enterobactin and other catechoyl amide sequestering agents, and greatly exceeds that of desferrioxamine B (Desferal®), the current drug of choice in treating iron overload. Two

  12. Ferric ion-specific sequestering agents. 7. Synthesis, iron-exchange kinetics, and stability constants of n-substituted, sulfonated catechoylamide analogues of enterobactin

    SciTech Connect

    Pecoraro, V.L.; Weitl, F.L.; Raymond, K.N.

    1981-08-26

    Two analogues of enterobactin are reported which exhibit (i) stability to base-catalyzed hydrolysis of the central ring, (ii) water solubility, and (iii) N-substitution to block peptidase hydrolysis of the amide bonds. The first compound 1,3,5-tris(N-methyl-N-(2,3-dihydroxysulfobenzoyl)aminomethyl)benzene (Me/sub 3/MECAMS) was prepared, via the amide of trimesoyl chloride and MeNH/sub 2/, in four steps and 6% overall yield. The proton-dependent formation constant (log K* = log ((FeL/sup 6 -/)(H/sup +/)/sup 3/)/((Fe/sup 3 +/)(H/sub 3/L/sup 6 -/))) is 5.21, which gives an equilibrium concentration of (Fe/sup 3 +/) at pH 7.4 x 1 x 10/sup -27/ M for 10/sup -5/ M Me/sub 3/MECAMS and 10/sup -6/M total Fe/sup 3 +/. Me/sub 3/MECAMS (6.0 mM) removed 3.7% of the ferric iron initially sequestered by the iron-storage protein ferritin after 6 h. The human iron-transport protein transferrin releases iron to Me/sub 3/MECAMS with a pseudo-first-order rate constant of 1.9 x 10/sup -3/ min/sup -1/ (ligand concentration 2 x 10/sup -4/ M, T = 25/sup 0/C, ..mu.. = 0.10 M). Two related compounds have been prepared in which the catechol ring is attached to the amide nitrogen through a methylene group. In 1,3,5-tris(N-acetyl-N-(2,3-dihydroxysulfobenzyl)aminomethyl)benzene (NAcMECAMS) and its unsulfonated precursor, the amide linkage of the catechoyl amides such as Me/sub 3/MECAMS has been shifted from an endo position relative to the benzene and catechol rings to an exo position in which the amide carbonyl is not conjugated with the catechol ring and cannot form a stable chelate ring in conjunction with a catechol oxygen. As a result of the removal of the carbonyl group from conjugation with the catechol ring, the acidity of NAcMECAMS is less than Me/sub 3/MECAMS. While the estimated log ..beta../sub 110/ = 40 is approximately the same as for the Me/sub 3/MECAMS, the effective formation constant (log K*) and pM (-log(Fe/sub aq//sup 3 +/)) values are lower (4.0 and 25.0, respectively).

  13. Soluble ferric iron as an effective protective agent against UV radiation: Implications for early life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Felipe; Aguilera, Angeles; Amils, Ricardo

    2007-11-01

    Some recent MER Rover Opportunity results on ancient sedimentary rocks from Mars describe sandstones originated from the chemical weathering of olivine basalts by acidic waters [Squyres, S.W., Knoll, A.H., 2005. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 240, 1-10]. The absence of protective components in early Mars atmosphere forced any possible primordial life forms to deal with high doses of UV radiation. A similar situation occurred on the primitive Earth during the development of early life in the Archean [Berkner, L.V., Marshall, L.C., 1965. J. Atmos. Sci. 22 (3), 225-261; Kasting, J.F., 1993. Science 259, 920-926]. It is known that some cellular and/or external components can shield organisms from damaging UV radiation or quench its toxic effects [Olson, J.M., Pierson, B.K., 1986. Photosynth. Res. 9, 251-259; García-Pichel, F., 1998. Origins Life Evol. B 28, 321-347; Cockell, C., Rettberg, P., Horneck, G., Scherer, K., Stokes, M.D., 2003. Polar Biol. 26, 62-69]. The effectiveness of iron minerals for UV protection has also been reported [Phoenix, V.R., Konhauser, K.O., Adams, D.G., Bottrell, S.H., 2001. Geology 29 (9), 823-826], but nothing is known about the effect of iron in solution. Here we demonstrate the protective effect of soluble ferric iron against UV radiation on acidophilic photosynthetic microorganisms. These results offer an interesting alternative means of protection for life on the surface of early Mars and Earth, especially in light of the geochemical conditions in which the sedimentary minerals, jarosite and goethite, recently reported by the MER missions, were formed [Squyres, S.W., Arvidson, R.E., Bell III, J.F., Brückner, J., Cabrol, N.A., Calvin, W., Carr, M.H., Christensen, P.R., Clark, B.C., Crumpler, L., Des Marais, D.J., d'Uston, C., Economou, T., Farmer, J., Farrand, W., Folkner, W., Golombek, M., Gorevan, S., Grant, J.A., Greeley, R., Grotzinger, J., Haskin, L., Herkenhoff, K.E., Hviid, S., Johnson, J., Klingelhöfer, G., Knoll, A.H., Landis, G

  14. Effects of phosphate and silicate on the transformation of hydroxycarbonate green rust to ferric oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xionghan; Wang, Xiaoming; Zhu, Mengqiang; Koopal, Luuk K.; Xu, Huanhuan; Wang, Yan; Liu, Fan

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxycarbonate green rust (GR1(CO32-)) was prepared by oxidation of aerated aqueous suspensions of Fe(II) hydroxide, and the presence of light promoted the transformation of GR1(CO32-) by dissolved O2 at pH 7.8 and 25 °C. Further transformation of GR1(CO32-) in the light was conducted in the presence of orthophosphate (P) or silicate (Si) anions, followed by solution analysis and solid product characterization using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Results show that both P and Si anions significantly affect the transformation of GR1(CO32-) through adsorption on the intermediate products. The time required for complete GR1(CO32-) transformation and the phases, crystallinity and morphology of the transformation products all depend on the Fe/anion molar ratio. When compared to the control, the transformation can be promoted by low Si concentrations but retarded by P. With decreasing Fe/P ratio, the products change from acicular goethite (absence of P) to tabular lepidocrocite (Fe/P: 120-48) and to mixed phases of platelets of ferric GR1(CO32-) (EX-GR1) and minor ferrihydrite (Fe/P: 24-3). In terms of Si, the products are goethites when the Fe/Si ratio of 48-12, and with increasing ratio, the goethite crystallinity and particle size decrease and the morphology changes from acicular (absence of Si) to plate-like or isodimensional particles. The goethite morphology at low Fe/Si ratios is comparable to natural goethite samples commonly found in soils. At Fe/Si = 3, the products are EX-GR1 platelets with minor ferrihydrite coexisting. The likely pathway of the oxidative GR1(CO32-) transformation in the control system and in the presence of low concentrations of Si (Fe/Si ⩾ 12) is GR1(CO32-) → amorphous γ-FeOOH-like phase → α-FeOOH via a dissolution-oxidation-precipitation mechanism. In addition, Fe(II) released during dissolution of GR1(CO32-) is adsorbed on the products and the

  15. Eleven-years-long record of ferric hydroxide sedimentation in Satsuma Iwo-Jima island, Kagoshima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueshiba, T.; Kiyokawa, S.; Goto, S.; Oguri, K.; Ito, T.; Ikehara, M.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Nagata, T.; Ninomiya, T.; Ikegami, F.

    2011-12-01

    Satsuma Iwo-Jima island is active in volcanic activity located about 40 km south of Kyushu Island, Japan. It has many hot springs, and is surrounded by patches of reddish brown and white colored seawater. Nagahama Bay, a small port located in the southern part of the island, retains reddish brown seawater and precipitates ferric hydroxide (Ninomiya and Kiyokawa, 2009). We conducted multidisciplinary study to investigate mechanisms and histories of precipitation of the sediments. From 2009 to 2011, we obtained 1.5m-long core samples in the bay that record sedimentation of mainly ferric hydroxide during the last 11~13 years since dredging in 1998. We compare their stratigraphy with (a) 11 years meteorological data and (b) volcanic activity record in that period. Stratigraphy: Thirteen short cores (<1m long) were collected from Nagahama Bay. The lower unit contains three layers of white and pink tuff beds (T1, T2 and T3) with thickness of 1~9cm. The upper unit mainly contains sand bed and reddish-brown mud. The tuff beds are mainly composed of volcanic glass. Sand bed is essentially a mixture of felsic rock fragments, volcanic glass, and ferric-rich fine materials. The reddish brown sediment between T1 and T2 has very fine orange-colored laminations (1~2mm thick/each). (a) Meteorological data: 11-years-long meteorological data of the Satsuma Iwo-Jima island suggest that heavy rainfalls (precipitation over 100mm/day) occurred in June 2000 (189mm/day), June 2001 (124.5mm/day), and June 2002 (122mm/day), and that three events of strong typhoon occurred in 2004 (maximum wind speed: 40.3m/s, 54.3m/s and 44.6m/s), 2005 (43.3m/s), and 2007 (50.2m/s). These meteorological events are reflected in, sometimes disturb, the sediment record. (b) Volcanic data: Volcanic activity has occurred from 1997 (Shinohara, 2002) to October 2004 (Japan Meteorological Agency, 2010). During that time, ash was spewed out from and deposited near the volcano. Tuffaceous beds in the sediments of

  16. Ferric Hydrogensulfate [Fe(HSO4)3] As a Reusable Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Synthesis of 5-Substituted-1H-Tetrazoles and Amides

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Hossein; Seyedi, Seyed Mohammad; Zarei, Elaheh Rahimi

    2011-01-01

    Ferric hydrogensulfate catalyzed the synthesis of 5-substituted 1H-tetrazoles via [2 + 3] cycloaddition of nitriles and sodium azide. This method has the advantages of high yields, simple methodology, and easy workup. The catalyst can be recovered by simple filtration and reused delivering good yields. Also, ferric hydrogensulfate catalyzed the hydrolysis of nitriles to primary amides under aqueous conditions. Various aliphatic and aromatic nitriles converted to the corresponding amides in good yields without any contamination with carboxylic acids. PMID:24052817

  17. Evidence for an unusual electronic structure of wheat germ peroxidase compound I.

    PubMed

    Converso, D A; Fernández, M E

    1998-09-01

    Oxidized states of wheat germ peroxidase isozyme C2 (WGP C2) were investigated by means of electronic absorption spectroscopy. Addition of one molar equivalent of H2O2 to ferric WGP C2 led to the formation of an oxidized species with an absorption spectrum very similar to that of peroxidase compound II, with a Soret maximum at 411 nm and visible maxima at 523 and 553 nm. The transformation took place with an isosbestic point at 409 nm. Stopped flow spectroscopy showed no inflection points for the formation of this species when it was registered at 420 nm, and we could verify the persistence of the isosbestic point from 20 ms to 10 s. The oxidized species decays spontaneously to ferric enzyme in a double-exponential manner. By adding excess H2O2 to the system we obtained an inactive derivative identical to horseradish peroxidase P-670. In the presence of one equivalent of reducing substrate and excess H2O2 compound III was formed. The results so indicate that the species obtained in the reaction of WGP C2 with equimolecular amounts of H2O2 is compound I. The resulting compound I spectrum was identical to that of cytochrome c peroxidase, suggesting the formation of a protein radical rather than the typical pi cation radical, a feature which had not been described before for a plant peroxidase.

  18. Performance evaluation of ALCAN-AASF50-ferric coated activated alumina and granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) for arsenic removal in the presence of competitive ions in an active well :Kirtland field trial - initial studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Neidel, Linnah L.; Krumhansl, James Lee; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Khandaker, Nadim Reza

    2006-01-01

    This report documents a field trial program carried out at Well No.15 located at Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico, to evaluate the performance of two relatively new arsenic removal media, ALCAN-AASF50 (ferric coated activated alumina) and granular ferric hydroxide (US Filter-GFH). The field trial program showed that both media were able to remove arsenate and meet the new total arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) in drinking water of 10 {micro}g/L. The arsenate removal capacity was defined at a breakthrough effluent concentration of 5 {micro}g/L arsenic (50% of the arsenic MCL of 10 {micro}g/L). At an influent pH of 8.1 {+-} 0.4, the arsenate removal capacity of AASF50 was 33.5 mg As(V)/L of dry media (29.9 {micro}g As(V)/g of media on a dry basis). At an influent pH of 7.2 {+-} 0.3, the arsenate removal capacity of GFH was 155 mg As(V)/L of wet media (286 {micro}g As(V)/g of media on a dry basis). Silicate, fluoride, and bicarbonate ions are removed by ALCAN AASF50. Chloride, nitrate, and sulfate ions were not removed by AASF50. The GFH media also removed silicate and bicarbonate ions; however, it did not remove fluoride, chloride, nitrate, and sulfate ions. Differences in the media performance partly reflect the variations in the feed-water pH between the 2 tests. Both the exhausted AASF50 and GFH media passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test with respect to arsenic and therefore could be disposed as nonhazardous waste.

  19. Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes with encapsulated ferric carbide as excellent electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in acid and alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Guoyu; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Hao; Peng, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) with encapsulated Fe3C nanoparticles (Fe3C@NCNTs) are synthesized by a simple direct pyrolysis of melamine and ferric chloride. The characterization results reveal that Fe3C is mainly encapsulated in the interior of NCNTs and N species is mainly distributed on the outside surface of NCNTs. Iron and iron carbide catalyze the growth of NCNTs and are wrapped by carbon to form Fe3C@NCNTs. The as-prepared Fe3C@NCNTs catalyst exhibits superior oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity, excellent methanol tolerance and long-term stability in both acid and alkaline media. It is proven that the doped N is the main active site for ORR and the inner Fe3C with outside carbon form the synergetic active site to enhance ORR activity. The ORR mechanism of direct four electron transfer pathway is proved in acid and alkaline media.

  20. An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction

    PubMed Central

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical for the growth and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. L. pneumophila utilizes two main modes of iron assimilation, namely ferrous iron uptake via the FeoB system and ferric iron acquisition through the action of the siderophore legiobactin. This review highlights recent studies concerning the mechanism of legiobactin assimilation, the impact of c-type cytochromes on siderophore production, the importance of legiobactin in lung infection and a newfound role for a bacterial pyomelanin in iron acquisition. These data demonstrate that key aspects of L. pneumophila iron acquisition are significantly distinct from those of long-studied, ‘model’ organisms. Indeed, L. pneumophila may represent a new paradigm for a variety of other intracellular parasites, pathogens and under-studied bacteria. PMID:26000653

  1. Breadboard wash water renovation system. [using ferric chloride and ion exchange resins to remove soap and dissolved salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A total wash water renovation system concept was developed for removing objectionable materials from spacecraft wash water in order to make the water reusable. The breadboard model system described provides for pretreatment with ferric chloride to remove soap by chemical precipitation, carbon adsorption to remove trace dissolved organics, and ion exchange for removal of dissolved salts. The entire system was put into continuous operation and carefully monitored to assess overall efficiency and equipment maintenance problems that could be expected in actual use. In addition, the capacity of the carbon adsorbers and the ion-exchange resin was calculated and taken into consideration in the final evaluation of the system adequacy. The product water produced was well within the Tentative Wash Water Standards with regard to total organic carbon, conductivity, urea content, sodium chloride content, color, odor, and clarity.

  2. Absorption in the Q-band region by isolated ferric heme+ and heme+(histidine) in vacuo.

    PubMed

    Wyer, Jean Ann; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2010-08-28

    Absorption by heme proteins is determined by the heme microenvironment that is often vacuumlike (hydrophobic pocket). Here we provide absorption spectra in the Q-band region of isolated ferric heme(+) and heme(+)(histidine) ions in vacuo to be used as references in protein biospectroscopy. Ions were photoexcited in an electrostatic storage ring and their decay monitored in time. Both ions display a triple band structure with maxima at 500, 518, and 530 nm. Previous attempts to study four-coordinate Fe(III)-heme(+) were hampered by the strong affinity of Fe(3+) for water and anions. Absorption at higher wavelengths is also measured, which is ascribed to charge-transfer transitions from the porphyrin to the iron. Finally, our data serve to benchmark theoretical calculations. PMID:20815568

  3. Effect of natural dissolved organic carbon on phosphate removal by ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate treatment of wetland waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qualls, Robert G.; Sherwood, Lindsay J.; Richardson, Curtis J.

    2009-09-01

    The use of wetlands for the removal of excess N and P has become widespread. Some sensitive P-limited ecosystems, however, may require additional reductions in the concentration of P entering the system. It has been proposed that the treatment of wetlands through addition of ferric chloride or aluminum sulfate can augment the natural P removal mechanisms. However, high concentrations of natural dissolved organic matter may interfere with the removal of P by metal addition. We evaluated the doses of ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate necessary to reduce total P concentrations below 0.32 μM (10 μg/L) in water from the Northern Everglades, and we determined the effect of various concentrations (21, 38, and 60 mg/L) of natural dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the removal of PO4 and total P. High concentrations of natural DOC inhibited both the short-term removal of PO4 and the longer-term removal of total P from the water column. Similar results were observed using 15 μM citric acid in an experiment to determine whether citric acid could effectively mimic the inhibition of phosphorus removal associated with natural DOC. Stoichiometry of these experiments indicates that the mechanism of natural DOC interference was not complexation of the metal ions by the DOC; we hypothesize that it could be adsorption to the terminal hydroxyl groups on a polynuclear Fe or Al colloid, effectively blocking the adsorption sites from a phosphate molecule. Also, the ability of citric acid to mimic the inhibitory effects also suggests that the results of the study are broadly applicable to wetland and other waters with high natural organic acid concentrations.

  4. Groundwater arsenic removal by coagulation using ferric(III) sulfate and polyferric sulfate: A comparative and mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jinli; Jing, Chuanyong; Che, Dongsheng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Duan, Shuxuan

    2015-06-01

    Elevated arsenic (As) in groundwater poses a great threat to human health. Coagulation using mono- and poly-Fe salts is becoming one of the most cost-effective processes for groundwater As removal. However, a limitation comes from insufficient understanding of the As removal mechanism from groundwater matrices in the coagulation process, which is critical for groundwater treatment and residual solid disposal. Here, we overcame this hurdle by utilizing microscopic techniques to explore molecular As surface complexes on the freshly formed Fe flocs and compared ferric(III) sulfate (FS) and polyferric sulfate (PFS) performance, and finally provided a practical solution in As-geogenic areas. FS and PFS exhibited a similar As removal efficiency in coagulation and coagulation/filtration in a two-bucket system using 5mg/L Ca(ClO)2. By using the two-bucket system combining coagulation and sand filtration, 500 L of As-safe water (<10 μg/L) was achieved during five treatment cycles by washing the sand layer after each cycle. Fe k-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and As k-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the solid residue indicated that As formed a bidentate binuclear complex on ferrihydrite, with no observation of scorodite or poorly-crystalline ferric arsenate. Such a stable surface complex is beneficial for As immobilization in the solid residue, as confirmed by the achievement of much lower leachate As (0.9 μg/L-0.487 mg/L) than the US EPA regulatory limit (5 mg/L). Finally, PFS is superior to FS because of its lower dose, much lower solid residue, and lower cost for As-safe drinking water.

  5. Ferric chloride-catalyzed reaction of [60]fullerene with tert-butyl N-substituted carbamates: synthesis of oxazolidino[4,5:1,2][60]fullerenes.

    PubMed

    You, Xun; Wang, Guan-Wu

    2014-01-01

    The rare oxazolidinofullerenes have been prepared by the ferric chloride-catalyzed reaction of [60]fullerene with various tert-butyl N-substituted carbamates via t-Bu-O bond cleavage and heteroannulation under mild conditions. A possible mechanism for the formation of oxazolidinofullerenes is proposed.

  6. Switching Patients with Non-Dialysis Chronic Kidney Disease from Oral Iron to Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose: Effects on Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent Requirements, Costs, Hemoglobin and Iron Status

    PubMed Central

    Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Di Gennaro, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD) often receive an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) and oral iron treatment. This study evaluated whether a switch from oral iron to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose can reduce ESA requirements and improve iron status and hemoglobin in patients with ND-CKD. Methods This prospective, single arm and single-center study included adult patients with ND-CKD (creatinine clearance ≤40 mL/min), hemoglobin 11–12 g/dL and iron deficiency (ferritin <100 μg/L or transferrin saturation <20%), who were regularly treated with oral iron and ESA during 6 months prior to inclusion. Study patients received an intravenous ferric carboxymaltose dose of 1,000 mg iron, followed by a 6-months ESA/ ferric carboxymaltose maintenance regimen (target: hemoglobin 12 g/dL, transferrin saturation >20%). Outcome measures were ESA dose requirements during the observation period after initial ferric carboxymaltose treatment (primary endpoint); number of hospitalizations and transfusions, renal function before and after ferric carboxymaltose administration, number of adverse reactions (secondary endpoints). Hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, ferritin and transferrin saturation were measured monthly from baseline until end of study. Creatinine clearance, proteinuria, C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase bimonthly from baseline until end of study. Results Thirty patients were enrolled (age 70.1±11.4 years; mean±SD). Mean ESA consumption was significantly reduced by 83.2±10.9% (from 41,839±3,668 IU/patient to 6,879±4,271 IU/patient; p<0.01). Hemoglobin increased by 0.7±0.3 g/dL, ferritin by 196.0±38.7 μg/L and transferrin saturation by 5.3±2.9% (month 6 vs. baseline; all p<0.01). No ferric carboxymaltose-related adverse events were reported and no patient withdrew or required transfusions during the study. Conclusion Among patients with ND

  7. In vivo interactions between cobalt or ferric compounds and the pools of sulphide in the blood during and after H2S poisoning.

    PubMed

    Haouzi, Philippe; Sonobe, Takashi; Torsell-Tubbs, Nicole; Prokopczyk, Bogdan; Chenuel, Bruno; Klingerman, Candice M

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S), a chemical hazard in oil and gas production, has recently become a dreadful method of suicide, posing specific risks and challenges for the first responders. Currently, there is no proven effective treatment against H2S poisoning and its severe neurological, respiratory or cardiac after-effects. We have recently described that H2S is present in various compartments, or pools, in the body during sulphide exposure, which have different levels of toxicity. The general goals of our study were to (1) determine the concentrations and kinetics of the various pools of hydrogen sulphide in the blood, i.e., gaseous (CgH2S) versus total sulphide, i.e., reacting with monobromobimane (CMBBH2S), during and following H2S exposure in a small and large mammal and (2) establish the interaction between the pools of H2S and a methemoglobin (MetHb) solution or a high dose of hydroxocobalamin (HyCo). We found that CgH2S during and following H2S infusion was similar in sedated sheep and rats at any given rate of infusion/kg and provoked symptoms, i.e., hyperpnea and apnea, at the same CgH2S. After H2S administration was stopped, CgH2S disappeared within 1 min. CMBBH2S also dropped to 2-3μM, but remained above baseline levels for at least 30 min. Infusion of a MetHb solution during H2S infusion produced an immediate reduction in the free/soluble pool of H2S only, whereas CMBBH2S increased by severalfold. HyCo (70 mg/kg) also decreased the concentrations of free/soluble H2S to almost zero; CgH2S returned to pre-HyCo levels within a maximum of 20 min, if H2S infusion is maintained. These results are discussed in the context of a relevant scenario, wherein antidotes can only be administered after H2S exposure.

  8. In Vivo Interactions Between Cobalt or Ferric Compounds and the Pools of Sulphide in the Blood During and After H2S Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Haouzi, Philippe; Sonobe, Takashi; Torsell-Tubbs, Nicole; Prokopczyk, Bogdan; Chenuel, Bruno; Klingerman, Candice M.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S), a chemical hazard in oil and gas production, has recently become a dreadful method of suicide, posing specific risks and challenges for the first responders. Currently, there is no proven effective treatment against H2S poisoning and its severe neurological, respiratory or cardiac after-effects. We have recently described that H2S is present in various compartments, or pools, in the body during sulphide exposure, which have different levels of toxicity. The general goals of our study were to (1) determine the concentrations and kinetics of the various pools of hydrogen sulphide in the blood, i.e., gaseous (CgH2S) versus total sulphide, i.e., reacting with monobromobimane (CMBBH2S), during and following H2S exposure in a small and large mammal and (2) establish the interaction between the pools of H2S and a methemoglobin (MetHb) solution or a high dose of hydroxocobalamin (HyCo). We found that CgH2S during and following H2S infusion was similar in sedated sheep and rats at any given rate of infusion/kg and provoked symptoms, i.e., hyperpnea and apnea, at the same CgH2S. After H2S administration was stopped, CgH2S disappeared within 1 min. CMBBH2S also dropped to 2–3μM, but remained above baseline levels for at least 30 min. Infusion of a MetHb solution during H2S infusion produced an immediate reduction in the free/soluble pool of H2S only, whereas CMBBH2S increased by severalfold. HyCo (70 mg/kg) also decreased the concentrations of free/soluble H2S to almost zero; CgH2S returned to pre-HyCo levels within a maximum of 20 min, if H2S infusion is maintained. These results are discussed in the context of a relevant scenario, wherein antidotes can only be administered after H2S exposure. PMID:25015662

  9. Characterization of Fluorescent Siderophore-Mediated Iron Uptake in Pseudomonas sp. Strain M114: Evidence for the Existence of an Additional Ferric Siderophore Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Morris, John; O'Sullivan, Daniel J.; Koster, Margot; Leong, John; Weisbeek, Peter J.; O'Gara, Fergal

    1992-01-01

    In Pseudomonas sp. strain M114, the outer membrane receptor for ferric pseudobactin M114 was shown to transport ferric pseudobactins B10 and A225, in addition to its own. The gene encoding this receptor, which was previously cloned on pCUP3, was localized by Tn5 mutagenesis to a region comprising >1.6 kb of M114 DNA. A mutant (strain M114R1) lacking this receptor was then created by a marker exchange technique. Characterization of this mutant by using purified pseudobactin M114 in radiolabeled ferric iron uptake studies confirmed that it was completely unable to utilize this siderophore for acquisition of iron. In addition, it lacked an outer membrane protein band of 89 kDa when subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. As a result, growth of the mutant was severely restricted under low-iron conditions. However, this phenotype was reversed in the presence of another fluorescent siderophore (pseudobactin MT3A) from Pseudomonas sp. strain MT3A, suggesting the presence of a second receptor in strain M114. Furthermore, wild-type Pseudomonas sp. strain B24 was not able to utilize ferric pseudobactin MT3A, and this phenotype was not reversed upon expression of the M114 receptor encoded on pCUP3. However, a cosmid clone (pMS1047) that enabled strain B24 to utilize ferric pseudobactin MT3A was isolated from an M114 gene bank. Radiolabel transport assays with purified pseudobactin MT3A confirmed this event. Plasmid pMS1047 was shown to encode an outer membrane protein of 81 kDa in strain B24 under iron-limiting conditions; this protein corresponds to a similar protein in strain M114. Images PMID:16348650

  10. Reduction of Ferric Iron in Anaerobic, Marine Sediment and Interaction with Reduction of Nitrate and Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jan

    1982-01-01

    Studies were carried out to elucidate the nature and importance of Fe3+ reduction in anaerobic slurries of marine surface sediment. A constant accumulation of Fe2+ took place immediately after the endogenous NO3− was depleted. Pasteurized controls showed no activity of Fe3+ reduction. Additions of 0.2 mM NO3− and NO2− to the active slurries arrested the Fe3+ reduction, and the process was resumed only after a depletion of the added compounds. Extended, initial aeration of the sediment did not affect the capacity for reduction of NO3− and Fe3+, but the treatments with NO3− increased the capacity for Fe3+ reduction. Addition of 20 mM MoO42− completely inhibited the SO42− reduction, but did not affect the reduction of Fe3+. The process of Fe3+ reduction was most likely associated with the activity of facultative anaerobic, NO3−-reducing bacteria. In surface sediment, the bulk of the Fe3+ reduction may be microbial, and the process may be important for mineralization in situ if the availability of NO3− is low. PMID:16345937

  11. Compounding in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Zdoryk, Oleksandr A; Georgiyants, Victoriya A; Gryzodub, Oleksandr I; Schnatz, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounding in modern Ukraine has a rich history and goes back to ancient times. Today in the Ukraine, there is a revival of compounding practice, the opening of private compounding pharmacies, updating of legislative framework and requirements of the State Pharmacopeia of Ukraine for compounding preparations, and the introduction of Good Pharmaceutical Practice. PMID:23696172

  12. Evaluation of Mycelial Nutrients, Bioactive Compounds, and Antioxidants of Five Himalayan Entomopathogenic Ascomyceteous Fungi from India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sapan Kumar; Gautam, Nandini; Atri, Narender Singh

    2015-01-01

    In this study, using standard methods, mycelial nutrients, bioactive compounds, and antioxidants were analyzed for the first time for five fungal species: Isaria sinclairii (Berk.) Lloyd, I. tenuipes Peck, I. japonica Yasuda, I. farinosa (Holmsk) Fr. and Cordyceps tuberculata (Lebert) Maire. All of these species were low in fat content and rich in protein, fiber, ash, and carbohydrates. Mineral elements (Fe, Mg, Cu, Mn, and Ca) were detected in appreciable amounts. All three types of fatty acids (saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated) as well as bioactive compounds (ascorbic acid, β-carotene, lycopene, phenolic compounds, and polysaccharides) were detected for each species. The investigated species showed high ferric-reducing antioxidant power as well as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl radical scavenging activity. Although differences were observed in the values of each species, each species showed richness in one or more components. PMID:26559700

  13. Pharmacy compounding urban legends.

    PubMed

    Kastango, Eric S

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews and clarifies a small sampling of the myths, or urban legends, about compounding. Included are comments on United sTates Pharmacopeia Chapter 797, environmental issues related to sterile compounding, and suggested resources for clarification of some of these myths. This article recommends a knowledge-based partnership between compounding pharmacists and pharmaceutical manufacturers to improve compounding activities and quality assurance methods to ensure that compounded medications are safe.

  14. Phytodegradation of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lee A; Reynolds, Charles M

    2004-06-01

    The phytodegradation of organic compounds can take place inside the plant or within the rhizosphere of the plant. Many different compounds and classes of compounds can be removed from the environment by this method, including solvents in groundwater, petroleum and aromatic compounds in soils, and volatile compounds in the air. Although still a relatively new area of research, there are many laboratories studying the underlying science necessary for a wide range of applications for plant-based remediation of organic contaminants.

  15. Structural stability of coprecipitated natural organic matter and ferric iron under reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henneberry, Yumiko K.; Kraus, Tamara E.C.; Nico, Peter S.; Horwath, William R.

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to assess the interaction of Fe coprecipitated with dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its effect on Fe (hydr)oxide crystallinity and DOM retention under abiotic reducing conditions. A Fe-based coagulant was reacted with DOM from an agricultural drain and the resulting precipitate (floc) was exposed to S(-II) and Fe(II). Solution concentrations of Fe(II/III) and DOM were monitored, floc crystallinity was determined using X-ray diffraction, and the composition and distribution of functional groups were assessed using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Results indicate coprecipitation of Fe(III) with DOM forms a non-crystalline floc that withstands crystallization regardless of change in pH, Fe:DOM ratio and type of reductant added. There was no evidence that exposure to reducing conditions led to release of DOM from the floc, indicating that coprecipitation with complex natural DOM in aquatic environments may stabilize Fe (hydr)oxides against crystallization upon reaction with reduced species and lead to long term sequestration of the DOM. STXM analysis identified spatially distinct regions with remarkable functional group purity, contrary to the model of DOM as a relatively uniform complex polymer lacking identifiable organic compounds. Polysaccharide-like OM was strongly and directly correlated with the presence of Fe but showed different Fe binding strength depending on the presence of carboxylic acid functional groups, whereas amide and aromatic functional groups were inversely correlated with Fe content.

  16. Penta- and hexa-coordinate ferric hemoglobins display distinct pH titration profiles measured by Soret peak shifts.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Sheetal; Kumar, Amit; Shandilya, Manish; Mukhi, Nitika; Singh, Amit Kumar; Kateriya, Suneel; Kaur, Jagreet; Kundu, Suman

    2016-10-01

    Hemoglobins with diverse characteristics have been identified in all kingdoms of life. Their ubiquitous presence indicates that these proteins play important roles in physiology, though function for all hemoglobins are not yet established with certainty. Their physiological role may depend on their ability to bind ligands, which in turn is dictated by their heme chemistry. However, we have an incomplete understanding of the mechanism of ligand binding for these newly discovered hemoglobins and the measurement of their kinetic parameters depend on their coordination at the heme iron. To gain insights into their functional role, it is important to categorize the new hemoglobins into either penta- or hexa-coordinated varieties. We demonstrate that simple pH titration and absorbance measurements can determine the coordination state of heme iron atom in ferric hemoglobins, thus providing unambiguous information about the classification of new globins. This method is rapid, sensitive and requires low concentration of protein. Penta- and hexa-coordinate hemoglobins displayed distinct pH titration profiles as observed in a variety of hemoglobins. The pentacoordinate distal histidine mutant proteins of hexacoordinate hemoglobins and ligand-bound hexacoordinate forms of pentacoordinate hemoglobins reverse the pH titration profiles, thus validating the sensitivity of this spectroscopic technique.

  17. Mercury (II) reduction and co-precipitation of metallic mercury on hydrous ferric oxide in contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jan-Helge; Bischoff, Cornelia; Ahrens, Christian G M; Biester, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) speciation and sorption analyses in contaminated aquifers are useful for understanding transformation, retention, and mobility of Hg in groundwater. In most aquifers hydrous ferric oxides (HFOs) are among the most important sorbents for trace metals; however, their role in sorption or mobilization of Hg in aquifers has been rarely analyzed. In this study, we investigated Hg chemistry and Hg sorption to HFO under changing redox conditions in a highly HgCl2-contaminated aquifer (up to 870μgL(-1) Hg). Results from aqueous and solid phase Hg measurements were compared to modeled (PHREEQC) data. Speciation analyses of dissolved mercury indicated that Hg(II) forms were reduced to Hg(0) under anoxic conditions, and adsorbed to or co-precipitated with HFO. Solid phase Hg thermo-desorption measurements revealed that between 55 and 93% of Hg bound to HFO was elemental Hg (Hg(0)). Hg concentrations in precipitates reached more than 4 weight %, up to 7000 times higher than predicted by geochemical models that do not consider unspecific sorption to and co-precipitation of elemental Hg with HFO. The observed process of Hg(II) reduction and Hg(0) formation, and its retention and co-precipitation by HFO is thought to be crucial in HgCl2-contaminated aquifers with variable redox-conditions regarding the related decrease in Hg solubility (factor of ~10(6)), and retention of Hg in the aquifer.

  18. Genotoxicity of ferric oxide nanoparticles in Raphanus sativus: Deciphering the role of signaling factors, oxidative stress and cell death.

    PubMed

    Saquib, Quaiser; Faisal, Mohammad; Alatar, Abdulrahman A; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Ahmed, Mukhtar; Ansari, Sabiha M; Alwathnani, Hend A; Okla, Mohammad K; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Musarrat, Javed; Praveen, Shelly; Khan, Shams T; Wahab, Rizwan; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Ahmad, Javed

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the genotoxic and apoptotic potential of ferric oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3-NPs) in Raphanus sativus (radish). Fe2O3-NPs retarded the root length and seed germination in radish. Ultrathin sections of treated roots showed subcellular localization of Fe2O3-NPs, along with the appearance of damaged mitochondria and excessive vacuolization. Flow cytometric analysis of Fe2O3-NPs (1.0mg/mL) treated groups exhibited 219.5%, 161%, 120.4% and 161.4% increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), nitric oxide (NO) and Ca(2+) influx in radish protoplasts. A concentration dependent increase in the antioxidative enzymes glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) has been recorded. Comet assay showed a concentration dependent increase in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strand breaks in Fe2O3-NPs treated groups. Cell cycle analysis revealed 88.4% of cells in sub-G1 apoptotic phase, suggesting cell death in Fe2O3-NPs (2.0mg/mL) treated group. Taking together, the genotoxicity induced by Fe2O3-NPs highlights the importance of environmental risk associated with improper disposal of nanoparticles (NPs) and radish can serve as a good indicator for measuring the phytotoxicity of NPs grown in NP-polluted environment. PMID:27593272

  19. Dissolution behaviour of ferric pyrophosphate and its mixtures with soluble pyrophosphates: Potential strategy for increasing iron bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Blanco, Elena; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Velev, Orlin D; Velikov, Krassimir P

    2016-10-01

    Ferric pyrophosphate (FePP) is a widely used iron source in food fortification and in nutritional supplements, due to its white colour, that is very uncommon for insoluble Fe salts. Although its dissolution is an important determinant of Fe adsorption in human body, the solubility characteristics of FePP are complex and not well understood. This report is a study on the solubility of FePP as a function of pH and excess of pyrophosphate ions. FePP powder is sparingly soluble in the pH range of 3-6 but slightly soluble at pH<2 and pH>8. In the presence of pyrophosphate ions the solubility of FePP strongly increases at pH 5-8.5 due to formation a soluble complex between Fe(III) and pyrophosphate ions, which leads to an 8-10-fold increase in the total ionic iron concentration. This finding is beneficial for enhancing iron bioavailability, which important for the design of fortified food, beverages, and nutraceutical products. PMID:27132828

  20. Shock Experiments on Basalt - Ferric Sulfate Mixes at 21 GPa & 49 GPa and their Relevance to Martian Meteorite Impact Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Ross, D. K.; See, T. H.; Nyquist, L. E.; Sutton, S.; Asimow, P.

    2013-01-01

    Large abundance of Martian atmospheric gases and neutron-induced isotopic excesses as well as Rb-Sr isotopic variations determined in some impact glasses in basaltic shergottites (e.g., Shergotty #DBS, Zagami #H1 and EET79001 #27, #8 and #104) provide definitive evidence for the occurrence of a Martian regolith component in their constituent mineral assemblages. Some of these glass-es, known as gas-rich impact-melts (GRIM), contain numerous micron-sized iron sulfide blebs along with minor amounts of iron sulfate particulates. As these GRIM glasses contain a Martian regolith component and as iron sulfates (but not sulfides) are found to occur abundantly on the Mars surface, we suggested that the sulfide blebs in GRIMs were likely generated by shock-reduction of the parental iron sulfate bearing regolith material that had been incorporated into the cavities/crevices of basaltic host rock prior to the impact event on Mars. To test whether the sulfates could be reduced to sulfides by impact shock, we carried out laboratory shock experiments on a basalt plus ferric sulfate mixture at 49 GPa at the Caltech Shock Wave Laboratory and at 21 GPa at Johnson Space Center (JSC) Experimental Impact Laboratory. The experimental details and the preliminary results for the Caltech 49 GPa experiment were presented at LPSC last year. Here, we report the results for the 21 GPa experiment at JSC and compare these results to obtain further insight into the mechanism of the bleb formation in the GRIM glasses.

  1. Ferric pyrophosphate citrate administered via dialysate reduces erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use and maintains hemoglobin in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ajay; Lin, Vivian; Guss, Carrie; Pratt, Raymond; Ikizler, T Alp; Besarab, Anatole

    2015-01-01

    Ferric pyrophosphate citrate (FPC) is a water-soluble iron salt administered via dialysate to supply iron directly to transferrin. The PRIME study tested whether treatment with FPC could reduce prescribed erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) use and maintain hemoglobin in hemodialysis patients. This 9-month, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter clinical study included 103 patients undergoing hemodialysis 3–4 times weekly. The FPC group received dialysate containing 2 μmol/l of iron. The placebo group received standard dialysate. A blinded central anemia management group facilitated ESA dose adjustments. Intravenous iron was administered according to the approved indication when ferritin levels fell below 200 μg/l. The primary end point was the percentage change from baseline in prescribed ESA dose at end of treatment. Secondary end points included intravenous iron use and safety. At the end of treatment, there was a significant 35% reduction in prescribed ESA dose in FPC-treated patients compared with placebo. The FPC patients used 51% less intravenous iron than placebo. Adverse and serious adverse events were similar in both groups. Thus, FPC delivered via dialysate significantly reduces the prescribed ESA dose and the amount of intravenous iron needed to maintain hemoglobin in chronic hemodialysis patients. PMID:26154926

  2. Effects of three additives on the removal of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) by coagulation using ferric chloride or aluminum sulfate.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Naoyuki; Kobayashi, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid and its salts (PFOS) are emerging contaminants with long half-lives in water and human bodies. Accordingly, PFOS removal from water streams is required for controlling the PFOS pollution. To provide a simple PFOS separation technology, effects of three additives, powdered activated carbon (PAC), gelatin, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), on the PFOS removal by coagulation with ferric chloride or aluminum sulfate were investigated in this study. As a result, coagulation with PAC or CTAB addition was effective in the PFOS removal, though the conventional coagulation and coagulation with gelatin addition were ineffective. A PFOS removal efficiency of over 90% was observed for the CTAB dose of over 1.6 μM (0.58 mg/L) and for the PAC dose of over 40 mg/L, and that of over 95% was achieved by the CTAB dose of over 2.4 μM (0.87 mg/L), when the initial PFOS concentration was 1.84 μM. The positive effect of CTAB would be caused by micelle formation, which was enhanced by both the association of hydrophobic tails and the electrostatic attraction of hydrophilic heads of PFOS and CTAB. Thus, a linear cationic surfactant of CTAB was concluded to be an effective additive for the PFOS removal by coagulation.

  3. Genotoxicity of ferric oxide nanoparticles in Raphanus sativus: Deciphering the role of signaling factors, oxidative stress and cell death.

    PubMed

    Saquib, Quaiser; Faisal, Mohammad; Alatar, Abdulrahman A; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Ahmed, Mukhtar; Ansari, Sabiha M; Alwathnani, Hend A; Okla, Mohammad K; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Musarrat, Javed; Praveen, Shelly; Khan, Shams T; Wahab, Rizwan; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Ahmad, Javed

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the genotoxic and apoptotic potential of ferric oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3-NPs) in Raphanus sativus (radish). Fe2O3-NPs retarded the root length and seed germination in radish. Ultrathin sections of treated roots showed subcellular localization of Fe2O3-NPs, along with the appearance of damaged mitochondria and excessive vacuolization. Flow cytometric analysis of Fe2O3-NPs (1.0mg/mL) treated groups exhibited 219.5%, 161%, 120.4% and 161.4% increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), nitric oxide (NO) and Ca(2+) influx in radish protoplasts. A concentration dependent increase in the antioxidative enzymes glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) has been recorded. Comet assay showed a concentration dependent increase in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strand breaks in Fe2O3-NPs treated groups. Cell cycle analysis revealed 88.4% of cells in sub-G1 apoptotic phase, suggesting cell death in Fe2O3-NPs (2.0mg/mL) treated group. Taking together, the genotoxicity induced by Fe2O3-NPs highlights the importance of environmental risk associated with improper disposal of nanoparticles (NPs) and radish can serve as a good indicator for measuring the phytotoxicity of NPs grown in NP-polluted environment.

  4. Penta- and hexa-coordinate ferric hemoglobins display distinct pH titration profiles measured by Soret peak shifts.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Sheetal; Kumar, Amit; Shandilya, Manish; Mukhi, Nitika; Singh, Amit Kumar; Kateriya, Suneel; Kaur, Jagreet; Kundu, Suman

    2016-10-01

    Hemoglobins with diverse characteristics have been identified in all kingdoms of life. Their ubiquitous presence indicates that these proteins play important roles in physiology, though function for all hemoglobins are not yet established with certainty. Their physiological role may depend on their ability to bind ligands, which in turn is dictated by their heme chemistry. However, we have an incomplete understanding of the mechanism of ligand binding for these newly discovered hemoglobins and the measurement of their kinetic parameters depend on their coordination at the heme iron. To gain insights into their functional role, it is important to categorize the new hemoglobins into either penta- or hexa-coordinated varieties. We demonstrate that simple pH titration and absorbance measurements can determine the coordination state of heme iron atom in ferric hemoglobins, thus providing unambiguous information about the classification of new globins. This method is rapid, sensitive and requires low concentration of protein. Penta- and hexa-coordinate hemoglobins displayed distinct pH titration profiles as observed in a variety of hemoglobins. The pentacoordinate distal histidine mutant proteins of hexacoordinate hemoglobins and ligand-bound hexacoordinate forms of pentacoordinate hemoglobins reverse the pH titration profiles, thus validating the sensitivity of this spectroscopic technique. PMID:27449132

  5. Simultaneous microbial reduction of iron(III) and arsenic(V) in suspensions of hydrous ferric oxide.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kate M; Malasarn, Davin; Saltikov, Chad W; Newman, Dianne K; Hering, Janet G

    2006-10-01

    Bacterial reduction of arsenic(V) and iron(III) oxides influences the redox cycling and partitioning of arsenic (As) between solid and aqueous phases in sediment-porewater systems. Two types of anaerobic bacterial incubations were designed to probe the relative order of As(V) and Fe(III) oxide reduction and to measure the effect of adsorbed As species on the rate of iron reduction, using hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) as the iron substrate. In one set of experiments, HFO was pre-equilibrated with As(V) and inoculated with fresh sediment from Haiwee Reservoir (Olancha, CA), an As-impacted field site. The second set of incubations consisted of HFO (without As) and As(III)- and As(V)- equilibrated HFO incubated with Shewanella sp. ANA-3 wild-type (WT) and ANA-3deltaarrA, a mutant unable to produce the respiratory As(V) reductase. Of the two pathways for microbial As(V) reduction (respiration and detoxification), the respiratory pathway was dominant under these experimental conditions. In addition, As(III) adsorbed onto the surface of HFO enhanced the rate of microbial Fe(III) reduction. In the sediment and ANA-3 incubations, As(V) was reduced simultaneously or prior to Fe(III), consistent with thermodynamic calculations based on the chemical conditions of the ANA-3 WT incubations.

  6. Distance determination between low-spin ferric haem and nitroxide spin label using DEER: the neuroglobin case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezhevskaya, M.; Bordignon, E.; Polyhach, Y.; Moens, L.; Dewilde, S.; Jeschke, G.; Van Doorslaer, S.

    2013-10-01

    This work demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) to determine the inter-spin distance between nitroxide spin labels and low-spin (S = 1/2) ferric haem centres. For these means, two human neuroglobin variants were spin labelled leading to singly labelled haem proteins with the nitroxide label on one of the natural Cys residues (Cys55 or Cys120). Room-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance was used to characterise the mobility of the nitroxide labels and X- and Q-band DEER experiments were performed to detect nitroxide-haem distances. Effects of residual nuclear modulations in the DEER traces were carefully evaluated. The DEER-derived distances were compared with theoretical predictions from an X-ray diffraction structure of human neuroglobin using a rotamer library approach as well as with distance information obtained from electron relaxation measurements. The structural biological implications of the spin-labelled side chains' dynamics and of the obtained distances are also discussed.

  7. Alterations of the [59Fe]ferric citrate biodistribution in hyperferremic mice after the administration of pyrophosphate and desferrioxamine.

    PubMed

    Sawas-Dimopoulou, C; Soulpi, C

    1983-02-01

    One of the most efficient anions in enhancing the ability of desferrioxamine (DFO) to remove iron from transferrin in vitro has been shown to be pyrophosphate (PYP). To evaluate the in vivo effect of PYP in hyperferremic mice, the biodistribution of [59Fe]ferric citrate was studied after the i.p. administration of: 1) only saline in the control animals; 2) an aqueous solution of tetrasodium diphosphate (PYP; 40 gm/2 g of b.wt.); 3) desferral (DFO; 12 mg/20 g of b.wt.); and 4) PYP + DFO at the respective dosages shown above. The radioactivity in each organ, blood, urine and feces was measured and referred to as percentage of the injected dose. PYP administered alone acted as a weaker chelator of iron than DFO. The combined administration of DFO and PYP contributed more than DFO or PYP separately, to the increase of urinary excretion of 59Fe and to the significant decrease of the radioiron concentration in liver (.01 less than P less than .05). The above induced changes are not, however, the additive result of the separate effect of DFO and PYP. That observation would suggest that DFO + PYP combined in a unique treatment, interact with iron through a common reaction pathway and that PYP plays in vivo a synergistic role in that interaction. The kind of iron with which DFO + PYP interacts is then suggested to be the transferrin-bound iron located in extracellular spaces of tissues.

  8. Alterations of the (/sup 59/Fe)ferric citrate biodistribution in hyperferremic mice after the administration of pyrophosphate and desferrioxamine

    SciTech Connect

    Sawas-Dimopoulou, C.; Soulpi, C.

    1983-02-01

    One of the most efficient anions in enhancing the ability of desferrioxamine (DFO) to remove iron from transferrin in vitro has been shown to be pyrophosphate (PYP). To evaluate the in vivo effect of PYP in hyperferremic mice, the biodistribution of (/sup 59/Fe)ferric citrate was studied after the i.p. administration of: 1) only saline in the control animals; 2) an aqueous solution of tetrasodium diphosphate (PYP; 40 gm/2 g of b.wt.); 3) desferral (DFO; 12 mg/20 g of b.wt.); and 4) PYP + DFO at the respective dosages shown above. The radioactivity in each organ, blood, urine and feces was measured and referred to as percentage of the injected dose. PYP administered alone acted as a weaker chelator of iron than DFO. The combined administration of DFO and PYP contributed more than DFO or PYP separately, to the increase of urinary excretion of /sup 59/Fe and to the significant decrease of the radioiron concentration in liver (.01 less than P less than .05). The above induced changes are not, however, the additive result of the separate effect of DFO and PYP. That observation would suggest that DFO + PYP combined in a unique treatment, interact with iron through a common reaction pathway and that PYP plays in vivo a synergistic role in that interaction. The kind of iron with which DFO + PYP interacts is then suggested to be the transferrin-bound iron located in extracellular spaces of tissues.

  9. Alterations of the (/sup 59/Fe)ferric citrate biodistribution in hyperferremic mice after the administration of pyrophosphate and desferrioxamine

    SciTech Connect

    Sawas-Dimopoulou, C.; Soulpi, C.

    1983-02-01

    One of the most efficient anions in enhancing the ability of desferrioxamine (DFO) to remove iron from transferrin in vitro has been shown to be pyrophosphate (PYP). To evaluate the in vivo effect of PYP in hyperferremic mice, the biodistribution of (/sup 59/Fe)ferric citrate was studied after the i.p. administration of: 1) only saline in the control animals; 2) an aqueous solution of tetrasodium diphosphate; 3) desferral; and 4) PYP + DFO. The radioactivity in each organ, blood, urine and feces was measured and referred to as percentage of the injected dose. PYP administered alone acted as a weaker chelator of iron than DFO. The combined administration of DFO and PYP contributed more than DFO or PYP separately, to the increase of urinary excretion of 59Fe and to the significant decrease of the radioiron concentration in liver. The above induced changes are not, however, the additive result of the separate effect of DFO and PYP. That observation would suggest that DFO + PYP combined in a unique treatment, interact with iron through a common reaction pathway and that PYP plays in vivo a synergistic role in that interaction. The kind of iron with which DFO + PYP interacts is then suggested to be the transferrin-bound iron located in extracellular spaces of tissues.

  10. Synthesis of a ferric hydroxide-coated cellulose nanofiber hybrid for effective removal of phosphate from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guirong; Liu, Min; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Jiangqi

    2016-12-10

    Ferric hydroxide-coated cellulose nanofibers (Fe(OH)3@CNFs) were synthesized for the removal of phosphate from wastewater. The maximum sorption capacity of Fe(OH)3@CNFs for phosphate was estimated to be 142.86mg/g, demonstrating a superior adsorption capacity compared with many adsorbents reported in the literature. Batch experiments were performed to investigate various adsorption conditions on the adsorption performance. It was discovered that an increased solution ionic strength would remarkably enhance the adsorption. Additionally, Fe(OH)3@CNFs achieved a favorable adsorption performance over a wide range of pH conditions, which could result in operation cost savings. The adsorption of phosphate can be described by both the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order models. The phosphate adsorbed by Fe(OH)3@CNFs was characterized using XPS, SEM, SBET and EDS. The data obtained revealed that the electrostatic attraction and ligand exchange constituted the major forces in phosphate adsorption. This work suggested that Fe(OH)3@CNFs are a promising adsorbent for phosphate removal. PMID:27577894

  11. Harmful algal bloom removal and eutrophic water remediation by commercial nontoxic polyamine-co-polymeric ferric sulfate-modified soils.

    PubMed

    Dai, Guofei; Zhong, Jiayou; Song, Lirong; Guo, Chunjing; Gan, Nanqin; Wu, Zhenbin

    2015-07-01

    Harmful algal bloom has posed great threat to drinking water safety worldwide. In this study, soils were combined with commercial nontoxic polyamine poly(epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine) (PN) and polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS) to obtain PN-PFS soils for Microcystis removal and eutrophic water remediation under static laboratory conditions. High pH and temperature in water could enhance the function of PN-PFS soil. Algal removal efficiency increased as soil particle size decreased or modified soil dose increased. Other pollutants or chemicals (such as C, P, and organic matter) in eutrophic water could participate and promote algal removal by PN-PFS soil; these pollutants were also flocculated. During PN-PFS soil application in blooming field samples, the removal efficiency of blooming Microcystis cells exceeded 99 %, the cyanotoxin microcystins reduced by 57 %. Water parameters (as TP, TN, SS, and SPC) decreased by about 90 %. CODMn, PO4-P, and NH4-N also sharply decreased by >45 %. DO and ORP in water improved. Netting and bridging effects through electrostatic attraction and complexation reaction could be the two key mechanisms of Microcystis flocculation and pollutant purification. Considering the low cost of PN-PFS soil and its nontoxic effect on the environment, we proposed that this soil combination could be applied to remove cyanobacterial bloom and remediate eutrophic water in fields.

  12. The ferric uptake regulator of Helicobacter pylori: a critical player in the battle for iron and colonization of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Pich, Oscar Q; Merrell, D Scott

    2013-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is arguably one of the most successful pathogens; it colonizes the stomachs of more than half of the human population. Colonization and persistence in such an inhospitable niche requires the presence of exquisite adaptive mechanisms. One of the proteins that contributes significantly to the remarkable adaptability of H. pylori is the ferric uptake regulator (Fur), which functions as a master regulator of gene expression. In addition to genes directly related to iron homeostasis, Fur controls expression of several enzymes that play a central role in metabolism and energy production. The absence of Fur leads to severe H. pylori colonization defects and, accordingly, several Fur-regulated genes have been shown to be essential for colonization. Moreover, proteins encoded by Fur-regulated genes have a strong impact on redox homeostasis in the stomach and are major determinants of inflammation. In this review, we discuss the main roles of Fur in the biology of H. pylori and highlight the importance of this regulatory protein in the infectious process. PMID:23701330

  13. Effect of low molecular weight organic acids on phosphorus adsorption by ferric-alum water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Wang, Ziyuan; Lin, Lu; Tian, Binghui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2012-02-15

    Effects of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs; citric acid, oxalic acid and tartaric acid) on phosphorus (P) adsorption by ferric-alum water treatment residuals (FARs) were studied. Both batch and column experiments indicated that the effects of LMWOAs on P adsorption were closely related to adsorption time. Initially, all acids presented inhibitory function on P adsorption. The inhibition became weaker with time, eventually promoting P adsorption for citric acid and tartaric acid. In the column experiment with a 61-day duration, high P adsorption rates (>55%) were observed for the test groups containing citric acid and tartaric acid. Interestingly, higher pH likely enhanced P adsorption with the effects of LMWOAs and a distinct relationship between LMWOAs' effects on P adsorption and their concentrations was not observed. Moreover, fractionation of the adsorbed P from the FARs demonstrated that oxalic acid reduced P adsorption capacity, while citric acid and tartaric acid increased. Based on the forms of Fe and Al existing in the FARs and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses, LMWOAs can promote P adsorption through activating crystalline Fe/Al and preventing crystallization of amorphous Fe/Al to increase P adsorption sites, and can also inhibit P adsorption by competition with adsorption sites.

  14. Effects of three additives on the removal of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) by coagulation using ferric chloride or aluminum sulfate.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Naoyuki; Kobayashi, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid and its salts (PFOS) are emerging contaminants with long half-lives in water and human bodies. Accordingly, PFOS removal from water streams is required for controlling the PFOS pollution. To provide a simple PFOS separation technology, effects of three additives, powdered activated carbon (PAC), gelatin, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), on the PFOS removal by coagulation with ferric chloride or aluminum sulfate were investigated in this study. As a result, coagulation with PAC or CTAB addition was effective in the PFOS removal, though the conventional coagulation and coagulation with gelatin addition were ineffective. A PFOS removal efficiency of over 90% was observed for the CTAB dose of over 1.6 μM (0.58 mg/L) and for the PAC dose of over 40 mg/L, and that of over 95% was achieved by the CTAB dose of over 2.4 μM (0.87 mg/L), when the initial PFOS concentration was 1.84 μM. The positive effect of CTAB would be caused by micelle formation, which was enhanced by both the association of hydrophobic tails and the electrostatic attraction of hydrophilic heads of PFOS and CTAB. Thus, a linear cationic surfactant of CTAB was concluded to be an effective additive for the PFOS removal by coagulation. PMID:27332843

  15. Effect of phosphate on the particle size of ferric oxyhydroxides anchored onto activated carbon: As(V) removal from water.

    PubMed

    Arcibar-Orozco, Javier A; Avalos-Borja, Miguel; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene

    2012-09-01

    The surface area of iron oxyhydroxides is a key factor when removing As from water. However, research related to this matter shows that this issue has not been explored in detail. The use of capping agents is a viable method to synthesize ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticles; however, this method to our knowledge has not been applied for the anchorage of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles on activated carbon (AC). In the present work, the addition of PO(4) (as a capping agent) in forced hydrolysis of FeCl(3) in AC was investigated. Results revealed that the surface area of modified materials reached a maximum of about 900 m(2)/g with a molar ratio PO(4)/Fe of 0.1. Moreover, microscopy studies indicate a size range of iron nanoparticles from 2 to 300 nm, where the smallest particles are attained with the highest concentration of PO(4). The surface charge distribution of modified samples became less positive; however, the As removal increased, indicating that electrostatic interaction is not the controlling sorption mechanism. Modified samples showed a 40% increase on As(V) adsorption capacity when using a molar ratio PO(4)/Fe of 1.5. The proposed method allowed anchoring of iron oxyhydroxides nanoparticles on AC, which have a high As(V) adsorption capacity (5 mg/g).

  16. The effect of granular ferric hydroxide amendment on the reduction of nitrate in groundwater by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Song, Hocheol; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Chon, Chul-Min; Kim, Yongje; Nam, In-Hyun; Schwartz, Franklin W; Cho, Dong-Wan

    2013-11-01

    The feasibility of using granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) with zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) for its potential utility in enhancing nitrate reduction was investigated. The addition of 10gL(-1) GFH to 25gL(-1) Fe(0) significantly enhanced nitrate removal, resulting in 93% removal of 52.2mg-NL(-1) in 36-h as compared to 23% removal with Fe(0) alone. Surface analyses of the reacted Fe(0)/GFH revealed the presence of magnetite on the Fe(0) surface, which probably served as an electron mediator for nitrate reduction. Addition of GFH to Fe(0) also resulted in lower solution pH compared to Fe(0). The rate enhancing effect of GFH on nitrate reduction was attributed to the combined effects of magnetite formation and pH buffering by GFH. GFH amendment (100gL(-1)) significantly increased reduction capacity and longevity of Fe(0) to complete several nitrate reduction cycles before inactivation, giving a total nitrate removal of 205mg-NL(-1), while unamended Fe(0) gave only 20mg-NL(-1) before inactivation during the first reduction cycle. The overall result demonstrated the potential utility of Fe(0)/GFH system that may be developed into a viable technology for removal of nitrate from groundwater.

  17. Effect of ferric ion on nitrogen consumption, biomass and oil accumulation of a Scenedesmus rubescens-like microalga.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; Gu, Na; Lin, Junda

    2012-05-01

    This investigation examined the effects of ferric ion source and concentration on the biomass yield, fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) productivity and composition from Scenedesmus rubescens-like microalga. The algae cultivated with Fe(2+)-SO(4)(2-)/EDTA had higher ash free dry biomass (AFDB) production and in vivo chlorophyll a concentration than those with Fe(2+)-SO(4)(2-) and Fe(3+)-Cl(-) (P<0.001). The high or low Fe(2+) concentration can partly restrict the ammonia consumption, the AFDB and FAME accumulation. The algae at 1mg/L Fe(2+) concentration had the highest AFDB and FAME productivity (341.1 ± 25.8 and 107.8 ± 19.3mg/L/d) (P<0.001). The mean content of C16 and C18 series at all Fe(2+) concentrations was 88.6% ± 2.9% of total FAME, and it decreased with the increase of Fe(2+) concentrations. Among the fatty acids profiles, the contents of C18: 0, C18: 1n-7 and C18: 1n-9 are significantly changed under the different Fe(2+) concentrations, but not the contents of C16 series.

  18. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake in Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34 and identification of aleB encoding the ferric iron-alcaligin E receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gilis, A; Khan, M A; Cornelis, P; Meyer, J M; Mergeay, M; van der Lelie, D

    1996-01-01

    Siderophore production in response to iron limitation was observed in Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34, and the corresponding siderophore was named alcaligin E. Alcaligin E was characterized as a phenolate-type siderophore containing neither catecholate nor hydroxamate groups. Alcaligin E promoted the growth of siderophore-deficient A. eutrophus mutants under iron-restricted conditions and promoted 59Fe uptake by iron-limited cells. However, the growth of the Sid- mutant AE1152, which was obtained from CH34 by Tn5-Tc mutagenesis, was completely inhibited by the addition of alcaligin E. AE1152 also showed strongly reduced 59Fe uptake in the presence of alcaligin E. This indicates that a gene, designated aleB, which is involved in transport of ferric iron-alcaligin E across the membrane is inactivated. The aleB gene was cloned, and its putative amino acid sequence showed strong similarity to those of ferric iron-siderophore receptor proteins. Both wild-type strain CH34 and aleB mutant AE1152 were able to use the same heterologous siderophores, indicating that AleB is involved only in ferric iron-alcaligin E uptake. Interestingly, no utilization of pyochelin, which is also a phenolate-type siderophore, was observed for A. eutrophus CH34. Genetic studies of different Sid- mutants, obtained after transposon mutagenesis, showed that the genes involved in alcaligin E and ferric iron-alcaligin E receptor biosynthesis are clustered in a 20-kb region on the A. eutrophus CH34 chromosome in the proximity of the cys-232 locus. PMID:8808942

  19. Can ferric-superoxide act as a potential oxidant in P450(cam)? QM/MM investigation of hydroxylation, epoxidation, and sulfoxidation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wenzhen; Shaik, Sason

    2011-04-13

    In view of recent reports of high reactivity of ferric-superoxide species in heme and nonheme systems (Morokuma et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 11993-12005; Que et al. Inorg. Chem. 2010, 49, 3618-3628; Nam et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 5958-5959; J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 10668-10670), we use herein combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods to explore the potential reactivity of P450(cam) ferric-superoxide toward hydroxylation, epoxidation, and sulfoxidation. The calculations demonstrate that P450 ferric-superoxide is a sluggish oxidant compared with the high-valent oxoiron porphyrin cation-radical species. As such, unlike heme enzymes with a histidine axial ligand, the P450 superoxo species does not function as an oxidant in P450(cam). The origin of this different behavior of the superoxo species of P450 vis-à-vis other heme enzymes like tryptophan 2, 3-dioxygenase (TDO) is traced to the ability of the latter superoxo species to make a stronger FeOO-X (X = H,C) bond and to stabilize the corresponding bond-activation transition states by resonance with charge-transfer configurations. By contrast, the negatively charged thiolate ligand in the P450 superoxo species minimizes the mixing of charge transfer configurations in the transition state and raises the reaction barrier. However, as we demonstrate, an external electric field oriented along the Fe-O axis with a direction pointing from Fe toward O will quench Cpd I formation by slowing the reduction of ferric-superoxide and will simultaneously lower the barriers for oxidation by the latter species, thereby enabling observation of superoxo chemistry in P450. Other options for nascent superoxo reactivity in P450 are discussed.

  20. Diluting ferric carboxymaltose in sodium chloride infusion solution (0.9% w/v) in polypropylene bottles and bags: effects on chemical stability

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, Erik; Braitsch, Michaela; Bichsel, Tobias; Mühlebach, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to assess the physicochemical stability of colloidal ferric carboxymaltose solution (Ferinject) when diluted and stored in polypropylene (PP) bottles and bags for infusion. Methods Two batches of ferric carboxymaltose solution (Ferinject) were diluted (500 mg, 200 mg and 100 mg iron in 100 mL saline) in PP bottles or bags under aseptic conditions. The diluted solutions were stored at 30°C and 75%±5% relative humidity (rH) for 72 h, and samples were withdrawn aseptically at preparation and after 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. Multiple parameters were used to test stability-related measures (pH, total iron and iron (II) content, molecular weight range determination, microbial contamination and particles count ≥10 μm). Results Overall, Ferinject diluted in 0.9% (w/v) NaCl solution and stored in PP bottles and bags was stable within the specifications for the complex and the acceptability limits set for all assays. In both containers, total iron content remained stable, within 10% of the theoretical iron content, and levels of iron (II) remained far below the threshold of acceptability. All preparations were free from sediments, particle numbers were acceptable and there was no microbial contamination. The molecular weight distribution and polydispersity index were also acceptable. Conclusions Under the tested experimental conditions, colloidal ferric carboxymaltose solution (Ferinject) diluted in saline in PP infusion bottles or bags demonstrated physical and chemical stability for up to 72 h at 30°C and 75% rH. Because of the lack of additional clinical data, when using ferric carboxymaltose, physicians/pharmacists should refer to the dilution and storing recommendations given in the product's summary of product characteristics. PMID:26835007

  1. The crystal structures of the ferric and ferrous forms of the heme complex of HmuO, a heme oxygenase of Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Hirotsu, Shoko; Chu, Grace C; Unno, Masaki; Lee, Dong-Sun; Yoshida, Tadashi; Park, Sam-Yong; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Ikeda-Saito, Masao

    2004-03-19

    Crystal structures of the ferric and ferrous heme complexes of HmuO, a 24-kDa heme oxygenase of Corynebacterium diphtheriae, have been refined to 1.4 and 1.5 A resolution, respectively. The HmuO structures show that the heme group is closely sandwiched between the proximal and distal helices. The imidazole group of His-20 is the proximal heme ligand, which closely eclipses the beta- and delta-meso axis of the porphyrin ring. A long range hydrogen bonding network is present, connecting the iron-bound water ligand to the solvent water molecule. This enables proton transfer from the solvent to the catalytic site, where the oxygen activation occurs. In comparison to the ferric complex, the proximal and distal helices move closer to the heme plane in the ferrous complex. Together with the kinked distal helix, this movement leaves only the alpha-meso carbon atom accessible to the iron-bound dioxygen. The heme pocket architecture is responsible for stabilization of the ferric hydroperoxo-active intermediate by preventing premature heterolytic O-O bond cleavage. This allows the enzyme to oxygenate selectively at the alpha-meso carbon in HmuO catalysis. PMID:14645223

  2. Bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity analysis of Malaysian pineapple cultivars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiet, Chong Hang; Zulkifli, Razauden Mohamed; Hidayat, Topik; Yaakob, Harisun

    2014-03-01

    Pineapple industry is one of the important agricultural sectors in Malaysia with 76 cultivars planted throughout the country. This study aims to generate useful nutritional information as well as evaluating antioxidant properties of different pineapple commercial cultivars in Malaysia. The bioactive compound content and antioxidant capacity of `Josapine', `Morris' and `Sarawak' pineapple (Ananas comosus) were studied. The pineapple varieties were collected at commercial maturity stage (20-40% yellowish of fruit peel) and the edible portion of the fruit was used as sample for evaluation. The bioactive compound of the fruit extracts were evaluated by total phenolic and tannin content assay while the antioxidant capacity was determined by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). From the results obtained, total phenolic and tannin content was highest for `Josapine' followed by `Morris' and `Sarawak'. With respect to FRAP, `Josapine' showed highest reducing capacity, followed by `Morris' and then `Sarawak' having the least value. The bioactive compounds content are positively correlated with the antioxidant capacities of the pineapple extracts. This result indicates that the total phenolics and tannin content present in the pineapples may contribute to the antioxidant capacity of the pineapples.

  3. Green tea yogurt: major phenolic compounds and microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Amirdivani, Shabboo; Baba, Ahmad Salihin Hj

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate fermentation of milk in the presence of green tea (Camellia sinensis) with respect to changes in antioxidant activity, phenolic compounds and the growth of lactic acid bacteria. Pasteurized full fat cow's milk and starter culture were incubated at 41 °C in the presence of two different types of green tea extracts. The yogurts formed were refrigerated (4 °C) for further analysis. The total phenolic content was highest (p < 0.05) in air-dried green tea-yogurt (MGT) followed by steam-treated green tea (JGT) and plain yogurts. Four major compounds in MGTY and JGTY were detected. The highest concentration of major phenolic compounds in both samples was related to quercetin-rhamnosylgalactoside and quercetin-3-O-galactosyl-rhamnosyl-glucoside for MGTY and JGTY respectively during first 7 day of storage. Diphenyl picrylhydrazyl and ferric reducing antioxidant power methods showed highest antioxidant capacity in MGTY, JGTY and PY. Streptococcus thermophillus and Lactobacillus spp. were highest in MGTY followed by JGTY and PY. This paper evaluates the implementation of green tea yogurt as a new product with functional properties and valuable component to promote the growth of beneficial yogurt bacteria and prevention of oxidative stress by enhancing the antioxidant activity of yogurt. PMID:26139940

  4. Magnetic circular dichroism studies of the active site heme coordination sphere of exogenous ligand-free ferric cytochrome c peroxidase from yeast: effects of sample history and pH.

    PubMed

    Pond, A E; Sono, M; Elenkova, E A; McRee, D E; Goodin, D B; English, A M; Dawson, J H

    1999-09-30

    Electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopic data at 4 degrees C are reported for exogenous ligand-free ferric forms of cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) in comparison with two other histidine-ligated heme proteins, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and myoglobin (Mb). In particular, we have examined the ferric states of yeast wild-type CCP (YCCP), CCP (MKT) which is the form of the enzyme that is expressed in and purified from E. coli, and contains Met-Lys-Thr (MKT) at the N-terminus, CCP (MKT) in the presence of 60% glycerol, lyophilized YCCP, and alkaline CCP (MKT). The present study demonstrates that, while having similar electronic absorption spectra, the MCD spectra of ligand-free ferric YCCP and CCP (MKT) are somewhat varied from one another. Detailed spectral analyses reveal that the ferric form of YCCP, characterized by a long wavelength charge transfer (CT) band at 645 nm, exists in a predominantly penta-coordinate state with spectral features similar to those of native ferric HRP rather than ferric Mb (His/water hexa-coordinate). The electronic absorption spectrum of ferric CCP (MKT) is similar to those of the penta-coordinate states of ferric YCCP and ferric HRP including a CT band at 645 nm. However, its MCD spectrum shows a small trough at 583 nm that is absent in the analogous spectra of YCCP and HRP. Instead, this trough is similar to that seen for ferric myoglobin at about 585 nm, and is attributed (following spectral simulations) to a minor contribution (< or = 5%) in the spectrum of CCP (MKT) from a hexa-coordinate low-spin species in the form of a hydroxide-ligated heme. The MCD data indicate that the lyophilized sample of ferric YCCP (lambda CT = 637 nm) contains considerably increased amounts of hexa-coordinate low-spin species including both His/hydroxide and bis-His species. The crystal structure of a spectroscopically similar sample of CCP (MKT) (lambda CT = 637 nm) solved at 2.0 A resolution is consistent with His

  5. Dinitroso and polynitroso compounds

    PubMed Central

    Gowenlock, Brian G.; Richter-Addo, George B.

    2005-01-01

    The growing interest in the chemistry of C-nitroso compounds (RN=O; R = alkyl or aryl group) is due in part to the recognition of their participation in various metabolic processes of nitrogen-containing compounds. C-Nitroso compounds have a rich organic chemistry in their own right, displaying interesting intra- and intermolecular dimerization processes and addition reactions with unsaturated compounds. In addition, they have a fascinating coordination chemistry. While most of the attention has been directed towards C-nitroso compounds containing a single –NO moiety, there is an emerging area of research dealing with dinitroso and polynitroso compounds. In this critical review, we present and discuss the synthetic routes and properties of these relatively unexplored dinitroso and polynitroso compounds, and suggest areas of further development involving these compounds. (126 references.) PMID:16100619

  6. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  7. Sulfate minerals: a problem for the detection of organic compounds on Mars?

    PubMed

    Lewis, James M T; Watson, Jonathan S; Najorka, Jens; Luong, Duy; Sephton, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    The search for in situ organic matter on Mars involves encounters with minerals and requires an understanding of their influence on lander and rover experiments. Inorganic host materials can be helpful by aiding the preservation of organic compounds or unhelpful by causing the destruction of organic matter during thermal extraction steps. Perchlorates are recognized as confounding minerals for thermal degradation studies. On heating, perchlorates can decompose to produce oxygen, which then oxidizes organic matter. Other common minerals on Mars, such as sulfates, may also produce oxygen upon thermal decay, presenting an additional complication. Different sulfate species decompose within a large range of temperatures. We performed a series of experiments on a sample containing the ferric sulfate jarosite. The sulfate ions within jarosite break down from 500 °C. Carbon dioxide detected during heating of the sample was attributed to oxidation of organic matter. A laboratory standard of ferric sulfate hydrate released sulfur dioxide from 550 °C, and an oxygen peak was detected in the products. Calcium sulfate did not decompose below 1000 °C. Oxygen released from sulfate minerals may have already affected organic compound detection during in situ thermal experiments on Mars missions. A combination of preliminary mineralogical analyses and suitably selected pyrolysis temperatures may increase future success in the search for past or present life on Mars.

  8. Sulfate Minerals: A Problem for the Detection of Organic Compounds on Mars?

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Jonathan S.; Najorka, Jens; Luong, Duy; Sephton, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The search for in situ organic matter on Mars involves encounters with minerals and requires an understanding of their influence on lander and rover experiments. Inorganic host materials can be helpful by aiding the preservation of organic compounds or unhelpful by causing the destruction of organic matter during thermal extraction steps. Perchlorates are recognized as confounding minerals for thermal degradation studies. On heating, perchlorates can decompose to produce oxygen, which then oxidizes organic matter. Other common minerals on Mars, such as sulfates, may also produce oxygen upon thermal decay, presenting an additional complication. Different sulfate species decompose within a large range of temperatures. We performed a series of experiments on a sample containing the ferric sulfate jarosite. The sulfate ions within jarosite break down from 500°C. Carbon dioxide detected during heating of the sample was attributed to oxidation of organic matter. A laboratory standard of ferric sulfate hydrate released sulfur dioxide from 550°C, and an oxygen peak was detected in the products. Calcium sulfate did not decompose below 1000°C. Oxygen released from sulfate minerals may have already affected organic compound detection during in situ thermal experiments on Mars missions. A combination of preliminary mineralogical analyses and suitably selected pyrolysis temperatures may increase future success in the search for past or present life on Mars. Key Words: Mars—Life detection—Geochemistry—Organic matter—Jarosite. Astrobiology 15, 247–258. PMID:25695727

  9. Sulfate minerals: a problem for the detection of organic compounds on Mars?

    PubMed

    Lewis, James M T; Watson, Jonathan S; Najorka, Jens; Luong, Duy; Sephton, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    The search for in situ organic matter on Mars involves encounters with minerals and requires an understanding of their influence on lander and rover experiments. Inorganic host materials can be helpful by aiding the preservation of organic compounds or unhelpful by causing the destruction of organic matter during thermal extraction steps. Perchlorates are recognized as confounding minerals for thermal degradation studies. On heating, perchlorates can decompose to produce oxygen, which then oxidizes organic matter. Other common minerals on Mars, such as sulfates, may also produce oxygen upon thermal decay, presenting an additional complication. Different sulfate species decompose within a large range of temperatures. We performed a series of experiments on a sample containing the ferric sulfate jarosite. The sulfate ions within jarosite break down from 500 °C. Carbon dioxide detected during heating of the sample was attributed to oxidation of organic matter. A laboratory standard of ferric sulfate hydrate released sulfur dioxide from 550 °C, and an oxygen peak was detected in the products. Calcium sulfate did not decompose below 1000 °C. Oxygen released from sulfate minerals may have already affected organic compound detection during in situ thermal experiments on Mars missions. A combination of preliminary mineralogical analyses and suitably selected pyrolysis temperatures may increase future success in the search for past or present life on Mars. PMID:25695727

  10. Regulating compounding pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Noble, Ashley

    2015-06-01

    (1) The Pew Charitable Trusts identified 27 compounding incidents that resulted in 89 deaths since 2001. (2) Unlike drug manufacturers, compounding pharmacies are generally not required to report adverse events associated with their products to the FDA. (3) Federal law on drug compounding was updated in 2013 to create a new group of compounders called "outsourcing facilities." Over 50 facilities in 23 states are now registered with the FDA.

  11. Influence of protein environment on magnetic circular dichroism spectral properties of ferric and ferrous ligand complexes of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Pond, A E; Sono, M; Elenkova, E A; Goodin, D B; English, A M; Dawson, J H

    1999-01-01

    The addition of exogenous ligands to the ferric and ferrous states of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) is investigated with magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) at 4 degrees C to determine the effect the protein environment may exercise on spectral properties. The MCD spectrum of each derivative is directly compared to those of analogous forms of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and myoglobin (Mb), two well-characterized histidine-ligated heme proteins. The ferric azide adduct of CCP is a hexacoordinate, largely low-spin species with an MCD spectrum very similar to that of ferric azide HRP. This complex displays an MCD spectrum dissimilar from that of the Mb derivative, possibly because of the stabilizing interaction between the azide ligand and the distal arginine of CCP (Arg 48). For the ferric fluoride derivative all three proteins display varied MCD data, indicating that the differences in the distal pocket of each protein influences their respective MCD characteristics. The MCD data for the cyanoferric complexes are similar for all three proteins, demonstrating that a strong field ligand bound in the sixth axial position dominates the MCD characteristics of the derivative. Similarly, the ferric NO complexes of the three proteins show MCD spectra similar in feature position and shape, but vary somewhat in intensity. Reduction of CCP at neutral pH yields a typical pentacoordinate high-spin complex with an MCD spectrum similar to that of deoxyferrous HRP. Formation of the NO and cyanide complexes of ferrous CCP gives derivatives with MCD spectra similar to the analogous forms of HRP and Mb in both feature position and shape. Addition of CO to deoxyferrous CCP results in a ferrous-CO complex with MCD spectral similarity to that of ferrous-CO HRP but not Mb, indicating that interactions between the ligand and the distal residues affects the MCD characteristics. Examination of alkaline (pH 9.7) deoxyferrous CCP indicates that a pH dependent conformational change has

  12. Treatment of Iron Deficiency with or without Anaemia with Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose in Gynaecological Practices - A Non-Interventional Study.

    PubMed

    Herfs, R; Fleitmann, L; Kocsis, I

    2014-01-01

    In this multi-centre, prospective, non-interventional study, the effectiveness and tolerance of ferric carboxymaltose (ferinject®; FCM) was tested through use in standard gynaecological practice. In total, data from 273 patients was evaluated. 193 of these patients displayed iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), and 68 had iron deficiency without anaemia (ID). The reasons for the ID/IDA were hypermenorrhoea (HyM) (n = 170), post-partum condition (PP) (n = 53) or another indication (n = 53). The average age of the patients was 40 years old, with 8 % of them being vegetarians. Half of the patients had already been treated for anaemia, primarily with oral iron products (94 %). The primary, serious accompanying symptoms of anaemia were fatigue (72 %), lack of concentration (42 %), pale mucous membranes (42 %), headache (26 %) and sleep disorders (21 %). Only one patient did not show serious symptoms at the start of the study. The most frequent indications for parenteral therapy were the need for rapid iron substitution to reduce symptoms (> 70 %), followed by the lower effectiveness or intolerance of oral products (42 % each) as well as patients not completing the course of treatment with oral products (12 %). Patient information was collected at both the beginning and the end of the observation period, which lasted 15 weeks on average. FCM was most frequently administered via infusion (92 %; average infusion duration 21 minutes). Seven percent of patients received bolus injections. The average total iron dosage per patient was 788.7 mg (median 550 mg; range: 50-3000 mg); the median individual dosage was 500 mg (range: 50-1000 mg). The total dosage was, in most cases, administered through a single application (range: 1-10). Symptoms, blood values (Hb), iron stores (serum-ferritin [S-ferritin]) and transport iron (transferrin saturation [TSAT]) normalised to a large extent. In all subgroups, 92 % of women displayed a marked

  13. Short-term effect of the soil amendments activated carbon, biochar, and ferric oxyhydroxide on bacteria and invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hale, Sarah E; Jensen, John; Jakob, Lena; Oleszczuk, Patryk; Hartnik, Thomas; Henriksen, Thomas; Okkenhaug, Gudny; Martinsen, Vegard; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the secondary ecotoxicological effects of soil amendment materials that can be added to contaminated soils in order to sequester harmful pollutants. To this end, a nonpolluted agricultural soil was amended with 0.5, 2, and 5% of the following four amendments: powder activated carbon (PAC), granular activated carbon, corn stover biochar, and ferric oxyhydroxide powder, which have previously been proven to sequester pollutants in soil. The resulting immediate effects (i.e., without aging the mixtures before carrying out tests) on the springtail Folsomia candida, the earthworm species Aporectodea caliginosa and Eisenia fetida, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri, a suite of ten prokaryotic species, and a eukaryote (the yeast species Pichia anomalia) were investigated. Reproduction of F. candida was significantly increased compared to the unamended soil when 2% biochar was added to it. None of the treatments caused a negative effect on reproduction. All amendments had a deleterious effect on the growth of A. caliginosa when compared to the unamended soil, except the 0.5% amendment of biochar. In avoidance tests, E. fetida preferred biochar compared to all other amendments including the unamended soil. All amendments reduced the inhibition of luminescence to V. fischeri, i.e., were beneficial for the bacteria, with PAC showing the greatest improvement. The effects of the amendments on the suite of prokaryotic species and the eukaryote were variable, but overall the 2% biochar dose provided the most frequent positive effect on growth. It is concluded that the four soil amendments had variable but never strongly deleterious effects on the bacteria and invertebrates studied here during the respective recommended experimental test periods. PMID:23802136

  14. Inhibition of the ferric uptake regulator by peptides derived from anti-FUR peptide aptamers: coupled theoretical and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Cissé, Cheickna; Mathieu, Sophie V; Abeih, Mohamed B Ould; Flanagan, Lindsey; Vitale, Sylvia; Catty, Patrice; Boturyn, Didier; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle; Crouzy, Serge

    2014-12-19

    The FUR protein (ferric uptake regulator) is an iron-dependent global transcriptional regulator. Specific to bacteria, FUR is an attractive antibacterial target since virulence is correlated to iron bioavailability. Recently, four anti-FUR peptide aptamers, composed of 13 amino acid variable loops inserted into a thioredoxinA scaffold, were identified, which were able to interact with Escherichia coli FUR (EcFUR), inhibit its binding to DNA and to decrease the virulence of pathogenic E. coli in a fly infection model. The first characterization of anti-FUR linear peptides (pF1 6 to 13 amino acids) derived from the variable part of the F1 anti-FUR peptide aptamer is described herein. Theoretical and experimental approaches, in original combination, were used to study interactions of these peptides with FUR in order to understand their mechanism of inhibition. After modeling EcFUR by homology, docking with Autodock was combined with molecular dynamics simulations in implicit solvent to take into account the flexibility of the partners. All calculations were cross-checked either with other programs or with experimental data. As a result, reliable structures of EcFUR and its complex with pF1 are given and an inhibition pocket formed by the groove between the two FUR subunits is proposed. The location of the pocket was validated through experimental mutation of key EcFUR residues at the site of proposed peptide interaction. Cyclisation of pF1, mimicking the peptide constraint in F1, improved inhibition. The details of the interactions between peptide and protein were analyzed and a mechanism of inhibition of these anti-FUR molecules is proposed.

  15. Validation of an in vitro method for the determination of cyanide release from ferric-hexacyanoferrate: Prussian blue.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongsheng; Brownell, Charles R; Sadrieh, Nakissa; May, Joan C; Del Grosso, Alfred V; Lyon, Robbe C; Faustino, Patrick J

    2007-03-12

    Prussian blue (PB), ferric hexacyanoferrate, Fe(4)[Fe(CN)(6)](3) is indicated for the treatment of known or suspected internal contamination with radioactive cesium, radioactive thallium, or non-radioactive thallium. Owing to the molecular properties, cyanide is likely dissociated from PB under physiologically relevant pH conditions, thus raising a concern for the safety of the product. The objective of this study was to calibrate and validate a cyanide assay over a wide pH range (from 0.5 to 12) on the basis of Spectroquant cyanide test method (Merck). Merck's photometric method requires that the measurement solution be within pH 5.5-6.0, hence samples and standards need to be adjusted to this pH range. Since the process of pH adjustment may have significant impact on the determination of cyanide, the analysis method needs to be optimized, calibrated and validated under each pH condition in the study. The validation characteristics included accuracy, precision, quantification limit, linearity, and stability. The intra-day accuracy ranged from 90% to 109% for the deionized water and solutions of pH 0.5-12. The intra-day precision (R.S.D.) ranged from 2.4% to 8.1% for the deionized water and solutions of pH 0.5-12. The analytical range was linear from 0.05 to 0.5 ppm (mg/L). The R(2) ranged from 0.9925 to 0.9998. This validated method was successfully implemented to determine cyanide release from PB under various pH conditions (from 1.0 to 12) at different time-points (from 1 to 24 h). PMID:17174056

  16. Kinetic Modeling of Phosphate Adsorption by Preformed and In situ formed Hydrous Ferric Oxides at Circumneutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yanpeng; Yue, Qinyan

    2016-01-01

    Kinetics of phosphate removal by Fe(III) was investigated by both preformed and in situ formed hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) at pH 6.0–8.0. A pseudo-second-order empirical model was found to adequately describe phosphate removal in the two cases. The Elovich and intra-particle diffusion models, however, were only capable of describing phosphate adsorption to preformed HFO (PF-HFO). By using surface complexation kinetic models (SCKMs) to describe phosphate adsorption to PF-HFO, the adsorption rate constant (0.0386–0.205 mM−1 min−1 for SCKM-1 and 0.0680–0.274 mM−1 min−1 for SCKM-2) decreased with increasing pH while the protonation reaction rate constant in SCKM-2 (0.0776–0.0947 mM−1 min−1) increased over the pH range 6.0–8.0. Using the rate constants obtained from the process of phosphate adsorption to PF-HFO, the amount of active surface sites on the in situ formed HFO were calculated as 0.955 ± 0.170, 1.46 ± 0.39 and 2.98 ± 0.78 mM for pH = 6.0, 7.0 and 8, respectively. Generally, as the SCKMs incorporate phosphate complexation on HFO surface sites and protons competiting for the surface sites, they could provide a good description of the rate and extent of phosphate removal by both preformed and in-situ formed HFO over a wide range of conditions. PMID:27739456

  17. Inhibition of bactericidal and bacteriolytic activities of poly-D-lysine and lysozyme by chitotriose and ferric iron.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, G R; O'Neill, M M; Cafarella, T G; Germaine, G R

    1991-02-01

    In a previous report from this laboratory (N. J. Laible and G. R. Germaine, Infect. Immun. 48:720-728, 1985), evidence was presented to suggest that the bactericidal actions of both reduced (i.e., muramidase-inactive) human placental lysozyme and the synthetic cationic homopolymer poly-D-lysine involved the activation of a bacterial endogenous activity that was inhibitable by N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose (chitotriose). In the present investigation however, we found that the bactericidal and bacteriolytic action of poly-D-lysine could be prevented only by some commercially available chitotriose preparations and not by others. Analysis by physical and chemical methods failed to distinguish protective chitotriose (CTa) and nonprotective chitotriose (CTi) preparations. CTi and CTa preparations displayed equal capacities to competitively inhibit binding of [3H]chitotriose by immobilized lysozyme and were indistinguishable in their abilities to block the lytic activity of lysozyme against Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells. Elemental analysis revealed significantly higher levels of phosphorus, calcium, iron, sodium, manganese, and copper in CTa. Removal of metals from CTa by chelate chromatography completely abolished the poly-D-lysine-protective capacity. Of the metals detected, only ferric iron (5 to 10 microM) mimicked the protective action of CTa. A Fe(III) concentration of 50 microM was required to inhibit lysozyme (5 micrograms/ml). Both Fe(III) and CTa (but not CTi) quantitatively blocked the labeling of poly-D-lysine by fluorescamine, suggesting that the primary amino groups of the lysine residues participate in iron binding. Thus, it appears that the poly-D-lysine-protective capacity of certain chitotriose preparations was due not to the chitotriose itself but to contaminating metal ions which interact directly with the polycationic agent. In contrast, Fe(III) cannot account for inhibition of either the bactericidal or bacteriolytic activity of lysozyme by

  18. A universally calibrated microplate ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay for foods and applications to Manuka honey.

    PubMed

    Bolanos de la Torre, Amparo Angelica S; Henderson, Terence; Nigam, Poonam Singh; Owusu-Apenten, Richard K

    2015-05-01

    The ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay was recently adapted to a microplate format. However, microplate-based FRAP (mFRAP) assays are affected by sample volume and composition. This work describes a calibration process for mFRAP assays which yields data free of volume effects. From the results, the molar absorptivity (ε) for the mFRAP assay was 141,698 M(-1) cm(-1) for gallic acid, 49,328 M(-1) cm(-1) for ascorbic acid, and 21,606 M(-1) cm(-1) for ammonium ferrous sulphate. The significance of ε (M(-1) cm(-1)) is discussed in relation to mFRAP assay sensitivity, minimum detectable concentration, and the dimensionless FRAP-value. Gallic acid showed 6.6 mol of Fe(2+) equivalents compared to 2.3 mol of Fe(+2) equivalents for ascorbic acid. Application of the mFRAP assay to Manuka honey samples (rated 5+, 10+, 15+, and 18+ Unique Manuka Factor; UMF) showed that FRAP values (0.54-0.76 mmol Fe(2+) per 100g honey) were strongly correlated with UMF ratings (R(2)=0.977) and total phenols content (R(2) = 0.982)whilst the UMF rating was correlated with the total phenols (R(2) = 0.999). In conclusion, mFRAP assay results were successfully standardised to yield data corresponding to 1-cm spectrophotometer which is useful for quality assurance purposes. The antioxidant capacity of Manuka honey was found to be directly related to the UMF rating.

  19. Kinetic Modeling of Phosphate Adsorption by Preformed and In situ formed Hydrous Ferric Oxides at Circumneutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yanpeng; Yue, Qinyan

    2016-10-01

    Kinetics of phosphate removal by Fe(III) was investigated by both preformed and in situ formed hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) at pH 6.0–8.0. A pseudo-second-order empirical model was found to adequately describe phosphate removal in the two cases. The Elovich and intra-particle diffusion models, however, were only capable of describing phosphate adsorption to preformed HFO (PF-HFO). By using surface complexation kinetic models (SCKMs) to describe phosphate adsorption to PF-HFO, the adsorption rate constant (0.0386–0.205 mM‑1 min‑1 for SCKM-1 and 0.0680–0.274 mM‑1 min‑1 for SCKM-2) decreased with increasing pH while the protonation reaction rate constant in SCKM-2 (0.0776–0.0947 mM‑1 min‑1) increased over the pH range 6.0–8.0. Using the rate constants obtained from the process of phosphate adsorption to PF-HFO, the amount of active surface sites on the in situ formed HFO were calculated as 0.955 ± 0.170, 1.46 ± 0.39 and 2.98 ± 0.78 mM for pH = 6.0, 7.0 and 8, respectively. Generally, as the SCKMs incorporate phosphate complexation on HFO surface sites and protons competiting for the surface sites, they could provide a good description of the rate and extent of phosphate removal by both preformed and in-situ formed HFO over a wide range of conditions.

  20. Ferric pyrophosphate citrate (Triferic™) administration via the dialysate maintains hemoglobin and iron balance in chronic hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Fishbane, Steven N.; Singh, Ajay K.; Cournoyer, Serge H.; Jindal, Kailash K.; Fanti, Paolo; Guss, Carrie D.; Lin, Vivian H.; Pratt, Raymond D.; Gupta, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Background Administration of ferric pyrophosphate citrate (FPC, Triferic™) via hemodialysate may allow replacement of ongoing uremic and hemodialysis-related iron losses. FPC donates iron directly to transferrin, bypassing the reticuloendothelial system and avoiding iron sequestration. Methods Two identical Phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled trials (CRUISE 1 and 2) were conducted in 599 iron-replete chronic hemodialysis patients. Patients were dialyzed with dialysate containing 2 µM FPC-iron or standard dialysate (placebo) for up to 48 weeks. Oral or intravenous iron supplementation was prohibited, and doses of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents were held constant. The primary efficacy end point was the change in hemoglobin (Hgb) concentration from baseline to end of treatment (EoT). Secondary end points included reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr) and serum ferritin. Results In both trials, Hgb concentration was maintained from baseline to EoT in the FPC group but decreased by 0.4 g/dL in the placebo group (P < 0.001, combined results; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.2–0.6). Placebo treatment resulted in significantly larger mean decreases from baseline in CHr (−0.9 pg versus −0.4 pg, P < 0.001) and serum ferritin (−133.1 µg/L versus −69.7 µg/L, P < 0.001) than FPC treatment. The proportions of patients with adverse and serious adverse events were similar in both treatment groups. Conclusions FPC delivered via dialysate during hemodialysis replaces iron losses, maintains Hgb concentrations, does not increase iron stores and exhibits a safety profile similar to placebo. FPC administered by hemodialysis via dialysate represents a paradigm shift in delivering maintenance iron therapy to hemodialysis patients. PMID:26175145

  1. The role of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients with gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Koduru, Pramoda; Abraham, Bincy P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common form of nutritional anemia worldwide. Iron plays a pivotal role in vital functioning of almost every organ system. IDA affects both physical and psychological functioning of humans. Oral iron is considered as first-line therapy for the treatment of IDA due to low cost, good safety profile and ease of administration. However, the absorption of oral iron is affected by several factors and incidence of gastrointestinal side effects can lead to lack of adherence to therapy as well as poor efficacy. This has led to the emergence of intravenous iron therapy which is clearly superior to oral iron with higher increment of hemoglobin levels and rapid replenishment of iron stores. Ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) is a novel non-dextran intravenous iron form which has been approved for use in patients with iron deficiency who have had inadequate response to oral iron therapy, intolerance to oral iron, or nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease. The safety and efficacy of using FCM for the treatment of IDA has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. One dose can provide a large amount of iron and has a very short infusion time. It should be considered as first-line therapy in patients with active inflammation like inflammatory bowel disease when gastrointestinal absorption of oral iron may be compromised. It should also be given to patients who have inadequate response to oral iron therapy. It has been shown to be noninferior to other intravenous iron formulations with a good safety profile and produced fewer anaphylactic reactions. PMID:26770269

  2. Chemical, physical, and sensory characteristics of mozzarella cheese fortified using protein-chelated iron or ferric chloride.

    PubMed

    Rice, W H; McMahon, D J

    1998-02-01

    Mozzarella cheese containing 25 and 50 mg of iron/kg of cheese was manufactured from milk that had been fortified with casein-chelated iron, whey protein-chelated iron, or FeCl3. Chemical, physical, and sensory characteristics were compared with those of a control cheese. Physical properties were assessed by testing melting, apparent viscosity, and browning of heated cheese. Cheeses were evaluated by trained panelists for the presence of metallic flavors, oxidized flavors, and other undesirable flavors. Addition of 25 mg iron/kg of cheese had no effects on the physical properties of Mozzarella cheese. Apparent viscosity of cheese fortified with 50 mg of iron/kg of cheese tended to be slightly higher than the control cheese, although this difference was not statistically significant at all storage times. Cook color was not affected by iron fortification. No increase in chemical oxidation (measured using thiobarbituric acid assay) was observed between the control and iron-fortified cheeses. Slight but statistically significant increases in metallic flavors, oxidized flavors, and off-flavors in the iron-fortified cheese were observed by the trained sensory panel, but the flavor defects were of very low intensity. For metallic flavors, oxidized flavors, and off-flavors, the control cheese scored 1.5, 1.5, and 1.3, respectively; the iron-fortified cheese scored 2.1, 2.0, and 1.6 based on a nine-point scale (where 1 = not perceptible to 3 = slightly perceptible). Sensory scores for iron-fortified cheese made using casein-chelated iron or whey protein-chelated iron was not significantly different from those of cheese made using ferric chloride. When used on pizza, consumer panels rated the iron-fortified cheeses as comparable with the control cheese.

  3. Short-term effect of the soil amendments activated carbon, biochar, and ferric oxyhydroxide on bacteria and invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hale, Sarah E; Jensen, John; Jakob, Lena; Oleszczuk, Patryk; Hartnik, Thomas; Henriksen, Thomas; Okkenhaug, Gudny; Martinsen, Vegard; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the secondary ecotoxicological effects of soil amendment materials that can be added to contaminated soils in order to sequester harmful pollutants. To this end, a nonpolluted agricultural soil was amended with 0.5, 2, and 5% of the following four amendments: powder activated carbon (PAC), granular activated carbon, corn stover biochar, and ferric oxyhydroxide powder, which have previously been proven to sequester pollutants in soil. The resulting immediate effects (i.e., without aging the mixtures before carrying out tests) on the springtail Folsomia candida, the earthworm species Aporectodea caliginosa and Eisenia fetida, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri, a suite of ten prokaryotic species, and a eukaryote (the yeast species Pichia anomalia) were investigated. Reproduction of F. candida was significantly increased compared to the unamended soil when 2% biochar was added to it. None of the treatments caused a negative effect on reproduction. All amendments had a deleterious effect on the growth of A. caliginosa when compared to the unamended soil, except the 0.5% amendment of biochar. In avoidance tests, E. fetida preferred biochar compared to all other amendments including the unamended soil. All amendments reduced the inhibition of luminescence to V. fischeri, i.e., were beneficial for the bacteria, with PAC showing the greatest improvement. The effects of the amendments on the suite of prokaryotic species and the eukaryote were variable, but overall the 2% biochar dose provided the most frequent positive effect on growth. It is concluded that the four soil amendments had variable but never strongly deleterious effects on the bacteria and invertebrates studied here during the respective recommended experimental test periods.

  4. Adsorptive selenite removal from water using a nano-hydrated ferric oxides (HFOs)/polymer hybrid adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bingjun; Xiao, Lili; Nie, Guangze; Pan, Bingcai; Wu, Jun; Lv, Lu; Zhang, Weiming; Zheng, Shourong

    2010-01-01

    Selenite (SeO(3)(2-)) is an oxyanion of environmental significance due to its toxicity when taken in excess. In the present study, a hybrid adsorbent (HFO-201) was prepared by irreversibly impregnating hydrated ferric oxide (HFO) nanoparticles within a commercial available anion-exchange resin (D-201), and its adsorption towards selenite from water was investigated in batch and column tests. HFO-201 exhibited improved sorption selectivity toward selenite as compared to the polymeric anion exchanger D-201. Two possible adsorption interactions were responsible for selenite removal by HFO-201, the electrostatic interaction from the ammonium groups bound to the D-201 matrix, and the formation of inner-sphere complexes between the loaded HFO nanoparticles and selenite. In a wide pH range (i.e., 3-8), increasing solution pH was found to result in a decrease of selenite removal on HFO-201. Adsorption isotherms fit the Freundlich model well, and selenite adsorption increased with increasing ambient temperature, indicating its endothermic nature. Column adsorption tests suggested that satisfactory removal of selenite from 2 mg/L to less than 0.01 mg/L could be achieved by HFO-201 even in the presence of the commonly encountered anionic competition at greater concentration, with the treatment capacity of approximately 1200 bed volume (BV) per run, while that for D-201 was only less than 30 BV under otherwise identical conditions. Furthermore, the exhausted HFO-201 was amenable to efficient in situ regeneration with a binary NaOH-NaCl solution.

  5. Effect of ionizing radiation on antioxidant compounds present in cork wastewater.

    PubMed

    Madureira, J; Melo, R; Botelho, M L; Leal, J P; Fonseca, I M

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary study of the gamma radiation effects on the antioxidant compounds present in cork cooking water was carried out. Radiation studies were performed using radiation between 20 and 50 kGy at 0.4 and 2.4 kGy h(-1). The radiation effects on organic matter content were evaluated by chemical oxygen demand. The antioxidant activity was measured by ferric reducing power assay. The total phenolic content was studied using the Folin-Ciocalteau method. Results show that gamma radiation increases both the amount of phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity of cork cooking water. These results highlight the potential of this technology for increasing the added value of cork waters.

  6. Ecotoxicology of organofluorous compounds.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Margaret B; Loi, Eva I H; Kwok, Karen Y; Lam, Paul K S

    2012-01-01

    Organofluorous compounds have been developed for myriad purposes in a variety of fields, including manufacturing, industry, agriculture, and medicine. The widespread use and application of these compounds has led to increasing concern about their potential ecological toxicity, particularly because of the stability of the C-F bond, which can result in chemical persistence in the environment. This chapter reviews the chemical properties and ecotoxicology of four groups of organofluorous compounds: fluorinated refrigerants and propellants, per- and polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), fluorinated pesticides, and fluoroquinolone antibiotics. These groups vary in their environmental fate and partitioning, but each raises concern in terms of ecological risk on both the regional and global scale, particularly those compounds with long environmental half-lives. Further research on the occurrence and toxicities of many of these compounds is needed for a more comprehensive understanding of their ecological effects.

  7. XAFS Model Compound Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newville, Matthew

    The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

  8. Preparation of uranium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

    2013-02-19

    UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

  9. Ferric Carboxymaltose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... carboxymaltose injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood ... medication is also used to treat iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease (damage to ...

  10. Nitrodifluoraminoterphenyl compounds and processes

    DOEpatents

    Lerom, M.W.; Peters, H.M.

    1975-07-08

    This patent relates to the nitrodifluoraminoterphenyl compounds: 3,3''-bis (difluoramino)-2,2'' 4,4', 4'',6,6',6''-octanitro-m-terphenyl (DDONT) and 3,3''-bis(difluoramino)-2,2',2''4,4',4'',6,6',6''-nonanitro-m-terphenyl (DDNONA). Procedures are described wherein diamino precursors of the indicated compounds are prepared and the final compounds are obtained by a fluorination operation. The compounds are highly energetic and suitable for use as explosives and particularly in exploding bridge wire (EBW) detonators. (auth)

  11. Phytochemical Compounds and Antioxidant Capacity of Tucum-Do-Cerrado (Bactris setosa Mart), Brazil's Native Fruit.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Fernanda R; Arruda, Andréa F; Siqueira, Egle M A; Arruda, Sandra F

    2016-03-01

    This study identified major phenolic compounds of the tucum-do-cerrado (Bactris setosa) peel, as well as antioxidant activity and total phytochemical compound concentration of different extracts of the peel and pulp of this fruit. Phenolic compounds of the different extracts of tucum-do-cerrado peel were identified and quantified using a high-performance liquid chromatography system coupled to a diode array detector (DAD). Total phytochemical compound content was determined by spectrophotometric assays and the antioxidant activity by ferric reducing antioxidant power and β-carotene/linoleic assays. Total phenolic, flavanols, total anthocyanins and yellow flavonoids concentration of tucum-do-cerrado were 122-, 14-, 264- and 61-fold higher in the peel than in the pulp, respectively. The aqueous, methanolic and ethanolic extracts of the tucum-do-cerrado peel exhibited higher antioxidant activity compared to its pulp. Flavanols, anthocyanins, flavones, phenolic acids and stilbenes were the main phenolic classes identified in the tucum-do-cerrado peel extracts. Results suggest that the antioxidant capacity and the phytochemical compound content of the tucum-do-cerrado are mainly associated with the peel. Although flavonoids are the main compounds identified in tucum-do-cerrado peel, other phenolics identified in minor amounts, such as phenolic acids and stilbenes, may be responsible for the high antioxidant capacity of the fruit. PMID:26907338

  12. Adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) on Freshly Prepared Ferric Hydroxide (FeOxHy)

    PubMed Central

    He, Zan; Liu, Ruiping; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study prepared fresh ferric hydroxide (in-situ FeOxHy) by the enhanced hydrolysis of Fe3+ ions, and investigates its adsorptive behaviors toward Sb(III) and Sb(V) through laboratory and pilot-scale studies. A contact time of 120-min was enough to achieve adsorption equilibrium for Sb(III) and Sb(V) on the in-situ FeOxHy, and the Elovich model was best to describe the adsorption kinetics of Sb(III) and Sb(V). The Freundlich model was better than Langmuir model to describe the adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) on the in-situ FeOxHy, and the maximum adsorption capacity of Sb(III) and Sb(V) was determined to be 12.77 and 10.21 mmol/g the in-situ FeOxHy as Fe, respectively. Adsorption of Sb(V) decreased whereas that of Sb(III) increased with elevated pH over pH 3–10, owing to the different electrical properties of Sb(III) and Sb(V). Adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) was slightly affected by ionic strength, and thus indicated the formation of inner sphere complexes between Sb and the adsorbent. Sulfate and carbonate showed little effect on the adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V). Phosphate significantly inhibited the adsorption of Sb(V), whereas slightly effected that of Sb(III) due to its similar chemical structure to Sb(V). Pilot-scale continuous experiment indicated the feasibility of using in-situ FeOxHy to remove Sb(V), and equilibrium adsorption capacity at the equilibrium Sb(V) concentration of 10 μg/L was determined to be 0.11, 0.07, 0.07, 0.11, and 0.12 mg/g the in-situ FeOxHy as Fe at equilibrium pH of 7.5–7.7, 6.9–7.0, 6.3–6.6, 5.9–6.4, and 5.2–5.9, respectively. PMID:25741175

  13. The Formation, Structure, and Ageing of As-Rich Hydrous Ferric Oxide at the Abandoned Sb Deposit Pezinok (Slovakia)

    SciTech Connect

    Majzlan,J.; Lalinska, B.; Chovan, M.; Jurkovic, L.; Milovska, S.; Gottlicher, J.

    2007-01-01

    The abandoned Sb deposit Pezinok in Slovakia is a significant source of As and Sb pollution that can be traced in the upper horizons of soils kilometers downstream. The source of the metalloids are two tailing impoundments which hold {approx}380,000 m{sup 3} of mining waste. The tailings and the discharged water have circumneutral pH values (7.0 {+-} 0.6) because the acidity generated by the decomposition of the primary sulfides (pyrite, FeS{sub 2}; arsenopyrite, FeAsS; berthierite, FeSb{sub 2}S{sub 4}) is rapidly neutralized by the abundant carbonates. The weathering rims on the primary sulfides are iron oxides which act as very efficient scavengers of As and Sb (with up to 19.2 wt% As and 23.7 wt% Sb). In-situ {mu}-XANES experiments indicate that As in the weathering rims is fully oxidized (As{sup 5+}). The pore solutions in the impoundment body contain up to 81 ppm As and 2.5 ppm Sb. Once these solutions are discharged from the impoundments, they precipitate or deposit masses of As-rich hydrous ferric oxide (As-HFO) with up to 28.3 wt% As{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 2.7 wt% Sb. All As-HFO samples are amorphous to X-rays. They contain Fe and As in their highest oxidation state and in octahedral and tetrahedral coordination, respectively, as suggested by XANES and EXAFS studies on Fe K and As K edges. The iron octahedra in the As-HFO share edges to form short single chains and the chains polymerize by sharing edges or corners with the adjacent units. The arsenate ions attach to the chains in a bidentate-binuclear and monodentate fashion. In addition, hydrogen-bonded complexes may exist to satisfy the bonding requirements of all oxygen atoms in the first coordination sphere of As{sup 5+}. Structural changes in the As-HFO samples were traced by chemical analyses and Fe EXAFS spectroscopy during an ageing experiment. As the samples age, As becomes more easily leachable. EXAFS spectra show a discernible trend of increasing number of Fe-Fe pairs at a distance of 3

  14. Effects of a cocarcinogen, ferric oxide, on the metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene in the isolated perfused lung

    SciTech Connect

    Warshawsky, D.; Bingham, E.

    1984-01-01

    An isolated perfused New Zealand rabbit lung preparation was used to investigate the effects of a cocarcinogen, ferric oxide (Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/), on the metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), a ubiquitous potent carcinogen that has been associated with the increased incidence of human bronchiogenic carcinoma in occupational and urban settings. (/sup 14/C)-BaP was administered intratracheally to an isolated perfused lung (IPL) preparation with and without Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ after intraperitoneal pretreatment of the whole animal with BaP or intratracheal pretreatment of the whole animal with Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and/or BaP. BaP and its metabolites were isolated from serial blood samples up to 180 min after administration of (/sup 14/C)BaP to the IPL. BaP and its metabolites were also isolated from lung tissue, washout fluid, macrophage, and trachea bronchi at the end of the perfusion at 180 min. Patterns of BaP metabolites were determined by chromatographic techniques and liquid scintillation counting. Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ pretreatment to the whole animal or administration of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ to the IPL altered BaP metabolism by the perfused lung. Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ pretreatment to the whole animal resulted in an increase in the total rate of appearance of metabolites of BaP in the blood, while Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ administration to the IPL resulted in a decrease in the total rate of appearance of BaP metabolites in the blood and inhibited the effect of pretreatment. These data suggest that pulmonary exposure to a known cocarcinogen, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, in the presence of BaP results in increased production of dihydrodiols of BaP, which may be further metabolized to the ultimate carcinogenic form(s) of BaP. Therefore, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ can enhance the metabolic activation of BaP by the lung, as well as act as a carrier for penetration and retention of BaP in the lung. 49 references, 6 tables.

  15. The selectivity of Vibrio cholerae H-NOX for gaseous ligands follows the "sliding scale rule" hypothesis. Ligand interactions with both ferrous and ferric Vc H-NOX.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Liu, Wen; Berka, Vladimir; Tsai, Ah-lim

    2013-12-31

    Vc H-NOX (or VCA0720) is an H-NOX (heme-nitric oxide and oxygen binding) protein from facultative aerobic bacterium Vibrio cholerae. It shares significant sequence homology with soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), a NO sensor protein commonly found in animals. Similar to sGC, Vc H-NOX binds strongly to NO and CO with affinities of 0.27 nM and 0.77 μM, respectively, but weakly to O2. When positioned on a "sliding scale" plot [Tsai, A.-l., et al. (2012) Biochemistry 51, 172-186], the line connecting log K(D)(NO) and log K(D)(CO) of Vc H-NOX can almost be superimposed with that of Ns H-NOX. Therefore, the measured affinities and kinetic parameters of gaseous ligands to Vc H-NOX provide more evidence to validate the "sliding scale rule" hypothesis. Like sGC, Vc H-NOX binds NO in multiple steps, forming first a six-coordinate heme-NO complex at a rate of 1.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), and then converts to a five-coordinate heme-NO complex at a rate that is also dependent on NO concentration. Although the formation of oxyferrous Vc H-NOX cannot be detected at a normal atmospheric oxygen level, ferrous Vc H-NOX is oxidized to the ferric form at a rate of 0.06 s(-1) when mixed with O2. Ferric Vc H-NOX exists as a mixture of high- and low-spin states and is influenced by binding to different ligands. Characterization of both ferric and ferrous Vc H-NOX and their complexes with various ligands lays the foundation for understanding the possible dual roles in gas and redox sensing of Vc H-NOX.

  16. FhuD1, a Ferric Hydroxamate-binding Lipoprotein in Staphylococcus aureus - A case of gene duplication and lateral transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Sebulsky, M. Tom; Speziali, Craig D.; Shilton, Brian H.; Edgell, David R.

    2010-11-16

    Staphylococcus aureus can utilize ferric hydroxamates as a source of iron under iron-restricted growth conditions. Proteins involved in this transport process are: FhuCBG, which encodes a traffic ATPase; FhuD2, a post-translationally modified lipoprotein that acts as a high affinity receptor at the cytoplasmic membrane for the efficient capture of ferric hydroxamates; and FhuD1, a protein with similarity to FhuD2. Gene duplication likely gave rise to fhuD1 and fhuD2. While the genomic locations of fhuCBG and fhuD2 in S. aureus strains are conserved, both the presence and the location of fhuD1 are variable. The apparent redundancy of FhuD1 led us to examine the role of this protein. We demonstrate that FhuD1 is expressed only under conditions of iron limitation through the regulatory activity of Fur. FhuD1 fractions with the cell membrane and binds hydroxamate siderophores but with lower affinity than FhuD2. Using small angle x-ray scattering, the solution structure of FhuD1 resembles that of FhuD2, and only a small conformational change is associated with ferrichrome binding. FhuD1, therefore, appears to be a receptor for ferric hydroxamates, like FhuD2. Our data to date suggest, however, that FhuD1 is redundant to FhuD2 and plays a minor role in hydroxamate transport. However, given the very real possibility that we have not yet identified the proper conditions where FhuD1 does provide an advantage over FhuD2, we anticipate that FhuD1 serves an enhanced role in the transport of untested hydroxamate siderophores and that it may play a prominent role during the growth of S. aureus in its natural environments.

  17. The FupA/B protein uniquely facilitates transport of ferrous iron and siderophore-associated ferric iron across the outer membrane of Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Girija; Sen, Bhaswati

    2014-02-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious Gram-negative pathogen that replicates intracellularly within the mammalian host. One of the factors associated with virulence of F. tularensis is the protein FupA that mediates high-affinity transport of ferrous iron across the outer membrane. Together with its paralogue FslE, a siderophore-ferric iron transporter, FupA supports survival of the pathogen in the host by providing access to the essential nutrient iron. The FupA orthologue in the attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS) is encoded by the hybrid gene fupA/B, the product of an intergenic recombination event that significantly contributes to attenuation of the strain. We used (55)Fe transport assays with mutant strains complemented with the different paralogues to show that the FupA/B protein of LVS retains the capacity for high-affinity transport of ferrous iron, albeit less efficiently than FupA of virulent strain Schu S4. (55)Fe transport assays using purified siderophore and siderophore-dependent growth assays on iron-limiting agar confirmed previous findings that FupA/B also contributes to siderophore-mediated ferric iron uptake. These assays further demonstrated that the LVS FslE protein is a weaker siderophore-ferric iron transporter than the orthologue from Schu S4, and may be a result of the sequence variation between the two proteins. Our results indicate that iron-uptake mechanisms in LVS differ from those in Schu S4 and that functional differences in the outer membrane iron transporters have distinct effects on growth under iron limitation.

  18. Microbial reduction of ferric iron oxyhydroxides as a way for remediation of grey forest soils heavily polluted with toxic metals by infiltration of acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan; Spasova, Irena; Nicolova, Marina

    2015-04-01

    The abandoned uranium mine Curilo is a permanent source of acid mine drainage (AMD) which steadily contaminated grey forest soils in the area. As a result, the soil pH was highly acidic and the concentration of copper, lead, arsenic, and uranium in the topsoil was higher than the relevant Maximum Admissible Concentration (MAC) for soils. The leaching test revealed that approximately half of each pollutant was presented as a reducible fraction as well as the ferric iron in horizon A was presented mainly as minerals with amorphous structure. So, the approach for remediation of the AMD-affected soils was based on the process of redoxolysis carried out by iron-reducing bacteria. Ferric iron hydroxides reduction and the heavy metals released into soil solutions was studied in the dependence on the source of organic (fresh or silage hay) which was used for growth and activity of soil microflora, initial soil pH (3.65; 4.2; and 5.1), and the ion content of irrigation solutions. The combination of limestone (2.0 g/ kg soil), silage addition (at rate of 45 g dry weight/ kg soil) in the beginning and reiterated at 6 month since the start of soil remediation, and periodical soil irrigation with slightly acidic solutions containing CaCl2 was sufficient the content of lead and arsenic in horizon A to be decreased to concentrations similar to the relevant MAC. The reducible, exchangeable, and carbonate mobile fractions were phases from which the pollutants was leached during the applied soil remediation. It determined the higher reduction of the pollutants bioavailability also as well as the process of ferric iron reduction was combined with neutralization of the soil acidity to pH (H2O) 6.2.

  19. Effects of urea and acetic acid on the heme axial ligation structure of ferric myoglobin at very acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Droghetti, Enrica; Sumithran, Suganya; Sono, Masanori; Antalík, Marián; Fedurco, Milan; Dawson, John H; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2009-09-01

    The heme iron coordination of ferric myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of 9.0M urea and 8.0M acetic acid at acidic pH values has been probed by electronic absorption, magnetic circular dichroism and resonance Raman spectroscopic techniques. Unlike Mb at pH 2.0, where heme is not released from the protein despite the acid denaturation and the loss of the axial ligand, upon increasing the concentration of either urea or acetic acid, a spin state change is observed, and a novel, non-native six-coordinated high-spin species prevails, where heme is released from the protein.

  20. Effects of urea and acetic acid on the heme axial ligation structure of ferric myoglobin at very acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    Droghetti, Enrica; Sumithran, Suganya; Sono, Masanori; Antalík, Marián; Fedurco, Milan; Dawson, John H.; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2009-01-01

    The heme iron coordination of ferric myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of 9.0 M urea and 8.0 M acetic acid at acidic pH values has been probed by electronic absorption, magnetic circular dichroism and resonance Raman spectroscopic techniques. Unlike Mb at pH 2.0, where heme is not released from the protein despite the acid denaturation and the loss of the axial ligand, upon increasing the concentration of either urea or acetic acid, a spin state change is observed, and a novel, non-native six-coordinated high spin species prevails, where heme is released from the protein. PMID:19622342

  1. Acute effects of road salts and associated cyanide compounds on the early life stages of the unionid mussel Villosa iris.

    PubMed

    Pandolfo, Tamara J; Cope, W Gregory; Young, George B; Jones, Jess W; Hua, Dan; Lingenfelser, Susan F

    2012-08-01

    The toxicity of cyanide to the early life stages of freshwater mussels (order Unionida) has remained unexplored. Cyanide is known to be acutely toxic to other aquatic organisms. Cyanide-containing compounds, such as sodium ferrocyanide and ferric ferrocyanide, are commonly added to road deicing salts as anticaking agents. The purpose of the present study was to assess the acute toxicity of three cyanide compounds (sodium cyanide, sodium ferrocyanide, and ferric ferrocyanide), two road salts containing cyanide anticaking agents (Morton and Cargill brands), a brine deicing solution (Liquidow brand), and a reference salt (sodium chloride) on glochidia (larvae) and juveniles of the freshwater mussel Villosa iris. Sodium ferrocyanide and ferric ferrocyanide were not acutely toxic to glochidia and juvenile mussels at concentrations up to 1,000 mg/L and 100 mg/L, respectively. Lowest observed effect concentrations (LOECs) for these two chemicals ranged from 10 to >1,000 mg/L. Sodium cyanide was acutely toxic to juvenile mussels, with a 96-h median effective concentration (EC50) of 1.10 mg/L, although glochidia tolerated concentrations up to 10 mg/L. The EC50s for sodium chloride, Liquidow brine, Morton road salt, and Cargill road salt were not significantly different for tests within the same life stage and test duration (range, 1.66-4.92 g/L). These results indicate that cyanide-containing anticaking agents do not exacerbate the toxicity of road salts, but that the use of road salts and brine solutions for deicing or dust control on roads may warrant further investigation.

  2. Bioactive compounds, folates and antioxidant properties of tomatoes (Lycopersicum esculentum) during vine ripening.

    PubMed

    Jesús Periago, María; García-Alonso, Javier; Jacob, Karin; Belén Olivares, Ana; José Bernal, Ma; Dolores Iniesta, Ma; Martínez, Carmen; Ros, Gaspar

    2009-12-01

    Bioactive compounds and their relationship with antioxidant activity were determined in three tomato cultivars (Ronaldo, Siena and Copo) during vine ripening. The lycopene, chlorophyll (total, a and b), total phenolic, flavonoid, vitamin C and folate contents, and the antioxidant activity, by the ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay and the beta-carotene lineolate system, were determined in the samples. Tomato ripening involved the breakdown of chlorophylls, accompanied by a continuous increase in the lycopene content. Total phenolics, flavonoids and vitamin C increased significantly during ripening, whereas the folate content fell markedly as tomatoes turned from green to red. The lycopene and flavonoid content was highest in the Copo cultivar, vitamin C and folate highest in Ronaldo, and total phenolics highest in Siena. The antioxidant activity, as measured with the ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay, increased significantly during ripening in all extracts, and showed a positive correlation with the total phenolic and flavonoid contents. However, when measured with the beta-carotene lineolate system, the antioxidant activity decreased significantly during ripening; perhaps due to the antioxidant activity of chlorophylls and the peroxidation activity of vitamin C. PMID:19919517

  3. Lignin peroxidase compound III. Mechanism of formation and decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Gold, M.H. )

    1990-02-05

    Lignin peroxidase compound III (LiPIII) was prepared via three procedures: (a) ferrous LiP + O{sub 2} (LiPIIIa), (b) ferric LiP + O{sub 2}{sup {bar {sm bullet}}} (LiPIIIb), and (c) LiP compound II + excess H{sub 2}O{sub 2} followed by treatment with catalase (LiPIIIc). LiPIIIa, b, and c each have a Soret maximum at {approximately}414 nm and visible bands at 543 and 578 nm. LiPIIIa, b, and c each slowly reverted to native ferric LiP, releasing stoichiometric amounts of O{sub 2}{sup {bar {sm bullet}}} in the process. The LiPIII reversion reactions obeyed first-order kinetics with rate constants of {approximately}1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}. In the presence of excess peroxide, at pH 3.0, native LiP, LiPII, and LiPIIIa, b, and c are all converted to a unique oxidized species (LiPIII*) with a spectrum displaying visible bands at 543 and 578 nm, but with a Soret maximum at 419 nm, red-shifted 5 nm from that of LiPIII. LiPIII* is bleached and inactivated in the presence of excess H{sub 2}O{sub 2} via a biphasic process. The fast first phase of this bleaching reaction obeys second-order kinetics, with a rate constant of 1.7 {times} 10{sup 1} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Addition of veratryl alcohol to LiPIII* results in its rapid reversion to the native enzyme, via an apparent one-step reaction that obeys second-order kinetics, with a rate constant of 3.5 {times} 10{sup 1} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Stoichiometric amounts of O{sub 2}{sup {bar {sm bullet}}} are released during this reaction. When this reaction was run under conditions that prevented further reactions, HPLC analysis of the products demonstrated that veratryl alcohol was not oxidized. These results suggest that the binding of veratryl alcohol to LiPIII* displaces O{sub 2}{sup {bar {sm bullet}}}, thus returning the enzyme to its native state. In contrast, the addition of veratryl alcohol to LiPIII did not affect the rate of spontaneous reversion of LiPIII to the native enzyme.

  4. Comparative proteomic analysis of sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans CCM 4253 cultures having lost the ability to couple anaerobic elemental sulfur oxidation with ferric iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Jiri; Sedo, Ondrej; Potesil, David; Janiczek, Oldrich; Zdrahal, Zbynek; Mandl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    In extremely acidic environments, ferric iron can be a thermodynamically favorable electron acceptor during elemental sulfur oxidation by some Acidithiobacillus spp. under anoxic conditions. Quantitative 2D-PAGE proteomic analysis of a resting cell suspension of a sulfur-grown Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans CCM 4253 subculture that had lost its iron-reducing activity revealed 147 protein spots that were downregulated relative to an iron-reducing resting cell suspension of the antecedent sulfur-oxidizing culture and 111 that were upregulated. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of strongly downregulated spots identified several physiologically important proteins that apparently play roles in ferrous iron oxidation, including the outer membrane cytochrome Cyc2 and rusticyanin. Other strongly repressed proteins were associated with sulfur metabolism, including heterodisulfide reductase, thiosulfate:quinone oxidoreductase and sulfide:quinone reductase. Transcript-level analyses revealed additional downregulation of other respiratory genes. Components of the iron-oxidizing system thus apparently play central roles in anaerobic sulfur oxidation coupled with ferric iron reduction in the studied microbial strain. PMID:27394989

  5. Ferrous iron formation following the co-aggregation of ferric iron and the Alzheimer's disease peptide β-amyloid (1–42)

    PubMed Central

    Everett, J.; Céspedes, E.; Shelford, L. R.; Exley, C.; Collingwood, J. F.; Dobson, J.; van der Laan, G.; Jenkins, C. A.; Arenholz, E.; Telling, N. D.

    2014-01-01

    For decades, a link between increased levels of iron and areas of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology has been recognized, including AD lesions comprised of the peptide β-amyloid (Aβ). Despite many observations of this association, the relationship between Aβ and iron is poorly understood. Using X-ray microspectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy and spectrophotometric iron(II) quantification techniques, we examine the interaction between Aβ(1–42) and synthetic iron(III), reminiscent of ferric iron stores in the brain. We report Aβ to be capable of accumulating iron(III) within amyloid aggregates, with this process resulting in Aβ-mediated reduction of iron(III) to a redox-active iron(II) phase. Additionally, we show that the presence of aluminium increases the reductive capacity of Aβ, enabling the redox cycling of the iron. These results demonstrate the ability of Aβ to accumulate iron, offering an explanation for previously observed local increases in iron concentration associated with AD lesions. Furthermore, the ability of iron to form redox-active iron phases from ferric precursors provides an origin both for the redox-active iron previously witnessed in AD tissue, and the increased levels of oxidative stress characteristic of AD. These interactions between Aβ and iron deliver valuable insights into the process of AD progression, which may ultimately provide targets for disease therapies. PMID:24671940

  6. High affinity (/sup 3/H). beta. -Alanine uptake by scar margins of ferric chloride-induced epileptogenic foci in rat isocortex

    SciTech Connect

    Robitaille, Y.; Sherwin, A.

    1984-07-01

    Cortical astrocytes of normal mammalian brain are endowed with a high affinity uptake system for ..beta..-Alanine which is competitively inhibited by gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter strongly implicated in epileptogenesis. The authors evaluated (/sup 3/H) ..beta..-Alanine uptake by reactive astrocytes proliferating within scar of epileptogenic foci induced in rat motor cortex by microinjections of 100 mM ferric chloride. Following in vitro incubation of scar tissue with (/sup 3/H) ..beta..-Alanine, ultrastructural morphometry of grain patterns at 5, 30 and 120 days post injection revealed early and significant grain count increases over astroglial processes, predominantly those related to perivascular glial end-feet. Astrocytic cell body and endothelial cell counts showed a more gradual and stepwise increase. Similar data were obtained by comparing visual and edited mean astrocytic grain counts. These results suggest that the enhanced uptake of reactive astrocytes may reflect a marked decrease of inhibitory GABAergic neurons within ferric chloride-induced scars. 7 figures, 1 table.

  7. TRANSFORMATION OF NITROSOBENZENES AND HYDROXYLANILINES BY FE (II) SPECIES: ELUCIDATION OF MECHANISM, EFFECT OF FERRIC OXIDES AND PH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this work was to (i) study the effect of structure composition on the reactivity of a series of N-hydroxylaniline and nitrosobenzene compounds toward their reduction by Fe(II) species, (ii) evaluate the usefulness of several chemical parameters for predicting the r...

  8. MTBE DEGRADATION USING FENTON'S REAGENT: THE EFFECT OF FERROUS AND FERRIC IRON MIXTURES ON THE EFFICIENCY OF THE OVERALL REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gasoline additive MTBE has been extensively used in the U.S. since the late 70's to increase the octane rating in reformulated gasoline, replacing toxic organo-lead compounds. However, its use was boosted during the late 80's, when the study of additional physico-chemical pro...

  9. MTBE DEGRADATION USING FENTON REAGENT: THE EFFECT OF FERROUS AND FERRIC IRON MIXTURES ON THE EFFICIENCY OF THE OVERALL REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gasoline additive MTBE has been extensively used in the U.S. since the late 70's to increase the octane rating in reformulated gasoline, replacing toxic organo-lead compounds. However, its use was boosted during the late 80's, when the study of additional physico-chemical pro...

  10. Primary Ferric Iron-Bearing Rhönite in Plutonic Igneous Angrite NWA 4590: Implications for Redox Conditions on the Angrite Parent Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehner, S. M.; Irving, A. J.

    2007-12-01

    Northwest Africa 4590 is a heterogeneous olivine gabbro with cumulate texture composed of Al-Ti-rich clinopyroxene, pure anorthite, Ca-rich olivine, kirschsteinite and ulvöspinel, with accessory troilite, merrillite, Ca silicophosphate, kamacite and glasses [1]. Rhönite now has been identified in this specimen (for the first time in any angrite) as (1) a large (0.65 mm long), blocky, anhedral grain adjacent to anorthite, kirschsteinite and troilite, (2) ca. 15 micron grains along grain boundaries of the major phases (in one case in contact with clinopyroxene and metal), and (3) ca. 30 micron grains within melt inclusions and veins composed of kirschsteinite, olivine, anorthite, troilite, hercynite and glass. The rhönite is nearly opaque in transmitted light, with a deep cinnamon-red color on thin grain edges. The average composition of the largest grain is (in wt.%): SiO2 23.6, TiO2 9.9, Al2O3 16.3, Cr2O3 0.1, FeOt 33.6, MnO 0.14, MgO 3.5, CaO 13.1. Stoichiometry (14 cations, 20 oxygen atoms) requires about 12% of the total iron to be in the ferric state, resulting in the nominal formula: (Ca2.01Mn0.02)(Fe2+3.55Fe3+0.45Mg0.75Al0.12Cr0.15)Ti0.9 5(Si3.37Al2.63)O20 In the co-existing ulvöspinel about 18% of the iron must be ferric to achieve charge balance; likewise, Fe-Ti spinel coexisting with metal in Angra dos Reis contains ferric iron [2]. In contrast, the spinel (Cr-pleonaste) in metal-rich angrite NWA 2999 is stoichiometric without any apparent ferric iron. The coexistence of ferric iron- bearing silicate and oxide phases with Fe metal implies that the oxygen fugacity during crystallization of NWA 4590 was somewhat more oxidizing than that of the IW buffer. Compositions of primary (pre-exsolution) olivine and kirschsteinite in NWA 4590 record a minimum magmatic temperature of 910-950°C, based on the solvus of [3]. Previous experimental studies [4] also imply that other metal-bearing plutonic (AdoR, LEW 86010) and quench-textured (LEW 87051) angrites

  11. Heart testing compound

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

    1983-06-29

    The compound 15-(p-(/sup 125/I)-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

  12. Heart testing compound

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F.; Goodman, Mark M.

    1985-01-01

    The compound 15-(p-[.sup.125 I]-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

  13. Anti-Fog Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Tracer Chemical Corporation's TRX Anti-Fog Composition is an inexpensive product which prevents condensation on plastic and glass surfaces. It was the result from a Tech Briefs article detailing a Johnson Space Center compound.

  14. Compound composite odontoma

    PubMed Central

    Girish, G; Bavle, Radhika M; Singh, Manish Kumar; Prasad, Sahana N

    2016-01-01

    The term odontoma has been used as a descriptor for any tumor of odontogenic origin. It is a growth in which both epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibits complete differentiation. Odontomas are considered as hamartomas rather than true neoplasm. They are usually discovered on routine radiographic examination. Odontomas, according to the World Health Organization, are classified into complex odontoma and compound odontomas. The present paper reports a case of compound composite odontomas. PMID:27194882

  15. Compound composite odontoma.

    PubMed

    Girish, G; Bavle, Radhika M; Singh, Manish Kumar; Prasad, Sahana N

    2016-01-01

    The term odontoma has been used as a descriptor for any tumor of odontogenic origin. It is a growth in which both epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibits complete differentiation. Odontomas are considered as hamartomas rather than true neoplasm. They are usually discovered on routine radiographic examination. Odontomas, according to the World Health Organization, are classified into complex odontoma and compound odontomas. The present paper reports a case of compound composite odontomas.

  16. Chemistry of peroxide compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volnov, I. I.

    1981-01-01

    The history of Soviet research from 1866 to 1967 on peroxide compounds is reviewed. This research dealt mainly with peroxide kinetics, reactivity and characteristics, peroxide production processes, and more recently with superoxides and ozonides and emphasis on the higher oxides of group 1 and 2 elements. Solid state fluidized bed synthesis and production of high purity products based on the relative solubilities of the initial, intermediate, and final compounds and elements in liquid ammonia are discussed.

  17. Compounding a Problem?

    PubMed

    Berlin, Joey

    2016-01-01

    Allergist-immunologists say a U.S. Pharmacopeia proposal will mess with an allergy treatment system that's worked for more than a century. The revised standards, if adopted, would remove a key exemption separating allergen extract preparations from the stricter requirements of other compounds. Immunologists say the exemption has allowed them to compound allergen extracts in their own offices, and they've done so safely and effectively millions of times a year.

  18. Understanding medication compounding issues.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rodney W

    2014-04-01

    The potential for contamination of compounded products and the resulting infections are a serious threat to patient safety. Immediate use products are used frequently in the perioperative department, and perioperative nurses should be familiar with the guidelines and practices that aim to reduce the contamination that can occur during the sterile compounding process. Four common themes lead to successful compounding: quality (eg, product identification, purity, stability, compatibility, risk level assessment), the environment (eg, using a segregated compounding area with specialized airflow capabilities, reducing particulate matter, practicing proper hand hygiene, performing gloved fingertip sampling, properly cleaning equipment and work areas), personnel activities (eg, familiarity with types of containers used and how often they can be accessed, following expiration dates and the number of times containers can be accessed), and the control process (eg, process monitoring, quality improvement). If a third-party vendor is contracted to handle compounding for a facility, perioperative personnel should be aware of the responsibilities for the facility and the vendor to ensure a quality compounding program. PMID:24674793

  19. Nonpost mold cure compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akihiro

    1997-08-01

    The recent low price trend of electronic products has made IC manufacturing efficiency a top priority in the semiconductor industry. Post mold cure (PMC) process, which generally involves heating the packages in the oven at 175 C for 4 to 8 hours, takes up much longer time than most other assembly processes. If this PMC process can be reduced or eliminated, semiconductor makers will be rewarded with a much higher cost merit. We define the purpose of Non-PMC as 'to get high reliability with suitable physical and electrical properties without PMC'. We compared carious properties of molding compound before and after PMC. We found that curing reaction has almost complete through DSC and C-NMR measurement, but several properties have not stabilized yet, and that not all properties after PMC were better than before PMC. We developed new grade of molding compound considering these facts. And we found that main factors to accomplish non-PMC compound are curability and flowability, and more, increasing of fundamental properties. To accomplish non-PMC, at first, molding compound need to have very high curability. Generally speaking, too high curability causes low flowability, and causes incomplete filing, wire sweep, pad shift, and weak adhesion to inner parts of IC packages. To prevent these failures, various compound properties were studied, and we achieved in adding good flowability to very high curable molding compound. Finally, anti-popcorn property was improved by adding low moisture, high adhesion, high Tg, and high flexural strengths at high temperature. Through this study, we developed new compound grade for various package, especially large QFP using standard ECN resin.

  20. Metalloid compounds as drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sekhon, B. S.

    2013-01-01

    The six elements commonly known as metalloids are boron, silicon, germanium, arsenic, antimony, and tellurium. Metalloid containing compounds have been used as antiprotozoal drugs. Boron-based drugs, the benzoxaboroles have been exploited as potential treatments for neglected tropical diseases. Arsenic has been used as a medicinal agent and arsphenamine was the main drug used to treat syphilis. Arsenic trioxide has been approved for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Pentavalent antimonials have been the recommended drug for visceral leishmaniasis and cutaneous leishmaniasis. Tellurium (IV) compounds may have important roles in thiol redox biological activity in the human body, and ammonium trichloro (dioxoethylene-O, O’-)tellurate (AS101) may be a promising agent for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Organosilicon compounds have been shown to be effective in vitro multidrug-resistance reverting agents. PMID:24019824