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Sample records for ferrite martensite microalloyed

  1. Microstructural Dependence of Work Hardening Behavior in Martensite-Ferrite Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, N.; Sankaran, S.; Madhavan, R.; Suwas, Satyam; Venugopal, P.

    2015-01-01

    Martensite-ferrite microstructures were produced in four microalloyed steels A (Fe-0.44C-Cr-V), B (Fe-0.26C-Cr-V), C (Fe-0.34C-Cr-Ti-V), and D (Fe-0.23C-Cr-V) by intercritical annealing. SEM analysis reveals that steels A and C contained higher martensite fraction and finer ferrite when compared to steels B and D which contained coarser ferrite grains and lower martensite fraction. A network of martensite phase surrounding the ferrite grains was found in all the steels. Crystallographic texture was very weak in these steels as indicated by EBSD analysis. The steels contained negligible volume fraction of retained austenite (approx. 3-6%). TEM analysis revealed the presence of twinned and lath martensite in these steels along with ferrite. Precipitates (carbides and nitrides) of Ti and V of various shapes with few nanometers size were found, particularly in the microstructures of steel B. Work hardening behavior of these steels at ambient temperature was evaluated through modified Jaoul-Crussard analysis, and it was characterized by two stages due to presence of martensite and ferrite phases in their microstructure. Steel A displayed large work hardening among other steel compositions. Work hardening behavior of the steels at a warm working temperature of 540 °C was characterized by a single stage due to the decomposition of martensite into ferrite and carbides at this temperature as indicated by SEM images of the steels after warm deformation.

  2. A preliminary ferritic-martensitic stainless steel constitution diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, M.C.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary research to develop a constitution diagram that will more accurately predict the microstructure of ferritic and martensitic stainless steel weld deposits. A button melting technique was used to produce a wide range of compositions using mixtures of conventional ferritic and martensitic stainless steels, including types 403, 409, 410, 430, 439 and 444. These samples were prepared metallographically, and the vol-% ferrite and martensite was determined quantitatively. In addition, the hardness and ferrite number (FN) were measured. Using this data, a preliminary constitution diagram is proposed that provides a more accurate method for predicting the microstructures of arc welds in ferritic and martensitic stainless steels.

  3. Two-phase ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanenko, S. A.; Fonshtein, N. M.

    1984-11-01

    The results of laboratory and production experiments showed that the main condition for providing the necessary combination of properties of two-phase ferritic-martensitic steels (high tensile strength, low yield strength, high plasticity and work hardenability) is obtaining the specified quantity of the hardening phase (martensite) in the structure (20-28% M to obtain σt ≥ 550 MPa or 10-18% M for σt ≥ 450 MPa). The specified ratio of the structural constituents under conditions of mass production of two-phase ferritic-martensitic steels may be guaranteed only with the use of steels containing carbon and alloy elements within the necessary limits and also with strict observance of the heat-treatment cycle. Without the use of metallographic measurements as the criteria for obtaining the optimum structural condition in addition to the required values of strength and plasticity it is necessary to use the σ0.2/σt ratio, which must not be greater than 0.5-0.6 with the absence of yield points on the tensile curve (without special temper rolling). As the result of the combination of work done in the Central Scientific-Research Institute of Ferrous Metallurgy together with plants of the Ministries of Ferrous Metallurgy and of the Automobile Industry at present the production is being introduced and experimental production lots of heat-treated two-phase steels of the following types with guaranteed mechanical properties are being supplied: At the Novolipetsk Metallurgical Combine cold-rolled 0.7-2.0-mm sheet of 06KhG(S)Yu and 06G2SYu steels with σ0.2 = 260-320 MPa, σt ≥ 550 MPa, δ4 ≥ 30%, and σ0.2/σt ≤ 0.5-0.6. At the Cherepovets Metallurgical Combine hot-rolled 2-6-mm sheet of 09G2(S) steel with σ0.2 = 260-320 MPa, σt ≥ 550 MPa, δ4 ≥ 25%, and σ0.2/σt ≤ 0.5-0.6. At the Beloretsk Metallurgical Combine (billets melted and rolled at the Cherepovets Metallurgical Combine) heat-treated cold-drawn wire up to 10.5 mm in diameter of 06KhGR steel with

  4. Effect of V and Ta on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Xiang; Liu, Guoquan; Hu, Benfu; Wang, Jinsan; Ullah, Asad

    2013-08-15

    12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels are promising candidate materials for good corrosion and irradiation resistance used for supercritical water-cooled reactor cladding and in-core components. V and Ta are considered to have improved the creep strength of high Cr steels by precipitating as MX phase. In this paper, a series of trial products microalloyed with V and V–Ta are produced, and the microstructure is characterized after quenching at 1050 °C and tempering at 780 °C by using TEM method to investigate the effect of these elements on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel. The results from both the experimental observations and thermodynamic and kinetic calculations reveal that V and V–Ta can promote the stable MX precipitation instead of M{sub 2}X, thus increasing the volume fraction of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. Two-phase separation behavior of the (Ta, V)(C, N) carbonitride into a Ta(V)C(N) phase and a V(Ta)N(C) phase in 12Cr3WVTa steel is observed and further discussed. - Highlights: • Microalloyed with V and V-Ta can promote the precipitation of MX instead of M{sub 2}X. • The presence of delta-ferrite in microstructure affects the morphology of MX. • Two-phase separation of MX carbonitride was observed in 12Cr3WVTa steel.

  5. Strengthening and toughening mechanisms in low-c microalloyed martensitic steel as influenced by austenite conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennett, Shane C.

    Three low-carbon ASTM A514 microalloyed steels were used to assess the effects of austenite conditioning on the microstructure and mechanical properties of martensite. A range of prior austenite grain sizes with and without thermomechanical processing were produced in a Gleeble RTM 3500 and direct-quenched. Samples in the as-quenched, low temperature tempered, and high temperature tempered conditions were studied. The microstructure was characterized with scanning electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The uniaxial tensile properties and Charpy V-notch properties were measured and compared with the microstructural features (prior austenite grain size, packet size, block size, lath boundaries, and dislocation density). For the equiaxed prior austenite grain conditions, prior austenite grain size refinement decreases the packet size, decreases the block size, and increases the dislocation density of as-quenched martensite. However, after high temperature tempering the dislocation density decreases with prior austenite grain size refinement. Thermomechanical processing increases the low angle substructure, increases the dislocation density, and decreases the block size of as-quenched martensite. The dislocation density increase and block size refinement is sensitive to the austenite grain size before ausforming. The larger prior austenite grain size conditions have a larger increase in dislocation density, but the small prior austenite grain size conditions have the largest refinement in block size. Additionally, for the large prior austenite grain size conditions, the packet size increases with thermomechanical processing. The strength of martensite is often related to an effective grain size or carbon concentration. For the current work, it was concluded that the strength of martensite is primarily controlled by the dislocation density and dislocation substructure; which is related to a grain

  6. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Shiju; Das, C. R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-12-01

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  7. Nitrogen alloying of the 12% Cr martensitic-ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A. S.; Artem'eva, D. A.; Mikhailov, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    The influence of the nitrogen content on the structure and mechanical properties of heat and corrosion resistant 12% Cr martensitic-ferritic steel developed at the Central Research Institute of Structural Materials Prometey has been studied. Steel containing 0.061 wt % nitrogen possesses a high level of mechanical properties. The decrease in the nitrogen content to 0.017 wt % leads to an increase of structurally free ferrite fraction in the steel, a decrease in the density of dislocations, a decrease of structural dispersity and the absence of finely dispersed precipitates of niobium and vanadium nitrides and carbides. As a result, there is a decrease in the strength properties, especially in the heat resistance.

  8. Friction Stir Welding of HT9 Ferritic-Martensitic Steel: An Assessment of Microstructure and Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    report of FSW on a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel is the work of Chung, which applied this approach to a dissimilar weld between F82H (ferritic...January 2007. [43] Y. Chung et al., ―Interface microstructure evolution of dissimilar friction stir butt welded F82H steel and SUS304,‖ Materials... WELDING OF HT9 FERRITIC- MARTENSITIC STEEL: AN ASSESSMENT OF MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES by Lara L. Ray June 2013 Thesis Advisor: Luke N

  9. Postirradiation thermocyclic loading of ferritic-martensitic structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, L.; Orychtchenko, A.; Petersen, C.; Rybin, V.

    Thermonuclear fusion reactors of the Tokamak-type will be unique power engineering plants to operate in thermocyclic mode only. Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels are prime candidate structural materials for test blankets of the ITER fusion reactor. Beyond the radiation damage, thermomechanical cyclic loading is considered as the most detrimental lifetime limiting phenomenon for the above structure. With a Russian and a German facility for thermal fatigue testing of neutron irradiated materials a cooperation has been undertaken. Ampule devices to irradiate specimens for postirradiation thermal fatigue tests have been developed by the Russian partner. The irradiation of these ampule devices loaded with specimens of ferritic-martensitic steels, like the European MANET-II, the Russian 05K12N2M and the Japanese Low Activation Material F82H-mod, in a WWR-M-type reactor just started. A description of the irradiation facility, the qualification of the ampule device and the modification of the German thermal fatigue facility will be presented.

  10. Ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardening stainless steel laser weldings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurelio, Giuseppe; Ludovico, Antonio D.; Panagopoulos, Christos N.; Tundo, Corrado

    1998-07-01

    Even if many steels and alloys have been welded on the last years, nowadays there are some other stainless steel alloys that need a further comprehension when they have to be welded. Typically these alloys are martensitic and precipitation hardening ones that still present some problems to be weld, i.e. hot cracks, fragile beads, an excessive grain size and other surface defects. In this work some martensitic stainless steels of which a AISI 420B, a AISI 440C and a AISI 630 have been studied. The last one is always with a martensitic structure but, in particular, some interesting mechanical properties are reached by a precipitation hardening process. This research has experimented and studied the mechanical and technological properties of the welds obtained on the above cited AISI 420B, AISI 440C and AISI 630, welded by 1.5 kW CO2 laser. The results have also been compared with the ones obtained on ferritic stainless steels AISI 430 and 430F. A technological characterization of the welds has followed as metallographic tests and evaluations, microhardness, tensile and fatigue tests.

  11. Effect of deformation on ferrite nucleation and growth in a plain carbon and two microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essadiqi, E.; Jonas, J. J.

    1989-06-01

    Isothermal compression tests were carried out on plain C, Mo, and Mo-Nb-V microalloyed steels in order to study the effect of austenite deformation on the ferrite nucleation and growth rates. The nucleation rate increases with deformation and the degree of supersaturation, Ae3- T; it appears to be reduced by the substitutional elements Mo, Nb, and V through reduction of the austenite grain boundary energy. The growth rate increases with the degree of supersaturation and is also reduced by these elements, apparently through the solute drag-like effect. Under static conditions, increasing the prestraining strain rate increases the nucleation rate, but this increase is small compared to the effect of concurrent deformation. The growth rate under static conditions decreases as the deformation or the strain rate is increased.

  12. Carbides in a High-Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yin Zhong; Ji, Bo; Zhou, Xiao Ling; Zhu, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The precipitate phases in an 11 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic steel normalized at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 0.5 hour and tempered at 1053 K (780 °C) for 1.5 hours have been investigated. Except for dominant phases, Cr-rich M23C6 carbide and Nb-rich, Ta-Nb-rich, and V-rich MC carbides, needle-like precipitates with a typical size of 70 to 310 and 10 to 30 nm for the length of the long and short axis of the needles, respectively, were also observed on the extraction carbon replica of the steel. The typical metallic element composition of the needle-like precipitates is about 53-82Fe, 14-26Cr, 0.5-18Ta, 1-6W, and 2-5Co in atomic pct. Through energy dispersive X-ray analysis and electron diffraction along with calculations regarding lattice parameter and interplanar spacing, the needle-like precipitates were identified as a Fe-rich M5C2 carbide, which is not known to have been reported previously in high-chromium steels. The M5C2 carbide has a base-centered monoclinic crystal structure with the approximate lattice parameters a/ b/ c = 1.142/0.5186/0.5383 nm and β = 104.68 deg. The formation of the Fe-rich M5C2 carbides in the steel has been discussed. The effect of chromium content in matrix and boron addition on the precipitate phases in ferritic/martensitic steels has also been discussed.

  13. Nanosized MX Precipitates in Ultra-Low-Carbon Ferritic/Martensitic Heat-Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Feng-Shi; Jung, Woo-Sang

    2009-02-01

    Nanosized MX precipitates in ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant 9Cr-W-Mo-VNbTiN steels were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) using carbon film replicas. The steels were prepared by vacuum induction melting followed by hot forging and rolling into plates. The plates were normalized at 1100 °C for 1 hour, cooled in air, and tempered at 700 °C for 1 hour. The results show that bimodal nanosized MX precipitates distribute densely and homogeneously in the matrix within martensitic lath after normalizing-and-tempering heat treatment. The larger nanosized MX precipitates with the size of 30 to 50 nm are rich in Nb, while the smaller ones with the size of about 10 nm contain less Nb but more V. Small addition of Ti causes an increase in the number of the larger nanosized MX precipitates. The total number density of the nanosized MX precipitates in the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic steels is measured to be over 300/ μm2, much higher than that in conventional ferritic/martensitic steels. Short-term creep test results show that the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic steels with high dense nanosized MX precipitates have much higher creep rupture strength than conventional ASME-P92 steel. The strength degradation of the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels during creep is also discussed in this article.

  14. Fracture mechanisms in dual phase steels based on the acicular ferrite + martensite/austenite microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poruks, Peter

    The fracture mechanisms of low carbon microalloyed plate steels based on the acicular ferrite + marten site/austenite microstructure (AF + M/A) are investigated. The final microstructure consists of a dispersed phase of submicron equi-axed martensite particles with a bainitic ferrite matrix. A series of plates with M/A volume fractions of 0.076--0.179 are studied. Brittle fracture is investigated by Instrumented Charpy impact testing of samples at -196°C and subsequent metallography. The M/A particles are identified as the crack nucleation sites and the cleavage fracture stress calculated to be 2400 MPa in a complete AF microstrucuture. This value is significantly larger than in steels that contain significant proportions of conventional bainite. Standard Charpy and Instrumented Charpy impact testing is conducted through a temperature range from -80 to + 22°C to study ductile fracture behaviour. The total absorbed energy is separated into energies of crack nucleation and of crack propagation. It is found that the energy of crack nucleation is weakly dependent on the volume fraction of M/A and completely independent of temperature over the range studied. The crack propagation energy varies significantly with both variables, decreasing with increased volume fraction of M/A and with decreasing temperature. The peak load in the instrumented Charpy data is used to calculate the dynamic fracture toughness, KId, which is found to be 105--120 MPa-m1/2. The void nucleation and void growth stages of ductile fracture are studied by metallographic examination of tensile bars. The sites of void nucleation are identified as inclusions and M/A particles. Voids nucleate at the M/A particles by decohesion of the particle-matrix interface. A constant void nucleation strain of epsilon = 0.90 +/- 0.05 is measured for all of the samples independent of the volume fraction of M/A. A stress-based criterion is used to predict void nucleation and the interface strength is determined to be

  15. Tritium retention in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Y.; Abe, S.; Matsuyama, M.; Alimov, V.K.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Bobyr, N.P.; Cherkez, D.I.; Khripunov, B.I.; Golubeva, A.V.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Klimov, N.S.; Chernov, V.M.; Oyaidzu, M.; Yamanishi, T.

    2015-03-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are structural material candidates for breeding blankets of future fusion reactors. Therefore, tritium (T) retention in RAFM steels is an important problem in assessing the T inventory of blankets. In this study, specimens of RAFM steels were subjected to irradiation of 20 MeV W ions to 0.54 displacements per atom (dpa), exposure to high flux D plasmas at 400 and 600 K and that to pulsed heat loads. The specimens thus prepared were exposed to DT gas at 473 K. Despite severe modification in the surface morphology, heat loads had negligible effects on T retention. Significant increase in T retention at the surface and/or subsurface was observed after D plasma exposure. However, T trapped at the surface/subsurface layer was easily removed by maintaining the specimens in the air at about 300 K. Displacement damage led to increase in T retention in the bulk due to the trapping effects of defects, and T trapped was stable at 300 K. It was therefore concluded that displacement damages had the largest influence on T retention under the present conditions.

  16. Effect of constituent phase on mechanical properties of 9Cr-1WVTa reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Moon, Joonoh; Park, Min-Gu; Lee, Tae-Ho; Jang, Min-Ho; Kim, Hyoung Chan; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2014-12-01

    Influence of the formation of ferrite and accompanying carbides in martensite matrix on the tensile and Charpy impact properties was investigated for reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) 9Cr-1WVTa steel. As the fractions of ferrite and carbide adjacent to the ferrite grain boundary increase, both tensile and Charpy impact properties deteriorated in as-normalized condition. In particular, the tensile strength and elongation decreased simultaneously, which is believed to be led by the localized deformation in ferrite which is softer than martensite, promoting the formation and growth of voids. In addition, the formation of ferrite was also detrimental to the Charpy impact properties regarding to the absorbed energy because the precipitation of carbides around ferrite were vulnerable to the nucleation and propagation of cleavage cracks. The degradation of tensile properties can be recovered by tempering, but the DBTT temperature still increases with presence of ferrite.

  17. Martensitic/ferritic steels as container materials for liquid mercury target of ESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.

    1996-06-01

    In the previous report, the suitability of steels as the ESS liquid mercury target container material was discussed on the basis of the existing database on conventional austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels, especially on their representatives, solution annealed 316 stainless steel (SA 316) and Sandvik HT-9 martensitic steel (HT-9). Compared to solution annealed austenitic stainless steels, martensitic/ferritic steels have superior properties in terms of strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, mercury corrosion resistance, void swelling and irradiation creep resistance. The main limitation for conventional martensitic/ferritic steels (CMFS) is embrittlement after low temperature ({le}380{degrees}C) irradiation. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can increase as much as 250 to 300{degrees}C and the upper-shelf energy (USE), at the same time, reduce more than 50%. This makes the application temperature range of CMFS is likely between 300{degrees}C to 500{degrees}C. For the present target design concept, the temperature at the container will be likely controlled in a temperature range between 180{degrees}C to 330{degrees}C. Hence, CMFS seem to be difficult to apply. However, solution annealed austenitic stainless steels are also difficult to apply as the maximum stress level at the container will be higher than the design stress. The solution to the problem is very likely to use advanced low-activation martensitic/ferritic steels (LAMS) developed by the fusion materials community though the present database on the materials is still very limited.

  18. Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations.

  19. Kinetics and formation mechanisms of intragranular ferrite in V-N microalloyed 600 MPa high strength rebar steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Fu-ming; Li, Chang-rong

    2016-04-01

    To systematically investigate the kinetics and formation mechanisms of intragranular ferrite (IGF), isothermal heat treatment in the temperature range of 450°C to 600°C with holding for 30 s to 300 s, analysis of the corresponding microstructures, and observation of the precipitated particles were conducted in V-N microalloyed 600 MPa high strength rebar steel. The potency of V(C,N) for IGF nucleation was also analyzed statistically. The results show that the dominant microstructure transforms from bainite (B) and acicular ferrite (AF) to grain boundary ferrite (GBF), intragranular polygonal ferrite (IPF), and pearlite (P) as the isothermal temperature increases from 450°C to 600°C. When the holding time at 600°C is extended from 30 s to 60 s, 120 s, and 300 s, the GBF content ranges from 6.0vol% to 6.5vol% and the IPF content increases from 0.5vol% to 2.8vol%, 13.1vol%, and 13.5vol%, respectively, because the ferrite transformation preferentially occurs at the grain boundaries and then occurs at the austenite grains. Notably, V(C,N) particles are the most effective nucleation site for the formation of IPF, accounting for 51% of the said formation.

  20. Kinetics of Ferrite Recrystallization and Austenite Formation During Intercritical Annealing of the Cold-Rolled Ferrite/Martensite Duplex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, Y.; Kermanpur, A.; Najafizadeh, A.; Kalashami, A. Ghatei

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafine-grained, dual-phase (UFG DP) steels were produced by a new route using an uncommon cold-rolling and subsequent intercritical annealing of ferrite/martensite duplex starting microstructures. The effects of processing parameters such as rolling reduction, intercritical annealing temperature, and time on the microstructural evaluations have been studied. UFG DP steels with an average grain size of about 1 to 2 μm were achieved by short intercritical annealing of the 80 pct cold-rolled duplex microstructures. The kinetics of ferrite recrystallization and austenite formation were studied based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model. The proposed model for describing the isothermal austenite formation kinetics was applied successfully to the nonisothermal conditions. It was found that complete recrystallization of ferrite before the austenite formation led to the formation of a large extent randomly distributed austenite in the ferrite matrix and a chain-networked structure.

  1. Effects of Microalloying on the Impact Toughness of Ultrahigh-Strength TRIP-Aided Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Junya; Ina, Daiki; Nakajima, Yuji; Sugimoto, Koh-ichi

    2013-11-01

    The effects of the addition of Cr, Mo, and/or Ni on the Charpy impact toughness of a 0.2 pct C-1.5 pct Si-1.5 pct Mn-0.05 pct Nb transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP)-aided steel with a lath-martensite structure matrix ( i.e., a TRIP-aided martensitic steel or TM steel) were investigated with the aim of using the steel in automotive applications. In addition, the relationship between the toughness of the various alloyed steels and their metallurgical characteristics was determined. When Cr, Cr-Mo, or Cr-Mo-Ni was added to the base steel, the TM steel exhibited a high upper-shelf Charpy impact absorbed value that ranged from 100 to 120 J/cm2 and a low ductile-brittle fracture appearance transition temperature that ranged from 123 K to 143 K (-150 °C to -130 °C), while also exhibiting a tensile strength of about 1.5 GPa. This impact toughness of the alloyed steels was far superior to that of conventional martensitic steel and was caused by the presence of (i) a softened wide lath-martensite matrix, which contained only a small amount of carbide and hence had a lower carbon concentration, (ii) a large amount of finely dispersed martensite-retained austenite complex phase, and (iii) a metastable retained austenite phase of 2 to 4 vol pct in the complex phase, which led to plastic relaxation via strain-induced transformation and played an important role in the suppression of the initiation and propagation of voids and/or cleavage cracks.

  2. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Nitride-Strengthened Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiangguo; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yan, Wei; Wang, Wei; Sha, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2012-12-01

    Nitride-strengthened reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are developed taking advantage of the high thermal stability of nitrides. In the current study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of a nitride-strengthened RAFM steel with improved composition were investigated. Fully martensitic microstructure with fine nitrides dispersion was achieved in the steel. In all, 1.4 pct Mn is sufficient to suppress delta ferrite and assure the steel of the full martensitic microstructure. Compared to Eurofer97, the steel showed similar strength at room temperature but higher strength at 873 K (600 °C). The steel exhibited very high impact toughness and a low ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of 243 K (-30 °C), which could be further reduced by purification.

  3. Toughness of 12%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel welds produced by non-arc welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, B.J.; Gooch, T.G.

    1998-08-01

    Low carbon 12%Cr steels can offer reduced life cycle costs in many applications. The present work examined the behavior of commercial steels of varying composition when subject to low heat input welding by the electron beam (EB) process and to a forge cycle by linear friction welding (LFW). Charpy impact testing was carried out on the high temperature heat-affected zone (HAZ)/fusion boundary or weld interface, with metallographic examination. With EB welding, the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was below 0 C (32 F) only for steel of low ferrite factor giving a fully martensitic weld area. Higher ferrite factor alloys showed predominantly ferritic transformed microstructures and a transition well above room temperature. Grain coarsening was found even with low EB process power, the peak grain size increasing with both heat input and steel ferrite factor. Use of LFW gave a fine weld area structure and DBTTs around 0 C even in high ferrite factor (FF) material.

  4. Microstructure and properties of pipeline steel with a ferrite/martensite dual-phase microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Li Rutao Zuo Xiurong Hu Yueyue Wang Zhenwei Hu, Dingxu

    2011-08-15

    In order to satisfy the transportation of the crude oil and gas in severe environmental conditions, a ferrite/martensite dual-phase pipeline steel has been developed. After a forming process and double submerged arc welding, the microstructure of the base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The pipe showed good deformability and an excellent combination of high strength and toughness, which is suitable for a pipeline subjected to the progressive and abrupt ground movement. The base metal having a ferrite/martensite dual-phase microstructure exhibited excellent mechanical properties in terms of uniform elongation of 7.5%, yield ratio of 0.78, strain hardening exponent of 0.145, an impact energy of 286 J at - 10 deg. C and a shear area of 98% at 0 deg. C in the drop weight tear test. The tensile strength and impact energy of the weld metal didn't significantly reduce, because of the intragranularly nucleated acicular ferrites microstructure, leading to high strength and toughness in weld metal. The heat affected zone contained complete quenching zone and incomplete quenching zone, which exhibited excellent low temperature toughness of 239 J at - 10 deg. C. - Research Highlights: {yields}The pipe with ferrite/martensite microstructure shows high deformability. {yields}The base metal of the pipe consists of ferrite and martensite. {yields}Heat affected zone shows excellent low temperature toughness. {yields}Weld metal mainly consists of intragranularly nucleated acicular ferrites. {yields}Weld metal shows excellent low temperature toughness and high strength.

  5. Effect of deformation on the austenite-to-ferrite transformation in a plain carbon and two microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essadiqi, E.; Jonas, J. J.

    1988-03-01

    Isothermal compression tests were carried out on three steels: (i) a plain C, (ii) a Mo, and (iii) a Mo-Nb-V microalloyed grade in order to study the effect of deformation on the austenite-to-ferrite transformation. Dynamic TTT (DTTT) curves were determined, which show clearly the extent to which deformation accelerates the decomposition of austenite. The latter effect is diminished by the addition of the alloying elements Mo, Nb, and V and is further reduced as the temperature is increased. The substitutional elements Mo, Nb, and V appear to reduce the nucleation rate through reduction of the austenite grain boundary energy. The growth rate is also reduced by these elements, apparently through the solute drag-like effect. The microstructural results indicate that the ferrite formed under dynamic conditions becomes more homogeneous and finer when the strain rate or the temperature is increased. Under static conditions, increasing the prestrain or the prestraining strain rate accelerates the γ-to-α transformation and reduces the mean grain size of the ferrite, although the highest transformation rate is still associated with the dynamic case.

  6. Processing of Bimodal Grain-Sized Ultrafine-Grained Dual Phase Microalloyed V-Nb Steel with 1370 MPa Strength and 16 pct Uniform Elongation Through Warm Rolling and Intercritical Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa Rao, M.; Subramanya Sarma, V.; Sankaran, S.

    2014-11-01

    Ultrafine-grained dual phase microalloyed V-Nb steel with ultimate tensile strength of 1371 MPa and uniform elongation of 16 pct characterized by bimodal ferrite grain structure was obtained through warm rolling and subsequent intercritical annealing. The bimodal ferrite grain structure with uniform dispersion of Nb/V carbides and strong γ-fiber texture promoted high strain hardening rate and high uniform elongation and high strength is attributed to ultrafine-grained ferrite and martensite.

  7. Influence of Nb-Microalloying on the Formation of Nano/Ultrafine-Grained Microstructure and Mechanical Properties During Martensite Reversion Process in a 201-Type Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghbadorani, Hojjat Samaei; Kermanpur, Ahmad; Najafizadeh, Abbas; Behjati, Peiman; Moallemi, Mohammad; Rezaee, Ahad

    2015-08-01

    In this study, influence of Nb-microalloying on formation of nano/ultrafined grain microstructure and mechanical properties during martensite reversion process in a 201-type austenitic stainless steel microalloyed with Nb was investigated. For this purpose, the 90 pct cold-rolled samples with almost fully martensitic microstructure were reversion annealed at 1023 K to 1173 K (750 °C to 900 °C) for 5 to 1800 seconds. The microstructural evolution was characterized using X-ray diffractometer, Ferritescope, optical microscope, scanning, and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties were evaluated using hardness and tensile tests. The reversion mechanism was found to be diffusion controlled. In comparison with other types of 201 steel, the kinetics of grain growth at 1173 K (900 °C) was much slower in the Nb-bearing steel, being related to the rapid precipitation of nano-sized Nb-rich carbonitrides during reversion process. At this temperature, the finest austenitic microstructure was achieved in the specimen reversion annealed for 60 seconds, possessing a microstructure composed of nano and ultrafined grains with an average grain size of 93 nm. This specimen exhibited an excellent combination of ultrahigh strength (yield strength of 1 GPa and tensile strength of 1.5 GPa) and good ductility (tensile elongation of 35 pct).

  8. Summary of the IEA workshop/working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    An International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Group on Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for Fusion Applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, the European Union, the United States, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, United Kingdom, 24-25 October 1996. At the meeting preliminary data generated on the large heats of steel purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. The second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The next meeting will be held in conjunction with the International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) in Sendai, Japan, 23-31 October 1997.

  9. Reason for high strength and good ductility in dual phase steels composed of soft ferrite and hard martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Daisuke; Ikeda, Gosuke; Park, Myeong-heom; Shibata, Akinobu; Tsuji, Nobuhiro

    2017-07-01

    Dual phase (DP) steels in which the microstructures are composed of a soft ferrite phase and a hard martensite phase are known to show good strain-hardening, high strength and large elongation, but reasons for their superior mechanical properties are still unclear. In the present study, two types of DP structures, having either networked martensite or isolated martensite were fabricated in a low-carbon steel by different heat treatment routes, and their tensile deformation behavior was analyzed using the digital image correlation (DIC) technique. It was revealed that the DP specimens having networked martensite microstructures showed a better strength-ductility balance than the DP specimens with isolated martensite structures. The microscopic DIC analysis of identical areas showed that the strain distribution within the DP microstructures was not uniform and the plastic strain was localized in soft ferrite grains. The strain localized regions tended to detour around hard martensite but eventually propagated across the martensite. It was found also from the DIC analysis that the degree of strain partitioning between ferrite and martensite in the networked DP structure was lower than that in the isolated DP structure. The deformation became more homogeneous when the hard phase (martensite) was connected to form a network structure, which could be one of the reasons for the better strength-ductility balance in the networked DP structure compared to that in the isolated DP structure.

  10. Fatigue strength of low-activation ferritic-martensitic high-chromium EK-181 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmakov, A. G.; Terent'ev, V. F.; Prosvirnin, D. V.; Chernov, V. M.; Leont'eva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    The static and cyclic mechanical properties of low-activation ferritic-martensitic EK-181 (Fe‒12Cr-2W-V-Ta-B-C) steel are studied in the temperature range 20-920°C (static tests) and at 20°C (cyclic tests). The fracture mechanisms of the steel under static tension and fatigue fracture conditions are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy.

  11. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  12. Microstructural stability of 9-12%Cr ferrite/martensite heat-resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei; Wang, Wei; Shan, Yi-Yin; Yang, Ke

    2013-03-01

    The microstructural evolutions of advanced 9-12%Cr ferrite/martensite heat-resistant steels used for power generation plants are reviewed in this article. Despite of the small differences in chemical compositions, the steels share the same microstructure of the as-tempered martensite. It is the thermal stability of the initial microstructure that matters the creep behavior of these heat-resistant steels. The microstructural evolutions involved in 9-12%Cr ferrite heat-resistant steels are elaborated, including (1) martensitic lath widening, (2) disappearance of prior austenite grain boundary, (32) emergence of subgrains, (4) coarsening of precipitates, and (5) formation of new precipitates, such as Laves-phase and Z-phase. The former three microstructural evolutions could be retarded by properly disposing the latter two. Namely improving the stability of precipitates and optimizing their size distribution can effectively exert the beneficial influence of precipitates on microstructures. In this sense, the microstructural stability of the tempered martensite is in fact the stability of precipitates during the creep. Many attempts have been carried out to improve the microstructural stability of 9-12%Cr steels and several promising heat-resistant steels have been developed.

  13. Metallography studies and hardness measurements on ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in STIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Long, B.; Dai, Y.

    2008-06-01

    In this work metallography investigations and microhardness measurements have been performed on 15 ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels and 6 weld metals irradiated in the SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP). The results demonstrate that all the steels have quite similar martensite lath structures. However, the sizes of the prior austenite grain (PAG) of these steels are quite different and vary from 10 to 86 μm. The microstructure in the fusion zones (FZ) of electron-beam welds (EBWs) of 5 steels (T91, EM10, MANET-II, F82H and Optifer-IX) is similar in respect to the martensite lath structure and PAG size. The FZ of the inert-gas-tungsten weld (TIGW) of the T91 steel shows a duplex structure of large ferrite gains and martensite laths. The microhardness measurements indicate that the normalized and tempered FM steels have rather close hardness values. The unusual high hardness values of the EBW and TIGW of the T91 steel were detected, which suggests that these materials are without proper tempering or post-welding heat treatment.

  14. Characterization of Ferrite in Tempered Martensite of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Using the Electron Backscattered Diffraction Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, C. R.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Murty, B. S.

    2011-12-01

    Ferrite was identified and characterized in tempered martensitic modified 9Cr-1Mo steel using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. Microstructural examination of the as-received modified 9Cr-1Mo steel revealed the presence of polycrystalline grains without lath morphology having low hardness within a predominantly tempered lath martensitic matrix. These grains were identified as the ferrite phase, and subsequent EBSD data analysis confirmed that the image quality (IQ) index of these grains is higher and boundary line length per unit area is lower than those of martensitic matrix. Therefore, it is proposed that characterization of ferrite phase in martensitic matrix can be carried out using microstructural parameters such as IQ index and boundary line length per unit area obtained from EBSD data analysis.

  15. Load partitioning between ferrite/martensite and dispersed nanoparticles of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-06-18

    In this study, a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray technique was used to investigate the tensile deformation processes of a 9Cr-ODS ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel at different temperatures. Two minor phases within the 9Cr-ODS F/M steel matrix were identified as Y2Ti2O7 and TiN by the high-energy X-ray diffraction, and confirmed by the analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The lattice strains of the matrix and particles were measured through the entire tensile deformation process. During the tensile tests, the lattice strains of the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) showed a strong temperature dependence, decreasing with increasing temperature. Analysis of the internal stress at three temperatures showed that the load partitioning between the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) was initiated during sample yielding and reached to a peak during sample necking. At three studied temperatures, the internal stress of minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN) was about 2 times that of F/M matrix at yielding position, while the internal stress of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN reached about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times that of the F/M matrix at necking position, respectively. It indicates that the strengthening of the matrix is due to minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN), especially Y2Ti2O7 particles. Although the internal stresses of all phases decreased with increasing temperature from RT to 600 degrees C, the ratio of internal stresses of each phase at necking position stayed in a stable range (internal stresses of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN were about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times of that of F/M matrix, respectively). The difference between internal stress of the F/M matrix and the applied stress at 600 degrees C is slightly lower than those at RI and 300 degrees C, indicating that the nanoparticles still have good strengthening effect at 600 degrees C. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of δ-ferrite evolution and high-temperature annealing on mechanical properties of 11Cr3W3Co ferritic/martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhongxia; Shen, Yinzhong; Ji, Bo; Zhang, Lanting

    2016-03-01

    An 11Cr3W3Co ferritic/martensitic steel was annealed at 1100 °C for different time to gradually dissolve δ-ferrite, and then conducted tensile, hardness, and short-term creep tests in combination with microstructural characterization to study the effect of δ-ferrite on the mechanical properties of high-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels. The amount of δ-ferrite gradually decreased to a minimum value with increasing annealing time up to 10 h, and then tended to an ascending tendency when annealed for 15 and 20 h. Accordingly the tensile strength at 300 and 650 °C, and Vickers hardness of the steel had an increase and a decrease tendency when δ-ferrite amount decreased down to its minimum value and increased again, respectively. The short-term creep property at 210 MPa at 650 °C of the steel exhibited a serious degradation as annealing time gradually increased to 15 h. The morphology and orientation of δ-ferrite grains seriously affected the short-term creep property of the steel. δ-ferrite with a continuously bamboo-like shape parallel to loading direction effectively improved the short-term creep property of the steel at high temperature, while δ-ferrite with a granular or block shape seriously damaged the short-term creep property of the steel. These findings have also been discussed.

  17. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-01

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400–450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0–1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3–5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  18. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-02

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400-450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0-1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3-5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  19. Development and characterization of advanced 9Cr ferritic/martensitic steels for fission and fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saroja, S.; Dasgupta, A.; Divakar, R.; Raju, S.; Mohandas, E.; Vijayalakshmi, M.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents the results on the physical metallurgy studies in 9Cr Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels. Yttria strengthened ODS alloy was synthesized through several stages, like mechanical milling of alloy powders and yttria, canning and consolidation by hot extrusion. During characterization of the ODS alloy, it was observed that yttria particles possessed an affinity for Ti, a small amount of which was also helpful in refining the dispersoid particles containing mixed Y and Ti oxides. The particle size and their distribution in the ferrite matrix, were studied using Analytical and High Resolution Electron Microscopy at various stages. The results showed a distribution of Y 2O 3 particles predominantly in the size range of 5-20 nm. A Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel has also been developed with the replacement of Mo and Nb by W and Ta with strict control on the tramp and trace elements (Mo, Nb, B, Cu, Ni, Al, Co, Ti). The transformation temperatures ( Ac1, Ac3 and Ms) for this steel have been determined and the transformation behavior of the high temperature austenite phase has been studied. The complete phase domain diagram has been generated which is required for optimization of the processing and fabrication schedules for the steel.

  20. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-01-01

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400–450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0–1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3–5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry. PMID:28150692

  1. The Z-Phase in 9Cr Ferritic/martensitic Heat Resistant Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Fengshi; Chen, Fuxia; Jiang, Xuebo; Xue, Bing; Zhou, Li; Jung, Woosang

    The precipitation behavior of Z-phase was investigated during long-term aging at 650°C in an ultra low carbon 9Cr ferritic/martensitic heat resistant steel. The steel was prepared by vacuum induction melting followed by hot forging and rolling into a plate. The plate was normalized at 1100°C for 1h, cooled in air and tempered at 700°C for 1h. Bimodal nano-sized MX precipitates distribute densely and homogeneously in the matrix within martensitic lath after normalizing-and-tempering heat treatment. After aging at 650°C for 1200h, the Z-phase was found to nucleate on the larger nano-sized MX. The Z-phase and MX have the following orientation relationship: <112>Z-phase//<001>MX and (1bar 10){Z-phase}//(200){MX} .

  2. Low-Cycle Fatigue Properties of P92 Ferritic-Martensitic Steel at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Hu, ZhengFei; Schmauder, Siegfried; Mlikota, Marijo; Fan, KangLe

    2016-04-01

    The low-cycle fatigue behavior of P92 ferritic-martensitic steel and the corresponding microstructure evolution at 873 K has been extensively studied. The test results of fatigue lifetime are consistent with the Coffin-Manson relationship over a range of controlled total strain amplitudes from 0.15 to 0.6%. The influence of strain amplitude on the fatigue crack initiation and growth has been observed using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The formation mechanism of secondary cracks is established according to the observation of fracture after fatigue process and there is an intrinsic relationship between striation spacing, current crack length, and strain amplitude. Transmission electron microscopy has been employed to investigate the microstructure evolution after fatigue process. It indicates the interaction between carbides and dislocations together with the formation of cell structure inhibits the cyclic softening. The low-angle sub-boundary elimination in the martensite is mainly caused by the cyclic stress.

  3. Radiation hardening and deformation behavior of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Shiba, K.

    1998-03-01

    Tensile data from several 8--12% Cr alloys irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses up to 34 dpa at temperatures ranging from 90 to 600 C are discussed in this paper. One of the critical questions surrounding the use of ferritic-martensitic steels in a fusion environment concerns the loss of uniform elongation after irradiation at low temperatures. Irradiation and testing at temperatures below 200--300 C results in uniform elongations less than 1% and stress-strain curves in which plastic instability immediately follows yielding, implying dislocation channeling and flow localization. Reductions in area and total elongations, however, remain high.

  4. Irradiation-induced grain growth in nanocrystalline reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W. B.; Chen, L. Q.; Zhang, C. Yang, Z. G.; Ji, Y. Z.; Zang, H.; Shen, T. L.

    2014-09-22

    In this work, we investigate the microstructure evolution of surface-nanocrystallized reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels upon high-dose helium ion irradiation (24.3 dpa). We report a significant irradiation-induced grain growth in the irradiated buried layer at a depth of 300–500 nm, rather than at the peak damage region (at a depth of ∼840 nm). This phenomenon can be explained by the thermal spike model: minimization of the grain boundary (GB) curvature resulting from atomic diffusion in the cascade center near GBs.

  5. Recent Progress of R&D Activities on Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Q.; Baluc, N.; Dai, Y.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, A.; Konys, J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Lindau, R.; Muroga, T.; Odette, George R.; Raj, B.; Stoller, Roger E.; Tan, L.; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Tavassoli, A,-A.F.; Yamamoto, Takuya; Wan, F.; Wu, Y.

    2013-01-03

    Several types of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel have been developed over the past 30 years in China, Europe, India, Japan, Russia and the USA for application in ITER TBM and future fusion DEMO and power reactors. The progress has been particularly important during the past few years with evaluation of mechanical porperties of these steels before and after irradiation and in contact with different cooling media. This paper presents recent RAFM steel results obtained in ITER partner countries in relation with different TBM and DEMO options

  6. Report on thermal aging effects on tensile properties of ferritic-martensitic steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.; Listwan, J.T.; Natesan, K.

    2012-05-10

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of thermal-aging induced degradation of tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic steels. The report is the first deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030103), under the Work Package A-11AN040301, 'Advanced Alloy Testing' performed by Argonne National Laboratory, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing tensile data on aged alloys and a mechanistic model, validated by experiments, with a predictive capability on long-term performance. The scope of work is to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on the tensile properties of advanced alloys such as ferritic-martensitic steels, mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616, and advanced austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS. The aging experiments have been conducted over a temperature of 550-750 C for various time periods to simulate the microstructural changes in the alloys as a function of time at temperature. In addition, a mechanistic model based on thermodynamics and kinetics has been used to address the changes in microstructure of the alloys as a function of time and temperature, which is developed in the companion work package at ANL. The focus of this project is advanced alloy testing and understanding the effects of long-term thermal aging on the tensile properties. Advanced materials examined in this project include ferritic-martensitic steels mod.9Cr-1Mo and NF616, and austenitic steel, HT-UPS. The report summarizes the tensile testing results of thermally-aged mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 ferritic-martensitic steels. NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 experienced different thermal-mechanical treatments before thermal aging experiments. NF616 H1 was normalized and tempered, and NF616 H2 was normalized and tempered and cold-rolled. By examining these two heats, we evaluated the effects of thermal-mechanical treatments on material microstructures and

  7. Effect of microstructural evolution by isothermal aging on the mechanical properties of 9Cr-1WVTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min-Gu; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Moon, Joonoh; Park, Jun Young; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kang, Namhyun; Chan Kim, Hyoung

    2017-03-01

    The influence of microstructural changes caused by aging condition on tensile and Charpy impact properties was investigated for reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) 9Cr-1WVTa steels having single martensite and a mixed microstructure of martensite and ferrite. For the mixed microstructure of martensite and ferrite, the Charpy impact properties deteriorated in both as-normalized and tempered conditions due to the ferrite and the accompanying M23C6 carbides at the ferrite grain boundaries which act as path and initiation sites for cleavage cracks, respectively. However, aging at 550 °C for 20-100 h recovered gradually the Charpy impact toughness without any distinct drop in strength, as a result of the spheroidization of the coarse M23C6 carbides at the ferrite grain boundaries, which makes crack initiation more difficult.

  8. Influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junru; Liu, Jianjun; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Chaolei; Liu, Yazheng

    2017-03-01

    The dissolution process of delta ferrites and the influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steel 10Cr12Ni3Mo2VN were studied by isothermal heating and thermal simulation experiments. The precipitation temperature of delta ferrites in experimental steel is about 1195 °C. M23C6-type carbides incline to precipitate and coarsen at the boundaries of delta ferrites below 930 °C, and can be rapidly dissolved by heating at 1180 °C. The percentage of delta ferrites gradually decreases with heating time. And a Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation was established to describe the dissolution process of delta ferrites at 1180 °C. High temperature pre-deformation can markedly increase the dissolution rate of delta ferrites. Pre-deformation can largely increase the interface area between delta ferrite and matrix and thus increase the unit-time diffusing quantities of alloying elements between delta ferrites and matrix. In addition, high temperature pre-deformation leads to dynamic recrystallization and increases the number of internal grain boundaries in the delta ferrites. This can also greatly increase the diffusing rate of alloying elements. In these cases, the dissolution of delta ferrites can be promoted.

  9. Influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junru; Liu, Jianjun; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Chaolei; Liu, Yazheng

    2017-02-01

    The dissolution process of delta ferrites and the influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steel 10Cr12Ni3Mo2VN were studied by isothermal heating and thermal simulation experiments. The precipitation temperature of delta ferrites in experimental steel is about 1195 °C. M23C6-type carbides incline to precipitate and coarsen at the boundaries of delta ferrites below 930 °C, and can be rapidly dissolved by heating at 1180 °C. The percentage of delta ferrites gradually decreases with heating time. And a Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation was established to describe the dissolution process of delta ferrites at 1180 °C. High temperature pre-deformation can markedly increase the dissolution rate of delta ferrites. Pre-deformation can largely increase the interface area between delta ferrite and matrix and thus increase the unit-time diffusing quantities of alloying elements between delta ferrites and matrix. In addition, high temperature pre-deformation leads to dynamic recrystallization and increases the number of internal grain boundaries in the delta ferrites. This can also greatly increase the diffusing rate of alloying elements. In these cases, the dissolution of delta ferrites can be promoted.

  10. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T.; Kim, Jeoung Han; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2017-02-01

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This study aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide a comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The KJQ versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.

  11. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T.; Kim, Jeoung Han; ...

    2016-12-07

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This paper aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide amore » comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The KJQ versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Finally, irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.« less

  12. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T.; Kim, Jeoung Han; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2016-12-07

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This paper aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide a comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The KJQ versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Finally, irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.

  13. Investigation of Magnetic Signatures and Microstructures for Heat-Treated Ferritic/Martensitic HT-9 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; McCloy, John S.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan

    2013-05-01

    There is increased interest in improved methods for in-situ nondestructive interrogation of materials for nuclear reactors in order to ensure reactor safety and quantify material degradation (particularly embrittlement) prior to failure. Therefore, a prototypical ferritic/martensitic alloy, HT-9, of interest to the nuclear materials community was investigated to assess microstructure effects on micromagnetics measurements – Barkhausen noise emission, magnetic hysteresis measurements, and first-order reversal curve analysis – for samples with three different heat-treatments. Microstructural and physical measurements consisted of high-precision density, resonant ultrasound elastic constant determination, Vickers microhardness, grain size, and texture. These were varied in the HT-9 alloy samples and related to various magnetic signatures. In parallel, a meso-scale microstructure model was created for alpha iron and effects of polycrystallinity and demagnetization factor were explored. It was observed that Barkhausen noise emission decreased with increasing hardness and decreasing grain size (lath spacing) while coercivity increased. The results are discussed in terms of the use of magnetic signatures for nondestructive interrogation of radiation damage and other microstructural changes in ferritic/martensitic alloys.

  14. Study of martensitic-ferritic dual phase steels produced by hot stamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erişir, E.; Bilir, O. G.

    2017-02-01

    The effects of heat treatment and initial microstructure on tensile properties of 22MnB5 and 30MnB5 high-strength hot stamping steels with martensite-ferrite matrix were investigated. Hot stamping steels possessed limited elongations of about 5% in a tensile strength ranging from 1300 to 1500 MPa when quenched at temperatures above A3 temperatures. The total elongations were tried to improve by partial austenization between Ac1 and Ac3 temperature and quenching. Ac1 and Ac3 temperatures were calculated via ThermoCalc. Microstructural characterization was made by using Light Microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope. Microstructure is composed of ferrite+martensite. It was seen that annealing temperature affects the volume fraction of phases. It was concluded that initial microstructure is an important parameter for the final microstructure. This method can be used for automobile parts which require higher TE with sufficient yield and tensile strength. Also this process may be a way of using Zn coated steel sheets in hot stamping process.

  15. On the (in)adequacy of the Charpy impact test to monitor irradiation effects of ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaouadi, R.

    2007-02-01

    Irradiation embrittlement studies rely very often on Charpy impact data, in particular the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). However, while the DBTT-shift is equivalent to the increase of the fracture toughness transition temperature of ferritic steels, it is not the case for ferritic/martensitic steels. The aim of this study is to critically assess experimental data obtained on a 9%Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel, Eurofer-97, to better understand the underlying mechanisms involved during the fracture process. More specifically, a dedicated analysis using the load diagram approach allows to unambiguously reveal the actual effects of irradiation on physically rather than empirically based parameters. A comparison is made between a ferritic and ferritic/martensitic steel to better identify the possible similarities and differences. Tensile, Charpy impact and fracture toughness tests data are examined in a global approach to assess the actual rather than apparent irradiation effects. The adequacy or inadequacy of the Charpy impact test to monitor irradiation effects is extensively discussed.

  16. Study of Ferrite During Refinement of Prior Austenite Grains in Microalloyed Steel Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiang; Wen, Guanghua; Tang, Ping

    2017-08-01

    The formation of coarse prior austenite grain is a key factor to promote transverse crack, and the susceptibility to the transverse crack can be reduced by refining the austenite grain size. In the present study, the high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) was used to simulate two types of double phase-transformation technologies. The distribution and morphology of ferrites under different cooling conditions were analyzed, and the effects of ferrite distribution and morphology on the double phase-transformation technologies were explored to obtain the suitable double phase-change technology for the continuous casting process. The results indicate that, under the thermal cycle TH0 [the specimens were cooled down to 913 K (640 °C) at a cooling rate of 5.0 K/s (5.0 °C/s)], the width of prior austenite grain boundaries was thick, and the dislocation density at grain boundaries was high. It had strong inhibition effect on crack propagation; under the thermal cycle TH1 [the specimens were cooled down to 1073 K (800 °C) at a cooling rate of 5.0 K/s (5.0 °C/s) and then to 913 K (640 °C) at a cooling rate of 1.0 K/s (1.0 °C/s)], the width of prior austenite grain boundary was thin, and the dislocation density at grain boundaries was low. It was beneficial to crack propagation. After the first phase change, the developed film-like ferrite along the austenite grain boundaries improved the nucleation conditions of new austenitic grains and removed the inhibition effect of the prior austenite grain boundaries on the austenite grain size.

  17. Investigation on the Enhanced Oxidation of Ferritic/Martensitic Steel P92 in Pure Steam.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Juntao; Wu, Ximao; Wang, Wen; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2014-04-03

    Oxidation of ferritic/martensitic steel P92 was investigated in pure oxygen and in pure steam at 600-800 °C by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the oxidation of P92 was significantly enhanced and multilayer scale with an outer iron oxides layer formed in pure steam. At 700 °C, the gas switch markedly influenced the scaling kinetics and scale microstructure. It was supposed that the higher affinity of iron to steam would be attributed to the enhanced oxidation of P92 in pure steam, and the much easier transport of hydroxyl would account for the significant difference induced by gas switch.

  18. Investigation on the Enhanced Oxidation of Ferritic/Martensitic Steel P92 in Pure Steam

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Juntao; Wu, Ximao; Wang, Wen; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of ferritic/martensitic steel P92 was investigated in pure oxygen and in pure steam at 600–800 °C by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the oxidation of P92 was significantly enhanced and multilayer scale with an outer iron oxides layer formed in pure steam. At 700 °C, the gas switch markedly influenced the scaling kinetics and scale microstructure. It was supposed that the higher affinity of iron to steam would be attributed to the enhanced oxidation of P92 in pure steam, and the much easier transport of hydroxyl would account for the significant difference induced by gas switch. PMID:28788592

  19. Summary Report of Summer Work: High Purity Single Crystal Growth & Microstructure of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pestovich, Kimberly Shay

    2015-08-18

    Harnessing the power of the nuclear sciences for national security and to benefit others is one of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s missions. MST-8 focuses on manipulating and studying how the structure, processing, properties, and performance of materials interact at the atomic level under nuclear conditions. Within this group, single crystal scintillators contribute to the safety and reliability of weapons, provide global security safeguards, and build on scientific principles that carry over to medical fields for cancer detection. Improved cladding materials made of ferritic-martensitic alloys support the mission of DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program to close the nuclear fuel cycle, aiming to solve nuclear waste management challenges and thereby increase the performance and safety of current and future reactors.

  20. Creep behavior of pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic martensitic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Zhang, Ying; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    The creep behavior of various pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel was investigated at 650 C in laboratory air. The coatings were fabricated in two temperature regimes, i.e., 650 or 700 C (low temperature) and 1050 C(high temperature), and consisted of a range of Al levels and thicknesses. For comparison, uncoated specimens heat-treated at 1050 C to simulate the high temperature coating cycle also were included in the creep test. All coated specimens showed a reduction in creep resistance, with 16 51% decrease in rupture life compared to the as-received bare substrate alloy. However, the specimens heat-treated at 1050 C exhibited the lowest creep resistance among all tested samples, with a surprisingly short rupture time of < 25 h, much shorter than the specimen coated at 1050 C. Factors responsible for the reduction in creep resistance of both coated and heat-treated specimens were discussed.

  1. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  2. Mechanical properties and microstructure of advanced ferritic-martensitic steels used under high dose neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamardin, V. K.; Golovanov, V. N.; Bulanova, T. M.; Povstianko, A. V.; Fedoseev, A. E.; Goncharenko, Yu. D.; Ostrovsky, Z. E.

    Some results of the study of mechanical properties and structure of ferritic-martensitic chromium steels with 13% and 9% chromium, irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor up to different damage doses are presented in this report. Results concerning the behaviour of commercial steels, containing to molybdenum, vanadium and niobium, and developed for the use in fusion reactors, are compared to low-activation steels in which W and Ta replaced Mo and Nb. It is shown that after irradiation to the dose of ˜10 dpa at 400°C 0.1C-9Cr-1W, V, Ta steels are prone to lower embrittlement as deduced from fracture surface observations of tensile specimens. Peculiarities of fine structure and fracture mode, composition and precipitation reactions in steels during irradiation are discussed.

  3. Effect of mechanical restraint on weldability of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel thick plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serizawa, Hisashi; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Manabu; Kawahito, Yousuke; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Katayama, Seiji

    2011-10-01

    As one of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, the weldability of thick F82H plate was experimentally examined using new heat sources in order to minimize the total heat input energy in comparison with TIG welding. A full penetration of 32 mm thick plate could be produced as a combination of a 12 mm deep first layer generated by a 10 kW fiber laser beam and upper layers deposited by a plasma MIG hybrid welding with Ar + 2%O shielding gas. Also, the effect of mechanical restraint on the weldability under EB welding of thick F82H plate was studied by using FEM to select an appropriate specimen size for the basic test. The appropriate and minimum size for the basic test of weldability under EB welding of 90 mm thick plate might be 200 mm in length and 400 mm in width where the welding length should be about 180 mm.

  4. Reduction method of DBTT shift due to irradiation for reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakai, E.; Okubo, N.; Ando, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Takada, F.

    2010-03-01

    The method for reducing irradiation-induced DBTT shift of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels was examined. F82H-LN (low nitrogen, 20 ppm), F82H+60 ppm 11B+200 ppmN and F82H+60 ppm 10B+200 ppmN steels tempered at 780 °C for 0.5 h were irradiated at 250 °C to 2 dpa, and the results for Charpy impact tests were analyzed. The upper shelf energy of F82H+ 11B+N steel was hardly changed by the irradiation, and DBTT shift was very small. From our research, DBTT shift due to irradiation can be reduced by the control of tempered conditions before irradiation, and it is found to be furthermore reduced by impurity doping with 60 ppm 11B and 200 ppmN to F82H steel.

  5. ODS Ferritic/martensitic alloys for Sodium Fast Reactor fuel pin cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubuisson, Philippe; Carlan, Yann de; Garat, Véronique; Blat, Martine

    2012-09-01

    The development of ODS materials for the cladding for Sodium Fast Reactors is a key issue to achieve the objectives required for the GEN IV reactors. CEA, AREVA and EDF have launched in 2007 an important program to determine the optimal fabrication parameters, and to measure and understand the microstructure and properties before, under and after irradiation of such cladding materials. The aim of this paper is to present the French program and the major results obtained recently at CEA on Fe-9/14/18Cr1WTiY2O3 ferritic/martensitic ODS materials. The first step of the program was to consolidate Fe-9/14/18Cr ODS materials as plates and bars to study the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the new alloys. The second step consists in producing tubes at a geometry representative of the cladding of new Sodium Fast Reactors. The optimization of the fabrication route at the laboratory scale is conducted and different tubes were produced. Their microstructure depends on the martensitic (Fe-9Cr) or ferritic (Fe-14Cr) structure. To join the plug to the tube, the reference process is the welding resistance. A specific approach is developed to model the process and support the development of the welds performed within the "SOPRANO" facility. The development at CEA of Fe-9/14/18Cr new ODS materials for the cladding for GENIV Sodium Fast Reactors is in progress. The first microstructural and mechanical characterizations are very encouraging and the full assessment and qualification of this new alloys and products will pass through the irradiation of specimens, tubes, fuel pins and subassemblies up to high doses.

  6. Liquid metal embrittlement susceptibility of ferritic martensitic steel in liquid lead alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, J.; Bosch, R. W.; Sapundjiev, D.; Almazouzi, A.

    2008-06-01

    The susceptibility of the ferritic-martensitic steels T91 and EUROFER97 to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) in lead alloys has been examined under various conditions. T91, which is currently the most promising candidate material for the high temperature components of the future accelerator driven system (ADS) was tested in liquid lead bismuth eutectic (LBE), whereas the reduced activation steel, EUROFER97 which is under consideration to be the structural steel for fusion reactors was tested in liquid lead lithium eutectic. These steels, similar in microstructure and mechanical properties in the unirradiated condition were tested for their susceptibility to LME as function of temperature (150-450 °C) and strain rate (1 × 10 -3-1 × 10 -6 s -1). Also, the influence of pre-exposure and surface stress concentrators was evaluated for both steels in, respectively, liquid PbBi and PbLi environment. To assess the LME effect, results of the tests in liquid metal environment are compared with tests in air or inert gas environment. Although both unirradiated and irradiated smooth ferritic-martensitic steels do not show any or little deterioration of mechanical properties in liquid lead alloy environment compared to their mechanical properties in gas as function of temperature and strain rate, pre-exposure or the presence of surface stress concentrators does lead to a significant decrease in total elongation for certain test conditions depending on the type of liquid metal environment. The results are discussed in terms of wetting enhanced by liquid metal corrosion or crack initiation processes.

  7. Mechanical property changes of low activation ferritic/martensitic steels after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Hirose, T.; Hamilton, M. L.; Narui, M.

    Mechanical property changes of Fe- XCr-2W-0.2V,Ta ( X: 2.25-12) low activation ferritic/martensitic steels including Japanese Low Activation Ferritic/martensitic (JLF) steels and F82H after neutron irradiation were investigated with emphasis on Charpy impact property, tensile property and irradiation creep properties. Dose dependence of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) in JLF-1 (9Cr steel) irradiated at 646-700 K increased with irradiation up to 20 dpa and then decreased with further irradiation showing highest DBTT of 260 K at 20 dpa. F82H showed similar dose dependence in DBTT to JLF-1 with higher transition temperature than that of JLF-1 at the same displacement damage. Yield strength in JLF steels and F82H showed similar dose dependence to that of DBTT. Yield strength increased with irradiation up to 15-20 dpa and then decreased to saturate above about 40 dpa. Irradiation hardening in 7-9%Cr steels (JLF-1, JLF-3, F82H) were observed to be smaller than those in steels with 2.25%Cr (JLF-4) or 12%Cr (JLF-5). Dependences of creep strain on applied hoop stress and neutron fluence were measured to be 1.5 and 1, respectively. Temperature dependence of creep coefficient showed a maximum at about 700 K which was caused by irradiation induced void formation or irradiation enhanced creep deformation. Creep coefficient of F82H was larger than those of JLF steels above 750 K. This was considered to be caused by the differences in N and Ta concentration between F82H and JLF steels.

  8. Mechanical Performance of Ferritic Martensitic Steels for High Dose Applications in Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderoglu, Osman; Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are considered for core applications and pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors as well as first walls and blankets for fusion reactors. There are significant scientific data on testing and industrial experience in making this class of alloys worldwide. This experience makes F/M steels an attractive candidate. In this article, tensile behavior, fracture toughness and impact property, and creep behavior of the F/M steels under neutron irradiations to high doses with a focus on high Cr content (8 to 12) are reviewed. Tensile properties are very sensitive to irradiation temperature. Increase in yield and tensile strength (hardening) is accompanied with a loss of ductility and starts at very low doses under irradiation. The degradation of mechanical properties is most pronounced at <0.3 T M ( T M is melting temperature) and up to 10 dpa (displacement per atom). Ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit a high fracture toughness after irradiation at all temperatures even below 673 K (400 °C), except when tested at room temperature after irradiations below 673 K (400 °C), which shows a significant reduction in fracture toughness. Creep studies showed that for the range of expected stresses in a reactor environment, the stress exponent is expected to be approximately one and the steady state creep rate in the absence of swelling is usually better than austenitic stainless steels both in terms of the creep rate and the temperature sensitivity of creep. In short, F/M steels show excellent promise for high dose applications in nuclear reactors.

  9. Diffusive transport parameters of deuterium through China reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Liu, Lingbo; Xiang, Xin; Rao, Yongchu; Ye, Xiaoqiu; Chen, Chang An

    2016-03-01

    Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels have been considered as the most promising candidate structure materials for a fusion reactor. In the recent decades, two new types of RAFM steels, called China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel and China Low-activation Ferritic (CLF-1) steel, have been developed. The gas evolution permeation technique has been used to investigate diffusive transport parameters of deuterium through CLAM and CLF-1 over the temperature range 623 ∼ 873 K at deuterium pressure of 105 Pa. The resultant transport parameters are: Φ (mol. m-1 s-1 Pa-1/2) = 5.40 × 10-8 exp (-46.8 (kJ. mol-1)/RT), D(m2 s-1) = 3.81 × 10-7 exp(-24.0(kJ. mol-1)/RT) and S (mol. m-3 Pa-1/2) = 1.42 × 10-1 exp(-22.8(kJ. mol-1)/RT) for CLAM; while Φ(mol m-1 s-1 Pa-1/2) = 1.76 × 10-8 exp(-43.9(kJ. mol-1)/RT), D(m2. s-1) = 1.02 × 10-7 exp(-16.9(kJ. mol-1)/RT) and S(mol. m-1 Pa-1/2) = 1.73 × 10-1 exp(-27.0(kJ. mol-1) /RT) for CLF-1. The results show that CLAM is more permeable than CLF-1, thus it is easier for hydrogen isotopes to transport and be removed.

  10. Proceedings of the IEA working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1995-02-01

    An International Energy Agency (IEA) working group consist- ng of researchers from Japan, the European Union (EU), and the United States, met at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) 16 February 1995 to continue planning a collaborative test program on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications. Plates from a 5-ton, a 1-ton, and three 150 kg heats of reduced-activation martensitic steels have been melted and processed to 7.5- and 15-mm plates in Japan. Plates were delivered in 1994 to the three parties that will participate in the test program. A second 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H steel was produced in Japan in late 1994, and it was processed into 15- and 25-mm plates, which are to be shipped in February, 1995. Weldments will be produced on plates from this heat, and they will be shipped in April, 1995. At the ORNL meeting, a detailed test program and schedule was presented by the EU representatives, and less detailed programs were presented by the Japanese and US representatives. Detailed program schedules are required from the latter two programs to complete the program planning stage. A meeting is planned for 19--20 September 1995 in Switzerland to continue the planning and coordination of the test program and to present the preliminary results obtained in the collaboration.

  11. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Snead, L. L.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-09-01

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ∼500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimental results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. The strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9-20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  12. Microstructural Evolution and Recrystallization Kinetics of a Cold-Rolled, Ferrite-Martensite Structure During Intercritical Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etesami, S. A.; Enayati, M. H.

    2016-07-01

    The recrystallization behavior of 80 pct, cold-rolled, low-carbon, dual-phase steel during intercritical annealing for different times was studied. The annealed microstructures showed that the recrystallization initially occurred in the deformed martensitic regions. The values of Avrami exponent for recrystallization varied from 3.8 to 4 with an activation energy of 46.9 kJ/mol. This study also introduced a novel method for the production of bimodal grain structures in low-carbon, ferrite-martensite steel.

  13. Corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaowei

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels and Ni-based alloys in supercritical water (SCW) has been studied due to their potential applications in future nuclear reactor systems, fossil fuel power plants and waste treatment processes. 9˜12% chromium ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit good radiation resistance and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Ni-based alloys with an austenitic face-centered cubic (FCC) structure are designed to retain good mechanical strength and corrosion/oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Corrosion tests were carried out at three temperatures, 360°C, 500°C and 600°C, with two dissolved oxygen contents, 25 ppb and 2 ppm for up to 3000 hours. Alloys modified by grain refinement and reactive element addition were also investigated to determine their ability to improve the corrosion resistance in SCW. A duplex oxide structure was observed in the F/M steels after exposure to 25 ppb oxygen SCW, including an outer oxide layer with columnar magnetite grains and an inner oxide layer constituted of a mixture of spinel and ferrite phases in an equiaxed grain structure. An additional outermost hematite layer formed in the SCW-exposed samples when the oxygen content was increased to 2 ppm. Weight gain in the F/M steels increased with exposure temperatures and times, and followed parabolic growth kinetics in most of the samples. In Ni-based alloys after exposure to SCW, general corrosion and pitting corrosion were observed, and intergranular corrosion was found when exposed at 600°C due to formation of a local healing layer. The general oxide structure on the Ni-based alloys was characterized as NiO/Spinel/(CrxFe 1-x)2O3/(Fe,Ni). No change in oxidation mechanism was observed in crossing the critical point despite the large change in water properties. Corrosion resistance of the F/M steels was significantly improved by plasma-based yttrium surface treatment because of restrained outward diffusion of iron by the

  14. Parametric study of irradiation effects on the ductile damage and flow stress behavior in ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-10-01

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are currently being considered as structural materials in fusion and Gen-IV nuclear reactors. These materials are expected to experience high dose radiation, which can increase their ductile to brittle transition temperature and susceptibility to failure during operation. Hence, to estimate the safe operational life of the reactors, precise evaluation of the ductile to brittle transition temperatures of ferritic-martensitic steels is necessary. Owing to the scarcity of irradiated samples, particularly at high dose levels, micro-mechanistic models are being employed to predict the shifts in the ductile to brittle transition temperatures. These models consider the ductile damage evolution, in the form of nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids; and the brittle fracture, in the form of probabilistic cleavage initiation, to estimate the influence of irradiation on the ductile to brittle transition temperature. However, the assessment of irradiation dependent material parameters is challenging and influences the accuracy of these models. In the present study, the effects of irradiation on the overall flow stress and ductile damage behavior of two ferritic-martensitic steels is parametrically investigated. The results indicate that the ductile damage model parameters are mostly insensitive to irradiation levels at higher dose levels though the resulting flow stress behavior varies significantly.

  15. Phase transformation and impact properties in the experimentally simulated weld heat-affected zone of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho; Jang, Min-Ho; Park, Min-Gu; Han, Heung Nam

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the phase transformation and impact properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel are investigated. The HAZs were experimentally simulated using a Gleeble simulator. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite through normalizing at 1000 °C and tempering at 750 °C, while the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The impact properties using a Charpy V-notch impact test revealed that the HAZs showed poor impact properties due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared with the base steel. In addition, the impact properties of the HAZs further deteriorated with an increase in the δ-ferrite fraction caused by increasing the peak temperature. The impact properties of the HAZs could be improved through the formation of tempered martensite after post weld heat treatment (PWHT), but they remained lower than that of the base steel because the δ-ferrite remained in the tempered HAZs.

  16. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement will be reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture. In addition to irradiation hardening, neutrons from the fusion reaction will produce large amounts of helium in the steels used to construct fusion power plant components. Tests to simulate the fusion environment indicate that helium can also affect the toughness. Steels are being developed for fusion applications that have a low DBTT prior to irradiation and then show only a small shift after irradiation. A martensitic 9Cr-2WVTa (nominally Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C) steel had a much lower DBTT than the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb steel prior to neutron irradiation and showed a much smaller increase in DBTT after irradiation. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Influence of displacement damage on deuterium and helium retention in austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloys considered for ADS service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyevodin, V. N.; Karpov, S. A.; Kopanets, I. E.; Ruzhytskyi, V. V.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of ion-implanted hydrogen (deuterium) and helium in austenitic 18Cr10NiTi stainless steel, EI-852 ferritic steel and ferritic/martensitic steel EP-450 and their interaction with displacement damage were investigated. Energetic argon irradiation was used to produce displacement damage and bubble formation to simulate nuclear power environments. The influence of damage morphology and the features of radiation-induced defects on deuterium and helium trapping in structural alloys was studied using ion implantation, the nuclear reaction D(3He,p)4He, thermal desorption spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. It was found in the case of helium irradiation that various kinds of helium-radiation defect complexes are formed in the implanted layer that lead to a more complicated spectra of thermal desorption. Additional small changes in the helium spectra after irradiation with argon ions to a dose of ≤25 dpa show that the binding energy of helium with these traps is weakly dependent on the displacement damage. It was established that retention of deuterium in ferritic and ferritic-martensitic alloys is three times less than in austenitic steel at damage of ˜1 dpa. The retention of deuterium in steels is strongly enhanced by presence of radiation damages created by argon ion irradiation, with a shift in the hydrogen release temperature interval of 200 K to higher temperature. At elevated temperatures of irradiation the efficiency of deuterium trapping is reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  18. Influence of structural-phase state of ferritic-martensitic steels on the helium porosity development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, I. I.; Staltsov, M. S.; Kalin, B. A.; Bogachev, I. A.; Guseva, L. Yu; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Drozhzhina, M. V.; Manukovsky, K. V.; Nikolaeva, I. D.

    2016-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to study the effect of the initial structural-phase state (SPhS) of ferritic-martensitic steels EK-181, EP-450 and EP-450- ODS (with 0.5 wt.% nanoparticles of Y2O3) on the of helium porosity formation and gas swelling. Different SPhS of steel EK-181 was produced by water quenching, annealing, normalizing plus tempered, intensive plastic deformation by torsion (HPDT). Irradiation was carried out by He+-40 keV ions at 923 K up to fluence of 5-1020 He+/m2. It is shown that the water quenching causes the formation of uniformly distributed small bubbles (d¯ ∼ 2 nm) of the highest density (ρ∼ 1025 m-3). After normalization followed by tempering as well as after annealing bubbles distribution is highly non-uniform both by volume and in size. Very large faceted bubbles (pre-equilibrium gas-filled voids) are formed in ferrite grains resulting in high level of gas swelling of the irradiated layer with S = 4,9 ± 1,2 and 3.8 ± 0.9% respectively. Nano- and microcrystalline structure created by HPDT completely degenerate at irradiation temperature and ion irradiation formed bubbles of the same parameters as in the annealed steel. Bubbles formed in EP-450-ODS steel are smaller in size and density, which led to a decrease of helium swelling by 4 times (S = 0.8 ± 0.2%) as compared to the swelling of the matrix steel EP-450 (S = 3.1 ± 0.7%).

  19. Development of benchmark reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Gaganidze, E.; Hirose, T.; Ando, M.; Zinkle, S. J.; Lindau, R.; Diegele, E.

    2017-09-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel is the benchmark structural material for in-vessel components of fusion reactor. The current status of RAFM developments and evaluations is reviewed based on two leading RAFM steels, F82H and EUROFER-97. The applicability of various joining technologies for fabrication of fusion first wall and blanket structures, such as weld or diffusion bonding, is overviewed as well. The technical challenges and potential risks of utilizing RAFM steels as the structural material of in-vessel components are discussed, and possible mitigation methodology is introduced. The discussion suggests that deuterium-tritium fusion neutron irradiation effects currently need to be treated as an ambiguity factor which could be incorporated within the safety factor. The safety factor will be defined by the engineering design criteria which are not yet developed with regard to irradiation effects and some high temperature process, and the operating time condition of the in-vessel component will be defined by the condition at which those ambiguities due to neutron irradiation become too large to be acceptable, or by the critical condition at which 14 MeV fusion neutron irradiation effects is expected to become different from fission neutron irradiation effects.

  20. Nano-scale nitride-particle-strengthened high-temperature wrought ferritic and martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, Ronald L; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Maziasz, Philip J

    2009-04-21

    A method of making a steel composition includes the steps of: a. providing a steel composition that includes up to 15% Cr, up to 3% Mo, up to 4% W, 0.05-1% V, up to 2% Si, up to 3% Mn, up to 10% Co, up to 3% Cu, up to 5% Ni, up to 0.3% C, 0.02-0.3% N, balance iron, wherein the percentages are by total weight of the composition; b. austenitizing the composition at a temperature in the range of 1000.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C.; c. cooling the composition of steel to a selected hot-working temperature in the range 500.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C.; d. hot-working the composition at the selected hot-working temperature; e. annealing the composition for a time period of up to 10 hours at a temperature in the range of 500.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C.; and f. cooling the composition to ambient temperature to transform the steel composition to martensite, bainite, ferrite, or a combination of those microstructures.

  1. Microstructural analysis of ferritic-martensitic steels irradiated at low temperature in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, N.; Robertson, J.P.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Wakai, E.

    1998-09-01

    Disk specimens of ferritic-martensitic steel, HT9 and F82H, irradiated to damage levels of {approximately}3 dpa at irradiation temperatures of either {approximately}90 C or {approximately}250 C have been investigated by using transmission electron microscopy. Before irradiation, tempered HT9 contained only M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide. Irradiation at 90 C and 250 C induced a dislocation loop density of 1 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3} and 8 {times} 10{sup 21} m{sup {minus}3}, respectively. in the HT9 irradiated at 250 C, a radiation-induced phase, tentatively identified as {alpha}{prime}, was observed with a number density of less than 1 {times} 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3}. On the other hand, the tempered F82H contained M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and a few MC carbides; irradiation at 250 C to 3 dpa caused minor changes in these precipitates and induced a dislocation loop density of 2 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3}. Difference in the radiation-induced phase and the loop microstructure may be related to differences in the post-yield deformation behavior of the two steels.

  2. Void swelling in high dose ion-irradiated reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Monterrosa, Anthony M.; Zhang, Feifei; Huang, Hao; Yan, Qingzhi; Jiao, Zhijie; Was, Gary S.; Wang, Lumin

    2015-07-01

    To determine the void swelling resistance of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels CNS I and CNS II at high doses, ion irradiation was performed up to 188 dpa (4.6 × 1017 ion/cm2) at 460 °C using 5 MeV Fe++ ions. Helium was pre-implanted at levels of 10 and 100 appm at room temperature to investigate the role of helium on void swelling. Commercial FM steel T91 was also irradiated in this condition and the swelling results are of included in this paper as a reference. Voids were observed in all conditions. The 9Cr CNS I samples implanted with 10 appm helium exhibited lower swelling than 9Cr T91 irradiated at the same condition. The 12Cr CNS II with 10 and 100 appm helium showed significantly lower swelling than CNS I and T91. The swelling rate for CNS I and CNS II were determined to be 0.02%/dpa and 0.003%/dpa respectively. Increasing the helium content from 10 to 100 appm shortened the incubation region and increased the void density but had no effect on the swelling rates.

  3. Ion-irradiation-induced microstructural modifications in ferritic/martensitic steel T91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; Miao, Yinbin; Li, Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Stubbins, James F.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, in situ transmission electron microscopy investigations were carried out to study the microstructural evolution of ferritic/martensitic steel T91 under 1 MeV Krypton ion irradiation up to 4.2 × 1015 ions/cm2 at 573 K, 673 K, and 773 K. At 573 K, grown-in defects are strongly modified by black-dot loops, and dislocation networks together with black-dot loops were observed after irradiation. At 673 K and 773 K, grown-in defects are only partially modified by dislocation loops; isolated loops and dislocation segments were commonly found after irradiation. Post irradiation examination indicates that at 4.2 × 1015 ions/cm2, about 51% of the loops were a0 / 2 < 111 > type for the 673 K irradiation, and the dominant loop type was a0 < 100 > for the 773 K irradiation. Finally, a dispersed barrier hardening model was employed to estimate the change in yield strength, and the calculated ion data were found to follow the similar trend as the existing neutron data with an offset of 100-150 MPa.

  4. Microstructure control for high strength 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Busby, J. T.; Sokolov, M. A.; Klueh, R. L.

    2012-03-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (F-M) steels with 9 wt.%Cr are important structural materials for use in advanced nuclear reactors. Alloying composition adjustment, guided by computational thermodynamics, and thermomechanical treatment (TMT) were employed to develop high strength 9Cr F-M steels. Samples of four heats with controlled compositions were subjected to normalization and tempering (N&T) and TMT, respectively. Their mechanical properties were assessed by Vickers hardness and tensile testing. Ta-alloying showed significant strengthening effect. The TMT samples showed strength superior to the N&T samples with similar ductility. All the samples showed greater strength than NF616, which was either comparable to or greater than the literature data of the PM2000 oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel at temperatures up to 650 °C without noticeable reduction in ductility. A variety of microstructural analyses together with computational thermodynamics provided rational interpretations on the strength enhancement. Creep tests are being initiated because the increased yield strength of the TMT samples is not able to deduce their long-term creep behavior.

  5. The development of ferritic-martensitic steels with reduced long-term activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kelzenberg, S.; Röhrig, H.-D.; Schäfer, L.; Schirra, M.

    1994-09-01

    Ferritic-martensitic 9-12% CrMoVNb steels of MANET type possess a number of advantageous properties for fusion reactor application. Their optimization has led to improved creep and fracture-toughness properties. New 9-10% CrWVTa alloys have been developed by KfK/IMF in collaboration with the SAARSTAHL GmbH which have a reduced long-term activation and show in addition superior fracture toughness properties. The calculation of dose rate and other radiological parameters with the presently available FISPACT/EAF codes, extended by KfK files for sequential reactions has shown that the long-term dose-rate in these alloys is governed by the remaining 'impurity level' of Nb and the alloying elements W and Ta. Sequential reactions — though relevant for single alloying elements like Cr, Mn, V and N — provide only a second order effect in Fe-based alloys. A challenge for the future materials development is the production of alloys with the desired narrow specification of elements and impurities, which necessitates new ways of steelmaking.

  6. A reassessment of the effects of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.; Hankin, G.L.

    1998-03-01

    To test the effect of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels, two approaches are reviewed: quantification of results of tests performed on specimens irradiated in reactors with very different neutron spectra, and isotopic tailoring experiments. Data analysis can show that if the differences in reactor response are indeed due to helium effects, then irradiation in a fusion machine at 400 C to 100 dpa and 1000 appm He will result in a ductile to brittle transition temperature shift of over 500 C. However, the response as a function of dose and helium level is unlikely to be simply due to helium based on physical reasoning. Shear punch tests and microstructural examinations also support this conclusion based on irradiated samples of a series of alloys made by adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation in HFIR. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys. However, helium itself, up to 75 appm at over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys. This behavior is instead understood to result from complex precipitation response. The database for effects of helium on embrittlement based on nickel additions is therefore probably misleading and experiments should be redesigned to avoid nickel precipitation.

  7. Effect of ultrasonic impact peening on the corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ziqiang; Liu, Zhe; Li, Ming; Luo, Jing-Li; Chen, Weixing; Zheng, Wenyue; Guzonas, Dave

    2015-02-01

    Ferritic-Martensitic (F/M) steels are important candidate alloys to be used in the next generation (Generation-IV) SCWRs. In this work, two F/M steels with the same Cr content of around 12 wt.% and varied Si content from 0.6 wt.% to 2.2 wt.% were evaluated in supercritical water (SCW) at 500 °C and 25 MPa for up to 1000 h. The effect of ultrasonic shot peening on the oxidation behavior of these F/M steels have been investigated. The results showed that the oxidation was affected by the Si content as well as the surface modification. The F/M steel with low Si concentration exhibited higher corrosion resistance than that of the alloy with high Si content. Shot peening, which could modify the microstructure at the surface, showed significantly beneficial effect to improving the oxidation resistance. A thin, uniform oxide layer formed on the peened sample could be attributed to the enhanced diffusion of Cr induced by the surface modification.

  8. Studies on A-TIG welding of Low Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (LAFM) steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.

    2012-02-01

    Low Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steels (LAFM) are chosen as the candidate material for structural components in fusion reactors. The structural components are generally fabricated by welding processes. Activated Tungsten Inert Gas (A-TIG) welding is an emerging process for welding of thicker components. In the present work, attempt was made to develop A-TIG welding technology for LAFM steel plates of 10 mm thick. Activated flux was developed for LAFM steel by carrying out various bead-on-plate TIG welds without flux and with flux. The optimum flux was identified as one which gave maximum depth of penetration at minimum heat input values. With the optimized flux composition, LAFM steel plate of 10 mm thickness was welded in square butt weld joint configuration using double side welding technique. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy was used for characterizing the microstructures. Microhardness measurements were made across the weld cross section for as welded and post weld heat treated samples. Tensile and impact toughness properties were determined. The mechanical properties values obtained in A-TIG weld joint were comparable to that obtained in weld joints of LAFM steel made by Electron beam welding process.

  9. Neodymium-rich precipitate phases in a high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yinzhong; Zhou, Xiaoling; Shang, Zhongxia

    2016-05-01

    Neodymium being considered as nitride forming element has been used in a design of advanced ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels for fossil fired power plants at service temperatures of 630 °C to 650 °C to effectively improve the creep strength of the steels. To fully understand the characteristics of neodymium precipitates in high-Cr FM steels, precipitate phases in an 11Cr FM steel with 0.03 wt% addition of Nd have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Three neodymium phases with a face-centered cubic crystal structure and different composition were observed in the steel. They consisted of neodymium carbonitride with an average lattice parameter of 1.0836 nm, Nd-rich carbonitride mainly containing Mn, and Nd-rich MN nitride mainly containing Mn and Co. Other three Nd-rich and Nd-containing phases, which appear to be Nd-Co-Cr/Nd-rich intermetallic compounds and Cr-Fe-rich nitride containing Nd, were also detected in the steel. Nd-relevant precipitates were found to be minor phases compared with M23C6 and Nb/V/Ta-rich MX phases in the steel. The content of Nd in other precipitate phases was very low. Most of added Nd is considered to be present as solid solution in the matrix of the steel.

  10. Precipitate phases in normalized and tempered ferritic/martensitic steel P92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yinzhong; Liu, Huan; Shang, Zhongxia; Xu, Zhiqiang

    2015-10-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steel P92 is a promising candidate for cladding and duct applications in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor. The precipitate phases of the P92 steel normalized at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 30 min and tempered at 1038 K (765 °C) for 1 h have been investigated using transmission electron microscopes. Four types of phases consisting of M23C6, MX, M2X and sigma-FeCr were identified in the steel. MX phases consist of Nb-rich M(C,N) carbonitride, Nb-rich MC carbide, V-rich M(C,N) carbonitride, V-rich MC carbide, V-rich MN nitride, and complex MC carbides with Nb-rich MC core and V-rich MC wings. M2X phases consist of Cr-rich M2(C,N) carbonitride, Cr-rich M2C carbide and M2N nitride. Sigma-FeCr has a simple tetragonal lattice and a typical chemical formula of Fe0.45Cr0.45W0.1. M23C6 and MX are the dominant phases, while the sigma-FeCr has the lowest content. The formation of sigma-FeCr and M2X phases in the steel is also discussed.

  11. Using nonlinear ultrasound measurements to track thermal aging in modified 9%Cr ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Daniel; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Ruiz, Alberto; Joo, Young-Sang

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates early thermal aging in 9%Cr ferritic martensitic (FM) steel, which is caused by the formation of second phases during high temperature exposure. This study employs a recently developed nonlinear ultrasonic technique to explore the sensitivity of the nonlinearity parameter. Experimental results show that the nonlinearity parameter is sensitive to certain changes in material's properties such as thermal embrittlement and hardness changes; therefore, it can be used as an indicator of the thermal damage. The specimens investigated are heat treated for different holding times ranging from 200h to 3000h at 650°C. Nonlinear ultrasonic experiments are conducted for each specimen using a wedge transducer to generate and an air-coupled transducer to detect Raleigh surface waves. The amplitudes of the first and second order harmonics are measured at different propagation distances and these amplitudes are used to obtain the relative nonlinearity parameter for each specimen with a different holding time. The nonlinear ultrasonic results are compared with independent mechanical measurements and metallographic images. This research proposes the nonlinear ultrasonic technique as a nondestructive evaluation tool not only to detect thermal damage in early stages, and also to qualitatively assess the stage of thermal damage.

  12. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Luzginova, N.; Tanigawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe-Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7-9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe-8%Cr-2%W-TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe-9%Cr-1%W-TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  13. Charpy impact tests on martensitic/ferritic steels after irradiation in SINQ target-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yong; Marmy, Pierre

    2005-08-01

    Charpy impact tests were performed on martensitic/ferritic (MF) steels T91, F82H, Optifer-V and Optimax-A/-C irradiated in SINQ Target-3 up to 7.5 dpa and 500 appm He in a temperature range of 120-195 °C. Results demonstrate that for all the four kinds of steels, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) increases with irradiation dose. The difference in the DBTT shifts (ΔDBTT) of the different steels is not significant after irradiation in the SINQ target. The ΔDBTT data from the previous small punch (Δ DBTT SP) and the present Charpy impact (ΔDBTT CVN) tests can be correlated with the expression: Δ DBTT SP = 0.4ΔDBTT CVN. All the ΔDBTT data fall into a linear band when they are plotted versus helium concentration. The results indicate that helium effects on the embrittlement of MF steels are significant, particularly at higher concentrations. It suggests that MF steels may not be very suitable for applications at low temperatures in spallation irradiation environments where helium production is high.

  14. Effect of silicon on the microstructure and mechanical properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shenghu; Rong, Lijian

    2015-04-01

    The effect of Si in the range of 0.05-0.77 wt.% on the microstructure, tensile properties and impact toughness of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels has been investigated. An increase in Si content affected the prior austenite grain size resulting in an increase in the tensile strength at room temperature. The tensile strength of steels tested above 773 K did not change significantly with the addition of Si, which was due to the diminished carbide hardening effect and boundary strengthening effect. Detailed fractographic analysis revealed that tear fractures occurred in the samples tensile tested at room temperature, while cup and cone fractures were found in samples tensile tested at temperatures above 773 K, which were induced by the easing of dislocation pile-ups. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) decreased when the Si content increased to 0.22 wt.%. However, the DBTT increased when the Si content reached 0.77 wt.% and this was due to the precipitation of Laves phase. The RAFM steel with approximately 0.22 wt.% Si content was found to possess an optimized combination of microstructure, tensile properties and impact toughness.

  15. Microstructure property analysis of HFIR-irradiated reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Hashimoto, N.; Sakasegawa, H.; Klueh, R. L.; Sokolov, M. A.; Shiba, K.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kohyama, A.

    2004-08-01

    The effects of irradiation on the Charpy impact properties of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels were investigated on a microstructural basis. It was previously reported that the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of F82H-IEA and its heat treatment variant increased by about 130 K after irradiation at 573 K up to 5 dpa. Moreover, the shifts in ORNL9Cr-2WVTa and JLF-1 steels were much smaller, and the differences could not be interpreted as an effect of irradiation hardening. The precipitation behavior of the irradiated steels was examined by weight analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis on extraction residues, and SEM/EDS analysis was performed on extraction replica samples and fracture surfaces. These analyses suggested that the difference in the extent of DBTT shift could be explained by (1) smaller irradiation hardening at low test temperatures caused by irradiation-induced lath structure recovery (in JLF-1), and (2) the fracture stress increase caused by the irradiation-induced over-solution of Ta (in ORNL9Cr-2WVTa).

  16. A review of some effects of helium on charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.; Hankin, G. L.; Hamilton, M. L.

    1998-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels, two approaches are reviewed: quantification of results of earlier tests performed by other researchers on specimens irradiated in reactors with very different neutron spectra, and evaluation of isotopic tailoring experiments. Data analysis can show that if the differences in reactor response are indeed due to helium effects, then irradiation in a fusion machine at 400°C to 100 dpa and 1000 appm He will result in a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift of over 500°C. However, it can be shown that the response as a function of dose and helium level is unlikely to be simply due to helium based on physical reasoning. Shear punch tests and microstructural examinations support this conclusion based on irradiated samples of a series of alloys made by adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys. However, helium itself, up to 75 appm at over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys. This behavior is instead understood to result from complex precipitation response. The database for effects of helium on embrittlement based on nickel additions is therefore probably misleading and experiments should be redesigned to avoid nickel precipitation.

  17. In-beam fatigue of a ferritic-martensitic steel. First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmy, P.

    1994-09-01

    Due to its pulsed operation mode, a fusion device will have to sustain thermal stresses and at the same time be exposed to a flux of 14 MeV neutrons. In order to simulate this irradiation condition, a new irradiation device has been developed, in which the specimen can be stress and strain-controlled during the irradiation. For the simulation of the fusion neutrons, a 590 MeV proton beam is used. This type of particle produces from spallation reactions the displacement damage and the helium typical of fusion neutrons in the material. The influence of the in situ deformation on the low cycle fatigue of a 12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steel (MANET II) has been investigated. The results are compared with results from non-irradiated specimens and from specimens tested after irradiation to the same end-of-life fluence. The effects of the different conditions are reported for a temperature TTest = TIrr = 573 K and a total imposed strain of 0.7%.

  18. High Strain Fatigue Properties of the F82H Ferritic-Martensitic Steel under Proton Irradiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Marmy, P; Oliver, Brian M. )

    2003-05-15

    During the up and down cycles of a fusion reactor, the first wall is exposed concomitantly to a flux of energetic neutrons that generates radiation defects and to a neutron thermal flux that induces thermal stresses. The resulting strains may exceed the elastic limit and induce a plastic deformation in the material. A similar situation occurs in the window of a spallation liquid source target and results in the same type of damage. This particular loading has been simulated in F82H martensitic ferritic steel, using a device allowing a fatigue test to be carried out during irradiation with 590 MeV protons. All fatigue tests were carried out at 300?C, in a strain controlled test at strain levels around 0.8%. Two different signals have been used: a fully symmetrical triangle wave signal (R=-1) and a triangle ramp with 2 min tension holds. The fatigue was investigated under three different conditions: unirradiated , irradiated and post irradiation tested, and finally in beam tested. The main result is that the in beam tested specimens have the lowest life as compared to the post irradiation tested specimens and unirradiated specimens. Hydrogen is suspected to be the main contributor to the observed embrittlement.

  19. High strain fatigue properties of F82H ferritic martensitic steel under proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmy, P.; Oliver, B. M.

    2003-05-01

    During the up and down cycles of a fusion reactor, the first wall is exposed concomitantly to a flux of energetic neutrons that generates radiation defects and to a thermal flux that induces thermal stresses. The resulting strains may exceed the elastic limit and induce plastic deformation in the material. A similar situation occurs in the window of a spallation liquid source target and results in the same type of damage. This particular loading has been simulated in F82H ferritic-martensitic steel, using a device allowing a fatigue test to be carried out during irradiation with 590 MeV protons. All fatigue tests were carried out in a strain controlled test at strain levels around 0.8% and at 300 °C. Two different signals have been used: a fully symmetrical triangle wave signal ( R=-1) and a triangle ramp with 2 min tension holds. The fatigue was investigated under three different conditions: unirradiated, irradiated and post-irradiation tested, and finally in-beam tested. The main result is that the in-beam tested specimens have the lowest life as compared to the post-irradiation tested specimen and unirradiated specimen. Hydrogen is suspected to be the main contributor to the observed embrittlement.

  20. Formation and Oxidation Performance of Low-Temperature Pack Aluminide Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Ying; Pint, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    A pack cementation process was developed to coat commercial 9% Cr ferritic-martensitic steel T91 at temperatures below its normal tempering temperature to avoid any potential detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of the coated alloy. In order to prevent the formation of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} coatings, the Al activity in the pack cementation process was reduced by substituting the pure Al masteralloy with binary Cr-Al masteralloys containing either 15 or 25 wt.% Al. When the Cr-25Al masteralloy was used, a duplex coating was formed at 700 C, consisting of a thin Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} outer layer and an inner layer of FeAl. With the Cr-15Al masteralloy, an FeAl coating of {approx} 12 {micro}m thick was achieved at 700 C. The pack aluminide coatings fabricated at 700 C are being evaluated in air + 10 vol.% H{sub 2}O at 650 C and 700 C to determine their long-term oxidation performance.

  1. Diffusion Bonding Beryllium to Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel: Development of Processes and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ryan Matthew

    Only a few materials are suitable to act as armor layers against the thermal and particle loads produced by magnetically confined fusion. These candidates include beryllium, tungsten, and carbon fiber composites. The armor layers must be joined to the plasma facing components with high strength bonds that can withstand the thermal stresses resulting from differential thermal expansion. While specific joints have been developed for use in ITER (an experimental reactor in France), including beryllium to CuCrZr as well as tungsten to stainless steel interfaces, joints specific to commercially relevant fusion reactors are not as well established. Commercial first wall components will likely be constructed front Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, which will need to be coating with one of the three candidate materials. Of the candidates, beryllium is particularly difficult to bond, because it reacts during bonding with most elements to form brittle intermetallic compounds. This brittleness is unacceptable, as it can lead to interface crack propagation and delamination of the armor layer. I have attempted to overcome the brittle behavior of beryllium bonds by developing a diffusion bonding process of beryllium to RAFM steel that achieves a higher degree of ductility. This process utilized two bonding aids to achieve a robust bond: a. copper interlayer to add ductility to the joint, and a titanium interlayer to prevent beryllium from forming unwanted Be-Cu intermetallics. In addition, I conducted a series of numerical simulations to predict the effect of these bonding aids on the residual stress in the interface. Lastly, I fabricated and characterized beryllium to ferritic steel diffusion bonds using various bonding parameters and bonding aids. Through the above research, I developed a process to diffusion bond beryllium to ferritic steel with a 150 M Pa tensile strength and 168 M Pa shear strength. This strength was achieved using a Hot Isostatic

  2. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wei; Chen, Gaoqiang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Frederick, David Alan; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  3. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry.

  4. Assessment of Tungsten Content on Tertiary Creep Deformation Behavior of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar

    2015-10-01

    Tertiary creep deformation behavior of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels having different tungsten contents has been assessed. Creep tests were carried out at 823 K (550 °C) over a stress range of 180 to 260 MPa on three heats of the RAFM steel (9Cr-W-0.06Ta-0.22V) with tungsten content of 1, 1.4, and 2.0 wt pct. With creep exposure, the steels exhibited minimum in creep rate followed by progressive increase in creep rate until fracture. The minimum creep rate decreased, rupture life increased, and the onset of tertiary stage of creep deformation delayed with the increase in tungsten content. The tertiary creep behavior has been assessed based on the relationship, , considering minimum creep rate () instead of steady-state creep rate. The increase in tungsten content was found to decrease the rate of acceleration of tertiary parameter ` p.' The relationships between (1) tertiary parameter `p' with minimum creep rate and time spent in tertiary creep deformation and (2) the final creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the same first-order reaction rate theory prevailed in the minimum creep rate as well as throughout the tertiary creep deformation behavior of the steel. A master tertiary creep curve of the steels has been developed. Scanning electron microscopic investigation revealed enhanced coarsening resistance of carbides in the steel on creep exposure with increase in tungsten content. The decrease in tertiary parameter ` p' with tungsten content with the consequent decrease in minimum creep rate and increase in rupture life has been attributed to the enhanced microstructural stability of the steel.

  5. Gap Analysis of Material Properties Data for Ferritic/Martensitic HT-9 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Neil R.; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena; Rodriguez, Edward A.

    2012-08-28

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), is supporting the development of an ASME Code Case for adoption of 12Cr-1Mo-VW ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel, commonly known as HT-9, primarily for use in elevated temperature design of liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFR) and components. In 2011, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) nuclear engineering staff began assisting in the development of a small modular reactor (SMR) design concept, previously known as the Hyperion Module, now called the Gen4 Module. LANL staff immediately proposed HT-9 for the reactor vessel and components, as well as fuel clad and ducting, due to its superior thermal qualities. Although the ASME material Code Case, for adoption of HT-9 as an approved elevated temperature material for LMFR service, is the ultimate goal of this project, there are several key deliverables that must first be successfully accomplished. The most important key deliverable is the research, accumulation, and documentation of specific material parameters; physical, mechanical, and environmental, which becomes the basis for an ASME Code Case. Time-independent tensile and ductility data and time-dependent creep and creep-rupture behavior are some of the material properties required for a successful ASME Code case. Although this report provides a cursory review of the available data, a much more comprehensive study of open-source data would be necessary. This report serves three purposes: (a) provides a list of already existing material data information that could ultimately be made available to the ASME Code, (b) determines the HT-9 material properties data missing from available sources that would be required and (c) estimates the necessary material testing required to close the gap. Ultimately, the gap analysis demonstrates that certain material properties testing will be required to fulfill the necessary information package for an ASME Code Case.

  6. Oxidation behavior of ferritic-martensitic and ODS steels in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Jeremy

    Ferritic-martensitic and ODS alloys are primary candidates for application as cladding and structural material in Generation IV nuclear power plants, especially the supercritical water reactor. One of the main in-service degradation mechanisms for these alloys is uniform corrosion, thus this project focuses on understanding the oxidation behavior of these alloys in the supercritical water (SCW) environment. This understanding is acquired through the analysis of the oxide microstructure using microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence associated with electron microscopy (both SEM and TEM). The microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence technique provides unique microstructural data of the oxide. This technique simultaneously probes elemental and phase information step by step with a sub-micron spatial resolution throughout the oxide layers. Thus we were able to locate specific phases, such as Cr2O3, at specific locations in the oxide layer, mainly the interfaces. The electron microscopy complemented this analysis by imaging the oxide layers, to yield detailed information on the oxide morphology. All the alloys studied exhibited the same three-layer structure with an outer layer containing only Fe3O4, an inner layer containing a mixture of Fe3O4 and FeCr2O 4, and a diffusion layer containing a mixture of chromium-rich precipitates (Cr2O3 and FeCr2O4) and metal grains. By analyzing samples with various exposure times, we were able to follow the evolution of the oxide microstructure with exposure time. To obtain the corroded samples, several corrosion experiments were performed: some in supercritical water (at 500°C and 600°C) and one experiment in 500°C steam. The test in steam was undertaken to obtain more data points in the kinetic curves, because we thought the corrosion in steam and supercritical water at the same temperature would result in similar kinetics. This turned out not to be the case and the samples in supercritical

  7. Microscale deformation of a tempered martensite ferritic steel: Modelling and experimental study of grain and sub-grain interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, Brian J.; Li, Dong-Feng; Guo, Yina; Tiernan, Peter; Leen, Sean B.; O'Dowd, Noel P.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a finite-element modelling framework is presented with explicit representation of polycrystalline microstructure for a tempered martensite ferritic steel. A miniature notched specimen was manufactured from P91 steel with a 20,000 h service history and tested at room temperature under three point bending. Deformation at the microscale is quantified by electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) before and after mechanical loading. A representative volume element was developed, based on the initial EBSD scan, and a crystal plasticity model used to account for slip-based inelastic deformation in the material. The model showed excellent correlation with the experimental data when the relevant comparisons were made.

  8. Fractographic examination of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel charpy specimens irradiated to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.; Schubert, L.E.

    1996-10-01

    Fractographic examinations are reported for a series of reduced activation ferritic/Martensitic steel Charpy impact specimens tested following irradiation to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C in FFTF. One-third size specimens of six low activation steels developed for potential application as structural materials in fusion reactors were examined. A shift in brittle fracture appearance from cleavage to grain boundary failure was noted with increasing manganese content. The results are interpreted in light of transmutation induced composition changes in a fusion environment.

  9. Phase Transformation Study in Nb-Mo Microalloyed Steels Using Dilatometry and EBSD Quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isasti, Nerea; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Taheri, Mitra L.; Uranga, Pello

    2013-08-01

    A complete microstructural characterization and phase transformation analysis has been performed for several Nb and Nb-Mo microalloyed low-carbon steels using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and dilatometry tests. Compression thermomechanical schedules were designed resulting in the undeformed and deformed austenite structures before final transformation. The effects of microalloying additions and accumulated deformation were analyzed after CCT diagram development and microstructural quantification. The resulting microstructures ranged from polygonal ferrite and pearlite at slow cooling ranges, to a combination of quasipolygonal ferrite and granular ferrite for intermediate cooling rates, and finally, to bainitic ferrite with martensite for fast cooling rates. The addition of Mo promotes a shift in the CCT diagrams to lower transformation start temperatures. When the amount of Nb is increased, CCT diagrams show little variations for transformations from the undeformed austenite and higher initial transformation temperatures in the transformations from the deformed austenite. This different behavior is due to the effect of niobium on strain accumulation in austenite and its subsequent acceleration of transformation kinetics. This article shows the complex interactions between chemical composition, deformation, and the phases formed, as well as their effect on microstructural unit sizes and homogeneity.

  10. Controlled Forging of a Nb Containing Microalloyed Steel for Automotive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhaie, Davood; Hosseini Benhangi, Pooya; Fazeli, Fateh; Mazinani, Mohammad; Zohourvahid Karimi, Ebrahim; Ghandehari Ferdowsi, Mahmoud Reza

    2012-12-01

    Controlled forging of microalloyed steels is a viable economical process for the manufacture of automotive parts. Ferrite grain refinement and precipitation hardening are the major microstructural parameters to enhance the mechanical properties of the forged components. In the current study, a modified thermomechanical treatment for additional ferrite grain refinement is developed by exploiting the effect of Nb in increasing the T NR (no recrystallization temperature) and via phase transformation from a pancaked austenite. This is accomplished by performing the final passes of forging below the T NR temperature followed by a controlled cooling stage to produce a mixture of fine grained ferrite, small scaled acicular ferrite as well as a limited amount of martensite. The effect of processing parameters in terms of forging strain, cooling rate and aging condition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a medium carbon, Nb containing microalloyed steel is investigated. An attempt is made to identify a suitable microstructure that provides a proper combination of high strength and good impact toughness. The processing-microstructure relationships for the proposed novel forging procedure are discussed, and directions for further improvements are outlined.

  11. Development of next generation tempered and ODS reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Boutard, J. L.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Kimura, A.; Lindau, R.; Odette, G. R.; Rieth, M.; Tan, L.; Tanigawa, H.

    2017-09-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are currently the most technologically mature option for the structural material of proposed fusion energy reactors. Advanced next-generation higher performance steels offer the opportunity for improvements in fusion reactor operational lifetime and reliability, superior neutron radiation damage resistance, higher thermodynamic efficiency, and reduced construction costs. The two main strategies for developing improved steels for fusion energy applications are based on (1) an evolutionary pathway using computational thermodynamics modelling and modified thermomechanical treatments (TMT) to produce higher performance reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels and (2) a higher risk, potentially higher payoff approach based on powder metallurgy techniques to produce very high strength oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels capable of operation to very high temperatures and with potentially very high resistance to fusion neutron-induced property degradation. The current development status of these next-generation high performance steels is summarized, and research and development challenges for the successful development of these materials are outlined. Material properties including temperature-dependent uniaxial yield strengths, tensile elongations, high-temperature thermal creep, Charpy impact ductile to brittle transient temperature (DBTT) and fracture toughness behaviour, and neutron irradiation-induced low-temperature hardening and embrittlement and intermediate-temperature volumetric void swelling (including effects associated with fusion-relevant helium and hydrogen generation) are described for research heats of the new steels.

  12. Development of next generation tempered and ODS reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion energy applications

    DOE PAGES

    Zinkle, S. J.; Boutard, J. L.; Hoelzer, D. T.; ...

    2017-06-09

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are currently the most technologically mature option for the structural material of proposed fusion energy reactors. Advanced next-generation higher performance steels offer the opportunity for improvements in fusion reactor operational lifetime and reliability, superior neutron radiation damage resistance, higher thermodynamic efficiency, and reduced construction costs. The two main strategies for developing improved steels for fusion energy applications are based on (1) an evolutionary pathway using computational thermodynamics modelling and modified thermomechanical treatments (TMT) to produce higher performance reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels and (2) a higher risk, potentially higher payoff approach based on powder metallurgy techniquesmore » to produce very high strength oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels capable of operation to very high temperatures and with potentially very high resistance to fusion neutron-induced property degradation. The current development status of these next-generation high performance steels is summarized, and research and development challenges for the successful development of these materials are outlined. In conclusion, material properties including temperature-dependent uniaxial yield strengths, tensile elongations, high-temperature thermal creep, Charpy impact ductile to brittle transient temperature (DBTT) and fracture toughness behaviour, and neutron irradiation-induced low-temperature hardening and embrittlement and intermediate-temperature volumetric void swelling (including effects associated with fusion-relevant helium and hydrogen generation) are described for research heats of the new steels.« less

  13. Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking of High Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in Supercritical Water

    SciTech Connect

    Jinsung, Jang; Seong Sik, Hwang; Chang Hee, Han; Byung Hak, Lee

    2006-07-01

    Corrosion behavior of the F-M (ferritic-martensitic) steels (T91, T92, T122) and Fe-base ODS (oxide dispersion strengthened) alloy (MA956{sup TM}) were evaluated in an aerated (8 ppm D.O.) SCW (supercritical water) at the temperature range between 300 and 627 deg C under 25 MPa. In aerated SCW the weight change of the F-M steel specimens became greater as the test temperature increased. However, the extent of the weight change at 350 deg C, just below the critical temperature appeared not to be less than those at 550 deg C. And the weight changes of all the F-M steel specimens in the deaerated SCW (for 347 hrs in 100 ppb D.O. for 347 hrs, and in 10 ppb D.O. for 432 hrs) tended to converge to about 1 mgcm{sup -2}. In aerated or deaerated conditions 20Cr Fe-base ODS alloy appeared to be very resistant to a SCW corrosion at all the test temperatures up to 500 hrs. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 9Cr F-M steels (T91 and T92) was investigated by CERT (Constant Extension Rate Test) in SCW at various temperatures and D.O. levels with different strain rates. T91 did not show any evidence of a SCC in a fully deaerated (below 10 ppb D.O.) SCW at 500, 550, and 600 deg C at the test conditions. T92 specimens were tested at 500 deg C in SCW with different D.O. levels. The strain rate did not seem to affect the SCC behavior of the T92 steel, but D.O. in SCW seems to affect the SCC behavior to some extent. The total elongation of T92 in SCW of 100 ppb or of 500 ppb D.O. was significantly smaller than that at a fully deaerated (below 10 ppb D.O.) SCW (about 15 vs. 20%), and it appears to provide a clue to a SCC on the fracture surface after the CERT test. (authors)

  14. Precipitation behavior and martensite lath coarsening during tempering of T/P92 ferritic heat-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lin-qing; Zhang, Dan-tian; Liu, Yong-chang; Ning, Bao-qun; Qiao, Zhi-xia; Yan, Ze-sheng; Li, Hui-jun

    2014-05-01

    Tempering is an important process for T/P92 ferritic heat-resistant steel from the viewpoint of microstructure control, as it facilitates the formation of final tempered martensite under serving conditions. In this study, we have gained deeper insights on the mechanism underlying the microstructural evolution during tempering treatment, including the precipitation of carbides and the coarsening of martensite laths, as systematically analyzed by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the precipitates was analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicate the formation of M3C (cementite) precipitates under normalized conditions. However, they tend to dissolve within a short time of tempering, owing to their low thermal stability. This phenomenon was substantiated by X-ray diffraction analysis. Besides, we could observe the precipitation of fine carbonitrides (MX) along the dislocations. The mechanism of carbon diffusion controlled growth of M23C6 can be expressed by the Zener's equation. The movement of Y-junctions was determined to be the fundamental mechanism underlying the martensite lath coarsening process. Vickers hardness was estimated to determine their mechanical properties. Based on the comprehensive analysis of both the micro-structural evolution and hardness variation, the process of tempering can be separated into three steps.

  15. Microstructural evolution of ferritic-martensitic steels under heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topbasi, Cem

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are primary candidate materials for fuel cladding and internal applications in the Sodium Fast Reactor, as well as first-wall and blanket materials in future fusion concepts because of their favorable mechanical properties and resistance to radiation damage. Since microstructure evolution under irradiation is amongst the key issues for these materials in these applications, developing a fundamental understanding of the irradiation-induced microstructure in these alloys is crucial in modeling and designing new alloys with improved properties. The goal of this project was to investigate the evolution of microstructure of two commercial ferritic-martensitic steels, NF616 and HCM12A, under heavy ion irradiation at a broad temperature range. An in situ heavy ion irradiation technique was used to create irradiation damage in the alloy; while it was being examined in a transmission electron microscope. Electron-transparent samples of NF616 and HCM12A were irradiated in situ at the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory with 1 MeV Kr ions to ˜10 dpa at temperatures ranging from 20 to 773 K. The microstructure evolution of NF616 and HCM12A was followed in situ by systematically recording micrographs and diffraction patterns as well as capturing videos during irradiation. In these irradiations, there was a period during which no changes are visible in the microstructure. After a threshold dose (˜0.1 dpa between 20 and 573 K, and ˜2.5 dpa at 673 K) black dots started to become visible under the ion beam. These black dots appeared suddenly (from one frame to the next) and are thought to be small defect clusters (2-5 nm in diameter), possibly small dislocation loops with Burgers vectors of either ½ or . The overall density of these defect clusters increased with dose and saturated around 6 dpa. At saturation, a steady-state is reached in which defects are eliminated and created at the same rates so that the

  16. Microstructural Variations Across a Dissimilar 316L Austenitic: 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel Weld Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Karthikeyan, T.; Dasgupta, Arup; Sudha, C.; Hajra, R. N.; Albert, S. K.; Saroja, S.; Jayakumar, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discuss the microstructural variations across a dissimilar weld joint between SS316 and 9Cr-RAFM steel and its modifications on post weld heat treatments (PWHT). Detailed characterization showed a mixed microstructure of austenite and martensite in the weld which is in agreement with the phases predicted using Schaeffler diagram based on composition measurements. The presence of very low volume fraction of δ-ferrite in SS316L has been identified employing state of the art electron back-scattered diffraction technique. PWHT of the ferritic steel did not reduce the hardness in the weld metal. Thermal exposure at 973 K (700 °C) showed a progressive reduction in hardness of weld joint with duration of treatment except in austenitic base metal. However, diffusion annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) for 100 hours resulted in an unexpected increase in hardness of weld metal, which is a manifestation of the dilution effects and enrichment of Ni on the transformation characteristics of the weld zone. Migration of carbon from ferritic steel aided the precipitation of fine carbides in the austenitic base metal on annealing at 973 K (700 °C); but enhanced diffusion at 1073 K (880 °C) resulted in coarsening of carbides and thereby reduction of hardness.

  17. Oxidation kinetics and mechanisms in HT-9 ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez Velez, Soraya

    Lead and lead alloys, such as lead bismuth eutectic (LBE), have gained worldwide recognition as potential candidates for coolant and target material in accelerator-driven systems (ADS) due to their excellent chemical, physical, and nuclear properties; however, they are corrosive to stainless steels, which are candidate materials for piping and molten metal containers in ADS applications. The Russians have used LBE as a coolant in their nuclear submarines for more than several decades and their experience has given way to the hypothesis that oxides protect steels from LBE corrosion, thus renewing interest in further understanding the oxidation kinetics and mechanisms of candidate stainless steel alloys. The proposed work will contribute to the ongoing research effort by elucidating the oxidation kinetics and mechanisms, and characterizing the oxides of HT-9, a candidate stainless steel for ADS application. HT-9 (DIN X20CrMoWV12 or Fe-12Cr-MoVW) is a 12 wt% Cr martensitic/ferritic stainless steel alloy developed by Sandvik (Sweden). The approach is to perform thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to evaluate the oxidation kinetics and assess oxidation rates. Flat bar samples polished to one micron were subjected to non-isothermal and isothermal oxidation scans. Non-isothermal scans were done in dry air from room temperature to 950°C with ramping rates of 2°C/minute and 5°C/minute to obtain preliminary oxidation behavior information. Isothermal scans were done in dry air from 600°C to 800°C for 48 hours, from 800°C to 900°C for 24 hours, and at 950°C for 6 hours. The structure and composition of the oxide film developed during the isothermal scans were characterized using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy capabilities (SEM/EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Oxidation of HT-9 exhibited a complex behavior that does not follow a simple oxidation model and changes as a function of exposure time. At low temperatures (T ≥ 825°C), the

  18. Thermal Diffusivity of Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel Determined by the Time Domain Photoacoustic Piezoelectric Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Binxing; Wang, Yafei; Gao, Chunming; Sun, Qiming; Wang, Pinghuai

    2015-06-01

    The thermal diffusivity of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (CLF-1), which is recognized as the primary candidate structural material for the test blanket module of the international thermal-nuclear experimental reactor, has been studied by the time-domain (TD) photoacoustic piezoelectric (PAPE) technique. The TD PAPE model based on a simplified thermoelastic theory under square-wave modulated laser excitation is presented, relating the TD PAPE signal to the modulation frequency, thermal diffusivity, and other material parameters. Thermal diffusivities of reference samples such as copper and nickel were measured and analyzed, by which the validity of the technique is verified. The thermal diffusivity of the CLF-1 sample was measured to be , which is at a medium level among the ordinary steel materials ( to and has decent heat-dissipation ability. The results show that the TD PAPE technique can provide a fast and economic way for the investigation of the thermophysical properties of fusion reactor structural materials.

  19. Annealing effects on the microstructure and coercive field of two ferritic-martensitic Eurofer steels: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, V. B.; Sandim, M. J. R.; Stamopoulos, D.; Renzetti, R. A.; Santos, A. D.; Sandim, H. R. Z.

    2013-04-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels are promising candidates for structural applications in future nuclear fusion power plants. Oxide dispersion strengthened ODS-Eurofer and Eurofer 97 steels were cold rolled to 80% reduction in thickness and annealed in vacuum for 1 h from 200 to 1350 °C to evaluate both their thermal stability and magnetic behavior. The microstructural changes were followed by magnetic measurements, in particular the corresponding variation of the coercive field (Hc), as a function of both annealing and tempering treatments. Results show that Y2O3 nanoparticles strongly affect the mechanical properties of ODS-Eurofer steel but leave their magnetic properties fairly unchanged when compared with Eurofer-97 steel.

  20. Charpy Impact Properties of Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels Irradiated in HFIR up to 20 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Klueh, R.L.

    2003-07-15

    The effects of irradiation up to 20 dpa on the Charpy impact properties of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFs) were investigated. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of F82H-IEA shifted up to around 323K. TIG weldments of F82H showed a fairly small variation on their impact properties. A finer prior austenite grain size in F82H-IEA after a different heat treatment resulted in a 20K lower DBTT compared to F82H-IEA after the standard heat treatment, and that effect was maintained even after irradiation. Helium effects were investigated utilizing Ni-doped F82H, but no obvious evidence of helium effects was obtained. ORNL9Cr-2WVTa and JLF-1 steels showed smaller DBTT shifts compared to F82H-IEA.

  1. Irradiation effects on precipitation and its impact on the mechanical properties of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Sakasegawa, H.; Hashimoto, N.; Klueh, R. L.; Ando, M.; Sokolov, M. A.

    2007-08-01

    It was previously reported that reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFs) showed a variety of changes in ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and yield stress after irradiation at 573 K up to 5 dpa. The precipitation behavior of the irradiated steels was examined and the presence of irradiation induced precipitation which works as if it was forced to reach the thermal equilibrium state at irradiation temperature 573 K. In this study, transmission electron microscopy was performed on extraction replica specimens to analyze the size distribution of precipitates. It turned out that the hardening level multiplied by the square root of the average block size showed a linear dependence on the extracted precipitate weight. This dependence suggests that the difference in irradiation hardening between RAFs was caused by different precipitation behavior on block, packet and prior austenitic grain boundaries during irradiation. The simple Hall-Petch law could be applicable for interpreting this dependence.

  2. Determining the shear fracture properties of HIP joints of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel by a torsion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Noh, Sanghoon; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2012-08-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is a key technology used to fabricate a first wall with cooling channels for the fusion blanket system utilizing a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel. To qualify the HIPped components, small specimen test techniques are beneficial not only to evaluate the thin-wall cooling channels containing the HIP joint but also to use in neutron irradiation studies. This study aims to develop the torsion test method with special emphasis on providing a reasonable and comprehensive method to determine interfacial shear properties of HIP joints during the torsional fracture process. Torsion test results identified that the torsion process shows yield of the base metal followed by non-elastic deformation due to work hardening of the base metal. By considering this work hardening issue, we propose a reasonable and realistic solution to determine the torsional yield shear stress and the ultimate torsional shear strength of the HIPped interface. Finally, a representative torsion fracture process was identified.

  3. Fatigue crack propagation in dual-phase steels: Effects of ferritic-martensitic microstructures on crack path morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, V. B.; Suresh, S.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1984-06-01

    microstructures with maximum resistance to fatigue crack extension while maintaining high strength levels. A wide range of crack growth rates has been examined, from ~10-8 to 10-3 mm per cycle, in a series of duplex microstructures of comparable yield strength and prior austenite grain size where intercritical heat treatments were used to vary the proportion, morphology, and distribution of the ferrite and martensite phases. Results of fatigue crack propagation tests, conducted on “long cracks” in room temperature moist air environments, revealed a very large influence of microstructure over the entire spectrum of growth rates at low load ratios. Similar trends were observed at high load ratio, although the extent of the microstructural effects on crack growth behavior was significantly less marked. Specifically, microstructures containing fine globular or coarse martensite in a coarse-grained ferritic matrix demonstrated exceptionally high resistance to crack growth without loss in strength properties. To our knowledge, these microstructures yielded the highest ambient temperature fatigue threshold stress intensity range ΔK0 values reported to date, and certainly the highest combination of strength and ΔK0 for steels ( i.e., ΔK0 values above 19 MPa√m with yield strengths in excess of 600 MPa). Such unusually high crack growth resistance is attributed primarily to a tortuous morphology of crack path which results in a reduction in the crack driving force from crack deflection and roughness-induced crack closure mechanisms. Quantitative metallography and experimental crack closure measurements, applied to currently available analytical models for the deflection and closure processes, are presented to substantiate such interpretations.

  4. High Strength-High Ductility Combination Ultrafine-Grained Dual-Phase Steels Through Introduction of High Degree of Strain at Room Temperature Followed by Ultrarapid Heating During Continuous Annealing of a Nb-Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yonggang; Di, Hongshuang; Hu, Meiyuan; Zhang, Jiecen; Misra, R. D. K.

    2017-07-01

    Ultrafine-grained dual-phase (UFG-DP) steel consisting of ferrite (1.2 μm) and martensite (1 μm) was uniquely processed via combination of hot rolling, cold rolling and continuous annealing of a low-carbon Nb-microalloyed steel. Room temperature tensile properties were evaluated and fracture mechanisms studied and compared to the coarse-grained (CG) counterpart. In contrast to the CG-DP steel, UFG-DP had 12.7% higher ultimate tensile strength and 10.7% greater uniform elongation. This is partly attributed to the increase in the initial strain-hardening rate, decrease in nanohardness ratio of martensite and ferrite. Moreover, a decreasing number of ferrite grains with {001} orientation increased the cleavage fracture stress and increased the crack initiation threshold stress with consequent improvement in ductility UFG-DP steel.

  5. Effect of Austenization Temperature on the Microstructure and Strength of 9% and 12% Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Terry C. Totemeier

    2004-10-01

    The effect of reduced-temperature austenization on the microstructure and strength of two ferritic-martensitic steels was studied. Prototypic 9% and 12% Cr steels, grade 91 (9Cr-1MoVNb) and type 422 stainless (12Cr-1MoVW), respectively, were austenized at 925°C and 1050°C and tempered at 760°C. The reduced austenization temperature was intended to simulate potential inadequate austenization during field construction of large structures and also the thermal cycle experienced in the Type IV region of weld heat affected zones (HAZ). The microstructure, tensile behavior, and creep strength were characterized for both steels treated at each condition. The reduced austenization temperature resulted in general coarsening of carbides in both steels and polygonization of the tempered martensite structure in type 422. For this steel, a marked reduction in microhardness was observed, while there was little change in microhardness for grade 91. Slight reductions in tensile strength were observed for both steels at room temperature and elevated temperatures of 450 and 550°C. The strength reduction was greater for type 422 than for grade 91. At 650°C the tensile strength reduction was minimal for both steels. Marked reductions in creep rupture lives were observed for both steels at 650°C; the reductions were less at 600°C and minimal at 550°C. Overall, the higher Cr content steel was observed to be more sensitive to variations in heat treatment conditions.

  6. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Henry, J.; Rieth, M.; Sakasegawa, H.; Tanigawa, H.; Huang, Q.

    2016-10-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. In addition to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti, X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M23C6 (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. Limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic are presented and compared with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ∼70 displacements per atom at ∼300-325 °C.

  7. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Tavassoli, A. -A. F.; Henry, J.; Rieth, M.; Sakasegawa, H.; Tanigawa, H.; Huang, Q.

    2016-07-26

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. Additionally, to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti, X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M23C6 (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. We present and compare limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ~70 displacements per atom at ~300–325 °C.

  8. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Tavassoli, A. -A. F.; Henry, J.; Rieth, M.; Sakasegawa, H.; Tanigawa, H.; Huang, Q.

    2016-07-26

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. Additionally, to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti, X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M23C6 (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. We present and compare limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ~70 displacements per atom at ~300–325 °C.

  9. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Tavassoli, A. -A. F.; ...

    2016-07-26

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. Additionally, to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti,more » X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M23C6 (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. We present and compare limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ~70 displacements per atom at ~300–325 °C.« less

  10. Microstructural characterization of weld joints of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel fabricated by different joining methods

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Paul, V.; Saroja, S.; Albert, S.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed electron microscopy study on the microstructure of various regions of weldment fabricated by three welding methods namely tungsten inert gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding in an indigenously developed 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. Electron back scatter diffraction studies showed a random micro-texture in all the three welds. Microstructural changes during thermal exposures were studied and corroborated with hardness and optimized conditions for the post weld heat treatment have been identified for this steel. Hollomon–Jaffe parameter has been used to estimate the extent of tempering. The activation energy for the tempering process has been evaluated and found to be corresponding to interstitial diffusion of carbon in ferrite matrix. The type and microchemistry of secondary phases in different regions of the weldment have been identified by analytical transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Comparison of microstructural parameters in TIG, electron beam and laser welds of RAFM steel • EBSD studies to illustrate the absence of preferred orientation and identification of prior austenite grain size using phase identification map • Optimization of PWHT conditions for indigenous RAFM steel • Study of kinetics of tempering and estimation of apparent activation energy of the process.

  11. Small punch tensile/fracture test data and 3D specimen surface data on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel from cryogenic to room temperature.

    PubMed

    Bruchhausen, Matthias; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Ripplinger, Stefan; Austin, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Raw data from small punch tensile/fracture tests at two displacement rates in the temperature range from -196 °C to room temperature on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel are presented. A number of specimens were analyzed after testing by means of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Based on the CT volume data detailed 3D surface maps of the specimens were established. All data are open access and available from Online Data Information Network (ODIN)https://odin.jrc.ec.europa.eu. The data presented in the current work has been analyzed in the research article "On the determination of the ductile to brittle transition temperature from small punch tests on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel" (M. Bruchhausen, S. Holmström, J.-M. Lapetite, S. Ripplinger, 2015) [1].

  12. The Effect of Niobium Microalloying on Processing and Application Properties of Dual Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrbacher, Hardy

    Dual phase steel is widely used in today's car body manufacturing. Its characteristics of high n-value and good elongation (A80) are the basis of good press formability. However, practical experience has shown unexpected failure in forming operations where tight bending, stretch flanging or hole expansion are predominant. The inhomogeneous microstructure of soft ferrite and hard martensite in combination with highly localized straining is the origin of these problems. Furthermore, weldability and delayed cracking have been experienced to cause problems in ultra-high strength DP steel. Refinement and homogenization of the two-phase microstructure as well as lowering of the carbon content have been identified as remedies to the mentioned problems. However, mill processing of DP steel with reduced carbon content is more difficult especially for the higher strength levels. Niobium microalloying proved to be very effective in increasing the processing window of low-carbon DP steels besides of its natural effect of refining the microstructure. Meanwhile the production of niobium microalloyed DP steel has been established in several markets including China. The paper details the fundamentals, demonstrates respective production concepts and presents examples of application of Nb-microalloyed DP steels.

  13. Fracture toughness of the IEA heat of F82H ferritic/martensitic stainless steel as a function of loading mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaxin; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1997-04-01

    Mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness tests were performed for the IEA heat of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel F82H at ambient temperature in order to provide comparison with previous measurements on a small heat given a different heat treatment. The results showed that heat to heat variations and heat treatment had negligible consequences on Mode I fracture toughness, but behavior during mixed-mode testing showed unexpected instabilities.

  14. Effect of Carbon Content on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 9 to 12 pct Cr Ferritic/Martensitic Heat-Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Feng-Shi; Tian, Li-Qian; Xue, Bing; Jiang, Xue-Bo; Zhou, Li

    2012-07-01

    Two heats of 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels were prepared. One has an ultralow carbon content of 0.01 wt pct, whereas another heat has a normal carbon content of 0.09 wt pct. The effect of carbon content on microstructure and mechanical properties of 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels was studied. The results show that the ultralow-carbon steel contains bimodal, nanosized MX precipitates with high density in the matrix but few M23C6 carbide particles in the normalized-and-tempered state. The smaller nanosized MX precipitates have two kinds of typical morphology: One is cubic and another is rectangular. The cubic MX precipitate contains Nb, Ti, and V, whereas the rectangular one only contains Nb and V. The normal carbon steel has abundant M23C6 carbide particles along the grain and lath boundaries and much less density of nanosized MX precipitates after the same heat treatments. After long-term aging at 923 K (650 °C) for 10,000 hours, the stress rupture properties of the ultralow carbon content steel degrades more significantly. The strength degradation mechanism of the 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels is discussed in this article.

  15. Effect of Heat Input on Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties in the Weld Heat-Affected Zone of 9Cr-2W-VTa Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel for Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Hyoung Chan

    2015-01-01

    The phase transformation and mechanical properties in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel were explored. The samples for HAZs were prepared using a Gleeble simulator at different heat inputs. The base steel consisted of tempered martensite and carbides through quenching and tempering treatment, whereas the HAZs consisted of martensite, δ-ferrite, and a small volume of autotempered martensite. The prior austenite grain size, lath width of martensite, and δ-ferrite fraction in the HAZs increased with increase in the heat input. The mechanical properties were evaluated using Vickers hardness and Charpy V-notch impact test. The Vickers hardness in the HAZs was higher than that in the base steel but did not change noticeably with increase in the heat input. The HAZs showed poor impact property due to the formation of martensite and δ-ferrite as compared to the base steel. In addition, the impact property of the HAZs deteriorated more with the increase in the heat input. Post weld heat treatment contributed to improve the impact property of the HAZs through the formation of tempered martensite, but the impact property of the HAZs remained lower than that of base steel.

  16. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on mechanical properties and structure of reduced-activation Cr-W-V steels of bainitic, martensitic, and martensitic-ferritic classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorynin, I. V.; Rybin, V. V.; Kursevich, I. P.; Lapin, A. N.; Nesterova, E. V.; Klepikov, E. Yu

    2000-12-01

    Effects of molybdenum replacement by tungsten in steels of the bainitic, martensitic, and martensitic-ferritic classes containing 2.5%, 8% and 11% Cr, respectively, were investigated. The phase composition and structure of the bainitic steels were varied by changing the cooling rates from the austenitization temperature (from values typical for normalization up to V=3.3 × 10-2°C/s) and then tempering. The steels were irradiated to a fluence of 4×1023 n/m2 (⩾0.5 MeV) at 270°C and to fluences of 1.3×1023 and 1.2×1024 n/m2 (⩾0.5 MeV) at 70°C. The 2.5Cr-1.4WV and 8Cr-1.5WV steels have shown lower values of the shifts in ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) under irradiation in comparison with corresponding Cr-Mo steels. Radiation embrittlement at elevated irradiation temperature was lowest in bainitic 2.5Cr-1.4WV steel and martensitic-ferritic 11Cr-1.5WV steel. The positive effect of molybdenum replacement by tungsten at irradiation temperature ∼300°C is reversed at Tirr=70∘C.

  17. Demonstration of a high burnup heterogeneous core using ferritic/martensitic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lovell, A J; Fox, G L; Sutherland, W H; Hecht, S L

    1986-04-11

    The purpose of the Core Demonstration Experiment (CDE) is to demonstrate the capability of a mixed-oxide fuel system to achieve a three year life in a prototypic LMR heterogeneous reactor environment. The CDE assemblies are fabricated using wire-wrapped, large-diameter, advanced-oxide fuel and blanket pins with tempered martensitic HT9 cladding, wire wrap, and duct. The highest power fuel assembly operates with a Beginning of Life (BOL) peak linear pin power of 445 W/cm and a peak cladding temperature of 615C. The fuel and blanket assembly irradiation will start in FFTF Cycle 9 and continue for about 900 Equivalent Full Power Days (EFPD). The successful utilization of the tempered martensitic HT9 alloy in an FFTF test assembly is fully anticipated. The low swelling, observed at intermediate neutron fluence and projected to higher fluences, together with reasonable creep behavior gives acceptable mechanical performance for fuel pins, blanket pins and ducts. Duct length increase, dilation and bow; plus fuel and blanket pin diameter increases remain within specified tolerances. In addition, stress rupture data from unirradiated HT9 imply cumulative damage fractions for the nominal fuel and blanket pins that are low.

  18. Ar ion irradiation hardening of high-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels at 700 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yinzhong; Zhu, Jun; Huang, Xi

    2016-03-01

    High-Cr ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels are being considered for applications as fuel cladding or core structures for Generation-IV reactors. Because high temperatures approaching 923-973 K (650-700 °C) are envisioned in the designs of Generation IV reactors, irradiation response of high-Cr FM steels at the high temperatures requires investigations. Response of two high-Cr FM steels P92 and 11Cr to irradiation at 973 K (700 °C) was investigated through Ar ion irradiation in combination with damage simulations, nanoindentation measurements and microstructure analyses. Irradiation hardening occurred in both steels after Ar ion irradiation at 973 K (700 °C) to 10 dpa, providing the first evidence that irradiation hardening can occur at a high irradiation temperature of 973 K (700 °C) in high-Cr FM steels. Argon bubbles with a very high number density and an average diameter of about 2.6-3 nm formed in the two steels after the irradiation. The irradiation hardening occurred in the two steels is attributed to the formation of these high-number-density fine argon bubbles produced by the irradiation homogeneously distributed in the matrix. Difference in the magnitude of irradiation hardening between the two steels was also discussed.

  19. Void swelling and microstructure evolution at very high damage level in self-ion irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getto, E.; Sun, K.; Monterrosa, A. M.; Jiao, Z.; Hackett, M. J.; Was, G. S.

    2016-11-01

    The void swelling and microstructure evolution of ferritic-martensitic alloys HT9, T91 and T92 were characterized following irradiation with Fe++ ions at 460 °C to damage levels of 75-650 displacements per atom with 10 atom parts per million pre-implanted helium. Steady state swelling rate of 0.033%/ dpa was determined for HT9, the least swelling resistant alloy, and 0.007%/ dpa in T91. In T91, resistance was due to suppression of void nucleation. Swelling resistance was greatest in T92, with a low density (∼1 × 1020 m-3) of small voids that had not grown appreciably, indicating suppression of nucleation and growth. Additional heats of T91 indicated that alloy composition was not the determining factor of swelling resistance. Carbon and chromium-rich M2X precipitates formed at 250 dpa and were correlated with decreased nucleation in T91 and T92, but did not affect void growth in HT9. Dislocation and G-phase microstructure evolution was analyzed up to 650 dpa in HT9.

  20. Microstructural evolution in a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel and its relation to high-temperature deformation and rupture models

    SciTech Connect

    DiMelfi, R.J.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The ferritic-martensitic stainless steel HT-9 exhibits an anomalously high creep strength in comparison to its high-temperature flow strength from tensile tests performed at moderate rates. A constitutive relation describing its high-temperature tensile behavior over a wide range of conditions has been developed. When applied to creep conditions the model predicts deformation rates orders of magnitude higher than observed. To account for the observed creep strength, a fine distribution of precipitates is postulated to evolve over time during creep. The precipitate density is calculated at each temperature and stress to give the observed creep rate. The apparent precipitation kinetics thereby extracted from this analysis is used in a model for the rupture-time kinetics that compares favorably with observation. Properly austenitized and tempered material was aged over times comparable to creep conditions, and in a way consistent with the precipitation kinetics from the model. Microstructural observations support the postulates and results of the model system. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Blister formation on 13Cr2MoNbVB ferritic-martensitic steel exposed to hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. V.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Ruzhytskyi, V. V.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Kopanets, I. E.; Karpov, S. A.; Vasilenko, R. L.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of pre-irradiation specimen deformation level on surface blister formation and sub-surface cracking of dual-phase 13Cr2MoNbVB ferritic-martensitic steel was studied using glow discharge hydrogen plasma with ion energy of 1 keV to fluences of 2 × 1025 H/m2. Protium was used for most studies, but deuterium was used for measuring the depth dependence of hydrogen diffusion. Formation of blisters was observed in the temperature range 230-340 K. It was found that pre-irradiation deformation caused changes in the threshold fluences of blister formation and also in blister size distribution. Subsurface cracks located on grain boundaries far beyond the implantation zone were formed concurrently with blisters, arising from hydrogen diffusion and trapping at defects. It was observed that cracks as long as 1 mm in length were formed in 95% deformed steel at depths up to 500 μm from surface.

  2. Impact of the use of the ferritic/martensitic ODS steels cladding on the fuel reprocessing PUREX process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinner, B.; Auroy, M.; Mas, D.; Saint-Jevin, A.; Pasquier-Tilliette, S.

    2012-09-01

    Some ferritic/martensitic oxide dispersed strengthened (F/M ODS) steels are presently developed at CEA for the fuel cladding of the next generation of sodium fast nuclear reactors. The objective of this work is to study if this change of cladding could have any consequences on the spent fuel reprocessing PUREX process. During the fuel dissolution stage the cladding can actually be corroded by nitric acid. But some process specifications impose not to exceed a limit concentration of the corrosion products such as iron and chromium in the dissolution medium. For that purpose the corrosion behavior of these F/M ODS steels is studied in hot and concentrated nitric acid. The influence of some metallurgical parameters such as the chromium content, the elaboration process and the presence of the yttrium oxides is first discussed. The influence of environmental parameters such as the nitric acid concentration, the temperature and the presence of oxidizing species coming from the fuel is then analyzed. The corrosion rate is characterized by mass loss measurements and electrochemical tests. Analyses of the corroded surface are carried out by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  3. Microstructure and mechanical property of ferritic-martensitic steel cladding under a 650 °C liquid sodium environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, Sung Ho

    2013-11-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the effect of liquid sodium on the microstructural and mechanical property of ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) used for a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) cladding tube. A quasi-dynamic device characterized by natural circulation was constructed and a compatibility test between FMS and liquid sodium was performed. HT9 (12Cr-1MoWVN) and Gr.92 (9Cr-2WNbVNB) coupons as well as a Gr.92 cladding tube were immersed in the 650 °C liquid sodium up to 3095 h and a microstructural observation, a mechanical property evaluation such as nanoindentation, and a ring tension test were also done in this study. The results showed that both HT9 and Gr.92 exhibited macroscopic weight loss behavior where pitting and decarburization took place. Weight loss as well as the decarburization process decreased as the chromium content increased. A compatibility test over the cladding tube revealed that a decrease of the mechanical property caused by the aging process governed the whole mechanical property of the cladding tube.

  4. Development of Advanced 9Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and Austenitic Stainless Steels for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Sam; Tan, Lizhen; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel Grade 92, with or without thermomechanical treatment (TMT), and austenitic stainless steels HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine precipitate strengthening) and NF709 were selected as potential candidate structural materials in the U.S. Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) program. The objective is to develop advanced steels with improved properties as compared with reference materials such as Grade 91 and Type 316H steels that are currently in nuclear design codes. Composition modification and/or processing optimization (e.g., TMT and cold-work) were performed to improve properties such as resistance to thermal aging, creep, creep-fatigue, fracture, and sodium corrosion. Testings to characterize these properties for the advanced steels were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory, the Argonne National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the U.S. SFR program. This paper focuses on the resistance to thermal aging and creep of the advanced steels. The advanced steels exhibited up to two orders of magnitude increase in creep life compared to the reference materials. Preliminary results on the weldment performance of the advanced steels are also presented. The superior performance of the advanced steels would improve reactor design flexibility, safety margins and economics.

  5. Effect of processing on microstructural features and mechanical properties of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic EUROFER steel grade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puype, A.; Malerba, L.; De Wispelaere, N.; Petrov, R.; Sietsma, J.

    2017-10-01

    The microstructure of a 9Cr-1W-0.22V-0.09Ta-0.11C reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel has been investigated after thermo-mechanical rolling with subsequent annealing for 30 min at temperatures of 880 °C, 920 °C, 980 °C and 1050 °C, followed by water quenching. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigations and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) measurements were performed to determine the microstructural features after the different thermal treatments. Additionally, the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the materials were studied after tempering at 750 °C for 2 h. This study aims to understand microstructural processes that occur in the material during thermo-mechanical treatment and to assess the effect of the microstructure on its strength and toughness, with a view on improving its mechanical performance. Microstructural analysis together with the data from mechanical tests identified the beneficial effect of grain refinement obtained with adequate processing on the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and on the delay of strength degradation at elevated temperatures.

  6. End Closure Joining of Ferritic-Martensitic and Oxide-Dispersion Strengthened Steel Cladding Tubes by Magnetic Pulse Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Gu; Park, Jin-Ju; Lee, Min-Ku; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Kyu; Spirin, Alexey; Krutikov, Vasiliy; Paranin, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic pulse welding (MPW) technique was employed for the end closure joining of fuel pin cladding tubes made of ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel and oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel. The technique is a solid-state impact joining process based on the electromagnetic force, similar to explosive welding. For a given set of optimal process parameters, e.g., the end-plug geometry, the rigid metallurgical bonding between the tube and end plug was obtained by high-velocity impact collision accompanied with surface jetting. The joint region showed a typical wavy morphology with a narrow grain boundary-like bonding interface. There was no evidence of even local melting, and only the limited grain refinement was observed in the vicinity of the bonding interface without destructing the original reinforcement microstructure of the FM-ODS steel, i.e., a fine grain structure with oxide dispersion. No leaks were detected during helium leakage test, and moreover, the rupture occurred in the cladding tube section without leaving any joint damage during internal pressure burst test. All of the results proved the integrity and durability of the MPWed joints and signified the great potential of this method of end closure joining for advanced fast reactor fuel pin fabrication.

  7. Triple ion-beam studies of radiation damage in 9Cr2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H.; Hunn, J.D.; Rao, G.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Mansur, L.K.

    1997-11-01

    To simulate radiation damage under a future Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) environment, irradiation experiments were conducted on a candidate 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel using the Triple Ion Facility (TIF) at ORNL. Irradiation was conducted in single, dual, and triple ion beam modes using 3.5 MeV Fe{sup ++}, 360 keV He{sup +}, and 180 keV H{sup +} at 80, 200, and 350{degrees}C. These irradiations produced various defects comprising black dots, dislocation loops, line dislocations, and gas bubbles, which led to hardening. The largest increase in hardness, over 63 %, was observed after 50 dpa for triple beam irradiation conditions, revealing that both He and H are augmenting the hardening. Hardness increased less than 30 % after 30 dpa at 200{degrees}C by triple beams, compatible with neutron irradiation data from previous work which showed about a 30 % increase in yield strength after 27.2 dpa at 365{degrees}C. However, the very large concentrations of gas bubbles in the matrix and on lath and grain boundaries after these simulated SNS irradiations make predictions of fracture behavior from fission reactor irradiations to spallation target conditions inadvisable.

  8. Oxidation behavior of ferritic/martensitic steels in stagnant liquid LBE saturated by oxygen at 600 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Quanqiang; Liu, Jian; Luan, He; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Yan, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2015-02-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are primary candidates for application as cladding and structural materials in the Generation IV Nuclear Reactor, especially accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS). The compatibility of F/M steels with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is a critical issue for development of ADS using liquid LBE as the coolant. In this work, the corrosion tests of two F/M steels, including a novel 9-12 Cr modified F/M steel named SIMP steel and a commercial T91 steel, were conducted in the static oxygen-saturated liquid LBE at 600 °C up to 1000 h, the microstructure of the oxide scale formed on these two steels was analyzed, the relationship between the microstructure and the oxidation behavior was studied, and the reason why the SIMP steel showed better oxidation resistance compared to T91 steel was analyzed. The results of this study confirmed that the oxidation behavior of the F/M steels in liquid metals is influenced by their alloying elements and microstructures.

  9. Dependence on grain boundary structure of radiation induced segregation in a 9 wt.% Cr model ferritic/martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Barnard, Leland M.; Parish, Chad M.; Busby, Jeremy T.; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd R.

    2013-04-01

    Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels containing 9 wt.% Cr are candidates for structural and cladding components in the next generation of advanced nuclear fission and fusion reactors. Although it is known these alloys exhibit radiation-induced segregation (RIS) at grain boundaries (GBs) while in-service, little is known about the mechanism behind RIS in F/M steels. The classical understanding of RIS in F/M steels presents a mechanism where point defects migrate to GBs acting as perfect sinks. However, variation in grain boundary structure may influence the sink efficiency and these migration processes. A proton irradiated 9 wt.% Cr model alloy steel was investigated using STEM/EDS spectrum imaging and GB misorientation analysis to determine the role of GB structure on RIS at different GBs. An ab initio based rate theory model was developed and compared to the experimental findings. This investigation found Cr preferentially segregates to specific GB structures. The preferential segregation to specific GB structures suggests GB structure plays a key role in the mechanism behind radiation-induced segregation, showing that not all grain boundaries in F/M steels act as perfect sinks. The study also found how irradiation dose and temperature impact the radiation-induced segregation response in F/M steels.

  10. Effects of alloying elements and heat treatments on mechanical properties of Korean reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Y. B.; Kang, S. H.; Noh, S.; Kim, T. K.; Lee, D. W.; Cho, S.; Jeong, Y. H.

    2014-12-01

    As part of an alloy development program for Korean reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel, a total of 37 program alloys were designed and their mechanical properties were evaluated with special attention being paid to the effects of alloying elements and heat treatments. A reduction of the normalizing temperature from 1050 °C to 980 °C was found to have a positive effect on the impact resistance, resulting in a decrease in ductile-brittle transition-temperature (DBTT) of the program alloys by an average of 30 °C. The yield strength and creep rupture time are affected strongly by the tempering time at 760 °C but at the expense of ductility. Regarding the effects of the alloying elements, the addition of trace amounts of Zr enhances both the creep and impact resistance: the lowest DBTT was observed for the alloys containing 0.005 wt.% Zr, whereas the addition of 0.01 wt.% Zr extends the creep rupture-time under an accelerated condition. The enhanced impact resistance owing to the normalizing at lower temperature is attributed to a more refined grain structure, which provides more barriers to the propagation of cleavage cracks. Solution softening by Zr addition is suggested as a possible mechanism for enhanced resistance to both impact and creep of the program alloys.

  11. Fabrication and integrity test preparation of HIP-joined W and ferritic-martensitic steel mockups for fusion reactor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Won; Shin, Kyu In; Kim, Suk Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae Sung; Choi, Bo Guen; Moon, Se Youn; Hong, Bong Guen

    2014-10-01

    Tungsten (W) and ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) as armor and structural materials, respectively, are the major candidates for plasma-facing components (PFCs) such as the blanket first wall (BFW) and the divertor, in a fusion reactor. In the present study, three W/FMS mockups were successfully fabricated using a hot isostatic pressing (HIP, 900 °C, 100 MPa, 1.5 hrs) with a following post-HIP heat treatment (PHHT, tempering, 750 °C, 70 MPa, 2 hrs), and the W/FMS joining method was developed based on the ITER BFW and the test blanket module (TBM) development project from 2004 to the present. Using a 10-MHz-frequency flat-type probe to ultrasonically test of the joint, we found no defects in the fabricated mockups. For confirmation of the joint integrity, a high heat flux test will be performed up to the thermal lifetime of the mockup under the proper test conditions. These conditions were determined through a preliminary analysis with conventional codes such as ANSYS-CFX for thermal-hydraulic conditions considering the test facility, the Korea heat load test facility with an electron beam (KoHLT-EB), and its water coolant system at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI).

  12. Evolution of the mechanical properties and microstructure of ferritic-martensitic steels irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamardin, V. K.; Golovanov, V. N.; Bulanova, T. M.; Povstyanko, A. V.; Fedoseev, A. E.; Ostrovsky, Z. E.; Goncharenko, Yu. D.

    2002-12-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of low-activation ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels 0.1C-9Cr-1W, V, Ta, B and 0.1C-12Cr-2W, V, Ti, B is studied under tension at temperatures of 330-540 °C and doses of 50 dpa. Steel 0.1C-13Cr-Mo, V, Nb, B was chosen for comparison. At irradiation temperatures of 330-340 °C, the radiation hardening of steel with 9%Cr achieves saturation at a dose of 10 dpa. In this case as compared to steels with 12%Cr, the fracture surface is characterized as ductile without cleavage traces. At irradiation temperatures higher than 420 °C, there is no difference in the behavior of the materials under investigation. The data on radiation creep obtained by direct measurement and from the profilometry data satisfy a model ɛ¯/ σ¯=B 0+D Ṡ, when B0 and D have the values typical for steels of FM type.

  13. IRRADIATION CREEP AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TWO FERRITIC-MARTENSITIC STEELS IRRADIATED IN THE BN-350 FAST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Porollo, S. I.; Konobeev, Yu V.; Dvoriashin, A. M.; Budylkin, N. I.; Mironova, E. G.; Leontyeva-Smirnova, M. V.; Loltukhovsky, A. G.; Bochvar, A. A.; Garner, Francis A.

    2002-09-01

    Russian ferritic/martensitic steels EP-450 and EP-823 were irradiated to 20-60 dpa in the BN-350 fast reactor in the form of pressurized creep tubes and small rings used for mechanical property tests. Data derived from these steels serves to enhance our understanding of the general behavior of this class of steels. It appears that these steels exhibit behavior that is very consistent with that of Western steels. Swelling is relatively low at high neutron exposure and confined to temperatures less then 420 degrees C, but may be camouflaged somewhat by precipitation-related densification. The irradiation creep studies confirm that the creep compliance of F/M steels is about one-half that of austenitic steels, and that the loss of strength at test temperatures above 500 degrees C is a problem generic to all F/M steels. This conclusion is supported by post-irradiation measurement of short-term mechanical properties. At temperatures below 500 degrees C both steels retain their high strength (yield stress 0.2=550-600 MPa), but at higher test temperatures a sharp decrease of strength properties occurs. However, the irradiated steels still retain high post-irradiation ductility at test temperatures in the range of 20-700 degrees C.

  14. Effect of Composition and Deformation on Coarse-Grained Austenite Transformation in Nb-Mo Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isasti, N.; Jorge-Badiola, D.; Taheri, M. L.; López, B.; Uranga, P.

    2011-12-01

    Thermomechanical processing of microalloyed steels containing niobium can be performed to obtain deformed austenite prior to transformation. Accelerated cooling can be employed to refine the final microstructure and, consequently, to improve both strength and toughness. This general rule is fulfilled if the transformation occurs on a quite homogeneous austenite microstructure. Nevertheless, the presence of coarse austenite grains before transformation in different industrial processes is a usual source of concern, and regarding toughness, the coarsest high-angle boundary units would determine its final value. Sets of deformation dilatometry tests were carried out using three 0.06 pct Nb microalloyed steels to evaluate the effect of Mo alloying additions (0, 0.16, and 0.31 pct Mo) on final transformation from both recrystallized and unrecrystallized coarse-grained austenite. Continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams were created, and detailed microstructural characterization was achieved through the use of optical microscopy (OM), field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM), and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The resultant microstructures ranged from polygonal ferrite (PF) and pearlite (P) at slow cooling ranges to bainitic ferrite (BF) accompanied by martensite (M) for fast cooling rates. Plastic deformation of the parent austenite accelerated both ferrite and bainite transformation, moving the CCT curves to higher temperatures and shorter times. However, an increase in the final heterogeneity was observed when BF packets were formed, creating coarse high-angle grain boundary units.

  15. Deformation Microstructure of a Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel Irradiated in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, N.; Klueh, R.L.; Ando, M.; Tanigawa, H.; Sawai, T.; Shiba, K.

    2003-09-15

    In order to determine the contributions of different microstructural features to strength and to deformation mode, microstructure of deformed flat tensile specimens of irradiated reduced activation F82H (IEA heat) base metal (BM) and its tungsten inert-gas (TIG) weldments (weld metal and weld joint) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), following fracture surface examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After irradiation, the fracture surfaces of F82H BM and TIG weldment showed a martensitic mixed quasi-cleavage and ductile-dimple fracture. The microstructure of the deformed region of irradiated F82H BM contained dislocation channels. This suggests that dislocation channeling could be the dominant deformation mechanism in this steel, resulting in the loss of strain-hardening capacity. While, the necked region of the irradiated F82H TIG, where showed less hardening than F82H BM, showed deformation bands only. From these results, it is suggested that the pre-irradiation microstructure, especially the dislocation density, could affect the post-irradiation deformation mode.

  16. Interdiffusion Behavior of Al-Rich Oxidation Resistant Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Velraj, S.; Zhang, Ying; Hawkins, W. E.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2012-06-21

    We investigated interdiffusion of thin Al-rich coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation on 9Cr ferritic–martensitic alloys in the temperature range of 650–700°C. The compositional changes after long-term exposures in laboratory air and air + 10 vol% H2O were examined experimentally. Interdiffusion was modeled by a modified coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model (COSIM) program. The modification enabled the program to directly input the concentration profiles of the as-deposited coating determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Reasonable agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental Al profiles after exposures. Moreover, the model was also applied to predict coating lifetime at 650–700°C based on a minimum Al content (Cb) required at the coating surface to re-form protective oxide scale. In addition to a Cb value established from the failure of a thin CVD coating at 700°C, values reported for slurry aluminide coatings were also included in lifetime predictions.

  17. Low temperature superplasticity and thermal stability of a nanostructured low-carbon microalloyed steel

    PubMed Central

    Hu, J.; Du, L.-X.; Sun, G.-S.; Xie, H.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2015-01-01

    We describe here for the first time the low temperature superplasticity of nanostructured low carbon steel (microalloyed with V, N, Mn, Al, Si, and Ni). Low carbon nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) bulk steel was processed using a combination of cold-rolling and annealing of martensite. The complex microstructure of NG/UFG ferrite and 50–80 nm cementite exhibited high thermal stability at 500 °C with low temperature elongation exceeding 100% (at less than 0.5 of the absolute melting point) as compared to the conventional fine-grained (FG) counterpart. The low temperature superplasticity is adequate to form complex components. Moreover, the low strength during hot processing is favorable for decreasing the spring back and minimize die loss. PMID:26687012

  18. Low temperature superplasticity and thermal stability of a nanostructured low-carbon microalloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.; Du, L.-X.; Sun, G.-S.; Xie, H.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2015-12-01

    We describe here for the first time the low temperature superplasticity of nanostructured low carbon steel (microalloyed with V, N, Mn, Al, Si, and Ni). Low carbon nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) bulk steel was processed using a combination of cold-rolling and annealing of martensite. The complex microstructure of NG/UFG ferrite and 50-80 nm cementite exhibited high thermal stability at 500 °C with low temperature elongation exceeding 100% (at less than 0.5 of the absolute melting point) as compared to the conventional fine-grained (FG) counterpart. The low temperature superplasticity is adequate to form complex components. Moreover, the low strength during hot processing is favorable for decreasing the spring back and minimize die loss.

  19. Radiation induced segregation and precipitation behavior in self-ion irradiated Ferritic/Martensitic HT9 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ce; Auger, Maria A.; Moody, Michael P.; Kaoumi, Djamel

    2017-08-01

    In this study, Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) HT9 steel was irradiated to 20 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600 nm depth at 420 and 440 °C, and to 1, 10 and 20 dpa at 600 nm depth at 470 °C using 5 MeV Fe++ ions. The characterization was conducted using ChemiSTEM and Atom Probe Tomography (APT), with a focus on radiation induced segregation and precipitation. Ni and/or Si segregation at defect sinks (grain boundaries, dislocation lines, carbide/matrix interfaces) together with Ni, Si, Mn rich G-phase precipitation were observed in self-ion irradiated HT9 except in very low dose case (1 dpa at 470 °C). Some G-phase precipitates were found to nucleate heterogeneously at defect sinks where Ni and/or Si segregated. In contrast to what was previously reported in the literature for neutron irradiated HT9, no Cr-rich α‧ phase, χ-phases, η phase and voids were found in self-ion irradiated HT9. The difference of observed microstructures is probably due to the difference of irradiation dose rate between ion irradiation and neutron irradiation. In addition, the average size and number density of G-phase precipitates were found to be sensitive to both irradiation temperature and dose. With the same irradiation dose, the average size of G-phase increased whereas the number density decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Within the same irradiation temperature, the average size increased with increasing irradiation dose.

  20. Modification in the Microstructure of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo Ferritic Martensitic Steel Exposed to Sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanthi, T. N.; Sudha, Cheruvathur; Paul, V. Thomas; Bharasi, N. Sivai; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2014-09-01

    Mod. 9Cr-1Mo is used as the structural material in the steam generator circuit of liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors. Microstructural modifications on the surface of this steel are investigated after exposing to flowing sodium at a temperature of 798 K (525 °C) for 16000 hours. Sodium exposure results in the carburization of the ferritic steel up to a depth of ~218 µm from the surface. Electron microprobe analysis revealed the existence of two separate zones with appreciable difference in microchemistry within the carburized layer. Differences in the type, morphology, volume fraction, and microchemistry of the carbides present in the two zones are investigated using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Formation of separate zones within the carburized layer is understood as a combined effect of leaching, diffusion of the alloying elements, and thermal aging. Chromium concentration on the surface in the α-phase suggested possible degradation in the corrosion resistance of the steel. Further, concentration-dependent diffusivities for carbon are determined in the base material and carburized zones using Hall's and den Broeder's methods, respectively. These are given as inputs for simulating the concentration profiles for carbon using numerical computation technique based on finite difference method. Predicted thickness of the carburized zone agrees reasonably well with that of experiment.

  1. Mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness of a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaxin; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1993-10-01

    The critical J-integrals of mode I (J{sub IC}), mixed-mode I/III (J{sub MC}), and mode III (J{sub IIIC}) were examined for a ferritic stainless steel (F-82H) at ambient temperature. A determination of J{sub MC} was made using modified compact-tension specimens. Different ratios of tension/shear stress were achieved by varying the principal axis of the crack plane between 0 and 55 degrees from the load line. Results showed that J{sub MC} and tearing modulus (T{sub M}) values varied with the crack angles and were lower than their mode I and mode III counterparts. Both the minimum J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values occurred at a crack angle between 40 and 50 degrees, where the load ratio of {sigma}{sub i}/{sigma}{sub iii} was 1.2 to 0.84. The J{sub min} was 240 Kj/M{sup 2}, and ratios of J{sub IC}/J{sub min} and J{sub IIIC}/J{sub min} were 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. The morphology of fracture surfaces was consistent with the change of J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values. While the upper shelf-fracture toughness of F-82H depends on loading mode, the J{sub min} remains very high. Other important considerations include the effect of mixed-mode loading on the DBT temperature, and effects of hydrogen and irradiation on J{sub min}.

  2. Effects of Microstructure on CVN Impact Toughness in Thermomechanically Processed High Strength Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Tao; Zhou, Yanlei; Jia, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Zhaodong

    2017-02-01

    Investigation on the correlation between microstructure and CVN impact toughness is of practical importance for the microstructure design of high strength microalloyed steels. In this work, three steels with characteristic microstructures were produced by cooling path control, i.e., steel A with granular bainite (GB), steel B with polygonal ferrite (PF) and martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent, and steel C with the mixture of bainitic ferrite (BF), acicular ferrite (AF), and M-A constituent. Under the same alloy composition and controlled rolling, similar ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures were obtained for the three steels. Steel A achieved the highest upper shelf energy (USE), while large variation of impact absorbed energy has been observed in the ductile-to-brittle transition region. With apparently large-sized PF and M-A constituent, steel B shows the lowest USE and delamination phenomenon in the ductile-to-brittle transition region. Steel C exhibits an extended upper shelf region, intermediate USE, and the fastest decrease of impact absorbed energy in the ductile-to-brittle transition region. The detailed CVN impact behavior is studied and then linked to the microstructural features.

  3. Analysis of microalloy precipitate reversion in steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michal, G. M.; Locci, I. E.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of the ferrite to austenite allotropic transformation on the stability of MXn precipitates in an iron matrix is studied. In the MX phase, M is a group IVb or Vb transition metal, such as niobium, titanium, or vanadium. X is carbon or nitrogen and n is in the range of 0.75-1.0. The application of the present model to the case of vanadium carbide reversion in a microalloyed steel is discussed.

  4. Analysis of microalloy precipitate reversion in steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michal, G. M.; Locci, I. E.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of the ferrite to austenite allotropic transformation on the stability of MXn precipitates in an iron matrix is studied. In the MX phase, M is a group IVb or Vb transition metal, such as niobium, titanium, or vanadium. X is carbon or nitrogen and n is in the range of 0.75-1.0. The application of the present model to the case of vanadium carbide reversion in a microalloyed steel is discussed.

  5. Fabrication of 13Cr-2Mo Ferritic/Martensitic Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Steel Components by Mechanical Alloying and Spark-Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, I.; Grigoryev, E.; Khasanov, O. L.; Olevsky, E.

    2014-06-01

    The outcomes of the mechanical alloying of 13Cr-2Mo ferritic/martensitic steel and yttria (oxide-dispersion-strengthened steel) powders in a ball mill are reported in terms of the powder particle size and morphology evolution. The optimal ball mill rotation speed and the milling time are discussed. The densification kinetics of the mechanically alloyed powder during the process of spark-plasma sintering is analyzed. An optimal set of the compaction processing parameters, including the maximum temperature, the dwell time, and the heating rate, is determined. The specifics of the densification are discussed in terms of the impact of major spark-plasma sintering parameters as well as the possible phase transformations occurring during compaction processing.

  6. The corrosion product of Cs-Te corrosive compound with 11Cr-Ferritic/Martensitic Steel and 9Cr-Oxide Dispersion Strengthened steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, K.; Tanigaki, T.; Fujimura, R.; Fukumoto, K.; Uno, M.

    2015-05-01

    Cs-Te corrosion tests were performed to FBR fuel cladding candidate materials listed below: 11Cr-Ferritic/Martensitic Steel (F/M steel) and 9Cr Oxide Dispersion Strengthened steel (ODS steel). The corrosion products of Cs-Te corrosive compound Cs2Te3 with F/M steel or ODS steel were picked up from the specimens after the corrosion test by focus ion beam method (FIB) and the corrosion products were specified based on element analysis and crystal analysis by transmit electron microscopy (TEM) with electron dispersion X-ray spectrum (EDS). The result of analysis allowed us to presume Cs-Te corrosion reactions in the Fe-Cr based fuel cladding material. The presumable reactions are 4Te + 3/23 Cr23C6 →Cr3Te4 + 18/23 C and 4Te + 3Cr →Cr3Te4 .

  7. SANS and TEM of ferritic-martensitic steel T91 irradiated in FFTF up to 184 dpa at 413 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, J.; Anderoglu, O.; Dickerson, R.; Hartl, M.; Dickerson, P.; Aguiar, J. A.; Hosemann, P.; Toloczko, M. B.; Maloy, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    Ferritic-martensitic steel T91 was previously irradiated in the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) program of the Fast Flux Test Reactor Facility (FFTF) at 413 °C up to 184 dpa. The microstructure was analyzed by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Both SANS and TEM revealed a large fraction of voids with an average size of 29-32 nm leading to a calculated void swelling of 1.2-1.6% based on the volume fraction of the voids in the sample. SANS gave no indication of second phase particles having formed under irradiation in the material. Using TEM, one zone was found where a few G-phase particles were analyzed. Quantities were however too low to state reliable particle densities. No alpha prime (α') or Laves phase were observed in any of the investigated zones.

  8. Influence of helium on deuterium retention in reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel (F82H) under simultaneous deuterium and helium irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushiji, K.; Lee, H. T.; Oya, M.; Hamaji, Y.; Ibano, K.; Ueda, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Deuterium and helium retention in Japanese reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel (F82H) under simultaneous D-He irradiation at 500, 625, 750, and 818 K was studied. This study aims to clarify tritium retention behavior in RAFM steels to assess their use as plasma facing materials. The irradiation fluence was kept constant at 1 × 1024 D m-2. Four He desorption peaks were observed with He retention greatest at 625 K. At T > 625 K a monotonic decrease in He retention was observed. At all temperatures a systematic reduction in D retention was observed for the simultaneous D-He case in comparison to D-only case. This suggests that He implanted at the near surface in RAFM steels may reduce the inward penetration of tritium in RAFM steels that would result in lower tritium inventory for a given fluence.

  9. Small punch tests on martensitic/ferritic steels F82H, T91 and Optimax-A irradiated in SINQ Target-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, X.; Dai, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Small punch (SP) tests were conducted in a temperature range from -190 to 80 °C on martensitic/ferritic steels F82H, T91 and Optimax-A irradiated in SINQ Target-3 up to 9.4 dpa in a irradiation temperature range of 90-275 °C. Results demonstrate: (a) the irradiation hardening deduced from SP tests is reasonably consistent with the results obtained by tensile tests; (b) with increasing irradiation dose, the SP yield load increases at all test temperatures, while the displacement at the maximum load and the total displacement at failure decrease; (c) the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT SP) increases with increasing irradiation dose, and does so more quickly at irradiation doses above ˜6-7 dpa; in addition, the ΔDBTT SP increases linearly with helium content.

  10. Microstructure and property examination of the weld HAZ in Grade 100 microalloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poorhaydari-Anaraki, Kioumars

    The microstructure and mechanical property variations across different regions of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a Grade 100 microalloyed steel were examined for a range of heat inputs from 0.5 to 2.5 kJ/mm. Autogenous gas tungsten arc welding was performed on plates of Grade 100 steel to create the HAZ. The weld thermal cycles were recorded by embedding thermocouples at different locations in the plates. Examination of precipitate alterations (dissolution, coarsening and reprecipitation) was carried out theoretically and/or experimentally using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Iron matrix phase transformations and grain size changes were examined with optical microscopy as well as TEM (both thin foils and carbon replicas). Hardness measurements (macro-, micro- and nano-hardness) were mainly used for examination of mechanical properties across the HAZ. Hardness measurements across the HAZ showed hardening in 0.5 kJ/mm weld samples and softening in the 1.5 and 2.5 kJ/mm weld samples. This was mainly due to the difference in cooling rates, since fast cooling results in microstructures with finer structures (especially grain size) and higher levels of solutes and sub-structure in the matrix. The coarse-grained HAZ (CGHAZ) had a higher hardness relative to the fine-grained HAZ (FGHAZ), regardless of the heat input, due to the formation of bainitic and martensitic fine structures (laths/plates) inside large prior austenite grains. The CGHAZ-0.5 kJ/mm consisted of packets of untempered lath martensite and coarse regions of autotempered martensite or aged massive ferrite. Increasing the heat input to 1.5 and 2.5 kJ/mm resulted in mainly bainitic microstructures (e.g., granular bainite) with some acicular ferrite and grain-boundary ferrite in the CGHAZ. The FGHAZ was mainly made up of polygonal ferrite, with considerable amounts of bainitic ferrite in the case of the 0.5 kJ/mm weld sample. Nb-rich carbides mostly survived the thermal cycles experienced in FGHAZ

  11. Influence of Alloy Content and Prior Microstructure on Evolution of Secondary Phases in Weldments of 9Cr-Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Sudha, C.; Saroja, S.

    2015-08-01

    9Cr-Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steels with 1 and 1.4 wt pct tungsten are materials of choice for the test blanket module in fusion reactors. The steels possess a tempered martensite microstructure with a decoration of inter- and intra-lath carbides, which undergoes extensive modification on application of heat. The change in substructure and precipitation behavior on welding and subsequent thermal exposure has been studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Changes i.e., formation of various phases, their volume fraction, size, and morphology in different regions of the weldment due to prolonged thermal exposure was influenced not only by the time and temperature of exposure but also the prior microstructure. Laves phase of type Fe2W was formed in the high tungsten steel, on aging the weldment at 823 K (550 °C). It formed in the fine-grained heat-affected zone (HAZ) at much shorter durations than in the base metal. The accelerated kinetics has been understood in terms of enhanced precipitation of carbides at lath/grain boundaries during aging and the concomitant depletion of carbon and chromium and enrichment of tungsten in the vicinity of the carbides. Therefore, the fine-grained HAZ in the weldment was identified as a region susceptible for failure during service.

  12. Microstructure and Mechanism of Strengthening of Microalloyed Pipeline Steel: Ultra-Fast Cooling (UFC) Versus Laminar Cooling (LC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Wang, X.; Hu, W.; Kang, J.; Yuan, G.; Di, H.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2016-06-01

    A novel thermo-mechanical controlled processing (TMCP) schedule involving ultra-fast cooling (UFC) technique was used to process X70 (420 MPa) microalloyed pipeline steel with high strength-high toughness combination. A relative comparison is made between microstructure and mechanical properties between conventionally processed (CP) and ultra-fast cooled (UFC) pipeline steels, together with differences in strengthening mechanisms with respect to both types of processes. UFC-processed steel exhibited best combination of strength and good toughness compared to the CP process. The microstructure of CP pipeline steel mainly consisted of acicular ferrite (AF), bainitic ferrite (BF), and dispersed secondary martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent and a small fraction of fine quasi-polygonal ferrite. In contrast, the microstructure of UFC-processed pipeline steel was predominantly composed of finer AF, BF, and dispersed M/A constituent. The primary strengthening mechanisms in UFC pipeline steel were grain size strengthening and dislocation strengthening with strength increment of ~277 and ~151 MPa, respectively. However, the strengthening contribution in CP steel was related to grain size strengthening, dislocation strengthening, and precipitation strengthening, and the corresponding strength increments were ~212, ~149 and ~86 MPa, respectively. The decrease in strength induced by reducing Nb and Cr in UFC pipeline steel was compensated by enhancing the contribution of grain size strengthening in the UFC process. In conclusion, cooling schedule of UFC combined with LC is a promising method for processing low-cost pipeline steels.

  13. Analysis of stress-induced Burgers vector anisotropy in pressurized tube specimens of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steel: JLF-1

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Shibayama, T.

    1998-09-01

    A procedure for determining the Burgers vector anisotropy in irradiated ferritic steels allowing identification of all a<100> and all a/2<111> dislocations in a region of interest is applied to a pressurized tube specimen of JLF-1 irradiated at 430 C to 14.3 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV) or 61 dpa. Analysis of micrographs indicates large anisotropy in Burgers vector populations develop during irradiation creep.

  14. Irradiation-induced impurity segregation and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature shift in high chromium ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Faulkner, R. G.; Flewitt, P. E. J.

    2007-08-01

    A model is presented to predict irradiation-induced impurity segregation and its contribution to the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift in high chromium ferritic steels. The hardening contribution (dislocation loops, voids and precipitates) is also considered in this study. The predicted results are compared with the experimental DBTT shifts data for irradiated 9Cr1MoVNb and 12Cr1MoVW steels with different grain sizes.

  15. Influence of Tool Rotational Speed and Post-Weld Heat Treatments on Friction Stir Welded Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manugula, Vijaya L.; Rajulapati, Koteswararao V.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Mythili, R.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of tool rotational speed (200 and 700 rpm) on evolving microstructure during friction stir welding (FSW) of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel (RAFMS) in the stir zone (SZ), thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and heat-affected zone (HAZ) have been explored in detail. The influence of post-weld direct tempering (PWDT: 1033 K (760 °C)/ 90 minutes + air cooling) and post-weld normalizing and tempering (PWNT: 1253 K (980 °C)/30 minutes + air cooling + tempering 1033 K (760 °C)/90 minutes + air cooling) treatments on microstructure and mechanical properties has also been assessed. The base metal (BM) microstructure was tempered martensite comprising Cr-rich M23C6 on prior austenite grain and lath boundaries with intra-lath precipitation of V- and Ta-rich MC precipitates. The tool rotational speed exerted profound influence on evolving microstructure in SZ, TMAZ, and HAZ in the as-welded and post-weld heat-treated states. Very high proportion of prior austenitic grains and martensite lath boundaries in SZ and TMAZ in the as-welded state showed lack of strengthening precipitates, though very high hardness was recorded in SZ irrespective of the tool speed. Very fine-needle-like Fe3C precipitates were found at both the rotational speeds in SZ. The Fe3C was dissolved and fresh precipitation of strengthening precipitates occurred on both prior austenite grain and sub-grain boundaries in SZ during PWNT and PWDT. The post-weld direct tempering caused coarsening and coalescence of strengthening precipitates, in both matrix and grain boundary regions of TMAZ and HAZ, which led to inhomogeneous distribution of hardness across the weld joint. The PWNT heat treatment has shown fresh precipitation of M23C6 on lath and grain boundaries and very fine V-rich MC precipitates in the intragranular regions, which is very much similar to that prevailed in BM prior to FSW. Both the PWDT and PWNT treatments caused considerable reduction in the hardness of SZ

  16. Fatigue tests on a ferritic-martensitic steel at 420$deg;C: Comparison between in-situ and postirradiation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.

    1994-09-01

    Strain-controlled fatigue experiments under simultaneous irradiation have been performed to investigate the specific loadings of structural materials in next-step fusion devices. All irradiations were done on specimens made of the tempered ferritic/martensitic Cr steel MANET-I at 420°C using a 104 MeV α-particle beam. Continuous push-pull cycling ( R = -1) has been applied with total strain ranges Δɛ t between 0.5 and 1.0%. Under in-beam conditions at e.g. Δɛ t = 0.5% a number of cycles to failure of Nt = 42000, a He concentration of 400 appm and a damage dose of 1.6 dpa has been reached. This Nf is by about a factor of two below the average Nf-value of unirradiated reference tests, but seven times higher than Nf of comparable postirradiated specimens. It was found, that at least at 420°C conventional postirradiation tests are a conservative approach to in-situ conditions, and that in strain-controlled tests Nf is mainly governed by the time evolution of the irradiation-induced hardening. Relevant microstructural features like the He-bubble morphology are correlated with the fatigue properties.

  17. Microstructure evolution of two model ferritic/martensitic steels under in situ ion irradiation at low doses (0-2 dpa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaoumi, D.; Adamson, J.; Kirk, M.

    2014-02-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate materials for structural and cladding components designed for Generation IV reactors because of their superior resistance to radiation damage at the high operating temperatures envisioned in these reactors. To enable the development and optimization of such advanced alloys for in-reactor use, a fundamental understanding of radiation damage accumulation in materials is required. In this work, two model F/M steels (12Cr model alloy and 9Cr model alloy) were irradiated with 1 MeV Kr ions at 50 K, 180 K, 298 K, 473 K and 573 K in situ in a TEM. The microstructure evolution under irradiation was followed and characterized at successive doses in terms of irradiation-induced defect formation and evolution, defect density, size distribution and interaction with the as-fabricated microstructure (e.g. dislocation networks, lath boundaries) using weak-beam dark-field imaging. The effect of the irradiation temperature on the defect kinetics is assessed at doses up to 2 dpa.

  18. Silicon-containing ferritic/martensitic steel after exposure to oxygen-containing flowing lead-bismuth eutectic at 450 and 550 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, Carsten; Koch, Verena; Wedemeyer, Olaf; Skrypnik, Aleksandr; Konys, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    A ferritic/martensitic (f/m) steel with 9 and 3 mass% of chromium (Cr) and silicon (Si), respectively, was tested on performance in flowing lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 450 and 550 °C, each at concentrations of solved oxygen of both 10-7 and 10-6 mass%. The 9Cr-3Si steel generally exhibits the same basic corrosion modes as other f/m materials with 9 mass% Cr and typically lower Si content, namely Steel T91. The Si-rich steel shows an overall improved performance in comparison to T91 at 450 °C and 10-7 mass% solved oxygen, but especially at 450 °C and 10-6 mass% solved oxygen. The advantage of higher Si-content in 9Cr steel is less clear at 550 °C. Especially high oxygen content in flowing LBE at 550 °C, between >10-6 mass% and oxygen saturation, seems detrimental for the high-Si material in respect of the initiation and progress of a solution-based corrosion.

  19. Energy-filtered TEM imaging and EELS study of ODS particles and argon-filled cavities in ferritic-martensitic steels.

    PubMed

    Klimiankou, M; Lindau, R; Möslang, A

    2005-01-01

    Oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels with yttrium oxide (Y(2)O(3)) have been produced by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing for use as advanced material in fusion power reactors. Argon gas, usually widely used as inert gas during mechanical alloying, was surprisingly detected in the nanodispersion-strengthened materials. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) led to the following results: (i) chemical composition of ODS particles, (ii) voids with typical diameters of 1-6 nm are formed in the matrix, (iii) these voids are filled with Ar gas, and (iv) the high-density nanosized ODS particles serve as trapping centers for the Ar bubbles. The Ar L(3,2) energy loss edge at 245 eV as well as the absorption features of the ODS particle elements were identified in the EELS spectrum. The energy resolution in the EEL spectrum of about 1.0 eV allows to identify the electronic structure of the ODS particles.

  20. Evaluation of mechanically alloyed Cu-based powders as filler alloy for brazing tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Prado, J.; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2017-07-01

    80Cu-20Ti powders were evaluated for their use as filler alloy for high temperature brazing of tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (Eurofer), and its application for the first wall of the DEMO fusion reactor. The use of alloyed powders has not been widely considered for brazing purposes and could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system due to its narrower melting range, determined by DTA analysis, which enhances the spreading capabilities of the filler. Ti contained in the filler composition acts as an activator element, reacting and forming several interfacial layers at the Eurofer-braze, which enhances the wettability properties and chemical interaction at the brazing interface. Brazing thermal cycle also activated the diffusion phenomena, which mainly affected to the Eurofer alloying elements causing in it a softening band of approximately 400 μm of thickness. However, this softening effect did not degrade the shear strength of the brazed joints (94 ± 23 MPa), because failure during testing was always located at the tungsten-braze interface.

  1. Effect of Tungsten on Long-Term Microstructural Evolution and Impression Creep Behavior of 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Vijayanand, V. D.; Sudha, C.; Saroja, S.

    2017-01-01

    The present study describes the changes in the creep properties associated with microstructural evolution during thermal exposures to near service temperatures in indigenously developed reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels with varying tungsten (1 and 1.4 wt pct W) contents. The creep behavior has been studied employing impression creep (IC) test, and the changes in impression creep behavior with tungsten content have been correlated with the observed microstructures. The results of IC test showed that an increase in 0.4 pct W decreases the creep rate to nearly half the value. Creep strength of 1.4 pct W steel showed an increase in steels aged for short durations which decreased as aging time increased. The microstructural changes include coarsening of precipitates, reduction in dislocation density, changes in microchemistry, and formation of new phases. The formation of various phases and their volume fractions have been predicted using the JMatPro software for the two steels and validated by experimental methods. Detailed transmission electron microscopy analysis shows coarsening of precipitates and formation of a discontinuous network of Laves phase in 1.4 W steel aged for 10,000 hours at 823 K (550 °C) which is in agreement with the JMatPro simulation results.

  2. Dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature for a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to investigate the dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature in the range of {minus}95{degrees}C to 25{degrees}C for a low activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel (F82-H). Mode I and mixed Mode I/III fracture toughnesses were investigated in the range of {minus}95 to 25{degree}C for a F82-H steel heat-treated in the following way; 1000{degree}C/20 h/air-cooled (AC), 1100{degree}C/7 min/AC, and 700{degree}C/2 h/AC. The results indicate that crack tip plasticity was increased by mixed mode loading, and suggest that at low temperature, mode I fracture toughness is the critical design parameter, but at temperatures above room temperature, expecially concerning fatigure and creep-fatigue crack growth rate, a mixed mode loading may be more harmful than a mode I loading for this steel because a mixed mode loading results in lower fracture toughness and higher crack tip plasticity (or dislocation activity).

  3. Triple Ion-Beam Studies of Radiation Damage in 9Cr2WVTa Ferritic/Martensitic Steel for a High Power Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, EH

    2001-08-01

    To simulate radiation damage under a future Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) environment, irradiation experiments were conducted on a candidate 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel using the Triple Ion Facility (TIF) at ORNL. Irradiation was conducted in single, dual, and triple ion beam modes using 3.5 MeV Fe{sup 2}, 360 keV He{sup +}, and 180 keV H{sup +} at 80, 200, and 350 C. These irradiations produced various defects comprising black dots, dislocation loops, line dislocations, and gas bubbles, which led to hardening. The largest increase in hardness, over 63%, was observed after 50 dpa for triple beam irradiation conditions, revealing that both He and H are augmenting the hardening. Hardness increased less than 30% after 30 dpa at 200 C by triple beams, compatible with neutron irradiation data from previous work which showed about a 30% increase in yield strength after 27.2 dpa at 365 C. However, the very large concentrations of gas bubbles in the matrix and on lath and grain boundaries after these simulated SNS irradiations make predictions of fracture behavior from fission reactor irradiations to spallation target conditions inadvisable.

  4. High heat flux test with HIP-bonded Ferritic Martensitic Steel mock-up for the first wall of the KO HCML TBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won Lee, Dong; Dug Bae, Young; Kwon Kim, Suk; Yun Shin, Hee; Guen Hong, Bong; Cheol Bang, In

    2011-10-01

    In order for a Korean Helium Cooled Molten Lithium (HCML) Test Blanket Module (TBM) to be tested in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), fabrication method for the TBM FW such as Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP, 1050 °C, 100 MPa, 2 h) has been developed including post HIP heat treatment (PHHT, normalizing at 950 °C for 2 h and tempering at 750 °C for 2 h) with Ferritic Martensitic Steel (FMS). Several mock-ups were fabricated using the developed methods and one of them, three-channel mock-up, was used for performing a High Heat Flux (HHF) test to verify the joint integrity. Test conditions were determined using the commercial code, ANSYS-11, and the test was performed in the Korea Heat Load Test (KoHLT) facility, which was used a radiation heating with a graphite heater. The mock-up survived up to 1000 cycles under 1.0 MW/m 2 heat flux and there is no delamination or failure during the test.

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of V-Nb Microalloyed Ultrafine-Grained Dual-Phase Steels Processed Through Severe Cold Rolling and Intercritical Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa Rao, M.; Subramanya Sarma, V.; Sankaran, S.

    2016-12-01

    Ultrafine-grained (UFG) dual-phase (DP) steel was produced by severe cold rolling (true strain of 2.4) and intercritical annealing of a low carbon V-Nb microalloyed steel in a temperature range of 1003 K to 1033 K (730 °C to 760 °C) for 2 minutes, and water quenching. The microstructure of UFG DP steels consisted of polygonal ferrite matrix with homogeneously distributed martensite islands (both of size <1 µm) and a small fraction of the inter lath films of retained austenite. The UFG DP steel produced through intercritical annealing at 1013 K (740 °C) has good combination of strength (1295 MPa) and ductility (uniform elongation, 13 pct). The nanoscale V- and Nb-based carbides/carbonitrides and spheroidized cementite particles have played a crucial role in achieving UFG DP microstructure and in improving the strength and work hardening. Analysis of work hardening behavior of the UFG DP steels through modified Crussard-Jaoul analysis showed a continuously varying work hardening rate response which could be approximated by 2 or 3 linear regimes. The transmission electron microscopy analysis on post tensile-tested samples indicated that these regimes are possibly related to the work hardening of ferrite, lath, and twin martensite, respectively.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of V-Nb Microalloyed Ultrafine-Grained Dual-Phase Steels Processed Through Severe Cold Rolling and Intercritical Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa Rao, M.; Subramanya Sarma, V.; Sankaran, S.

    2017-03-01

    Ultrafine-grained (UFG) dual-phase (DP) steel was produced by severe cold rolling (true strain of 2.4) and intercritical annealing of a low carbon V-Nb microalloyed steel in a temperature range of 1003 K to 1033 K (730 °C to 760 °C) for 2 minutes, and water quenching. The microstructure of UFG DP steels consisted of polygonal ferrite matrix with homogeneously distributed martensite islands (both of size <1 µm) and a small fraction of the inter lath films of retained austenite. The UFG DP steel produced through intercritical annealing at 1013 K (740 °C) has good combination of strength (1295 MPa) and ductility (uniform elongation, 13 pct). The nanoscale V- and Nb-based carbides/carbonitrides and spheroidized cementite particles have played a crucial role in achieving UFG DP microstructure and in improving the strength and work hardening. Analysis of work hardening behavior of the UFG DP steels through modified Crussard-Jaoul analysis showed a continuously varying work hardening rate response which could be approximated by 2 or 3 linear regimes. The transmission electron microscopy analysis on post tensile-tested samples indicated that these regimes are possibly related to the work hardening of ferrite, lath, and twin martensite, respectively.

  7. Effects of boron and phosphorus on creep properties of a ferritic/martensitic steel for fast reactor cladding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The thermal efficiencies of both conventional and supercritical fossil-fueled power plants can be improved by increasing the operating temperatures and pressures. Increased thermal efficiency would also result in significant fuel cost savings, as well as reduced environmental emissions per megawatt generated. Creep properties of materials currently used as tubes in the hottest areas of the boiler, the superheater and reheater sections, limit the operating temperature. As such, steels with improved creep strength compared to these conventional alloys are needed to increase the operational efficiencies of thermal-electric generating stations. A new class of creep-resistant, 10%Cr martensitic steel has been developed for use as high temperature components, especially in the electric utility, petrochemical & chemical industries. The steel differs from other 9-12%Cr steels in two important ways: It is strengthened by a uniform dispersion of very fine, coarsening-resistant TiC particles rather than chromium-rich, M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates; and the TiC particles are precipitated in austenite prior to the martensitic transformation, not during tempering. By carefully controlling the thermo-mechanical treatment, three TiC sizes were incorporated into the matrix: 4, 12 and 25 nm; grain size and precipitate volume fraction (0.005) were kept constant. Creep tests on these three specimen types were done at 550{degrees}C, 600{degrees}C and 650{degrees}C. Results indicate that reducing the average particle size from 25 to 4 nm (thereby also reducing the average inter-particle spacing) decreases the steady-state creep rate by more than four orders of magnitude. The prototype steel`s composition must now be optimized, and in doing so the effects of boron and phosphorus are investigated.

  8. Use of double and triple-ion irradiation to study the influence of high levels of helium and hydrogen on void swelling of 8-12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriiyanova, Y. E.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    In accelerator-driven spallation (ADS) devices, some of the structural materials will be exposed to intense fluxes of very high energy protons and neutrons, producing not only displacement damage, but very high levels of helium and hydrogen. Unlike fission flux-spectra where most helium and hydrogen are generated by transmutation in nickel and only secondarily in iron or chromium, gas production in ADS flux-spectra are rather insensitive to alloy composition, such that Fe-Cr base ferritic alloys also generate very large gas levels. While ferritic alloys are known to swell less than austenitic alloys in fission spectra, there is a concern that high gas levels in fusion and especially ADS facilities may strongly accelerate void swelling in ferritic alloys. In this study of void swelling in response to helium and hydrogen generation, irradiation was conducted on three ferritic-martensitic steels using the Electrostatic Accelerator with External Injector (ESUVI) facility that can easily produce any combination of helium to dpa and/or hydrogen to dpa ratios. Irradiation was conducted under single, dual and triple beam modes using 1.8 MeV Cr+3, 40 keV He+, and 20 keV H+. In the first part of this study we investigated the response of dual-phase EP-450 to variations in He/dpa and H/dpa ratio, focusing first on dual ion studies and then triple ion studies, showing that there is a diminishing influence on swelling with increasing total gas content. In the second part we investigated the relative response of three alloys spanning a range of starting microstructure and composition. In addition to observing various synergisms between He and H, the most important conclusion was that the tempered martensite phase, known to lag behind the ferrite phase in swelling in the absence of gases, loses much of its resistance to void nucleation when irradiated at large gas/dpa levels.

  9. Effects of alloying and processing modifications on precipitation and strength in 9%Cr ferritic/martensitic steels for fast reactor cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tippey, Kristin E.

    P92 was modified with respect to alloying and processing in the attempt to enhance high-temperature microstructural stability and mechanical properties. Alloying effects were modeled in ThermoCalcRTM and analyzed with reference to literature. ThermoCalcRTM modeling was conducted to design two low-carbon P92-like low-carbon alloys with austenite stabilized by alternative alloying; full conversion to austenite allows for a fully martensitic structure. Goals included avoidance of Z-phase, decrease of M23C6 phase fraction and maintained or increased MX phase fraction. Fine carbonitride precipitation was optimized by selecting alloying compositions such that all V and Nb could be solutionized at temperatures outside the delta-ferrite phase field. A low-carbon alloy (LC) and a low-carbon-zero-niobium alloy (0Nb) were identified and fabricated. This low-carbon approach stems from the increased creep resistance reported in several low-carbon alloys, presumably from reduced M23C6 precipitation and maintained MX precipitation [1], although these low-carbon alloys also contained additional tungsten (W) and cobalt (Co) compared to the base P92 alloy. The synergistic effect of Co and W on the microstructure and mechanical properties are difficult to deconvolute. Higher solutionizing temperatures allow more V and Nb into solution and increase prior austenite grain size; however, at sufficiently high temperatures delta-ferrite forms. Optimal solutionizing temperatures to maximize V and Nb in solution, while avoiding the onset of the delta ferrite phase field, were analyzed in ThermoCalcRTM. Optical microscopy showed ThermoCalc RTM predicted higher delta-ferrite onset temperatures of 20 °C in P92 alloys to nearly 50 °C in the designed alloys of the critical temperature. Identifying the balance where maximum fine precipitation is achieved and delta-ferrite avoided is a key factor in the design of an acceptable P92-like alloy for Generation IV reactor cladding. Processing was

  10. Effect of sodium environment on the low cycle fatigue properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, R.; Sandhya, R.; Ganesan, V.; Valsan, M.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2009-02-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is the material of current interest for the steam generator components of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). The steam generator has been designed to operate for 30-40 years. It is important to accurately determine the life of the components in the actual environment in order to consider the extension of life beyond the design life. With this objective in view, a programme has been initiated at our laboratory to evaluate the effects of flowing sodium on the LCF behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. LCF tests conducted in flowing sodium environment at 823 K and 873 K exhibited cyclic softening behaviour both in air and sodium environments. The fatigue lives are significantly improved in sodium environment when compared to the data obtained in air environment under identical testing conditions. The lack of oxidation in sodium environment is considered to be responsible for the delayed crack initiation and consequent increase in fatigue life. Comparison of experimental lifetimes with RCC-MR design code predictions indicated that the design curve based on air tests is too conservative.

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a Ti-microalloyed low-carbon stainless steel treated by quenching-partitioning-tempering process

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, S.T.; Liu, Z.Y.; Wang, Z.; Wang, G.D.

    2016-06-15

    Quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) process was used to treat a Ti-microalloyed low-carbon stainless steel after cold rolling. In addition to martensite, ferrite and retained austenite, TiN, coarse TiC, fine TiC, (Fe,Cr){sub 3}C and ultra-fine TiC precipitates were formed after the Q-P-T treatment. Based on field emission-scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations, thermodynamic, crystallographic and statistical analyses were used to reveal the precipitation behaviors of these particles. The effects of partitioning-tempering (P-T) temperature and time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Q-P-T treated specimens were specially studied. The coarsening and spheroidization of (Fe,Cr){sub 3}C particles during P-T stage were obviously retarded by large Cr addition. The retained austenite was obtained significantly with appropriate P-T parameters. The precipitation of ultra-fine TiC particles in the martensite during the P-T stage at 500 °C induced a secondary hardening. - Highlights: • Some fine TiC with 30–70 nm precipitated in austenite during partial austenization. • A part of fine TiC had K-S OR with martensite after Q-P-T treatment. • A part of fine TiC had a OR specially deviating from K-S OR with martensite. • Coarsening and spheroidization of (Fe,Cr){sub 3}C were retarded during P-T stage. • Ultra-fine TiC with < 10 nm precipitated in martensite during P-T stage at 500 °C.

  12. Effect of loading mode on the fracture toughness of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Hirth, J.P.; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-09-01

    The critical J integrals of mode I (J{sub IC}), mixed-mode I/III (J{sub MC}), and mode III (J{sub IIIC}) were examined for a ferritic stainless steel (F-82H) at ambient temperature. A determination of J{sub MC} was made using modified compact-tension specimens. Different ratios of tension/shear stress were achieved by varying the principal axis of the crack plane between 0 and 55 degrees from the load line. The results showed that J{sub MC}s and tearing moduli (T{sub M}) varied with the crack angles and were lower than their mode I and mode III counterparts. Both the minimum J{sub MC} and T{sub M} occurred at a crack angle between 40 and 50 degrees, where {sigma}{sub i}/{sigma}{sub iii} was 1.2 to 0.84. The J{sub min} was 240 kJ/m{sup 2}, and ratios of J{sub IC}/J{sub min} and J{sub IIIC}/J{sub min} were about 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. Morphology of fracture surfaces was consistent with the change of J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values. While the upper shelf-fracture toughness of F-82H depends on loading mode, the J{sub min} remains very high. Other important considerations include the effect of mixed-mode loading on the DBT temperature, and effects of hydrogen and irradiation on J{sub min}.

  13. Process Integrated Heat Treatment of a Microalloyed Medium Carbon Steel: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Sebastian; Schledorn, Mareike; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Milenin, Andrij; Nürnberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Air-water spray cooling was employed during a heat treatment to enhance the mechanical properties of microalloyed medium carbon steel test cylinders (38MnVS6, 88 mm diameter). Using appropriate cooling times and intensities, the test cylinders' surfaces could be quenched and subsequently self-tempered by the residual heat of the core. Simultaneously, it was possible to keep the core regions of the cylinders in the bainitic regime and carry out a quasi-isothermal holding. The resulting microstructures consisted of tempered martensite (near-surface) and bainite with pearlite and ferrite (core). Compared to the standard heat treatment (controlled air cooling), the tensile properties (proof stress and ultimate tensile strength) could be improved for both near-surface and core regions with the adapted spray cooling. A hardness profile with 450 HV10 surface hardness and a hardening depth of more than 11 mm could be realized. In addition, an increase of the impact toughness for the core was achieved, resulting in approximately 25 J charpy impact energy. This is a substantial improvement compared to standard heat treatment procedure and values reported in the literature and can be attributed to the reduced pearlite volume fraction and the increased amount of fine bainite.

  14. Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Peter

    2013-09-30

    The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV

  15. Influence of Nitrogen Addition on Transformation Behavior and Mechanical Properties of Vanadium Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jiangnan; Wang, Ruizhen; Yang, Caifu

    The influence of nitrogen addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of vanadium microalloyed steels was studied by thermal simulation and bench scale rolling experiment . The results show that addition of nitrogen enhances the starting temperature of transformation, and promotes the formation of intragranular ferrite. Increasing nitrogen promotes acicular ferrite formation, and refines MA constituent. Increasing vanadium promotes the precipitation strengthening, but has little effect on toughness. For steel rich of nitrogen, vanadium mainly precipitates in austenite in the form of VN. For low nitrogen steels, however, vanadium precipitates as VC in ferrite. The lattice misfit degree of austenite-ferrite, VC-ferrite and VN-ferrite are 6.72%, 3.89% and 1.55% respectively. It indicates that VN precipitated in austenite acts as preferential nucleation sites and promotes the intragranular ferrite transformation.

  16. The Determining Role of Finish Cooling Temperature on the Microstructural Evolution and Precipitation Behavior in an Nb-V-Ti Microalloyed Steel in the Context of Newly Developed Ultrafast Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Zhaodong; Deng, Xiangtao; Wang, Guodong; Misra, R. D. K.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied here the impact of finish cooling temperature on the microstructural evolution and precipitation behavior in Nb-V-Ti microalloyed steel through thermo-mechanical simulation in the context of newly developed ultrafast cooling system. The microstructural evolution was studied in terms of morphology and crystallography of precipitates using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. At finish cooling temperature of 933 K and 893 K (660 °C and 620 °C), the microstructure primarily consisted of polygonal ferrite, together with a small amount of wedge-shaped acicular ferrite and lamellar pearlite, while, at 853 K and 813 K (580 °C and 540 °C), the microstructure consisted of lath bainite with fine interlath cementite and granular bainite with martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent. In all the finish cooling temperatures studied, the near-spherical precipitates of size range ~2 to 15 nm were randomly dispersed in ferrite and bainite matrix. The carbide precipitates were identified as (Nb,V)C with NaCl-type crystal structure. With a decrease in the finish cooling temperature, the size of the precipitates was decreased, while the number density first increased with a peak at 893 K (620 °C) and then decreased. Using Ashby-Orowan model, the contribution of the precipitation strengthening to yield strength was ~149 MPa at the finish cooling temperature of 893 K (620 °C).

  17. The effect of niobium on the hardenability of microalloyed austenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossaert, C.; Rees, G.; Maurickx, T.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    1995-01-01

    The powerful effect that varying the extent of niobium-carbide dissolution has on the “hardenability” of microalloyed austenite is demonstrated using dilatometric measurement of the critical cooling rate required to from microstructures containing >95 Pct martensite. The results can be rationalized on the hypothesis that the hardenability of austenite is enhanced by niobium in solid solution, possibly by its segregation to austenite grain boundaries, but is decreased by precipitation of niobium-carbide particles. This effect appears analogous to that of boron in steels and is found to be independent of variations in the austenite grain size.

  18. A Novel Mo and Nb Microalloyed Medium Mn TRIP Steel with Maximal Ultimate Strength and Moderate Ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Minghui; Li, Zhun; Chao, Qi; Hodgson, Peter D.

    2014-11-01

    The multi-phase, metastable, and multi-scale (M3) constitution of a novel transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel (Fe-0.17C-6.5Mn-1.1Al-0.22Mo-0.05Nb, wt pct) was designed through thermodynamic calculations combined with experimental analysis. In this study, Mo and Nb microalloying was used to control the fraction of retained austenite and its mechanical stability during tensile deformation and to improve the yield strength. Thermodynamic calculations were developed to determine the critical annealing temperature, at which a large fraction of retained austenite (~38 pct) would be obtained through the effects of solute enrichment. The experimental observation was in good agreement with the predicted results. According to the critical annealing temperature, such an ultrafine (<200 nm) M3, microstructure with optimum mechanical stability was successfully achieved. The results of this work demonstrated the superior performance with improved yield strength of 1020 to 1140 MPa and excellent ductility (>30 pct), as compared with other TRIP steels. Both angle-selective backscatter and electron backscatter diffraction techniques were employed to interpret the transformation from the deformed martensitic laths to the ultrafine austenite and ferrite duplex structure.

  19. Precipitation and fine structure in medium-carbon vanadium and vanadium/niobium microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. W.; Krauss, G.

    1989-11-01

    Hot-rolled and continuously cooled, medium-carbon microalloyed steels containing 0.2 or 0.4 pct C with vanadium (0.15 pct) or vanadium (0.15 pct) plus niobium (0.04 pct) additions were investigated with light and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope was conducted on precipitates of the 0.4 pct C steel with vanadium and niobium additions. The vanadium steels contained fine interphase precipitates within ferrite, pearlite nodules devoid of interphase precipitates, and fine ferritic transformation twins. The vanadium plus niobium steels contained large Nb-rich precipitates, precipitates which formed in cellular arrays on deformed austenite substructure and contained about equal amounts of niobium and vanadium, and V-rich interphase precipitates. Transformation twins in the ferrite and interphase precipitates in the pearlitic ferrite were not observed in either of the steels containing both microalloying elements. Consistent with the effect of higher C concentrations on driving the microalloying precipitation reactions, substructure precipitation was much more frequently observed in the 0.4C-V-Nb steel than in the 0.2C-V-Nb steel, both in the ferritic and pearlitic regions of the microstructure. Also, superposition of interphase and substructure precipitation was more frequently observed in the high-C-V-Nb steel than in the similar low-C steel.

  20. The Formation of Martensitic Austenite During Nitridation of Martensitic and Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangiabadi, Amirali; Dalton, John C.; Wang, Danqi; Ernst, Frank; Heuer, Arthur H.

    2017-01-01

    Isothermal martensite/ferrite-to-austenite phase transformations have been observed after low-temperature nitridation in the martensite and δ-ferrite phases in 15-5 PH (precipitation hardening), 17-7 PH, and 2205 (duplex) stainless steels. These transformations, in the region with nitrogen concentrations of 8 to 16 at. pct, are consistent with the notion that nitrogen is a strong austenite stabilizer and substitutional diffusion is effectively frozen at the paraequilibrium temperatures of our experiments. Our microstructural and diffraction analyses provide conclusive evidence for the martensitic nature of these phase transformations.

  1. Study of MHD Corrosion and Transport of Corrosion Products of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in the Flowing PbLi and its Application to Fusion Blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidi, Sheida

    Two important components of a liquid breeder blanket of a fusion power reactor are the liquid breeder/coolant and the steel structure that the liquid is enclosed in. One candidate combination for such components is Lead-Lithium (PbLi) eutectic alloy and advanced Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel. The research performed here is aimed at: (1) better understanding of corrosion processes in the system including RAFM steel and flowing PbLi in the presence of a strong magnetic field and (2) prediction of corrosion losses in conditions of a Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) blanket, which is at present the key liquid metal blanket concept in the US. To do this, numerical and analytical tools have been developed and then applied to the analysis of corrosion processes. First, efforts were taken to develop a computational suite called TRANSMAG (Transport phenomena in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows) as an analysis tool for corrosion processes in the PbLi/RAFM system, including transport of corrosion products in MHD laminar and turbulent flows. The computational approach in TRANSMAG is based on simultaneous solution of flow, energy and mass transfer equations with or without a magnetic field, assuming mass transfer controlled corrosion and uniform dissolution of iron in the flowing PbLi. Then, the new computational tool was used to solve an inverse mass transfer problem where the saturation concentration of iron in PbLi was reconstructed from the experimental data resulting in the following correlation: CS = e 13.604--12975/T, where T is the temperature of PbLi in K and CS is in wppm. The new correlation for saturation concentration was then used in the analysis of corrosion processes in laminar flows in a rectangular duct in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field. As shown in this study, the mass loss increases with the magnetic field such that the corrosion rate in the presence of a magnetic field can be a few times higher compared to purely

  2. Residual ferrite formation in 12CrODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, S.; Kudo, Y.; Wu, X.; Oono, N.; Hayashi, S.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing Cr content from 9 to 12 mass% leads to superior corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistances, and usually changes microstructure from martensite to a ferrite. To make transformable martensitic type of 12CrODS steels that have superior processing capability by using α/γ phase transformation, alloy design was conducted through varying nickel content. The structure of 12CrODS steels was successfully modified from full ferrite to a transformable martensite-base matrix containing ferrite. This ferrite consists of both equilibrium ferrite and a metastable residual ferrite. It was shown that the fraction of the equilibrium ferrite is predictable by computed phase diagram and formation of the residual ferrite was successfully evaluated through pinning of α/γ interfacial boundaries by oxide particles.

  3. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ Xray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  4. Effect of heat input on microstructure and properties of hybrid fiber laser-arc weld joints of the 800 MPa hot-rolled Nb-Ti-Mo microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.-N.; Zhang, S.-H.; Zhou, J.; Zhang, M.; Chen, C.-J.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2017-04-01

    Hybrid fiber laser-arc welding (HLAW) process was applied to a novel hot-rolled Nb-Ti-Mo microalloyed steels of 8 mm thickness. The steel is primarily used to manufacture automotive and construction machinery components, etc. To elucidate the effect of heat input on geometry, microstructure and mechanical properties, different heat inputs (3.90, 5.20 and 7.75 kJ/cm) were used by changing the welding speeds. With increased heat input, the depth/width of penetration was decreased, and the geometry of fusion zone (FZ) changed to "wine cup-like" shape. In regard to the microstructural constituents, the martensite content was decreased, but granular bainite (GB) content was increased. The main microstructural difference was in the FZ cross-section at 7.75 kJ/cm because of the effect of thermal source on the top and bottom. The microstructure of the top part consisted of GB, grain boundary ferrite, and acicular ferrite, while the bottom part was primarily lath martensite. The hardness distribution was similar for different heat inputs. Hardness in FZ, coarse-grained HAZ and mixed-grained HAZ was higher than the base metal (BM), but for the fine-grained HAZ was similar or marginally less than the base metal (BM). Tensile strain was concentrated in the BM such that the fracture occurred in this region. In summary, the geometry, microstructure, and mechanical properties of weld joints were superior at heat input of 5.20 kJ/cm.

  5. The Effect of Cool Deformation on the Microstructural Evolution and Flow Strength of Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi Anijdan, Seyyed Hashem

    Cool deformation is a process in which a small amount of plastic deformation is applied at temperatures well below the end of the austenite transformation temperature. In this thesis, a systematic study was conducted to evaluate the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of microalloyed steels processed by thermomechanical schedules incorporating cool deformation. Thermodynamic analysis was conducted to predict equilibrium phases formed by the presence of microalloying elements such as Ti, Nb, Mo and their appearance were then elaborated by means of TEM microscopy. As well, continuous cooling torsion (CCT) was employed to study the transformation behavior of steels for austenite conditioned and unconditioned. Cool deformation was incorporated into a full scale simulation of hotrolling, and the effect of prior austenite conditioning on the cool deformability of microalloyed steels was investigated. Out of these studies, a new definition of no-recystallization temperature (Tnr) was proposed based on dynamic precipitation, which was then recognized in the Nb bearing steels by using TEM analysis as well as flow curves analysis. Results show that cool deformation greatly improves the strength of microalloyed steels. Of the several mechanisms identified, such as work hardening, precipitation, grain refinement, and strain induced transformation (SIT) of retained austenite, SIT was proposed, for the first time in microalloyed steels, to be the significant mechanism of strengthening due to the deformation in ferrite. Results also show that the effect of ferrite precipitation is greatly overshadowed by SIT at room temperature. Finally, considering the interplay of SIT and precipitation for the Nb bearing steels, a rolling schedule was designed incorporating austenite conditioning, cooling rate and cool deformation that maximized the strength.

  6. Effect of alloying on microstructure and precipitate evolution in ferritic weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Badri Kannan

    The effect of alloying on the microstructure of ferritic weld metal produced with an self-shielded flux cored arc welding process (FCAW-S) has been studied. The welding electrode has a flux core that is intentionally alloyed with strong deoxidizers and denitriding elements such as aluminum, titanium and zirconium in addition to austenite formers such as manganese and nickel. This results in formation of microstructure consisting of carbide free bainite, retained austenite and twinned martensite. The work focuses on characterization of the microstructures and the precipitates formed during solidification and the allotropic phase transformation of the weld metal. Aluminum, manganese and nickel have significant solubility in iron while aluminum, titanium and zirconium have very strong affinity for nitrogen and oxygen. The effect of these alloying elements on the phase transformation and precipitation of oxides and nitrides have been studied with various characterization techniques. In-situ X-ray synchrotron diffraction has been used to characterize the solidification path and the effect of heating and cooling rates on microstructure evolution. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in conjunction with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to study the effect of micro-alloying additions on inclusion evolution. The formation of core-shell structure of oxide/nitride is identified as being key to improvement in toughness of the weld metal. Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) in combination with Orientation Imaging Microscopy (OIM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been employed to study the effect of alloying on austenite to ferrite transformation modes. The prevention of twinned martensite has been identified to be key to improving ductility for achieving high strength weld metal.

  7. The effect of low dose irradiation on the impact fracture energy and tensile properties of pure iron and two ferritic martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belianov, I.; Marmy, P.

    1998-10-01

    Two batches of subsize V-notched impact bend specimens and subsize tensile specimens have been irradiated in the Saphir test reactor of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The first batch of specimen has been irradiated at 250°C to a dose of 2.65 × 10 19 n/cm 2 (0.042 dpa) and the second batch has been irradiated at 400°C to a dose of 8.12 × 10 19 n/cm 2 (0.13 dpa). Three different materials in three different microstructures were irradiated: pure iron and two ferritic steels, the alloy MANET 2 and a low activation composition CETA. The results of the impact tests and of the corresponding tensile tests are presented. Despite the very low neutron dose, a significant shift of the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) is observed. The influence of the test temperature on the impact energy is discussed for the irradiated and unirradiated conditions, with special emphasis on the microstructure.

  8. Comparative Tensile Flow and Work-Hardening Behavior of 9 Pct Chromium Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in the Framework of the Estrin-Mecking Internal-Variable Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. K.; Christopher, J.

    2016-06-01

    The comparative tensile flow and work-hardening behavior of P9 steel in two different product forms, normalized and tempered plate and thick section tube plate forging, and P91 steel were investigated in the framework of the dislocation dynamics based Estrin-Mecking (E-M) one-internal-variable approach. The analysis indicated that the flow behavior of P9 and P91 steels was adequately described by the E-M approach in a wide range of temperatures. It was suggested that dislocation dense martensite lath/cell boundaries and precipitates together act as effective barriers to dislocation motion in P9 and P91 steels. At room and intermediate temperatures, the evolution of the internal-state variable, i.e., the dislocation density with plastic strain, exhibited insignificant variations with respect to temperature. At high temperatures, a rapid evolution of dislocation density with plastic strain toward saturation with increasing temperature was observed. The softer P9 steel tube plate forging exhibited higher work hardening in terms of larger gains in the dislocation density and flow stress contribution from dislocations than the P9 steel plate and P91 steel at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 873 K (27 °C to 600 °C). The evaluation of activation energy suggests that the deformation is controlled by cross-slip of dislocations at room and intermediate temperatures, and climb of dislocations at high temperatures. The relative influence of initial microstructure on flow and work-hardening parameters associated with the E-M approach was discussed in the three temperature regimes displayed by P9 and P91 steels.

  9. Niobium in Microalloyed Rail Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    Rails generally do not have a homogeneous austenite grain structure across their sections because the degree of plastic strain achieved during hot-rolling depends on location. Here we explore a philosophy in which niobium microalloying may be introduced in order to thermomechanically process the material so that pancaked and refined austenite grains may eventually be achieved in the critical regions of the rail. The essential principle in alloy design involves the avoidance of coarse niobium carbide precipitates in the regions of the steel that contain chemical segregation caused by non-equilibrium solidification. Both pearlitic and cementite-free bainitic rails have been studied. The work is of generic value to the design of high-carbon microalloyed steels.

  10. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  11. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  12. The Development of Lightweight Commercial Vehicle Wheels Using Microalloying Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hongzhou; Zhang, Lilong; Wang, Jiegong; Xuan, Zhaozhi; Liu, Xiandong; Guo, Aimin; Wang, Wenjun; Lu, Guimin

    Lightweight wheels can reduce weight about 100kg for commercial vehicles, and it can save energy and reduce emission, what's more, it can enhance the profits for logistics companies. The development of lightweight commercial vehicle wheels is achieved by the development of new steel for rim, the process optimization of flash butt welding, and structure optimization by finite element methods. Niobium micro-alloying technology can improve hole expansion rate, weldability and fatigue performance of wheel steel, and based on Niobium micro-alloying technology, a special wheel steel has been studied whose microstructure are Ferrite and Bainite, with high formability and high fatigue performance, and stable mechanical properties. The content of Nb in this new steel is 0.025% and the hole expansion rate is ≥ 100%. At the same time, welding parameters including electric upsetting time, upset allowance, upsetting pressure and flash allowance are optimized, and by CAE analysis, an optimized structure has been attained. As a results, the weight of 22.5in×8.25in wheel is up to 31.5kg, which is most lightweight comparing the same size wheels. And its functions including bending fatigue performance and radial fatigue performance meet the application requirements of truck makers and logistics companies.

  13. Microstructural characterization of a warm-deformed microalloyed steel

    SciTech Connect

    Eghbali, B.

    2008-04-15

    A warm deformation process using torsion testing was carried out on a low carbon Nb-microalloyed steel. The physical processes that occur during deformation were studied by analyzing the warm flow curves. The mechanisms of fine ferrite grain formation were studied by means of optical microscopy and an electron back-scattering diffraction technique. The results show that warm flow curves of ferrite are similar to those affected only by dynamic softening events. Microstructural analysis shows that, with increasing strain, the new fine equiaxed ferrite grains surrounded by high-angle boundaries are generated at the initial boundaries. During the early stages of deformation, as strain increases the grain size decreases and the grain aspect ratio rapidly increases. A further increase of the strain also leads to continuous decreases of both the grain size and the grain aspect ratio. The dynamic softening mechanism and dynamical formation of new fine grains, observed during warm deformation, were verified to be due to continuous dynamic recrystallization.

  14. Recrystallization kinetics of microalloyed steels deformed in the intercritical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simielli, E. A.; Yue, S.; Jonas, J. J.

    1992-02-01

    A plain carbon and two microalloyed steels were tested under interrupted loading conditions. The base steel contained 0.06 pct C and 1.31 pct Mn, and the other alloys contained single additions of 0.29 pct Mo and 0.04 pct Nb. Double-hit compression tests were performed on cylindrical specimens of the three steels at 820 °C, 780 °C, and 740 °C within the α + γ field. A’softening curve was determined at each temperature by the offset method. In parallel, the progress of ferrite recrystallization was followed on quenched specimens of the three steels by means of quantitative metallography. It was observed that, in the base steel, a recrystallizes more slowly than y. The addition of Mo retards recrystallization and has a greater influence on γ than on α recrystallization. This effect is in agreement with calculations based on the Cahn theory of solute drag. Niobium addition has an even greater effect on the recrystallization of the two phases. In this steel, the recrystallization of ferrite was incomplete at the three intercritical temperatures. Furthermore, the austenite remained completely unrecrystallized up to the maximum time involved in the experiments (1 hour). The metallographic results indicate that the nucleation of recrystallization occurs heterogeneously in the microstructure, the interface between ferrite and austenite being the preferred site for nucleation.

  15. Heat input and dilution effects in microalloyed steel weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.C. ); Kluken, A.O. . Div. of Metallurgy); Edwards, G.R. . Center for Welding and Joining Research)

    1994-01-01

    The sensitivity of weld metal microstructure and mechanical properties to variations in both heat input (i.e., cooling rate) and weld dilution in submerged arc (SA) welding of microalloyed steel was examined. Weldments were prepared with weld metal dilutions of approximately 40% and 70% at heat inputs of 2.0, 3.3, 4.6, and 5.3 kJ/mm, using two commercial welding wires and a basic commercial flux. The high dilution welds, which were ordinary bead-on-plate welds, resulted in microstructures that ranged from ferrite with aligned second phase at low heat inputs to acicular ferrite at high heat inputs. Special over-welding techniques were used to make the low dilution welds, allowing use of the same welding parameters as those for the high dilution welds. The technique involved remelting of weld metal to simulate the effect of multipass welding. The microstructure of these welds was predominantly acicular ferrite, independent of heat input. As a consequence, the low dilution welds had superior toughness compared to the high dilution welds.

  16. Effect of microalloying elements on the structure and properties of low-carbon and ultralow-carbon cold-rolled steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girina, O. A.; Fonshtein, N. M.; Storozheva, L. M.

    1994-03-01

    Cold-rolled steels used for the forged components of automobiles should exhibit high, partly mutually-exclusive properties: high forgeability with desirably high strength, resistance to aging combined with hardenability at temperatures for drying paint coatings, etc. Satisfaction of these requirements is provided to a considerable degree by microalloying. The final mechanical properties of cold-rolled steel depend on such structural parameters of hot-rolled strip as texture, the amount of dissolved C and N atoms in α-solid solution, and ferrite grain size. With constant hot rolling production schedules these structural parameters are governed by steel composition, in particular by the type of microalloying. In this work the effect is considered for dispersed microalloying elements, i.e., phosphorus, boron, titanium, and nïobium, on the final mechanical properties of low- and ultralow-carbon steels.

  17. Effect of microalloying on the strength of high carbon wire steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephanie L.

    Microalloying additions of V, Nb, and N were investigated as means of increasing strength of eutectoid steels for wire applications. In order to examine the effects of microalloying additions during several stages of wire processing, continuous cooling experiments with and without deformation as well as patenting simulations were conducted using a Gleeble® 3500 thermomechanical simulator. Continuous cooling was performed from industrial austenitizing (1093 °C) and laying head (950 °C and 880 °C) temperatures, at rates ranging from 1 50 °C/s. Deformation was induced via hot torsion testing, which was followed by continuous cooling from 950 °C at rates of 5, 10, and 25 °C/s. Industrial wire patenting was simulated by austenitizing at 1093 °C or 950 °C for 30 sec, then rapid cooling to isothermal transformation temperatures of 575, 600, 625, and 650 °C for 15 sec before cooling to room temperature. Metallography, Vickers hardness, pearlite colony size and pearlite interlamellar spacing (ILS) measurements were used to examine the effects of these treatments. Continuous cooling transformation (CCT) curves were constructed for four steels: 1080, V, V+N, and V+Nb. In the V-microalloyed steel, additional N accelerated pearlite transformation and Nb delayed pearlite transformation. Observed N effects are in agreement with the theory of VN nucleating grain boundary ferrite and accelerating pearlite transformation, proposed by Han et al. [1995], and also consistent with observations by Brownrigg and Prior [2002]. Delay of transformation temperatures has been observed due to Nb effects [De Ardo, 2009]. A larger delay observed with higher austenitizing temperatures suggests that Nb precipitates may not be as effective at delaying transformation. V strengthening effects were observed in all microalloyed steels using a model that predicted hardness of eutectoid steels by incorporating colony size and ILS measurements, with maximum strengthening observed

  18. The effect of chemical composition and austenite conditioning on the transformation behavior of microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mousavi Anijdan, S.H.; Rezaeian, Ahmad; Yue, Steve

    2012-01-15

    In this investigation, by using continuous cooling torsion (CCT) testing, the transformation behavior of four microalloyed steels under two circumstances of austenite conditioning and non-conditioning was studied. A full scale hot-rolling schedule containing a 13-pass deformation was employed for the conditioning of the austenite. The CCT tests were then employed till temperature of {approx} 540 Degree-Sign C and the flow curves obtained from this process were analyzed. The initial and final microstructures of the steels were studied by optical and electron microscopes. Results show that alloying elements would decrease the transformation temperature. This effect intensifies with the gradual increase of Mo, Nb and Cu as alloying elements added to the microalloyed steels. As well, austenite conditioning increased the transformation start temperature due mainly to the promotion of polygonal ferrite formation that resulted from a pancaked austenite. The final microstructures also show that CCT alone would decrease the amount of bainite by inducing ferrite transformation in the two phase region. In addition, after the transformation begins, the deformation might result in the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization in the ferrite region. This could lead to two different ferrite grain sizes at the end of the CCT. Moreover, the Nb bearing steels show no sign of decreasing the strength level after the transformation begins in the non-conditioned situation and their microstructure is a mix of polygonal ferrite and bainite indicating an absence of probable dynamic recrystallization in this condition. In the conditioned cases, however, these steels show a rapid decrease of the strength level and their final microstructures insinuate that ferrite could have undergone a dynamic recrystallization due to deformation. Consequently, no bainite was seen in the austenite conditioned Nb bearing steels. The pancaking of austenite in the latest cases produced fully polygonal ferrite

  19. Nanocarbonitride precipitation contribution to the yield stress of a V-Nb microalloyed steel.

    PubMed

    Sobral, M D C; Mei, P R; Kestenbach, H J

    2010-02-01

    Nanocarbonitride precipitation during thermomechanical processing is well known as one of the important mechanisms to increase mechanical properties of hot rolled microalloyed steels. Some studies of industrial hot rolled strips have quantified the contribution of the different ways of precipitation: in austenite, at the interface austenite/ferrite, or in supersaturated ferrite during final cooling. Thin slabs of microalloyed steels (0.07-0.08% V and 0.02-0.04% Nb) were thermomecanically processed on a laboratory-scale rolling mill. The different modes of nanocarbonitride precipitation were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. It was observed interphase precipitation with average diameter of nanocarbonitride of 4.4 nm and potential contribution to strengthening of 90 MPa, according to the Orowan-Ashby model. From the Orowan-Ashby model of precipitation strengthening, strength contributions of about 50 MPa were found for nanocarbonitride particles formed in austenite. The inclusion of a holding extra period of 15 minutes just below the Finishing Rolling Initial Temperature has confirmed an important contribution to the yield stress given by the nanocarbonitride particles formed in austenite.

  20. Tensile Work Hardening Modeling of Precipitation Strengthened Nb-Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iza-Mendia, Amaia; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Gutiérrez, Isabel

    2017-03-01

    Very often Nb contributes to the strength of a microalloyed steel beyond the expected level due to the grain size strengthening resulting from thermomechanical processing. Two different mechanisms are behind this phenomenon, and both of them have to do with the amount of Nb remaining in the solution after hot rolling. The first of them is the increase of the hardenability of the steel due to Nb, and the second one is the fine precipitation of NbC in ferrite. The contribution of the precipitates to the work hardening of two thermally and thermomechanically processed microalloyed steels is addressed in this work and this contribution has been integrated into previously developed models by the authors for ferrite-pearlite microstructures. An L eff is considered through the effective spacing associated to the different obstacles and their interactions with the moving dislocations. The model obtained shows good agreement with the experimental tensile curves from the end of yield point elongation to the onset of necking.

  1. A method to study interface diffusion of arsenic into a Nb-Ti microalloyed low carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuan-zhi; Xu, Jian-ping

    2012-09-01

    A novel diffusion couple method was used to investigate the interface diffusion of arsenic into a Nb-Ti microalloyed low carbon steel and its effects on phase transformation at the interface. It is discovered that the content of arsenic has great effect on grain growth and phase transformation at high temperature. When the arsenic content is no more than 1wt%, there is no obvious grain growth and no obvious ferrite transitional region formed at the diffusion interface. However, when the arsenic content is no less than 5wt%, the grain grows very rapidly. In addition, the arsenic-enriched ferrite transitional layer forms at the diffusion interface in the hot-rolling process, which results from a slower diffusion rate of arsenic atoms than that of carbon in ferrite.

  2. Evolution of Microalloyed Steels Since Microalloying '75 with Specific Emphasis on Linepipe and Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, J. Malcolm; Barbaro, F.

    In the four decades since the Conference Microalloying '75 was held in Washington, DC, there has been an avalanche of development and application in almost all steel products but most notably in automotive, plate and linepipe steels. Revolutions in steelmaking, casting, rolling and accelerated cooling have all contributed to the adoption of this versatile, economical class of steel. Today it is estimated that fully seventeen percent of all steel produced relies on microalloying additions and related metallurgical technology.

  3. Development of Microstructure and Crystallographic Texture in a Double-Sided Friction Stir Welded Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, S.; Wynne, B. P.; Baker, T. N.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure and crystallographic texture has been investigated in double-sided friction stir welded microalloyed steel, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The microstructure analyses show that the center of stirred zone reached a temperature between Ac1 and Ac3 during FSW, resulting in a dual-phase austenitic/ ferritic microstructure. The temperatures in the thermo-mechanically affected zone and the overlapped area between the first and second weld pass did not exceed the Ac1. The shear generated by the rotation probe occurs in austenitic/ferritic phase field where the austenite portion of the microstructure is transformed to a bainitic ferrite, on cooling. Analysis of crystallographic textures with regard to shear flow lines generated by the probe tool shows the dominance of simple shear components across the whole weld. The austenite texture at Ac1 - Ac3 is dominated by the B { {1bar{1}2} }< 110rangle and bar{B} { {bar{1}1bar{2}} }< bar{1}bar{1}0rangle simple shear texture components, where the bainite phase textures formed on cooling were inherited from the shear textures of the austenite phase with relatively strong variant selection. The ferrite portion of the stirred zone and the ferrites in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and the overlapped area underwent shear deformation with textures dominated by the D1 { {bar{1}bar{1}2} }< 111rangle and D2 { {11bar{2}} }< 111rangle simple shear texture components. The formation of ultrafine equiaxed ferrite with submicron grain size has been observed in the overlapped area between the first and second weld pass. This is due to continuous dynamic strain-induced recrystallization as a result of simultaneous severe shear deformation and drastic undercooling.

  4. Adaptive modulations of martensites.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, S; Rössler, U K; Heczko, O; Wuttig, M; Buschbeck, J; Schultz, L; Fähler, S

    2010-04-09

    Modulated phases occur in numerous functional materials like giant ferroelectrics and magnetic shape-memory alloys. To understand the origin of these phases, we employ and generalize the concept of adaptive martensite. As a starting point, we investigate the coexistence of austenite, adaptive 14M phase, and tetragonal martensite in Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape-memory alloy epitaxial films. We show that the modulated martensite can be constructed from nanotwinned variants of the tetragonal martensite phase. By combining the concept of adaptive martensite with branching of twin variants, we can explain key features of modulated phases from a microscopic view. This includes metastability, the sequence of 6M-10M-14M-NM intermartensitic transitions, and the magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  5. Effect of Controlled Hot Rolling Parameters on Microstructure of a Nb-Microalloyed Steel Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Khaki, Daavood Mirahmadi; Abedi, Amir

    2011-01-17

    The design of controlled rolling process of microalloyed steel sheets is affected by several factors. In this investigation, effect of the reheating, finishing and coiling temperatures of rolling, which are considered as the most effective parameters on microstructure of hot rolled products has been studied. For this purpose, seven different reheating temperatures between 1000 to 1300 deg. C with 50 deg. C increments, three different finishing temperatures of 950, 900 and 850 deg. C below the non-recrystallization temperature and one temperature of 800 deg. C in the inter critical range and four different coiling temperatures of 550, 600, 650 and 700 deg. C were chosen. By soaking the specimens in furnace, the grain coarsening temperature (T{sub gc}) is obtained about 1250 deg. C. Hence, for these kinds of steels, the reheating temperature 1200 to 1250 deg. C is recommended. Moreover, it is observed that decreasing the coiling and finishing temperatures causes more grain refinement of microstructure and the morphology is changed from polygonal ferrite to acicular one. Findings of this research provide a good connection among reheating, finishing and coiling temperatures and microstructural features of Nb-microalloyed steel sheets.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Microalloyed High-Strength Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. D.; Huang, B. X.; Wang, L.; Rong, Y. H.

    2008-01-01

    The high strength of transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels with tensile strength from 800 to 1000 MPa were designed based on grain refinement and precipitation strengthening through microalloying with Nb, Nb/V, and Nb/Mo in a Fe-0.2C-1.5Si-1.5Mn cold-rolled TRIP steel. The origins of alloying strengthening for three grades of 860, 950, and 1010 MPa TRIP steels obtained in this work were revealed by the combination of Thermo-Calc and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The addition of Nb in Nb, Nb/V, and Nb/Mo TRIP steels can effectively refine the austenite grain in the hot-rolled process by the NbC carbides retarding austenite recrystallization and, in turn, refine final microstructure after intercritical annealing. The addition of Nb/V can precipitate partially fine and dispersive (Nb,V)C carbides in ferrite grains instead of coarse NbC carbides; therefore, the precipitation strengthening plays an important role in the increase of TRIP steel strength. The addition of Nb/Mo cannot only precipitate fully fine and dispersive (Nb,Mo)C carbides in ferrite grains but also increase the volume fraction of bainite accompanying the decrease of volume fraction of ferrite, leading to the drastic increase of both the yield strength and tensile strength.

  7. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of High-Mn TRIP Steel Based on Warm Deformation of Martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhikai; Li, Longfei; Yang, Wangyue; Sun, Zuqing

    2015-04-01

    High-Mn TRIP steel with about 5 wt pct Mn was prepared by a thermo-mechanical treatment based on warm deformation of martensite and subsequent short-time annealing in the intercritical region. The microstructural evolution and the mechanical properties of the used steel during such treatment were investigated. The results indicate that during warm deformation of martensite in the intercritical region, the decomposition of martensite was accelerated by warm deformation and the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization of ferrite led to the formation of equiaxed ferrite grains. Meanwhile, the reverse transformation of austenite was accelerated by warm deformation to some extent. During subsequent annealing in the intercritical region, static recrystallization of ferrite led to the increase in the fraction of equiaxed ferrite grains, and the formation of the reversed austenite was accelerated by the addition of the deformation-stored energy, while the stability of the reversed austenite was improved by the accelerated diffusions of C atoms and Mn atoms. As a whole, the mechanical properties of the used steel by the thermo-mechanical treatment based on warm deformation of martensite and subsequent short-time annealing in the intercritical region were comparable to the steels with similar compositions subjected to intercritical annealing for hours after cold rolling of martensite.

  8. Assessment of the microstructure and torsional fatigue performance of an induction hardened vanadium microalloyed medium-carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothleutner, Lee M.

    Vanadium microalloying of medium-carbon bar steels is a common practice in industry for a number of hot rolled as well as forged and controlled-cooled components. However, use of vanadium microalloyed steels has expanded into applications beyond their originally designed controlled-cooled processing scheme. Applications such as transmission shafts often require additional heat-treatments such as quench and tempering and/or induction hardening to meet packaging or performance requirements. As a result, there is uncertainty regarding the influence of vanadium on the properties of heat-treated components, specifically the effect of rapid heat-treating such as induction hardening. In the current study, the microstructural evolution and torsional fatigue behavior of induction hardened 1045 and 10V45 (0.08 wt pct V) steels were examined. Torsional fatigue specimens specifically designed for this research were machined from the as-received, hot rolled bars and induction hardened using both scanning (96 kHz/72 kW) and single-shot (31 kHz/128 kW) methods. Four conditions were evaluated, three scan hardened to 25, 32, and 44 pct nominal effective case depths and one single-shot hardened to 44 pct. Torsional fatigue tests were conducted at a stress ratio of 0.1 and shear stress amplitudes of 550, 600, and 650 MPa. Physical simulations using the thermal profiles from select induction hardened conditions were conducted in the GleebleRTM 3500 to augment microstructural analysis of torsional fatigue specimens. Thermal profiles were calculated by a collaborating private company using electro-thermal finite element analysis. Residual stresses were evaluated for all conditions using a strain gage hole drilling technique. The results showed that vanadium microalloying has an influence on the microstructure in the highest hardness region of the induction-hardened case as well as the total case region. Vanadium microalloyed conditions consistently exhibited a greater amount of non-martensitic

  9. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, S. A.; Saleh, T. A.; Anderoglu, O.; Romero, T. J.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Li, S.; Cole, J. I.; Fielding, R.

    2016-01-01

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress-strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress-strain constitutive σ(ɛ) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ɛ) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where the latter can be understood in terms of the alloy's σ(ɛ) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ɛ) in the range of 0-10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are also analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. Notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.

  10. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    DOE PAGES

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Anderoglu, Osman; ...

    2015-08-06

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress–strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress–strain constitutive σ(ε) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ε) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where as the latter can be understood in terms ofmore » the alloy's σ(ε) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ε) in the range of 0–10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. As a result, notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.« less

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of dual phase steels, with different martensite morphology, produced during TLP bonding of a low C-Mn steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazaeli, Abolfazl; Ekrami, Aliakbar; Kokabi, Amir Hossein

    2016-09-01

    In this research, production of ferrite - martensite dual phase Steels with different martensite morphology was considered during transient liquid phase bonding of a low carbon steel. The steel was bonded using an iron base interlayer with melting point of 1443 K and 40 μm thickness. Bonding process carried out at 1473 K, under pressure of 0.5 MPa, at different holding time of 10, 20, 30 and 40 minutes. Microstructural studies of joint region showed that isothermal solidification completed at the bonding time of 40 minutes. Microstructure of joints made at the bonding time of 10, 20, and 30 minutes consists of two distinct region, athermal and isothermal solidified zones. Microstructure of these zones was studied and chemical composition of these zones was determined by EDS. Joints made with bonding time of 40 minutes were homogenized at 1008 K and then cooled into cold water to produce dual phase ferrite and martensite microstructure with different martensite morphology. According to shear test results, it was found that the shear strength of ferrite - fibrous martensite microstructure is greater than those with ferrite - continuous martensite and ferrite - blocky martensite microstructure.

  12. Reverse-Martensitic Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel upon Up-quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kiminori; Guo, Defeng; Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xiangyi

    2016-08-01

    Reverse-martensitic transformation utilizing up-quenching was demonstrated for austenitic stainless steel. Up-quenching was done following the stress-induced phase modification to martensite and then enrichment of the body-centered-cubic ferrite. Transmission-electron-microscopy observation and Vickers hardness test revealed that the reverse-martensitic transformation yields quench hardening owing to an introduction of highly-concentrated dislocation. It is furthermore found that Cr precipitation on grain boundaries caused by isothermal aging is largely suppressed in the present approach.

  13. Observation on Formation of Fresh Martensite from the Reversed Austenite During Water-Quenching Process in Fe-0.2C-5Mn Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chuan; Zhang, Chi; Cao, Wen-Quan; Yang, Zhi-Gang; Weng, Yu-Qing

    2015-09-01

    Phase transformation behavior during intercritical annealing in Fe-0.2C-5Mn was studied. Austenite lath formed and transformed at martensite lath during annealing. XRD revealed that retained austenite amount did not always increase with time. TEM result may firstly demonstrate that reversed austenite partly changed into fresh martensite during quenching while the remained part was retained as retained austenite. The final structure consisted of ferrite, retained austenite and fresh martensite. Simulation was done by DICTRA to support TEM result.

  14. Residual stress relaxation and fatigue behavior of an induction hardened microalloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, Ana Luisa Rivas De

    particles. varepsilon-carbide was identified in samples tempered at 177sp° C and cementite at higher tempering temperatures. High compressive residual stress levels were generated at the hardened outer surface layer by the phase transformation and pre-straining. The compressive residual stresses were reduced during tempering. At low tempering temperatures the residual stress relaxation occurred basically by the contraction experienced by the steel due to the precipitation of carbides. At higher tempering temperatures the relaxation of compressive residual stresses occurred mainly by creep. The relaxation of residual stresses by creep is assisted by the dislocation pipe diffusion of iron atoms in ferrite and can be represented by an Avrami type of function. During fatigue, a significant reduction of compressive residual stresses occurred in the first few loading cycles due to the Bausingher effect. After this transient phenomenon, the residual stresses monotonically relaxed with the logarithm of the number of applied cycles. The vanadium microalloyed steel showed greater resistance to mechanical stress relaxation than the 1530 steel.

  15. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Anderoglu, Osman; Romero, Tobias J.; Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya; Li, S.; Cole, James I.; Fielding, Randall

    2015-08-06

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress–strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress–strain constitutive σ(ε) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ε) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where as the latter can be understood in terms of the alloy's σ(ε) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ε) in the range of 0–10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. As a result, notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.

  16. Experimental investigation of the transformation texture in hotrolled ferritic stainless steel using single orientation determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raabe, D.; Ylitalo, M.

    1996-01-01

    Two ferritic stainless steels (≈16.5 mass pct Cr) were hot-rolled using seven subsequent passes. The first sample was rolled within the range 1280 °C to 750 °C, i.e., the deformation started in the ferritic region. The second sample was rolled within the range 1080 °C to 770 °C, i.e., the deformation started in the ferritic-austenitic region. In both cases, up to 40 vol pct of the ferrite transformed into austenite during hot rolling. During the last passes, the austenite transformed into cubic martensite. After hot rolling, these former austenitic regions were identified using a selective etching technique and examined using single orientation determination in the scanning electron microscope. The regions which remained ferritic throughout the hot-rolling process were investigated as well. Whereas the texture of the martensite considerably depended on the hot-rolling conditions, especially on the temperature and on the intervals between the rollings, the texture of the ferrite was less affected. The textures of the martensite were interpreted in terms of the crystallographic transformation rules between austenite and martensite. The textures of the ferrite were discussed in terms of recovery and recrystallization.

  17. Influence of cooling rate on secondary phase precipitation and proeutectoid phase transformation of micro-alloyed steel containing vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Kun; Meng, Lingtao; Liu, Qing; Liu, Bo; Huang, Yunhua

    2016-05-01

    During continuous casting process of low carbon micro-alloyed steel containing vanadium, the evolution of strand surface microstructure and the precipitation of secondary phase particles (mainly V(C, N)) are significantly influenced by cooling rate. In this paper, influence of cooling rate on the precipitation behavior of proeutectoid α-ferrite at the γ-austenite grain boundary and in the steel matrix are in situ observed and analyzed through high temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy. The relationship between cooling rate and precipitation of V(C, N) from steel continuous casting bloom surface microstructure is further studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron dispersive spectrometer. Relative results have shown the effect of V(C, N) precipitation on α-ferrite phase transformation is mainly revealed in two aspects: (i) Precipitated V(C, N) particles act as inoculant particles to promote proeutectoid ferrite nucleation. (ii) Local carbon concentration along the γ-austenite grain boundaries is decreased with the precipitation of V(C, N), which in turn promotes α-ferrite precipitation.

  18. Austenite grain coarsening in microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, L. J.; Raley, J. C.

    1983-10-01

    A uniform, fine-grain structure is essential in steels, particularly for strip and plate, that are to meet demands for high strength and toughness. To produce such microstructures, every step of the high-temperature processing of the steel must be carefully controlled, beginning with grain coarsening that occurs during reheating for slab rolling. Extremely coarse or nonuniform grain structures in the reheated slab are difficult to refine by subsequent hot working. Accordingly, the grain-coarsening behavior of laboratory heats of C-Mn-Si base steels and of such steels with additions of Al, V, Ti, or Nb was examined to understand the principles governing the behavior of this class of steels. The grain-coarsening temperature (the temperature at which abnormal or discontinuous growth occurs) varies with the type and concentration of the microalloy addition; an approximate relation is presented. Generally the grain-coarsening temperature increases with, but is lower than, the temperature required for complete dissolution of the microalloy carbide or nitride present. Thus, steels containing the very insoluble TiN coarsen at much higher temperatures than steels containing the more soluble VCN. These results agree qualitatively with predictions of models of grain-boundary pinning by precipitate particles.

  19. Microstructural behavior of 8Cr-ODS martensitic steels during creep deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, K.; Esaka, H.; Tamura, M.; Tanigawa, H.

    2011-10-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels show a high anisotropy in their creep behavior because of the δ-ferrite grain elongated in the hot-rolled direction and the characteristic formation of creep cavities. In this work, the relationship between the δ-ferrite grain and the growth of creep cavities in 8Cr-ODS steels was investigated. The samples of two ODS steels with different δ-ferrite volume fractions were machined parallel and perpendicular to the hot-rolled direction. Creep rupture tests and interrupted tests were performed at 700 °C and about 197 MPa. Cavities formed in the martensite along δ-ferrite grains during creep deformation. The area fraction of the cavities of all specimens increased in proportion to the cube root of test time. When the volume fraction of δ-ferrite was high and δ-ferrite grains elongated parallel to the load direction, δ-ferrite then obstructed the propagation of cracks. However, when the volume fraction of δ-ferrite was low and δ-ferrite grains elongated perpendicular to the load direction, δ-ferrite grains had little effect on crack propagation.

  20. High resolution studies in martensite

    SciTech Connect

    Sarikaya, M.; Easterling, K.; Thomas, G.

    1980-03-01

    Detailed microstructural studies were performed on the lath martensite in steels containing 0.1 and 0.3 wt %-low alloy structural steels by lattice imaging. This method is providing information on the fine substructural details of dislocated martensite.

  1. Precipitation Behavior of the Second Phase in V-Ti Microalloy TRIP Steels at Different Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Hui; Fu, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Hu; He, Yan-Lin; Wang, Hua; Li, Lin

    2016-05-01

    Precipitation behavior of the second phase in V-Ti microalloyed transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels at different conditions was investigated. The second phase is mainly composed of Vanadium-titanium carbides and vanadium-titanium nitrides, which precipitates from bainitic ferrites as well as ferrite grains and grain boundaries. The average size, size distribution and numbers of the second phase of TRIP steel in as-cast state, as hot and cold rolled state and as TRIP heated state were analyzed and compared by using the technique of carbon extraction replica and transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that hot rolling can promote the second phase refining. In addition, the size of the second phase is obviously increased with the prolonged time soaking at 800􀔨. The average equivalent radiu of the second phase in samples after intercritical annealing at 800°C for 5 minutes and bainitic isothermal transformation temperature of 400°C for 5 minutes is about 4nm.

  2. Improvement of fracture toughness of forging steels microalloyed with titanium by accelerated cooling after hot working

    SciTech Connect

    Linaza, M.A.; Romero, J.L.; Rodriguez-Ibabe, J.M.; Urcola, J.J. )

    1993-11-01

    Ti addition is becoming common practice in the fabrication of many grades of engineering steels. In general it is used with the aim of refining the microstructure through the inhibiting effect to grain coarsening exerted by small TiN precipitates. Although a number of recommendations are made for obtaining the maximum yield of fine TiN precipitates, nonetheless a certain proportion of the precipitate volume fraction is usually in the form of coarse TiN precipitates. Several authors suggest that such coarse TiN particles are simply ineffective in pinning the grain boundaries without impairing other properties. In a recent paper it was shown that these coarse TiN particles act as cleavage nucleation sites, impairing the fracture toughness of steel with coarse ferrite-pearlite microstructures. The present work reports further fracture toughness results and fracture mechanisms for Ti treated microalloyed forging steels. They show that after hot working and accelerated cooling transforming the austenite mainly in an acicular microstructure, ductile rupture results without any cleavage nucleated in the coarse TiN particles, as occurred when the same material had a coarse ferrite-pearlite microstructure.

  3. Response of ferritic steels to nonsteady loading at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1984-04-01

    High-temperature operating experience is lacking in pressure vessel materials that have strength levels above 586 MPa. Because of their tendency toward strain softening, we have been concerned about their behavior under nonsteady loading. Testing was undertaken to explore the extent of softening produced by monotonic and cyclic strains. The specific materials included bainitic 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel, a micro-alloyed version of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel, a micro-alloyed version of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel containing vanadium, titanium, and boron, and a martensitic 9Cr-1Mo-V-Nb steel. Tests included tensile, creep, variable stress creep, relaxation, strain cycling, stress cycling, and non-isothermal creep ratchetting experiments. We found that these steels had very low uniform elongation and exhibited small strains to the onset of tertiary creep compared to annealed 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel. Repeated relaxation test data also indicated a limited capacity for strain hardening. Reversal strains produced softening. The degree of softening increased with increased initial strength level. We concluded that the high strength bainitic and martensitic steels should perform well when used under conditions where severe cyclic operation does not occur.

  4. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gazder, Azdiar A; Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th; Mitchell, David R G; Pereloma, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth.

  5. Influence of interface mobility on the evolution of Austenite-Martensite grain assemblies during annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J; Santofimia, Maria J; Speer, John G; Zhao, L; Sietsma, Jilt

    2009-01-01

    The quenching and partitioning (Q&P) process is a new heat treatment for the creation of advanced high-strength steels. This treatment consists of an initial partial or full austenitization, followed by a quench to form a controlled amount of martensite and an annealing step to partition carbon atoms from the martensite to the austenite. In this work, the microstructural evolution during annealing of martensite-austenite grain assemblies has been analyzed by means of a modeling approach that considers the influence of martensite-austenite interface migration on the kinetics of carbon partitioning. Carbide precipitation is precluded in the model, and three different assumptions about interface mobility are considered, ranging from a completely immobile interface to the relatively high mobility of an incoherent ferrite-austenite interface. Simulations indicate that different interface mobilities lead to profound differences in the evolution of microstructure that is predicted during annealing.

  6. Effect of Cooling Rate and Chemical Composition on Microstructure and Properties of Naturally Cooled Vanadium-Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Anish; Sahu, Pooja; Neogy, Suman; Chakrabarti, Debalay; Mitra, Rahul; Mukherjee, Subrata; Kundu, Saurabh

    2017-04-01

    Samples from two V-microalloyed steels (0.05 wt pct V) having different C and N levels, namely high-C low-N steel, HCLN (0.22 wt pct C, 0.007 wt pct N) and low-C high-N steel, LCHN (0.06 wt pct C, 0.013 wt pct N) were naturally cooled from 1373 K (1100 °C) to room temperature over a range of cooling rates (0.07 to 3.33 K/s). Samples from a plain C-Mn steel (0.06 wt pct C, 0.007 wt pct N) were also subjected to the same heat treatment for comparison. The effect of cooling rate and steel composition on microstructures, precipitates, and tensile properties has been investigated. Due to the presence of large fraction of harder constituents, like pearlite and bainite, HCLN steel showed higher strength and lower ductility than LCHN steel. LCHN steel, on the other hand, showed good combination of strength and ductility due to its predominantly ferrite matrix with precipitation strengthening. The V-precipitate size was more refined and the precipitate density was higher in HCLN steel than that in LCHN steel. This observation confirms the importance of C content in V-microalloyed steel in terms of precipitation strengthening. An intermediate cooling rate ( 1.4 K/s) has been found to be the optimum choice in order to maximize the precipitation strengthening in V-containing steels.

  7. Effect of Cooling Rate and Chemical Composition on Microstructure and Properties of Naturally Cooled Vanadium-Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Anish; Sahu, Pooja; Neogy, Suman; Chakrabarti, Debalay; Mitra, Rahul; Mukherjee, Subrata; Kundu, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    Samples from two V-microalloyed steels (0.05 wt pct V) having different C and N levels, namely high-C low-N steel, HCLN (0.22 wt pct C, 0.007 wt pct N) and low-C high-N steel, LCHN (0.06 wt pct C, 0.013 wt pct N) were naturally cooled from 1373 K (1100 °C) to room temperature over a range of cooling rates (0.07 to 3.33 K/s). Samples from a plain C-Mn steel (0.06 wt pct C, 0.007 wt pct N) were also subjected to the same heat treatment for comparison. The effect of cooling rate and steel composition on microstructures, precipitates, and tensile properties has been investigated. Due to the presence of large fraction of harder constituents, like pearlite and bainite, HCLN steel showed higher strength and lower ductility than LCHN steel. LCHN steel, on the other hand, showed good combination of strength and ductility due to its predominantly ferrite matrix with precipitation strengthening. The V-precipitate size was more refined and the precipitate density was higher in HCLN steel than that in LCHN steel. This observation confirms the importance of C content in V-microalloyed steel in terms of precipitation strengthening. An intermediate cooling rate ( 1.4 K/s) has been found to be the optimum choice in order to maximize the precipitation strengthening in V-containing steels.

  8. Atomic scale investigation of non-equilibrium segregation of boron in a quenched Mo-free martensitic steel.

    PubMed

    Li, Y J; Ponge, D; Choi, P; Raabe, D

    2015-12-01

    B-added low carbon steels exhibit excellent hardenability. The reason has been frequently attributed to B segregation at prior austenite grain boundaries, which prevents the austenite to ferrite transformation and favors the formation of martensite. The segregation behavior of B at prior austenite grain boundaries is strongly influenced by processing conditions such as austenitization temperatures and cooling rates and by alloying elements such as Mo, Cr, and Nb. Here an local electrode atom probe was employed to investigate the segregation behavior of B and other alloying elements (C, Mn, Si, and Cr) in a Cr-added Mo-free martensitic steel. Similar to our previous results on a Mo-added steel, we found that in both steels B is segregated at prior austenite grain boundaries with similar excess values, whereas B is neither detected in the martensitic matrix nor at martensite-martensite boundaries at the given cooling rate of 30K/s. These results are in agreement with the literature reporting that Cr has the same effect on hardenability of steels as Mo in the case of high cooling rates. The absence of B at martensite-martensite boundaries suggests that B segregates to prior austenite grain boundaries via a non-equilibrium mechanism. Segregation of C at all boundaries such as prior austenite grain boundaries and martensite-martensite boundaries may occur by an equilibrium mechanism.

  9. Effects of induction hardening and prior cold work on a microalloyed medium carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.L. ); Medlin, D.J. ); Krauss, G. )

    1999-08-01

    The torsional strength and microstructural response to induction hardening of a 10V45 steel with prior cold work was evaluated. The vanadium-microalloyed 1045 (10V45) steel was characterized in three conditions: as-hot-rolled, 18% cold-reduced, and 29% cold-reduced. Two of these evaluations, 10V45 as-hot-rolled and 10V45-18%, were subjected to stationary and progressive induction hardening to three nominal case depths: 2, 4, and 6 mm. All specimens were subsequently furnace tempered at 190 C for 1 h. The martensitic case microstructures contained residual lamellar carbides due to incomplete dissolution of the pearlitic carbides in the prior microstructure. Torsional overload strength, as measured by maximum torque capacity, is greatly increased by increasing case depth, and to a lesser extent by increasing prior cold work level. Maximum torque capacity ranges from 2520 to 3170 N[center dot]m, depending upon induction hardening processing. Changing induction hardening processing from stationary (single-shot) to progressive (scan) had little effect on torque capacity.

  10. Structure-induced microalloying effect in multicomponent alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Gu -Qing; Yang, Liang; Wu, Shi -Yang; Zeng, Qiao -Shi; Sun, Cheng -Jun; Wang, Yin -Gang

    2016-04-28

    In this study, the microalloying effect on glass-forming ability (GFA) has been investigated from the structural aspect, by performing synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction and absorption measurements coupled with simulations in the NiNbZr ternary system. We propose a new parameter which counts the fraction of the fivefold symmetries in all clusters and find it is strongly associated with the GFA. In particular, this structural parameter has the highest value in a composition where the best GFA is achieved. The present work provides an in-depth understanding of microalloying-induced high GFAs in multicomponent alloys.

  11. Fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic clad fuel pins

    SciTech Connect

    Zirker, L.R. ); Bottcher, J.H. ); Shikakura, S. ); Tsai, C.L. . Dept. of Welding Engineering); Hamilton, M.L. )

    1991-01-01

    A resistance butt welding procedure was developed and qualified for joining ferritic fuel pin cladding to end caps. The cladding are INCO MA957 and PNC ODS lots 63DSA and 1DK1, ferritic stainless steels strengthened by oxide dispersion, while the end caps are HT9 a martensitic stainless steel. With adequate parameter control the weld is formed without a residual melt phase and its strength approaches that of the cladding. This welding process required a new design for fuel pin end cap and weld joint. Summaries of the development, characterization, and fabrication processes are given for these fuel pins. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Formation of Delta Ferrite in 9 Wt Pct Cr Steel Investigated by In-Situ X-Ray Diffraction Using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, P.; Palmer, T. A.; Elmer, J. W.; Specht, E. D.; Allen, S. M.

    2010-10-01

    In-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements using high energy synchrotron radiation were performed to monitor in real time the formation of delta ferrite in a martensitic 9 wt pct chromium steel under simulated weld thermal cycles. Volume fractions of martensite, austenite, and delta ferrite were measured as a function of temperature at a 10 K/s heating rate to 1573 K (1300 °C) and subsequent cooling. At the peak temperature, the delta ferrite concentration rose to 19 pct, of which 17 pct transformed back to austenite on subsequent cooling.

  13. Characterization of HAZ of API X70 Microalloyed Steel Welded by Cold-Wire Tandem Submerged Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadijoo, Mohsen; Kenny, Stephen; Collins, Laurie; Henein, Hani; Ivey, Douglas G.

    2017-03-01

    High-strength low-carbon microalloyed steels may be adversely affected by the high-heat input and thermal cycle that they experience during tandem submerged arc welding. The heat-affected zone (HAZ), particularly the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ), i.e., the region adjacent to the fusion line, has been known to show lower fracture toughness compared with the rest of the steel. The deterioration in toughness of the CGHAZ is attributed to the formation of martensite-austenite (M-A) constituents, local brittle zones, and large prior austenite grains (PAG). In the present work, the influence of the addition of a cold wire at various wire feed rates in cold-wire tandem submerged arc welding, a recently developed welding process for pipeline manufacturing, on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the HAZ of a microalloyed steel has been studied. The cold wire moderates the heat input of welding by consuming the heat of the trail electrode. Macrostructural analysis showed a decrease in the CGHAZ size by addition of a cold wire. Microstructural evaluation, using both tint etching optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, indicated the formation of finer PAGs and less fraction of M-A constituents with refined morphology within the CGHAZ when the cold wire was fed at 25.4 cm/min. This resulted in an improvement in the HAZ impact fracture toughness. These improvements are attributed to lower actual heat introduced to the weldment and lower peak temperature in the CGHAZ by cold-wire addition. However, a faster feed rate of the cold wire at 76.2 cm/min adversely affected the toughness due to the formation of slender M-A constituents caused by the relatively faster cooling rate in the CGHAZ.

  14. Characterization of HAZ of API X70 Microalloyed Steel Welded by Cold-Wire Tandem Submerged Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadijoo, Mohsen; Kenny, Stephen; Collins, Laurie; Henein, Hani; Ivey, Douglas G.

    2017-05-01

    High-strength low-carbon microalloyed steels may be adversely affected by the high-heat input and thermal cycle that they experience during tandem submerged arc welding. The heat-affected zone (HAZ), particularly the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ), i.e., the region adjacent to the fusion line, has been known to show lower fracture toughness compared with the rest of the steel. The deterioration in toughness of the CGHAZ is attributed to the formation of martensite-austenite (M-A) constituents, local brittle zones, and large prior austenite grains (PAG). In the present work, the influence of the addition of a cold wire at various wire feed rates in cold-wire tandem submerged arc welding, a recently developed welding process for pipeline manufacturing, on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the HAZ of a microalloyed steel has been studied. The cold wire moderates the heat input of welding by consuming the heat of the trail electrode. Macrostructural analysis showed a decrease in the CGHAZ size by addition of a cold wire. Microstructural evaluation, using both tint etching optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, indicated the formation of finer PAGs and less fraction of M-A constituents with refined morphology within the CGHAZ when the cold wire was fed at 25.4 cm/min. This resulted in an improvement in the HAZ impact fracture toughness. These improvements are attributed to lower actual heat introduced to the weldment and lower peak temperature in the CGHAZ by cold-wire addition. However, a faster feed rate of the cold wire at 76.2 cm/min adversely affected the toughness due to the formation of slender M-A constituents caused by the relatively faster cooling rate in the CGHAZ.

  15. Computer simulation of martensitic transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ping

    1993-11-01

    The characteristics of martensitic transformations in solids are largely determined by the elastic strain that develops as martensite particles grow and interact. To study the development of microstructure, a finite-element computer simulation model was constructed to mimic the transformation process. The transformation is athermal and simulated at each incremental step by transforming the cell which maximizes the decrease in the free energy. To determine the free energy change, the elastic energy developed during martensite growth is calculated from the theory of linear elasticity for elastically homogeneous media, and updated as the transformation proceeds.

  16. Influence of nonmartensitic transformation products on mechanical properties of tempered martensite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, J M; Lankford, W T

    1952-01-01

    The influence of nonmartensitic transformations products on the mechanical properties of tempered martensite is presented for samples of a SAE 4340 steel, partially isothermally transformed to specific high-temperature transformation products and quenched and tempered to hardness values of from 25 to 40 Rockwell c. The effects of upper bainite in amounts of 1,5, 10, 20 and 50 percent, of 5 percent ferrite, and of 5 percent pearlite on the tensile, impact, and fatigue properties are evaluated. (author)

  17. Reheat response and accelerated cooling of a microalloyed steel with an air/water atomizer: Effect on microstructure and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejavar, S. R.; Aswath, P. B.

    1994-04-01

    The use of an atomizer for accelerated cooling is discussed. An atomizer is an effective tool for controlling the microstructure and properties of a microalloyed steel because of its flexibility of operation and control of cooling rate over a broad range of temperatures. Some basic issues regarding heat transfer in pool boiling and in spray cooling also are presented. Reheating response studies were conducted in addition to studies of the effect of accelerated cooling on the microstructure and properties of a low- carbon steel microalloyed with niobium and vanadium. This steel produces a tempered martensitic microstructure on quenching and a predominantly bainitic microstructure at slower cooling rates. The yield, tensile, and fracture strengths can be tailored by controlling the cooling rate, which in turn can be controlled by the air/water ratio and flow rates in the atomizer. Impact toughness is a function of cooling rate and reaches a maximum followed by a decrease, probably due to the formation of upper bainite at lower cooling rates. Fractographic studies indicated that tensile fracture occurred by microvoid coalescence, with the dimple size decreasing as the cooling rate decreased. Charpy impact fracture studies indicated that the primary mode of failure was by quasi- cleavage, with the number of secondary cracks also decreasing as the cooling rate decreased.

  18. Fatigue Hardening Behavior of 1.5 GPa Grade Transformation-Induced Plasticity-Aided Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Koh-Ichi; Hojo, Tomohiko

    2016-11-01

    Low cycle fatigue hardening/softening behavior of a 0.2 pct C-1.5 pct Si-1.5 pct Mn-1.0 pct Cr-0.2 pct Mo-0.05 pct Nb transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP)-aided steel consisting of a wide lath martensite structure matrix and a narrow lath martensite-metastable retained austenite mixture was investigated. The steel exhibited notable fatigue hardening in the same way as TRIP-aided bainitic ferrite steel, although conventional martensitic steel such as SCM420 steel with the same tensile strength exhibited fatigue softening. The considerable fatigue hardening of this steel is believed to be associated mainly with the compressive internal stress that results from a difference in flow stress between the matrix and the martensite-austenite-like phase, with a small contribution from the strain-induced transformation and dislocation hardenings.

  19. Assessment of martensitic steels as structural materials in magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, J.M.; Chen, W.Y.K.; Cheng, E.T.; Dalessandro, J.A.; Miller, P.H.; Rosenwasser, S.N.; Thompson, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    This manuscript documents the results of preliminary experiments and analyses to assess the feasibility of incorporating ferromagnetic martensitic steels in fusion reactor designs and to evaluate the possible advantages of this class of material with respect to first wall/blanket lifetime. The general class of alloys under consideration are ferritic steels containing from about 9 to 13 percent Cr with some small additions of various strengthening elements such as Mo. These steels are conventionally used in the normalized and tempered condition for high temperature applications and can compete favorably with austenitic alloys up to about 600/sup 0/C. Although the heat treatment can result in either a tempered martensite or bainite structure, depending on the alloy and thermal treatment parameters, this general class of materials will be referred to as martensitic stainless steels for simplicity.

  20. Computer Simulation of Martensitic Transformations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rifkin, Jonathan A.

    This investigation attempted to determine the mechanism of martensitic nucleation by employing computer molecular dynamics; simulations were conducted of various lattices defects to see if they can serve as nucleation sites. As a prerequisite to the simulations the relation between transformation properties and interatomic potential was studied. It was found that the interatomic potential must have specific properties to successfully simulate solid-solid transformations; in particular it needs a long range oscillating tail. We've also studied homogeneous transformations between BCC and FCC structures and concluded it is unlikely that any has a lower energy barrier energy than the Bain transformation. A two dimensional solid was modelled first to gain experience on a relatively simple system; the transformation was from a square lattice to a triangular one. Next a three dimensional system was studied whose interatomic potential was chosen to mimic sodium. Because of the low transition temperature (18K) the transformation from the low temperature phase to high temperature phase was studied (FCC to BCC). The two dimensional system displayed many phenomena characteristic of real martensitic systems: defects promoted nucleation, the martensite grew in plates, some plates served to nucleate new plates (autocatalytic nucleation) and some defects gave rise to multiple plates (butterfly martensite). The three dimensional system did not undergo a permanent martensitic transformation but it did show signs of temporary transformations where some martensite formed and then dissipated. This happened following the dissociation of a screw dislocation into two partial dislocations.

  1. Optimization of resistance spot welding parameters for microalloyed steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viňáš, Ján; Kaščák, Ľuboš; Greš, Miroslav

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the results of resistance spot welding of hot-dip galvanized microalloyed steel sheets used in car body production. The spot welds were made with various welding currents and welding time values, but with a constant pressing force of welding electrodes. The welding current and welding time are the dominant characteristics in spot welding that affect the quality of spot welds, as well as their dimensions and load-bearing capacity. The load-bearing capacity of welded joints was evaluated by tensile test according to STN 05 1122 standard and dimensions and inner defects were evaluated by metallographic analysis by light optical microscope. Thewelding parameters of investigated microalloyed steel sheets were optimized for resistance spot welding on the pneumatic welding machine BPK 20.

  2. Microstructural evolution and examination of α'-martensite during a multi-pass dissimilar stainless steel GTAW process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chih-Chun; Lin, Dong-Yih; Wu, Weite

    2008-10-01

    This study discusses the microstructural evolution and examination of α'-martensite in fusion zones and heat-affected zones under multi-pass dissimilar stainless steels welding. The morphology, quantity, grain size, and chemical composition of the α'-martensite and δ-ferrite were analyzed using optical microscopy (OM), an image analyzer (IA), a ferritscope (FS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), respectively. Recrystallization induced grain refinement of α'-martensite in over-lapping heat-affected zones (HAZ1 > 2 and HAZ2 > 3) after the second and third pass of welding. The Creq, Nieq, and K-factor values were calculated in an elemental analysis according to the Kaltenhauser equation. The higher Nieq (8.0-9.26) and lower K-factor (7.73-9.50) were examined for α'-martensite in the second pass fusion zone (FZ-2) as opposed to δ-ferrite. Comparatively, the ä-ferrite indicated higher Creq (22.30-22.91) and K-factor (15.72-16.68) values.

  3. EVALUATION OF SPECIFICATION RANGES FOR CREEP STRENGTH ENHANCED FERRITIC STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Shingledecker, John P; Santella, Michael L; Wilson, Keely A

    2008-01-01

    Creep Strength Enhanced Ferritic Steels (CSEF) such as Gr. 91, 911, 92, and 122 require a fully martensitic structure for optimum properties, mainly good creep strength. However, broad chemical compositional ranges are specified for these steel grades which can strongly influence the microstructures obtained. In this study, we have produced chemical compositions within the specification ranges for these alloys which intentionally cause the formation of ferrite or substantially alter the lower intercritical temperatures (A1) so as to affect the phase transformation behavior during tempering. Thermodynamic modeling, thermo-mechanical simulation, tensile testing, creep testing, and microstructural analysis were used to evaluate these materials. The results show the usefulness of thermodynamic calculations for setting rational chemical composition ranges for CSEF steels to control the critical temperatures, set heat-treatment temperature limits, and eliminate the formation of ferrite.

  4. The disinfection of water by microalloyed aluminium-based composite.

    PubMed

    Bojić, A; Purenović, M; Kocić, B; Perović, J; Ursić-Janković, J; Bojić, D

    2003-03-01

    In the submitted paper the water disinfection capacity of the microalloyed aluminium based composite (MABC) was studied. MABC is material in the form of steel wire, plated with microalloyed aluminium. The effects of the composite are based on the very negative stationary potential of microalloyed aluminium, and its spontaneous dissolution in water with generation of AI(III) ions, and reduction of water with the generation of H2 and OH ions. As a final product of these reactions, a voluminous Al(OH)3 precipitate is formed. Having in mind its great efficacy in purification of different waters from many chemical pollutants we made the following hypothesis: reduction characteristics of the MABC surface, presence of Al(III) and OH ions, and coprecipitation on Al(OH)3, can be also toxic and destructive for bacteria in water. The experiments were carried out with the water model solutions (WMS) based on adapted natural surface water (NSW), inoculated with the Escherichia coli. All treatments were performed in the original semi-flow system (SFS), in which convection increases efficacy. The results show that approximately every 10 min the number of viable bacteria was reduced for about one log10 count, with the complete disinfected water phase as the outcome of the treatment. At the end of the treatment, the Al(OH)3 precipitate still contained a low amount of coprecipitated viable bacteria, which died within a relatively short period.

  5. Weldability and toughness assessment of Ti-microalloyed offshore steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Kocak, M.

    1997-01-01

    The present study has been carried out to investigate the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) microstructure and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) toughness of grade StE 355 Ti-microalloyed offshore steels. Three parent plates (40-mm thick) were studied, two of which had Ti microalloying with either Nb + V or Nb also present. As a third steel, conventional StE 355 steel without Ti addition was welded for comparison purposes. Multipass tandem submerged arc weld (SAW) and manual metal arc weld (SMAW) welds were produced. Different heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructures were simulated to ascertain the detrimental effect of welding on toughness. All HAZ microstructures were examined using optical and electron microscopy. It can be concluded that Ti addition with appropriate steel processing, which disperses fine TiN precipitates uniformly, with a fine balance of other microalloying elements and with a Ti/N weight ratio of about 2.2, is beneficial for HAZ properties of StE 355 grade steel.

  6. Microstructure and toughness of CrW and CrV ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, F.; Araki, H.; Noda, T.; Okada, M.

    1988-07-01

    In order to obtain an optimum alloy composition of reduced-activation Cr-W-V ferritic steels, the microstructural evolution during thermal aging at 823-973 K and its effect on the toughness were investigated for simple Cr-W and Cr-V steels by means of transmission electron microscopy and Charpy impact testing. The microstructural evolution of the Cr-W steels was similar to that of the conventional CrMo steels. Carbides precipitated in the martensite and the intermetallic compound Fe 2W precipitated in the δ-ferrite of the Cr-W steels. On the other hand, only carbides precipitated in both the martensite and the δ-ferrite of the Cr-V steels. The effect of Cr, W and V on the thermal embrittlement is discussed by taking account of the precipitation behavior.

  7. Effect of Hot Coiling Under Accelerated Cooling on Development of Non-equiaxed Ferrite in Low Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanjewar, H. A.; Tripathi, Pranavkumar

    2016-06-01

    Strengthening mechanisms dominant in non-equiaxed ferrite structures are not so familiar and well measured. In present study, non-equiaxed ferritic structures were generated and perceived to be strengthened by grain/crystal refinement, presence of varying substructures, solid solution strengthening, and textural hardening. A Nb-V microalloyed steel was modeled under various accelerated cooling and coiling temperature conditions in a thermo-mechanical simulator. Decrease in coiling temperature in conjunction with accelerated cooling resulted in non-equiaxed ferrite structures with array of phase morphologies. Intermediate transformation conditions produced increase in strength concurrent with observed smallness in crystallite size and high amount of microstrain in the matrix phase indicative of high dislocation densities and crystal imperfections. Increase in strength is partially attributed to solid solution and texture hardening owing to increase in (111) pole intensity in structure.

  8. The morphology and ageing behaviour of δ-ferrite in a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, R.; Singh, R. N.; Sinha, T. K.; Kashyap, B. P.

    1992-10-01

    Dual phase (martensite + δ-ferrite) microstructures were developed in a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, by austenitising at 1523-1623 K, followed by water-quenching. These duplex structures were thermally aged at 973 K for ageing periods varying from 30 min to 21 h. Morphological aspects of δ-ferrite phase and its response to age-hardening were studied by optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis and microhardness testing. It was observed that austenitizing at 1523 K produced fine, acicular δ-ferrite while the δ-ferrite formed by austenitising at higher temperatures (1573-1623 K) were massive, irregular-shaped and banded. Moreover the presence of 8-ferrite caused an abnormally strong (110) reflection, observed in X-ray diffraction patterns of martensite plus δ-ferrite structures. This behaviour is thought to be due to development of (110) texture in δ-ferrite phase. Thermal ageing at 973 K caused age-hardening of δ-ferrite with a peak hardness attained after 3.6 ks of ageing. Electron microscopic results suggest that the observed hardening was caused by the formation of Fe 2Mo Laves phase.

  9. Microstructural characterization and strengthening behavior of nanometer sized carbides in Ti–Mo microalloyed steels during continuous cooling process

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chih-Yuan; Yang, Jer-Ren; Chen, Chien-Chon; Chen, Shih-Fan

    2016-04-15

    Nanometer-sized carbides that precipitated in a Ti–Mo bearing steel after interrupted continuous cooling in a temperature range of 620–700 °C with or without hot deformation were investigated by field-emission-gun transmission electron microscopy. The nanometer-sized carbides were identified as randomly homogeneous precipitation carbides and interphase precipitation carbides coexisting in the ferrite matrix. It is found that this dual precipitation morphology of carbides in the steel leads to the non-uniform mechanical properties of individual ferrite grains. Vickers hardness data mainly revealed that, in the specimens cooled at a rate of 0.5 °C/s without hot deformation, the range of Vickers hardness distribution was 230–340 HV 0.1 when cooling was interrupted at 680 °C, and 220–360 HV 0.1 when cooling was interrupted at 650 °C. For the specimens cooled at a rate of 0.5 °C/s with hot deformation, the range of Vickers hardness distribution was 290–360 HV 0.1 when cooling was interrupted at 680 °C, and 280–340 HV 0.1 when cooling was interrupted at 650 °C. Therefore, a narrower range of hardness distribution occurred in the specimens that underwent hot deformation and were then cooled with a lower interrupted cooling temperature. The uniform precipitation status in each ferrite grain can lead to ferrite grains with a narrower Vickers hardness distribution. On the other hand, interrupted cooling produced a maximum Vickers hardness of 320–330 HV 0.1 for the hot deformed specimens and 290–310 HV 0.1 for the non-deformed specimens with cooling interrupted in the temperature range of 660–670 °C. The maximum Vickers hardness obtained in such a temperature range can be ascribed to the full precipitation of the microalloying elements in the supersaturated ferrite matrix with a tiny size (~ 4–7 nm). - Highlight: • The interrupted continuous cooling temperatures were 620 °C to 700 °C. • Precipitation carbides with dual dispersed morphology

  10. Application Research of Nb Microalloying on Medium and High Carbon Long Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongqing, Zhang; Aimin, Guo; Jansto, Steven G.; Quanli, Wang

    It is well known that the strengthening mechanisms of Nb Microalloying on low carbon flat products have been widely studied and recognized since Microalloying 75 in Washington, DC, but the application research of Nb Microalloying on higher carbon long products in excess of 0.020% carbon has been incomplete and full of debate for a long time due to limited solubility of Nb(CN) in austenite, dominant application of V Microalloying in long products, as well as uncertainty about the effects of Nb. In this paper, some new phenomena have been presented and clarified based on the application cases of Nb Microalloying in long products, including high strength rebars microalloyed with small amount Nb and high-carbon wire rod microalloyed with Nb addition up to 0.02% used for prestressed steel strand. Contrary to the traditional opinions, Nb-bearing rebars manifest higher tensile-to-yield ratio compared with V-bearing rebars, especially for high strength rebars of HRB500 and HRB600, which would be discussed based on production processing of rebar products. In addition, Nb Microalloying for high carbon wire rod used for perstressed steel strand also demonstrates encouraging application prospect by reducing net carbide of entectoid steel with carbon content up to 0.087%, as shown from test results of Nb-bearing 87B product. As for these abnormal phenomena, industrial production and subsequent microstructure analysis have been carried out to further validate and clarify the strengthening mechanisms of Nb Microalloying, which will facilitate the understanding of Nb Microalloying technology.

  11. The effect of high temperature deformation on the hot ductility of niobium-microalloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarandi, Faramarz Mh

    Low hot ductility at the straightening stage of the steel continuous casting process, where the surface temperature ranges from 600 to 1200°C, is associated with transverse cracking on the billet surface. This is attributed to various microalloying elements, which are essential for the mechanical characteristics of the final products. Thermomechanical processing is a new approach to alleviate this problem. In this work, two grades of Nb-containing steel, one modified with B, were examined. In order to simulate the key parameters of continuous casting, specimens were melted in situ and subjected to thermal conditions similar to that occurring in a continuous casting mill. They were also deformed at different stages of the thermal schedule. Finally, the hot ductility was evaluated at the end of the thermal schedule, corresponding to the straightening stage in continuous casting at which the hot ductility problem occurs in the continuous casting process. The results showed that the presence of B is noticeably beneficial to the hot ductility. Failure mode analysis was performed and the mechanism of fracture was elaborated. As well, the potential mechanisms under which B can improve the hot ductility were proposed. Deformation during solidification (i.e. in the liquid + solid two phase region) led to a significant loss of hot ductility in both steels. By contrast, deformation in the delta-ferrite region, after solidification, was either detrimental or beneficial depending on the deformation start temperature. The hot ductility was considerably improved in the steel without B when deformation was applied during the delta → gamma transformation. The effect of such deformation on the other steel grade was not significant. Examination of the microstructure revealed that such improvement is related to a grain refinement in austenite. Therefore, the effect of deformation parameters was studied in detail and the optimum condition leading to the greatest improvement in the

  12. Effect of Microstructure on Torsional Fatigue Endurance of Martensitic Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Shunsuke; Ishiguro, Yasuhide; Kawabata, Yoshikazu; Sakata, Kei; Sato, Akio; Sakai, Jun'ichi

    The microstructural influence of martensitic carbon steel on torsional fatigue endurance was investigated, taking into consideration the application of high strength steel electric resistance welded (ERW) tubes to automotive structural parts. The chemical composition of the base steel alloy was 0.1-0.2%C-0.2-1.5%Si-1.3-1.9%Mn-0.01%P-0.001%S-(Cr, Mo, Ti, Nb, B). Laboratory vacuum-fused ingots were hot-rolled, heated to 1023 or 1223 K in a salt bath, and then water-quenched and tempered at 473 K. Consequently, three types of microstructure, martensite (M), martensite and ferrite (M+F), and ferrite and pearlite (F+P), were prepared. Fully reversed torsional fatigue testing was conducted with 6 mm diameter round bar specimens. Torsional fatigue endurance was found to monotonously increase with increases in the tensile strength of the specimen from 540 to 1380 MPa. The martensitic single structure and the M+F dual-phase structure showed a similar level of fatigue endurance at a tensile strength of approximately 950 MPa. However, fatigue micro-crack morphology varied slightly between them. At the surface of the M+F specimen, many small cracks were observed in addition to the main crack. Conversely, in the martensitic specimen, these small cracks were rarely observed. ΔK decreasing/increasing crack growth testing with compact tension (CT)-type specimens was also conducted. Based on these experimental results, the effect of microstructure and stress level on the initiation/propagation cycle ratio is discussed. In addition to fatigue properties, some practical properties, such as low-temperature toughness and hydrogen embrittlement resistance, were also evaluated in view of actual applications for automotive structural parts.

  13. Effect of Nb on Delayed Fracture Resistance of Ultra-High Strength Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Rongjie; Fonstein, Nina; Pottore, Narayan; Jun, Hyun Jo; Bhattacharya, Debanshu; Jansto, Steve

    Ultra-high strength steels are materials of considerable interest for automotive and structural applications and are increasingly being used in those areas. Higher strength, however, makes steels more prone to hydrogen embrittlement (HE). The effects of Nb and other alloying elements on the hydrogen-induced delayed fracture resistance of cold rolled martensitic steels with ultra-high strength 2000 MPa were studied using an acid immersion test, thermal desorption analysis (TDA) and measuring of permeation. The microstructure was characterized by high resolution field emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). It was shown that the combined addition of Nb significantly improved the delayed fracture resistance of investigated steel. The addition of Nb to alloyed martensitic steels resulted in very apparent grain refinement of the prior austenite grain size. The Nb microalloyed steel contained a lower diffusible hydrogen content during thermal desorption analysis as compared to the base steel and had a higher trapped hydrogen amount after charging. The reason that Nb improved the delayed fracture resistance of steels can be attributed mostly to both hydrogen trapping and grain refinement.

  14. Influence of processing parameters and alloying additions on the mechanically determined no-recrystallization temperature in niobium microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homsher-Ritosa, Caryn Nicole

    Microalloying elements are added to plate steels to improve the mechanical properties through grain refinement and precipitation strengthening. In industrial practice, such refinement is obtained by controlling the rolling near critical temperatures in austenite. Generally, a large amount of hot deformation is desired below the no-recrystallization temperature (TNR) to increase the grain boundary area to promote fine ferrite grains upon transformation during cooling. Ideally, a high TNR is desired for increased deformation below TNR at minimal rolling loads and minimal loss of productivity. To increase TNR, microalloying elements such as Nb, V, and Ti are used. The primary purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of multiple microalloying elements on the mechanically determined via torsion testing no-recrystallization temperature (TNR_Tor) in Nb-bearing plate steel. This project focused on the influence of alloying elements and deformation parameters on TNR_Tor. The main objective was to experimentally determine the TNR_Tor for various laboratory-grade steels with systematically varying amounts of Nb, V, and Ti, with C and N held constant. The synergistic effects of these microalloying elements were evaluated. Another objective was to determine the TNR_Tor with systematically varied deformation parameters for the same set of steels. Comparisons of the measured TNR through two different mechanical tests were conducted. Finally, a microstructural evaluation around the mechanically determined TNR_Tor via multistep hot torsion testing was made. To accomplish these objectives six Nb-bearing steels were laboratory produced with 0.065 wt pct C, 0.044 wt pct N, and varying amounts of Nb, V, and Ti. Multistep hot torsion tests were conducted using the GleebleRTM 3500 thermomechanical simulator between the temperatures of 1200 and 750 °C. The mean flow stress was calculated for each deformation step and plotted against the inverse absolute temperature. The

  15. Austenite Static Recrystallization Kinetics in Microalloyed B Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrañaga-Otegui, Ane; Pereda, Beatriz; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Gutiérrez, Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Boron is added to steels to increase hardenability, substituting of more expensive elements. Moreover, B acts as a recrystallization delaying element when it is in solid solution. However, B can interact with N and/or C to form nitrides and carbides at high temperatures, limiting its effect on both phase transformation and recrystallization. On the other hand, other elements like Nb and Ti are added due to the retarding effect that they exert on the austenite softening processes, which results in pancaked austenite grains and refined room microstructures. In B steels, Nb and Ti are also used to prevent B precipitation. However, the complex interaction between these elements and its effect on the austenite microstructure evolution during hot working has not been investigated in detail. The present work is focused on the effect the B exerts on recrystallization when added to microalloyed steels. Although B on its own leads to retarded static recrystallization kinetics, when Nb is added a large delay in the static recrystallization times is observed in the 1273 K to 1373 K (1000 °C to 1100 °C) temperature range. The effect is larger than that predicted by a model developed for Nb-microalloyed steels, which is attributed to a synergistic effect of both elements. However, this effect is not so prominent for Nb-Ti-B steels. The complex effect of the composition on recrystallization kinetics is explained as a competition between the solute drag and precipitation pinning phenomena. The effect of the microalloying elements is quantified, and a new model for the predictions of recrystallization kinetics that accounts for the B and Nb+B synergetic effects is proposed.

  16. Model for Strain-Induced Precipitation Kinetics in Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Sebastian F.; Quispe, Alberto; Gomez, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    Based on Dutta and Sellars's expression for the start of strain-induced precipitation in microalloyed steels, a new model has been constructed which takes into account the influence of variables such as microalloying element percentages, strain, temperature, strain rate, and grain size. Although the equation given by these authors reproduces the typical "C" shape of the precipitation start time (P s) curve well, the expression is not reliable for all cases. Recrystallization-precipitation-time-temperature diagrams have been plotted thanks to a new experimental study carried out by means of hot torsion tests on approximately twenty microalloyed steels with different Nb, V, and Ti contents. Mathematical analysis of the results recommends the modification of some parameters such as the supersaturation ratio (K s) and constant B, which is no longer a constant, but a function of K s when the latter is calculated at the nose temperature (T N) of the P s curve. The value of parameter B is deduced from the minimum point or nose of the P s curve, where ∂t 0.05/∂T is equal to zero, and it can be demonstrated that B cannot be a constant. The new expressions for these parameters are derived from the latest studies undertaken by the authors and this work represents an attempt to improve the model. The expressions are now more consistent and predict the precipitation-time-temperature curves with remarkable accuracy. The model for strain-induced precipitation kinetics is completed by means of Avrami's equation.

  17. Variation in Mechanical Properties and Heterogeneity in Microstructure of High-Strength Ferritic Steel During Mill Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, M.; Barat, K.; Das, S. K.; Ravi Kumar, B.; Pramanick, A. K.; Chakraborty, J.; Das, G.; Hadas, S.; Bharathy, S.; Ray, S. K.

    2014-06-01

    HS600 and HS800 are two new generation, high-strength advanced ferritic steels that find widespread application in automobiles. During commercial production of the same grades with different thicknesses, it has been found that mechanical properties like tensile strength and stretchability varied widely and became inconsistent. In the current endeavor, two different thicknesses have been chosen from a mill trial sample of HS600 and HS800. An in-depth structural characterization was carried out for all four alloys to explain the variation in their respective mechanical and shear punch properties. The carbon content was smaller and Ti + Mo quantity was higher in case of HS800 with respect to HS600. The microstructure of both steels consisted of the dispersion of (Ti,Mo)C in a ferrite matrix. The grain size of HS800 was little larger than HS600 due to an increased coiling temperature (CT) of the former in comparison to the latter. It was found that in case of same grade of steel with a different thickness, a variation in microstructure occurred due to change in strain, CT, and cooling rate. The strength and stretch formability of these two alloys were predominantly governed by a microalloyed carbide. In this respect, carbides with a size range above 5 nm were responsible for loosing coherency with ferrite matrix. In case of HS600, both ≤5 and >5-nm size (Ti,Mo)C precipitates shared a nearly equal fraction of microalloyed precipitates. However, for HS800, >5-nm size (Ti,Mo)C carbide was substantially higher than ≤5-nm size alloy carbides. The ultimate tensile strength and yield strength of HS800 was superior to that of HS600 owing to a higher quantity of microalloyed carbide with a decreased column width and interparticle distance. A higher degree of in-coherency of HS800 made the alloy prone to crack formation with low stretchability.

  18. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  19. Nickel (Ni) Microalloying Additions in Sn-Cu Lead-free Solder. Short Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, M. A. A. Mohd; Sandu, I. G.; Abdullah, M. M. A.; Sandu, I.; Saleh, N. A.

    2017-06-01

    In this digital-age era, solder plays important role in electronic packaging industries. As interconnects material, solder provide an electrical and mechanical support to the electronics devices. Solder usually consist of two or more addition of microalloying. By microalloying addition, the solidification structure can be modified. This paper reviews the addition of Ni as microalloying in Sn-Cu lead free solder. Small additions of Ni resulted with an improvement of solder in microstructure and in intermetallic compounds. The stabilization of hexagonal structure of Cu6Sn5 in lead-free solder alloys occurred due to present of Ni.

  20. Direct observation of phase transformations in the simulated heat-affected zone of a 9Cr martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Peter; Palmer, T. A.; Elmer, J. W.; Specht, Eliot D

    2008-01-01

    An experimental test melt of a boron alloyed 9Cr-3W-3Co-V,Nb steel for high temperature applications in the thermal power generation industry was produced by vacuum induction melting. This grade of steel typically displays a homogeneous tempered martensitic microstructure in the as-received condition. However, after welding, this microstructure is significantly altered, resulting in a loss of its desired properties. The phase transformations during simulated thermal cycles typical of those experienced in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) were directly observed by in situ X-ray diffraction experiments using synchrotron radiation. Heating rates of 10 C s-1 and 100 C s-1 up to a peak temperature of 1300 C are investigated here. The final microstructures observed after both simulated weld thermal cycles are primarily composed of martensite with approximately 4% retained delta ferrite and 4% retained austenite, by volume. With the temporal resolution of the in situ X-ray diffraction technique, phase transformations from tempered martensite to austenite to delta ferrite during heating and to martensite during cooling were monitored. With this technique, the evolution of the final microstructure through both heating and cooling is monitored, providing additional context to the microstructural observations.

  1. Mechanical properties of steels with a microstructure of bainite/martensite and austenite islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syammach, Sami M.

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are continually being developed in order to reduce weight and improve safety for automotive applications. There is need for economic steels with improved strength and ductility combinations. These demands have led to research and development of third generation AHSS. Third generation AHSS include steel grades with a bainitic and tempered martensitic matrix with retained austenite islands. These steels may provide improved mechanical properties compared to first generation AHSS and should be more economical than second generation AHSS. There is a need to investigate these newer types of steels to determine their strength and formability properties. Understanding these bainitic and tempered martensitic steels is important because they likely can be produced using currently available production systems. If viable, these steels could be a positive step in the evolution of AHSS. The present work investigates the effect of the microstructure on the mechanical properties of steels with a microstructure of bainite, martensite, and retained austenite, so called TRIP aided bainitic ferrite (TBF) steels. The first step in this project was creating the desired microstructure. To create a microstructure of bainite, martensite, and austenite an interrupted austempering heat treatment was used. Varying the heat treatment times and temperatures produced microstructures of varying amounts of bainite, martensite, and austenite. Mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, strain hardening, and hole-expansion ratios were then evaluated for each heat treatment. Correlations between mechanical properties and microstructure were then evaluated. It was found that samples after each of the heat treatments exhibited strengths between 1050 MPa and 1350 MPa with total elongations varying from 8 pct to 16 pct. By increasing the bainite and austenite volume fraction the strength of the steel was found to decrease, but the ductility increased. Larger

  2. Sensitization of Laser-beam Welded Martensitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Rajendran, Kousika Dhasanur; Lindner, Stefan

    Ferritic and martensitic stainless steels are an attractive alternative in vehicle production due to their inherent corrosion resistance. By the opportunity of press hardening, their strength can be increased to up to 2000 MPa, making them competitors for unalloyed ultra-high strength steels. Welding, nevertheless, requires special care, especially when it comes to joining of high strength heat treated materials. With an adopted in-line heat treatment of the welds in as-rolled as well as press hardened condition, materials with sufficient fatigue strength and acceptable structural behavior can be produced. Because of microstructural transformations in the base material such as grain coarsening and forced carbide precipitation, the corrosion resistance of the weld zone may be locally impaired. Typically the material in the heat-affected zone becomes sensitive to intergranular cracking in the form of knife-edge corrosion besides the fusion line. The current study comprises of two text scenarios. By an alternating climate test, general response in a corroding environment is screened. In order to understand the corrosion mechanisms and to localize the sensitive zones, sensitisation tests were undertaken. Furthermore, the applicability of a standard test according to ASTM 763-83 was examined. It was found that the alternative climate test does not reveal any corrosion effects. Testing by the oxalic acid test revealed clearly the effect of welding, weld heat treatment and state of thermal processing. Also application of the standard which originally suited for testing ferritic stainless steels could have been justified.

  3. Effect of microalloying on pearlite transformation of high carbon wire steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephanie L.

    Microalloying has been shown to improve strength in eutectoid steels for wire applications, and previous work on vanadium-microalloyed eutectoid steels showed delayed pearlite transformation with additions of niobium and accelerated pearlite transformation with additional nitrogen. This study investigates the origin of the CCT shifts with microalloying additions and whether trends in hardness and microstructural feature sizes observed in continuous cooling tests persist through industrial hot rolling simulations. An industrially hot rolled 1080 wire rod with vanadium additions and three laboratory-prepared alloys were studied. The base alloy, denoted the V steel, had a composition of 0.80C-0.50Mn-0.24Si-0.20Cr-0.079V-0.0059N (wt pct). The V+N steel contained 0.0088 wt pct N, and the V+Nb steel contained an additional 0.010 wt pct Nb. All alloys were subjected to a GleebleRTM 3500 torsion hot rolling simulation based on industrial wire rod hot rolling parameters. Microstructural constituents, Vickers hardness, pearlite colony size, and pearlite interlamellar spacing (ILS) were characterized for each alloy. All alloys exhibited pearlitic microstructures with some proeutectoid ferrite at prior austenite grain boundaries, with no evidence of shear transformation products. The V steel has the lowest overall hardness, while both nitrogen and niobium additions increase hardness by approximately 15 HV, correlating to a 43 MPa increase in yield strength. Niobium additions refined ILS, with an average ILS of 92 +/- 3 nm for the V+Nb steel compared to 113 +/- 5 nm for the V steel and 113 +/- 3 nm for the V+N alloy. Vanadium additions produced precipitation strengthening for all alloys and heat treatments, and additional precipitation strengthening with nitrogen and niobium additions was not apparent based on a Taleff regression analysis. Atom probe tomography of an industrially processed wire rod with vanadium additions revealed vanadium enrichment of cementite, and vanadium

  4. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  5. Strain aging and toughness characteristics of ferritic weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kocak, M.; Petrovski, B.; Evans, G.M.

    1994-12-31

    The effects of varying nitrogen, titanium, boron, and aluminum contents on the as-deposited, stress-relieved, and artificially strain-aged shielded metal arc weld (SMAW) metal properties have been studied. There are still uncertainties concerning the exact role of each element and interactions between these elements with respect to the weld metal microstructure, strain aging and fracture properties. Therefore, systematic additions of titanium (in the range of 5 ppm to 500 ppm), boron (5 ppm to 200 ppm), aluminum (5 ppm to 560 ppm) and nitrogen were made to obtain various amounts of acicular ferrite and different microstructures which lead to the varying fracture behaviors and sensitivity to the strain aging. Increasing boron content also leads to an increase of the Charpy-V transition temperature with varying sensitivity to nitrogen content. Results indicate that as toughness of the as-deposited weld metal containing 40 ppm boron s much more sensitive to nitrogen content than the weld deposits contain 160 ppm boron. A similar trend has also been seen with the addition of 160 ppm aluminum to the weld metal while a change of titanium content did not cause such a significant change. In summary, present paper rigorously reviews the results of this extensive research program to develop a mechanistic understanding of the microalloying system (Ti, B and Al) on the strain aging and fracture toughness properties (Charpy-V and CTOD) of the multipass ferritic weldments.

  6. XXIst Century Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaleyrat, F.; Zehani, K.; Pasko, A.; Loyau, V.; LoBue, M.

    2012-05-01

    Ferrites have always been a subject of great interest from point of view of magnetic application, since the fist compass to present date. In contrast, the scientific interest for iron based magnetic oxides decreased after Ørsted discovery as they where replaced by coil as magnetizing sources. Neel discovery of ferrimagnetism boosted again interest and leads to strong developments during two decades before being of less interest. Recently, the evolution of power electronics toward higher frequency, the downsizing of ceramics microstucture to nanometer scale, the increasing price of rare-earth elements and the development of magnetocaloric materials put light again on ferrites. A review on three ferrite families is given herein: harder nanostructured Ba2+Fe12O19 magnet processed by spark plasma sintering, magnetocaloric effect associated to the spin transition reorientation of W-ferrite and low temperature spark plasma sintered Ni-Zn-Cu ferrites for high frequency power applications.

  7. Effect of sulphur on cube texture formation in microalloyed nickel substrate tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickemeyer, J.; Selbmann, D.; Opitz, R.; Wendrock, H.; Baunack, S.; Sarma, V. Subramanya; Holzapfel, B.; Schultz, L.; Maher, E.

    2005-01-01

    Cube textured substrate tapes were prepared by cold forming and annealing from nickel and microalloyed nickel in order to manufacture long flexible superconductors of the YBCO (YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ) type. It was shown that sulphur as a metallurgical trace impurity can hinder the processes of cube texture formation in nickel based materials. Experiments were performed to overcome this detrimental effect of sulphur by microalloying of different nickel qualities with Mo, W or Ag and by specific heat treatments.

  8. Creep resistant, precipitation-dispersion-strengthened, martensitic stainless steel and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Buck, Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    An iron-based, corrosion-resistant, precipitation strengthened, martensitic steel essentially free of delta ferrite for use at high temperatures has a nominal composition of 0.05-0.1 C, 8-12 Cr, 1-5 Co, 0.5-2.0 Ni, 0.41-1.0 Mo, 0.1-0.5 Ti, and the balance iron. This steel is different from other corrosion-resistant martensitic steels because its microstructure consists of a uniform dispersion of fine particles, which are very closely spaced, and which do not coarsen at high temperatures. Thus at high temperatures this steel combines the excellent creep strength of dispersion-strengthened steels, with the ease of fabricability afforded by precipitation hardenable steels.

  9. Creep resistant, precipitation-dispersion-strengthened, martensitic stainless steel and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Buck, R.F.

    1994-05-10

    An iron-based, corrosion-resistant, precipitation strengthened, martensitic steel essentially free of delta ferrite for use at high temperatures has a nominal composition of 0.05--0.1 C, 8--12 Cr, 1--5 Co, 0.5--2.0 Ni, 0.41--1.0 Mo, 0.1--0.5 Ti, and the balance iron. This steel is different from other corrosion-resistant martensitic steels because its microstructure consists of a uniform dispersion of fine particles, which are very closely spaced, and which do not coarsen at high temperatures. Thus at high temperatures this steel combines the excellent creep strength of dispersion-strengthened steels, with the ease of fabricability afforded by precipitation hardenable steels. 2 figures.

  10. Lath martensites in low carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sarikaya, M.; Thomas, G.

    1982-01-01

    The morphology and crystallography of lath martensite in low and medium carbon steels have been studied by transmission electron microscopy and diffraction. The steels have microduplex structures of dislocated lath martensite (a < b much less than c) with fairly straight boundaries and continuous interlath thin films of retained austenite. Stacks of laths (i.e., single crystals of martensite) form the packets which are derived from different (111) transformation variants of austenite. Microdiffraction experiments directly allow the determination of the orientation relationships between austenite and martensite. Relative orientations of adjacent individual laths cluster about common orientations from small to large angular differences all around a common <110>M direction. The overall microstructure and orientations result from minimization of the total strain and shape deformation. Considerable accommodation occurs by deformation of laths (sometimes twinned) and austenite (sometimes tripped to twin martensite). In the meantime, microchemical analyses have shown considerable carbon segregation to the martensite-austenite interface. 4 figures.

  11. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding of 10-mm-Thick Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM: As-Welded Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-07-01

    Cast CA6NM martensitic stainless steel plates, 10 mm in thickness, were welded using hybrid laser-arc welding. The effect of different welding speeds on the as-welded joint integrity was characterized in terms of the weld bead geometry, defects, microstructure, hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and impact energy. Significant defects such as porosity, root humping, underfill, and excessive penetration were observed at a low welding speed (0.5 m/min). However, the underfill depth and excessive penetration in the joints manufactured at welding speeds above 0.75 m/min met the specifications of ISO 12932. Characterization of the as-welded microstructure revealed untempered martensite and residual delta ferrite dispersed at prior-austenite grain boundaries in the fusion zone. In addition, four different heat-affected zones in the weldments were differentiated through hardness mapping and inference from the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary phase diagram. The tensile fracture occurred in the base metal for all the samples and fractographic analysis showed that the crack path is within the martensite matrix, along primary delta ferrite-martensite interfaces and within the primary delta ferrite. Additionally, Charpy impact testing demonstrated slightly higher fracture energy values and deeper dimples on the fracture surface of the welds manufactured at higher welding speeds due to grain refinement and/or lower porosity.

  12. The influence of fine ferrite formation on the γ/α interface, fine bainite and retained austenite in a thermomechanically-processed transformation induced plasticity steel

    DOE PAGES

    Timokhina, Ilana B.; Miller, Michael K.; Beladi, Hossein; ...

    2016-03-03

    We subjected a Fe–0.26C–1.96Si–2Mn with 0.31Mo (wt%) steel to a novel thermomechanical processing route to produce fine ferrite with different volume fractions, bainite, and retained austenite. In two types of fine ferrites were found to be: (i) formed along prior austenite grain boundaries, and (ii) formed intragranularly in the interior of austenite grains. An increase in the volume fraction of fine ferrite led to the preferential formation of blocky retained austenite with low stability, and to a decrease in the volume fraction of bainite with stable layers of retained austenite. Moreover, the difference in the morphology of the bainitic ferritemore » and the retained austenite after different isothermal ferrite times was found to be responsible for the deterioration of the mechanical properties. The segregation of Mn, Mo, and C at distances of 2–2.5 nm from the ferrite and retained austenite/martensite interface on the retained austenite/martensite site was observed after 2700 s of isothermal hold. Finally, it was suggested that the segregation occurred during the austenite-to-ferrite transformation, and that this would decrease the interface mobility, which affects the austenite-to-ferrite transformation and ferrite grain size.« less

  13. Influence of cooling rate on the precipitation behavior in Ti–Nb–Mo microalloyed steels during continuous cooling and relationship to strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, F.Z.; Wang, X.M.; Chen, L.; Yang, S.W.; Shang, C.J.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2015-04-15

    In this study we elucidate carbide precipitation at varied cooling rates in Ti–Nb–Mo microalloyed steels during continuous cooling. The study suggests that increasing the cooling rate prevents precipitate formation in the ferrite phase during continuous cooling after finish rolling at 850 °C. At a lower cooling rate of 0.5 °C/s, the microhardness of ferrite grains exhibited maxima because of high volume fraction of fine carbides. A high density of nanoscale carbides with similar precipitation characteristics, including interphase precipitates, was observed at cooling rates of 0.5 and 1 °C/s, but the carbides were marginally larger and the spacing between them was increased with cooling rate. Additionally, carbide precipitation at a high cooling rate was associated with strain-induced precipitation. Through the analysis of selection area electron diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, lattice imaging, the fine spherical-shaped carbides of size ~ 6–10 nm were identified as MC-type carbides of the type (Ti,Nb,Mo)C and NbC. - Highlights: • We model three cooling rates which have indicated different precipitation behaviors. • We find two types of precipitates including NbC and (Ti,Nb,Mo)C based on HRTEM study. • Increasing cooling rate will decrease volume fraction and size of the precipitates. • There is no absence of interphase precipitation when the cooling rate increases to 5 °C/s.

  14. Epitaxial Garnets and Hexagonal Ferrites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Ferrites Lithium Ferrite Magnetostatic Wave Garnets Epitaxy Yttrium Iron Garnet Liquid Phase Epitaxy Hexagonal Ferrite Microwave Signal Processing...epitaxial ferrit ( materials for use in microwave and millirreter-wave signal processing devices. The major emphasis has been on multiple layer...overall objective of this research is to develop epitaxial single crystal ferrite films suitable for microwave and millimeter-wave signal processing at

  15. Hot-Deformation Behavior and Hot-Processing Maps of AISI 410 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Rong-Sheng; Jin, Miao; Guo, Bao-Feng; Liu, Xin-Gang; Chen, Lei

    2016-10-01

    The compressive deformation behaviors of 410 martensitic stainless steel were investigated on a Gleeble-1500 thermomechanical simulator, and the experimental stress-strain data were obtained. The measured flow stress was corrected for friction and temperature. A constitutive equation that accounts for the influence of strain was established, and the hot-processing maps at different strain were plotted. The microstructure evolution of the hot-deformation process was studied on the basis of microstructural observations at high temperatures. Phase-transformation experiments on 410 steel were conducted at high temperatures to elucidate the effects of temperature on the delta-ferrite content. The initial forging temperature and optimum process parameters were obtained on the basis of the processing map and the changes in the delta-ferrite content at high temperatures.

  16. Multiscale Modeling of the Deformation of Advanced Ferritic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nasr M. Ghoniem; Nick Kioussis

    2009-04-18

    The objective of this project is to use the multi-scale modeling of materials (MMM) approach to develop an improved understanding of the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of high-temperature structural materials that are being developed or proposed for Gen IV applications. In particular, the research focuses on advanced ferritic/ martensitic steels to enable operation up to 650-700°C, compared to the current 550°C limit on high-temperature steels.

  17. Influence of Temperature on Fatigue-Induced Martensitic Phase Transformation in a Metastable CrMnNi-Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, Horst; Glage, Alexander; Droste, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Metastable austenitic steels can exhibit a fatigue-induced martensitic phase transformation during cyclic loading. It is generally agreed that a certain strain amplitude and a threshold of the cumulated plastic strain must be exceeded to trigger martensitic phase transformation under cyclic loading. With respect to monotonic loading, the martensitic phase transformation takes place up to a critical temperature—the so-called M d temperature. The goal of the present investigation is to determine an M d,c temperature which would be the highest temperature at which a fatigue-induced martensitic phase transformation can take place. For this purpose, fatigue tests controlled by the total strain were performed at different temperatures. The material investigated was a high-alloy metastable austenitic steel X3CrMnNi16.7.7 (16.3Cr-7.2Mn-6.6Ni-0.03C-0.09N-1.0Si) produced using the hot pressing technique. The temperatures were set in the range of 283 K (10 °C) ≤ T ≤ 473 K (200 °C). Depending on the temperature and strain amplitude, the onset of the martensitic phase transformation shifted to different values of the cumulated plastic strain, or was inhibited completely. Moreover, it is known that metastable austenitic CrMnNi steels with higher nickel contents can exhibit the deformation-induced twinning effect. Thus, at higher temperatures and strain amplitudes, a transition from the deformation-induced martensitic transformation to deformation-induced twinning takes place. The fatigue-induced martensitic phase transformation was monitored during cyclic loading using a ferrite sensor. The microstructure after the fatigue tests was examined using the back-scattered electrons, the electron channeling contrast imaging and the electron backscatter diffraction techniques to study the temperature-dependent dislocation structures and phase transformations.

  18. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructure of low-activation ferritic alloys*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, A.; Matsui, H.

    1994-09-01

    Microstructures of low-activation ferritic alloys, such as 2.25% Cr-2% W, 7% Cr-2% W, 9% Cr-2% W and 12% Cr-2% W alloys, were observed after FFTF irradiation at 698 K to a dose of 36 dpa. Martensite in 7% Cr-2% W, 9% Cr-2% W and 12% Cr-2% W alloys and bainite in 2.25% Cr-2% W alloy were fairly stable after the irradiation. Microvoids were observed in the martensite in each alloy but not in bainite and δ-ferrite in 12% Cr-2% W alloys. An addition of 0.02% Ti to 9% Cr-2% W alloy considerably reduced the void density. Spherical (Ta, W) and Ti-rich precipitates were observed in the Ti-added 9% Cr-2% W alloy. Precipitates observed in 9% Cr-2% W and 7% Cr-2% W alloys are mainly Cr-rich M 23C 6 (Ta, W) and Ta(W)-rich M 6C and Fe-rich Laves phase. In 2.25% Cr-2% W alloy, high density of fine (Ta, W)-rich M 2C type precipitates as well as M 6C were observed. Spherical small α' Cr-rich particles were observed in both martensite and α-ferrite in 12% Cr-2% W alloys. Correlation between postirradiation microstructure and irradiation hardening is shown and discussed for these alloys.

  19. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on impact properties of Cr-W-V ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Alexander, D. J.

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on eight normalized-and-tempered ferritic and martensitic steels irradiated in two different normalized conditions. Irradiation was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at 393°C to ≈14 dpa on eight steels with 2.25%, 5%, 9%, and 12% Cr (0.1% C) with varying amounts of W, V, and Ta. The different normalization treatments involved changing the cooling rate after austenitization. The faster cooling rate produced 100% bainite in the 2.25Cr steels, compared to duplex structures of bainite and polygonal ferrite for the slower cooling rate. For both cooling rates, martensite formed in the 5% and 9% Cr steels, and martensite with ≈25% δ-ferrite formed in the 12% Cr steel. Irradiation caused an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy (USE). The difference in microstructure in the low-chromium steels due to the different heat treatments had little effect on properties. For the high-chromium martensitic steels, only the 5Cr steel was affected by heat treatment. When the results at 393°C were compared with previous results at 365°C, all but a 5Cr and a 9Cr steel showed the expected decrease in the shift in DBTT with increasing temperature.

  20. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  1. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  2. Notch-Fatigue Properties of Advanced TRIP-Aided Bainitic Ferrite Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Junya; Sugimoto, Koh-ichi

    2012-11-01

    To develop a transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP)-aided bainitic ferrite steel (TBF steel) with high hardenability for a common rail of the next generation diesel engine, 0.2 pct C-1.5 pct Si-1.5 pct Mn-0.05 pct Nb TBF steels with different contents of Cr, Mo, and Ni were produced. The notch-fatigue strength of the TBF steels was investigated and was related to the microstructural and retained austenite characteristics. If Cr, Mo, and/or Ni were added to the base steel, then the steels achieved extremely higher notch-fatigue limits and lower notch sensitivity than base TBF steel and the conventional structural steels. This was mainly associated with (1) carbide-free and fine bainitic ferrite lath structure matrix without proeutectoid ferrite, (2) a large amount of fine metastable retained austenite, and (3) blocky martensite phase including retained austenite, which may suppress a fatigue crack initiation and propagation.

  3. Characteristics of Laser Beam and Friction Stir Welded AISI 409M Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2012-04-01

    This article presents the comparative evaluation of microstructural features and mechanical properties of friction stir welded (solid-state) and laser beam welded (high energy density fusion welding) AISI 409M grade ferritic stainless steel joints. Optical microscopy, microhardness testing, transverse tensile, and impact tests were performed. The coarse ferrite grains in the base material were changed to fine grains consisting duplex structure of ferrite and martensite due to the rapid cooling rate and high strain induced by severe plastic deformation caused by frictional stirring. On the other hand, columnar dendritic grain structure was observed in fusion zone of laser beam welded joints. Tensile testing indicates overmatching of the weld metal relative to the base metal irrespective of the welding processes used. The LBW joint exhibited superior impact toughness compared to the FSW joint.

  4. HIGH POWER FERRITE PHASE SHIFTER

    DTIC Science & Technology

    power tests to 100 kw peak are reported for waveguide configurations containing (1) single crystal lithium ferrite; (2) polycrystalline cubic ... structure , nickel ferrite; and (3) polycrystalline hexagonal structure nickel-cobalt ’W’ ferrite with its magnetic anisotropy oriented parallel to the applied

  5. Morphology of Proeutectoid Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiaqing; Hillert, Mats; Borgenstam, Annika

    2017-01-01

    The morphology of grain boundary nucleated ferrite particles in iron alloys with 0.3 mass pct carbon has been classified according to the presence of facets. Several kinds of particles extend into both grains of austenite and have facets to both. It is proposed that they all belong to a continuous series of shapes. Ferrite plates can nucleate directly on the grain boundary but can also develop from edges on many kinds of particles. Feathery structures of parallel plates on both sides of a grain boundary can thus form. In sections, parallel to their main growth direction, plates have been seen to extend the whole way from the nucleation site at the grain boundary and to the growth front. This happens in the whole temperature range studied from 973 K to 673 K (700 °C to 400 °C). The plates thus grow continuously and not by subunits stopping at limited length and continuing the growth by new ones nucleating. Sometimes, the plates have ridges and in oblique sections they could be mistaken for the start of new plates. No morphological signs were observed indicating a transition between Widmanstätten ferrite and bainitic ferrite. It is proposed that there is only one kind of acicular ferrite.

  6. Morphology of Proeutectoid Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiaqing; Hillert, Mats; Borgenstam, Annika

    2017-03-01

    The morphology of grain boundary nucleated ferrite particles in iron alloys with 0.3 mass pct carbon has been classified according to the presence of facets. Several kinds of particles extend into both grains of austenite and have facets to both. It is proposed that they all belong to a continuous series of shapes. Ferrite plates can nucleate directly on the grain boundary but can also develop from edges on many kinds of particles. Feathery structures of parallel plates on both sides of a grain boundary can thus form. In sections, parallel to their main growth direction, plates have been seen to extend the whole way from the nucleation site at the grain boundary and to the growth front. This happens in the whole temperature range studied from 973 K to 673 K (700 °C to 400 °C). The plates thus grow continuously and not by subunits stopping at limited length and continuing the growth by new ones nucleating. Sometimes, the plates have ridges and in oblique sections they could be mistaken for the start of new plates. No morphological signs were observed indicating a transition between Widmanstätten ferrite and bainitic ferrite. It is proposed that there is only one kind of acicular ferrite.

  7. Bauschinger Effect in Microalloyed Steels: Part I. Dependence on Dislocation-Particle Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostryzhev, Andrii G.; Strangwood, Martin; Davis, Claire L.

    2010-03-01

    The Bauschinger effect (yield stress decreasing at the start of reverse deformation after forward prestrain) is an important factor in strength development for cold metal forming technology. In steels, the magnitude of the Bauschinger effect depends on composition, through the presence of microalloy precipitates, and prior processing, through the size and distribution of microalloy precipitates and presence of retained work hardening. In this article, the microstructures of two (Nb- and Nb-V-microalloyed) steel plates, in terms of (Ti,Nb,V,Cu)-rich particle distributions and dislocation densities, have been quantitatively related to the Bauschinger parameters for the same processing conditions. For the 12- to 50-nm effective particle size range, the Bauschinger stress parameter increases with the particle number density and dislocation density increase. The relative influence of these two microstructure parameters is discussed.

  8. On the Processing of Martensitic Steels in Continuous Galvanizing Lines: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Taejin; Kwak, Jaihyun; de Cooman, B. C.

    2012-01-01

    The conventional continuous hot-dip galvanizing (GI) and galvannealing (GA) processes can be applied to untransformed austenite to produce Zn and Zn-alloy coated low-carbon ultra-high-strength martensitic steel provided specific alloying additions are made. The most suitable austenite decomposition behavior results from the combined addition of boron, Cr, and Mo, which results in a pronounced transformation bay during isothermal transformation. The occurrence of this transformation bay implies a considerable retardation of the austenite decomposition in the temperature range below the bay, which is close to the stages in the continuous galvanizing line (CGL) thermal cycle related to the GI and GA processes. After the GI and GA processes, a small amount of granular bainite, which consists of bainitic ferrite and discrete islands of martensite/austenite (M/A) constituents embedded in martensite matrix, is present in the microstructure. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the steel after the GI and GA cycle was over 1300 MPa, and the stress-strain curve was continuous without any yielding phenomena.

  9. Previous heat treatment inducing different plasma nitriding behaviors in martensitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, C. A.; Alvarez, F.; Mitchell, D. R. G.; Collins, G. A.; Short, K. T.

    2006-09-15

    In this work we report a study of the induced changes in structure and corrosion behavior of martensitic stainless steels nitrided by plasma immersion ion implantation (PI{sup 3}) at different previous heat treatments. The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction and glancing angle x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic measurements. Depending on the proportion of retained austenite in the unimplanted material, different phase transformations are obtained at lower and intermediate temperatures of nitrogen implantation. At higher temperatures, the great mobility of the chromium yields CrN segregations like spots in random distribution, and the {alpha}{sup '}-martensite is degraded to{alpha}-Fe (ferrite). The nitrided layer thickness follows a fairly linear relationship with the temperature and a parabolic law with the process time. The corrosion resistance depends strongly on chromium segregation from the martensitic matrix, as a result of the formation of CrN during the nitrogen implantation process and the formation of Cr{sub x}C during the heat treatment process. Briefly speaking, the best results are obtained using low tempering temperature and low implantation temperature (below 375 deg. ) due to the increment of the corrosion resistance and nitrogen dissolution in the structure with not too high diffusion depths (about 5-10 {mu}m)

  10. Effects of Microalloying in Multi Phase Steels for Car Body Manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleck, Wolfgang; Phiu-On, Kriangyut

    Microalloying elements like Al, B, Nb, Ti, V can be used to optimise the microstructure evolution and the mechanical properties of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). Microalloying elements are characterised by small additions < 0.1 mass% and their ability to form carbides or nitrides. They can increase strength by grain refinement and precipitation hardening, retard or accelerate transformations and affect the diffusion kinetics. Thus, by their addition the AHSS with their high requirements to process control can be adopted to existing processing lines. Different combinations of microstructural phases and different chemical compositions have been investigated for AHSS in order to combine high strength with excellent formability.

  11. Ferrite logic reliability study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, J. A.; Clark, C. B.

    1973-01-01

    Development and use of digital circuits called all-magnetic logic are reported. In these circuits the magnetic elements and their windings comprise the active circuit devices in the logic portion of a system. The ferrite logic device belongs to the all-magnetic class of logic circuits. The FLO device is novel in that it makes use of a dual or bimaterial ferrite composition in one physical ceramic body. This bimaterial feature, coupled with its potential for relatively high speed operation, makes it attractive for high reliability applications. (Maximum speed of operation approximately 50 kHz.)

  12. International Conference on Martensitic Transformations (ICOMAT 92)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-05

    of stress -induced (that is, occuring in the region ahead of a crack tip) t-ni martensitic transformation to fracture toughness Of ceramics is...discussed in detail. and considered that it is related to th differenet Initial stress iields Intr~odu4ed by the constrained- h 5tiR in the P"ent Phase...diffractometer, which makes the accurate determination of struc- tures possible for single crystal martensites produced by stress - induced transformation

  13. Chemical and mechanical stabilization of martensite

    SciTech Connect

    Kustov, S.; Pons, J.; Cesari, E.; Van Humbeeck, J

    2004-09-06

    An algorithm of quantitative analysis of two basic contributions to the stabilization of martensite - atomic reordering ('chemical' stabilization component) and pinning of interfaces ('mechanical' contribution) - has been developed. The algorithm uses data obtained by routine calorimetry measurements. The possibility to quantitatively separate contributions of 'chemical' and 'mechanical' stabilization components stems from the fact that they affect the first reverse transformation of stabilized martensite through thermodynamically reversible and irreversible factors, respectively. Analysis of the thermodynamics of the thermoelastic martensitic transformations allowed us to conclude that stabilization of martensite should be described in terms of pure shift and broadening of the reverse transformation. These parameters are shown to have a clear physical meaning. Namely, pure shift of the reverse transformation as a result of martensite stabilization provides an upper estimate for the atomic reordering or 'chemical' contribution to the stabilization, whereas broadening of the reverse transformation represents a lower limit for pinning-induced or 'mechanical' stabilization component. Experimental data on stabilization of a Cu-Zn-Al alloy are analyzed, indicating that contributions of 'chemical' and 'mechanical' stabilization components are comparable but depend on martensite ageing period and details of the initial heat treatment of samples.

  14. Materials design data for reduced activation martensitic steel type EUROFER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Alamo, A.; Bedel, L.; Forest, L.; Gentzbittel, J.-M.; Rensman, J.-W.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Schirra, M.; Schmitt, R.; Schneider, H. C.; Petersen, C.; Lancha, A.-M.; Fernandez, P.; Filacchioni, G.; Maday, M. F.; Mergia, K.; Boukos, N.; Baluc; Spätig, P.; Alves, E.; Lucon, E.

    2004-08-01

    Materials design limits derived so far from the data generated in Europe for the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel type Eurofer are presented. These data address the short-term needs of the ITER Test Blanket Modules and a DEMOnstration fusion reactor. Products tested include plates, bars, tubes, TIG and EB welds, as well as powder consolidated blocks and solid-solid HIP joints. Effects of thermal ageing and low dose neutron irradiation are also included. Results are sorted and screened according to design code requirements before being introduced in reference databases. From the physical properties databases, variations of magnetic properties, modulus of elasticity, density, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, mean and instantaneous linear coefficients of thermal expansion versus temperature are derived. From the tensile and creep properties databases design allowable stresses are derived. From the instrumented Charpy impact and fracture toughness databases, ductile to brittle transition temperature, toughness and behavior of materials in different fracture modes are evaluated. From the fatigue database, total strain range versus number of cycles to failure curves are plotted and used to derive fatigue design curves. Cyclic curves are also derived and compared with monotonic hardening curves. Finally, irradiated and aged materials data are compared to ensure that the safety margins incorporated in unirradiated design limits are not exceeded.

  15. Crystallographic analysis of the martensitic transformation in medium-carbon steel with packet martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundyrev, V. M.; Zel'dovich, V. I.; Schastlivtsev, V. M.

    2016-10-01

    Based on X-ray diffraction studies of the martensite texture in a single martensite packet, exact orientation relationships between the orientations of martensite crystallites and the original austenite single crystal in medium-carbon steel 37KhN3A have been determined to be as follows: (011)α||(1; 0.990; 1.009)γ to an accuracy of ± 0.15°, [ {01overline 1 } ]_α ||{[ {1;1.163; - 2.133} ]_γ } to an accuracy of ±0.15°. It has been shown that the orientation relationships proved to be almost the same as in the Fe-31% Ni alloy with a twinned martensite with close lattice parameters. Therefore, the conclusion has been drawn that the mechanism of the lattice deformation upon the martensitic transformation is the same in both alloys. It is described as follows. The lattice deformation occurs by shear on the (111) plane in the {[ {11overline 2 } ]_{_γ }} direction and is accompanied by an additional change in the dimensions in the mutually perpendicular directions {[ {11overline 2 } ]_{_γ }},[ {111} ],and{[ {1overline 1 0} ]_{_γ }}. The invariantlattice deformation is implemented by slip in martensite on the planes of the (112)α type in the direction {[ {overline 1 overline 1 1} ]_α }. One of the 24 crystallographically equivalent variants of the transformation mechanism has been considered. Apart from this type of deformation, an additional deformation of martensite is possible that does not change its orientation. It has been shown that the orientation of the martensite crystallite calculated via the phenomenological theory of the martensitic transformations (PTMT) differs by approximately 1° from the experimentally determined orientation. This refers to both the lath and twinned martensite. In the twinned martensite, the invariant plane obtained in the PTMT calculations and the habit plane coincide. In lath martensite of 37KhN3A steel, the invariant plane of the martensite crystal obtained in PTMT calculations deviates by 25° from the orientation of the

  16. Precipitates in Nb and Nb-V microalloyed X80 pipeline steel.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyi; Liu, Delu; Zhang, Jianping; Tian, Wenhuai

    2013-08-01

    Precipitates in two X80 pipeline steels were studied by transmission electron microscopy equipped with an energy filtering system. The steels are microalloyed with niobium and niobium-vanadium (Nb-V), respectively, and produced by continuous hot rolling. Besides the precipitates TiN and (Ti, Nb) (C, N), which were 10-100 nm in size, a large number of precipitates smaller than 10 nm distributed in the two steels have been observed. In the Nb-V microalloyed steel, only a few titanium nitrides covered by vanadium compounds on the surface have been observed. It is inferred that the vanadium exists mainly in the matrix as a solid solution element. The fact has been accepted that there was no contribution to the precipitation strengthening of the X80 steel by adding 0.04-0.06% vanadium under the present production process. By contrast, the toughness of the Nb-V steel is deteriorated. Therefore, a better toughness property of the Nb microalloyed X80 results from the optimum microalloying composition design and the suitable accelerating cooling after hot rolling.

  17. Niobium carbide and tin precipitation in continuously cast microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Julian

    With high yield strength, toughness and good weldability, microalloyed steels are widely used in the automotive, pipeline and transportation industries. Microalloying elements such as niobium (Nb), titanium (Ti) and vanadium (V) in concentrations of less than 0.1 wt. pct. are typical. For optimal benefits in the final product, it is usually desired for Ti to form fine precipitates during and after solidification and for Nb to be in solution prior to hot-rolling. Vanadium precipitates at lower temperatures and is less involved in the solidification/casting process. In one aspect of the investigation, the effects of cooling rate on the titanium nitride (TiN) precipitation size distribution were investigated in a Ti-added low-carbon steel. Prior research reported an inverse relationship between the average TiN precipitation size and the post-solidification cooling rate and the present work was undertaken to examine this behavior over a wider range of cooling rates. Using the GleebleRTM 3500's casting simulation capabilities along with controlled cooling rates, the TiN precipitation behavior in thick-slab, thin-slab and thin-strip material was simulated using a commercially produced 0.04C, 1.23Mn steel with near-stoichiometric Ti and N levels. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of carbon extraction replicas was carried out to characterize the influence of cooling rates on precipitate size distributions. Decreasing particle sizes with increasing cooling rates were found. Average particle sizes as low as 6.7 nm were present in thin-strip simulations and might be of interest, as fine particles could contribute to strengthening of rapidly cooled steels. In a second aspect of the investigation, niobium carbide (NbC) precipitation during the compact strip production (CSP) process was investigated in two Nb-added low-carbon steels. Instead of industrial sampling, the GleebleRTM was used for casting simulations using two CMn(Nb) steels with high and low- Nb

  18. The Influence of the Thermomechanical Processing Regime on the Structural Evolution of Mo-Nb-Ti-V Microalloyed Steel Subjected to High-Pressure Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurova, Elena; Maier, Galina; Melnikov, Eugene; Naydenkin, Eugene; Smirnov, Aleksander; Bataev, Vladimir; Odessky, Pavel; Dobatkin, Sergey; Maier, Hans J.

    2017-07-01

    In the present study the effect of the thermal-mechanical processing regime—cold high-pressure torsion (HPT) at room temperature, cold HPT followed by annealing at 773 K (500 °C), and warm HPT at 723 K (450 °C)—on the peculiarities of the microstructure and microhardness of a Mo-Nb-Ti-V-0.08C microalloyed steel was analyzed. HPT processing resulted in high deformation and refinement of the initial structure and produced an ultrafine-grained microstructure featuring different morphologies with fine (<5 nm) and coarse (15 to 20 nm) carbides and with a mean size of the ferrite grain-subgrain structural elements of ≈100 nm. After room-temperature HPT, a mixed grain-subgrain structure with a high microhardness of 608 HV was obtained. Warm HPT caused formation of an ultrafine-grained structure with a microhardness of 553 HV. After annealing of cold HPT-processed specimens at 773 K (500 °C), a partial recovery of the structure occurred, but the average size of the structural elements and their distribution varied only slightly whereas the microhardness increased to 642 HV. The variations in the microhardness with the processing regime were correlated to changes in microstructural parameters (grain size, dislocation density and precipitation strengthening).

  19. Microstructure Evolution and Age-Hardening Behavior of Microalloyed Austenitic Fe-30Mn-9Al-0.9C Light-Weight Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Park, Seong-Jun; Lee, Changhee; Han, Heung Nam; Lee, Tae-Ho; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2017-10-01

    The aging behavior and mechanical properties of microalloyed austenitic Fe-30Mn-9Al-0.9C light-weight steels were investigated through transmission electron microscopy analysis, electron backscatter diffraction analysis, tensile tests, and Vickers hardness tests. The base steels were aged at 823 K (550 °C) for up to 10,000 minutes. The true stress-strain responses of solution-treated samples before aging showed that the addition of Nb and/or V improved the strength by grain refinement and precipitation hardening. During the process of tensile deformation, the strain-hardening rate of Fe-30Mn-9Al-0.9C steel steadily increased due to the microband-induced plasticity (MBIP) from the onset of plastic deformation to ɛ = 25 pct, while such behavior was weakened and not observed in Nb- and/or V-added steels despite MBIP. In the early stage of aging, the Vickers hardness gradually increased with an increase in the aging time due to the precipitation of κ-carbide of (Fe,Mn)3AlC and remained stagnant between the aging times of 1000 and 3000 minutes. The hardness increased again after 3000 minutes due to the formation of ferrite and brittle β-Mn.

  20. Carbonitride precipitation in niobium/vanadium microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speer, J. G.; Michael, J. R.; Hansen, S. S.

    1987-02-01

    A detailed study of carbonitride precipitation in niobium/vanadium microalloyed steels is presented. A thermodynamic model is developed to predict the austenite/carbonitride equilibrium in the Fe-Nb-V-C-N system, using published solubility data and the Hillert/Staffansson model for stoichiometric phases. The model can be used to estimate equilibrium austenite and carbonitride compositions, and the amounts of each phase, as a function of steel composition and temperature. The model also provides a method to estimate the carbonitride solution temperatures for different steel compositions. Actual carbonitride precipitation behavior in austenite is then examined in two experimental 0.03Nb steels containing 0.05V and 0.20V, respectively. Samples were solution treated, rolled at 954 °C (20 pct or 50 pct), held isothermally for times up to 10,000 seconds at 843 °C, 954 °C, or 1066 °C, and brine quenched. The process of carbonitride precipitation in deformed austenite is followed by analytical electron microscopy (AEM) of carbon extraction replicas. Precipitates are. observed at prior-austenite grain boundaries, and also within the grains (presumably at substructure introduced by the rolling deformation). Analysis of the grain-boundary and matrix precipitate compositions by AEM indicates that the grain-boundary precipitates are consistently richer in vanadium than the matrix precipitates, although compositional trends with holding time and temperature are similar for the two types of precipitates. The compositions of both the grain-boundary and matrix precipitates are not significantly influenced by the rolling reduction or the holding time at temperature. As predicted by the thermodynamic model, the precipitates become more vanadium-rich as the vanadium level in the steel is increased and as the temperature is reduced. The agreement between the measured and predicted precipitate compositions is quite good for the grain-boundary precipitates, although the matrix

  1. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on impact behavior of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1998-03-01

    Charpy tests were conducted on eight normalized-and-tempered reduced-activation ferritic steels irradiated in two different normalized conditions. Irradiation was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility at 393 C to {approx}14 dpa on steels with 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% Cr (0.1% C) with varying amounts of W, V, and Ta. The different normalization treatments involved changing the cooling rate after austenitization. The faster cooling rate produced 100% bainite in the 2.25 Cr steels, compared to duplex structures of bainite and polygonal ferrite for the slower cooling rate. For both cooling rates, martensite formed in the 5 and 9% Cr steels, and martensite with {approx}25% {delta}-ferrite formed in the 12% Cr steel. Irradiation caused an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy. The difference in microstructure in the low-chromium steels due to the different heat treatments had little effect on properties. For the high-chromium martensitic steels, only the 5 Cr steel was affected by heat treatment. When the results at 393 C were compared with previous results at 365 C, all but a 5 Cr and a 9 Cr steel showed the expected decrease in the shift in DBTT with increasing temperature.

  2. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels.

    PubMed

    Papula, Suvi; Sarikka, Teemu; Anttila, Severi; Talonen, Juho; Virkkunen, Iikka; Hänninen, Hannu

    2017-06-03

    Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC) phases ferrite and α'-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α'-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility.

  3. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels

    PubMed Central

    Papula, Suvi; Sarikka, Teemu; Anttila, Severi; Talonen, Juho; Virkkunen, Iikka; Hänninen, Hannu

    2017-01-01

    Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC) phases ferrite and α’-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α’-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility. PMID:28772975

  4. Must we use ferritic steel in TBM?

    SciTech Connect

    Salavy, Jean-Francois; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Cho, Seungyon; Enoeda, Mikio; Giancarli, Luciano; Kurtz, Richard J.; Luo, Tian Y.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Wong, Clement

    2010-12-13

    Mock-ups of DEMO breeding blankets, called Test Blanket Modules (TBMs), inserted and tested in ITER in dedicated equatorial ports directly facing the plasma, are expected to provide the first experimental answers on the necessary performance of the corresponding DEMO breeding blankets. Several DEMO breeding blanket designs have been studied and assessed in the last 20 years. At present, after considering various coolant and breeder combinations, all the TBM concepts proposed by the seven ITER Parties use Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel as the structural material. In order to perform valuable tests in ITER, the TBMs are expected to use the same structural material as corresponding DEMO blankets. However, due to the fact that this family of steels is ferromagnetic, their presence in the ITER vacuum vessel will create perturbations of the ITER magnetic fields that could reduce the quality of the plasma confinement during H-mode. As a consequence, a legitimate question has been raised on the necessity of using RAFM steel for TBMs structural material in ITER. By giving a short description of the main TBM testing objectives in ITER and assessing the consequences of not using such a material, this paper gives a comprehensive answer to this question. According to the working group author of the study, the use of RAFM steel as structural material for TBM is judged mandatory.

  5. Epitaxial Garnets and Hexagonal Ferrites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-20

    Iron Garnet Liquid Phase Epitaxy Hexagonal Ferrite microwave Signal Processing Millimeter-Wave 20. ABSTRACT (Continue ani revee arde if necoeermy and...le.’uIfy by block rns.) e objective of this research is to develop new and improved epitauial ferrite materials for use in microwave and millimeter... ferrite films suitable for microwave and millimeter-wave signal processing at frequencies above 1 GHz. The specific tasks are: a. Analyze and develop

  6. Thermally Activated Martensite: Its Relationship to Non-Thermally Activated (Athermal) Martensite

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, D E; Jones, N J; Schwartz, A J; Massalski, T B

    2008-10-21

    The classification of martensitic displacive transformations into athermal, isothermal or anisothermal is discussed. Athermal does not mean 'no temperature dependence' as is often thought, but is best considered to be short for the notion of no thermal activation. Processes with no thermal activation do not depend on time, as there is no need to wait for sufficient statistical fluctuations in some specific order parameter to overcome an activation barrier to initiate the process. Clearly, this kind of process contrasts with those that are thermally activated. In the literature, thermally activated martensites are usually termed isothermal martensites, suggesting a constant temperature. Actually such martensites also typically occur with continuous cooling. The important distinctive feature of these martensites is that they are thermally activated and hence are distinguishable in principle from athermal martensites. A third type of process, anisothermal, has been introduced to account for those transformations which are thought to be thermally activated but which occur on continuous cooling. They may occur so rapidly that they do not appear to have an incubation time, and hence could be mistakenly called an athermal transformation. These designations will be reviewed and discussed in terms of activation energies and kinetic processes of the various martensitic transformations.

  7. Microstructure and cleavage in lath martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, John W., Jr.; Kinney, Chris; Pytlewski, Ken; Adachi, Y.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the microstructure of lath martensitic steels and the mechanisms by which it controls cleavage fracture. The specific experimental example is a 9Ni (9 wt% Ni) steel annealed to have a large prior austenite grain size, then examined and tested in the as-quenched condition to produce a relatively coarse lath martensite. The microstructure is shown to approximate the recently identified ‘classic’ lath martensite structure: prior austenite grains are divided into packets, packets are subdivided into blocks, and blocks contain interleaved laths whose variants are the two Kurjumov-Sachs relations that share the same Bain axis of the transformation. When the steel is fractured in brittle cleavage, the laths in the block share {100} cleavage planes and cleave as a unit. However, cleavage cracks deflect or blunt at the boundaries between blocks with different Bain axes. It follows that, as predicted, the block size governs the effective grain size for cleavage.

  8. Microstructure and cleavage in lath martensitic steels.

    PubMed

    Morris, John W; Kinney, Chris; Pytlewski, Ken; Adachi, Y

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the microstructure of lath martensitic steels and the mechanisms by which it controls cleavage fracture. The specific experimental example is a 9Ni (9 wt% Ni) steel annealed to have a large prior austenite grain size, then examined and tested in the as-quenched condition to produce a relatively coarse lath martensite. The microstructure is shown to approximate the recently identified 'classic' lath martensite structure: prior austenite grains are divided into packets, packets are subdivided into blocks, and blocks contain interleaved laths whose variants are the two Kurjumov-Sachs relations that share the same Bain axis of the transformation. When the steel is fractured in brittle cleavage, the laths in the block share {100} cleavage planes and cleave as a unit. However, cleavage cracks deflect or blunt at the boundaries between blocks with different Bain axes. It follows that, as predicted, the block size governs the effective grain size for cleavage.

  9. Time-temperature equivalence in Martensite tempering

    SciTech Connect

    Hackenberg, Robert E.; Thomas, Grant A.; Speer, John G.; Matlock, David K.; Krauss, George

    2008-06-16

    The relationship between time and temperature is of great consequence in many materials-related processes including the tempering of martensite. In 1945, Hollomon and Jaffe quantified the 'degree of tempering' as a function of both tempering time, t, and tempering temperature, T, using the expression, T(log t + c). Here, c is thought to be a material constant and appears to decrease linearly with increasing carbon content. The Hollomon-Jaffe tempering parameter is frequently cited in the literature. This work reviews the original derivation of the tempering parameter concept, and presents the use of the characteristics diffusion distance as an alternative time-temperature relationship during martensite tempering. During the tempering of martensite, interstitial carbon atoms diffuse to form carbides. In addition, austenite decomposes, dislocations and grain boundaries rearrange, associated with iron self diffusion. Since these are all diffusional processes, it is reasonable to expect the degree of tempering to relate to the extent of diffusion.

  10. Clusters in carbon martensite: Thermodynamics and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Dabrowski, L.

    1998-12-01

    An original method of evaluation of the cluster population in carbon martensite has been developed. Using this method, it is shown that Kurdjumov`s model of carbon redistribution within the different octahedral site sublattices can quantitatively account for both observed normal and abnormal tetragonality in carbon martensite. It is also shown that the existence of the internal strains in martensite constitutes a necessary and sufficient condition for the energetic preference of tetrahedral over the cubic lattice. The presence of the residual tetragonal distortion in the quasi-cubic phase of k-martensite is associated with the presence of the mixed clusters formed of the atoms belonging to O{sub c} sublattice as well as to remaining ones. By using a computer simulation of the dynamical behavior of carbon martensite approaching the thermodynamical equilibrium, it was found that the ultimate state of this system is strongly beyond the thermal equilibrium. Even after long-term aging, the free energy is far beyond the minimum value allowed for this system. The reason for such a behavior and the possible aging processes proceeding in this system are discussed at the molecular level. All of the ordering parameters are affected by the aging process. The evolution proceeds in the distinctly different time intervals for different parameters. At first, the long-range ordering parameter that determines the tetragonality of martensite evolves and reaches the stable value. In the next stage, the formation and then disintegration of two-particle clusters occurs. Disintegration of two-particle clusters coincides with the stage when three-particle cluster formation occurs at a high rate. Three-particle clusters also disintegrate when some time elapses. The evolution of these processes is illustrated graphically in the time range from 16 seconds to 1500 years, as estimated on the basis of experimental data.

  11. Formation of nano-size oxide particles and δ-ferrite at elevated temperature in 9Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sawoong; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Kaito, Takeji; Yamashita, Shinichiro; Inoue, Masaki; Asayama, Tai; Shobu, Takahisa

    2011-10-01

    Excellent high-temperature strength and resistance to radiation damage of 9Cr Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (9Cr-ODS) martensitic steel have been realized by nano-size Y-Ti-O complex oxide particles dispersed in the matrix and a dual phase structure consisting of α'-martensite and δ-ferrite. These are produced by mechanically alloying Fe-Cr-Ti powders with Y 2O 3 followed by a hot-consolidation process. Therefore, the hot-consolidation process is the issue to be clarified for the formation of nano-size oxide particle and δ-ferrite. The temperature dependence of the formation and development of nano-size oxide particles and δ-ferrite using mechanically alloyed 9Cr-ODS raw powder were investigated applying X-ray Diffraction and Small Angle X-ray Scattering measurement at SPring-8 and by Electron Probe Micro Analysis. In situ heating measurement techniques with XRD and SAXS enabled real-time observation of phase transformations and allowed correlation between formation of nano-size oxide particle and δ-ferrite.

  12. Incommensurateness in nanotwinning models of modulated martensites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benešová, Barbora; Frost, Miroslav; Kampschulte, Malte; Melcher, Christof; Sedlák, Petr; Seiner, Hanuš

    2015-11-01

    We study the formation of modulated martensites in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys by a mathematical model originating from the nanotwinning concept. The results show that the incommensurateness, systematically observed in experiments for the modulated phases, may be understood as a precursor effect of the intermartensitic transitions, and its appearance does not contradict the nanotwinning concept itself. The model sufficiently explains the different levels of incommensurateness reported from different experimental observations for the 14-layered and 10-layered martensites of the Ni-Mn-Ga alloy and outlines the mechanism of formation of faults in the stacking sequences of these materials.

  13. Mechanical properties of martensitic alloy AISI 422

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, M.L. ); Huang, F.H.; Hu, Wan-Liang )

    1992-06-01

    HT9 is a martensitic stainless steel that has been considered for structural applications in liquid metal reactors (LMRs) as well as in fusion reactors. AISI 422 is a commercially available martensitic stainless steel that closely resembles HT9, and was studied briefly under the auspices of the US LMR program. Previously unpublished tensile, fracture toughness and charpy impact data on AISI 422 were re-examined for potential insights into the consequences of the compositional differences between the two alloys, particularly with respect to current questions concerning the origin of the radiation-induced embrittlement observed in HT9.

  14. Mechanical properties of martensitic alloy AISI 422

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.H.; Hu, W.L. ); Hamilton, M.L. )

    1992-09-01

    HT9 is a martensitic stainless steel that has been considered for structural applications in liquid metal reactors (LMRs) as well as in fusion reactors. AISI 422 is a commercially available martensitic stainless steel that closely resembles HT9, and was studied briefly under the auspices of the US LMR program. Previously unpublished tensile, fracture toughness and charpy impact data on AISI 422 were reexamined for potential insights into the consequences of the compositional differences between the two alloys, particularly with respect to current questions concerning the origin of the radiation-induced embrittlement observed in HT9. 8 refs, 8 figs.

  15. Laser Beam Welding of Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. Strengths of up to 2 GPa at fracture elongations of 15% can be attained through this. Welding of these materials, as a result, became a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply efficient heat control. For two application cases, tailored blank production in as-rolled condition and welding during assembly in hot stamped condition, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown through metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KS-II concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method.

  16. Analysis of factors responsible for the accelerated creep rupture of 12% Cr martensitic steel weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A. S.; Okhapkin, K. A.; Mikhailov, M. S.; Skutin, V. S.; Zubova, G. E.; Fedotov, B. V.

    2016-06-01

    In the process of the investigation of the heat resistance of a 0.07C-12Cr-Ni-Mo-V-Nb steel of the martensitic-ferritic class, a reduction was revealed in the long-term strength of its welded joints to below the level of the strength of the base metal. To establish the causes for the accelerated failure of the welded joints, an imitation of the thermal cycles was carried out that produce the structure of the heataffected zone using a dilatometer. In the samples with the structure that corresponds to that of the heataffected zone, a local zone of softening was revealed. The investigations of the metal structure using transmission electron microscopy have shown that the reduction in the creep rupture strength was caused by structural changes under the conditions of the thermal cycle of welding upon the staying of the steel in the temperature range between the Ac 1 and Ac 3 points.

  17. Assessment of mechanical properties of the martensitic steel EUROFER97 by means of punch tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Y.; Spätig, P.; Victoria, M.

    2002-12-01

    The ball punch test technique was used to evaluate the conventional tensile and impact properties of the tempered martensitic steel EUROFER97 from room temperature down to liquid nitrogen temperature. The testing was carried out on unirradiated material only with small disks, 3 mm in diameter and 0.25 mm in thickness. For comparison, tensile tests were also performed over the same temperature range. Correlations between the load at the plastic bending initiation and the maximum load of the punch tests with the yield stress and the ultimate tensile stress of the tension tests could be established. The temperature dependence of the specific fracture energy of the punch test was used to define a ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and to correlate this with the DBTT measured from impact Charpy on KLST specimens. The results are compared with other available correlations done in the past on other ferritic steels.

  18. Microstructure and mechanical properties of newly developed low activation martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victoria, M.; Gavillet, D.; Spätig, P.; Rezai-Aria, F.; Rossmann, S.

    1996-10-01

    The reference ferritic-martensitic steel of the European Fusion Technology Program, the 10CrMoNbV MANET cast, has been modified by replacing the elements that result in long term residual radioactivity when irradiated under a fusion neutron spectra by others which have shorter activation periods. A base composition of a 9CrWVTa steel has been so defined. Two different compositions of the base alloy have been cast from high purity components, which the Mn and N contents have been varied. The extracted carbide types and their size distribution have been studied under the electron microscope. The mechanical properties of both compositions have been determined. Both steel compositions have a ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) well below room temperature while their tensile properties are comparable to those of the parent (MANET) steel.

  19. Effect of irradiation temperature on void swelling of China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Fei; Qiao Jiansheng; Huang Yina; Wan Farong Ohnuki, Soumei

    2008-03-15

    CLAM is one composition of a Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel (RAFM), which is being studied in a number of institutes and universities in China. The effect of electron-beam irradiation temperature on irradiation swelling of CLAM was investigated by using a 1250 kV High Voltage Electron Microscope (HVEM). In-situ microstructural observations indicated that voids formed at each experimental temperature - 723 K, 773 K and 823 K. The size and number density of voids increased with increasing irradiation dose at each temperature. The results show that CLAM has good swelling resistance. The maximum void swelling was produced at 723 K; the swelling was about 0.3% when the irradiation damage was 13.8 dpa.

  20. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  1. Austenite Formation Kinetics During Rapid Heating in a Microalloyed Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BURNETT,M.E.; DYKHUIZEN,RONALD C.; KELLEY,J. BRUCE; PUSKAR,JOSEPH D.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.

    1999-09-07

    The model parameters for the normalized 1054V1 material were compared to parameters previously generated for 1026 steel, and the transformation behavior was relatively consistent. Validation of the model predictions by heating into the austenite plus undissolved ferrite phase field and rapidly quenching resulted in reasonable predictions when compared to the measured volume fractions from optical metallography. The hot rolled 1054V1 material, which had a much coarser grain size and a non-equilibrium volume fraction of pearlite, had significantly different model parameters and the on heating transformation behavior of this material was less predictable with the established model. The differences in behavior is consistent with conventional wisdom that normalized micro-structure produce a more consistent response to processing, and it reinforces the need for additional work in this area.

  2. Thermal helium desorption behavior in advanced ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Akihiko; Sugano, R.; Matsushita, Y.; Ukai, S.

    2005-02-01

    Thermal helium desorption measurements were performed to investigate the difference in the helium trapping and accumulation behavior among a reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel and oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) steels after implantation of He+ ions at room temperature. Thermal helium desorption spectra (THDS) were obtained during annealing to 1200 °C at a heating rate of 1 °C/s. The THDS of the ODS steels are very similar to that of the RAF steel, except for the presence of the peak in the temperature range from 800 to 1000 °C, where the α γ transformation related helium desorption from the γ-phase is considered to occur in the 9Cr-ODS martensitic steels. The fraction of helium desorption becomes larger at higher temperatures, and this trend is increased with the amount of implanted helium. In the 9Cr-ODS steels, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration mechanism was smaller than that in the RAF steel. This suggests that the bubble formation was suppressed in the ODS steels. In the 12Cr-ODS steel, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration reached more than 90%, suggesting that the trapping capacity of martensite phase in the 9Cr-ODS steel is rather large.

  3. Fine structure characterization of martensite/austenite constituent in low-carbon low-alloy steel by transmission electron forward scatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Li, C W; Han, L Z; Luo, X M; Liu, Q D; Gu, J F

    2016-11-01

    Transmission electron forward scatter diffraction and other characterization techniques were used to investigate the fine structure and the variant relationship of the martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent of the granular bainite in low-carbon low-alloy steel. The results demonstrated that the M/A constituents were distributed in clusters throughout the bainitic ferrite. Lath martensite was the main component of the M/A constituent, where the relationship between the martensite variants was consistent with the Nishiyama-Wassermann orientation relationship and only three variants were found in the M/A constituent, suggesting that the variants had formed in the M/A constituent according to a specific mechanism. Furthermore, the Σ3 boundaries in the M/A constituent were much longer than their counterparts in the bainitic ferrite region. The results indicate that transmission electron forward scatter diffraction is an effective method of crystallographic analysis for nanolaths in M/A constituents. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Influence of vanadium on static recrystallization in warm worked microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Mateo, C.; Lopez, B.; Rodriguez-Ibabe, J.M.

    1999-12-31

    Warm forging of steels, in the range from 600 to 900 C, offers some important advantages over traditional forging procedures, with a better dimensional accuracy as well as surface quality in comparison with hot forging, and lower flow stress and therefore lower press loads in comparison with cold forging. It is well established that in hot working of V microalloyed steels, the vanadium in solid solution has a little effect on the static recrystallization kinetics between passes. In contrast, if strain induced precipitation takes place the static recrystallization is notably modified. The objective of this work is to study the effects that the application of warm working can have on the austenite static recrystallization process of vanadium microalloyed steels, considering a range of temperatures in which different precipitate volume fractions can remain undissolved in the austenite prior to deformation. The static recrystallization kinetics were determined by stress relaxation tests following the deformation by plain strain compression.

  5. Assessment of microalloying effects on the high temperature fatigue behavior of NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Lerch, B. A.; Rao, K. B. S.

    1995-01-01

    Binary NiAl suffers from a lack of strength and poor creep properties at and above 1000 K. Poor creep resistance in turn affects low cycle fatigue (LCF) lives at low strain ranges due to the additional interactions of creep damage. One approach for improving these properties involved microalloying with either Zr or N. As an integral part of a much larger alloying program the low cycle fatigue behavior of Zr and N doped nickel aluminides produced by extrusion of prealloyed powders has been investigated. Strain controlled LCF tests were performed in air at 1000 K. The influence of these microalloying additions on the fatigue life and cyclic stress response of polycrystalline NiAl are discussed.

  6. Grain boundary structure effects on cold work embrittlement of microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Lehockey, E.M.; Palumbo, G.; Lin, P.

    1998-07-03

    Microalloyed steels (e.g., SAE 1005) used in deep drawing applications can often be susceptible to cold work embrittlement. Although cracks can propagate both intergranularly and transgranularly, initiation is believed to occur intergranularly. Grain boundaries having misorientations described by low-{Sigma} values in the Coincident Site Lattice (CSL) framework are recognized to exhibit increased resistance to sliding, cavitation, and cracking. Increasing the frequency of low-{Sigma}, special grain boundaries has been demonstrated to significantly enhance ductility and toughness in a wide variety of pure metals and alloys. Reduced susceptibility to these intergranular degradation processes arise from the increased structural order expected of low-{Sigma} CSL interfaces and possible reduced interaction with harmful impurities. The intention of the present work is to evaluate the effect of low-{Sigma} CSL boundaries on the nucleation and propagation of cracks during deep-draw forming operations in ultra-low carbon microalloyed steels.

  7. Abnormal grain growth in Eurofer-97 steel in the ferrite phase field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, V. B.; Sandim, H. R. Z.; Raabe, D.

    2017-03-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) Eurofer-97 steel is a candidate material for structural applications in future fusion reactors. Depending on the amount of prior cold rolling strain and annealing temperature, important solid-state softening reactions such as recovery, recrystallization, and grain growth occur. Eurofer-97 steel was cold rolled up to 70, 80 and 90% reductions in thickness and annealed in the ferrite phase field (below ≈ 800 °C). Changes in microstructure, micro-, and mesotexture were followed by orientation mappings provided by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Eurofer-97 steel undergoes abnormal grain growth above 650 °C and this solid-state reaction seems to be closely related to the high mobility of a few special grain boundaries that overcome pinning effects caused by fine particles. This solid-state reaction promotes important changes in the microstructure and microtexture of this steel. Abnormal grain growth kinetics for each condition was determined by means of quantitative metallography.

  8. Effect of solidification rate on microstructure evolution in dual phase microalloyed steel.

    PubMed

    Kostryzhev, A G; Slater, C D; Marenych, O O; Davis, C L

    2016-10-19

    In steels the dependence of ambient temperature microstructure and mechanical properties on solidification rate is not well reported. In this work we investigate the microstructure and hardness evolution for a low C low Mn NbTi-microalloyed steel solidified in the cooling rate range of 1-50 Cs(-1). The maximum strength was obtained at the intermediate solidification rate of 30 Cs(-1). This result has been correlated to the microstructure variation with solidification rate.

  9. Strengthening Mechanisms and Their Relative Contributions to the Yield Strength of Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junfang; Omotoso, Oladipo; Wiskel, J. Barry; Ivey, Douglas G.; Henein, Hani

    2012-09-01

    Microalloyed steels are used widely in oil and gas pipelines. They are a class of high-strength, low-carbon steels that contain small additions (in amounts less than 0.1 wt pct) of Nb, Ti, and/or V. The steels may contain other alloying elements, such as Mo, in amounts exceeding 0.1 wt pct. Precipitation in these steels can be controlled through thermomechanical-controlled processing, leading to precipitates with sizes that range from several microns to a few nanometers. Microalloyed steels have good strength, good toughness, and excellent weldability, which are attributed in part to the presence of the nanosized carbide and carbonitride precipitates. Because of their fine sizes, wide particle size distribution, and low volume fractions, conventional microscopic methods are not satisfactory for quantifying these precipitates. Matrix dissolution is a promising alternative to extract the precipitates for quantification. Relatively large volumes of material can be analyzed so that statistically significant quantities of precipitates of different sizes are collected. In this article, the microstructure features of a series of microalloyed steels (X70, X80, and X100) as well as a Grade 100 steel are characterized using optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A chemical dissolution technique is used to extract the precipitates from the steels. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are combined to analyze the chemical composition of these precipitates. Rietveld refinement of the XRD patterns is used to quantify fully the relative amounts of these precipitates. The size distribution of the nanosized precipitates is quantified using dark-field imaging (DF) in the TEM. The effects of microalloying content, finish rolling temperature (FRT), and coiling temperature (CT)/interrupted cooling temperature (ICT) on the grain size and the amount of nanoprecipitation are discussed. Individual strengthening contributions from grain

  10. Refractory phases synthesis at the surface microalloying using a wide aperture electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, S. V.; Htet Swe, Min

    2017-05-01

    The experimental results prove the ability to realize technology of chemical heat treatment of some materials by surface microalloying using a wide-aperture low-energy high-current electron beam. Such layers were produced due to initiating exothermic chemical self-propagating high-temperature reactions in the thermal explosion mode between the base and the thin film covered on the base. New phase compounds in reaction products were found.

  11. Effect of solidification rate on microstructure evolution in dual phase microalloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostryzhev, A. G.; Slater, C. D.; Marenych, O. O.; Davis, C. L.

    2016-10-01

    In steels the dependence of ambient temperature microstructure and mechanical properties on solidification rate is not well reported. In this work we investigate the microstructure and hardness evolution for a low C low Mn NbTi-microalloyed steel solidified in the cooling rate range of 1-50 Cs-1. The maximum strength was obtained at the intermediate solidification rate of 30 Cs-1. This result has been correlated to the microstructure variation with solidification rate.

  12. Mechanisms of Strength and Toughness in a Microalloyed, Precipitation Hardened Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    steels relate microstructural parameters to yield strength, Ty, ductile-to-brittle impact transition temperature ( DBTT ) and strain to fracture, ef E9...manganese steel , has shown the relationship between grain size and DBTT to be -11Oc per unit increment in da1 / 2 (mm- 1 / 2 ) while each unit increment in...Development Report !IECIIANISMS OF STRENGTH AND TOUGHNESS IN A MICROALLOYED, PRECIPITATION HARDENED STEEL M. E. Natishan sikA Approved for public release

  13. Effect of solidification rate on microstructure evolution in dual phase microalloyed steel

    PubMed Central

    Kostryzhev, A. G.; Slater, C. D.; Marenych, O. O.; Davis, C. L.

    2016-01-01

    In steels the dependence of ambient temperature microstructure and mechanical properties on solidification rate is not well reported. In this work we investigate the microstructure and hardness evolution for a low C low Mn NbTi-microalloyed steel solidified in the cooling rate range of 1–50 Cs−1. The maximum strength was obtained at the intermediate solidification rate of 30 Cs−1. This result has been correlated to the microstructure variation with solidification rate. PMID:27759109

  14. Precipitation in Microalloyed Steel by Model Alloy Experiments and Thermodynamic Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisk, Karin; Borggren, Ulrika

    2016-10-01

    Precipitation in microalloyed steel has been studied by applying thermodynamic calculations based on a description of the Gibbs energies of the individual phases over the full multicomponent composition range. To validate and improve the thermodynamic description, new experimental investigations of the phase separation in the cubic carbides/nitrides/carbonitrides in alloys containing Nb, V, Mo, and Cr, have been performed. Model alloys were designed to obtain equilibrium carbides/carbonitrides that are sufficiently large for measurements of compositions, making it possible to study the partitioning of the elements into different precipitates, showing distinctly different composition sets. The reliability of the calculations, when applied to multicomponent alloys, was tested by comparing with published experimental studies of precipitation in microalloyed steel. It is shown that thermodynamic calculations accurately describe the observed precipitation sequences. Further, they can reproduce several important features of precipitation processes in microalloyed steel such as the partitioning of Mo between matrix and precipitates and the variation of precipitate compositions depending on precipitation temperature.

  15. Microstructural Features Controlling Mechanical Properties in Nb-Mo Microalloyed Steels. Part I: Yield Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isasti, Nerea; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Taheri, Mitra L.; Uranga, Pello

    2014-10-01

    Low carbon Nb-Mo microalloyed steels show interesting synergies between the "micro"-alloying elements when high strength-high toughness properties are required. Strain accumulation in austenite is enhanced, and therefore grain sizes are refined in the final microstructures. The presence of Mo facilitates the presence of non-polygonal phases, and this constituent modification induces an increment in strength through a substructure formation as well as through an increase in the dislocation density. Regarding fine precipitation and its strengthening effect, the mean size of NbC is reduced in the presence of Mo and their fraction increased, thus enhancing their contribution to yield strength. In this paper, a detailed characterization of the microstructural features of a series of microalloyed steels is described using the electron-backscattered diffraction technique. Mean crystallographic unit sizes, a grain boundary misorientation analysis, and dislocation density measurements are performed. Transmission electron microscopy is carried out to analyze the chemical composition of the precipitates and to estimate their volume fraction. In this first part, the contribution of different strengthening mechanisms to yield strength is evaluated and the calculated value is compared to tensile test results for different coiling temperatures and compositions.

  16. Microstructural Features Controlling Mechanical Properties in Nb-Mo Microalloyed Steels. Part II: Impact Toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isasti, Nerea; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Taheri, Mitra L.; Uranga, Pello

    2014-10-01

    The present paper is the final part of a two-part paper where the influence of coiling temperature on the final microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb-Mo microalloyed steels is described. More specifically, this second paper deals with the different mechanisms affecting impact toughness. A detailed microstructural characterization and the relations linking the microstructural parameters and the tensile properties have already been discussed in Part I. Using these results as a starting point, the present work takes a step forward and develops a methodology for consistently incorporating the effect of the microstructural heterogeneity into the existing relations that link the Charpy impact toughness to the microstructure. In conventional heat treatments or rolling schedules, the microstructure can be properly described by its mean attributes, and the ductile-brittle transition temperatures measured by Charpy tests can be properly predicted. However, when different microalloying elements are added and multiphase microstructures are formed, the influences of microstructural heterogeneity and secondary hard phases have to be included in a modified equation in order to accurately predict the DB transition temperature in Nb and Nb-Mo microalloyed steels.

  17. Effect of Mo on dynamic recrystallization and microstructure development of microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schambron, Thomas; Dehghan-Manshadi, Ali; Chen, Liang; Gooch, Taliah; Killmore, Chris; Pereloma, Elena

    2017-07-01

    The dynamic recrystallization (DRX) behaviour, mechanical properties and microstructure development of four low carbon, Nb-Ti-containing micro-alloyed steels with Mo contents from 0 to 0.27 wt% were studied. Plane strain compression tests were performed in a Gleeble 3500 thermomechanical simulator. The effects of composition, deformation temperature and strain rate on the DRX parameters and resultant microstructures were examined. The volume fraction of recrystallised grains was estimated from micrographs and a DRX model. The stress-strain curves showed the typical signs of DRX over a wide range of deformation conditions. Dynamic recovery was only observed for higher strain rates (5 s-1) and/or lower deformation temperatures (below 1000 °C). It was shown that Mo increases the hot strength by around 100 MPa per weight percent. In addition, it has an effect on retarding recrystallization in microalloyed steels by increasing the activation energy for DRX by 320 kJ/molK per weight percent. This was attributed to solute drag and the interaction with other microalloying elements.

  18. An atom probe study of carbon distribution in martensite in 2[1/4]Cr1Mo steel

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, R.C. . Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy); Miller, M.K. . Metals and Ceramics Division)

    1995-01-15

    2[1/4]Cr1Mo steel is used widely for superheater tubing in power plants, and as a filler material for joining [1/2]Cr[1/2]Mo[1/4]V steam piping. Components in power plants can be massive and therefore differences in cooling rates can result in a mixed microstructure of allotriomorphic ferrite, bainite and martensite. The creep strength of the steel is critically dependent on the carbide distribution within the microstructure. The position and nature of carbides within the microstructure is itself a critical function of the movement of carbon through the microstructure during the early stages of tempering. In this paper, atom probe field ion microscopy has been used to examine carbon segregation to lath boundaries in martensite in 2[1/4]Cr1Mo steel. Significant carbon enrichment was observed at the lath boundaries. This enrichment is consistent with the observation of retained austenite films at the lath boundaries in the transmission electron microscope, and with carbon levels previously found in retained austenite in low alloy ferrous martensites.

  19. Hydrogen-induced defects in austenite and ferrite of a duplex steel.

    PubMed

    Głowacka, A; Swiatnicki, W A; Jezierska, E

    2006-09-01

    The influence of hydrogen on the microstructure of two types of austeno-ferritic duplex stainless steel (Cr26-Ni6 model steel and Cr22-Ni5-Mo3 commercial steel), each of them after two thermo-mechanical treatments, was investigated. The aim of this study was to reveal microstructural changes appearing during the hydrogen charging and particularly to clarify the occurrence of phase transformations induced by hydrogen. The specific microstructural changes in the ferrite (alpha) and austenite (gamma) of both types of steel were observed. A strong increase of dislocation density was noticed in the alpha phase. In the case of model steel, longer hydrogen charging times led to significant ferrite grain refinement. In the commercial steel, the strips and twin plates appeared in the ferrite after hydrogenation. The appearance of stacking faults was revealed in the gamma phase. The martensite laths appeared in austenite after longer hydrogenation times. It seems that the microstructural changes gave rise to the formation of microcracks in the alpha and gamma phases as well as on the alpha/gamma interphase boundaries.

  20. Ferritic steels for sodium-cooled fast reactors: Design principles and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2010-09-01

    An overview of the current status of development of ferritic steels for emerging fast reactor technologies is presented in this paper. The creep-resistant 9-12Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are classically known for steam generator applications. The excellent void swelling resistance of ferritic steels enabled the identification of their potential for core component applications of fast reactors. Since then, an extensive knowledge base has been generated by identifying the empirical correlations between chemistry of the steels, heat treatment, structure, and properties, in addition to their in-reactor behavior. A few concerns have also been identified which pertain to high-temperature irradiation creep, embrittlement, Type IV cracking in creep-loaded weldments, and hard zone formation in dissimilar joints. The origin of these problems and the methodologies to overcome the limitations are highlighted. Finally, the suitability of the ferritic steels is re-evaluated in the emerging scenario of the fast reactor technology, with a target of achieving better breeding ratio and improved thermal efficiency.

  1. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Tyburska-Puschel, Beata; Sridharan, K.

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  2. Quench-Condensed Microalloyed Particles: a Microscopic View of Solid Solubility and Metastability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, Vincent Edward

    Solid solubility and metastability in noble-metal and iron-silver alloys have been studied from the perspective of microalloyed particles. Samples were obtained through a novel, gram-scale technique that consisted of cocondensation of two elemental metal vapors with a large excess of inert gas on the reaction surface of a rotating cryostat at 77 K. This technique permitted greater control of both particle size and composition than conventional gas aggregation methods. The chemical and physical characteristics of the microalloys have been elaborated through chemical analysis, x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, temperature-programmed mass spectrometry, EXAFS, XPS and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Electron microscopy indicated the microstructures of copper-gold and copper-silver microalloys prepared in sulfur hexafluoride to consist of discrete collections of crystallites suspended in amorphous "baths". The average dimensions of the crystallites were <100 A, while the aggregates spanned hundreds of nanometers. The microstructures of both systems were metastable. The EXAFS of a copper-silver microalloy showed it to be stiffer, as well as more disordered, than a homometallic copper product. The EXAFS also showed no detectable Cu-Ag contacts, but suggested the existence (through a "missing-atom" effect) of a large number of disordered copper sites. Moessbauer spectra of an iron -silver microalloy prepared in xenon revealed the presence of a superparamagnetic alloy phase characterized by a blocking temperature of approximately 45 K. Cocondensations of iron vapor with excess sulfur hexafluoride produced ultrafine (dimensions ~ 100 A), amorphous particles that were decorated with a -CF_{2^-} polymer. The formation of the polymer was attributed to reaction of the iron with the matrix and adventitious organic compounds--that is, to activation of S-F and C-H bonds. Matrix isolation experiments indicated that, although inert in their ground-state configuration, photoexcited (4p

  3. Investigation of Austenitization in Low Carbon Microalloyed Steel During Continuous Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunabalapandian, Kavitha; Samanta, Santigopal; Ranjan, Ravi; Singh, Shiv Brat

    2017-02-01

    Dilatation associated with the formation of austenite from ferrite-pearlite was calculated from equilibrium phase fraction and composition. Linear thermal expansion coefficient of ferrite required for the calculation was determined by iteration of dilatation data. A good match was obtained between the calculated and experimental dilatation curves. The calculated dilatation data were used to identify the stages of austenite formation: pearlite dissolution followed by ferrite to austenite transformation which is gradual at first before becoming rapid.

  4. Influence of Martensite Fraction on the Stabilization of Austenite in Austenitic-Martensitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiuliang; De Cooman, Bruno C.; Biermann, Horst; Mola, Javad

    2016-05-01

    The influence of martensite fraction ( f α') on the stabilization of austenite was studied by quench interruption below M s temperature of an Fe-13Cr-0.31C (mass pct) stainless steel. The interval between the quench interruption temperature and the secondary martensite start temperature, denoted as θ, was used to quantify the extent of austenite stabilization. In experiments with and without a reheating step subsequent to quench interruption, the variation of θ with f α' showed a transition after transformation of almost half of the austenite. This trend was observed regardless of the solution annealing temperature which influenced the martensite start temperature. The transition in θ was ascribed to a change in the type of martensite nucleation sites from austenite grain and twin boundaries at low f α' to the faults near austenite-martensite (A-M) boundaries at high f α'. At low temperatures, the local carbon enrichment of such boundaries was responsible for the enhanced stabilization at high f α'. At high temperatures, relevant to the quenching and partitioning processing, on the other hand, the pronounced stabilization at high f α' was attributed to the uniform partitioning of the carbon stored at A-M boundaries into the austenite. Reduction in the fault density of austenite served as an auxiliary stabilization mechanism at high temperatures.

  5. Effect of Strain-Induced Age Hardening on Yield Strength Improvement in Ferrite-Austenite Duplex Lightweight Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hyejin; Lee, Seok Gyu; Sohn, Seok Su; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-11-01

    Ferrite-austenite lightweight steels showing TRansformation-induced plasticity were developed by varying the aging temperature with or without prestraining, and their effects on tensile properties were investigated in relation with microstructural evolution of carbide formation. The aged steels contained austenite, pearlite, and martensite in the ferrite matrix, and the austenite volume fraction decreased with the increasing aging temperature because some austenite grains decomposed to pearlites. This austenite decomposition to pearlite was favorable for the improvement of yield strength, but negatively influenced overall tensile properties. The prestraining promoted the austenite decomposition by a diffusion-controlled phase transformation, and changed the morphology of the cementite from a long lamellar shape to a densely agglomerated particle shape. In order to obtain the large increase in yield strength as well as excellent combination of strength and ductility, the strain-induced aging treatment, i.e., prestraining followed by aging, is important like in the prestrained and 673 K (400 °C)-aged steel. This large increase in yield strength, in spite of a reduction of elongation (65 to 43 pct), was basically attributed to an appropriate amount of decomposition of austenite to pearlite ( e.g., 4 vol pct), while having sufficient austenite to martensite transformation ( e.g., 14.5 vol pct martensite).

  6. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  7. Martensitic transformations in laser processed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, M. van den; De Hosson, J.T.M. . Dept. of Applied Physics)

    1993-09-01

    This paper concentrates on laser coating of Fe-22 wt% Cr and a duplex steel SAF2205 by injecting Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] powder into the melt pool. In particular the work focuses on the stabilization of high temperature distorted spinel phases due to the high quench rates involved as well as on the a quantitative crystallographic analysis of the resulting morphologies. The microstructure observed in TEM indicates that the material does not solidify in the distorted spinel structure. The presence of a small amount of cubic (Fe, Cr)-spinel suggests that the distorted spinel in fact might be nucleated from the cubic spinel phase. The plate like morphology of the distorted spinel phase in combination with the twinned internal structure of the plates put forward the idea that the transformation might be martensitic. Martensitic calculations executed with the lattice parameters of the cubic and distorted (Fe, Cr)-spinel phases are in excellent agreement with the experimental data confirming that the transformation might be martensitic indeed.

  8. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. J.; Chathoth, S. M.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-09-28

    Extensive efforts have been made to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. In this work, we have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Our results indicate that atomic caging is the primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.

  9. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, C. J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; ...

    2015-09-28

    We've made extensive efforts to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. We have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Finally, our results indicate that atomic caging is themore » primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.« less

  10. Quantitative evaluation of dynamic precipitation kinetics in a complex Nb-Ti-V microalloyed steel using electrical resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae-Gil; Bae, Jin-Ho; Lee, Young-Kook

    2013-09-01

    The kinetics of dynamic precipitation in austenite of a complex Nb-Ti-V microalloyed steel during hot compression at 900 °C with a strain rate of 6.7 s-1 was quantitatively investigated through electrical resistivity measurements. The dynamic precipitation in the Nb-Ti-V microalloyed steel started at a strain of 0.15. The amount of tiny Nb-rich (Nb,Ti,V)C carbides, which were precipitated at crystal defects gradually increased up to 0.02 wt% at a maximum strain of 0.67. The electrical resistivity was successfully applied to the quantitative evaluation of dynamic precipitation kinetics in microalloyed steel by excluding the effects of crystal defects and interstitial atoms on the electrical resistivity.

  11. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; Wang, W. H.; Chathoth, S. M.

    2015-09-28

    We've made extensive efforts to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. We have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Finally, our results indicate that atomic caging is the primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.

  12. Acoustic emission and shape memory effect in the martensitic transformation.

    PubMed

    Sreekala, S; Ananthakrishna, G

    2003-04-04

    Acoustic emission signals are known to exhibit a high degree of reproducibility in time and show correlations with the growth and shrinkage of martensite domains when athermal martensites are subjected to repeated thermal cycling in a restricted temperature range. We show that a recently introduced two dimensional model for the martensitic transformation mimics these features. We also show that these features are related to the shape memory effect where near full reversal of morphological features are seen under these thermal cycling conditions.

  13. Transformation temperatures of martensite in beta phase nickel aluminide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Resistivity and thermal arrest measurements determined that the compositional dependence of Ms (martensite state) temperatures for NiAl martensite was linear between 60 and 69 atomic percent nickel, with Ms = 124 Ni - 7410 K. Resistivity and surface relief experiments indicated the presence of thermoelastic martensite for selected alloys. Some aspects of the transformation were studied by hot stage microscopy and related to the behavior observed for alloys exhibiting the shape-memory effect.

  14. Drastic influence of minor Fe or Co additions on the glass forming ability, martensitic transformations and mechanical properties of shape memory Zr-Cu-Al bulk metallic glass composites.

    PubMed

    González, Sergio; Pérez, Pablo; Rossinyol, Emma; Suriñach, Santiago; Dolors Baró, Maria; Pellicer, Eva; Sort, Jordi

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of Zr48Cu48 - x Al4M x (M ≡ Fe or Co, x = 0, 0.5, 1 at.%) metallic glass (MG) composites are highly dependent on the amount of Fe or Co added as microalloying elements in the parent Zr48Cu48Al4 material. Addition of Fe and Co promotes the transformation from austenite to martensite during the course of nanoindentation or compression experiments, resulting in an enhancement of plasticity. However, the presence of Fe or Co also reduces the glass forming ability, ultimately causing a worsening of the mechanical properties. Owing to the interplay between these two effects, the compressive plasticity for alloys with x = 0.5 (5.5% in Zr48Cu47.5Al4Co0.5 and 6.2% in Zr48Cu47.5Al4Fe0.5) is considerably larger than for Zr48Cu48Al4 or the alloys with x = 1. Slight variations in the Young's modulus (around 5-10%) and significant changes in the yield stress (up to 25%) are also observed depending on the composition. The different microstructural factors that have an influence on the mechanical behavior of these composites are investigated in detail: (i) co-existence of amorphous and crystalline phases in the as-cast state, (ii) nature of the crystalline phases (austenite versus martensite content), and (iii) propensity for the austenite to undergo a mechanically-driven martensitic transformation during plastic deformation. Evidence for intragranular nanotwins likely generated in the course of the austenite-martensite transformation is provided by transmission electron microscopy. Our results reveal that fine-tuning of the composition of the Zr-Cu-Al-(Fe,Co) system is crucial in order to optimize the mechanical performance of these bulk MG composites, to make them suitable materials for structural applications.

  15. Effect of irradiation temperature on microstructure of ferritic-martensitic ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Jäntsch, U.; Möslang, A.

    2017-09-01

    The EUROFER-ODS alloy with 0.5% Y2O3 was neutron irradiated with doses up to 16.2 dpa at 250 °C, 350 °C and 450 °C. The radiation induced changes in the microstructure (e.g. dislocation loops and voids) were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The number density of radiation induced defects was found to be significantly lower than in EUROFER 97 irradiated at the same conditions. It was found that the appearance and extent of radiation damage strongly depend not only on the irradiation temperature but also on the local number density and size distribution of ODS particles. The higher number density of dislocation loops and voids was found in the local areas with low number density of ODS particles. The interstitial loops with Burgers vector of both ½<111> and <100> types were detected by imaging using different diffraction conditions.

  16. Low temperature embrittlement behaviour of different ferritic-martensitic alloys for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieth, M.; Dafferner, B.

    1996-10-01

    In the last few years a lot of different low activation CrWVTa steels have been developed world-wide. Without irradiation some of these alloys show clearly a better low temperature embrittlement behaviour than commercial CrNiMoV(Nb) alloys. Within the MANITU project a study was carried out to compare, prior to the irradiation program, the embrittlement behaviour of different alloys in the unirradiated condition performing instrumented Charpy impact bending tests with sub-size specimens. The low activation materials (LAM) considered were different OPTIFER alloys (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe), F82H (JAERI), 9Cr2WVTa (ORNL), and GA3X (PNL). The modified commercial 10-11% CrNiMoVNb steels were MANET and OPTIMAR. A meaningful comparison between these alloys could be drawn, since the specimens of all materials were manufactured and tested under the same conditions.

  17. Tritium permeation experiments using reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel tube and erbium oxide coating

    SciTech Connect

    Takumi Chikada; Masashi Shimada; Robert Pawelko; Takayuki Terai; Takeo Muroga

    2013-09-01

    Low concentration tritium permeation experiments have been performed on uncoated F82H and Er2O3-coated tubular samples in the framework of the Japan-US TITAN collaborative program. Tritium permeability of the uncoated sample with 1.2 ppm tritium showed one order of magnitude lower than that with 100% deuterium. The permeability of the sample with 40 ppm tritium was more than twice higher than that of 1.2 ppm, indicating a surface contribution at the lower tritium concentration. The Er2O3-coated sample showed two orders of magnitude lower permeability than the uncoated sample, and lower permeability than that of the coated plate sample with 100% deuterium. It was also indicated that the memory effect of ion chambers in the primary and secondary circuits was caused by absorption of tritiated water vapor that was generated by isotope exchange reactions between tritium and surface water on the coating.

  18. Boron effect on the microstructure of 9% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenkov, M.; Materna-Morris, E.; Möslang, A.

    2015-07-01

    The microstructure of reduces-activation 9Cr-WTaV steel alloyed with 83 and 1160 wt. ppm 10B was detailed analysed using transmission electron microscopy. The influence of boron content on the precipitation behaviour of M23C6 and MX (VN and TaC) phases and, hence, on the formation process of steel's grain and lath structure was studied. VN precipitates, which play an important role in the stabilisation of the lath structure, exhibit most sensitive reaction on presence of boron. Their spatial density significantly reduces in the alloy with 83 ppm boron. In the steel with 1160 wt. ppm boron, no formation of VN was detected, whereas TaC particles precipitate at the lath and grain boundaries. These changes in the structure stabilisation mechanism lead to an increasing lath width and a decreasing thermal stability of laths and grains. Analytical investigations of several BN particles reveal their complex multi-phase structure and allow conclusions to be drawn with respect to their precipitation sequence.

  19. Diffusion Couple Alloying of Refractory Metals in Austenitic and Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    raised in the samples, the main mode was dislocation channeling [8]. b. Irradiation -Induced Precipitation and Grain Boundary Segregation In materials...centered Cubic FIB Focused Ion Beam HTGR High Temperature Gas Reactor IASCC Irradiation -assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking LMFBR Liquid Metal Fast...displacements per atom (dpa) (From [8]). Observations on irradiated austenitic steel determined that two deformation modes were present: dislocation

  20. New nano-particle-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels by conventional thermo-mechanical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Hashimoto, N.; Maziasz, P. J.

    2007-08-01

    For increased fusion power plant efficiency, steels for operation at 650 °C and higher are sought. Based on the science of precipitate strengthening, a thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT) was developed that increased the strength from room temperature to 700 °C of commercial nitrogen-containing steels and new steels designed for the TMT. At 700 °C increases in yield stress of 80 and 200% were observed for a commercial steel and a new steel, respectively, compared to commercial normalized-and-tempered steels. Creep-rupture strength was similarly improved. Depending on the TMT, precipitates were up to eight-times smaller at a number density four orders of magnitude greater than those in a conventionally heat treated steel of similar composition.

  1. Interaction between multi-component lanthanide alloy and ferritic-martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Hwan; Cheon, Jin Sik; Kim, June Hyung; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Chan Bock

    2014-09-01

    Studies were carried out to evaluate the effect of lanthanide elements which are generated during the fission process on the interaction between metal fuel and cladding material. Quartenary lanthanide alloy as Nd-Ce-Pr-La and Sm-contained quintenary alloy were manufactured by vacuum arc remelting and a diffusion couple test with HT9 (12Cr1MoWV) alloy was carried out at 660 and 700 °C for up to 231 h followed by microstructural analysis. The results showed that interdiffusion between lanthanide element (Nd, Ce) and Fe took place as the diffusion couple test proceeds to form intermetallic compounds as an RE2(Fe,Cr)17 (RE=Nd, Ce, Pr, La) type. As the number of alloying elements increased, the reaction layer thickness increased, but a deviation of the theoretical non-linear relationship as well as an increase in the rate exponent occurred. Instantaneous diffusion of Fe into a lanthanide side and its associated Fe depletion beneath the interface acted as the major driving force in forming the reaction layer. The addition of Ce enhanced the Nd diffusion and increased the layer growth when compared to pure Nd alone.

  2. Onset of plasticity of helium-implanted ferritic/martensitic steels during nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Siwei; Wang, Yongming; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-07-01

    The onset of plasticity during nanoindentation is a new method to investigate the irradiation damage of structural materials in fission and fusion reactors. In this paper, nanoindentation experiment was carried out to helium implanted F82H-IEA and nano-sized oxide dispersion strengthened F82H-ODS steels for studying the elastic-plastic transition at a constant loading rate. The onset of plasticity shifted after helium implantation. By a statistical thermal activation model, activation volume was extracted to discuss the strength of barrier for dislocation motion. The results reveal an increase in the pinning force and number density of effective obstacles for dislocation motion in He-implanted F82H-IEA, and a decrease in the local pinning force without changing the density of effective obstacles in He-implanted F82H-ODS.

  3. Development of Advanced Ods Ferritic Steels for Fast Reactor Fuel Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.

    Recent progress of the 9CrODS steel development is presented focusing on their microstructure control to improve sufficient high-temperature strength as well as cladding manufacturing capability. The martensitic 9CrODS steel is primarily candidate cladding materials for the Generation IV fast reactor fuel. They are the attractive composite-like materials consisting of the hard residual ferrite and soft tempered martensite, which are able to be easily controlled by α-γ phase transformation. The residual ferrite containing extremely nanosized oxide particles leads to significantly improved creep rupture strength in 9CrODS cladding. The creep strength stability at extended time of 60,000 h at 700 ºC is ascribed to the stable nanosized oxide particles. It was also reviewed that 9CrODS steel has well irradiation stability and fuel pin irradiation test was conducted up to 12 at% burnup and 51 dpa at the cladding temperature of 700ºC.

  4. Diffusion bonding between ODS ferritic steel and F82H steel for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Byungjun; Kasada, Ryuta; Kimura, Akihiko

    2012-07-01

    Diffusion bonding techniques were employed to join high Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel (Fe-15Cr-2W-0.2Ti-0.35Y2O3) and F82H steel under uni-axial hydrostatic pressure using a high vacuum hot press, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were investigated. The dissimilar joints were bonded by solid-state diffusion bonding (SSDB) and liquid phase diffusion bonding (LPDB). After bonding process, heat treatments were conducted to utilize the phase transformation of F82H steel for recovering the martensitic structure. Tensile tests with miniaturized specimens were carried out to investigate and compare the bonding strengths of each joint. Microstructure was observed for the bonding interface, and fracture mode was investigated after the tensile tests. LPDB joint of interfacial F82H steel fully recovered to martensite phase by post-joining heat treatments, while SSDB joint had ferrite phases at the interface even after heat treatment, which is considered to be due to decarburization of F82H steel during the bonding process. Therefore it is considered that the insert material plays a role as diffusion barrier of carbon during LPDB process. Microstructure observations and tensile tests of the joints revealed that the LPDB joints possess suitable tensile properties which are comparable to that of F82H steel. This indicates that LPDB is more promising method to bond ODS-FS and F82H steel than SSDB.

  5. Ferrite attenuator modulation improves antenna performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, J. C.; Larson, S. G.; Shorkley, F. H.; Williams, B. T.

    1970-01-01

    Ferrite attenuator inserted into appropriate waveguide reduces the gain of the antenna element which is causing interference. Modulating the ferrite attenuator to change the antenna gain at the receive frequency permits ground tracking until the antenna is no longer needed.

  6. The isothermal decomposition of austenite in hot-rolled microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooks, M. J.; Chilton, J. M.

    1984-06-01

    The isothermal decomposition of austenite has been examined in a set of 0.1 C, 1.4 Mn steels containing small amounts of Ti, V, or Nb. The volume fraction of ferrite was measured as a function of transformation temperature and holding time, after hot rolling. Precipitation of carbonitrides, in both the austenite and the ferrite, was examined by electron microscopy of extraction replicas. The decomposition is slowest in the Nb-alloyed steel, in which the start of transformation is delayed and ferrite growth rates are much lower than in the other steels. In the V-alloyed steels, ferrite growth rates are lower than in the plain carbon or Ti alloyed steels. These results are discussed in terms of the effects of carbonitride precipitation in the austenite during high temperature deformation and in the ferrite during transformation. The roles of V and Nb in solution are also considered.

  7. Effect of ferrite on cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nadezhdin, A.; Cooper, K. ); Timbers, G. . Kraft Pulp Division)

    1994-09-01

    Premature failure of stainless steel castings in bleach washing service is attributed to poor casting quality high porosity and to a high ferrite content, which makes the castings susceptible to corrosion by hot acid chloride solutions. A survey of the chemical compositions and ferrite contents of corrosion-resistant castings in bleach plants at three pulp mills found high [delta]-ferrite levels in the austenitic matrix due to the improper balance between austenite and ferrite stabilizers.

  8. Effect of Alloy Composition, Surface Preparation and Exposure Conditions on the Selective Oxidation Behavior of Ferritic Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-X Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, G H; Mu, N; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Piron Abellan, J; Olszewski, T; Quadakkers, W J; Holcomb, G R

    2010-09-01

    Abstract Selective oxidation behavior of ferritic martensitic Fe–Cr base alloys, exposed in various atmospheres containing combinations of O2, CO2, and H2O, were studied at various temperatures relevant to oxy-fuel combustion. This paper begins with a discussion of the required Cr content to form a continuous external chromia scale on a simple binary Fe–Cr alloy exposed in oxygen or air based on experiments and calculations using the classic Wagner model. Then, the effects of the exposure environment and Cr content on the selective oxidation of Fe–Cr alloys are evaluated. Finally, the effects produced by alloying additions of Si, commonly present in various groups of commercially available ferritic steels, are described. The discussion compares the oxide scale formation on simple binary and ternary Fe–Cr base model alloys with that on several commercially available ferritic steels.

  9. Microstructure and high temperature properties of the dissimilar weld between ferritic stainless steel and carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Kil; Hong, Seung Gab; Kang, Ki Bong; Kang, Chung Yun

    2009-10-01

    Dissimilar joints between STS441, a ferritic stainless steel, and SS400, a carbon steel, were welded by GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) using STS430LNb as a welding wire. The fracture behavior of the dissimilar weld was analyzed by a microstructural observation and thermo-mechanical tests. Martensite was formed at the region between SS400 and the weld metal because the Cr and Nb content in this region decreased due to the dilution of SS400 carbon steel during welding. According to results from a high temperature tensile test with a specimen aged at 900 °C, it was found that the tensile strength of the dissimilar weld at high temperature was equal to that of STS441 base metal and the formation of martensite had little influence on tensile strength of the dissimilar weld at high temperature. However, in the case of thermal fatigue resistance, the dissimilar weld had an inferior thermal fatigue life to STS441 because of the presence of martensite and the softened region around the interface between the dissimilar weld metal and SS400.

  10. Processing and application of nanosized ferrite powders

    SciTech Connect

    Drofenik, M.; Rozman, M.

    1995-09-01

    Crystalline MnZn ferrite of nanosize was prepared by the hydrothermal synthesis. The pH value of the starting suspension was found to influence substantially the ferrite composition. The nanosized ferrite powder is very sensitive to oxidation and sinters to nearly theoretical density in nitrogen. The correlation between the eddy-current loss and microstructure is given.

  11. Deformation Twinning in Nb-Microalloyed Fe-Mn-C-Al Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Eui Pyo; Kim, Dae Young; Park, Hyun Kyeong

    2017-09-01

    Work hardening and deformation twinning in microalloyed Fe-Mn-C-Al twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel with Nb were investigated in this study, and it was found that the addition of Nb affected the work-hardening behavior of TWIP steel. Moreover, the quantitative characterization of twinning was performed on the deformed microstructure by electron backscattering diffraction analysis, and the results indicate that the addition of Nb causes a reduction in twinning kinetics. The decrease in deformation twinning in TWIP steel with added Nb can be attributed to the effect of fine grain, dislocations in non-recrystallized grains, and the formation of twins on a particular grain orientation.

  12. The effect of microalloying additions on the tensile properties of polycrystalline NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Behbehani, M. K.

    1992-01-01

    The presently evaluated 0.1 at. pct Fe and Ga additions to NiAl, while beneficial in the case of monocrystalline NiAl ductility, does not improve ductility in the polycrystalline case; it also has little effect on tensile properties. A similar microalloying addition of Zr, by contrast, significantly depressed the tensile ductility of NiAl, and nearly doubled the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature (BDTT). The dependence of tensile properties on temperature was in all cases similar; tensile elongations remained low and constant until the BDTT was reached, and then dramatically increased.

  13. Effect of the conditions of REM microalloying of steel on the corrosion activity of nonmetallic inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movenko, D. A.; Kotel'nikov, G. I.; Pavlov, A. V.; Bytsenko, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental heats of low-alloy steel are performed under various conditions of rare-earth metal microalloying and aluminum and calcium deoxidation. Electron-probe microanalysis of nonmetallic inclusions and a metallographic investigation of a metal are used to show that, when interacting with water, nonmetallic cerium oxide inclusions do not form hydrates and, correspondingly, are not aggressive. When aluminum, calcium, and cerium additions are sequentially introduced into a melt, a continuous cerium oxide shell forms on calcium aluminates, protects corrosive nonmetallic inclusions against interaction with water, and weakens local metal corrosion.

  14. Optimisation of specimen temperature and pulse fraction in atom probe microscopy experiments on a microalloyed steel.

    PubMed

    Yao, L; Cairney, J M; Zhu, C; Ringer, S P

    2011-05-01

    This paper details the effects of systematic changes to the experimental parameters for atom probe microscopy of microalloyed steels. We have used assessments of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), compositional measurements and field desorption images to establish the optimal instrumental parameters. These corresponded to probing at the lowest possible temperature (down to 20K) with the highest possible pulse fraction (up to 30%). A steel containing a fine dispersion of solute atom clusters was used as an archetype to demonstrate the importance of running the atom probe at optimum conditions.

  15. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  16. Small high directivity ferrite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. M. B.

    A centimeter-wavelength antenna of millimetric dimensions, which uses the intrinsic angular sensitivity of ferrites, is described, with an emphasis on the modification of the material's permeability. The construction of both the ferrite film lens antenna and the ferrite film cassegrain antenna are detailed; both can be devised in a number of configurations for appropriate beam positioning and rf filtering. The antenna design, discussed primarily in the context of smart missiles, electronic warfare, and satellite systems, presents the possibility of magnetically switching between the transmit and receive modes within the antenna structure itself. Finally, it is noted that for a simple 2-dipole array the angular resolution can be two orders of magnitude higher than with the conventional techniques.

  17. High power ferrite microwave switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardash, I.; Roschak, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    A high power ferrite microwave switch was developed along with associated electronic driver circuits for operation in a spaceborne high power microwave transmitter in geostationary orbit. Three units were built and tested in a space environment to demonstrate conformance to the required performance characteristics. Each unit consisted of an input magic-tee hybrid, two non-reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifters, an out short-slot 3 db quadrature coupler, a dual driver electronic circuit, and input logic interface circuitry. The basic mode of operation of the high power ferrite microwave switch is identical to that of a four-port, differential phase shift, switchable circulator. By appropriately designing the phase shifters and electronic driver circuits to operate in the flux-transfer magnetization mode, power and temperature insensitive operation was achieved. A list of the realized characteristics of the developed units is given.

  18. Atomic force microscopy applied to the quantification of nano-precipitates in thermo-mechanically treated microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Renteria-Borja, Luciano; Hurtado-Delgado, Eduardo; Garnica-Gonzalez, Pedro; Dominguez-Lopez, Ivan; Garcia-Garcia, Adrian Luis

    2012-07-15

    Quantification of nanometer-size precipitates in microalloyed steels has been traditionally performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in spite of its complicated sample preparation procedures, prone to preparation errors and sample perturbation. In contrast to TEM procedures, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is performed on the as-prepared specimen, with sample preparation requirements similar to those for optical microscopy (OM), rendering three-dimensional representations of the sample surface with vertical resolution of a fraction of a nanometer. In AFM, contrast mechanisms are directly related to surface properties such as topography, adhesion, and stiffness, among others. Chemical etching was performed using 0.5% nital, at time intervals between 4 and 20 s, in 4 s steps, until reaching the desired surface finish. For the present application, an average surface-roughness peak-height below 200 nm was sought. Quantification results of nanometric precipitates were obtained from the statistical analysis of AFM images of the microstructure developed by microalloyed Nb and V-Mo steels. Topography and phase contrast AFM images were used for quantification. The results obtained using AFM are consistent with similar TEM reports. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We quantified nanometric precipitates in Nb and V-Mo microalloyed steels using AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures of the thermo-mechanically treated microalloyed steels were used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Topography and phase contrast AFM images were used for quantification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AFM results are comparable with traditionally obtained TEM measurements.

  19. Effect of Heat Treatment, Pre-stress and Surface Hardening on Fracture Toughness of Micro-Alloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag Chaudhury, Joydeb

    2014-01-01

    Micro-alloyed steels are being increasingly accepted by industry in various fields of application and are available with a wide variety of microstructures. Extensive literature is available on their microstructure-property relationships. The superior mechanical properties of micro-alloyed steels are caused by fine-grained microstructures and precipitation of micro-alloying elements such as V, Ti and Nb that led to an improvement in yield strength, in the product of tensile strength and total elongation and in Charpy V-notch impact energy as well. The microstructural changes caused by heat treatment or residual stress state caused by surface hardening or mechanical means may influence the fracture toughness of these micro-alloyed steels. It is in this context that the present work begins with experimental determination of quasi-static initiation fracture toughness ( J 1c) of low carbon (0.19%) micro-alloyed steel in as-rolled condition without any heat treatment. The study further explores the effect of normalizing, shot-peening and cyaniding followed by shot-peening on fracture toughness of as-rolled steel under study. The normalizing heat treatment, shot-peening and cyaniding followed by shot-peening—each indicates a positive influence on initiation fracture toughness. Results, when compared, show that cyaniding followed by shot-peening have led to a 2.7 times increase in J 1c. Cyaniding followed by shot-peening may therefore be considered as having the most positive influence on initiation fracture toughness in as-rolled condition for the type of micro-alloyed steel under study. Although initiation fracture toughness is in general known to decrease with increase in yield strength in LEFM arena, the micro-alloyed steel under study when normalized displayed simultaneous improvement in yield strength and J 1c. All these observed effects of normalizing, shot-peening and cyaniding on initiation fracture toughness (elastic-plastic fracture mechanics) were explained

  20. RF cavities with transversely biased ferrite tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, W.R.; Brophy, T.G.; Carlini, R.D.; Friedrichs, C.C.; Grisham, D.L.; Spalek, G.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1985-10-01

    Earley et al. suggested that ferrite tuned rf cavities have lower ferrite power dissipation if the ferrite bias field is perpendicular rather than parallel to the rf magnetic field. A 50-84 MHz cavity has been constructed in which ferrite can be biased either way. Low power measurements of six microwave ferrites show that the magnetic Q's of these ferrites under perpendicular bias are much higher than under parallel bias, and that the high Q region extends over a much wider range of rf permeability. TDK Y-5 ferrite was found to have a magnetic Q of 10,800, 4,800, 1,200 and 129 at rf permeabilities of 1.2, 2.4, 3.7 and 4.5, respectively. Measurements of perpendicularly biased ferrite at various power levels were made in a coaxial line cavity. The Q of Y-5 ferrite was found to decrease by less than a factor of 2 as the power density in the ferrite was increased to 1.3 W/cmT. A cavity design for a 6 GeV, high current, rapid cycling synchrotron using transversely biased ferrite tuning is described.

  1. Effect of microalloying elements on the Cube texture formation of Fe48%Ni alloy tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ateba Betanda, Y.; Helbert, A.-L.; Brisset, F.; Mathon, M.-H.; Waeckerlé, T.; Baudin, T.

    2015-04-01

    The effect of microalloying elements sulfur and niobium was studied in Fe48%Ni sheets on the first stages of nucleation and on recrystallization. It was shown that the addition of sulfur promotes the formation of Cube grains while the addition of niobium prevents the Cube grains formation. Regarding sulfur, it combines with manganese which is an inhibitor of recrystallization to form the MnS precipitates. The stored energy difference between Cube component and others components AEoube/other increases when sulfur is added. This stored energy difference which is the main driving energy for Cube grains formation during recrystallization explains the sharpness of the Cube texture when sulfur is added. On the contrary the niobium microalloying element addition prevents the formation of Cube grains. This could be explained by the fact that stored energy of cold-rolled components decreases with the addition of niobium and thus decreases Cube grains fraction when niobium is added. In order to explain these results, the development of Cube texture during recrystallization has been investigated in detail by EBSD, furthermore, the effect of stored energy has been studied by carrying out neutron diffraction measurements on the deformed states.

  2. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1997-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved.

  3. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated {approximately}400 C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1998-03-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400 C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400 C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  4. Microstructure and mechanical properties of China low activation martensitic steel joint by TIG multi-pass welding with a new filler wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bo; Zhang, Junyu; Wu, Qingsheng

    2017-07-01

    Tungsten Inner Gas (TIG) welding is employed for joining of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel. A new filler wire was proposed, and the investigation on welding with various heat input and welding passes were conducted to lower the tendency towards the residual of δ ferrite in the joint. With the optimized welding parameters, a butt joint by multi-pass welding with the new filler wire was prepared to investigate the microstructure and mechanical properties. The microstructure of the joint was observed by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hardness, Charpy impact and tensile tests of the joint were implemented at room temperature (25 °C). The results revealed that almost full martensite free from ferrite in the joints were obtained by multipass welding with the heat input of 2.26 kJ/mm. A certain degree of softening occurred at the heat affected zone of the joint according to the results of tensile and hardness tests. The as welded joints showed brittle fracture in the impact tests. However, the joints showed toughness fracture after tempering and relatively better comprehensive performance were achieved when the joints were tempered at 740 °C for 2 h.

  5. A STUDY OF FERRITE CAVITY.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO, Y.

    2002-04-19

    This note addresses the general concerns for the design of a ferrite cavity. The parameters are specified for the RCMS, for which the frequency ramp is in the range of 1.27 MHz to 6.44 MHz, or a ratio of 1:5.

  6. Twinning and martensite in a 304 austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Li, Xi; Sun, Xin; Wang, Y. D.; Zuo, Liang

    2012-08-30

    The microstructure characteristics and deformation behavior of 304L stainless steel during tensile deformation at two different strain rates have been investigated by means of interrupted tensile tests, electron-backscatter-diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The volume fractions of transformed martensite and deformation twins at different stages of the deformation process were measured using X-ray diffraction method and TEM observations. It is found that the volume fraction of martensite monotonically increases with increasing strain but decreases with increasing strain rate. On the other hand, the volume fraction of twins increases with increasing strain for strain level less than 57%. Beyond that, the volume fraction of twins decreases with increasing strain. Careful TEM observations show that stacking faults (SFs) and twins preferentially occur before the nucleation of martensite. Meanwhile, both {var_epsilon}-martensite and {alpha}{prime}-martensite are observed in the deformation microstructures, indicating the co-existence of stress induced- transformation and strain-induced-transformation. We also discussed the effects of twinning and martensite transformation on work-hardening as well as the relationship between stacking faults, twinning and martensite transformation.

  7. Refinement of Ferrite Grain Size near the Ultrafine Range by Multipass, Thermomechanical Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S.; Neogy, S.; Kumar, Vinod; Chakrabarti, D.; Haldar, A.

    2012-11-01

    Plane-strain compression testing was carried out on a Nb-Ti-V microalloyed steel, in a GLEEBLE3500 simulator using a different amount of roughing, intermediate, and finishing deformation over the temperature range of 1373 K to 1073 K (1100 °C to 800 °C). A decrease in soaking temperature from 1473 K to 1273 K (1200 °C to 1000 °C) offered marginal refinement in the ferrite ( α) grain size from 7.8 to 6.6 μm. Heavy deformation using multiple passes between A e3 and A r3 with true strain of 0.8 to 1.2 effectively refined the α grain size (4.1 to 3.2 μm) close to the ultrafine size by dynamic-strain-induced austenite ( γ) → ferrite ( α) transformation (DSIT). The intensities of microstructural banding, pearlite fraction in the microstructure (13 pct), and fraction of the harmful "cube" texture component (5 pct) were reduced with the increase in finishing deformation. Simultaneously, the fractions of high-angle (>15 deg misorientation) boundaries (75 to 80 pct), beneficial gamma-fiber (ND//<111>) texture components, along with {332}<133> and {554}<225> components were increased. Grain refinement and the formation of small Fe3C particles (50- to 600-nm size) increased the hardness of the deformed samples (184 to 192 HV). For the same deformation temperature [1103 K (830 °C)], the difference in α-grain sizes obtained after single-pass (2.7 μm) and multipass compression (3.2 μm) can be explained in view of the static- and dynamic-strain-induced γ → α transformation, strain partitioning between γ and α, dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization of the deformed α, and α-grain growth during interpass intervals.

  8. Effect of shot peening on the residual stress and mechanical behaviour of low-temperature and high-temperature annealed martensitic gear steel 18CrNiMo7-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, R.; Zhang, X.; Mallipeddi, D.; Angelou, N.; Toftegaard, H. L.; Li, Y.; Ahlström, J.; Lorentzen, L.; Wu, G.; Huang, X.

    2017-07-01

    A martensitic gear steel (18CrNiMo7-6) was annealed at 180 °C for 2h and at ∼ 750 °C for 1h to design two different starting microstructures for shot peening. One maintains the original as-transformed martensite while the other contains irregular-shaped sorbite together with ferrite. These two materials were shot peened using two different peening conditions. The softer sorbite + ferrite microstructure was shot peened using 0.6 mm conditioned cut steel shots at an average speed of 25 m/s in a conventional shot peening machine, while the harder tempered martensite steel was shot peened using 1.5 mm steel shots at a speed of 50 m/s in an in-house developed shot peening machine. The shot speeds in the conventional shot peening machine were measured using an in-house lidar set-up. The microstructure of each sample was characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy, and the mechanical properties examined by microhardness and tensile testing. The residual stresses were measured using an Xstress 3000 G2R diffractometer equipped with a Cr Kα x-ray source. The correspondence between the residual stress profile and the gradient structure produced by shot peening, and the relationship between the microstructure and strength, are analyzed and discussed.

  9. Crystallography of lath martensite and stabilization of retained austenite

    SciTech Connect

    Sarikaya. M.

    1982-10-01

    TEM was used to study the morphology and crystallography of lath martensite in low and medium carbon steels in the as-quenched and 200/sup 0/C tempered conditions. The steels have microduplex structures of dislocated lath martensite and continuous thin films of retained austenite at the lath interfaces. Stacks of laths form the packets which are derived from different (111) variants of the same austenite grain. The residual parent austenite enables microdiffraction experiments with small electron beam spot sizes for the orientation relationships (OR) between austenite and martensite. All three most commonly observed ORs, namely Kurdjumov-Sachs, Nishiyama-Wassermann, and Greninger-Troiano, operate within the same sample.

  10. Microstructure and martensitic transformation of Ni-Ti-Pr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunwang; Zhao, Shilei; Jin, Yongjun; Guo, Shaoqiang; Hou, Qingyu

    2017-09-01

    The effect of Pr addition on the microstructure and martensitic transformation behavior of Ni50Ti50- x Pr x ( x = 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9) alloys were investigated experimentally. Results show that the microstructures of Ni-Ti-Pr alloys consist of the NiTi matrix and the NiPr precipitate with the Ti solute. The martensitic transformation start temperature decreases gradually with the increase in Pr fraction. The stress around NiPr precipitates is responsible for the decrease in martensitic transformation temperature with the increase in Pr fraction in Ni-Ti-Pr alloys.

  11. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2015-11-13

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6 carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  12. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2017-01-31

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, copper, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  13. Friction in ferroelastic and martensitic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salje, E. K. H.

    2015-04-01

    Friction during ferroelastic and martensite phase transformations and under external elastic forcing is related to the appearance of jerks as fingerprint for avalanches of moving domain boundaries. It is argued that such avalanches can be observed if the time scale of the experiment is sufficiently long to allow a statistical evaluation and have a time resolution compatible with the characteristic duration of an avalanche. Typical experimental methods include the observation of acoustic emission, resonance elastic spectroscopy, calorimetry, and advanced phonon spectroscopy. The changes of the internal structure of mobile twin boundaries contribute to changes in their mobility and their friction. The local structures of jammed twin boundary patterns are elucidated by computer simulation, their time evolution is similar to that of observed avalanche dynamics.

  14. Cleavage fracture in bainitic and martensitic microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.Z.; Knott, J.F.

    1999-09-29

    This paper addresses the mechanisms of cleavage fracture in the pressure-vessel steel A533B. Microstructures of single bainite microstructures exhibit a higher propensity for brittle cleavage fracture than do those of auto-tempered martensites. The K{sub 1c} values of mixed microstructures are determined by the statistical distribution of the two phases and the range of the values is bounded by limits set by those for the single-phase microstructures. The results are explained in terms of the RKR model, which involves a local cleavage stress {sigma}*{sub F} and a distance ahead of the macrocrack tip, X, as two critical parameters. It is found that the carbides or carbide colonies act as critical microcrack nuclei, and hence play a key role in determining the fracture toughness, although packet boundaries in bainite may give rise to pop-in arrests in displacement-controlled tests.

  15. Laser-based welding of 17-4 PH martensitic stainless steel in a tubular butt joint configuration with a built-in backing bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Junjie; Atabaki, Mehdi Mazar; Liu, Wei; Pillai, Raju; Kumar, Biju; Vasudevan, Unnikrishnan; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-08-01

    Laser-based welding of thick 17-4 precipitation hardening (PH) martensitic stainless steel (SS) plates in a tubular butt joint configuration with a built-in backing bar is very challenging because the porosity and cracks are easily generated in the welds. The backing bar blocked the keyhole opening at the bottom surface through which the entrapped gas could escape, and the keyhole was unstable and collapsed overtime in a deep partially penetrated welding conditions resulting in the formation of pores easily. Moreover, the fast cooling rate prompted the ferrite transform to austenite which induced cracking. Two-pass welding procedure was developed to join 17-4 PH martensitic SS. The laser welding assisted by a filler wire, as the first pass, was used to weld the groove shoulder. The added filler wire could absorb a part of the laser beam energy; resulting in the decreased weld depth-to-width ratio and relieved intensive restraint at the weld root. A hybrid laser-arc welding or a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) was used to fill the groove as the second pass. Nitrogen was introduced to stabilize the keyhole and mitigate the porosity. Preheating was used to decrease the cooling rate and mitigate the cracking during laser-based welding of 17-4 PH martensitic SS plates.

  16. Development of a monolithic ferrite memory array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.; Bhiwandker, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the development and testing of ferrite monolithic memory arrays are presented. This development required the synthesis of ferrite materials having special magnetic and physical characteristics and the development of special processes; (1) for making flexible sheets (laminae) of the ferrite composition, (2) for embedding conductors in ferrite, and (3) bonding ferrite laminae together to form a monolithic structure. Major problems encountered in each of these areas and their solutions are discussed. Twenty-two full-size arrays were fabricated and fired during the development of these processes. The majority of these arrays were tested for their memory characteristics as well as for their physical characteristics and the results are presented. The arrays produced during this program meet the essential goals and demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating monolithic ferrite memory arrays by the processes developed.

  17. Simulation of an Austenite-Twinned-Martensite Interface.

    PubMed

    Kearsley, A J; Melara, L A

    2003-01-01

    Developing numerical methods for predicting microstructure in materials is a large and important research area. Two examples of material microstructures are Austenite and Martensite. Austenite is a microscopic phase with simple crystallographic structure while Martensite is one with a more complex structure. One important task in materials science is the development of numerical procedures which accurately predict microstructures in Martensite. In this paper we present a method for simulating material microstructure close to an Austenite-Martensite interface. The method combines a quasi-Newton optimization algorithm and a nonconforming finite element scheme that successfully minimizes an approximation to the total stored energy near the interface of interest. Preliminary results suggest that the minimizers of this energy functional located by the developed numerical algorithm appear to display the desired characteristics.

  18. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  19. Prediction of yield stress in highly irradiated ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windsor, Colin G.; Cottrell, Geoff; Kemp, Richard

    2008-03-01

    The design of any fusion power plant requires information on the irradiation hardening of low-activation ferritic/martensitic steels beyond the range of most present measurements. Neural networks have been used by Kemp et al (J. Nucl. Mater. 348 311-28) to model the yield stress of some 1811 irradiated alloys. The same dataset has been used in this study, but has been divided into a training set containing the majority of the dataset with low irradiation levels, and a test set which contains just those alloys which have been irradiated above a given level. For example some 4.5% of the alloys were irradiated above 30 displacements per atom. For this 'prediction' problem it is found that simpler networks with fewer inputs are advantageous. By using target-driven dimensionality reduction, linear combinations of the atomic inputs reduce the test residual below that achievable by adding inputs from single atoms. It is postulated that these combinations represent 'mechanisms' for the prediction of irradiated yield stress.

  20. Effects of strain-induced martensite and its reversion on the magnetic properties of AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza Filho, I. R.; Sandim, M. J. R.; Cohen, R.; Nagamine, L. C. C. M.; Hoffmann, J.; Bolmaro, R. E.; Sandim, H. R. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Strain-induced martensite (SIM) and its reversion in a cold-rolled AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel was studied by means of magnetic properties, light optical (LOM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), texture measurements, and Vickers microhardness testing. According to Thermo-calc© predictions, the BCC phase (residual δ-ferrite and SIM) is expected to be stable until 600 °C. The current material was cold rolled up to 60% thickness reduction and submitted to both isothermal and stepwise annealing up to 800 °C. Magnetic measurements were taken during annealing (in situ) of the samples and also for their post mortem conditions. The Curie temperatures (Tc) of residual δ-ferrite and SIM have similar values between 550 and 600 °C. Besides Tc, the focused magnetic parameters were saturation magnetization (Ms), remanent magnetization (MR), and coercive field (Hc). SIM reversion was found to occur in the range of 600-700 °C in good agreement with Thermo-calc© predictions. The microstructures of the material, annealed at 600 and 700 °C for 1 h, were investigated via EBSD. Microtexture measurements for these samples revealed that the texture components were mainly those found for the 60% cold rolled material. This is an evidence that the SIM reversion occurred by an athermal mechanism.

  1. Ferrite Phase Shifters Using Stress Insensitive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    loop property as far as microvave applications of ferrite toroids is concerned. Ideally, the remanent magnetization should equal the saturation ...a second phase that is presumably Mn ferrite or mannetite which both have large values of saturation magnetization (- 5000 gauss) and low field...temperature. In a ferrite device this may result in a loss of saturation and remanent magnetizations vhich may degrade phaser performance. In a unit excited

  2. Transformation temperatures of martensite in beta-phase nickel aluminide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Resistivity and thermal arrest measurements determined that the compositional dependence of M sub s temperatures for NiAl martensite was linear between 60 and 69 at. % Ni, with M sub s = (124 Ni - 7410)K. Resistivity and surface relief experiments for selected alloys indicated the presence of thermoelastic martensite. Some aspects of the transformation were studied by hot-stage microscopy and related to the behavior observed for alloys exhibiting the shape-memory effect.

  3. Transformation temperatures of martensite in beta-phase nickel aluminide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Resistivity and thermal arrest measurements determined that the compositional dependence of M sub s temperatures for NiAl martensite was linear between 60 and 69 at. % Ni, with M sub s = (124 Ni - 7410)K. Resistivity and surface relief experiments for selected alloys indicated the presence of thermoelastic martensite. Some aspects of the transformation were studied by hot-stage microscopy and related to the behavior observed for alloys exhibiting the shape-memory effect.

  4. Complex microalloying of low-pearlite steels subjected to controlled rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Matrosov, Y.I.

    1986-09-01

    The development of modern steels for large-diameter gas pipelines with stringent requirements for strength properties, resilience, resistance to brittle failure, and weldability is addressed. This paper examines the results of studies conducted on the development of domestic economically alloyed low-pearlite steels for large-diameter gas pipelines intended for service in the far north. The effect of microalloying on strength and plasticity is examined. The chemical composition of the steels under investiation with a different content of carbonitride-forming elements (vanadium, niobium, and titanium) introduced separately and as a group into the melt, as well as aluminum is presented. It is shown that the positive effect of vanadium, niobium, and titanium additives can be realized most fully in low-pearlite steels subjected to controlling rolling.

  5. Hot Deformation Behavior and Microstructural Evolution of a Medium Carbon Vanadium Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutrim, Rialberth M.; Rodrigues, Samuel F.; Reis, Gedeon S.; Silva, Eden S.; Aranas, Clodualdo; Balancin, Oscar

    2016-11-01

    Hot forging of steel requires application of large strains, under which conditions, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) is expected to take place. In this study, torsion tests were carried out on a medium carbon vanadium microalloyed steel (38MnSiVS5) to simulate hot forging. Deformations were applied isothermally in the temperature range 900-1200 °C at strain rates of 0.1-10 s-1 in order to observe for the occurrence of DRX and to investigate for the microstructural evolution during straining. The shape of the flow curves indicated that the recrystallization takes place during deformation. This was supported by optical microscopy performed on the quenched samples which displayed considerable amounts of recrystallized grains. It was shown that the grain size depends on straining conditions such as strain rate and temperature. Finally, it was revealed that these process parameters can considerably affect the evolution of microstructure of industrial grade steels by means of DRX.

  6. Novel nanostructures in microalloyed Pr-Fe-B nanocomposite permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shield, J. E.; Liu, Y.; Marr, R.

    2004-12-01

    Microalloying of Pr-Fe-B nanocomposite permanent magnets with refractory metals have resulted in the development of very fine two-phase nanostructures. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy has been used to characterize the phase and chemistry distributions in the nanostructures. With Hf and Ti additions, α -Fe and Pr2Fe14B form as discrete phases, forming a granular nanocomposite. However, with Nb additions grains with a discrete chemical segregation pattern were formed. The grain interiors were found to be poor in Fe and rich in Pr, while the grain shells were found to be poor in Pr and rich in Fe, Co and B. An increased coercivity was attributed to this unique structure.

  7. Quantitative analysis of Nb in solution in a microalloyed carburizing steel by electrochemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, A.L. Matlock, D.K. Speer, J.G.

    2008-05-15

    The amount of Nb in solution in a microalloyed carburizing steel (Nb-modified SAE 8620) was evaluated in different heat treated conditions. The test procedure involved electrochemical extraction, filtration and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopic (ICP-AES) analysis. Characterization by X-ray diffraction of the residues collected in the filters was also performed. Results showed that Nb in solution tends to hydrolyze during electrolysis in a 10 vol.% HCl electrolyte, giving misleading measurements of the amount of Nb that dissolved during high temperature heat treatment. Hydrolysis of Nb is prevented by the addition of tartaric acid to the electrolyte. In the full dissolution condition, coarse (Ti,Nb)CN was the only precipitate present. Finer (Nb,Ti)C precipitates were observed after heat treating at 1050 deg. C.

  8. Controlling the corrosion and cathodic activation of magnesium via microalloying additions of Ge.

    PubMed

    Liu, R L; Hurley, M F; Kvryan, A; Williams, G; Scully, J R; Birbilis, N

    2016-06-28

    The evolution of corrosion morphology and kinetics for magnesium (Mg) have been demonstrated to be influenced by cathodic activation, which implies that the rate of the cathodic partial reaction is enhanced as a result of anodic dissolution. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated to be moderated by the use of arsenic (As) alloying as a poison for the cathodic reaction, leading to significantly improved corrosion resistance. The pursuit of alternatives to toxic As is important as a means to imparting a technologically safe and effective corrosion control method for Mg (and its alloys). In this work, Mg was microalloyed with germanium (Ge), with the aim of improving corrosion resistance by retarding cathodic activation. Based on a combined analysis herein, we report that Ge is potent in supressing the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (reduction of water) upon Mg, improving corrosion resistance. With the addition of Ge, cathodic activation of Mg subject to cyclic polarisation was also hindered, with beneficial implications for future Mg electrodes.

  9. Controlling the corrosion and cathodic activation of magnesium via microalloying additions of Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. L.; Hurley, M. F.; Kvryan, A.; Williams, G.; Scully, J. R.; Birbilis, N.

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of corrosion morphology and kinetics for magnesium (Mg) have been demonstrated to be influenced by cathodic activation, which implies that the rate of the cathodic partial reaction is enhanced as a result of anodic dissolution. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated to be moderated by the use of arsenic (As) alloying as a poison for the cathodic reaction, leading to significantly improved corrosion resistance. The pursuit of alternatives to toxic As is important as a means to imparting a technologically safe and effective corrosion control method for Mg (and its alloys). In this work, Mg was microalloyed with germanium (Ge), with the aim of improving corrosion resistance by retarding cathodic activation. Based on a combined analysis herein, we report that Ge is potent in supressing the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (reduction of water) upon Mg, improving corrosion resistance. With the addition of Ge, cathodic activation of Mg subject to cyclic polarisation was also hindered, with beneficial implications for future Mg electrodes.

  10. Hardening from the rolling heat of low-pearlite constructional steel microalloyed with niobium and vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol'shakov, V. I.; Mongait, I. A.

    1983-12-01

    In direct hardening after controlled rolling with finishing at 780-800°C in low-pearlite steels there is formed a mixed structure with predominance of lath dislocation (packet) martensite, as the result of which the steel acquires high strength, ductility, and weldability.

  11. A martensite boundary on the WRC-1992 diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Kotecki, D.J.

    1999-05-01

    The upper martensite boundary line from the Schaeffler diagram for stainless steel weld metals can be transposed to the WRC-1992 diagram. However, magnetic measurements and longitudinal face bend tests of weld metals do not show good correspondence to this boundary. Many deposit compositions of lower chromium and nickel equivalents than those along Schaeffler`s transposed martensite boundary show no martensite as-deposited and pass a 2T longitudinal face bend test. Based upon magnetic measurements and bend tests of about 100 weld metal compositions, obtained as single-pass submerged arc deposits on ASTM A36 mild steel, a new martensite boundary is proposed for addition to the WRC-1992 diagram. This boundary separates compositions that exhibit no magnetic response attributable to martensite and pass a 2T longitudinal face bend test from compositions that have magnetic response that indicates the presence of as-deposited martensite and fail the bend test. Because manganese is part of neither the chromium equivalent nor the nickel equivalent on the WRC-1992 diagram, the line is specific to the Mn level considered in the tests--approximately 1%--that is suitable for most stainless steel cladding and dissimilar metal joining situations. It is probably conservative for deposits of much higher Mn content.

  12. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CREEP-RESISTANT FERRITIC STEEL WELDMENTS THROUGH THERMO-MECHANICAL TREATMENT AND ALLOY DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Prof. Sudarsanam Suresh; Shassere, Benjamin; Yu, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    Two different approaches have been proposed for improvement of cross-weld creep properties of the high temperature ferrous structural materials for fossil-fired energy applications. The traditional creep strength-enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steel weldments suffer from Type IV failures which occur at the fine-grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ). In order to minimize the premature failure at FGHAZ in the existing CSEF steels, such as modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steels (Grade 91), a thermo-mechanical treatment consisting of aus-forging/rolling and subsequent aus-aging is proposed which promotes the formation of stable MX carbonitrides prior to martensitic transformation. Such MX remains undissolved during welding process, even in FGHAZ, which successfully improves the cross-weld creep properties. Another approach is to develop a new fully ferrtic, creep-resistant FeCrAl alloy which is essentially free from Type IV failure issues. Fe-30Cr-3Al base alloys with minor alloying additions were developed which achieved a combination of good oxidation/corrosion resistance and improved tensile and creep performance comparable or superior to Grade 92 steel.

  13. Progress in ferrite phase shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, C. R., Jr.

    1983-10-01

    Advances in the technology of reciprocal ferrite phase shifters are outlined. Nonlatching rotary-field phase shifters have been produced with enhanced phase accuracy and modest control power. A significant quantity of dual-mode latching units has been built at 35 GHz, with good results. Both types of phase shifter can be adapted to perform other functions in addition to phase shifting. Examples of phase shifters that perform duplexing and polarization switching functions are given.

  14. Helium effects on microstructural evolution in tempered martensitic steels: In situ helium implanter studies in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Odette, George R.; Miao, Pifeng; Edwards, Danny J.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2009-04-30

    Microstructural evolutions in tempered martensitic steels (TMS) under neutron-irradiation, at fusion relevant He/dpa ratios and dpa rates, were characterized using a novel in situ He-implanter technique. F82H-mod3 was irradiated at 500 C in HFIR to a nominal 9 dpa and 190 or 380 appm He in both in the as-tempered (AT) and 20% cold-worked (CW) conditions. In all cases, a high number density of 1-2 nm He-bubbles were observed, along with fewer but larger 10 nm void-like faceted cavities. The He-bubbles form preferentially on dislocations and various interfaces. A slightly larger number of smaller He bubbles were observed in the CW condition. The lower He/dpa ratio produced slightly smaller and fewer He-bubbles. Comparisons of these observations to the results in nano-structured ferritic alloy (NFA) MA957 provide additional evidence that TMS may be susceptible to He-embrittlement as well as void swelling at fusion relevant He concentrations, while NFA are much more resistant to these degradation phenomena.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Laser Beam Welded Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. A strength of up to 2 GPa at a fracture strain of 15% can be attained. Welding of these materials became apparently a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply an efficient heat control. For two application cases, production of tailored blanks in as-rolled condition and welding in assembly in hot stamped conditions, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown in metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KSII concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method. For the case of assembly also joining with deep drawing and manganese boron steel was taken into consideration. The strength of the joint is determined by the weaker partner but can benefit from its ductility.

  16. High-strength economically alloyed corrosion-resistant steels with the structure of nitrogen martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, O.; Blinov, V.; Lukin, E.

    2016-04-01

    The use of nitrogen as the main alloying element allowing one both to increase the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of steels and to improve their processability is a new trend in physical metallurgy of high-strength corrosion resistant steels. The principles of alloying, which are developed for high-nitrogen steel in IMET RAS, ensure the formation of the structure, which contains predetermined amounts of martensite (70-80%) and austenite (20-30%) and is free from δ-ferrite, σ-phase, and Cr23C6 carbide. These principles were used as the base for the creation of new high-strength corrosion-resistant weldable and deformable 0Kh16AN5B, 06Kh16AN4FD, 08Kh14AN4MDB, 09Kh16AN3MF, 27Kh15AN3MD2, 40Kh13AN3M2, and 19Kh14AMB steels, which are operative at temperatures ranging from - 70 to 400°C. The developed nitrogen-containing steels compared with similar carbon steels are characterized by a higher resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion and are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. The new steels successfully passed trial tests as heavy duty articles.

  17. Deformation behavior of duplex austenite and ε-martensite high-Mn steel.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ki Hyuk; Suh, Byeong-Chan; Baik, Sung-Il; Kim, Young-Woon; Choi, Jong-Kyo; Kim, Nack J

    2013-02-01

    Deformation and work hardening behavior of Fe-17Mn-0.02C steel containing ε-martensite within the austenite matrix have been investigated by means of in situ microstructural observations and x-ray diffraction analysis. During deformation, the steel shows the deformation-induced transformation of austenite → ε-martensite → α'-martensite as well as the direct transformation of austenite → α'-martensite. Based on the calculation of changes in the fraction of each constituent phase, we found that the phase transformation of austenite → ε-martensite is more effective in work hardening than that of ε-martensite → α'-martensite. Moreover, reverse transformation of ε-martensite → austenite has also been observed during deformation. It originates from the formation of stacking faults within the deformed ε-martensite, resulting in the formation of 6H-long periodic ordered structure.

  18. Multifunctionality of nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Atma; Thakur, Awalendra K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite has been synthesized by adopting modified Pechini route. No evidence of impurity or secondary phase has been detected up to the detection of error limit of X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction pattern reveals orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pnma (62).Crystallite size and lattice strain was found to be ˜42.8nm and 0.306% respectively. Optical band gap was found to be 2.109 eV, by UV-Visible diffused reflectance spectrum (DRS). Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area was found to be ˜3.45 m2/g. Magnetization-hysteresis (M-H) loop was recorded at room temperature (300K) reveals weak ferromagnetism in Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite. The weak ferromagnetism in lanthanum ferrite is due to the uncompensated antiferromagnetic spin ordering. Ferroelectric loop hysteresis observed at room temperature at 100Hz depicts the presence of ferroelectric ordering in LaFeO3.Simultanious presence of magnetic and ferroelectric ordering at room temperature makes it suitable candidate of Multiferroic family.

  19. Multifunctionality of nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Atma; Thakur, Awalendra K.

    2016-05-06

    Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite has been synthesized by adopting modified Pechini route. No evidence of impurity or secondary phase has been detected up to the detection of error limit of X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction pattern reveals orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pnma (62).Crystallite size and lattice strain was found to be ∼42.8nm and 0.306% respectively. Optical band gap was found to be 2.109 eV, by UV-Visible diffused reflectance spectrum (DRS). Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area was found to be ∼3.45 m{sup 2}/g. Magnetization-hysteresis (M-H) loop was recorded at room temperature (300K) reveals weak ferromagnetism in Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite. The weak ferromagnetism in lanthanum ferrite is due to the uncompensated antiferromagnetic spin ordering. Ferroelectric loop hysteresis observed at room temperature at 100Hz depicts the presence of ferroelectric ordering in LaFeO{sub 3}.Simultanious presence of magnetic and ferroelectric ordering at room temperature makes it suitable candidate of Multiferroic family.

  20. Spin canting in ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, J.; Huang, H.; Salih, K. S. M.; Thiel, W. R.; Schünemann, V.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, an easily scalable process for the production of small (3 -7 nm) monodisperse superparamagnetic ferrite nanoparticles MeFe2O4 (Me = Zn, Mn, Co) from iron metal and octanoic acid has been reported (Salih et al., Chem. Mater. 25 1430-1435 2013). Here we present a Mössbauer spectroscopic study of these ferrite nanoparticles in external magnetic fields of up to B = 5 T at liquid helium temperatures. Our analysis shows that all three systems show a comparable inversion degree and the cationic distribution for the tetrahedral A and the octahedral B sites has been determined to (Zn0.19Fe0.81) A [Zn0.81Fe1.19] B O4, (Mn0.15Fe0.85) A [Mn0.85Fe1.15] B O4 and (Co0.27Fe0.73) A [Co0.73Fe1.27] B O4. Spin canting occurs presumably in the B-sites and spin canting angles of 33°, 51° and 59° have been determined for the zinc, the manganese, and the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  1. Effect of temperature and strain on microstructure refinement in low carbon microalloyed steel during multi-axis deformation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Baocun; Liu, Fenglian; Li, Guiyan; Xu, Rongjie; Yang, Jing

    2013-05-01

    Multi-axis deformation (MAD) tests were performed on a low carbon microalloyed steel with different process parameters. The effect of temperature and strain on the microstructure evolution were analyzed. The strain reversal effect was observed from the comparison between the microstructure resulting from the MAD process and the one from a uniaxial deformation process. However, with 0.3 strain per pass and the alternating compression time equal to 10 or more during the MAD process, ultra fine structures were obtained at deformation temperature below 800 °C. Due to the microalloyed elements in the tested steel, nanometer sized precipitates were introduced under MAD conditions, which also contributed to the microstructure refinement.

  2. Effects of Yttrium Microalloying on the Epitaxial Grain Growth in Ti-6Al-4V Weld Fusion Zones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    microalloy additions. 2 I ,m III II I I__ 3 EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE Weld Preparation - All the welds were prepared by the Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) process...1425*F for 2 h; 6) Hot swaged (0.650 in. dia); 7) Anneal at 1425*F for 2 h; 8) Warm swaged (0.300 in. dia); 9) Anneal at 1350*F for 3 h; 10) Cold drawn

  3. Surface modification of ferritic steels using MEVVA and duoplasmatron ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kulevoy, Timur V. Orlov, Nikolay N.; Rogozhkin, Sergey V.; Bogachev, Alexey A.; Nikitin, Alexander A.; Iskandarov, Nasib A.; Golubev, Alexander A.; Chalyhk, Boris B.; Fedin, Petr A.; Sitnikov, Alexey L.; Kozlov, Alexander V.; Kuibeda, Rostislav P.; Andrianov, Stanislav L.; Kravchuk, Konstantin S.; Useinov, Alexey S.; Oks, Efim M.

    2016-02-15

    Metal Vapor Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion source (IS) is a unique tool for production of high intensity metal ion beam that can be used for material surface modification. From the other hand, the duoplasmatron ion source provides the high intensity gas ion beams. The MEVVA and duoplasmatron IS developed in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics were used for the reactor steel surface modification experiments. Response of ferritic-martensitic steel specimens on titanium and nitrogen ions implantation and consequent vacuum annealing was investigated. Increase in microhardness of near surface region of irradiated specimens was observed. Local chemical analysis shows atom mixing and redistribution in the implanted layer followed with formation of ultrafine precipitates after annealing.

  4. Ferritic steel for use in nuclear energy — A report of the snowbird conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. W.

    1984-05-01

    This international conference on ferritic or martensitic steels consisted of a planary session with all invited papers and several parallel sessions of contributed papers. The conference was sponsored by the Metallurgical Society of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME) as well as several industrial organizations. The technical program chairmen were J. W. Davis of MDAC and D. J. Michel of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. The Program committee was composed of representatives from the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Japan, the UK, and the USA. The conference proceedings will be published as a hard bound book by the AIME. Consequently, the present paper is intended to highlight the results of the conference prior to the publication of the proceedings.

  5. Tensile Properties, Ferrite Contents, and Specimen Heating of Stainless Steels in Cryogenic Gas Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, T.; Yuri, T.; Ono, Y.

    2006-03-31

    We performed tensile tests at cryogenic temperatures below 77 K and in helium gas environment for SUS 304L and SUS 316L in order to obtain basic data of mechanical properties of the materials for liquid hydrogen tank service. We evaluate tensile curves, tensile properties, ferrite contents, mode of deformation and/or fracture, and specimen heating during the testing at 4 to 77 K. For both SUS 304L and 316L, tensile strength shows a small peak around 10 K, and specimen heating decreases above 30 K. The volume fraction of {alpha}-phase increases continuously up to 70 % with plastic strain, at approximately 15 % plastic strain for 304L and up to 35 % for 316L. There was almost no clear influence of testing temperature on strain-induced martensitic transformation at the cryogenic temperatures.

  6. Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels: a basic research joint program in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutard, J.-L.; Badjeck, V.; Barguet, L.; Barouh, C.; Bhattacharya, A.; Colignon, Y.; Hatzoglou, C.; Loyer-Prost, M.; Rouffié, A. L.; Sallez, N.; Salmon-Legagneur, H.; Schuler, T.

    2014-12-01

    AREVA, CEA, CNRS, EDF and Mécachrome are funding a joint program of basic research on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels (ODISSEE), in support to the development of oxide dispersion strengthened 9-14% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels for the fuel element cladding of future Sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors. The selected objectives and the results obtained so far will be presented concerning (i) physical-chemical characterisation of the nano-clusters as a function of ball-milling process, metallurgical conditions and irradiation, (ii) meso-scale understanding of failure mechanisms under dynamic loading and creep, and, (iii) kinetic modelling of nano-clusters nucleation and α/α‧ unmixing.

  7. Elastic model of a dislocation center for martensite nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Vereshchagin, V.P.; Kashchenko, M.P.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of spontaneous nucleation of a crystal of new phase when the original structure is metastable is usually connected with the catalyzing effect of defects playing the role of nucleation centers. In the case of the {gamma}{r_arrow}{alpha} martensite transformation in iron alloys, even individual dislocations can act as such defects, based on analysis of long-range elastic fields of isolated linear dislocations in a linearly elastic anisotropic continuum, the authors established the existence of a correlation between the geometric characteristics of the elastically deformed state in the vicinity of 60-degree and 30-degree dislocations and the structure and morphological characteristics of {alpha}-martensite observed in massive iron alloy samples. These results suggest that the dislocation affects the pathway of the martensite reaction and allows the authors to say that the specific characteristics of heterogeneous nucleation of new phase for the martensite mechanism of the {gamma}{r_arrow}{alpha} transformation involves singling out a single structural rearrangement variant which is suitable from the standpoint of adapation of the transforming lattice to the characteristic features of the elastically deformed state created by the dislocation. The possibilities for such adaption are limited by the crystallography of the transformation and the reactions of the surrounding austenite occurring when regular connections exist with the morphological characteristics of the martensite crystal, and are not necessarily compatible with the individual features of the elastic field of each dislocation. Considering this, the authors can introduce the concept of a dislocation center for nucleation of a martensite crystal about the region of the dislocation where conditions are realized which are favorable for the formation of a nucleus of martensite crystal of a certain shape and orientation, and they can develop an elastic model corresponding to this concept.

  8. Subdomain zinc ferrite particles: Synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannaparayil, T.; Komarneni, S.; Marande, R.; Zadarko, M.

    1990-05-01

    Ultrafine and nearly spherical particles of zinc ferrite were synthesized under mild hydrothermal conditions by precipitating from metal nitrates. These particles exhibited antiferromagnetic ordering below 13 K. Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements revealed the subdomain superparamagnetic nature of the particles having a narrow particle size distribution. The hydrothermal ferrite powders were found to sinter to almost theoretical density with little or no intragranular porosity.

  9. Ferrite Solutions for Electromagnetic Shock Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Phillip D.; Dudley, Mark; Primm, Paul

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop tools and test procedures for identifying ferrites suitable for use in shock line applications. Electromagnetic shocklines have been used to provide fast rising voltage pulses for many applications. In these applications a slow rising pulse is injected into the line where currents drive the ferrites into saturation leading to a fast rising output pulse. A shockline’s unique capabilities could be applied to new detonator configurations. A properly conditioned voltage pulse is critical for fire set applications. A carefully designed shockline could provide a passive solution to generating a fast rising voltage pulse for the fire set. Traditional circuits use ferrites operating in a linear regime. Shock lines push the ferrites well into the nonlinear regime where very few tools and data currently exist. Ferrite material is key to the operation of these shock lines, and tools for identifying suitable ferrites are critical. This report describes an experimental setup to that allows testing of ferrite samples and comparison to models with the goal of identifying optimal ferrites for shockline use.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Nickel Zinc Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, Manju; Nair, Divya S.

    2011-10-01

    Nano crystalline mixed ferrites can be prepared through different methods. In the present work a comparison was made on sol-gel auto combustion method and co-precipitation method by preparing Nickel Zinc Ferrite. The prepared samples were calcined at different temperatures and were characterized by powder XRD, FTIR. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the formation of ferrite in nanophase. The lattice parameter was found to be in the range 8.31-8.41Ao. This confirms that nano crystalline ferrite samples are in the cubic spinel structure. An average nano crystalline size was estimated from XRD by the Scherrer's equation. FTIR study also confirms the formation of ferrites. Sol-gel auto combustion technique was superior to co-precipitation method for producing single phase nano particles with smaller crystallite size.

  11. Ferrite thin films for microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zaquine, I.; Benazizi, H.; Mage, J.C.

    1988-11-15

    Production of ferrite thin films is the key to integration of microwave ferrite devices (circulators for phased array antennas, for instance). The interesting materials are the usual microwave ferrites: garnets, lithium ferrites, barium hexaferrites. The required thicknesses are a few tens of micrometers, and it will be important to achieve high deposition rates. Different substrates can be used: silicon and alumina both with and without metallization. The films were deposited by rf sputtering from a single target. The as-deposited films are amorphous and therefore require careful annealing in oxygen atmosphere. The sputtered films are a few micrometers thick on 4 in. substrates. The optimum annealing temperature was found by trying to obtain the highest possible magnetization for each ferrite. The precision on the value of magnetization is limited by the precision on the thickness of the film. We obtain magnetization values slightly lower than the target's. The ferromagnetic resonance linewidth was measured on toroids from 5 to 18 GHz.

  12. Influences of cyclic loading on martensite transformation of TRIP steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, W. J.; Hu, Z. G.; Zhang, W. G.

    2013-03-01

    While austenite transformation into martensite induces increasing of the crack initiation life and restraining of the growth of fatigue cracks in cyclic-loading processes, TRIP-assisted steels have a better fatigue life than the AHSS (Advance High Strength Steels). As two key parameters in the cyclic loading process, strain amplitude and cyclic frequency are used in a kinetic transformation model to reasonably evaluate the phase transformation from austenite into martensite with the shear-band intersections theory, in which strain amplitude and cyclic frequency are related to the rate of shear-band intersection formation and the driving force of phase transformation. The results revealed that the martensite volume fraction increased and the rate of phase transformation decrease while the number of cycles increased, and the martensite volume fraction was almost constant after the number of cycles was more than 2000 times. Higher strain amplitude promotes martensite transformation and higher cyclic frequency impedes phase transformation, which are interpreted by temperature increment, the driving force of phase transformation and the rate of shearband intersection formation.

  13. Martensitic transformation, shape memory effects, and other curious mechanical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Vandermeer, R.A.

    1982-01-08

    The objective of this paper is to review tutorially the subject of martensitic transformations in uranium alloys emphasizing their role in the shape memory effect (SME). We examine first what a martensitic transformation is, illustrating some of its characteristics with specific examples. As well as being athermal in nature, as expected, data are presented indicating that martensitic transformations in some uranium alloys also have a strong isothermal component. In addition, a few alloys are known to exhibit thermoelastic martensitic reactions. The SME, which is associated with these, is defined and demonstrated graphically with data from a uranium-6 wt % niobium alloy. Some of the important variables influencing SME behavior are described. Specifically, these are reheat temperature, amount of deformation, crystal structure, and composition. A mechanism for SME is postulated and the association with martensitic transformation is detailed. A self-induced shape instability in the uranium-7.5 wt % niobium-2.5 wt % zirconium alloy with a rationalization of the behavior in terms of texture and lattice parameter change during aging is reviewed and discussed. 24 figures.

  14. Hydrogen-assisted damage in austenite/martensite dual-phase steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Motomichi; Cem Tasan, Cemal; Nagashima, Tatsuya; Akiyama, Eiji; Raabe, Dierk; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki

    2016-01-01

    For understanding the underlying hydrogen embrittlement mechanism in transformation-induced plasticity steels, the process of damage evolution in a model austenite/martensite dual-phase microstructure following hydrogenation was investigated through multi-scale electron channelling contrast imaging and in situ optical microscopy. Localized diffusible hydrogen in martensite causes cracking through two mechanisms: (1) interaction between {1 1 0}M localized slip and {1 1 2}M twin and (2) cracking of martensite-martensite grain interfaces. The former resulted in nanovoids along the {1 1 2}M twin. The coalescence of the nanovoids generated plate-like microvoids. The latter caused shear localization on the specific plane where the crack along the martensite/martensite boundary exists, which led to additional martensite/martensite boundary cracking.

  15. Studies on oxidation and deuterium permeation behavior of a low temperature α-Al2O3-forming Fesbnd Crsbnd Al ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Zhao, Si-Xiang; Liu, Feng; Li, Xiao-Chun; Zhao, Ming-Zhong; Wang, Jing; Lu, Tao; Hong, Suk-Ho; Zhou, Hai-Shan; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the capability of Fesbnd Crsbnd Al ferritic steels as tritium permeation barrier in fusion systems, the oxidation behavior together with the permeation behavior of a Fesbnd Crsbnd Al steel was investigated. Gas driven permeation experiments were performed. The permeability of the oxidized Fesbnd Crsbnd Al steel was obtained and a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel CLF-1 was used as a comparison. In order to characterize the oxide layer, SEM, XPS, TEM, HRTEM were used. Al2O3 was detected in the oxide film by XPS, and HRTEM showed that Al2O3 in the α phase was found. The formation of α-Al2O3 layer at a relatively low temperature may result from the formation of Cr2O3 nuclei.

  16. Effects of microalloying on hot-rolled and cold-rolled Q&P steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo de Araujo, Ana Luiza

    Third generation advanced high strength steels (AHSS) have been a major focus in steel development over the last decade. The premise of these types of steel is based on the potential to obtain excellent combinations of strength and ductility with low-alloy compositions by forming mixed microstructures containing retained austenite (RA). The development of heat treatments able to achieve the desired structures and properties, such as quenching and partitioning (Q&P) steels, is driven by new requirements to increase vehicle fuel economy by reducing overall weight while maintaining safety and crashworthiness. Microalloying additions of niobium (Nb) and vanadium (V) in sheet products are known to provide strengthening via grain refinement and precipitation hardening and may influence RA volume fraction and transformation behavior. Additions of microalloying elements in Q&P steels have not been extensively studied to date, however. The objective of the present study was to begin to understand the potential roles of Nb and V in hot-rolled and cold-rolled Q&P steel. For that, a common Q&P steel composition was selected as a Base alloy with 0.2C-1.5Si-2.0Mn (wt. %). Two alloys with an addition of Nb (0.02 and 0.04 wt. %) and one with an addition of V (0.06 wt. %) to the Base alloy were investigated. Both hot-rolled and cold-rolled/annealed Q&P simulations were conducted. In the hot-rolled Q&P study, thermomechanical processing was simulated via hot torsion testing in a GleebleRTM 3500, and four coiling temperatures (CT) were chosen. Microstructural evaluation (including RA measurements via electron backscattered diffraction - EBSD) and hardness measurements were performed for all alloys and coiling conditions. The analysis showed that Nb additions led to overall refinement of the prior microstructure. Maximum RA fractions were measured at the 375 °C CT, and microalloying was associated with increased RA in this condition when compared to the Base alloy. A change in

  17. Advanced Microwave Ferrite Research (AMFeR): Phase Four

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-15

    activities. The first was the development of a ferrite/epoxy composite that can be directly injected into a dielectric substrate. As the ferrite...a ferrite/epoxy composite that can be directly injected into a dielectric substrate. As the ferrite cured, two external magnets were placed on both...as a low cost solution for self-biased circulator applications. The resulting barium ferrite mixture is pressed into a dielectric substrate hole to

  18. Ferrite Phase Shifters Using Stress Insensitive Materials. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-11

    PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 1.3 PROGRAM TECHNICAL TASKS (PHASE I) 2.0 BACKGROUND DISCUSSION 2.1 REMANENT STATE FERRITE PHASERS 2.2 REMANENT MAGNETIZATION 2.3... MAGNETIZATION AND MAGNETOSTRICTION 2.1 REMANENT STATE FERRITE PHASERS Microwave ferrite digital phase shifters utilize ferrite toroidal structures and the...The insertion phase length of the structure is dependent on the remanent magnetization of the ferrite (see the hysteresis loop shown in Figure 2-4

  19. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  20. Complexion-mediated martensitic phase transformation in Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Tasan, C. C.; Lai, M. J.; Dippel, A.-C.; Raabe, D.

    2017-02-01

    The most efficient way to tune microstructures and mechanical properties of metallic alloys lies in designing and using athermal phase transformations. Examples are shape memory alloys and high strength steels, which together stand for 1,500 million tons annual production. In these materials, martensite formation and mechanical twinning are tuned via composition adjustment for realizing complex microstructures and beneficial mechanical properties. Here we report a new phase transformation that has the potential to widen the application window of Ti alloys, the most important structural material in aerospace design, by nanostructuring them via complexion-mediated transformation. This is a reversible martensitic transformation mechanism that leads to a final nanolaminate structure of α'' (orthorhombic) martensite bounded with planar complexions of athermal ω (a-ω, hexagonal). Both phases are crystallographically related to the parent β (BCC) matrix. As expected from a planar complexion, the a-ω is stable only at the hetero-interface.

  1. Nanotribological behavior of deep cryogenically treated martensitic stainless steel

    PubMed Central

    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D; Tuckart, Walter R; Broitman, Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Cryogenic treatments are increasingly used to improve the wear resistance of various steel alloys by means of transformation of retained austenite, deformation of virgin martensite and carbide refinement. In this work the nanotribological behavior and mechanical properties at the nano-scale of cryogenically and conventionally treated AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel were evaluated. Conventionally treated specimens were subjected to quenching and annealing, while the deep cryogenically treated samples were quenched, soaked in liquid nitrogen for 2 h and annealed. The elastic–plastic parameters of the materials were assessed by nanoindentation tests under displacement control, while the friction behavior and wear rate were evaluated by a nanoscratch testing methodology that it is used for the first time in steels. It was found that cryogenic treatments increased both hardness and elastic limit of a low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, while its tribological performance was enhanced marginally. PMID:28904837

  2. Complexion-mediated martensitic phase transformation in Titanium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Tasan, C C; Lai, M J; Dippel, A-C; Raabe, D

    2017-02-01

    The most efficient way to tune microstructures and mechanical properties of metallic alloys lies in designing and using athermal phase transformations. Examples are shape memory alloys and high strength steels, which together stand for 1,500 million tons annual production. In these materials, martensite formation and mechanical twinning are tuned via composition adjustment for realizing complex microstructures and beneficial mechanical properties. Here we report a new phase transformation that has the potential to widen the application window of Ti alloys, the most important structural material in aerospace design, by nanostructuring them via complexion-mediated transformation. This is a reversible martensitic transformation mechanism that leads to a final nanolaminate structure of α″ (orthorhombic) martensite bounded with planar complexions of athermal ω (a-ω, hexagonal). Both phases are crystallographically related to the parent β (BCC) matrix. As expected from a planar complexion, the a-ω is stable only at the hetero-interface.

  3. Complexion-mediated martensitic phase transformation in Titanium

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J.; Tasan, C. C.; Lai, M. J.; Dippel, A. -C.; Raabe, D.

    2017-01-01

    The most efficient way to tune microstructures and mechanical properties of metallic alloys lies in designing and using athermal phase transformations. Examples are shape memory alloys and high strength steels, which together stand for 1,500 million tons annual production. In these materials, martensite formation and mechanical twinning are tuned via composition adjustment for realizing complex microstructures and beneficial mechanical properties. Here we report a new phase transformation that has the potential to widen the application window of Ti alloys, the most important structural material in aerospace design, by nanostructuring them via complexion-mediated transformation. This is a reversible martensitic transformation mechanism that leads to a final nanolaminate structure of α″ (orthorhombic) martensite bounded with planar complexions of athermal ω (a–ω, hexagonal). Both phases are crystallographically related to the parent β (BCC) matrix. As expected from a planar complexion, the a–ω is stable only at the hetero-interface. PMID:28145484

  4. Comparison of nanostructured nickel zinc ferrite and magnesium copper zinc ferrite prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hee, Ay Ching; Mehrali, Mehdi; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Mehrali, Mohammad; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2012-12-01

    Ferrite is an important ceramic material with magnetic properties that are useful in many types of electronic devices. In this study, structure and magnetic properties of nanostructured nickel zinc ferrite and magnesium copper zinc ferrite prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion were compared. Both ferrites samples demonstrated similar weight loss characteristics in TGA. The magnesium copper zinc ferrite showed a crystalline structure with an average crystallite size of 13.5 nm. However, nickel zinc ferrite showed an amorphous phase. Transmission electron micrographs showed agglomerated nanoparticles with an average crystallite size of 26.6 nm for magnesium copper zinc ferrite and 22.7 nm for nickel zinc ferrite. Magnesium copper zinc ferrite exhibited soft ferromagnetic bahaviour whereas nickel zinc ferrite showed superparamagnetic nature.

  5. Determination of the non-recrystallization temperature (TNR) in multiple microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homsher, Caryn Nicole

    Rolling mill metallurgists must be able to easily and accurately determine critical temperatures such as the non-recrystallization temperature (T NR) to properly plan rolling schedules for desired properties. Microalloyed steels have small additions of alloying elements such as V, Ti, and Nb, to improve mechanical properties through grain size control and precipitation strengthening. The value of TNR is based on both alloying elements and deformation parameters. To easily predict TNR, equations have been developed and utilized in the literature and industry. However, each equation has certain limitations which constrain its applicability. This study was completed using ten laboratory grade low-carbon microalloyed steels designed to meet the API X-70 specification with varying amounts of V, Nb, and Ti. Double-hit deformation tests were conducted on a Gleeble® 3500 system in the standard pocket-jaw configuration at the Colorado School of Mines to determine experimental values of TNR. Double-hit deformation tests involve cylindrical specimens in an axisymmetric compression test. The test method requires six steps: 1) reheat to ensure most precipitates dissolve back into solution, 2) cool to deformation temperature, 3) compress with given strain and strain rate, 4) hold for interpass time, 5) deform specimen again holding everything else constant, and 6) measure the percent recrystallized or percent fractional softening. The TNR is the temperature where fractional softening is equal to 20 %. Niobium plays the largest role in influencing TNR. Complex niobium-vanadium-carbonitride precipitates are believed to play a significant role increasing TNR in the Hi-V alloy The experimental values of TNR were compared with predicted values of TNR from four equations in the literature. The Bai 2011 equation was the most reliable of the existing empirical formulas considered, while the commonly used Boratto equation was not accurate in predicting the TNR for the alloys in this

  6. Effect of microalloying with rare-earth metals on the resistance of steels to deformation and failure under an alternating elastoplastic load

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselevskii, V.N.; Kovalev, V.V.; Kharitonov, D.F.; Neklyudov, I.M.; Ozhigov, L.S.

    1994-09-01

    Results of experimental investigation of the resistance of steels OKhl6Nl5M3B and Khl3Nl3T3 to cyclic alternating deformation and failure at T = 923{degrees}K after microalloying with Sc are presented. It is established that microalloying enhanced the characteristics investigated. Radiation-induced damage ({var_phi} = 4.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 17} neutrons/(m{sup 2} {center_dot} sec), E {ge} 0.1 MeV) during the loading of microalloyed steel OOKh16Nl5M3B lowered resistance to cyclic deformation while increasing the strain-hardening factor and cyclic longevity as compared with similar characteristics under normal conditions.

  7. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martenstic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-05-26

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ~500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimental results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. Furthermore, the strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9–20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  8. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martenstic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Lizhen; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-05-26

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ~500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimentalmore » results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. Furthermore, the strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9–20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.« less

  9. Comprehensive microstructural characterization in modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel by ultrasonic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anish; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankaro; Raj, Baldev

    2002-06-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel (T91/P91) has been subjected to a series of heat treatments consisting of soaking for 5 minutes at the selected temperatures, starting from the α-phase region (1073 K) to the γ + δ-phase region (1623 K), followed by oil quenching. Hardness measurements, microstructural features, and grain-size measurements by the linear-intercept method have been used for correlating them with the ultrasonic parameters. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements, and spectral analysis of the first backwall echo have been used for characterization of the microstructures obtained by various heat treatments. As the soaking temperature increased above Ac 1, the ultrasonic velocity decreased because of the increase in the volume fraction of martensite in the structure. There were sharp changes in the ultrasonic velocities corresponding to the two critical temperatures, Ac 1 and Ac 3. Ultrasonic longitudinal- and shear-wave velocities were found to be useful in identifying the Ac 1 and Ac 3 temperatures and for the determination of hardness in the intercritical region. However, ultrasonic attenuation and spectral analysis of the first backwall echo were found to be useful to characterize the variation in the prior-austenitic grain size and formation of δ ferrite above the Ac 4 temperature. The scattering coefficients have been experimentally determined for various microstructures and compared with the theoretically calculated value of the scattering coefficients for iron reported in literature.

  10. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martenstic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-05-26

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ~500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimental results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. Furthermore, the strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9–20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  11. Effect of W-addition on low cycle fatigue behavior of high Cr ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon Sik; Lee, Kee Ahn; Lee, Chong Soo

    1999-12-01

    A study was done to investigate the effect of tungsten (W) addition on the microstructure, tensile properties and low cycle fatigue (LCF) properties of 9Cr-lMo steels at 298K and 873K. Four steels containing different amounts of W (0W, 1.2W, 1.8W and 2.7W) were normalized at 1323K for 1 hour and tempered at 1023K for 1 hour. Microstructural analysis revealed that no significant differences wete observed in their tempered martensitic microstructure of 0W, 1.2W and 1.8W alloys, but d-ferrite was observed to form at the prior austenite grain boundaries of the 2.7W alloy. With the increase in W content, yield and tensile strength increased at both temperatures. Low cycle fatigue life also increased with the W content up to 1.8%, but decreased in the 2.7W alloy, which was primarily due to the presence of soft d-ferrite acting as the crack initiation site. The fatigue life at 873K was reduced compared to that at 298K, due not only to the decrease in strength at high temperature but also to the formation of oxide layers along the slip bands, which increases slip irre-versibility during cyclic deformation.

  12. Interatomic potential to study the formation of NiCr clusters in high Cr ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonny, G.; Bakaev, A.; Olsson, P.; Domain, C.; Zhurkin, E. E.; Posselt, M.

    2017-02-01

    Under irradiation NiSiPCr clusters are formed in high-Cr ferritic martensitic steels as well as in FeCr model alloys. In the literature little is known about the origin and contribution to the hardening of these clusters. In this work we performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the stability of small substitutional NiCr-vacancy clusters and interstitial configurations in bcc Fe. Based on DFT data and experimental considerations a ternary potential for the ferritic FeNiCr system was developed. The potential was applied to study the thermodynamic stability of NiCr clusters by means of Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) simulations. The results of our simulations show that Cr and Ni precipitate as separate fractions and suggest only a limited synergetic effect between Ni and Cr. Therefore our results suggest that the NiCrSiP clusters observed in experiments must be the result of other mechanisms than the synergy of Cr and Ni at thermal equilibrium.

  13. Identification, size classification and evolution of Laves phase precipitates in high chromium, fully ferritic steels.

    PubMed

    Lopez Barrilao, Jennifer; Kuhn, Bernd; Wessel, Egbert

    2017-10-01

    To fulfil the new challenges of the German "Energiewende" more efficient, sustainable, flexible and cost-effective energy technologies are strongly needed. For a reduction of consumed primary resources higher efficiency steam cycles with increased operating parameters, pressure and temperature, are mandatory. Therefore advanced materials are needed. The present study focuses on a new concept of high chromium, fully ferritic steels. These steels, originally designed for solid oxide fuel cell applications, provide favourable steam oxidation resistance, creep and thermomechanical fatigue behaviour in comparison to conventional ferritic-martensitic steels. The strength of this type of steel is achieved by a combination of solid-solution hardening and precipitation strengthening by intermetallic Laves phase particles. The effect of alloy composition on particle composition was measured by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and partly verified by thermodynamic modelling results. Generally the Laves phase particles demonstrated high thermodynamic stability during long-term annealing up to 40,000h at 600°C. Variations in chemical alloy composition influence Laves phase particle formation and consequently lead to significant changes in creep behaviour. For this reason particle size distribution evolution was analysed in detail and associated with the creep performance of several trial alloys. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation embrittlement of manganese-stabilized martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hu, W.L.

    1986-12-01

    Fractographic examination has been performed on selected Charpy specimens of manganese stabilized martensitic stainless steels in order to identify the cause of irradiation embrittlement. Embrittlement was found to be partly due to enhanced failure at grain boundaries arising from precipitation. Microstructural examination of a specimen irradiated at higher temperature has demonstrated the presence of Fe-Cr-Mn chi phase, a body centered cubic intermetallic phase known to cause embrittlement. This work indicated that manganese stabilized martensitic stainless steels are prone to intermetallic phase formation which is detrimental to mechanical properties.

  15. AM363 martensitic stainless steel: A multiphase equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Crockett, Scott D.

    2017-01-01

    A multiphase equation of state for stainless steel AM363 has been developed within the Opensesame approach and has been entered as material 4295 in the LANL-SESAME Library. Three phases were constructed separately: the low pressure martensitic phase, the austenitic phase and the liquid. Room temperature data and the explicit introduction of a magnetic contribution to the free energy determined the martensitic phase, while shock Hugoniot data was used to determine the austenitic phase and the phase boundaries. More experimental data or First Principles calculations would be useful to better characterize the liquid.

  16. Martensitic transformations in high-strength steels at aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovskaya, V. V.; Bannykh, O. A.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of heat treatment and elastic stresses on the texture of maraging NiTi-steels is studied. The interruption of the decomposition of martensite at the early stages is shown to be accompanied by the γ → α transformation, which proceeds upon cooling from the aging temperature and under elastic (σ < σ0.2) tensile stresses. The martensite has a crystallographic texture, which is caused by the evolution of hot-deformation texture as a result of quenching and decomposition of a supersaturated α solid solution.

  17. Influence of magnetic fields on structural martensitic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Lashley, J C; Cooley, J C; Smith, J L; Fisher, R A; Modic, K A; Yang, X- D; Riseborough, P S; Opeil, C P; Finlayson, T R; Goddard, P A; Silhanek, A V

    2009-01-01

    We show evidence that a structural martensitic transition is related to significant changes in the electronic structure, as revealed in thermodynamic measurements made in high-magnetic fields. The magnetic field dependence is considered unusual as many influential investigations of martensitic transitions have emphasized that the structural transitions are primarily lattice dynamical and are driven by the entropy due to the phonons. We provide a theoretical framework which can be used to describe the effect of magnetic field on the lattice dynamics in which the field dependence originates from the dielectric constant.

  18. Characterization of Solid State Phase Transformation in Continuously Heated and Cooled Ferritic Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, B; Mills, Michael J.; Specht, Eliot D; Santella, Michael L; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2010-12-01

    Arc welding processes involve cooling rates that vary over a wide range (1-100 K/s). The final microstructire is thus a product of the heating and cooling cycles experienced by the weld in addition to the weld composition. It has been shown that the first phase to form under weld cooling conditions may not be that predicted by equilibrium calculations. The partitioning of different interstitial/substitutional alloying elements at high temperatures can dramatically affect the subsequent phase transformations. In order to understand the effect of alloying on phase transformation temperatures and final microstructures time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique has been successfully used for characterization. The work by Jacot and Rappaz on pearlitic steels provided insight into austenitization of hypoeutectic steels using a finite volume model. However there is very little work done on the effect of heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation paths in bainitic/martensitic steels and weld metals. Previous work on a weld with higher aluminum content, deposited with a FCAW-S process indicated that even at aluminum levels where the primary phase to solidify from liquid should be delta ferrite, non-equilibrium austenite was observed. The presence of inhomogeneity in composition of the parent microstructure has been attributed to differences in transformation modes, temperatures and microstructures in dual-phase, TRIP steels and ferritic welds. The objectives of the work included the identification of the stability regions of different phases during heating and cooling, differences in the effect of weld heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation temperatures, and the variation in phase fractions of austenite and ferrite in the two phase regions as a function of temperature. The base composition used for the present work is a Fe-1%Al-2%Mn-1%Ni-0.04%C weld metal. A pseudo-binary phase diagram shows the expected solidification path under equilibrium

  19. Strain-induced martensite to austenite reverse transformation in an ultrafine-grained Fe-Ni-Mn martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Nanesa, H.; Nili-Ahmadabadi, M.; Koohdar, H. R.; Habibi-Parsa, M.; Nedjad, S. Hossein; Alidokht, S. A.; Langdon, Terence G.

    2014-05-01

    Research was conducted to evaluate the effect of heavy cold rolling on microstructural evolution in an Fe-10Ni-7Mn (wt.%) martensitic steel. The chemical driving force for the strain-induced martensite to austenite reverse transformation was calculated using thermodynamic principles and a model was developed for estimating the effect of applied stress on the driving force of the martensite to austenite reverse transformation through heavy cold rolling. These calculations show that, in order to make a reverse transformation feasible, the applied stress on the material should supply the total driving force, both chemical and non-chemical, for the transformation. It is demonstrated that after 60% cold rolling the required driving force for the reverse transformation may be provided. Experimental results, including cold rolling and transmission electron microscopy images, are utilized to verify the thermodynamic calculations.

  20. Carbon in cubic and tetragonal ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2013-09-01

    It is generally assumed that the phase diagrams and equilibrium thermodynamic data that apply to the conventional Fe-C system, also are relevant to the case where supersaturated ferrite is in contact with austenite. It seems that this may not be correct, since a change in the symmetry of the ferrite unit cell in the presence of excess carbon has the potential to alter the nature of the phase equilibrium. The implications of these discoveries are presented in the context of the early recognition by Cottrell and co-workers, of the importance that should be attached to the tetragonal symmetry of the octahedral interstices in the ferritic allotrope of iron.

  1. Porous Ba Ferrite Prepared from Wood Template

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Nobuyasu; Kuwahara, Masayuki; Sia, Chee Kiong; Ota, Toshitaka

    2009-01-01

    Ba ferrite materials with porous microstructures were prepared from a natural cedar wood template in order to investigate new electromagnetic shielding materials. The wood templates were infiltrated with barium nitrate and iron nitrate solutions (molar ratio = 1:12) and dried to form ferrite gel, then, they were sintered in air at a temperature between 800 °C and 1400 °C. The 1-dimensional porous structures were retained after sintering and the pore size was approximately 10–20 μm. These ferrites show large coercive force and anisotropy field. The largest coercive force was obtained for the specimen sintered at 800 °C.

  2. Ferrite thin films for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaquine, I.; Benazizi, H.; Mage, J. C.

    1988-11-01

    This paper describes the preparation and the properties of thin (a few micron-thick) ferrite films for microwave applications. The films were deposited by RF sputtering from a single ferrite target on two different 4-in-thick substrates, silicon and alumina, both bare and metallized. The as-deposited films were amorphous, requiring careful annealing in oxygen atmosphere. The optimum annealing temperature was determined by obtaining the highest possible magnetization for each ferrite. The conditions of microwave measurements are described together with the results.

  3. Drastic influence of minor Fe or Co additions on the glass forming ability, martensitic transformations and mechanical properties of shape memory Zr–Cu–Al bulk metallic glass composites

    PubMed Central

    González, Sergio; Pérez, Pablo; Rossinyol, Emma; Suriñach, Santiago; Dolors Baró, Maria; Pellicer, Eva; Sort, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of Zr48Cu48 − xAl4Mx (M ≡ Fe or Co, x = 0, 0.5, 1 at.%) metallic glass (MG) composites are highly dependent on the amount of Fe or Co added as microalloying elements in the parent Zr48Cu48Al4 material. Addition of Fe and Co promotes the transformation from austenite to martensite during the course of nanoindentation or compression experiments, resulting in an enhancement of plasticity. However, the presence of Fe or Co also reduces the glass forming ability, ultimately causing a worsening of the mechanical properties. Owing to the interplay between these two effects, the compressive plasticity for alloys with x = 0.5 (5.5% in Zr48Cu47.5Al4Co0.5 and 6.2% in Zr48Cu47.5Al4Fe0.5) is considerably larger than for Zr48Cu48Al4 or the alloys with x = 1. Slight variations in the Young’s modulus (around 5–10%) and significant changes in the yield stress (up to 25%) are also observed depending on the composition. The different microstructural factors that have an influence on the mechanical behavior of these composites are investigated in detail: (i) co-existence of amorphous and crystalline phases in the as-cast state, (ii) nature of the crystalline phases (austenite versus martensite content), and (iii) propensity for the austenite to undergo a mechanically-driven martensitic transformation during plastic deformation. Evidence for intragranular nanotwins likely generated in the course of the austenite–martensite transformation is provided by transmission electron microscopy. Our results reveal that fine-tuning of the composition of the Zr–Cu–Al–(Fe,Co) system is crucial in order to optimize the mechanical performance of these bulk MG composites, to make them suitable materials for structural applications. PMID:27877691

  4. Structural analysis of emerging ferrite: Doped nickel zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajinder; Kumar, Hitanshu; Singh, Ragini Raj; Barman, P. B.

    2015-08-28

    Ni{sub 0.6-x}Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.033, 0.264) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method and annealed at 900°C. Structural properties of all prepared samples were examined with X-ray diffraction (XRD). The partial formation of hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) secondary phase with spinel phase cubic structure of undoped and cobalt doped nickel zinc ferrite was found by XRD peaks. The variation in crystallite size and other structural parameters with cobalt doping has been calculated for most prominent peak (113) of XRD and has been explained on the basis of cations ionic radii difference.

  5. Controlling the corrosion and cathodic activation of magnesium via microalloying additions of Ge

    PubMed Central

    Liu, R. L.; Hurley, M. F.; Kvryan, A.; Williams, G.; Scully, J. R.; Birbilis, N.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of corrosion morphology and kinetics for magnesium (Mg) have been demonstrated to be influenced by cathodic activation, which implies that the rate of the cathodic partial reaction is enhanced as a result of anodic dissolution. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated to be moderated by the use of arsenic (As) alloying as a poison for the cathodic reaction, leading to significantly improved corrosion resistance. The pursuit of alternatives to toxic As is important as a means to imparting a technologically safe and effective corrosion control method for Mg (and its alloys). In this work, Mg was microalloyed with germanium (Ge), with the aim of improving corrosion resistance by retarding cathodic activation. Based on a combined analysis herein, we report that Ge is potent in supressing the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (reduction of water) upon Mg, improving corrosion resistance. With the addition of Ge, cathodic activation of Mg subject to cyclic polarisation was also hindered, with beneficial implications for future Mg electrodes. PMID:27350286

  6. Softening Kinetics in High Al and High Al-Nb-Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereda, B.; Aretxabaleta, Z.; López, B.

    2015-03-01

    Double-hit torsion tests were performed in order to study the effect of high Al levels (up to 2 wt.%) and Nb microalloying (up to 0.07 wt.%) on the static softening kinetics of 0.2%C-2%Mn steels. The addition of 1%Al leads to a delay in the softening kinetics due to solute-drag effect, equivalent to that exerted by 0.027%Nb. For the 2%Al steels, at temperatures below 1000 °C, γ → α phase transformation occurs after deformation, resulting in a larger retardation of the softening kinetics. At temperatures higher than 1000 °C, Nb in solid solution also contributes to the retardation of the static softening kinetics, and at lower temperatures NbC strain-induced precipitation leads to incomplete softening for the 1%Al steel, and to a complex interaction between softening, phase transformation, and NbC strain-induced precipitation for the 2%Al-Nb steels. The effect of Al on the static softening kinetics was quantified and introduced in a model developed in previous works for the prediction of the austenite microstructural evolution. In order to validate the results of the model, multipass torsion tests were carried out at conditions representative of hot strip and plate rolling mills. Model predictions show reasonable agreement with the results obtained at different deformation conditions.

  7. Multi analysis of the effect of grain size on the dynamic behavior of microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Anna K; Muszka, K; Majta, J; Wielgus, M

    2009-01-01

    This study presents some aspects of multiscale analysis and modeling of variously structured materials behavior in quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. The investigation was performed for two different materials of common application: high strength microalloyed steel (HSLA, X65), and as a reference more ductile material, Ti-IF steel. The MaxStrain technique and one pass hot rolling processes were used to produce ultrafine-grained and coarse-grained materials. The efficiency and inhomogeneity of microstructure refinement were examined because of their important role in work hardening and the initiation and growth of fracture under tensile stresses. It is shown that the combination of microstructures characterized by their different features contributes to the dynamic behavior and final properties of the product. In particular, the role of solute segregation at grain boundaries as well as precipitation of carbonitrides in coarse and ultrafine-grained structures is assessed. The predicted mechanical response of ultrafine-grained structures, using modified KHL model is in reasonable agreement with the experiments. This is a result of proper representation of the role of dislocation structure and the grain boundary and their multiscale effects included in this model.

  8. Overcoming challenges in the study of nitrided microalloyed steels using atom probe.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kelvin Y; Breen, Andrew J; Yao, Lan; Moody, Michael P; Gault, Baptiste; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2012-01-01

    Nitrided steels are widely used in the engineering field due to their superior hardness and other attractive properties. Atom probe tomography (APT) was employed to study two Nb-microalloyed CASTRIP steels with different N contents. A major challenge of using APT to study this group of materials is the presence of tails after Fe peaks in the mass spectra, which overestimates the composition for alloying elements such as Nb and Cu in the steels. One important factor that contributes to the tails is believed to be delayed field evaporation from Fe²⁺. This artefact of the mass spectrum was observed to be the most severe when voltage pulsing was used. The application of laser pulses with energy ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 nJ successfully reduced the tails and lead to better compositional measurement accuracy. Spatial resolution in the z-direction (along the tip direction) was observed to be less affected by changing laser energy but deteriorates in x-y direction with increasing laser energy. This investigation suggests that pulsed-laser atom probe with ∼0.4 nJ laser energy can be used to study this group of materials with improved mass resolution while still maintaining high spatial resolution.

  9. Microalloying Improves the Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Powder-Extruded NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing new structural materials in which high use temperatures and strength, coupled with low density, are the minimum requirements. The goal for these new materials is to provide operation well beyond the working range of conventional superalloys. Of the many intermetallics under consideration, NiAl is one of the few systems that has emerged as a promising candidate for further development. This is because of a number of property advantages--including low density, high melting temperature, high thermal conductivity, and excellent environmental resistance. However, binary NiAl lacks strength and creep resistance at elevated temperatures. Also, its poor high-temperature strength results in worse-than-predicted low-cycle fatigue (LCF) lives at low strain ranges at 727 C (1341 F) because of accelerated creep damage mechanisms that result in significant intergranular cracking. One approach for improving these properties involves microalloying NiAl with either Zr or N. As an integral part of this alloy-development program at the NASA Lewis Research Center, the low-cycle fatigue behavior of Zr- and N-doped nickel aluminides produced by extrusion of prealloyed powders was investigated and compared with similarly processed binary NiAl.

  10. Nonisothermal Austenite Grain Growth Kinetics in a Microalloyed X80 Linepipe Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Kumkum; Militzer, Matthias; Perez, Michel; Wang, Xiang

    2010-12-01

    Nonisothermal austenite grain growth kinetics under the influence of several combinations of Nb, Ti, and Mo containing complex precipitates has been studied in a microalloyed linepipe steel. The goal of this study is the development of a grain growth model to predict the austenite grain size in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ). Electron microscopy investigations of the as-received steel proved the presence of Ti-rich, Nb-rich, and Mo-rich precipitates. The steel has then been subjected to austenitizing heat treatments to selected peak temperatures at various heating rates that are typical for thermal cycles in the HAZ. Thermal cycles have a strong effect on the final austenite grain size. Using a mean field approach, a model is proposed for the dissolution of Nb-rich precipitates. This model has been coupled to a Zener-type austenite grain growth model in the presence of pinning particles. This coupling leads to accurate prediction of the austenite grain size along the nonisothermal heating path simulating selected thermal profiles of the HAZ.

  11. Microstructure characterization of the non-modulated martensite in Ni-Mn-Ga alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, M. Bennett, J.C.; Gharghouri, M.A.; Chen, J.; Hyatt, C.V.; Mailman, N.

    2008-06-15

    The microstructure of the non-modulated martensite in a Ni-Mn-Ga alloy has been characterized in detail by conventional transmission electron microscopy. Bright field images show that the martensite exhibits an internal substructure consisting of a high density of narrow twins. Using electron diffraction, it is found that the martensite has a tetragonal crystal structure. The lattice correspondence between the parent phase and the non-modulated martensite is investigated. Furthermore, the four twinning elements describing the microtwinning have been graphically and quantitatively determined. The results indicate that the microtwinning within the non-modulated martensite belongs to the compound type.

  12. Aspects of thermal martensite in a FeNiMnCo alloy.

    PubMed

    Güler, M; Güler, E; Kahveci, N

    2010-07-01

    Thermal martensite characteristics in Fe-29%Ni-2%Mn-2%Co alloy were investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Mössbauer spectroscopy characterization techniques. SEM observations obviously revealed the lath martensite morphology in the prior austenite phase of examined alloy. As well, the martensitic transformation kinetics was found to be as athermal type. On the other hand, Mössbauer spectroscopy offered the paramagnetic austenite phase and ferromagnetic martensite phase with their volume fractions. Also, the internal magnetic field of the martensite was measured as 32.9T from the Mössbauer spectrometer.

  13. Martensitic transformation and phase diagram in ternary Co-V-Ga Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao; Nagashima, Akihide; Nagasako, Makoto; Omori, Toshihiro; Kanomata, Takeshi; Kainuma, Ryosuke

    2017-03-01

    We report the martensitic transformation behavior in Co-V-Ga Heusler alloys. Thermoanalysis and thermomagnetization measurements were conducted to observe the martensitic transformation. By using a transmission electron microscope and an in situ X-ray diffractometer, martensitic transformation was found to occur from the L21 Heusler parent phase to the D022 martensite phase. Phase diagrams were determined for two pseudo-binary sections where martensitic transformation was detected. Magnetic properties, including the Curie temperatures and spontaneous magnetization of the parent phase, were also investigated. The magnetic properties showing behaviors different from those of NiMn-based alloys were found.

  14. Magnetic structure of martensite in Ni-Mn-Ga-Co alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesari, Eduard; Seguí, Concepció; Lázpita, Patricia

    Ni50-xCoxMn30Ga20 (x=6-9) alloys undergo martensitic transformation between ferromagnetic (FM) austenite and weak-magnetic martensite. However, the type of magnetism of martensite remains unclear. In this work, the results of a detailed study of the magnetic state of martensite in a Ni43Co7Mn30Ga20 are shown. The evolution with post-quench ageing indicates that improvement of atomic order increases the FM contributions to the weak-magnetic martensite, major changes occurring as the austenite switches from paramagnetic (PM) to FM. The results are consistent with the presence of FM clusters inside a PM matrix.

  15. Field induced martensitic phase transition in nonstoichoimetric Ni45Mn44Sn11 Heusler alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabri, T.; Venimadhav, A.; Nath, T. K.

    2017-05-01

    Nonstoichiometric high-Mn content Mn45Ni44Sn11 ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMAs) were prepared by arc melting technique. First order transition near the martensitic transition (austenitic → martensitic) has been observed from magnetization, differential scanning calorimetry and resistivity measurements upon heating and cooling run. The austenitic phase was transformed into the martensitic phase, which means that these alloys have potential as FSMA applications. The shift of martensitic transition to the lower temperature with the magnetic field confirms the field induced martensitic transition. This signifies that the highly ordered austenitic phase can be arrested to the lower temperature with the application of magnetic field.

  16. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Tempered High Cr Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra-Fuentes, L.; Hernandez-Rodriguez, M. A. L.; Zambrano-Robledo, P.; Salinas-Rodriguez, A.; Garcia-Sanchez, E.

    2017-07-01

    Microstructural and mechanical studies have been performed in a high Cr martensitic steel Firth-Vickers (FV535) to analyze the tempering of martensite. Nanoindentation technique was used to determine the hardness and elastic modulus through systematic measurements on martensite and tempered martensite. On the other hand, microscopic studies were carried out to analyze the material in the same condition as received and subsequently observe the microstructural modifications after heat treatment. The precipitation presented in the last stage of tempering was observed by transmission electron microscopy. The results showed the effect of the martensite decomposition on the mechanical and nanomechanical properties of FV535.

  17. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  18. HIGH POWER MICROWAVE FERRITES AND DEVICES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS, * MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, ALUMINUM, DELAY LINES, ELECTRODES, FERRITES , GADOLINIUM , GARNET, IONS, IRON, MAGNESIUM ALLOYS...MAGNETIC FIELDS, MAGNETIC MATERIALS, MAGNETIC MOMENTS, MANGANESE ALLOYS, MICROWAVE SPECTROSCOPY, NICKEL ALLOYS, RADIOFREQUENCY POWER, RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS, SINGLE CRYSTALS, WAVEFORM GENERATORS, YTTRIUM.

  19. HIGH POWER MICROWAVE FERRITES AND DEVICES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FERRITES , *FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS, *GARNET, *MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, ABSORPTION, ALUMINUM, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, ANISOTROPY, CRYSTALS, DIELECTRICS, DIRECT...CURRENT, ELECTRODES, GADOLINIUM , IRON, IRON ALLOYS, MAGNETIC FIELDS, MAGNETIC PROPERTIES, NICKEL ALLOYS, PHASE SHIFT CIRCUITS, RADIOFREQUENCY, RESONANCE, WAVEGUIDES, X RAY DIFFRACTION, YTTRIUM.

  20. ALL-FERRITE RHIC INJECTION KICKER

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN,H.; FISCHER,W.; PTITSYN,V.I.; TUOZZOLO,J.E.

    2001-06-18

    Ion beams are transferred from the AGS into RHIC in boxcar fashion as single bunches. The nominal design assumes 60 bunches per ring but increasing the number of bunches to gain luminosity is possible, thereby requiring injection kickers with a shorter rise time. The original injection system consists of traveling-wave dielectric loaded kicker magnets and a Blumlein pulser with a rise time adequate for the present operation. Voltage breakdown in the dielectric kickers suggested the use of all-ferrite magnets. In order to minimize the conversion cost, the design of the all-ferrite kicker uses the same components as the dielectric loaded units. The all-ferrite kickers showed in bench measured good breakdown properties and a current rise time of < 50 ns. A prototype kicker has been installed in the blue ring and was tested with beam. Beam measurements indicate suitability of all-ferrite kicker magnets for upgraded operation.