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Sample records for ferrite martensite microalloyed

  1. A preliminary ferritic-martensitic stainless steel constitution diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, M.C.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary research to develop a constitution diagram that will more accurately predict the microstructure of ferritic and martensitic stainless steel weld deposits. A button melting technique was used to produce a wide range of compositions using mixtures of conventional ferritic and martensitic stainless steels, including types 403, 409, 410, 430, 439 and 444. These samples were prepared metallographically, and the vol-% ferrite and martensite was determined quantitatively. In addition, the hardness and ferrite number (FN) were measured. Using this data, a preliminary constitution diagram is proposed that provides a more accurate method for predicting the microstructures of arc welds in ferritic and martensitic stainless steels.

  2. Effect of V and Ta on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Xiang; Liu, Guoquan; Hu, Benfu; Wang, Jinsan; Ullah, Asad

    2013-08-15

    12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels are promising candidate materials for good corrosion and irradiation resistance used for supercritical water-cooled reactor cladding and in-core components. V and Ta are considered to have improved the creep strength of high Cr steels by precipitating as MX phase. In this paper, a series of trial products microalloyed with V and V–Ta are produced, and the microstructure is characterized after quenching at 1050 °C and tempering at 780 °C by using TEM method to investigate the effect of these elements on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel. The results from both the experimental observations and thermodynamic and kinetic calculations reveal that V and V–Ta can promote the stable MX precipitation instead of M{sub 2}X, thus increasing the volume fraction of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. Two-phase separation behavior of the (Ta, V)(C, N) carbonitride into a Ta(V)C(N) phase and a V(Ta)N(C) phase in 12Cr3WVTa steel is observed and further discussed. - Highlights: • Microalloyed with V and V-Ta can promote the precipitation of MX instead of M{sub 2}X. • The presence of delta-ferrite in microstructure affects the morphology of MX. • Two-phase separation of MX carbonitride was observed in 12Cr3WVTa steel.

  3. Studies on Nb Microalloying of 13Cr Super Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoping; Wang, Lijun; Subramanian, Sundaresa V.; Liu, Chunming

    2012-12-01

    The effect of Nb microalloying on microstructure, mechanical properties, and pitting corrosion properties of quenched and tempered 13 pct Cr-5 pct Ni-0.02 pct C martensitic stainless steels with different Mo and N contents was investigated. The microstructure, density, and dispersion of high-angle boundaries, nanoscale precipitates, and amount of retained austenite were characterized by using electron backscattered diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction to correlate with properties. The results show that the combined effects of lowering nitrogen content in 13 pct Cr-5 pct Ni-1~2 pct Mo-0.02 pct C steels to 0.01 wt pct, and adding 0.1 pct Nb are to decrease the amount of Cr-rich precipitates, as Nb preferentially combines with residual carbon and nitrogen to form carbonitrides, suppressing the formation of Cr2N and Cr23C6. Austenite grain refinement can be achieved by Nb microalloying through proper heat treatment. If the nitrogen content is kept high, then Cr-rich precipitates would occur irrespective of microalloying addition. The NbN would also occur at high temperature, which will act as substrate for nucleation of coarse precipitates during subsequent tempering, impairing the toughness of the steel. It was shown that the addition of Nb to low interstitial super martensitic stainless steel retards the formation of reversed austenite and results in the formation of nanoscale precipitates (5 to 15 nm), which contribute to a significant increase in strength. More importantly, the pitting corrosion resistance was found to increase with Nb addition. This is attributed to suppression of Cr-rich precipitates, which can cause local depletion of Cr in the matrix and the initiation of pitting corrosion.

  4. A micro-alloyed ferritic steel strengthened by nanoscale precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Wang, Chong M.; Sun, Xin

    2011-10-25

    A ferritic steel with finely dispersive precipitates was investigated to reveal the fundamental strengthening mechanisms. The steel has a yield strength of 760 MPa, approximately three times higher than that of conventional Ti-bearing high strength hot-rolled sheet steels, and its ultimate tensile strength reaches 850 MPa with an elongation-to-failure value of 18%. Using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), fine carbides TiC with an average diameter of 10 nm were observed in the ferrite matrix of the 0.08%Ti steel, and some cubic M23C6 precipitates were also observed at the grain boundaries and the interior of the grains. The finely dispersive TiC precipitates in the matrix provide matrix strengthening. The estimated magnitude of precipitation strengthening is around 458 MPa, depending on the average size of the nanoscale precipitates. Dislocation densities increased from 3.42×1013 m-2 to 1.69 × 1014 m-2, respectively, with increasing tensile strain from 5.5% to 22%. The measured work-hardening behavior can be related to the observed dislocation accumulations resulting from the dispersive nano-scale precipitates.

  5. Carbides in a High-Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yin Zhong; Ji, Bo; Zhou, Xiao Ling; Zhu, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The precipitate phases in an 11 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic steel normalized at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 0.5 hour and tempered at 1053 K (780 °C) for 1.5 hours have been investigated. Except for dominant phases, Cr-rich M23C6 carbide and Nb-rich, Ta-Nb-rich, and V-rich MC carbides, needle-like precipitates with a typical size of 70 to 310 and 10 to 30 nm for the length of the long and short axis of the needles, respectively, were also observed on the extraction carbon replica of the steel. The typical metallic element composition of the needle-like precipitates is about 53-82Fe, 14-26Cr, 0.5-18Ta, 1-6W, and 2-5Co in atomic pct. Through energy dispersive X-ray analysis and electron diffraction along with calculations regarding lattice parameter and interplanar spacing, the needle-like precipitates were identified as a Fe-rich M5C2 carbide, which is not known to have been reported previously in high-chromium steels. The M5C2 carbide has a base-centered monoclinic crystal structure with the approximate lattice parameters a/ b/ c = 1.142/0.5186/0.5383 nm and β = 104.68 deg. The formation of the Fe-rich M5C2 carbides in the steel has been discussed. The effect of chromium content in matrix and boron addition on the precipitate phases in ferritic/martensitic steels has also been discussed.

  6. Non-instantaneous growth characteristics of martensitic transformation in high Cr ferritic creep-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chenxi; Shao, Yi; Chen, Jianguo; Liu, Yongchang

    2016-08-01

    Microstructural observation and high-resolution dilatometry were employed to investigate kinetics of martensitic transformation in high Cr ferritic creep-resistant steel upon different quenching/cooling rates. By incorporating the classical athermal nucleation and impingement correction, a non-instantaneous growth model for martensitic transformation has been developed. The developed model describes austenite/martensite interface mobility during martensite growth. The growth rate of martensite is found to be varied from 1 × 10-6 to 3 × 10-6 m/s. The low interface mobility suggests that it is not appropriate to presume the instantaneous growth behavior of martensite. Moreover, based on the proposed model, nucleation rate of martensite under different cooling rates is found to be nearly the same, while the growth rate of martensite is promoted by increasing the cooling rate.

  7. Nanosized MX Precipitates in Ultra-Low-Carbon Ferritic/Martensitic Heat-Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Feng-Shi; Jung, Woo-Sang

    2009-02-01

    Nanosized MX precipitates in ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant 9Cr-W-Mo-VNbTiN steels were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) using carbon film replicas. The steels were prepared by vacuum induction melting followed by hot forging and rolling into plates. The plates were normalized at 1100 °C for 1 hour, cooled in air, and tempered at 700 °C for 1 hour. The results show that bimodal nanosized MX precipitates distribute densely and homogeneously in the matrix within martensitic lath after normalizing-and-tempering heat treatment. The larger nanosized MX precipitates with the size of 30 to 50 nm are rich in Nb, while the smaller ones with the size of about 10 nm contain less Nb but more V. Small addition of Ti causes an increase in the number of the larger nanosized MX precipitates. The total number density of the nanosized MX precipitates in the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic steels is measured to be over 300/ μm2, much higher than that in conventional ferritic/martensitic steels. Short-term creep test results show that the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic steels with high dense nanosized MX precipitates have much higher creep rupture strength than conventional ASME-P92 steel. The strength degradation of the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels during creep is also discussed in this article.

  8. Fracture mechanisms in dual phase steels based on the acicular ferrite + martensite/austenite microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poruks, Peter

    The fracture mechanisms of low carbon microalloyed plate steels based on the acicular ferrite + marten site/austenite microstructure (AF + M/A) are investigated. The final microstructure consists of a dispersed phase of submicron equi-axed martensite particles with a bainitic ferrite matrix. A series of plates with M/A volume fractions of 0.076--0.179 are studied. Brittle fracture is investigated by Instrumented Charpy impact testing of samples at -196°C and subsequent metallography. The M/A particles are identified as the crack nucleation sites and the cleavage fracture stress calculated to be 2400 MPa in a complete AF microstrucuture. This value is significantly larger than in steels that contain significant proportions of conventional bainite. Standard Charpy and Instrumented Charpy impact testing is conducted through a temperature range from -80 to + 22°C to study ductile fracture behaviour. The total absorbed energy is separated into energies of crack nucleation and of crack propagation. It is found that the energy of crack nucleation is weakly dependent on the volume fraction of M/A and completely independent of temperature over the range studied. The crack propagation energy varies significantly with both variables, decreasing with increased volume fraction of M/A and with decreasing temperature. The peak load in the instrumented Charpy data is used to calculate the dynamic fracture toughness, KId, which is found to be 105--120 MPa-m1/2. The void nucleation and void growth stages of ductile fracture are studied by metallographic examination of tensile bars. The sites of void nucleation are identified as inclusions and M/A particles. Voids nucleate at the M/A particles by decohesion of the particle-matrix interface. A constant void nucleation strain of epsilon = 0.90 +/- 0.05 is measured for all of the samples independent of the volume fraction of M/A. A stress-based criterion is used to predict void nucleation and the interface strength is determined to be

  9. Tritium retention in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Y.; Abe, S.; Matsuyama, M.; Alimov, V.K.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Bobyr, N.P.; Cherkez, D.I.; Khripunov, B.I.; Golubeva, A.V.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Klimov, N.S.; Chernov, V.M.; Oyaidzu, M.; Yamanishi, T.

    2015-03-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are structural material candidates for breeding blankets of future fusion reactors. Therefore, tritium (T) retention in RAFM steels is an important problem in assessing the T inventory of blankets. In this study, specimens of RAFM steels were subjected to irradiation of 20 MeV W ions to 0.54 displacements per atom (dpa), exposure to high flux D plasmas at 400 and 600 K and that to pulsed heat loads. The specimens thus prepared were exposed to DT gas at 473 K. Despite severe modification in the surface morphology, heat loads had negligible effects on T retention. Significant increase in T retention at the surface and/or subsurface was observed after D plasma exposure. However, T trapped at the surface/subsurface layer was easily removed by maintaining the specimens in the air at about 300 K. Displacement damage led to increase in T retention in the bulk due to the trapping effects of defects, and T trapped was stable at 300 K. It was therefore concluded that displacement damages had the largest influence on T retention under the present conditions.

  10. Martensitic/ferritic steels as container materials for liquid mercury target of ESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.

    1996-06-01

    In the previous report, the suitability of steels as the ESS liquid mercury target container material was discussed on the basis of the existing database on conventional austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels, especially on their representatives, solution annealed 316 stainless steel (SA 316) and Sandvik HT-9 martensitic steel (HT-9). Compared to solution annealed austenitic stainless steels, martensitic/ferritic steels have superior properties in terms of strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, mercury corrosion resistance, void swelling and irradiation creep resistance. The main limitation for conventional martensitic/ferritic steels (CMFS) is embrittlement after low temperature ({le}380{degrees}C) irradiation. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can increase as much as 250 to 300{degrees}C and the upper-shelf energy (USE), at the same time, reduce more than 50%. This makes the application temperature range of CMFS is likely between 300{degrees}C to 500{degrees}C. For the present target design concept, the temperature at the container will be likely controlled in a temperature range between 180{degrees}C to 330{degrees}C. Hence, CMFS seem to be difficult to apply. However, solution annealed austenitic stainless steels are also difficult to apply as the maximum stress level at the container will be higher than the design stress. The solution to the problem is very likely to use advanced low-activation martensitic/ferritic steels (LAMS) developed by the fusion materials community though the present database on the materials is still very limited.

  11. Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations.

  12. Kinetics of Ferrite Recrystallization and Austenite Formation During Intercritical Annealing of the Cold-Rolled Ferrite/Martensite Duplex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, Y.; Kermanpur, A.; Najafizadeh, A.; Kalashami, A. Ghatei

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafine-grained, dual-phase (UFG DP) steels were produced by a new route using an uncommon cold-rolling and subsequent intercritical annealing of ferrite/martensite duplex starting microstructures. The effects of processing parameters such as rolling reduction, intercritical annealing temperature, and time on the microstructural evaluations have been studied. UFG DP steels with an average grain size of about 1 to 2 μm were achieved by short intercritical annealing of the 80 pct cold-rolled duplex microstructures. The kinetics of ferrite recrystallization and austenite formation were studied based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model. The proposed model for describing the isothermal austenite formation kinetics was applied successfully to the nonisothermal conditions. It was found that complete recrystallization of ferrite before the austenite formation led to the formation of a large extent randomly distributed austenite in the ferrite matrix and a chain-networked structure.

  13. Kinetics and formation mechanisms of intragranular ferrite in V-N microalloyed 600 MPa high strength rebar steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Fu-ming; Li, Chang-rong

    2016-04-01

    To systematically investigate the kinetics and formation mechanisms of intragranular ferrite (IGF), isothermal heat treatment in the temperature range of 450°C to 600°C with holding for 30 s to 300 s, analysis of the corresponding microstructures, and observation of the precipitated particles were conducted in V-N microalloyed 600 MPa high strength rebar steel. The potency of V(C,N) for IGF nucleation was also analyzed statistically. The results show that the dominant microstructure transforms from bainite (B) and acicular ferrite (AF) to grain boundary ferrite (GBF), intragranular polygonal ferrite (IPF), and pearlite (P) as the isothermal temperature increases from 450°C to 600°C. When the holding time at 600°C is extended from 30 s to 60 s, 120 s, and 300 s, the GBF content ranges from 6.0vol% to 6.5vol% and the IPF content increases from 0.5vol% to 2.8vol%, 13.1vol%, and 13.5vol%, respectively, because the ferrite transformation preferentially occurs at the grain boundaries and then occurs at the austenite grains. Notably, V(C,N) particles are the most effective nucleation site for the formation of IPF, accounting for 51% of the said formation.

  14. Current status and future R&D for reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishinuma, A.; Kohyama, A.; Klueh, R. L.; Gelles, D. S.; Dietz, W.; Ehrlich, K.

    1998-10-01

    International research and development programs on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels, the primary candidate-alloys for a DEMO fusion reactor and beyond, are briefly summarized, along with some information on conventional steels. An International Energy Agency (IEA) collaborative test program to determine the feasibility of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion is in progress and will be completed within this century. Baseline properties including typical irradiation behavior for Fe-(7-9)%Cr reduced-activation ferritic steels are shown. Most of the data are for a heat of modified F82H steel, purchased for the IEA program. Experimental plans to explore possible problems and solutions for fusion devices using ferromagnetic materials are introduced. The preliminary results show that it should be possible to use a ferromagnetic vacuum vessel in tokamak devices.

  15. Microstructure and properties of pipeline steel with a ferrite/martensite dual-phase microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Li Rutao Zuo Xiurong Hu Yueyue Wang Zhenwei Hu, Dingxu

    2011-08-15

    In order to satisfy the transportation of the crude oil and gas in severe environmental conditions, a ferrite/martensite dual-phase pipeline steel has been developed. After a forming process and double submerged arc welding, the microstructure of the base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The pipe showed good deformability and an excellent combination of high strength and toughness, which is suitable for a pipeline subjected to the progressive and abrupt ground movement. The base metal having a ferrite/martensite dual-phase microstructure exhibited excellent mechanical properties in terms of uniform elongation of 7.5%, yield ratio of 0.78, strain hardening exponent of 0.145, an impact energy of 286 J at - 10 deg. C and a shear area of 98% at 0 deg. C in the drop weight tear test. The tensile strength and impact energy of the weld metal didn't significantly reduce, because of the intragranularly nucleated acicular ferrites microstructure, leading to high strength and toughness in weld metal. The heat affected zone contained complete quenching zone and incomplete quenching zone, which exhibited excellent low temperature toughness of 239 J at - 10 deg. C. - Research Highlights: {yields}The pipe with ferrite/martensite microstructure shows high deformability. {yields}The base metal of the pipe consists of ferrite and martensite. {yields}Heat affected zone shows excellent low temperature toughness. {yields}Weld metal mainly consists of intragranularly nucleated acicular ferrites. {yields}Weld metal shows excellent low temperature toughness and high strength.

  16. Gas bubbles evolution peculiarities in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels and alloys under helium-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, I. I.; Kalashnikov, A. N.; Kalin, B. A.; Binyukova, S. Yu

    2003-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the gas bubble evolution in model alloys of the Fe-C system, ferritic-martensitic steels of 13Cr type, nickel and austenitic steels under 40-keV helium-ion irradiation up to a fluence of 5 × 10 20 m -2 at the temperature of 920 K. It was shown that helium-ion irradiation at high temperature resulted in formation of bubbles with a greater size and a smaller density in Fe and ferritic-martensitic steels than those in nickel and austenitic steels. Large gaseous bubbles in ferritic component are uniformly distributed in grains body in Fe-C alloys as well as in ferritic-martensitic steels. The bubbles with a higher density and a smaller size than those in ferritic component are formed in martensitic grains of steels and Fe-C alloys with a high carbon content ( NC>0.01 wt%), which leads to a small level of swelling of martensite in comparison with that of ferrite. In addition, the bubbles in martensitic grains have a tendency to ordered distribution.

  17. Summary of the IEA workshop/working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    An International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Group on Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for Fusion Applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, the European Union, the United States, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, United Kingdom, 24-25 October 1996. At the meeting preliminary data generated on the large heats of steel purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. The second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The next meeting will be held in conjunction with the International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) in Sendai, Japan, 23-31 October 1997.

  18. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  19. Metallography studies and hardness measurements on ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in STIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Long, B.; Dai, Y.

    2008-06-01

    In this work metallography investigations and microhardness measurements have been performed on 15 ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels and 6 weld metals irradiated in the SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP). The results demonstrate that all the steels have quite similar martensite lath structures. However, the sizes of the prior austenite grain (PAG) of these steels are quite different and vary from 10 to 86 μm. The microstructure in the fusion zones (FZ) of electron-beam welds (EBWs) of 5 steels (T91, EM10, MANET-II, F82H and Optifer-IX) is similar in respect to the martensite lath structure and PAG size. The FZ of the inert-gas-tungsten weld (TIGW) of the T91 steel shows a duplex structure of large ferrite gains and martensite laths. The microhardness measurements indicate that the normalized and tempered FM steels have rather close hardness values. The unusual high hardness values of the EBW and TIGW of the T91 steel were detected, which suggests that these materials are without proper tempering or post-welding heat treatment.

  20. Load partitioning between ferrite/martensite and dispersed nanoparticles of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-06-18

    In this study, a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray technique was used to investigate the tensile deformation processes of a 9Cr-ODS ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel at different temperatures. Two minor phases within the 9Cr-ODS F/M steel matrix were identified as Y2Ti2O7 and TiN by the high-energy X-ray diffraction, and confirmed by the analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The lattice strains of the matrix and particles were measured through the entire tensile deformation process. During the tensile tests, the lattice strains of the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) showed a strong temperature dependence, decreasing with increasing temperature. Analysis of the internal stress at three temperatures showed that the load partitioning between the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) was initiated during sample yielding and reached to a peak during sample necking. At three studied temperatures, the internal stress of minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN) was about 2 times that of F/M matrix at yielding position, while the internal stress of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN reached about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times that of the F/M matrix at necking position, respectively. It indicates that the strengthening of the matrix is due to minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN), especially Y2Ti2O7 particles. Although the internal stresses of all phases decreased with increasing temperature from RT to 600 degrees C, the ratio of internal stresses of each phase at necking position stayed in a stable range (internal stresses of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN were about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times of that of F/M matrix, respectively). The difference between internal stress of the F/M matrix and the applied stress at 600 degrees C is slightly lower than those at RI and 300 degrees C, indicating that the nanoparticles still have good strengthening effect at 600 degrees C. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Z-Phase in 9Cr Ferritic/martensitic Heat Resistant Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Fengshi; Chen, Fuxia; Jiang, Xuebo; Xue, Bing; Zhou, Li; Jung, Woosang

    The precipitation behavior of Z-phase was investigated during long-term aging at 650°C in an ultra low carbon 9Cr ferritic/martensitic heat resistant steel. The steel was prepared by vacuum induction melting followed by hot forging and rolling into a plate. The plate was normalized at 1100°C for 1h, cooled in air and tempered at 700°C for 1h. Bimodal nano-sized MX precipitates distribute densely and homogeneously in the matrix within martensitic lath after normalizing-and-tempering heat treatment. After aging at 650°C for 1200h, the Z-phase was found to nucleate on the larger nano-sized MX. The Z-phase and MX have the following orientation relationship: <112>Z-phase//<001>MX and (1bar 10){Z-phase}//(200){MX} .

  2. Radiation hardening and deformation behavior of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Shiba, K.

    1998-03-01

    Tensile data from several 8--12% Cr alloys irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses up to 34 dpa at temperatures ranging from 90 to 600 C are discussed in this paper. One of the critical questions surrounding the use of ferritic-martensitic steels in a fusion environment concerns the loss of uniform elongation after irradiation at low temperatures. Irradiation and testing at temperatures below 200--300 C results in uniform elongations less than 1% and stress-strain curves in which plastic instability immediately follows yielding, implying dislocation channeling and flow localization. Reductions in area and total elongations, however, remain high.

  3. Recent Progress of R&D Activities on Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Q.; Baluc, N.; Dai, Y.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, A.; Konys, J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Lindau, R.; Muroga, T.; Odette, George R.; Raj, B.; Stoller, Roger E.; Tan, L.; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Tavassoli, A,-A.F.; Yamamoto, Takuya; Wan, F.; Wu, Y.

    2013-01-03

    Several types of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel have been developed over the past 30 years in China, Europe, India, Japan, Russia and the USA for application in ITER TBM and future fusion DEMO and power reactors. The progress has been particularly important during the past few years with evaluation of mechanical porperties of these steels before and after irradiation and in contact with different cooling media. This paper presents recent RAFM steel results obtained in ITER partner countries in relation with different TBM and DEMO options

  4. Report on thermal aging effects on tensile properties of ferritic-martensitic steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.; Listwan, J.T.; Natesan, K.

    2012-05-10

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of thermal-aging induced degradation of tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic steels. The report is the first deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030103), under the Work Package A-11AN040301, 'Advanced Alloy Testing' performed by Argonne National Laboratory, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing tensile data on aged alloys and a mechanistic model, validated by experiments, with a predictive capability on long-term performance. The scope of work is to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on the tensile properties of advanced alloys such as ferritic-martensitic steels, mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616, and advanced austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS. The aging experiments have been conducted over a temperature of 550-750 C for various time periods to simulate the microstructural changes in the alloys as a function of time at temperature. In addition, a mechanistic model based on thermodynamics and kinetics has been used to address the changes in microstructure of the alloys as a function of time and temperature, which is developed in the companion work package at ANL. The focus of this project is advanced alloy testing and understanding the effects of long-term thermal aging on the tensile properties. Advanced materials examined in this project include ferritic-martensitic steels mod.9Cr-1Mo and NF616, and austenitic steel, HT-UPS. The report summarizes the tensile testing results of thermally-aged mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 ferritic-martensitic steels. NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 experienced different thermal-mechanical treatments before thermal aging experiments. NF616 H1 was normalized and tempered, and NF616 H2 was normalized and tempered and cold-rolled. By examining these two heats, we evaluated the effects of thermal-mechanical treatments on material microstructures and

  5. Irradiation-induced grain growth in nanocrystalline reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W. B.; Chen, L. Q.; Zhang, C. Yang, Z. G.; Ji, Y. Z.; Zang, H.; Shen, T. L.

    2014-09-22

    In this work, we investigate the microstructure evolution of surface-nanocrystallized reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels upon high-dose helium ion irradiation (24.3 dpa). We report a significant irradiation-induced grain growth in the irradiated buried layer at a depth of 300–500 nm, rather than at the peak damage region (at a depth of ∼840 nm). This phenomenon can be explained by the thermal spike model: minimization of the grain boundary (GB) curvature resulting from atomic diffusion in the cascade center near GBs.

  6. Investigation of Magnetic Signatures and Microstructures for Heat-Treated Ferritic/Martensitic HT-9 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; McCloy, John S.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan

    2013-05-01

    There is increased interest in improved methods for in-situ nondestructive interrogation of materials for nuclear reactors in order to ensure reactor safety and quantify material degradation (particularly embrittlement) prior to failure. Therefore, a prototypical ferritic/martensitic alloy, HT-9, of interest to the nuclear materials community was investigated to assess microstructure effects on micromagnetics measurements – Barkhausen noise emission, magnetic hysteresis measurements, and first-order reversal curve analysis – for samples with three different heat-treatments. Microstructural and physical measurements consisted of high-precision density, resonant ultrasound elastic constant determination, Vickers microhardness, grain size, and texture. These were varied in the HT-9 alloy samples and related to various magnetic signatures. In parallel, a meso-scale microstructure model was created for alpha iron and effects of polycrystallinity and demagnetization factor were explored. It was observed that Barkhausen noise emission decreased with increasing hardness and decreasing grain size (lath spacing) while coercivity increased. The results are discussed in terms of the use of magnetic signatures for nondestructive interrogation of radiation damage and other microstructural changes in ferritic/martensitic alloys.

  7. On the (in)adequacy of the Charpy impact test to monitor irradiation effects of ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaouadi, R.

    2007-02-01

    Irradiation embrittlement studies rely very often on Charpy impact data, in particular the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). However, while the DBTT-shift is equivalent to the increase of the fracture toughness transition temperature of ferritic steels, it is not the case for ferritic/martensitic steels. The aim of this study is to critically assess experimental data obtained on a 9%Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel, Eurofer-97, to better understand the underlying mechanisms involved during the fracture process. More specifically, a dedicated analysis using the load diagram approach allows to unambiguously reveal the actual effects of irradiation on physically rather than empirically based parameters. A comparison is made between a ferritic and ferritic/martensitic steel to better identify the possible similarities and differences. Tensile, Charpy impact and fracture toughness tests data are examined in a global approach to assess the actual rather than apparent irradiation effects. The adequacy or inadequacy of the Charpy impact test to monitor irradiation effects is extensively discussed.

  8. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  9. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of ferritic/martensitic steel in super critical pressurized water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, T.; Shiba, K.; Enoeda, M.; Akiba, M.

    2007-08-01

    A water-cooled solid breeder (WCSB) blanket cooled by high temperature SCPW (super critical pressurized water) is a practical option of DEMO reactor. Therefore, it is necessary to check the compatibility of the steel with SCPW. In this work, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H has been tested through slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in 23.5 MPa SCPW. And weight change behavior was measured up to 1000 h. F82H did not demonstrated stress corrosion cracking and its weight simply increased with surface oxidation. The weight change of F82H was almost same as commercial 9%-Cr steels. According to a cross-sectional analysis and weight change behavior, corrosion rate of F82H in the 823 K SCPW is estimated to be 0.04 mm/yr.

  10. Corrosion of austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Anderson, Mark; Taylor, D; Allen, Todd R.

    2011-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) is a potential coolant for advanced nuclear reactors. The corrosion behavior of austenitic steels (alloys 800H and AL-6XN) and ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels (F91 and HCM12A) exposed to S-CO{sub 2} at 650 C and 20.7 MPa is presented in this work. Oxidation was identified as the primary corrosion phenomenon. Alloy 800H had oxidation resistance superior to AL-6XN. The FM steels were less corrosion resistant than the austenitic steels, which developed thick oxide scales that tended to exfoliate. Detailed microstructure characterization suggests the effect of alloying elements such as Al, Mo, Cr, and Ni on the oxidation of the steels.

  11. Creep behavior of pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic martensitic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Zhang, Ying; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    The creep behavior of various pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel was investigated at 650 C in laboratory air. The coatings were fabricated in two temperature regimes, i.e., 650 or 700 C (low temperature) and 1050 C(high temperature), and consisted of a range of Al levels and thicknesses. For comparison, uncoated specimens heat-treated at 1050 C to simulate the high temperature coating cycle also were included in the creep test. All coated specimens showed a reduction in creep resistance, with 16 51% decrease in rupture life compared to the as-received bare substrate alloy. However, the specimens heat-treated at 1050 C exhibited the lowest creep resistance among all tested samples, with a surprisingly short rupture time of < 25 h, much shorter than the specimen coated at 1050 C. Factors responsible for the reduction in creep resistance of both coated and heat-treated specimens were discussed.

  12. Summary Report of Summer Work: High Purity Single Crystal Growth & Microstructure of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pestovich, Kimberly Shay

    2015-08-18

    Harnessing the power of the nuclear sciences for national security and to benefit others is one of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s missions. MST-8 focuses on manipulating and studying how the structure, processing, properties, and performance of materials interact at the atomic level under nuclear conditions. Within this group, single crystal scintillators contribute to the safety and reliability of weapons, provide global security safeguards, and build on scientific principles that carry over to medical fields for cancer detection. Improved cladding materials made of ferritic-martensitic alloys support the mission of DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program to close the nuclear fuel cycle, aiming to solve nuclear waste management challenges and thereby increase the performance and safety of current and future reactors.

  13. Resistance spot weldability of 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Yano, Yasuhide; Ito, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    Resistance spot welding of 11Cr-0.4Mo-2W, V, Nb ferritic/martensitic steel sheets with different thicknesses was examined to develop a manufacturing technology for a fast reactor fuel subassembly with an inner duct structure. In the spot welding, welding current, electrode force, welding time and holding time were varied as welding parameters to investigate the appropriate welding conditions. Welding conditions under which spot weld joints did not have either crack or void defects in the nugget could be found when the electrode force was increased to 9.8 kN. It was also found that the electrode cap with a longer tip end length was effective for preventing weld defect formations. Strength of the spot welded joint was characterized from micro hardness and shear tension tests. In addition, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the spot welded joint was measured by Charpy impact tests with specimens that had notches in the welded zone.

  14. Development of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and fabrication technologies for Indian test blanket module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Jayakumar, T.

    2011-10-01

    For the development of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel (RAFMS), for the Indian Test Blanket Module for ITER, a 3-phase programme has been adopted. The first phase consists of melting and detailed characterization of a laboratory scale heat conforming to Eurofer 97 composition, to demonstrate the capability of the Indian industry for producing fusion grade steel. In the second phase which is currently in progress, the chemical composition will be optimized with respect to tungsten and tantalum for better combination of mechanical properties. Characterization of the optimized commercial scale India-specific RAFM steel will be carried out in the third phase. The first phase of the programme has been successfully completed and the tensile, impact and creep properties are comparable with Eurofer 97. Laser and electron beam welding parameters have been optimized and welding consumables were developed for Narrow Gap - Gas Tungsten Arc welding and for laser-hybrid welding.

  15. Effect of mechanical restraint on weldability of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel thick plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serizawa, Hisashi; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Manabu; Kawahito, Yousuke; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Katayama, Seiji

    2011-10-01

    As one of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, the weldability of thick F82H plate was experimentally examined using new heat sources in order to minimize the total heat input energy in comparison with TIG welding. A full penetration of 32 mm thick plate could be produced as a combination of a 12 mm deep first layer generated by a 10 kW fiber laser beam and upper layers deposited by a plasma MIG hybrid welding with Ar + 2%O shielding gas. Also, the effect of mechanical restraint on the weldability under EB welding of thick F82H plate was studied by using FEM to select an appropriate specimen size for the basic test. The appropriate and minimum size for the basic test of weldability under EB welding of 90 mm thick plate might be 200 mm in length and 400 mm in width where the welding length should be about 180 mm.

  16. Mechanical Performance of Ferritic Martensitic Steels for High Dose Applications in Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderoglu, Osman; Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are considered for core applications and pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors as well as first walls and blankets for fusion reactors. There are significant scientific data on testing and industrial experience in making this class of alloys worldwide. This experience makes F/M steels an attractive candidate. In this article, tensile behavior, fracture toughness and impact property, and creep behavior of the F/M steels under neutron irradiations to high doses with a focus on high Cr content (8 to 12) are reviewed. Tensile properties are very sensitive to irradiation temperature. Increase in yield and tensile strength (hardening) is accompanied with a loss of ductility and starts at very low doses under irradiation. The degradation of mechanical properties is most pronounced at <0.3 T M ( T M is melting temperature) and up to 10 dpa (displacement per atom). Ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit a high fracture toughness after irradiation at all temperatures even below 673 K (400 °C), except when tested at room temperature after irradiations below 673 K (400 °C), which shows a significant reduction in fracture toughness. Creep studies showed that for the range of expected stresses in a reactor environment, the stress exponent is expected to be approximately one and the steady state creep rate in the absence of swelling is usually better than austenitic stainless steels both in terms of the creep rate and the temperature sensitivity of creep. In short, F/M steels show excellent promise for high dose applications in nuclear reactors.

  17. Diffusive transport parameters of deuterium through China reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Liu, Lingbo; Xiang, Xin; Rao, Yongchu; Ye, Xiaoqiu; Chen, Chang An

    2016-03-01

    Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels have been considered as the most promising candidate structure materials for a fusion reactor. In the recent decades, two new types of RAFM steels, called China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel and China Low-activation Ferritic (CLF-1) steel, have been developed. The gas evolution permeation technique has been used to investigate diffusive transport parameters of deuterium through CLAM and CLF-1 over the temperature range 623 ∼ 873 K at deuterium pressure of 105 Pa. The resultant transport parameters are: Φ (mol. m-1 s-1 Pa-1/2) = 5.40 × 10-8 exp (-46.8 (kJ. mol-1)/RT), D(m2 s-1) = 3.81 × 10-7 exp(-24.0(kJ. mol-1)/RT) and S (mol. m-3 Pa-1/2) = 1.42 × 10-1 exp(-22.8(kJ. mol-1)/RT) for CLAM; while Φ(mol m-1 s-1 Pa-1/2) = 1.76 × 10-8 exp(-43.9(kJ. mol-1)/RT), D(m2. s-1) = 1.02 × 10-7 exp(-16.9(kJ. mol-1)/RT) and S(mol. m-1 Pa-1/2) = 1.73 × 10-1 exp(-27.0(kJ. mol-1) /RT) for CLF-1. The results show that CLAM is more permeable than CLF-1, thus it is easier for hydrogen isotopes to transport and be removed.

  18. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Snead, L. L.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-09-01

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ∼500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimental results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. The strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9-20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  19. Microstructural Evolution and Recrystallization Kinetics of a Cold-Rolled, Ferrite-Martensite Structure During Intercritical Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etesami, S. A.; Enayati, M. H.

    2016-07-01

    The recrystallization behavior of 80 pct, cold-rolled, low-carbon, dual-phase steel during intercritical annealing for different times was studied. The annealed microstructures showed that the recrystallization initially occurred in the deformed martensitic regions. The values of Avrami exponent for recrystallization varied from 3.8 to 4 with an activation energy of 46.9 kJ/mol. This study also introduced a novel method for the production of bimodal grain structures in low-carbon, ferrite-martensite steel.

  20. Corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaowei

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels and Ni-based alloys in supercritical water (SCW) has been studied due to their potential applications in future nuclear reactor systems, fossil fuel power plants and waste treatment processes. 9˜12% chromium ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit good radiation resistance and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Ni-based alloys with an austenitic face-centered cubic (FCC) structure are designed to retain good mechanical strength and corrosion/oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Corrosion tests were carried out at three temperatures, 360°C, 500°C and 600°C, with two dissolved oxygen contents, 25 ppb and 2 ppm for up to 3000 hours. Alloys modified by grain refinement and reactive element addition were also investigated to determine their ability to improve the corrosion resistance in SCW. A duplex oxide structure was observed in the F/M steels after exposure to 25 ppb oxygen SCW, including an outer oxide layer with columnar magnetite grains and an inner oxide layer constituted of a mixture of spinel and ferrite phases in an equiaxed grain structure. An additional outermost hematite layer formed in the SCW-exposed samples when the oxygen content was increased to 2 ppm. Weight gain in the F/M steels increased with exposure temperatures and times, and followed parabolic growth kinetics in most of the samples. In Ni-based alloys after exposure to SCW, general corrosion and pitting corrosion were observed, and intergranular corrosion was found when exposed at 600°C due to formation of a local healing layer. The general oxide structure on the Ni-based alloys was characterized as NiO/Spinel/(CrxFe 1-x)2O3/(Fe,Ni). No change in oxidation mechanism was observed in crossing the critical point despite the large change in water properties. Corrosion resistance of the F/M steels was significantly improved by plasma-based yttrium surface treatment because of restrained outward diffusion of iron by the

  1. Parametric study of irradiation effects on the ductile damage and flow stress behavior in ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-10-01

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are currently being considered as structural materials in fusion and Gen-IV nuclear reactors. These materials are expected to experience high dose radiation, which can increase their ductile to brittle transition temperature and susceptibility to failure during operation. Hence, to estimate the safe operational life of the reactors, precise evaluation of the ductile to brittle transition temperatures of ferritic-martensitic steels is necessary. Owing to the scarcity of irradiated samples, particularly at high dose levels, micro-mechanistic models are being employed to predict the shifts in the ductile to brittle transition temperatures. These models consider the ductile damage evolution, in the form of nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids; and the brittle fracture, in the form of probabilistic cleavage initiation, to estimate the influence of irradiation on the ductile to brittle transition temperature. However, the assessment of irradiation dependent material parameters is challenging and influences the accuracy of these models. In the present study, the effects of irradiation on the overall flow stress and ductile damage behavior of two ferritic-martensitic steels is parametrically investigated. The results indicate that the ductile damage model parameters are mostly insensitive to irradiation levels at higher dose levels though the resulting flow stress behavior varies significantly.

  2. Influence of structural-phase state of ferritic-martensitic steels on the helium porosity development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, I. I.; Staltsov, M. S.; Kalin, B. A.; Bogachev, I. A.; Guseva, L. Yu; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Drozhzhina, M. V.; Manukovsky, K. V.; Nikolaeva, I. D.

    2016-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to study the effect of the initial structural-phase state (SPhS) of ferritic-martensitic steels EK-181, EP-450 and EP-450- ODS (with 0.5 wt.% nanoparticles of Y2O3) on the of helium porosity formation and gas swelling. Different SPhS of steel EK-181 was produced by water quenching, annealing, normalizing plus tempered, intensive plastic deformation by torsion (HPDT). Irradiation was carried out by He+-40 keV ions at 923 K up to fluence of 5-1020 He+/m2. It is shown that the water quenching causes the formation of uniformly distributed small bubbles (d¯ ∼ 2 nm) of the highest density (ρ∼ 1025 m-3). After normalization followed by tempering as well as after annealing bubbles distribution is highly non-uniform both by volume and in size. Very large faceted bubbles (pre-equilibrium gas-filled voids) are formed in ferrite grains resulting in high level of gas swelling of the irradiated layer with S = 4,9 ± 1,2 and 3.8 ± 0.9% respectively. Nano- and microcrystalline structure created by HPDT completely degenerate at irradiation temperature and ion irradiation formed bubbles of the same parameters as in the annealed steel. Bubbles formed in EP-450-ODS steel are smaller in size and density, which led to a decrease of helium swelling by 4 times (S = 0.8 ± 0.2%) as compared to the swelling of the matrix steel EP-450 (S = 3.1 ± 0.7%).

  3. Influence of delta ferrite and dendritic carbides on the impact and tensile properties of a martensitic chromium steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, L.

    1998-10-01

    Martensitic chrome steels with a high content of chromium incline to form delta ferrite frequently accompanied by massive dendritic carbide precipitations. Both phases mostly influence the mechanical properties of this steel in countercurrent manner. The relatively soft delta ferrite causes an increase of ductility and toughness, whilst the brittle dendritic carbides decreases both. Both phases mostly decrease the strength of the steel. One or the other influence will be dominant in dependence of the quantitative relation of the two phases. This is the cause for very different statements in the literature. The dendritic carbides should be avoided using a cooling rate of more than 10 3 K/min after the austenitization, because this phase mostly impairs the mechanical properties of the steel. However, the delta ferrite without dendritic carbides can be tolerated mostly.

  4. A reassessment of the effects of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.; Hankin, G.L.

    1998-03-01

    To test the effect of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels, two approaches are reviewed: quantification of results of tests performed on specimens irradiated in reactors with very different neutron spectra, and isotopic tailoring experiments. Data analysis can show that if the differences in reactor response are indeed due to helium effects, then irradiation in a fusion machine at 400 C to 100 dpa and 1000 appm He will result in a ductile to brittle transition temperature shift of over 500 C. However, the response as a function of dose and helium level is unlikely to be simply due to helium based on physical reasoning. Shear punch tests and microstructural examinations also support this conclusion based on irradiated samples of a series of alloys made by adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation in HFIR. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys. However, helium itself, up to 75 appm at over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys. This behavior is instead understood to result from complex precipitation response. The database for effects of helium on embrittlement based on nickel additions is therefore probably misleading and experiments should be redesigned to avoid nickel precipitation.

  5. Influence of combined thermomechanical treatment on impurity segregation in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, A. M.; Neustroev, V. S.; Shamardin, V. K.; Shestakov, V. P.; Tazhibaeva, I. L.; Krivchenkoa, V. A.

    2000-12-01

    In this study 13Cr2MoVNb ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) and 16Cr15Ni3MoNb austenitic stainless steel (ASS) tensile specimens were subjected to standard heat treatments and divided into two groups. Specimens in group 1 (FMS only) were aged at 400°C in a stress free and in an elastically stressed state with a tensile load (100 MPa) then doped with hydrogen in an electrolytic cell. Specimens in group 2 were subjected to cold work (up to 10%) and exposed to short-time heating at 500° for 0.5 h. All specimens were fractured at room temperature in an Auger spectrometer and Auger analysis of the fracture surfaces was performed in situ after fracturing. A noticeable increase of N and P segregation levels and a widening of the depth distribution on the grain boundary facets were observed in the FMS after aging in the stressed state. Cold-worked FMS and ASS showed a ductile dimple mode of fracture, but relatively high levels of S, P and N were observed on the dimple surfaces. We consider the origin of such effects in terms of the stressed state and plastic-deformation-enhanced segregation.

  6. Using nonlinear ultrasound measurements to track thermal aging in modified 9%Cr ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Daniel; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Ruiz, Alberto; Joo, Young-Sang

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates early thermal aging in 9%Cr ferritic martensitic (FM) steel, which is caused by the formation of second phases during high temperature exposure. This study employs a recently developed nonlinear ultrasonic technique to explore the sensitivity of the nonlinearity parameter. Experimental results show that the nonlinearity parameter is sensitive to certain changes in material's properties such as thermal embrittlement and hardness changes; therefore, it can be used as an indicator of the thermal damage. The specimens investigated are heat treated for different holding times ranging from 200h to 3000h at 650°C. Nonlinear ultrasonic experiments are conducted for each specimen using a wedge transducer to generate and an air-coupled transducer to detect Raleigh surface waves. The amplitudes of the first and second order harmonics are measured at different propagation distances and these amplitudes are used to obtain the relative nonlinearity parameter for each specimen with a different holding time. The nonlinear ultrasonic results are compared with independent mechanical measurements and metallographic images. This research proposes the nonlinear ultrasonic technique as a nondestructive evaluation tool not only to detect thermal damage in early stages, and also to qualitatively assess the stage of thermal damage.

  7. Formation and Oxidation Performance of Low-Temperature Pack Aluminide Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Ying; Pint, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    A pack cementation process was developed to coat commercial 9% Cr ferritic-martensitic steel T91 at temperatures below its normal tempering temperature to avoid any potential detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of the coated alloy. In order to prevent the formation of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} coatings, the Al activity in the pack cementation process was reduced by substituting the pure Al masteralloy with binary Cr-Al masteralloys containing either 15 or 25 wt.% Al. When the Cr-25Al masteralloy was used, a duplex coating was formed at 700 C, consisting of a thin Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} outer layer and an inner layer of FeAl. With the Cr-15Al masteralloy, an FeAl coating of {approx} 12 {micro}m thick was achieved at 700 C. The pack aluminide coatings fabricated at 700 C are being evaluated in air + 10 vol.% H{sub 2}O at 650 C and 700 C to determine their long-term oxidation performance.

  8. A closer look at the fracture toughness of ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucon, Enrico

    2007-08-01

    SCK·CEN has characterized the mechanical properties of several ferritic/martensitic steels, both unirradiated and irradiated. Fracture toughness has been evaluated using Charpy impact and fracture mechanics tests. Two safety-related features have emerged: (a) the applicability of the master curve approach (ASTM E1921-05) appears questionable; and (b) irradiation embrittlement is systematically larger when quantified in terms of quasi-static fracture toughness than when measured from Charpy tests. Both issues are examined in detail and possible interpretations are proposed; potential improvements given by the application of more advanced fracture toughness analysis methodologies are discussed. In order to clarify whether the Charpy/fracture toughness difference in embrittlement is due to loading rate effects, dynamic toughness tests have been performed in the unirradiated condition and for two irradiation doses (0.3 and 1.6 dpa). The corresponding dynamic T0 shifts have been compared with the shifts of Charpy and master curve quasi-static transition temperatures. Other possible contributions are examined and discussed.

  9. The development of ferritic-martensitic steels with reduced long-term activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kelzenberg, S.; Röhrig, H.-D.; Schäfer, L.; Schirra, M.

    1994-09-01

    Ferritic-martensitic 9-12% CrMoVNb steels of MANET type possess a number of advantageous properties for fusion reactor application. Their optimization has led to improved creep and fracture-toughness properties. New 9-10% CrWVTa alloys have been developed by KfK/IMF in collaboration with the SAARSTAHL GmbH which have a reduced long-term activation and show in addition superior fracture toughness properties. The calculation of dose rate and other radiological parameters with the presently available FISPACT/EAF codes, extended by KfK files for sequential reactions has shown that the long-term dose-rate in these alloys is governed by the remaining 'impurity level' of Nb and the alloying elements W and Ta. Sequential reactions — though relevant for single alloying elements like Cr, Mn, V and N — provide only a second order effect in Fe-based alloys. A challenge for the future materials development is the production of alloys with the desired narrow specification of elements and impurities, which necessitates new ways of steelmaking.

  10. Microstructural analysis of ferritic-martensitic steels irradiated at low temperature in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, N.; Robertson, J.P.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Wakai, E.

    1998-09-01

    Disk specimens of ferritic-martensitic steel, HT9 and F82H, irradiated to damage levels of {approximately}3 dpa at irradiation temperatures of either {approximately}90 C or {approximately}250 C have been investigated by using transmission electron microscopy. Before irradiation, tempered HT9 contained only M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide. Irradiation at 90 C and 250 C induced a dislocation loop density of 1 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3} and 8 {times} 10{sup 21} m{sup {minus}3}, respectively. in the HT9 irradiated at 250 C, a radiation-induced phase, tentatively identified as {alpha}{prime}, was observed with a number density of less than 1 {times} 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3}. On the other hand, the tempered F82H contained M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and a few MC carbides; irradiation at 250 C to 3 dpa caused minor changes in these precipitates and induced a dislocation loop density of 2 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3}. Difference in the radiation-induced phase and the loop microstructure may be related to differences in the post-yield deformation behavior of the two steels.

  11. Void swelling in high dose ion-irradiated reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Monterrosa, Anthony M.; Zhang, Feifei; Huang, Hao; Yan, Qingzhi; Jiao, Zhijie; Was, Gary S.; Wang, Lumin

    2015-07-01

    To determine the void swelling resistance of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels CNS I and CNS II at high doses, ion irradiation was performed up to 188 dpa (4.6 × 1017 ion/cm2) at 460 °C using 5 MeV Fe++ ions. Helium was pre-implanted at levels of 10 and 100 appm at room temperature to investigate the role of helium on void swelling. Commercial FM steel T91 was also irradiated in this condition and the swelling results are of included in this paper as a reference. Voids were observed in all conditions. The 9Cr CNS I samples implanted with 10 appm helium exhibited lower swelling than 9Cr T91 irradiated at the same condition. The 12Cr CNS II with 10 and 100 appm helium showed significantly lower swelling than CNS I and T91. The swelling rate for CNS I and CNS II were determined to be 0.02%/dpa and 0.003%/dpa respectively. Increasing the helium content from 10 to 100 appm shortened the incubation region and increased the void density but had no effect on the swelling rates.

  12. Precipitate phases in normalized and tempered ferritic/martensitic steel P92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yinzhong; Liu, Huan; Shang, Zhongxia; Xu, Zhiqiang

    2015-10-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steel P92 is a promising candidate for cladding and duct applications in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor. The precipitate phases of the P92 steel normalized at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 30 min and tempered at 1038 K (765 °C) for 1 h have been investigated using transmission electron microscopes. Four types of phases consisting of M23C6, MX, M2X and sigma-FeCr were identified in the steel. MX phases consist of Nb-rich M(C,N) carbonitride, Nb-rich MC carbide, V-rich M(C,N) carbonitride, V-rich MC carbide, V-rich MN nitride, and complex MC carbides with Nb-rich MC core and V-rich MC wings. M2X phases consist of Cr-rich M2(C,N) carbonitride, Cr-rich M2C carbide and M2N nitride. Sigma-FeCr has a simple tetragonal lattice and a typical chemical formula of Fe0.45Cr0.45W0.1. M23C6 and MX are the dominant phases, while the sigma-FeCr has the lowest content. The formation of sigma-FeCr and M2X phases in the steel is also discussed.

  13. Nano-scale nitride-particle-strengthened high-temperature wrought ferritic and martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, Ronald L; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Maziasz, Philip J

    2009-04-21

    A method of making a steel composition includes the steps of: a. providing a steel composition that includes up to 15% Cr, up to 3% Mo, up to 4% W, 0.05-1% V, up to 2% Si, up to 3% Mn, up to 10% Co, up to 3% Cu, up to 5% Ni, up to 0.3% C, 0.02-0.3% N, balance iron, wherein the percentages are by total weight of the composition; b. austenitizing the composition at a temperature in the range of 1000.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C.; c. cooling the composition of steel to a selected hot-working temperature in the range 500.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C.; d. hot-working the composition at the selected hot-working temperature; e. annealing the composition for a time period of up to 10 hours at a temperature in the range of 500.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C.; and f. cooling the composition to ambient temperature to transform the steel composition to martensite, bainite, ferrite, or a combination of those microstructures.

  14. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Luzginova, N.; Tanigawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe-Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7-9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe-8%Cr-2%W-TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe-9%Cr-1%W-TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  15. Studies on A-TIG welding of Low Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (LAFM) steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.

    2012-02-01

    Low Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steels (LAFM) are chosen as the candidate material for structural components in fusion reactors. The structural components are generally fabricated by welding processes. Activated Tungsten Inert Gas (A-TIG) welding is an emerging process for welding of thicker components. In the present work, attempt was made to develop A-TIG welding technology for LAFM steel plates of 10 mm thick. Activated flux was developed for LAFM steel by carrying out various bead-on-plate TIG welds without flux and with flux. The optimum flux was identified as one which gave maximum depth of penetration at minimum heat input values. With the optimized flux composition, LAFM steel plate of 10 mm thickness was welded in square butt weld joint configuration using double side welding technique. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy was used for characterizing the microstructures. Microhardness measurements were made across the weld cross section for as welded and post weld heat treated samples. Tensile and impact toughness properties were determined. The mechanical properties values obtained in A-TIG weld joint were comparable to that obtained in weld joints of LAFM steel made by Electron beam welding process.

  16. Tensile properties of ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in STIP-I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Y.; Long, B.; Tong, Z. F.

    2008-06-01

    Specimens of ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels T91, F82H, Optimax-A and the electron beam weld (EBW) of F82H were irradiated in the Swiss spallation neutron source (SINQ) Target-3 in a temperature range of 90-370 °C to displacement doses between 3 and 12 dpa. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature and the irradiation temperatures. The tensile test results demonstrated that the irradiation hardening increased with dose up to about 10 dpa. Meanwhile, the uniform elongation decreased to less than 1%, while the total elongation remained greater than 5%, except for an F82H specimen of 9.8 dpa tested at room temperature, which failed in elastic deformation regime. At higher doses of 11-12 dpa, the ductility of some specimens recovered, which could be due to the annealing effect of a short period of high temperature excursion. The results do not show significant differences in tensile properties for the different FM steels in the present irradiation conditions.

  17. Diffusion Bonding Beryllium to Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel: Development of Processes and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ryan Matthew

    Only a few materials are suitable to act as armor layers against the thermal and particle loads produced by magnetically confined fusion. These candidates include beryllium, tungsten, and carbon fiber composites. The armor layers must be joined to the plasma facing components with high strength bonds that can withstand the thermal stresses resulting from differential thermal expansion. While specific joints have been developed for use in ITER (an experimental reactor in France), including beryllium to CuCrZr as well as tungsten to stainless steel interfaces, joints specific to commercially relevant fusion reactors are not as well established. Commercial first wall components will likely be constructed front Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, which will need to be coating with one of the three candidate materials. Of the candidates, beryllium is particularly difficult to bond, because it reacts during bonding with most elements to form brittle intermetallic compounds. This brittleness is unacceptable, as it can lead to interface crack propagation and delamination of the armor layer. I have attempted to overcome the brittle behavior of beryllium bonds by developing a diffusion bonding process of beryllium to RAFM steel that achieves a higher degree of ductility. This process utilized two bonding aids to achieve a robust bond: a. copper interlayer to add ductility to the joint, and a titanium interlayer to prevent beryllium from forming unwanted Be-Cu intermetallics. In addition, I conducted a series of numerical simulations to predict the effect of these bonding aids on the residual stress in the interface. Lastly, I fabricated and characterized beryllium to ferritic steel diffusion bonds using various bonding parameters and bonding aids. Through the above research, I developed a process to diffusion bond beryllium to ferritic steel with a 150 M Pa tensile strength and 168 M Pa shear strength. This strength was achieved using a Hot Isostatic

  18. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welds of 11Cr-Ferritic/Martensitic Steel to 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Hiromichi T.; Yano, Yasuhide; Sekio, Yoshihiro

    2015-12-01

    Dissimilar joints between ferritic and austenitic steels are of interest for selected applications in next generation fast reactors. In this study, dissimilar friction-stir welding of an 11 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic steel to a 316 austenitic stainless steel was attempted and the mechanical properties and microstructure of the resulting welds were examined. Friction-stir welding produces a stir zone without macroscopic weld-defects, but the two dissimilar steels are not intermixed. The two dissimilar steels are interleaved along a sharp zigzagging interface in the stir zone. During small-sized tensile testing of the stir zone, this sharp interface did not act as a fracture site. Furthermore, the microstructure of the stir zone was refined in both the ferritic/martensitic steel and the 316 stainless steel resulting in improved mechanical properties over the adjacent base material regions. This study demonstrates that friction-stir welding can produce welds between dissimilar steels that contain no macroscopic weld-defects and display suitable mechanical properties.

  19. Assessment of Tungsten Content on Tertiary Creep Deformation Behavior of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar

    2015-10-01

    Tertiary creep deformation behavior of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels having different tungsten contents has been assessed. Creep tests were carried out at 823 K (550 °C) over a stress range of 180 to 260 MPa on three heats of the RAFM steel (9Cr-W-0.06Ta-0.22V) with tungsten content of 1, 1.4, and 2.0 wt pct. With creep exposure, the steels exhibited minimum in creep rate followed by progressive increase in creep rate until fracture. The minimum creep rate decreased, rupture life increased, and the onset of tertiary stage of creep deformation delayed with the increase in tungsten content. The tertiary creep behavior has been assessed based on the relationship, , considering minimum creep rate () instead of steady-state creep rate. The increase in tungsten content was found to decrease the rate of acceleration of tertiary parameter ` p.' The relationships between (1) tertiary parameter `p' with minimum creep rate and time spent in tertiary creep deformation and (2) the final creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the same first-order reaction rate theory prevailed in the minimum creep rate as well as throughout the tertiary creep deformation behavior of the steel. A master tertiary creep curve of the steels has been developed. Scanning electron microscopic investigation revealed enhanced coarsening resistance of carbides in the steel on creep exposure with increase in tungsten content. The decrease in tertiary parameter ` p' with tungsten content with the consequent decrease in minimum creep rate and increase in rupture life has been attributed to the enhanced microstructural stability of the steel.

  20. Oxidation of ferritic martensitic alloys T91, HCM12A and HT-9 in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampornrat, Pantip; Was, Gary S.

    2007-09-01

    The oxidation behavior of ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloys in supercritical water (SCW) was studied in order to evaluate the suitability of these alloys for use in the Gen IV supercritical water reactor (SCWR) concept. A series of exposure tests in SCW were performed with three F-M alloys: T91, HCM12A, and HT-9. The effect of temperature was evaluated over the range of 400-600 °C and the dissolved oxygen concentration was controlled at <10 ppb (deaerated condition), 100 and 300 ppb. The oxidation behavior was determined from weight gain measurements along with oxide structure analysis. The results indicated that the oxidation rate was strongly dependent on temperature and followed an Arrhenius behavior. Activation energies for oxidation were 172, 177, and 189 kJ/mol for HT-9, HCM12A, and T91, respectively. The time dependence of the oxidation rate followed an exponential law with time exponents ˜0.3-0.42. Reduction in oxidation rate was observed at intermediate values (100-300 ppb) of dissolved oxygen concentration. The oxide formed on the alloy surface consisted of an outer layer of porous magnetite (Fe 3O 4) and an inner layer of iron chromium oxide, (Fe, Cr) 3O 4 with spinel structure. A transition region lies beneath the inner oxide in which the metal content increases to bulk values and the oxygen content decreases to nearly zero. Iron chromium oxide, (Fe, Cr)O, with the wustite structure was observed in the transition layer at 600 °C. The relatively good agreement between the activation energies for oxidation and that for grain boundary diffusion of oxygen support an oxidation mechanism based on short circuit oxygen diffusion to the oxide-metal interface.

  1. Gap Analysis of Material Properties Data for Ferritic/Martensitic HT-9 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Neil R.; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena; Rodriguez, Edward A.

    2012-08-28

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), is supporting the development of an ASME Code Case for adoption of 12Cr-1Mo-VW ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel, commonly known as HT-9, primarily for use in elevated temperature design of liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFR) and components. In 2011, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) nuclear engineering staff began assisting in the development of a small modular reactor (SMR) design concept, previously known as the Hyperion Module, now called the Gen4 Module. LANL staff immediately proposed HT-9 for the reactor vessel and components, as well as fuel clad and ducting, due to its superior thermal qualities. Although the ASME material Code Case, for adoption of HT-9 as an approved elevated temperature material for LMFR service, is the ultimate goal of this project, there are several key deliverables that must first be successfully accomplished. The most important key deliverable is the research, accumulation, and documentation of specific material parameters; physical, mechanical, and environmental, which becomes the basis for an ASME Code Case. Time-independent tensile and ductility data and time-dependent creep and creep-rupture behavior are some of the material properties required for a successful ASME Code case. Although this report provides a cursory review of the available data, a much more comprehensive study of open-source data would be necessary. This report serves three purposes: (a) provides a list of already existing material data information that could ultimately be made available to the ASME Code, (b) determines the HT-9 material properties data missing from available sources that would be required and (c) estimates the necessary material testing required to close the gap. Ultimately, the gap analysis demonstrates that certain material properties testing will be required to fulfill the necessary information package for an ASME Code Case.

  2. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wei; Chen, Gaoqiang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Frederick, David Alan; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  3. Oxidation behavior of ferritic-martensitic and ODS steels in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Jeremy

    Ferritic-martensitic and ODS alloys are primary candidates for application as cladding and structural material in Generation IV nuclear power plants, especially the supercritical water reactor. One of the main in-service degradation mechanisms for these alloys is uniform corrosion, thus this project focuses on understanding the oxidation behavior of these alloys in the supercritical water (SCW) environment. This understanding is acquired through the analysis of the oxide microstructure using microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence associated with electron microscopy (both SEM and TEM). The microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence technique provides unique microstructural data of the oxide. This technique simultaneously probes elemental and phase information step by step with a sub-micron spatial resolution throughout the oxide layers. Thus we were able to locate specific phases, such as Cr2O3, at specific locations in the oxide layer, mainly the interfaces. The electron microscopy complemented this analysis by imaging the oxide layers, to yield detailed information on the oxide morphology. All the alloys studied exhibited the same three-layer structure with an outer layer containing only Fe3O4, an inner layer containing a mixture of Fe3O4 and FeCr2O 4, and a diffusion layer containing a mixture of chromium-rich precipitates (Cr2O3 and FeCr2O4) and metal grains. By analyzing samples with various exposure times, we were able to follow the evolution of the oxide microstructure with exposure time. To obtain the corroded samples, several corrosion experiments were performed: some in supercritical water (at 500°C and 600°C) and one experiment in 500°C steam. The test in steam was undertaken to obtain more data points in the kinetic curves, because we thought the corrosion in steam and supercritical water at the same temperature would result in similar kinetics. This turned out not to be the case and the samples in supercritical

  4. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry.

  5. Ferritic-Martensitic steel Test Blanket Modules: Status and future needs for design criteria requirements and fabrication validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavy, J.-F.; Aiello, G.; Aubert, P.; Boccaccini, L. V.; Daichendt, M.; De Dinechin, G.; Diegele, E.; Giancarli, L. M.; Lässer, R.; Neuberger, H.; Poitevin, Y.; Stephan, Y.; Rampal, G.; Rigal, E.

    2009-04-01

    The Helium-Cooled Lithium-Lead and the Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed are the two breeding blankets concepts for the DEMO reactor which have been selected by EU to be tested in ITER in the framework of the Test Blanket Module projects. They both use a 9%CrWVTa Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steel, called EUROFER, as structural material and helium as coolant. This paper gives an overview of the status of the EUROFER qualification program and discusses the future needs for design criteria requirements and fabrication validation.

  6. Fractographic examination of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel charpy specimens irradiated to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.; Schubert, L.E.

    1996-10-01

    Fractographic examinations are reported for a series of reduced activation ferritic/Martensitic steel Charpy impact specimens tested following irradiation to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C in FFTF. One-third size specimens of six low activation steels developed for potential application as structural materials in fusion reactors were examined. A shift in brittle fracture appearance from cleavage to grain boundary failure was noted with increasing manganese content. The results are interpreted in light of transmutation induced composition changes in a fusion environment.

  7. TIG and HIP joining of Reduced Activation Ferrite/Martensitic steel for the Korean ITER-TBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Duck Young; Oh, Seungjin; Ahn, Mu-Young; Yu, In-Keun; Kim, Duck-Hoi; Cho, Seungyon; Choi, Im-Sub; Kwon, Ki-Bum

    2011-10-01

    Korea is developing a Helium Cooled Solid Breeder Test Blanket Module for ITER. The primary candidate structural material is a Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel. The complex TBM structure requires developing joining technologies for successful fabrication. The characteristics of Tungsten Inert Gas welding and Hot Isostatic Pressing joining of RAFM steel were investigated. Metallurgical examinations showed that the steel grain size was increased after HIP joining and recovered by post joining heat treatment. Both TIG welding and HIP joining are found to be acceptable for ITER TBM based on mechanical tests and microstructure examination.

  8. Precipitation behavior and martensite lath coarsening during tempering of T/P92 ferritic heat-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lin-qing; Zhang, Dan-tian; Liu, Yong-chang; Ning, Bao-qun; Qiao, Zhi-xia; Yan, Ze-sheng; Li, Hui-jun

    2014-05-01

    Tempering is an important process for T/P92 ferritic heat-resistant steel from the viewpoint of microstructure control, as it facilitates the formation of final tempered martensite under serving conditions. In this study, we have gained deeper insights on the mechanism underlying the microstructural evolution during tempering treatment, including the precipitation of carbides and the coarsening of martensite laths, as systematically analyzed by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the precipitates was analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicate the formation of M3C (cementite) precipitates under normalized conditions. However, they tend to dissolve within a short time of tempering, owing to their low thermal stability. This phenomenon was substantiated by X-ray diffraction analysis. Besides, we could observe the precipitation of fine carbonitrides (MX) along the dislocations. The mechanism of carbon diffusion controlled growth of M23C6 can be expressed by the Zener's equation. The movement of Y-junctions was determined to be the fundamental mechanism underlying the martensite lath coarsening process. Vickers hardness was estimated to determine their mechanical properties. Based on the comprehensive analysis of both the micro-structural evolution and hardness variation, the process of tempering can be separated into three steps.

  9. Microstructural evolution of ferritic-martensitic steels under heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topbasi, Cem

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are primary candidate materials for fuel cladding and internal applications in the Sodium Fast Reactor, as well as first-wall and blanket materials in future fusion concepts because of their favorable mechanical properties and resistance to radiation damage. Since microstructure evolution under irradiation is amongst the key issues for these materials in these applications, developing a fundamental understanding of the irradiation-induced microstructure in these alloys is crucial in modeling and designing new alloys with improved properties. The goal of this project was to investigate the evolution of microstructure of two commercial ferritic-martensitic steels, NF616 and HCM12A, under heavy ion irradiation at a broad temperature range. An in situ heavy ion irradiation technique was used to create irradiation damage in the alloy; while it was being examined in a transmission electron microscope. Electron-transparent samples of NF616 and HCM12A were irradiated in situ at the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory with 1 MeV Kr ions to ˜10 dpa at temperatures ranging from 20 to 773 K. The microstructure evolution of NF616 and HCM12A was followed in situ by systematically recording micrographs and diffraction patterns as well as capturing videos during irradiation. In these irradiations, there was a period during which no changes are visible in the microstructure. After a threshold dose (˜0.1 dpa between 20 and 573 K, and ˜2.5 dpa at 673 K) black dots started to become visible under the ion beam. These black dots appeared suddenly (from one frame to the next) and are thought to be small defect clusters (2-5 nm in diameter), possibly small dislocation loops with Burgers vectors of either ½ or . The overall density of these defect clusters increased with dose and saturated around 6 dpa. At saturation, a steady-state is reached in which defects are eliminated and created at the same rates so that the

  10. Microstructural evolution of ferritic-martensitic steels under heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topbasi, Cem

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are primary candidate materials for fuel cladding and internal applications in the Sodium Fast Reactor, as well as first-wall and blanket materials in future fusion concepts because of their favorable mechanical properties and resistance to radiation damage. Since microstructure evolution under irradiation is amongst the key issues for these materials in these applications, developing a fundamental understanding of the irradiation-induced microstructure in these alloys is crucial in modeling and designing new alloys with improved properties. The goal of this project was to investigate the evolution of microstructure of two commercial ferritic-martensitic steels, NF616 and HCM12A, under heavy ion irradiation at a broad temperature range. An in situ heavy ion irradiation technique was used to create irradiation damage in the alloy; while it was being examined in a transmission electron microscope. Electron-transparent samples of NF616 and HCM12A were irradiated in situ at the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory with 1 MeV Kr ions to ˜10 dpa at temperatures ranging from 20 to 773 K. The microstructure evolution of NF616 and HCM12A was followed in situ by systematically recording micrographs and diffraction patterns as well as capturing videos during irradiation. In these irradiations, there was a period during which no changes are visible in the microstructure. After a threshold dose (˜0.1 dpa between 20 and 573 K, and ˜2.5 dpa at 673 K) black dots started to become visible under the ion beam. These black dots appeared suddenly (from one frame to the next) and are thought to be small defect clusters (2-5 nm in diameter), possibly small dislocation loops with Burgers vectors of either ½ or . The overall density of these defect clusters increased with dose and saturated around 6 dpa. At saturation, a steady-state is reached in which defects are eliminated and created at the same rates so that the

  11. Microstructural Variations Across a Dissimilar 316L Austenitic: 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel Weld Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Karthikeyan, T.; Dasgupta, Arup; Sudha, C.; Hajra, R. N.; Albert, S. K.; Saroja, S.; Jayakumar, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discuss the microstructural variations across a dissimilar weld joint between SS316 and 9Cr-RAFM steel and its modifications on post weld heat treatments (PWHT). Detailed characterization showed a mixed microstructure of austenite and martensite in the weld which is in agreement with the phases predicted using Schaeffler diagram based on composition measurements. The presence of very low volume fraction of δ-ferrite in SS316L has been identified employing state of the art electron back-scattered diffraction technique. PWHT of the ferritic steel did not reduce the hardness in the weld metal. Thermal exposure at 973 K (700 °C) showed a progressive reduction in hardness of weld joint with duration of treatment except in austenitic base metal. However, diffusion annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) for 100 hours resulted in an unexpected increase in hardness of weld metal, which is a manifestation of the dilution effects and enrichment of Ni on the transformation characteristics of the weld zone. Migration of carbon from ferritic steel aided the precipitation of fine carbides in the austenitic base metal on annealing at 973 K (700 °C); but enhanced diffusion at 1073 K (880 °C) resulted in coarsening of carbides and thereby reduction of hardness.

  12. Determining the shear fracture properties of HIP joints of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel by a torsion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Noh, Sanghoon; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2012-08-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is a key technology used to fabricate a first wall with cooling channels for the fusion blanket system utilizing a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel. To qualify the HIPped components, small specimen test techniques are beneficial not only to evaluate the thin-wall cooling channels containing the HIP joint but also to use in neutron irradiation studies. This study aims to develop the torsion test method with special emphasis on providing a reasonable and comprehensive method to determine interfacial shear properties of HIP joints during the torsional fracture process. Torsion test results identified that the torsion process shows yield of the base metal followed by non-elastic deformation due to work hardening of the base metal. By considering this work hardening issue, we propose a reasonable and realistic solution to determine the torsional yield shear stress and the ultimate torsional shear strength of the HIPped interface. Finally, a representative torsion fracture process was identified.

  13. Production and preliminary characterization of ferritic-martensitic steel T91 cladding tubes for LBE or Pb cooled nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, J.; Almazouzi, A.; Mueller, G.; Rusanov, A.

    2011-08-01

    Thin wall tubes with suitable dimensions for possible future use as nuclear fuel cladding based on ferritic-martensitic steel T91 have been produced. Several rolling routes for thin wall tube rolling have been successfully explored to produce T91 tubes of 8.5 mm OD and 0.5 mm wall thickness as well as 6.5 mm OD and 0.5 mm wall thickness. The results show that the cold rolled Т91 steel thin walled tubes remain ductile and the material easily carries fractional strains. Finally the microstructure of the resulting tubes was examined and preliminary burst and tensile tests were performed showing properties comparable to those of T91 plate material.

  14. The effect of tempering temperature on the features of phase transformations in the ferritic-martensitic steel EK-181

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polekhina, N. A.; Litovchenko, I. Yu.; Tyumentsev, A. N.; Astafurova, Е. G.; Chernov, V. M.; Leontyeva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2014-12-01

    Using the methods of dilatometry and differential scanning calorimetry, critical points of phase transformations in the low-activation ferritic-martensitic steel EK-181 (RUSFER-EK-181) are identified. The characteristic temperature intervals of precipitation of carbide phases are revealed. It is shown that particles of the metastable carbide M3C are formed within the temperature range (500-600) °C. Formation of the stable phases М23С6 and V(CN) begins at the temperatures higher than Т = 650 °С. An important feature of microstructure after tempering at Т = 720 °С is high density of nanoparticles (⩽10 nm) of vanadium carbonitride V(CN).

  15. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Tavassoli, A. -A. F.; Henry, J.; Rieth, M.; Sakasegawa, H.; Tanigawa, H.; Huang, Q.

    2016-07-26

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. Additionally, to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti,more » X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M23C6 (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. We present and compare limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ~70 displacements per atom at ~300–325 °C.« less

  16. Effect of Tungsten on Primary Creep Deformation and Minimum Creep Rate of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar; Mathew, M. D.

    2014-10-01

    Effect of tungsten on transient creep deformation and minimum creep rate of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel has been assessed. Tungsten content in the 9Cr-RAFM steel has been varied between 1 and 2 wt pct, and creep tests were carried out over the stress range of 180 and 260 MPa at 823 K (550 °C). The tempered martensitic steel exhibited primary creep followed by tertiary stage of creep deformation with a minimum in creep deformation rate. The primary creep behavior has been assessed based on the Garofalo relationship, , considering minimum creep rate instead of steady-state creep rate . The relationships between (i) rate of exhaustion of transient creep r' with minimum creep rate, (ii) rate of exhaustion of transient creep r' with time to reach minimum creep rate, and (iii) initial creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the first-order reaction-rate theory has prevailed throughout the transient region of the RAFM steel having different tungsten contents. The rate of exhaustion of transient creep r' and minimum creep rate decreased, whereas the transient strain ɛ T increased with increase in tungsten content. A master transient creep curve of the steels has been developed considering the variation of with . The effect of tungsten on the variation of minimum creep rate with applied stress has been rationalized by invoking the back-stress concept.

  17. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Henry, J.; Rieth, M.; Sakasegawa, H.; Tanigawa, H.; Huang, Q.

    2016-10-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. In addition to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti, X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M23C6 (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. Limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic are presented and compared with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ∼70 displacements per atom at ∼300-325 °C.

  18. Effect of Austenization Temperature on the Microstructure and Strength of 9% and 12% Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Terry C. Totemeier

    2004-10-01

    The effect of reduced-temperature austenization on the microstructure and strength of two ferritic-martensitic steels was studied. Prototypic 9% and 12% Cr steels, grade 91 (9Cr-1MoVNb) and type 422 stainless (12Cr-1MoVW), respectively, were austenized at 925°C and 1050°C and tempered at 760°C. The reduced austenization temperature was intended to simulate potential inadequate austenization during field construction of large structures and also the thermal cycle experienced in the Type IV region of weld heat affected zones (HAZ). The microstructure, tensile behavior, and creep strength were characterized for both steels treated at each condition. The reduced austenization temperature resulted in general coarsening of carbides in both steels and polygonization of the tempered martensite structure in type 422. For this steel, a marked reduction in microhardness was observed, while there was little change in microhardness for grade 91. Slight reductions in tensile strength were observed for both steels at room temperature and elevated temperatures of 450 and 550°C. The strength reduction was greater for type 422 than for grade 91. At 650°C the tensile strength reduction was minimal for both steels. Marked reductions in creep rupture lives were observed for both steels at 650°C; the reductions were less at 600°C and minimal at 550°C. Overall, the higher Cr content steel was observed to be more sensitive to variations in heat treatment conditions.

  19. Microstructural characterization of weld joints of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel fabricated by different joining methods

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Paul, V.; Saroja, S.; Albert, S.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed electron microscopy study on the microstructure of various regions of weldment fabricated by three welding methods namely tungsten inert gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding in an indigenously developed 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. Electron back scatter diffraction studies showed a random micro-texture in all the three welds. Microstructural changes during thermal exposures were studied and corroborated with hardness and optimized conditions for the post weld heat treatment have been identified for this steel. Hollomon–Jaffe parameter has been used to estimate the extent of tempering. The activation energy for the tempering process has been evaluated and found to be corresponding to interstitial diffusion of carbon in ferrite matrix. The type and microchemistry of secondary phases in different regions of the weldment have been identified by analytical transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Comparison of microstructural parameters in TIG, electron beam and laser welds of RAFM steel • EBSD studies to illustrate the absence of preferred orientation and identification of prior austenite grain size using phase identification map • Optimization of PWHT conditions for indigenous RAFM steel • Study of kinetics of tempering and estimation of apparent activation energy of the process.

  20. Small punch tensile/fracture test data and 3D specimen surface data on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel from cryogenic to room temperature.

    PubMed

    Bruchhausen, Matthias; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Ripplinger, Stefan; Austin, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Raw data from small punch tensile/fracture tests at two displacement rates in the temperature range from -196 °C to room temperature on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel are presented. A number of specimens were analyzed after testing by means of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Based on the CT volume data detailed 3D surface maps of the specimens were established. All data are open access and available from Online Data Information Network (ODIN)https://odin.jrc.ec.europa.eu. The data presented in the current work has been analyzed in the research article "On the determination of the ductile to brittle transition temperature from small punch tests on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel" (M. Bruchhausen, S. Holmström, J.-M. Lapetite, S. Ripplinger, 2015) [1].

  1. Small punch tensile/fracture test data and 3D specimen surface data on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel from cryogenic to room temperature.

    PubMed

    Bruchhausen, Matthias; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Ripplinger, Stefan; Austin, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Raw data from small punch tensile/fracture tests at two displacement rates in the temperature range from -196 °C to room temperature on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel are presented. A number of specimens were analyzed after testing by means of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Based on the CT volume data detailed 3D surface maps of the specimens were established. All data are open access and available from Online Data Information Network (ODIN)https://odin.jrc.ec.europa.eu. The data presented in the current work has been analyzed in the research article "On the determination of the ductile to brittle transition temperature from small punch tests on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel" (M. Bruchhausen, S. Holmström, J.-M. Lapetite, S. Ripplinger, 2015) [1]. PMID:27660812

  2. Mechanical properties of ferrite-perlite and martensitic Fe-Mn-V-Ti-C steel processed by equal-channel angular pressing and high-temeperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, G. G.; Astafurova, E. G.; Tukeeva, M. S.; Naidenkin, E. V.; Raab, G. I.; Dobatkin, S. V.

    2011-09-01

    Using the method of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP), submicrocrystalline structure is formed in lowcarbon Fe-Mn-V-Ti-C steel with the average grain size 260 nm in the ferrite-perlite state and 310 nm in the martensitic state. It is established that the ECAP treatment gives rise to improved mechanical properties (Hμ = 2.9 GPa, σ0 = 990 MPa in the ferrite-perlite and Hμ = 3.7 GPa, σ0 = 1125 MPa in martensitic states), decreased plasticity, and results in plastic flow localization under tensile loading. The high strength properties formed by the ECAP are shown to sustain up to the annealing temperature 500°C.

  3. Fracture toughness of the IEA heat of F82H ferritic/martensitic stainless steel as a function of loading mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaxin; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1997-04-01

    Mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness tests were performed for the IEA heat of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel F82H at ambient temperature in order to provide comparison with previous measurements on a small heat given a different heat treatment. The results showed that heat to heat variations and heat treatment had negligible consequences on Mode I fracture toughness, but behavior during mixed-mode testing showed unexpected instabilities.

  4. Effect of Carbon Content on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 9 to 12 pct Cr Ferritic/Martensitic Heat-Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Feng-Shi; Tian, Li-Qian; Xue, Bing; Jiang, Xue-Bo; Zhou, Li

    2012-07-01

    Two heats of 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels were prepared. One has an ultralow carbon content of 0.01 wt pct, whereas another heat has a normal carbon content of 0.09 wt pct. The effect of carbon content on microstructure and mechanical properties of 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels was studied. The results show that the ultralow-carbon steel contains bimodal, nanosized MX precipitates with high density in the matrix but few M23C6 carbide particles in the normalized-and-tempered state. The smaller nanosized MX precipitates have two kinds of typical morphology: One is cubic and another is rectangular. The cubic MX precipitate contains Nb, Ti, and V, whereas the rectangular one only contains Nb and V. The normal carbon steel has abundant M23C6 carbide particles along the grain and lath boundaries and much less density of nanosized MX precipitates after the same heat treatments. After long-term aging at 923 K (650 °C) for 10,000 hours, the stress rupture properties of the ultralow carbon content steel degrades more significantly. The strength degradation mechanism of the 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels is discussed in this article.

  5. End Closure Joining of Ferritic-Martensitic and Oxide-Dispersion Strengthened Steel Cladding Tubes by Magnetic Pulse Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Gu; Park, Jin-Ju; Lee, Min-Ku; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Kyu; Spirin, Alexey; Krutikov, Vasiliy; Paranin, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic pulse welding (MPW) technique was employed for the end closure joining of fuel pin cladding tubes made of ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel and oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel. The technique is a solid-state impact joining process based on the electromagnetic force, similar to explosive welding. For a given set of optimal process parameters, e.g., the end-plug geometry, the rigid metallurgical bonding between the tube and end plug was obtained by high-velocity impact collision accompanied with surface jetting. The joint region showed a typical wavy morphology with a narrow grain boundary-like bonding interface. There was no evidence of even local melting, and only the limited grain refinement was observed in the vicinity of the bonding interface without destructing the original reinforcement microstructure of the FM-ODS steel, i.e., a fine grain structure with oxide dispersion. No leaks were detected during helium leakage test, and moreover, the rupture occurred in the cladding tube section without leaving any joint damage during internal pressure burst test. All of the results proved the integrity and durability of the MPWed joints and signified the great potential of this method of end closure joining for advanced fast reactor fuel pin fabrication.

  6. IRRADIATION CREEP AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TWO FERRITIC-MARTENSITIC STEELS IRRADIATED IN THE BN-350 FAST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Porollo, S. I.; Konobeev, Yu V.; Dvoriashin, A. M.; Budylkin, N. I.; Mironova, E. G.; Leontyeva-Smirnova, M. V.; Loltukhovsky, A. G.; Bochvar, A. A.; Garner, Francis A.

    2002-09-01

    Russian ferritic/martensitic steels EP-450 and EP-823 were irradiated to 20-60 dpa in the BN-350 fast reactor in the form of pressurized creep tubes and small rings used for mechanical property tests. Data derived from these steels serves to enhance our understanding of the general behavior of this class of steels. It appears that these steels exhibit behavior that is very consistent with that of Western steels. Swelling is relatively low at high neutron exposure and confined to temperatures less then 420 degrees C, but may be camouflaged somewhat by precipitation-related densification. The irradiation creep studies confirm that the creep compliance of F/M steels is about one-half that of austenitic steels, and that the loss of strength at test temperatures above 500 degrees C is a problem generic to all F/M steels. This conclusion is supported by post-irradiation measurement of short-term mechanical properties. At temperatures below 500 degrees C both steels retain their high strength (yield stress 0.2=550-600 MPa), but at higher test temperatures a sharp decrease of strength properties occurs. However, the irradiated steels still retain high post-irradiation ductility at test temperatures in the range of 20-700 degrees C.

  7. Evolution of the mechanical properties and microstructure of ferritic-martensitic steels irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamardin, V. K.; Golovanov, V. N.; Bulanova, T. M.; Povstyanko, A. V.; Fedoseev, A. E.; Ostrovsky, Z. E.; Goncharenko, Yu. D.

    2002-12-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of low-activation ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels 0.1C-9Cr-1W, V, Ta, B and 0.1C-12Cr-2W, V, Ti, B is studied under tension at temperatures of 330-540 °C and doses of 50 dpa. Steel 0.1C-13Cr-Mo, V, Nb, B was chosen for comparison. At irradiation temperatures of 330-340 °C, the radiation hardening of steel with 9%Cr achieves saturation at a dose of 10 dpa. In this case as compared to steels with 12%Cr, the fracture surface is characterized as ductile without cleavage traces. At irradiation temperatures higher than 420 °C, there is no difference in the behavior of the materials under investigation. The data on radiation creep obtained by direct measurement and from the profilometry data satisfy a model ɛ¯/ σ¯=B 0+D Ṡ, when B0 and D have the values typical for steels of FM type.

  8. Fabrication and integrity test preparation of HIP-joined W and ferritic-martensitic steel mockups for fusion reactor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Won; Shin, Kyu In; Kim, Suk Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae Sung; Choi, Bo Guen; Moon, Se Youn; Hong, Bong Guen

    2014-10-01

    Tungsten (W) and ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) as armor and structural materials, respectively, are the major candidates for plasma-facing components (PFCs) such as the blanket first wall (BFW) and the divertor, in a fusion reactor. In the present study, three W/FMS mockups were successfully fabricated using a hot isostatic pressing (HIP, 900 °C, 100 MPa, 1.5 hrs) with a following post-HIP heat treatment (PHHT, tempering, 750 °C, 70 MPa, 2 hrs), and the W/FMS joining method was developed based on the ITER BFW and the test blanket module (TBM) development project from 2004 to the present. Using a 10-MHz-frequency flat-type probe to ultrasonically test of the joint, we found no defects in the fabricated mockups. For confirmation of the joint integrity, a high heat flux test will be performed up to the thermal lifetime of the mockup under the proper test conditions. These conditions were determined through a preliminary analysis with conventional codes such as ANSYS-CFX for thermal-hydraulic conditions considering the test facility, the Korea heat load test facility with an electron beam (KoHLT-EB), and its water coolant system at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI).

  9. Microstructure and mechanical property of ferritic-martensitic steel cladding under a 650 °C liquid sodium environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, Sung Ho

    2013-11-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the effect of liquid sodium on the microstructural and mechanical property of ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) used for a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) cladding tube. A quasi-dynamic device characterized by natural circulation was constructed and a compatibility test between FMS and liquid sodium was performed. HT9 (12Cr-1MoWVN) and Gr.92 (9Cr-2WNbVNB) coupons as well as a Gr.92 cladding tube were immersed in the 650 °C liquid sodium up to 3095 h and a microstructural observation, a mechanical property evaluation such as nanoindentation, and a ring tension test were also done in this study. The results showed that both HT9 and Gr.92 exhibited macroscopic weight loss behavior where pitting and decarburization took place. Weight loss as well as the decarburization process decreased as the chromium content increased. A compatibility test over the cladding tube revealed that a decrease of the mechanical property caused by the aging process governed the whole mechanical property of the cladding tube.

  10. Microstructural evolution in a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel and its relation to high-temperature deformation and rupture models

    SciTech Connect

    DiMelfi, R.J.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The ferritic-martensitic stainless steel HT-9 exhibits an anomalously high creep strength in comparison to its high-temperature flow strength from tensile tests performed at moderate rates. A constitutive relation describing its high-temperature tensile behavior over a wide range of conditions has been developed. When applied to creep conditions the model predicts deformation rates orders of magnitude higher than observed. To account for the observed creep strength, a fine distribution of precipitates is postulated to evolve over time during creep. The precipitate density is calculated at each temperature and stress to give the observed creep rate. The apparent precipitation kinetics thereby extracted from this analysis is used in a model for the rupture-time kinetics that compares favorably with observation. Properly austenitized and tempered material was aged over times comparable to creep conditions, and in a way consistent with the precipitation kinetics from the model. Microstructural observations support the postulates and results of the model system. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Blister formation on 13Cr2MoNbVB ferritic-martensitic steel exposed to hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. V.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Ruzhytskyi, V. V.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Kopanets, I. E.; Karpov, S. A.; Vasilenko, R. L.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of pre-irradiation specimen deformation level on surface blister formation and sub-surface cracking of dual-phase 13Cr2MoNbVB ferritic-martensitic steel was studied using glow discharge hydrogen plasma with ion energy of 1 keV to fluences of 2 × 1025 H/m2. Protium was used for most studies, but deuterium was used for measuring the depth dependence of hydrogen diffusion. Formation of blisters was observed in the temperature range 230-340 K. It was found that pre-irradiation deformation caused changes in the threshold fluences of blister formation and also in blister size distribution. Subsurface cracks located on grain boundaries far beyond the implantation zone were formed concurrently with blisters, arising from hydrogen diffusion and trapping at defects. It was observed that cracks as long as 1 mm in length were formed in 95% deformed steel at depths up to 500 μm from surface.

  12. Oxidation behavior of ferritic/martensitic steels in stagnant liquid LBE saturated by oxygen at 600 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Quanqiang; Liu, Jian; Luan, He; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Yan, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2015-02-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are primary candidates for application as cladding and structural materials in the Generation IV Nuclear Reactor, especially accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS). The compatibility of F/M steels with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is a critical issue for development of ADS using liquid LBE as the coolant. In this work, the corrosion tests of two F/M steels, including a novel 9-12 Cr modified F/M steel named SIMP steel and a commercial T91 steel, were conducted in the static oxygen-saturated liquid LBE at 600 °C up to 1000 h, the microstructure of the oxide scale formed on these two steels was analyzed, the relationship between the microstructure and the oxidation behavior was studied, and the reason why the SIMP steel showed better oxidation resistance compared to T91 steel was analyzed. The results of this study confirmed that the oxidation behavior of the F/M steels in liquid metals is influenced by their alloying elements and microstructures.

  13. Dynamic Strain Aging and Oxidation Effects on the Thermomechanical Fatigue Deformation of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagesha, A.; Kannan, R.; Srinivasan, V. S.; Sandhya, R.; Choudhary, B. K.; Laha, K.

    2016-03-01

    Thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) behavior of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel was investigated under in-phase (IP) and out-of-phase (OP) conditions under different mechanical strain amplitudes and temperature regimes. OP TMF was generally observed to result in the lowest cyclic lives compared to both IP TMF and isothermal low cycle fatigue (IF) at the maximum temperature ( T max). The stress-strain hysteresis loops under TMF were marked by extensive serrations associated with dynamic strain aging (DSA) at the strain amplitudes of ±0.4 and ±0.6 pct. The serrations were noticed during the downward ramp of temperature that resulted in IP and OP TMF exhibiting jerky flow in the compressive and tensile portions, respectively. However, no evidence of serrated flow was seen under IF cycling at any of the temperatures within the TMF cycle. The stress response during IP TMF was marked by a near-saturation regime over 65 to 70 pct of life in contrast to continuous cyclic softening in the case of OP TMF. The marked life reduction observed under OP cycling at the strain amplitudes of ±0.4 and ±0.6 pct was attributed to the deleterious influence associated with oxidation, DSA, and tensile mean stress. The findings assume importance in the context of elevated temperature fatigue design, considering the fact that the IF data at T max are deemed adequately conservative in traditional design approaches.

  14. Development of Advanced 9Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and Austenitic Stainless Steels for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Sam; Tan, Lizhen; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel Grade 92, with or without thermomechanical treatment (TMT), and austenitic stainless steels HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine precipitate strengthening) and NF709 were selected as potential candidate structural materials in the U.S. Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) program. The objective is to develop advanced steels with improved properties as compared with reference materials such as Grade 91 and Type 316H steels that are currently in nuclear design codes. Composition modification and/or processing optimization (e.g., TMT and cold-work) were performed to improve properties such as resistance to thermal aging, creep, creep-fatigue, fracture, and sodium corrosion. Testings to characterize these properties for the advanced steels were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory, the Argonne National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the U.S. SFR program. This paper focuses on the resistance to thermal aging and creep of the advanced steels. The advanced steels exhibited up to two orders of magnitude increase in creep life compared to the reference materials. Preliminary results on the weldment performance of the advanced steels are also presented. The superior performance of the advanced steels would improve reactor design flexibility, safety margins and economics.

  15. Void swelling and microstructure evolution at very high damage level in self-ion irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getto, E.; Sun, K.; Monterrosa, A. M.; Jiao, Z.; Hackett, M. J.; Was, G. S.

    2016-11-01

    The void swelling and microstructure evolution of ferritic-martensitic alloys HT9, T91 and T92 were characterized following irradiation with Fe++ ions at 460 °C to damage levels of 75-650 displacements per atom with 10 atom parts per million pre-implanted helium. Steady state swelling rate of 0.033%/ dpa was determined for HT9, the least swelling resistant alloy, and 0.007%/ dpa in T91. In T91, resistance was due to suppression of void nucleation. Swelling resistance was greatest in T92, with a low density (∼1 × 1020 m-3) of small voids that had not grown appreciably, indicating suppression of nucleation and growth. Additional heats of T91 indicated that alloy composition was not the determining factor of swelling resistance. Carbon and chromium-rich M2X precipitates formed at 250 dpa and were correlated with decreased nucleation in T91 and T92, but did not affect void growth in HT9. Dislocation and G-phase microstructure evolution was analyzed up to 650 dpa in HT9.

  16. Dry sliding wear system response of ferritic and tempered martensitic ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, V. K.; Mozumder, Y. H.; Shama, S.; Behera, R. K.; Pattaniak, A.; P, Sindhoora L.; Mishra, S. C.; Sen, S.

    2015-02-01

    Spheroidal graphite cast iron (SG iron) is the most preferable member of cast iron family due to its strength and toughness along with good tribological properties. SG iron specimens with annealed and martensitic matrix were subjected to dry sliding wear condition and the system response was correlated to matrix microstructure. Respective microstructure was obtained by annealing and quench and tempering heat treatment process for an austenitizing temperature of 1000°C. Specimens were subjected to Ball on plate wear tester under 40N, 50N, 60N load for a sliding distance of 7.54m. Except for quench and tempered specimen at 50N, weight loss was observed in every condition. The wear surface under optical microscope reveals adhesive mechanism for as-cast and annealed specimen whereas delaminated wear track feature was observed for quench and tempered specimen.

  17. Interdiffusion Behavior of Al-Rich Oxidation Resistant Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Velraj, S.; Zhang, Ying; Hawkins, W. E.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2012-06-21

    We investigated interdiffusion of thin Al-rich coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation on 9Cr ferritic–martensitic alloys in the temperature range of 650–700°C. The compositional changes after long-term exposures in laboratory air and air + 10 vol% H2O were examined experimentally. Interdiffusion was modeled by a modified coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model (COSIM) program. The modification enabled the program to directly input the concentration profiles of the as-deposited coating determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Reasonable agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental Al profiles after exposures. Moreover, the model was also applied to predict coating lifetime at 650–700°C based on a minimum Al content (Cb) required at the coating surface to re-form protective oxide scale. In addition to a Cb value established from the failure of a thin CVD coating at 700°C, values reported for slurry aluminide coatings were also included in lifetime predictions.

  18. Modification in the Microstructure of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo Ferritic Martensitic Steel Exposed to Sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanthi, T. N.; Sudha, Cheruvathur; Paul, V. Thomas; Bharasi, N. Sivai; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2014-09-01

    Mod. 9Cr-1Mo is used as the structural material in the steam generator circuit of liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors. Microstructural modifications on the surface of this steel are investigated after exposing to flowing sodium at a temperature of 798 K (525 °C) for 16000 hours. Sodium exposure results in the carburization of the ferritic steel up to a depth of ~218 µm from the surface. Electron microprobe analysis revealed the existence of two separate zones with appreciable difference in microchemistry within the carburized layer. Differences in the type, morphology, volume fraction, and microchemistry of the carbides present in the two zones are investigated using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Formation of separate zones within the carburized layer is understood as a combined effect of leaching, diffusion of the alloying elements, and thermal aging. Chromium concentration on the surface in the α-phase suggested possible degradation in the corrosion resistance of the steel. Further, concentration-dependent diffusivities for carbon are determined in the base material and carburized zones using Hall's and den Broeder's methods, respectively. These are given as inputs for simulating the concentration profiles for carbon using numerical computation technique based on finite difference method. Predicted thickness of the carburized zone agrees reasonably well with that of experiment.

  19. Low cycle fatigue properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels after high-dose neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaganidze, E.; Petersen, C.; Aktaa, J.; Povstyanko, A.; Prokhorov, V.; Diegele, E.; Lässer, R.

    2011-08-01

    This paper focuses on the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviour of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated to a displacement damage dose of up to 70 dpa at 330-337 °C in the BOR 60 reactor within the ARBOR 2 irradiation programme. The influence of neutron irradiation on the fatigue behaviour was determined for the as-received EUROFER97, pre-irradiation heat-treated EUROFER97 HT and F82H-mod steels. Strain-controlled push-pull loading was performed using miniaturized cylindrical specimens at a constant temperature of 330 °C with total strain ranges between 0.8% and 1.1%. Comparison of the LCF behaviour of irradiated and reference unirradiated specimens was performed for both the adequate total and inelastic strains. Neutron irradiation-induced hardening may have various effects on the fatigue behaviour of the steels. The reduction of inelastic strain in the irradiated state compared with the reference unirradiated state at common total strain amplitudes may increase fatigue lifetime. The increase in the stress at the adequate inelastic strain, by contrast, may accelerate fatigue damage accumulation. Depending on which of the two effects mentioned dominates, neutron irradiation may either extend or reduce the fatigue lifetime compared with the reference unirradiated state. The results obtained for EUROFER97 and EUROFER97 HT confirm these considerations. Most of the irradiated specimens show fatigue lifetimes comparable to those of the reference unirradiated state at adequate inelastic strains. Some irradiated specimens, however, show lifetime reduction or increase in comparison with the reference state at adequate inelastic strains.

  20. Mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness of a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaxin; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1993-10-01

    The critical J-integrals of mode I (J{sub IC}), mixed-mode I/III (J{sub MC}), and mode III (J{sub IIIC}) were examined for a ferritic stainless steel (F-82H) at ambient temperature. A determination of J{sub MC} was made using modified compact-tension specimens. Different ratios of tension/shear stress were achieved by varying the principal axis of the crack plane between 0 and 55 degrees from the load line. Results showed that J{sub MC} and tearing modulus (T{sub M}) values varied with the crack angles and were lower than their mode I and mode III counterparts. Both the minimum J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values occurred at a crack angle between 40 and 50 degrees, where the load ratio of {sigma}{sub i}/{sigma}{sub iii} was 1.2 to 0.84. The J{sub min} was 240 Kj/M{sup 2}, and ratios of J{sub IC}/J{sub min} and J{sub IIIC}/J{sub min} were 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. The morphology of fracture surfaces was consistent with the change of J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values. While the upper shelf-fracture toughness of F-82H depends on loading mode, the J{sub min} remains very high. Other important considerations include the effect of mixed-mode loading on the DBT temperature, and effects of hydrogen and irradiation on J{sub min}.

  1. Low temperature superplasticity and thermal stability of a nanostructured low-carbon microalloyed steel

    PubMed Central

    Hu, J.; Du, L.-X.; Sun, G.-S.; Xie, H.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2015-01-01

    We describe here for the first time the low temperature superplasticity of nanostructured low carbon steel (microalloyed with V, N, Mn, Al, Si, and Ni). Low carbon nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) bulk steel was processed using a combination of cold-rolling and annealing of martensite. The complex microstructure of NG/UFG ferrite and 50–80 nm cementite exhibited high thermal stability at 500 °C with low temperature elongation exceeding 100% (at less than 0.5 of the absolute melting point) as compared to the conventional fine-grained (FG) counterpart. The low temperature superplasticity is adequate to form complex components. Moreover, the low strength during hot processing is favorable for decreasing the spring back and minimize die loss. PMID:26687012

  2. Effect of transient thermal cycles in a supercritical water-cooled reactor on the microstructure and properties of ferritic martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totemeier, T. C.; Clark, D. E.

    2006-09-01

    Microstructural and mechanical property changes in modified 9Cr-1Mo and HCM12A ferritic-martensitic steels resulting from short-duration thermal transients that occur during loss of feedwater flow events in a supercritical water reactor (SCWR) were studied. Specimen blanks were exposed to reference transients with 810 and 840 °C maximum temperatures using a thermal cycle simulator, and the subsequent microstructure, hardness, and creep-rupture strength were evaluated. Exposure to five consecutive cycles at either temperature resulted in no significant changes - only very slight indications of overtempering. Subsequent study of a wider variety of transient conditions showed that significant ferrite-to-austenite transformation occurred during thermal transients whose maximum temperature exceeded 860 °C, or during transients with holds exceeding 10 s at 840 °C maximum temperature. The subsequent presence of untempered martensite in the microstructure, coupled with severe overtempering, resulted in an order of magnitude decrease in creep-rupture strength at 600 °C. The findings were consistent with measured Ac1 temperatures for the two steels and the dependence of Ac1 on heating rate.

  3. Effect of Cr content on the nanostructural evolution of irradiated ferritic/martensitic alloys: An object kinetic Monte Carlo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Malerba, L.; Becquart, C. S.

    2015-10-01

    Self-interstitial cluster diffusivity in Fe-Cr alloys, model materials for high-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels, is known to be reduced in a non-monotonic way as a function of Cr concentration: it first decreases, then increases. This non-monotonic behaviour is caused by a relatively long-ranged attractive interaction between Cr atoms and crowdions and correlates well with the experimentally observed swelling in these alloys under neutron irradiation, also seen to first decrease and then increase with increasing Cr content, under comparable irradiation conditions. Moreover, recent studies reveal that C atoms dispersed in the Fe matrix form under irradiation complexes with vacancies which, in turn, act as trap for one-dimensionally migrating self-interstitial clusters. The mobility of one-dimensional migrating clusters is considered key to determine swelling susceptibility. However, no model has ever been built that quantitatively describes the dependence of swelling on Cr content, allowing for the presence of C in the matrix. In this work we developed physically-based sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations intended to study the nanostructure evolution under irradiation in Fe-Cr-C alloys. The nanostructural evolution in Fe-C and in four Fe-Cr-C alloys (containing 2.5, 5, 9 and 12 wt.% Cr) neutron irradiated up to ∼0.6 dpa at 563 K was simulated according to the model and reference experiments were reproduced. Our model shows that the SIA cluster reduced mobility has a major influence on the nanostructural evolution: it increases the number of vacancy-SIA recombinations and thus leads to the suppression of voids formation. This provides a clear framework to interpret the non-monotonic dependence of swelling in Fe-Cr alloys versus Cr content. Our model also suggests that the amount of C in the matrix has an equally important role: high amounts of it may counteract the beneficial effect that Cr has in reducing swelling.

  4. Microstructural evolution of P92 ferritic/martensitic steel under Ar{sup +} ion irradiation at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Shuoxue; Guo Liping; Li Tiecheng; Chen Jihong; Yang Zheng; Luo Fengfeng; Tang Rui; Qiao Yanxin; Liu Feihua

    2012-06-15

    Irradiation damage in P92 ferritic/martensitic steel irradiated by Ar{sup +} ion beams to 7 and 12 dpa at elevated temperatures of 290 Degree-Sign C, 390 Degree-Sign C and 550 Degree-Sign C has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The precipitate periphery (the matrix/carbide interface) was amorphized only at 290 Degree-Sign C, while higher irradiation temperature could prevent the amorphization. The formation of the small re-precipitates occurred at 290 Degree-Sign C after irradiation to 12 dpa. With the increase of irradiation temperature and dose, the phenomenon of re-precipitation became more severe. The voids induced by irradiation were observed after irradiation to 7 dpa at 550 Degree-Sign C, showing that high irradiation temperature ({>=} 550 Degree-Sign C) was a crucial factor which promoted the irradiation swelling. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis revealed that segregation of Cr and W in the voids occurred under irradiation, which may influence mechanical properties of P92 F/M steel. - Graphical Abstract: High density of small voids, about 2.5 nm in diameter, was observed after irradiation to 12 dpa at 550 Degree-Sign C, which was shown in panel a (TEM micrograph). As shown in panel b (SEM image), a large number of nanometer-sized hillocks were formed in the surface irradiated at 550 Degree-Sign C, and the mean size was {approx} 30 nm. The formation of the nanometer-sized hillocks might be due to the voids that appeared as shown in TEM images (panel a). High irradiation temperature ({>=} 550 Degree-Sign C) was a crucial factor for the formation of void swelling. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small carbides re-precipitated in P92 matrix irradiated to 12 dpa at 290 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High density of voids was observed at 550 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Segregation of Cr and W in voids occurred under irradiation.

  5. Study of Grain-Growth Kinetics in Delta-Ferrite and Austenite with Application to Thin-Slab Cast Direct-Rolling Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tihe; O'Malley, Ronald J.; Zurob, Hatem S.

    2010-08-01

    The high-temperature grain-growth kinetics in delta-ferrite and austenite is investigated. The delta-ferrite growth kinetics was observed directly on a model alloy that contained 2.5 wt pct aluminum in order to stabilize delta-ferrite down to room temperature. The gamma grain-growth kinetics was by etching the former austenite grain boundaries in a precipitate-free variant of APIX60 steel. At high temperatures and in the absence of precipitation, the growth kinetics in both delta-ferrite and austenite appeared to follow a simple parabolic growth law. The findings are applied to the problem of grain-size control during the process of thin-slab casting direct rolling (TSCDR).

  6. Fabrication of 13Cr-2Mo Ferritic/Martensitic Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Steel Components by Mechanical Alloying and Spark-Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, I.; Grigoryev, E.; Khasanov, O. L.; Olevsky, E.

    2014-06-01

    The outcomes of the mechanical alloying of 13Cr-2Mo ferritic/martensitic steel and yttria (oxide-dispersion-strengthened steel) powders in a ball mill are reported in terms of the powder particle size and morphology evolution. The optimal ball mill rotation speed and the milling time are discussed. The densification kinetics of the mechanically alloyed powder during the process of spark-plasma sintering is analyzed. An optimal set of the compaction processing parameters, including the maximum temperature, the dwell time, and the heating rate, is determined. The specifics of the densification are discussed in terms of the impact of major spark-plasma sintering parameters as well as the possible phase transformations occurring during compaction processing.

  7. Microstructure and property examination of the weld HAZ in Grade 100 microalloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poorhaydari-Anaraki, Kioumars

    The microstructure and mechanical property variations across different regions of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a Grade 100 microalloyed steel were examined for a range of heat inputs from 0.5 to 2.5 kJ/mm. Autogenous gas tungsten arc welding was performed on plates of Grade 100 steel to create the HAZ. The weld thermal cycles were recorded by embedding thermocouples at different locations in the plates. Examination of precipitate alterations (dissolution, coarsening and reprecipitation) was carried out theoretically and/or experimentally using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Iron matrix phase transformations and grain size changes were examined with optical microscopy as well as TEM (both thin foils and carbon replicas). Hardness measurements (macro-, micro- and nano-hardness) were mainly used for examination of mechanical properties across the HAZ. Hardness measurements across the HAZ showed hardening in 0.5 kJ/mm weld samples and softening in the 1.5 and 2.5 kJ/mm weld samples. This was mainly due to the difference in cooling rates, since fast cooling results in microstructures with finer structures (especially grain size) and higher levels of solutes and sub-structure in the matrix. The coarse-grained HAZ (CGHAZ) had a higher hardness relative to the fine-grained HAZ (FGHAZ), regardless of the heat input, due to the formation of bainitic and martensitic fine structures (laths/plates) inside large prior austenite grains. The CGHAZ-0.5 kJ/mm consisted of packets of untempered lath martensite and coarse regions of autotempered martensite or aged massive ferrite. Increasing the heat input to 1.5 and 2.5 kJ/mm resulted in mainly bainitic microstructures (e.g., granular bainite) with some acicular ferrite and grain-boundary ferrite in the CGHAZ. The FGHAZ was mainly made up of polygonal ferrite, with considerable amounts of bainitic ferrite in the case of the 0.5 kJ/mm weld sample. Nb-rich carbides mostly survived the thermal cycles experienced in FGHAZ

  8. Analysis of stress-induced Burgers vector anisotropy in pressurized tube specimens of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steel: JLF-1

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Shibayama, T.

    1998-09-01

    A procedure for determining the Burgers vector anisotropy in irradiated ferritic steels allowing identification of all a<100> and all a/2<111> dislocations in a region of interest is applied to a pressurized tube specimen of JLF-1 irradiated at 430 C to 14.3 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV) or 61 dpa. Analysis of micrographs indicates large anisotropy in Burgers vector populations develop during irradiation creep.

  9. Microstructure and Mechanism of Strengthening of Microalloyed Pipeline Steel: Ultra-Fast Cooling (UFC) Versus Laminar Cooling (LC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Wang, X.; Hu, W.; Kang, J.; Yuan, G.; Di, H.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2016-06-01

    A novel thermo-mechanical controlled processing (TMCP) schedule involving ultra-fast cooling (UFC) technique was used to process X70 (420 MPa) microalloyed pipeline steel with high strength-high toughness combination. A relative comparison is made between microstructure and mechanical properties between conventionally processed (CP) and ultra-fast cooled (UFC) pipeline steels, together with differences in strengthening mechanisms with respect to both types of processes. UFC-processed steel exhibited best combination of strength and good toughness compared to the CP process. The microstructure of CP pipeline steel mainly consisted of acicular ferrite (AF), bainitic ferrite (BF), and dispersed secondary martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent and a small fraction of fine quasi-polygonal ferrite. In contrast, the microstructure of UFC-processed pipeline steel was predominantly composed of finer AF, BF, and dispersed M/A constituent. The primary strengthening mechanisms in UFC pipeline steel were grain size strengthening and dislocation strengthening with strength increment of ~277 and ~151 MPa, respectively. However, the strengthening contribution in CP steel was related to grain size strengthening, dislocation strengthening, and precipitation strengthening, and the corresponding strength increments were ~212, ~149 and ~86 MPa, respectively. The decrease in strength induced by reducing Nb and Cr in UFC pipeline steel was compensated by enhancing the contribution of grain size strengthening in the UFC process. In conclusion, cooling schedule of UFC combined with LC is a promising method for processing low-cost pipeline steels.

  10. Relationship Between Grain Boundary Structure and Radiation Induced Segregation in a Neutron Irradiated 9 wt. % Cr Model Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Miller, Brandon; Chichester, Heather J.M.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-01-01

    Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels with high Cr content posses the high temperature strength and low swelling rates required for advanced nuclear reactor designs. Radiation induced segregation (RIS) occurs in F/M steels due to solute atoms preferentially coupling to point defect fluxes to defect sinks, such as grain boundaries (GBs). The RIS response of F/M steels and austenitic steels has been shown to be dependent on the local structure of GBs but has only been demonstrated in ion irradiated specimens. A 9 wt. % Cr model alloy steel was irradiated to 3 dpa using neutrons at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the effect of neutron radiation environment on the RIS-GB structure dependence. This investigation found the relationship between GB structure and RIS is also active for F/M steels irradiated using neutrons. The data generated from the neutron irradiation is also compared to RIS data generated using proton irradiations on the same heat of model alloy.

  11. Influence of liquid lead and lead-bismuth eutectic on tensile, fatigue and creep properties of ferritic/martensitic and austenitic steels for transmutation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorse, D.; Auger, T.; Vogt, J.-B.; Serre, I.; Weisenburger, A.; Gessi, A.; Agostini, P.; Fazio, C.; Hojna, A.; Di Gabriele, F.; Van Den Bosch, J.; Coen, G.; Almazouzi, A.; Serrano, M.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, the tensile, fatigue and creep properties of the Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steel T91 and of the Austenitic Stainless (AS) Steel 316L in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) or lead, obtained in the different organizations participating to the EUROTRANS-DEMETRA project are reviewed. The results show a remarkable consistency, referring to the variety of metallurgical and surface state conditions studied. Liquid Metal Embrittlement (LME) effects are shown, remarkable on heat-treated hardened T91 and also on corroded T91 after long-term exposure to low oxygen containing Liquid Metal (LM), but hardly visible on passive or oxidized smooth T91 specimens. For T91, the ductility trough was estimated, starting just above the melting point of the embrittler ( TM,E = 123.5 °C for LBE, 327 °C for lead) with the ductility recovery found at 425 °C. LME effects are weaker on 316L AS steel. Liquid Metal Assisted Creep (LMAC) effects are reported for the T91/LBE system at 550 °C, and for the T91/lead system at 525 °C. Today, if the study of the LME effects on T91 and 316L in LBE or lead can be considered well documented, in contrast, complementary investigations are necessary in order to quantify the LMAC effects in these systems, and determine rigorously the threshold creep conditions.

  12. IRRADIATION CREEP AND SWELLING OF RUSSIAN FERRITIC-MARTENSITIC STEELS IRRADIATED TO VERY HIGH EXPOSURES IN THE BN-350 FAST REACTOR AT 305-335 DEGREES C

    SciTech Connect

    Konobeev, Yu V.; Dvoraishin, A. M.; Porollo, S. I.; Shulepin, S. V.; Budylkin, N. I.; Mironova, E. G.; Garner, Francis A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2003-09-03

    Russian ferritic martensitic (F(slash)M) steels EP(dash)450, EP(dash)852 and EP(dash)823 were irradiated in the BN(dash)350 fast reactor in the form of gas-pressurized creep tubes. The first steel is used in Russia for hexagonal wrappers in fast reactors. The other steels were developed for compatibility with Pb(dash)Bi coolants and serve to enhance our understanding of the general behavior of this class of steels. In an earlier paper we published data on irradiation creep of EP(dash)450 and EP(dash) 823 at temperatures between 390 and 520 degrees C, with dpa levels ranging from 20 to 60 dpa. In the current paper new data on the irradiation creep and swelling of EP(dash)450 and EP(dash)852 at temperatures between 305 and 335 degrees C and doses ranging from 61 to 89 dpa are presented. Where comparisons are possible, it appears that these steels exhibit behavior that is very consistent with that of Western steels. Swelling is relatively low at high neutron exposure and confined to temperatures less then 420 degrees C, but may be camouflaged somewhat by precipitation related densification. These irradiation creep studies confirm that the creep compliance of F(slash)M steels is about one half that of austenitic steels.

  13. High heat flux test with HIP-bonded Ferritic Martensitic Steel mock-up for the first wall of the KO HCML TBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won Lee, Dong; Dug Bae, Young; Kwon Kim, Suk; Yun Shin, Hee; Guen Hong, Bong; Cheol Bang, In

    2011-10-01

    In order for a Korean Helium Cooled Molten Lithium (HCML) Test Blanket Module (TBM) to be tested in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), fabrication method for the TBM FW such as Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP, 1050 °C, 100 MPa, 2 h) has been developed including post HIP heat treatment (PHHT, normalizing at 950 °C for 2 h and tempering at 750 °C for 2 h) with Ferritic Martensitic Steel (FMS). Several mock-ups were fabricated using the developed methods and one of them, three-channel mock-up, was used for performing a High Heat Flux (HHF) test to verify the joint integrity. Test conditions were determined using the commercial code, ANSYS-11, and the test was performed in the Korea Heat Load Test (KoHLT) facility, which was used a radiation heating with a graphite heater. The mock-up survived up to 1000 cycles under 1.0 MW/m 2 heat flux and there is no delamination or failure during the test.

  14. Dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature for a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to investigate the dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature in the range of {minus}95{degrees}C to 25{degrees}C for a low activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel (F82-H). Mode I and mixed Mode I/III fracture toughnesses were investigated in the range of {minus}95 to 25{degree}C for a F82-H steel heat-treated in the following way; 1000{degree}C/20 h/air-cooled (AC), 1100{degree}C/7 min/AC, and 700{degree}C/2 h/AC. The results indicate that crack tip plasticity was increased by mixed mode loading, and suggest that at low temperature, mode I fracture toughness is the critical design parameter, but at temperatures above room temperature, expecially concerning fatigure and creep-fatigue crack growth rate, a mixed mode loading may be more harmful than a mode I loading for this steel because a mixed mode loading results in lower fracture toughness and higher crack tip plasticity (or dislocation activity).

  15. Silicon-containing ferritic/martensitic steel after exposure to oxygen-containing flowing lead-bismuth eutectic at 450 and 550 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, Carsten; Koch, Verena; Wedemeyer, Olaf; Skrypnik, Aleksandr; Konys, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    A ferritic/martensitic (f/m) steel with 9 and 3 mass% of chromium (Cr) and silicon (Si), respectively, was tested on performance in flowing lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 450 and 550 °C, each at concentrations of solved oxygen of both 10-7 and 10-6 mass%. The 9Cr-3Si steel generally exhibits the same basic corrosion modes as other f/m materials with 9 mass% Cr and typically lower Si content, namely Steel T91. The Si-rich steel shows an overall improved performance in comparison to T91 at 450 °C and 10-7 mass% solved oxygen, but especially at 450 °C and 10-6 mass% solved oxygen. The advantage of higher Si-content in 9Cr steel is less clear at 550 °C. Especially high oxygen content in flowing LBE at 550 °C, between >10-6 mass% and oxygen saturation, seems detrimental for the high-Si material in respect of the initiation and progress of a solution-based corrosion.

  16. Relationship between lath boundary structure and radiation induced segregation in a neutron irradiated 9 wt.% Cr model ferritic/martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Miller, Brandon D.; Chichester, Heather J. M.; Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-02-01

    Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels with high Cr content posses the high temperature strength and low swelling rates required for advanced nuclear reactor designs. Radiation induced segregation (RIS) occurs in F/M steels due to solute atoms preferentially coupling to point defect fluxes which migrate to defect sinks, such as grain boundaries (GBs). The RIS response of F/M steels and austenitic steels has been shown to be dependent on the local structure of GBs where low energy structures have suppressed RIS responses. This relationship between local GB structure and RIS has been demonstrated primarily in ion-irradiated specimens. A 9 wt.% Cr model alloy steel was irradiated to 3 dpa using neutrons at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the effect of a neutron radiation environment on the RIS response at different GB structures. This investigation found the relationship between GB structure and RIS is also active for F/M steels irradiated using neutrons. The data generated from the neutron irradiation is also compared to RIS data generated using proton irradiations on the same heat of model alloy.

  17. Compatibility of ferritic-martensitic steel T91 welds with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic: Comparison between TIG and EB welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, J.; Coen, G.; Van Renterghem, W.; Almazouzi, A.

    2010-01-01

    The 9 wt.% chromium ferritic-martensitic steel T91 is being considered as candidate structural material for a future experimental accelerator driven system (XT-ADS). This material and its welded connections would need to be used in contact with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), under high irradiation doses. Both unirradiated tungsten inert gas (TIG) and electron beam (EB) welds of T91 have been examined by means of metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Vickers hardness measurements and tensile testing in both gas and liquid lead-bismuth environment. The TIG weld was commercially produced and post weld heat treated by a certified welding company while the post weld heat treatment of the experimental EB weld was optimized in terms of the Vickers hardness profile across the welded joint. The mechanical properties of the T91 TIG and EB welds in contact with LBE have been examined using slow strain rate tensile testing (SSRT) in LBE at 350 °C. All welds showed good mechanical behaviour in gas environment but total elongation was strongly reduced due to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) when tested in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic environment. The reduction in total elongation due to LME was larger for the commercially TIG welded joint than for the EB welded joint.

  18. Effects of boron and phosphorus on creep properties of a ferritic/martensitic steel for fast reactor cladding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The thermal efficiencies of both conventional and supercritical fossil-fueled power plants can be improved by increasing the operating temperatures and pressures. Increased thermal efficiency would also result in significant fuel cost savings, as well as reduced environmental emissions per megawatt generated. Creep properties of materials currently used as tubes in the hottest areas of the boiler, the superheater and reheater sections, limit the operating temperature. As such, steels with improved creep strength compared to these conventional alloys are needed to increase the operational efficiencies of thermal-electric generating stations. A new class of creep-resistant, 10%Cr martensitic steel has been developed for use as high temperature components, especially in the electric utility, petrochemical & chemical industries. The steel differs from other 9-12%Cr steels in two important ways: It is strengthened by a uniform dispersion of very fine, coarsening-resistant TiC particles rather than chromium-rich, M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates; and the TiC particles are precipitated in austenite prior to the martensitic transformation, not during tempering. By carefully controlling the thermo-mechanical treatment, three TiC sizes were incorporated into the matrix: 4, 12 and 25 nm; grain size and precipitate volume fraction (0.005) were kept constant. Creep tests on these three specimen types were done at 550{degrees}C, 600{degrees}C and 650{degrees}C. Results indicate that reducing the average particle size from 25 to 4 nm (thereby also reducing the average inter-particle spacing) decreases the steady-state creep rate by more than four orders of magnitude. The prototype steel`s composition must now be optimized, and in doing so the effects of boron and phosphorus are investigated.

  19. Use of double and triple-ion irradiation to study the influence of high levels of helium and hydrogen on void swelling of 8-12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriiyanova, Y. E.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    In accelerator-driven spallation (ADS) devices, some of the structural materials will be exposed to intense fluxes of very high energy protons and neutrons, producing not only displacement damage, but very high levels of helium and hydrogen. Unlike fission flux-spectra where most helium and hydrogen are generated by transmutation in nickel and only secondarily in iron or chromium, gas production in ADS flux-spectra are rather insensitive to alloy composition, such that Fe-Cr base ferritic alloys also generate very large gas levels. While ferritic alloys are known to swell less than austenitic alloys in fission spectra, there is a concern that high gas levels in fusion and especially ADS facilities may strongly accelerate void swelling in ferritic alloys. In this study of void swelling in response to helium and hydrogen generation, irradiation was conducted on three ferritic-martensitic steels using the Electrostatic Accelerator with External Injector (ESUVI) facility that can easily produce any combination of helium to dpa and/or hydrogen to dpa ratios. Irradiation was conducted under single, dual and triple beam modes using 1.8 MeV Cr+3, 40 keV He+, and 20 keV H+. In the first part of this study we investigated the response of dual-phase EP-450 to variations in He/dpa and H/dpa ratio, focusing first on dual ion studies and then triple ion studies, showing that there is a diminishing influence on swelling with increasing total gas content. In the second part we investigated the relative response of three alloys spanning a range of starting microstructure and composition. In addition to observing various synergisms between He and H, the most important conclusion was that the tempered martensite phase, known to lag behind the ferrite phase in swelling in the absence of gases, loses much of its resistance to void nucleation when irradiated at large gas/dpa levels.

  20. Effect of sodium environment on the low cycle fatigue properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, R.; Sandhya, R.; Ganesan, V.; Valsan, M.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2009-02-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is the material of current interest for the steam generator components of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). The steam generator has been designed to operate for 30-40 years. It is important to accurately determine the life of the components in the actual environment in order to consider the extension of life beyond the design life. With this objective in view, a programme has been initiated at our laboratory to evaluate the effects of flowing sodium on the LCF behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. LCF tests conducted in flowing sodium environment at 823 K and 873 K exhibited cyclic softening behaviour both in air and sodium environments. The fatigue lives are significantly improved in sodium environment when compared to the data obtained in air environment under identical testing conditions. The lack of oxidation in sodium environment is considered to be responsible for the delayed crack initiation and consequent increase in fatigue life. Comparison of experimental lifetimes with RCC-MR design code predictions indicated that the design curve based on air tests is too conservative.

  1. Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Peter

    2013-09-30

    The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV

  2. Process Integrated Heat Treatment of a Microalloyed Medium Carbon Steel: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Sebastian; Schledorn, Mareike; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Milenin, Andrij; Nürnberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Air-water spray cooling was employed during a heat treatment to enhance the mechanical properties of microalloyed medium carbon steel test cylinders (38MnVS6, 88 mm diameter). Using appropriate cooling times and intensities, the test cylinders' surfaces could be quenched and subsequently self-tempered by the residual heat of the core. Simultaneously, it was possible to keep the core regions of the cylinders in the bainitic regime and carry out a quasi-isothermal holding. The resulting microstructures consisted of tempered martensite (near-surface) and bainite with pearlite and ferrite (core). Compared to the standard heat treatment (controlled air cooling), the tensile properties (proof stress and ultimate tensile strength) could be improved for both near-surface and core regions with the adapted spray cooling. A hardness profile with 450 HV10 surface hardness and a hardening depth of more than 11 mm could be realized. In addition, an increase of the impact toughness for the core was achieved, resulting in approximately 25 J charpy impact energy. This is a substantial improvement compared to standard heat treatment procedure and values reported in the literature and can be attributed to the reduced pearlite volume fraction and the increased amount of fine bainite.

  3. The Determining Role of Finish Cooling Temperature on the Microstructural Evolution and Precipitation Behavior in an Nb-V-Ti Microalloyed Steel in the Context of Newly Developed Ultrafast Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Zhaodong; Deng, Xiangtao; Wang, Guodong; Misra, R. D. K.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied here the impact of finish cooling temperature on the microstructural evolution and precipitation behavior in Nb-V-Ti microalloyed steel through thermo-mechanical simulation in the context of newly developed ultrafast cooling system. The microstructural evolution was studied in terms of morphology and crystallography of precipitates using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. At finish cooling temperature of 933 K and 893 K (660 °C and 620 °C), the microstructure primarily consisted of polygonal ferrite, together with a small amount of wedge-shaped acicular ferrite and lamellar pearlite, while, at 853 K and 813 K (580 °C and 540 °C), the microstructure consisted of lath bainite with fine interlath cementite and granular bainite with martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent. In all the finish cooling temperatures studied, the near-spherical precipitates of size range ~2 to 15 nm were randomly dispersed in ferrite and bainite matrix. The carbide precipitates were identified as (Nb,V)C with NaCl-type crystal structure. With a decrease in the finish cooling temperature, the size of the precipitates was decreased, while the number density first increased with a peak at 893 K (620 °C) and then decreased. Using Ashby-Orowan model, the contribution of the precipitation strengthening to yield strength was ~149 MPa at the finish cooling temperature of 893 K (620 °C).

  4. Study of MHD Corrosion and Transport of Corrosion Products of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in the Flowing PbLi and its Application to Fusion Blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidi, Sheida

    Two important components of a liquid breeder blanket of a fusion power reactor are the liquid breeder/coolant and the steel structure that the liquid is enclosed in. One candidate combination for such components is Lead-Lithium (PbLi) eutectic alloy and advanced Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel. The research performed here is aimed at: (1) better understanding of corrosion processes in the system including RAFM steel and flowing PbLi in the presence of a strong magnetic field and (2) prediction of corrosion losses in conditions of a Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) blanket, which is at present the key liquid metal blanket concept in the US. To do this, numerical and analytical tools have been developed and then applied to the analysis of corrosion processes. First, efforts were taken to develop a computational suite called TRANSMAG (Transport phenomena in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows) as an analysis tool for corrosion processes in the PbLi/RAFM system, including transport of corrosion products in MHD laminar and turbulent flows. The computational approach in TRANSMAG is based on simultaneous solution of flow, energy and mass transfer equations with or without a magnetic field, assuming mass transfer controlled corrosion and uniform dissolution of iron in the flowing PbLi. Then, the new computational tool was used to solve an inverse mass transfer problem where the saturation concentration of iron in PbLi was reconstructed from the experimental data resulting in the following correlation: CS = e 13.604--12975/T, where T is the temperature of PbLi in K and CS is in wppm. The new correlation for saturation concentration was then used in the analysis of corrosion processes in laminar flows in a rectangular duct in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field. As shown in this study, the mass loss increases with the magnetic field such that the corrosion rate in the presence of a magnetic field can be a few times higher compared to purely

  5. Precipitation and fine structure in medium-carbon vanadium and vanadium/niobium microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, S.W.; Krauss, G. )

    1989-11-01

    This paper reports hot-rolled and continuously cooled, medium-carbon microalloyed steels containing 0.2 or 0.4 pct C with vanadium (0.15 pct) or vanadium (0.15 pct) plus niobium (0.04 pct) additions investigated with light and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope was conducted on precipitates of the 0.4 pct C steel with vanadium and niobium additions. The vanadium steels contained fine interphase precipitates within ferrite, pearlite nodules devoid of interphase precipitates, and fine ferritic transformation twins. The vanadium plus niobium steels contained large Nb-rich precipitates, precipitates which formed in cellular arrays on deformed austenite substructure and contained about equal amounts of niobium and vanadium, and V-rich interphase precipitates. Transformation twins in the ferrite and interphase precipitates in the pearlitic ferrite were not observed in either of the steels containing both microalloying elements. Consistent with the effect of higher C concentrations on driving the microalloying precipitation reactions, substructure precipitation was more frequently observed in the 0.4C-V-Nb steel than in the 0.2C-V-Nb steel, both in the ferritic and pearlitic regions of the microstructure. Also, superposition of interphase and substructure precipitation was more frequently observed in the high-C-V-Nb steel than in the similar low-C steel.

  6. Irradiation creep of 11Cr-0.5Mo-2W,V,Nb ferritic-martensitic, modified 316, and 15Cr-20Ni austenitic S.S. irradiated in FFTF to 103-206 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehira, A.; Mizuta, S.; Ukai, S.; Puigh, R. J.

    2000-12-01

    The irradiation creep of 11Cr-0.5Mo-2W-0.2V-0.05Nb ferritic-martensitic (PNC-FMS), modified 316 (PNC316) and 15Cr-20Ni base austenitic S.S. were determined by the gas pressurized capsule irradiation test using MOTA in FFTF. The pressurized capsules and open tubes were irradiated at 678-943 K to a peak dose of 206 dpa. The irradiation creep coefficients were derived from the diametral change differences between the capsules and open tubes, accounting for the stress-induced swelling. The creep compliance B0 and creep-swelling coupling coefficient D for PNC-FMS were found to be 0.43-0.76×10-6 MPa-1 dpa-1 and 0.85-2.5×10-2 MPa-1 for volumetric swelling, respectively. For both PNC316 and 15Cr-20Ni base S.S. the irradiation creep properties were very similar. B0 and D range from 0.55 to -1.5×10-6 MPa-1 dpa-1 and from 1.2 to -2.8×10-3 MPa-1, respectively.

  7. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ Xray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  8. Comparative Tensile Flow and Work-Hardening Behavior of 9 Pct Chromium Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in the Framework of the Estrin-Mecking Internal-Variable Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. K.; Christopher, J.

    2016-06-01

    The comparative tensile flow and work-hardening behavior of P9 steel in two different product forms, normalized and tempered plate and thick section tube plate forging, and P91 steel were investigated in the framework of the dislocation dynamics based Estrin-Mecking (E-M) one-internal-variable approach. The analysis indicated that the flow behavior of P9 and P91 steels was adequately described by the E-M approach in a wide range of temperatures. It was suggested that dislocation dense martensite lath/cell boundaries and precipitates together act as effective barriers to dislocation motion in P9 and P91 steels. At room and intermediate temperatures, the evolution of the internal-state variable, i.e., the dislocation density with plastic strain, exhibited insignificant variations with respect to temperature. At high temperatures, a rapid evolution of dislocation density with plastic strain toward saturation with increasing temperature was observed. The softer P9 steel tube plate forging exhibited higher work hardening in terms of larger gains in the dislocation density and flow stress contribution from dislocations than the P9 steel plate and P91 steel at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 873 K (27 °C to 600 °C). The evaluation of activation energy suggests that the deformation is controlled by cross-slip of dislocations at room and intermediate temperatures, and climb of dislocations at high temperatures. The relative influence of initial microstructure on flow and work-hardening parameters associated with the E-M approach was discussed in the three temperature regimes displayed by P9 and P91 steels.

  9. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  10. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  11. Martensite Embryology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Andrew C. E.; Olson, Gregory B.

    2000-03-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of martensite is modeled by examining the strain field of a dislocation array in a nonlinear, nonlocal continuum elastic matrix. The dislocations are modeled by including effects from atomic length scales, which control the dislocation Burger's vector, into a mesoscopic continuum model. The dislocation array models the heterogeneous nucleation source of the Olson/Cohen defect dissociation model, and depending on the potency can give rise to embryos of different character. High potency dislocations give rise to fully developed, classical pre-existing embryos, whereas low-potency dislocations result in the formation of highly nonclassical strain embryos. Heterogeneous nucleation theory is related to nucleation kinetics through the critical driving force for nucleation at a defect of a given potency. Recent stereological and calorimetric kinetic studies in thermoelastic TiNi alloys confirm that these materials exhibit the same form of defect potency distribution and resulting sample-size dependent Martensite start temperature, M_s, as nonthermoelastic FeNi systems. These results together point towards a broad theory of heterogeneous nucleation for both thermoelastic and nonthermoelastic martensites.

  12. Microstructural characterization of a warm-deformed microalloyed steel

    SciTech Connect

    Eghbali, B.

    2008-04-15

    A warm deformation process using torsion testing was carried out on a low carbon Nb-microalloyed steel. The physical processes that occur during deformation were studied by analyzing the warm flow curves. The mechanisms of fine ferrite grain formation were studied by means of optical microscopy and an electron back-scattering diffraction technique. The results show that warm flow curves of ferrite are similar to those affected only by dynamic softening events. Microstructural analysis shows that, with increasing strain, the new fine equiaxed ferrite grains surrounded by high-angle boundaries are generated at the initial boundaries. During the early stages of deformation, as strain increases the grain size decreases and the grain aspect ratio rapidly increases. A further increase of the strain also leads to continuous decreases of both the grain size and the grain aspect ratio. The dynamic softening mechanism and dynamical formation of new fine grains, observed during warm deformation, were verified to be due to continuous dynamic recrystallization.

  13. Study of aging and embrittlement of microalloyed steel bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campillo, B.; Perez, R.; Martinez, L.

    1996-10-01

    The aging of hooks, anchors, and other bent reinforcing steel bars in concrete structures are considered in modern international standards. Rebend test procedures have been designed in order to predict the aging embrittlement susceptibility by submerging bent reinforcing bar specimens in boiling water. Subsequently the bars are rebent or straightened in order to determine the loss of ductility or embrittlement of the aged material. The present work considers the influence of carbon, sulfur, and niobium on the performance of reinforcing bars in rebend tests of 300 heats of microalloyed steel bars with a variety of compositions. The microstructural evidence and the statistical results clearly indicate the strong influence of carbon and sulfur on rebend failure, while niobium-rich precipitates contribute to the hardening of the ferrite grains during aging.

  14. Strengthening Mechanisms in Thermomechanically Processed NbTi-Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostryzhev, Andrii G.; Marenych, Olexandra O.; Killmore, Chris R.; Pereloma, Elena V.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of deformation temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated for thermomechanically processed NbTi-microalloyed steel with ferrite-pearlite microstructure. With a decrease in the finish deformation temperature at 1348 K to 1098 K (1075 °C to 825 °C) temperature range, the ambient temperature yield stress did not vary significantly, work hardening rate decreased, ultimate tensile strength decreased, and elongation to failure increased. These variations in mechanical properties were correlated to the variations in microstructural parameters (such as ferrite grain size, solid solution concentrations, precipitate number density and dislocation density). Calculations based on the measured microstructural parameters suggested the grain refinement, solid solution strengthening, precipitation strengthening, and work hardening contributed up to 32 pct, up to 48 pct, up to 25 pct, and less than 3 pct to the yield stress, respectively. With a decrease in the finish deformation temperature, both the grain size strengthening and solid solution strengthening increased, the precipitation strengthening decreased, and the work hardening contribution did not vary significantly.

  15. Effect of microalloying on the strength of high carbon wire steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephanie L.

    Microalloying additions of V, Nb, and N were investigated as means of increasing strength of eutectoid steels for wire applications. In order to examine the effects of microalloying additions during several stages of wire processing, continuous cooling experiments with and without deformation as well as patenting simulations were conducted using a Gleeble® 3500 thermomechanical simulator. Continuous cooling was performed from industrial austenitizing (1093 °C) and laying head (950 °C and 880 °C) temperatures, at rates ranging from 1 50 °C/s. Deformation was induced via hot torsion testing, which was followed by continuous cooling from 950 °C at rates of 5, 10, and 25 °C/s. Industrial wire patenting was simulated by austenitizing at 1093 °C or 950 °C for 30 sec, then rapid cooling to isothermal transformation temperatures of 575, 600, 625, and 650 °C for 15 sec before cooling to room temperature. Metallography, Vickers hardness, pearlite colony size and pearlite interlamellar spacing (ILS) measurements were used to examine the effects of these treatments. Continuous cooling transformation (CCT) curves were constructed for four steels: 1080, V, V+N, and V+Nb. In the V-microalloyed steel, additional N accelerated pearlite transformation and Nb delayed pearlite transformation. Observed N effects are in agreement with the theory of VN nucleating grain boundary ferrite and accelerating pearlite transformation, proposed by Han et al. [1995], and also consistent with observations by Brownrigg and Prior [2002]. Delay of transformation temperatures has been observed due to Nb effects [De Ardo, 2009]. A larger delay observed with higher austenitizing temperatures suggests that Nb precipitates may not be as effective at delaying transformation. V strengthening effects were observed in all microalloyed steels using a model that predicted hardness of eutectoid steels by incorporating colony size and ILS measurements, with maximum strengthening observed

  16. The effect of chemical composition and austenite conditioning on the transformation behavior of microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mousavi Anijdan, S.H.; Rezaeian, Ahmad; Yue, Steve

    2012-01-15

    In this investigation, by using continuous cooling torsion (CCT) testing, the transformation behavior of four microalloyed steels under two circumstances of austenite conditioning and non-conditioning was studied. A full scale hot-rolling schedule containing a 13-pass deformation was employed for the conditioning of the austenite. The CCT tests were then employed till temperature of {approx} 540 Degree-Sign C and the flow curves obtained from this process were analyzed. The initial and final microstructures of the steels were studied by optical and electron microscopes. Results show that alloying elements would decrease the transformation temperature. This effect intensifies with the gradual increase of Mo, Nb and Cu as alloying elements added to the microalloyed steels. As well, austenite conditioning increased the transformation start temperature due mainly to the promotion of polygonal ferrite formation that resulted from a pancaked austenite. The final microstructures also show that CCT alone would decrease the amount of bainite by inducing ferrite transformation in the two phase region. In addition, after the transformation begins, the deformation might result in the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization in the ferrite region. This could lead to two different ferrite grain sizes at the end of the CCT. Moreover, the Nb bearing steels show no sign of decreasing the strength level after the transformation begins in the non-conditioned situation and their microstructure is a mix of polygonal ferrite and bainite indicating an absence of probable dynamic recrystallization in this condition. In the conditioned cases, however, these steels show a rapid decrease of the strength level and their final microstructures insinuate that ferrite could have undergone a dynamic recrystallization due to deformation. Consequently, no bainite was seen in the austenite conditioned Nb bearing steels. The pancaking of austenite in the latest cases produced fully polygonal ferrite

  17. Nanocarbonitride precipitation contribution to the yield stress of a V-Nb microalloyed steel.

    PubMed

    Sobral, M D C; Mei, P R; Kestenbach, H J

    2010-02-01

    Nanocarbonitride precipitation during thermomechanical processing is well known as one of the important mechanisms to increase mechanical properties of hot rolled microalloyed steels. Some studies of industrial hot rolled strips have quantified the contribution of the different ways of precipitation: in austenite, at the interface austenite/ferrite, or in supersaturated ferrite during final cooling. Thin slabs of microalloyed steels (0.07-0.08% V and 0.02-0.04% Nb) were thermomecanically processed on a laboratory-scale rolling mill. The different modes of nanocarbonitride precipitation were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. It was observed interphase precipitation with average diameter of nanocarbonitride of 4.4 nm and potential contribution to strengthening of 90 MPa, according to the Orowan-Ashby model. From the Orowan-Ashby model of precipitation strengthening, strength contributions of about 50 MPa were found for nanocarbonitride particles formed in austenite. The inclusion of a holding extra period of 15 minutes just below the Finishing Rolling Initial Temperature has confirmed an important contribution to the yield stress given by the nanocarbonitride particles formed in austenite. PMID:20352782

  18. Nanocarbonitride precipitation contribution to the yield stress of a V-Nb microalloyed steel.

    PubMed

    Sobral, M D C; Mei, P R; Kestenbach, H J

    2010-02-01

    Nanocarbonitride precipitation during thermomechanical processing is well known as one of the important mechanisms to increase mechanical properties of hot rolled microalloyed steels. Some studies of industrial hot rolled strips have quantified the contribution of the different ways of precipitation: in austenite, at the interface austenite/ferrite, or in supersaturated ferrite during final cooling. Thin slabs of microalloyed steels (0.07-0.08% V and 0.02-0.04% Nb) were thermomecanically processed on a laboratory-scale rolling mill. The different modes of nanocarbonitride precipitation were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. It was observed interphase precipitation with average diameter of nanocarbonitride of 4.4 nm and potential contribution to strengthening of 90 MPa, according to the Orowan-Ashby model. From the Orowan-Ashby model of precipitation strengthening, strength contributions of about 50 MPa were found for nanocarbonitride particles formed in austenite. The inclusion of a holding extra period of 15 minutes just below the Finishing Rolling Initial Temperature has confirmed an important contribution to the yield stress given by the nanocarbonitride particles formed in austenite.

  19. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Anderoglu, Osman; Romero, Tobias J.; Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya; Li, S.; Cole, James I.; Fielding, Randall

    2015-08-06

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress–strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress–strain constitutive σ(ε) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ε) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where as the latter can be understood in terms ofmore » the alloy's σ(ε) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ε) in the range of 0–10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. As a result, notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.« less

  20. Effects of Solute Nb Atoms and Nb Precipitates on Isothermal Transformation Kinetics from Austenite to Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Parker, Sally; Rose, Andrew; West, Geoff; Thomson, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    Nb is a very important micro-alloying element in low-carbon steels, for grain size refinement and precipitation strengthening, and even a low content of Nb can result in a significant effect on phase transformation kinetics from austenite to ferrite. Solute Nb atoms and Nb precipitates may have different effects on transformation behaviors, and these effects have not yet been fully characterized. This paper examines in detail the effects of solute Nb atoms and Nb precipitates on isothermal transformation kinetics from austenite to ferrite. The mechanisms of the effects have been analyzed using various microscopy techniques. Many solute Nb atoms were found to be segregated at the austenite/ferrite interface and apply a solute drag effect. It has been found that solute Nb atoms have a retardation effect on ferrite nucleation rate and ferrite grain growth rate. The particle pinning effect caused by Nb precipitates is much weaker than the solute drag effect.

  1. Effect of Controlled Hot Rolling Parameters on Microstructure of a Nb-Microalloyed Steel Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Khaki, Daavood Mirahmadi; Abedi, Amir

    2011-01-17

    The design of controlled rolling process of microalloyed steel sheets is affected by several factors. In this investigation, effect of the reheating, finishing and coiling temperatures of rolling, which are considered as the most effective parameters on microstructure of hot rolled products has been studied. For this purpose, seven different reheating temperatures between 1000 to 1300 deg. C with 50 deg. C increments, three different finishing temperatures of 950, 900 and 850 deg. C below the non-recrystallization temperature and one temperature of 800 deg. C in the inter critical range and four different coiling temperatures of 550, 600, 650 and 700 deg. C were chosen. By soaking the specimens in furnace, the grain coarsening temperature (T{sub gc}) is obtained about 1250 deg. C. Hence, for these kinds of steels, the reheating temperature 1200 to 1250 deg. C is recommended. Moreover, it is observed that decreasing the coiling and finishing temperatures causes more grain refinement of microstructure and the morphology is changed from polygonal ferrite to acicular one. Findings of this research provide a good connection among reheating, finishing and coiling temperatures and microstructural features of Nb-microalloyed steel sheets.

  2. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Anderoglu, Osman; Romero, Tobias J.; Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya; Li, S.; Cole, James I.; Fielding, Randall

    2015-08-06

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress–strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress–strain constitutive σ(ε) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ε) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where as the latter can be understood in terms of the alloy's σ(ε) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ε) in the range of 0–10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. As a result, notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.

  3. Irradiation effects in ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-08-01

    Since 1979 the Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance (ADIP) task funded by the US Department of Energy has been studying the 2-12Cr class of ferritic steels to establish the feasibility of using them in fusion reactor first wall/breeding blanket (FW/B) applications. The advantages of ferritic steels include superior swelling resistance, low thermal stresses compared to austenitic stainless steels, attractive mechanical properties up to 600°C. and service histories exceeding 100 000 h. These steels are commonly used in a range of microstructural conditions which include ferritic, martensitic. tempered martensitic, bainitic etc. Throughout this paper where the term "ferritic" is used it should be taken to mean any of these microstructures. The ADIP task is studying several candidate alloy systems including 12Cr-1MoWV (HT-9), modified 9Cr-1MoVNb, and dual-phased steels such as EM-12 and 2 {1}/{4}Cr-Mo. These materials are ferromagnetic (FM), body centered cubic (bcc), and contain chromium additions between 2 and 12 wt% and molybdenum additions usually below 2%. The perceived issues associated with the application of this class of steel to fusion reactors are the increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) with neutron damage, the compatibility of these steels with liquid metals and solid breeding materials, and their weldability. The ferromagnetic character of these steels can also be important in reactor design. It is the purpose of this paper to review the current understanding of these bcc steels and the effects of irradiation. The major points of discussion will be irradiation-induced or -enhanced dimensional changes such as swelling and creep, mechanical properties such as tensile strength and various measurements of toughness, and activation by neutron interactions with structural materials.

  4. Assessment of the microstructure and torsional fatigue performance of an induction hardened vanadium microalloyed medium-carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothleutner, Lee M.

    Vanadium microalloying of medium-carbon bar steels is a common practice in industry for a number of hot rolled as well as forged and controlled-cooled components. However, use of vanadium microalloyed steels has expanded into applications beyond their originally designed controlled-cooled processing scheme. Applications such as transmission shafts often require additional heat-treatments such as quench and tempering and/or induction hardening to meet packaging or performance requirements. As a result, there is uncertainty regarding the influence of vanadium on the properties of heat-treated components, specifically the effect of rapid heat-treating such as induction hardening. In the current study, the microstructural evolution and torsional fatigue behavior of induction hardened 1045 and 10V45 (0.08 wt pct V) steels were examined. Torsional fatigue specimens specifically designed for this research were machined from the as-received, hot rolled bars and induction hardened using both scanning (96 kHz/72 kW) and single-shot (31 kHz/128 kW) methods. Four conditions were evaluated, three scan hardened to 25, 32, and 44 pct nominal effective case depths and one single-shot hardened to 44 pct. Torsional fatigue tests were conducted at a stress ratio of 0.1 and shear stress amplitudes of 550, 600, and 650 MPa. Physical simulations using the thermal profiles from select induction hardened conditions were conducted in the GleebleRTM 3500 to augment microstructural analysis of torsional fatigue specimens. Thermal profiles were calculated by a collaborating private company using electro-thermal finite element analysis. Residual stresses were evaluated for all conditions using a strain gage hole drilling technique. The results showed that vanadium microalloying has an influence on the microstructure in the highest hardness region of the induction-hardened case as well as the total case region. Vanadium microalloyed conditions consistently exhibited a greater amount of non-martensitic

  5. Reverse-Martensitic Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel upon Up-quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kiminori; Guo, Defeng; Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xiangyi

    2016-08-01

    Reverse-martensitic transformation utilizing up-quenching was demonstrated for austenitic stainless steel. Up-quenching was done following the stress-induced phase modification to martensite and then enrichment of the body-centered-cubic ferrite. Transmission-electron-microscopy observation and Vickers hardness test revealed that the reverse-martensitic transformation yields quench hardening owing to an introduction of highly-concentrated dislocation. It is furthermore found that Cr precipitation on grain boundaries caused by isothermal aging is largely suppressed in the present approach.

  6. Influence of Martensite Volume Fraction on Impact Properties of Triple Phase (TP) Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Ahmad; Ekrami, A.

    2013-03-01

    Ferrite-bainite-martensite triple phase (TP) microstructures with different volume fractions of martensite were obtained by changing heat treatment time during austempering at 300 °C. Room temperature impact properties of TP steels with different martensite volume fractions ( V M) were determined by means of Charpy impact testing. The effects of test temperature on impact properties were also investigated for two selected microstructures containing 0 (the DP steel) and 8.5 vol.% martensite. Test results showed reduction in toughness with increasing V M in TP steels. Fracture toughness values for the DP and TP steels with 8.5 vol.% martensite were obtained from correlation between fracture toughness and the Charpy impact energy. Fractography of Charpy specimens confirmed decrease in TP steels' toughness with increasing V M by considering and comparing radial marks and crack initiation regions at the fracture surfaces of the studied steels.

  7. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gazder, Azdiar A; Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th; Mitchell, David R G; Pereloma, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth.

  8. Precipitation Behavior of the Second Phase in V-Ti Microalloy TRIP Steels at Different Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Hui; Fu, Shi-Yu; Jiang, Hu; He, Yan-Lin; Wang, Hua; Li, Lin

    2016-05-01

    Precipitation behavior of the second phase in V-Ti microalloyed transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels at different conditions was investigated. The second phase is mainly composed of Vanadium-titanium carbides and vanadium-titanium nitrides, which precipitates from bainitic ferrites as well as ferrite grains and grain boundaries. The average size, size distribution and numbers of the second phase of TRIP steel in as-cast state, as hot and cold rolled state and as TRIP heated state were analyzed and compared by using the technique of carbon extraction replica and transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that hot rolling can promote the second phase refining. In addition, the size of the second phase is obviously increased with the prolonged time soaking at 800􀔨. The average equivalent radiu of the second phase in samples after intercritical annealing at 800°C for 5 minutes and bainitic isothermal transformation temperature of 400°C for 5 minutes is about 4nm.

  9. Effect of silicon on ultra-low temperature toughness of Nb–Ti microalloyed cryogenic pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, J.A.; Wu, K.M.; Li, J.H.; Hodgson, P.D.; Hou, T.P.; Ding, Q.F.

    2013-09-15

    The effect of Si on the ultra-low temperature toughness of Nb–Ti microalloyed cryogenic pressure vessel steels was investigated by electron back-scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy. Equiaxed ferrite and bainite were obtained in the tempered steels with small Si additions. Nanosized Nb–Ti carbides (< 10 nm) were formed in the steel containing 0.05% Si, whereas much coarser carbides (> 30 nm) were found in the steel containing 0.47% Si. The ultra-low temperature toughness of the Nb–Ti microalloyed cryogenic pressure vessel steel was remarkably enhanced by the reduction in the Si content, which was attributed to the pre-existing iron carbide formation before the precipitation of nanosized Nb–Ti carbides during tempering. - Highlights: • Nanosized Nb-Ti carbides formed in the tempered steel with smaller Si addition. • Coarser Nb-Ti carbides formed in the tempered steel with more Si addition. • Pre-existing cememtites provide nucleation sites for Nb-Ti carbide precipitation. • Ultra-low temperature toughness was remarkably enhanced by Si content reduction.

  10. Atomic scale investigation of non-equilibrium segregation of boron in a quenched Mo-free martensitic steel.

    PubMed

    Li, Y J; Ponge, D; Choi, P; Raabe, D

    2015-12-01

    B-added low carbon steels exhibit excellent hardenability. The reason has been frequently attributed to B segregation at prior austenite grain boundaries, which prevents the austenite to ferrite transformation and favors the formation of martensite. The segregation behavior of B at prior austenite grain boundaries is strongly influenced by processing conditions such as austenitization temperatures and cooling rates and by alloying elements such as Mo, Cr, and Nb. Here an local electrode atom probe was employed to investigate the segregation behavior of B and other alloying elements (C, Mn, Si, and Cr) in a Cr-added Mo-free martensitic steel. Similar to our previous results on a Mo-added steel, we found that in both steels B is segregated at prior austenite grain boundaries with similar excess values, whereas B is neither detected in the martensitic matrix nor at martensite-martensite boundaries at the given cooling rate of 30K/s. These results are in agreement with the literature reporting that Cr has the same effect on hardenability of steels as Mo in the case of high cooling rates. The absence of B at martensite-martensite boundaries suggests that B segregates to prior austenite grain boundaries via a non-equilibrium mechanism. Segregation of C at all boundaries such as prior austenite grain boundaries and martensite-martensite boundaries may occur by an equilibrium mechanism.

  11. Microalloying of steels. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning production techniques, performance, and applications of microalloyed steels. Various microalloying materials are examined including niobium, vanadium, titanium, niobium/vanadium, aluminum, boron, molybdenum, and zirconium. Microalloying effects on the mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, metallurgical properties, and hot plasticity of steels are presented. Applications of microalloyed steels in the construction steel industry, physical properties of microalloyed steels, low-temperature service behavior, weldability, formability, and resistance to corrosion are discussed. (Contains a minimum of 193 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Effects of induction hardening and prior cold work on a microalloyed medium carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.L. ); Medlin, D.J. ); Krauss, G. )

    1999-08-01

    The torsional strength and microstructural response to induction hardening of a 10V45 steel with prior cold work was evaluated. The vanadium-microalloyed 1045 (10V45) steel was characterized in three conditions: as-hot-rolled, 18% cold-reduced, and 29% cold-reduced. Two of these evaluations, 10V45 as-hot-rolled and 10V45-18%, were subjected to stationary and progressive induction hardening to three nominal case depths: 2, 4, and 6 mm. All specimens were subsequently furnace tempered at 190 C for 1 h. The martensitic case microstructures contained residual lamellar carbides due to incomplete dissolution of the pearlitic carbides in the prior microstructure. Torsional overload strength, as measured by maximum torque capacity, is greatly increased by increasing case depth, and to a lesser extent by increasing prior cold work level. Maximum torque capacity ranges from 2520 to 3170 N[center dot]m, depending upon induction hardening processing. Changing induction hardening processing from stationary (single-shot) to progressive (scan) had little effect on torque capacity.

  13. Formation of delta ferrite in 9 wt.% Cr steel investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Peter; Palmer, T. A.; Elmer, J. W.; Specht, Eliot D; Allen, S M

    2010-01-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction measurements using high energy synchrotron radiation were performed to monitor in real time the formation of delta ferrite in a martensitic 9 wt.% chromium steel under simulated weld thermal cycles. Volume fractions of martensite, austenite and delta ferrite were measured as a function of temperature at a 10 C s-1 heating rate to 1300 C and subsequent cooling to room temperature. At the peak temperature, the delta ferrite concentration rose to a level of 19%, of which 17% transformed back to austenite on subsequent cooling. The final microstructure after this single thermal cycle consisted of newly formed martensite with 4% of retained austenite and 2% of retained delta ferrite.

  14. Influence of Martensite Mechanical Properties on Failure Mode and Ductility of Dual Phase Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the effects of the mechanical properties of the martensite phase on the failure mode and ductility of dual phase (DP) steels are investigated using a micromechanics-based finite element method. Actual microstructures of DP sheet steels obtained from scanning electron microscopy are used as representative volume element (RVE) in two-dimensional plane-stress finite element calculations. Failure is predicted as plastic strain localization in the RVE during deformation. The mechanical properties of the ferrite and martensite phases in a commercial DP 980 steel are obtained based on the in-situ X-ray diffraction measurements of a uniaxial tensile test. Computations are then conducted on the RVE in order to investigate the influence of the martensite mechanical properties and volume fraction on the macroscopic behavior and failure mode of DP steels. The computations show that, as the strength and volume fraction of the martensite phase increase, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of DP steels increases but the UTS strain and failure strain decrease. These results agree well with the general experimental observations on DP steels. Additionally, shear dominant failure modes usually develop for DP steels with lower martensite strengths, whereas split failure modes typically develop for DP steels with higher martensite strengths.

  15. Computer simulation of martensitic transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ping

    1993-11-01

    The characteristics of martensitic transformations in solids are largely determined by the elastic strain that develops as martensite particles grow and interact. To study the development of microstructure, a finite-element computer simulation model was constructed to mimic the transformation process. The transformation is athermal and simulated at each incremental step by transforming the cell which maximizes the decrease in the free energy. To determine the free energy change, the elastic energy developed during martensite growth is calculated from the theory of linear elasticity for elastically homogeneous media, and updated as the transformation proceeds.

  16. Fatigue Hardening Behavior of 1.5 GPa Grade Transformation-Induced Plasticity-Aided Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Koh-Ichi; Hojo, Tomohiko

    2016-11-01

    Low cycle fatigue hardening/softening behavior of a 0.2 pct C-1.5 pct Si-1.5 pct Mn-1.0 pct Cr-0.2 pct Mo-0.05 pct Nb transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP)-aided steel consisting of a wide lath martensite structure matrix and a narrow lath martensite-metastable retained austenite mixture was investigated. The steel exhibited notable fatigue hardening in the same way as TRIP-aided bainitic ferrite steel, although conventional martensitic steel such as SCM420 steel with the same tensile strength exhibited fatigue softening. The considerable fatigue hardening of this steel is believed to be associated mainly with the compressive internal stress that results from a difference in flow stress between the matrix and the martensite-austenite-like phase, with a small contribution from the strain-induced transformation and dislocation hardenings.

  17. Effect of Hot Coiling Under Accelerated Cooling on Development of Non-equiaxed Ferrite in Low Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanjewar, H. A.; Tripathi, Pranavkumar

    2016-06-01

    Strengthening mechanisms dominant in non-equiaxed ferrite structures are not so familiar and well measured. In present study, non-equiaxed ferritic structures were generated and perceived to be strengthened by grain/crystal refinement, presence of varying substructures, solid solution strengthening, and textural hardening. A Nb-V microalloyed steel was modeled under various accelerated cooling and coiling temperature conditions in a thermo-mechanical simulator. Decrease in coiling temperature in conjunction with accelerated cooling resulted in non-equiaxed ferrite structures with array of phase morphologies. Intermediate transformation conditions produced increase in strength concurrent with observed smallness in crystallite size and high amount of microstrain in the matrix phase indicative of high dislocation densities and crystal imperfections. Increase in strength is partially attributed to solid solution and texture hardening owing to increase in (111) pole intensity in structure.

  18. The morphology and ageing behaviour of δ-ferrite in a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, R.; Singh, R. N.; Sinha, T. K.; Kashyap, B. P.

    1992-10-01

    Dual phase (martensite + δ-ferrite) microstructures were developed in a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, by austenitising at 1523-1623 K, followed by water-quenching. These duplex structures were thermally aged at 973 K for ageing periods varying from 30 min to 21 h. Morphological aspects of δ-ferrite phase and its response to age-hardening were studied by optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis and microhardness testing. It was observed that austenitizing at 1523 K produced fine, acicular δ-ferrite while the δ-ferrite formed by austenitising at higher temperatures (1573-1623 K) were massive, irregular-shaped and banded. Moreover the presence of 8-ferrite caused an abnormally strong (110) reflection, observed in X-ray diffraction patterns of martensite plus δ-ferrite structures. This behaviour is thought to be due to development of (110) texture in δ-ferrite phase. Thermal ageing at 973 K caused age-hardening of δ-ferrite with a peak hardness attained after 3.6 ks of ageing. Electron microscopic results suggest that the observed hardening was caused by the formation of Fe 2Mo Laves phase.

  19. The influence of martensite shape, concentration, and phase transformation strain on the deformation behavior of stable dual-phase steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Sakaki, T.; Weng, G. J.

    1993-02-01

    A continuum model is developed to examine the influence of martensite shape, volume fraction, phase transformation strain, and thermal mismatch on the initial plastic state of the ferrite matrix following phase transformation and on the subsequent stress-strain behavior of the dual-phase steels upon loading. The theory is developed based on a relaxed constraint in the ductile matrix and an energy criterion to define its effective stress. In addition, it also assumes the martensite islands to possess a spheroidal shape and to be randomly oriented and homogenously dispersed in the ferrite matrix. It is found that for a typical water-quenched process from an intercritical temperature of 760 °C, the critical martensite volume fraction needed to induce plastic deformation in the ferrite matrix is very low, typically below 1 pct, regardless of the martensite shape. Thus, when the two-phase system is subjected to an external load, plastic deformation commences immediately, resulting in the widely observed “continuous yielding” behavior in dual-phase steels. The subsequent deformation of the dual-phase system is shown to be rather sensitive to the martensite shape, with the disc-shaped morphology giving rise to a superior overall response (over the spherical type). The stress-strain relations are also dependent upon the magnitude of the prior phase transformation strain. The strength coefficient h and the work-hardening exponent n of the smooth, parabolic-type stress-strain curves of the dual-phase system also increase with increasing martensite content for each selected inclusion shape. Comparison with an exact solution and with one set of experimental data indicates that the theory is generally within a reasonable range of accuracy.

  20. Microstructural Refinement of Bainite and Martensite for Enhanced Strength and Toughness in High-Carbon Low-Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, J.; Chattopadhyay, P. P.; Bhattacharjee, D.; Manna, I.

    2010-11-01

    This study attempts to determine the scope and extent of microstructural refinement through complete/partial recrystallization of prior cold deformed ferrite during austenitizing (1223 K (950 °C), 15 minutes) and/or austempering (543 K (270 °C), 30 minutes) followed by water quenching to obtain ultrafine bainitic sheaves along with thin martensitic plates in SAE 52100 steel. The volume fraction and sheaf/plate dimension (thickness/length) of bainitic ferrite and martensite were determined by optical and scanning/transmission electron microscopy studies coupled with compositional microanalysis. Marginal improvement in the tensile strength and significant improvement in the impact properties is obtained at an optimum level of prior cold deformation by tension in comparison to that recorded in austempered condition without prior deformation.

  1. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  2. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  3. Austenite Static Recrystallization Kinetics in Microalloyed B Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrañaga-Otegui, Ane; Pereda, Beatriz; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Gutiérrez, Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Boron is added to steels to increase hardenability, substituting of more expensive elements. Moreover, B acts as a recrystallization delaying element when it is in solid solution. However, B can interact with N and/or C to form nitrides and carbides at high temperatures, limiting its effect on both phase transformation and recrystallization. On the other hand, other elements like Nb and Ti are added due to the retarding effect that they exert on the austenite softening processes, which results in pancaked austenite grains and refined room microstructures. In B steels, Nb and Ti are also used to prevent B precipitation. However, the complex interaction between these elements and its effect on the austenite microstructure evolution during hot working has not been investigated in detail. The present work is focused on the effect the B exerts on recrystallization when added to microalloyed steels. Although B on its own leads to retarded static recrystallization kinetics, when Nb is added a large delay in the static recrystallization times is observed in the 1273 K to 1373 K (1000 °C to 1100 °C) temperature range. The effect is larger than that predicted by a model developed for Nb-microalloyed steels, which is attributed to a synergistic effect of both elements. However, this effect is not so prominent for Nb-Ti-B steels. The complex effect of the composition on recrystallization kinetics is explained as a competition between the solute drag and precipitation pinning phenomena. The effect of the microalloying elements is quantified, and a new model for the predictions of recrystallization kinetics that accounts for the B and Nb+B synergetic effects is proposed.

  4. Development of ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Corwin, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    Chromium-molybdenum ferritic (martensitic) steels are leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment will produce long-lived radioactive isotopes that will lead to difficult waste-disposal problems. Such problems could be reduced by replacing the elements in the steels (i.e., Mo, Nb, Ni, N, and Cu) that lead to long-lived radioactive isotopes. We have proposed the development of ferritic steels analogous to conventional Cr-Mo steels, which contain molybdenum and niobium. It is proposed that molybdenum be replaced by tungsten and niobium be replaced by tantalum. Eight experimental steels were produced. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% were used (all concentrations are in wt %). Steels with these chromium compositions, each containing 2% W and 0.25% V, were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, 2.25 Cr steels were produced with 2% W and no vanadium and with 0.25% V and O and 1% W. A 9Cr steel containing 2% W, 0.25 V, and 0.07% Ta was also studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1%. Tempering studies on the normalized steels indicated that the tempering behavior of the new Cr-W steels was similar to that of the analogous Cr-Mo steels. Microscopy studies indicated that 2% tungsten was required in the 2.25 Cr steels to produce 100% bainite in 15.9-mm-thick plate during normalization. The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100% martensite, but the 12 Cr steel contained about 75% martensite with the balance delta-ferrite. 33 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Sensitization of Laser-beam Welded Martensitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Rajendran, Kousika Dhasanur; Lindner, Stefan

    Ferritic and martensitic stainless steels are an attractive alternative in vehicle production due to their inherent corrosion resistance. By the opportunity of press hardening, their strength can be increased to up to 2000 MPa, making them competitors for unalloyed ultra-high strength steels. Welding, nevertheless, requires special care, especially when it comes to joining of high strength heat treated materials. With an adopted in-line heat treatment of the welds in as-rolled as well as press hardened condition, materials with sufficient fatigue strength and acceptable structural behavior can be produced. Because of microstructural transformations in the base material such as grain coarsening and forced carbide precipitation, the corrosion resistance of the weld zone may be locally impaired. Typically the material in the heat-affected zone becomes sensitive to intergranular cracking in the form of knife-edge corrosion besides the fusion line. The current study comprises of two text scenarios. By an alternating climate test, general response in a corroding environment is screened. In order to understand the corrosion mechanisms and to localize the sensitive zones, sensitisation tests were undertaken. Furthermore, the applicability of a standard test according to ASTM 763-83 was examined. It was found that the alternative climate test does not reveal any corrosion effects. Testing by the oxalic acid test revealed clearly the effect of welding, weld heat treatment and state of thermal processing. Also application of the standard which originally suited for testing ferritic stainless steels could have been justified.

  6. Mechanical properties of steels with a microstructure of bainite/martensite and austenite islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syammach, Sami M.

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are continually being developed in order to reduce weight and improve safety for automotive applications. There is need for economic steels with improved strength and ductility combinations. These demands have led to research and development of third generation AHSS. Third generation AHSS include steel grades with a bainitic and tempered martensitic matrix with retained austenite islands. These steels may provide improved mechanical properties compared to first generation AHSS and should be more economical than second generation AHSS. There is a need to investigate these newer types of steels to determine their strength and formability properties. Understanding these bainitic and tempered martensitic steels is important because they likely can be produced using currently available production systems. If viable, these steels could be a positive step in the evolution of AHSS. The present work investigates the effect of the microstructure on the mechanical properties of steels with a microstructure of bainite, martensite, and retained austenite, so called TRIP aided bainitic ferrite (TBF) steels. The first step in this project was creating the desired microstructure. To create a microstructure of bainite, martensite, and austenite an interrupted austempering heat treatment was used. Varying the heat treatment times and temperatures produced microstructures of varying amounts of bainite, martensite, and austenite. Mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, strain hardening, and hole-expansion ratios were then evaluated for each heat treatment. Correlations between mechanical properties and microstructure were then evaluated. It was found that samples after each of the heat treatments exhibited strengths between 1050 MPa and 1350 MPa with total elongations varying from 8 pct to 16 pct. By increasing the bainite and austenite volume fraction the strength of the steel was found to decrease, but the ductility increased. Larger

  7. Effect of Martensite Volume Fraction on Forming Limit Diagrams of Dual-Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaeimi, Mohammad; Basti, Ali; Alitavoli, Majid

    2015-05-01

    Prediction of the onset of failure due to localized necking has an important role on the determination of the formability of sheet metal, especially dual-phase steels, because of their increasing applications in the automotive industry. In the present study, a new application of the M-K model and theoretical forming limit diagram has been proposed. It is shown that this model can be useful in predicting the effect of microstructural aspects on the formability of dual-phase steels. For this purpose, the limiting strains of the dual-phase (ferrite-martensite) steel under different martensite volume fractions have been calculated. Furthermore, the effect of the heating rate on the formability of the DP samples has been predicted. To solve the non-linear system of equations, the modified Newton-Raphson method has been used. The results show that the limiting strains decrease by increasing the amount of martensite volume fractions. Furthermore, by increasing the heating rate, the dependence of the forming limit curves on the martensite volume fraction will be decreased.

  8. The influence of fine ferrite formation on the γ/α interface, fine bainite and retained austenite in a thermomechanically-processed transformation induced plasticity steel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Timokhina, Ilana B.; Miller, Michael K.; Beladi, Hossein; Hodgson, Peter D.

    2016-03-03

    We subjected a Fe–0.26C–1.96Si–2Mn with 0.31Mo (wt%) steel to a novel thermomechanical processing route to produce fine ferrite with different volume fractions, bainite, and retained austenite. In two types of fine ferrites were found to be: (i) formed along prior austenite grain boundaries, and (ii) formed intragranularly in the interior of austenite grains. An increase in the volume fraction of fine ferrite led to the preferential formation of blocky retained austenite with low stability, and to a decrease in the volume fraction of bainite with stable layers of retained austenite. Moreover, the difference in the morphology of the bainitic ferritemore » and the retained austenite after different isothermal ferrite times was found to be responsible for the deterioration of the mechanical properties. The segregation of Mn, Mo, and C at distances of 2–2.5 nm from the ferrite and retained austenite/martensite interface on the retained austenite/martensite site was observed after 2700 s of isothermal hold. Finally, it was suggested that the segregation occurred during the austenite-to-ferrite transformation, and that this would decrease the interface mobility, which affects the austenite-to-ferrite transformation and ferrite grain size.« less

  9. Creep resistant, precipitation-dispersion-strengthened, martensitic stainless steel and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Buck, Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    An iron-based, corrosion-resistant, precipitation strengthened, martensitic steel essentially free of delta ferrite for use at high temperatures has a nominal composition of 0.05-0.1 C, 8-12 Cr, 1-5 Co, 0.5-2.0 Ni, 0.41-1.0 Mo, 0.1-0.5 Ti, and the balance iron. This steel is different from other corrosion-resistant martensitic steels because its microstructure consists of a uniform dispersion of fine particles, which are very closely spaced, and which do not coarsen at high temperatures. Thus at high temperatures this steel combines the excellent creep strength of dispersion-strengthened steels, with the ease of fabricability afforded by precipitation hardenable steels.

  10. Creep resistant, precipitation-dispersion-strengthened, martensitic stainless steel and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Buck, R.F.

    1994-05-10

    An iron-based, corrosion-resistant, precipitation strengthened, martensitic steel essentially free of delta ferrite for use at high temperatures has a nominal composition of 0.05--0.1 C, 8--12 Cr, 1--5 Co, 0.5--2.0 Ni, 0.41--1.0 Mo, 0.1--0.5 Ti, and the balance iron. This steel is different from other corrosion-resistant martensitic steels because its microstructure consists of a uniform dispersion of fine particles, which are very closely spaced, and which do not coarsen at high temperatures. Thus at high temperatures this steel combines the excellent creep strength of dispersion-strengthened steels, with the ease of fabricability afforded by precipitation hardenable steels. 2 figures.

  11. Effect of microalloying on pearlite transformation of high carbon wire steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephanie L.

    Microalloying has been shown to improve strength in eutectoid steels for wire applications, and previous work on vanadium-microalloyed eutectoid steels showed delayed pearlite transformation with additions of niobium and accelerated pearlite transformation with additional nitrogen. This study investigates the origin of the CCT shifts with microalloying additions and whether trends in hardness and microstructural feature sizes observed in continuous cooling tests persist through industrial hot rolling simulations. An industrially hot rolled 1080 wire rod with vanadium additions and three laboratory-prepared alloys were studied. The base alloy, denoted the V steel, had a composition of 0.80C-0.50Mn-0.24Si-0.20Cr-0.079V-0.0059N (wt pct). The V+N steel contained 0.0088 wt pct N, and the V+Nb steel contained an additional 0.010 wt pct Nb. All alloys were subjected to a GleebleRTM 3500 torsion hot rolling simulation based on industrial wire rod hot rolling parameters. Microstructural constituents, Vickers hardness, pearlite colony size, and pearlite interlamellar spacing (ILS) were characterized for each alloy. All alloys exhibited pearlitic microstructures with some proeutectoid ferrite at prior austenite grain boundaries, with no evidence of shear transformation products. The V steel has the lowest overall hardness, while both nitrogen and niobium additions increase hardness by approximately 15 HV, correlating to a 43 MPa increase in yield strength. Niobium additions refined ILS, with an average ILS of 92 +/- 3 nm for the V+Nb steel compared to 113 +/- 5 nm for the V steel and 113 +/- 3 nm for the V+N alloy. Vanadium additions produced precipitation strengthening for all alloys and heat treatments, and additional precipitation strengthening with nitrogen and niobium additions was not apparent based on a Taleff regression analysis. Atom probe tomography of an industrially processed wire rod with vanadium additions revealed vanadium enrichment of cementite, and vanadium

  12. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding of 10-mm-Thick Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM: As-Welded Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-07-01

    Cast CA6NM martensitic stainless steel plates, 10 mm in thickness, were welded using hybrid laser-arc welding. The effect of different welding speeds on the as-welded joint integrity was characterized in terms of the weld bead geometry, defects, microstructure, hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and impact energy. Significant defects such as porosity, root humping, underfill, and excessive penetration were observed at a low welding speed (0.5 m/min). However, the underfill depth and excessive penetration in the joints manufactured at welding speeds above 0.75 m/min met the specifications of ISO 12932. Characterization of the as-welded microstructure revealed untempered martensite and residual delta ferrite dispersed at prior-austenite grain boundaries in the fusion zone. In addition, four different heat-affected zones in the weldments were differentiated through hardness mapping and inference from the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary phase diagram. The tensile fracture occurred in the base metal for all the samples and fractographic analysis showed that the crack path is within the martensite matrix, along primary delta ferrite-martensite interfaces and within the primary delta ferrite. Additionally, Charpy impact testing demonstrated slightly higher fracture energy values and deeper dimples on the fracture surface of the welds manufactured at higher welding speeds due to grain refinement and/or lower porosity.

  13. Multiscale Modeling of the Deformation of Advanced Ferritic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nasr M. Ghoniem; Nick Kioussis

    2009-04-18

    The objective of this project is to use the multi-scale modeling of materials (MMM) approach to develop an improved understanding of the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of high-temperature structural materials that are being developed or proposed for Gen IV applications. In particular, the research focuses on advanced ferritic/ martensitic steels to enable operation up to 650-700°C, compared to the current 550°C limit on high-temperature steels.

  14. Influence of cooling rate on the precipitation behavior in Ti–Nb–Mo microalloyed steels during continuous cooling and relationship to strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, F.Z.; Wang, X.M.; Chen, L.; Yang, S.W.; Shang, C.J.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2015-04-15

    In this study we elucidate carbide precipitation at varied cooling rates in Ti–Nb–Mo microalloyed steels during continuous cooling. The study suggests that increasing the cooling rate prevents precipitate formation in the ferrite phase during continuous cooling after finish rolling at 850 °C. At a lower cooling rate of 0.5 °C/s, the microhardness of ferrite grains exhibited maxima because of high volume fraction of fine carbides. A high density of nanoscale carbides with similar precipitation characteristics, including interphase precipitates, was observed at cooling rates of 0.5 and 1 °C/s, but the carbides were marginally larger and the spacing between them was increased with cooling rate. Additionally, carbide precipitation at a high cooling rate was associated with strain-induced precipitation. Through the analysis of selection area electron diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, lattice imaging, the fine spherical-shaped carbides of size ~ 6–10 nm were identified as MC-type carbides of the type (Ti,Nb,Mo)C and NbC. - Highlights: • We model three cooling rates which have indicated different precipitation behaviors. • We find two types of precipitates including NbC and (Ti,Nb,Mo)C based on HRTEM study. • Increasing cooling rate will decrease volume fraction and size of the precipitates. • There is no absence of interphase precipitation when the cooling rate increases to 5 °C/s.

  15. Influence of Temperature on Fatigue-Induced Martensitic Phase Transformation in a Metastable CrMnNi-Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, Horst; Glage, Alexander; Droste, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Metastable austenitic steels can exhibit a fatigue-induced martensitic phase transformation during cyclic loading. It is generally agreed that a certain strain amplitude and a threshold of the cumulated plastic strain must be exceeded to trigger martensitic phase transformation under cyclic loading. With respect to monotonic loading, the martensitic phase transformation takes place up to a critical temperature—the so-called M d temperature. The goal of the present investigation is to determine an M d,c temperature which would be the highest temperature at which a fatigue-induced martensitic phase transformation can take place. For this purpose, fatigue tests controlled by the total strain were performed at different temperatures. The material investigated was a high-alloy metastable austenitic steel X3CrMnNi16.7.7 (16.3Cr-7.2Mn-6.6Ni-0.03C-0.09N-1.0Si) produced using the hot pressing technique. The temperatures were set in the range of 283 K (10 °C) ≤ T ≤ 473 K (200 °C). Depending on the temperature and strain amplitude, the onset of the martensitic phase transformation shifted to different values of the cumulated plastic strain, or was inhibited completely. Moreover, it is known that metastable austenitic CrMnNi steels with higher nickel contents can exhibit the deformation-induced twinning effect. Thus, at higher temperatures and strain amplitudes, a transition from the deformation-induced martensitic transformation to deformation-induced twinning takes place. The fatigue-induced martensitic phase transformation was monitored during cyclic loading using a ferrite sensor. The microstructure after the fatigue tests was examined using the back-scattered electrons, the electron channeling contrast imaging and the electron backscatter diffraction techniques to study the temperature-dependent dislocation structures and phase transformations.

  16. Microalloying Boron Carbide with Silicon to Achieve Dramatically Improved Ductility.

    PubMed

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2014-12-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a hard material whose value for extended engineering applications such as body armor; is limited by its brittleness under impact. To improve the ductility while retaining hardness, we used density functional theory to examine modifying B4C ductility through microalloying. We found that replacing the CBC chain in B4C with Si-Si, denoted as (B11Cp)-Si2, dramatically improves the ductility, allowing a continuous shear to a large strain of 0.802 (about twice of B4C failure strain) without brittle failure. Moreover, (B11C)-Si2 retains low density and high hardness. This ductility improvement arises because the Si-Si linkages enable the icosahedra accommodate additional shear by rotating instead of breaking bonds.

  17. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  18. Characterization of microstructural and mechanical properties of a reduced activation ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselt, Ch. Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.

    2011-09-01

    For specific blanket and divertor applications in future fusion power reactors a replacement of presently considered Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steels as structural material by suitable oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic martensitic steels would allow a substantial increase of the operating temperature from ˜823 K to about 923 K. Temperatures above 973 K in the He cooled modular divertor concept necessitate the use of Reduced Activation Ferritic (RAF)-ODS-steels, which are not limited by a phase transition. The development concentrates on the ferritic ODS-steel Fe-13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3. The microstructures of a mechanically alloyed powder particle are observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ageing experiments for 1000 h and 3000 h at 1123.5 K and 1223.5 K of compacted Fe-13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 were executed. The impact especially on the oxide particles in terms of segregation and decomposition effects were monitored by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Long term vacuum creep experiments have been performed with rolled Fe-13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 at 923.5 K and 1023.5 K, which will be compared to reference alloys.

  19. Alloying design of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel for long life FBRs core materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, S.; Harada, M.; Okada, H.; Inoue, M.; Nomura, S.; Shikakura, S.; Asabe, K.; Nishida, T.; Fujiwara, M.

    1993-09-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels with excellent swelling resistance and superior high temperature strength are prospective cladding materials for advanced fast breeder reactors. The addition of Ti in 13Cr-3W ODS ferritic steels improved the high temperature strength remarkably by the formation of uniformly distributed ultra-fine oxide particles. ODS ferritic steels have a bamboo-like grain structure and a strong deformation texture. The decrease of creep rupture strength in the bi-axial direction compared to the uni-axial direction is attributed mainly to this unique bamboo grain structure. Nearly equivalent creep rupture strength for both bi-axial and uni-axial direction was successfully attained by introducing the α to γ transformation in ODS martensitic steel.

  20. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  1. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-07-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  2. Atom probe study of vanadium interphase precipitates and randomly distributed vanadium precipitates in ferrite.

    PubMed

    Nöhrer, M; Zamberger, S; Primig, S; Leitner, H

    2013-01-01

    Atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the precipitation reaction in the austenite and ferrite phases in vanadium micro-alloyed steel after a thermo-mechanical process. It was observed that only in the ferrite phase precipitates could be found, whereupon two different types were detected. Thus, the aim was to reveal the difference between these two types. The first type was randomly distributed precipitates from V supersaturated ferrite and the second type V interphase precipitates. Not only the arrangement of the particles was different also the chemical composition. The randomly distributed precipitates consisted of V, C and N in contrast to that the interphase precipitates showed a composition of V, C and Mn. Furthermore the randomly distributed precipitates had maximum size of 20 nm and the interphase precipitates a maximum size of 15 nm. It was assumed that the reason for these differences is caused by the site in which they were formed. The randomly distributed precipitates were formed in a matrix consisting mainly of 0.05 at% C, 0.68 at% Si, 0.03 at% N, 0.145 at% V and 1.51 at% Mn. The interphase precipitates were formed in a region with a much higher C, Mn and V content.

  3. Atom probe study of vanadium interphase precipitates and randomly distributed vanadium precipitates in ferrite.

    PubMed

    Nöhrer, M; Zamberger, S; Primig, S; Leitner, H

    2013-01-01

    Atom probe tomography and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the precipitation reaction in the austenite and ferrite phases in vanadium micro-alloyed steel after a thermo-mechanical process. It was observed that only in the ferrite phase precipitates could be found, whereupon two different types were detected. Thus, the aim was to reveal the difference between these two types. The first type was randomly distributed precipitates from V supersaturated ferrite and the second type V interphase precipitates. Not only the arrangement of the particles was different also the chemical composition. The randomly distributed precipitates consisted of V, C and N in contrast to that the interphase precipitates showed a composition of V, C and Mn. Furthermore the randomly distributed precipitates had maximum size of 20 nm and the interphase precipitates a maximum size of 15 nm. It was assumed that the reason for these differences is caused by the site in which they were formed. The randomly distributed precipitates were formed in a matrix consisting mainly of 0.05 at% C, 0.68 at% Si, 0.03 at% N, 0.145 at% V and 1.51 at% Mn. The interphase precipitates were formed in a region with a much higher C, Mn and V content. PMID:24041583

  4. Effects of Cold Rolling and Strain-Induced Martensite Formation in a SAF 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breda, Marco; Brunelli, Katya; Grazzi, Francesco; Scherillo, Antonella; Calliari, Irene

    2015-02-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) are biphasic steels having a ferritic-austenitic microstructure that allows them to combine good mechanical and corrosion-resistance properties. However, these steels are sensitive to microstructural modifications, such as ferrite decomposition at high temperatures and the possibility of strain-induced martensite (SIM) formation from cold-worked austenite, which can significantly alter their interesting features. In the present work, the effects of cold rolling on the developed microstructural features in a cold-rolled SAF 2205 DSS and the onset of martensitic transformation are discussed. The material was deformed at room temperature from 3 to 85 pct thickness reduction, and several characterization techniques (scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, hardness measurements, and time-of-flight-neutron diffraction) were employed in order to fully describe the microstructural behavior of the steel. Despite the low stacking fault energy of DSS austenite, which contributed to SIM formation, the steel was found to be more stable than other stainless steel grades, such as AISI 304L. Rolling textures were similar to those pertaining to single-phase materials, but the presence of the biphasic (Duplex) microstructure imposed deformation constraints that affected the developed microstructural features, owing to phases interactions. Moreover, even if an intensification of the strain field in austenite was revealed, retarded SIM transformation kinetics and lower martensite amounts with respect to AISI 304L were observed.

  5. Effects of self-accommodation and plastic accommodation in martensitic transformations and morphology of martensites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanju, Gu; Xiaoyan, Song; Jianxin, Zhang; Fuxing, Yin; Ruixiang, Wang

    1995-08-01

    The effects of self-accommodation and plastic accommodation in martensitic transformations and the displacement vector for lattice deformation are discussed. The authors propose that the formation of an invariant habit plane is connected with the self-accomodation between different martensitic variants and results in the formation of internal twinned martensites; the plastic accommodation, rather than self-accommodation, occurs between parent and new phases when the strength is low or the dislocation density is high for the parent phase and the invariant habit plane is difficult to form, resulting in the formation of dislocation martensites.

  6. On the Processing of Martensitic Steels in Continuous Galvanizing Lines: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Taejin; Kwak, Jaihyun; de Cooman, B. C.

    2012-01-01

    The conventional continuous hot-dip galvanizing (GI) and galvannealing (GA) processes can be applied to untransformed austenite to produce Zn and Zn-alloy coated low-carbon ultra-high-strength martensitic steel provided specific alloying additions are made. The most suitable austenite decomposition behavior results from the combined addition of boron, Cr, and Mo, which results in a pronounced transformation bay during isothermal transformation. The occurrence of this transformation bay implies a considerable retardation of the austenite decomposition in the temperature range below the bay, which is close to the stages in the continuous galvanizing line (CGL) thermal cycle related to the GI and GA processes. After the GI and GA processes, a small amount of granular bainite, which consists of bainitic ferrite and discrete islands of martensite/austenite (M/A) constituents embedded in martensite matrix, is present in the microstructure. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the steel after the GI and GA cycle was over 1300 MPa, and the stress-strain curve was continuous without any yielding phenomena.

  7. Previous heat treatment inducing different plasma nitriding behaviors in martensitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, C. A.; Alvarez, F.; Mitchell, D. R. G.; Collins, G. A.; Short, K. T.

    2006-09-15

    In this work we report a study of the induced changes in structure and corrosion behavior of martensitic stainless steels nitrided by plasma immersion ion implantation (PI{sup 3}) at different previous heat treatments. The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction and glancing angle x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic measurements. Depending on the proportion of retained austenite in the unimplanted material, different phase transformations are obtained at lower and intermediate temperatures of nitrogen implantation. At higher temperatures, the great mobility of the chromium yields CrN segregations like spots in random distribution, and the {alpha}{sup '}-martensite is degraded to{alpha}-Fe (ferrite). The nitrided layer thickness follows a fairly linear relationship with the temperature and a parabolic law with the process time. The corrosion resistance depends strongly on chromium segregation from the martensitic matrix, as a result of the formation of CrN during the nitrogen implantation process and the formation of Cr{sub x}C during the heat treatment process. Briefly speaking, the best results are obtained using low tempering temperature and low implantation temperature (below 375 deg. ) due to the increment of the corrosion resistance and nitrogen dissolution in the structure with not too high diffusion depths (about 5-10 {mu}m)

  8. Characterization of Low Temperature Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Arc Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Babu, S S; Vitek, J M

    2003-08-20

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) has been used to identify a previously unobserved low temperature ferrite ({delta})/austenite({gamma}) phase transformation in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) welds. In this ''ferrite dip'' transformation, the ferrite transforms to austenite during heating to peak temperatures on the order of 750 C, and re-transforms to ferrite during cooling, resulting in a ferrite volume fraction equivalent to that in the base metal. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) and laser dilatometry measurements during Gleeble{reg_sign} thermal simulations are performed in order to verify the existence of this low temperature phase transformation. Thermodynamic and kinetic models for phase transformations, including both local-equilibrium and para-equilibrium diffusion controlled growth, show that diffusion of substitutional alloying elements does not provide a reasonable explanation for the experimental observations. On the other hand, the diffusion of interstitial alloying elements may be rapid enough to explain this behavior. Based on both the experimental and modeling results, two mechanisms for the ''ferrite dip'' transformation, including the formation and decomposition of secondary austenite and an athermal martensitic-type transformation of ferrite to austenite, are considered.

  9. Austenite recrystallization and carbonitride precipitation in niobium microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, J.G.; Hansen, S.S. )

    1989-01-01

    The response of austenite to thermomechanical treatment is investigated in two series of niobium microalloyed steels. Optical and electron metallographic techniques were used to follow the austenite recystallizaiton and carbonitride precipitation reactions in these steels. The first series of steels contained a constant level of 0.05Nb, with carbon levels varying from 0.008 to 0.25 pct. It was found that a lower carbon concentration results in faster austenite recrystallization due to a smaller carbonitride supersaturation which leads to a reduced precipitate nucleation rate. The second series of steels was designed with a constant carbonitride supersaturation by simultaneously varying the Nb and C concentrations while maintaining a constant solubility product. In these steels, the recrystallization kinetics increase as the volume fraction of Nb(C,N) is reduced and/or as the precipitate coarsening rate is increased. The volume fraction of carbonitrides increases as the Nb:(C + 12/14 N) ratio approaches the stoichiometric ratio of approximately 8:1. An experiment to determine whether Nb atoms dissolved in the austenite could exert a significant solute-drag effect on the recrystallization reaction indicated that 0.20Nb in solution could reduce the rate of recrystallization compared to a Nb-free C-Mn steel.

  10. Microalloying and the mechanical properties of amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, H. George E.; Moshe, Michael; Procaccia, Itamar; Samwer, Konrad

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical properties of amorphous solids like metallic glasses can be dramatically changed by adding small concentrations (as low as 0.1%) of foreign elements. The glass-forming-ability, the ductility, the yield stress and the elastic moduli can all be greatly effected. This paper presents theoretical considerations with the aim of explaining the magnitude of these changes in light of the small concentrations involved. The theory is built around the experimental evidence that the microalloying elements organise around them a neighbourhood that differs from both the crystalline and the glassy phases of the material in the absence of the additional elements. These regions act as isotropic defects that in unstressed systems modify the shear moduli. When strained, these defects interact with the incipient plastic responses which are quadrupolar in nature. It will be shown that this interaction interferes with the creation of system-spanning shear bands and increases the yield strain. We offer experimentally testable estimates of the lengths of nano-shear bands in the presence of the additional elements.

  11. Must we use ferritic steel in TBM?

    SciTech Connect

    Salavy, Jean-Francois; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Cho, Seungyon; Enoeda, Mikio; Giancarli, Luciano; Kurtz, Richard J.; Luo, Tian Y.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Wong, Clement

    2010-12-13

    Mock-ups of DEMO breeding blankets, called Test Blanket Modules (TBMs), inserted and tested in ITER in dedicated equatorial ports directly facing the plasma, are expected to provide the first experimental answers on the necessary performance of the corresponding DEMO breeding blankets. Several DEMO breeding blanket designs have been studied and assessed in the last 20 years. At present, after considering various coolant and breeder combinations, all the TBM concepts proposed by the seven ITER Parties use Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel as the structural material. In order to perform valuable tests in ITER, the TBMs are expected to use the same structural material as corresponding DEMO blankets. However, due to the fact that this family of steels is ferromagnetic, their presence in the ITER vacuum vessel will create perturbations of the ITER magnetic fields that could reduce the quality of the plasma confinement during H-mode. As a consequence, a legitimate question has been raised on the necessity of using RAFM steel for TBMs structural material in ITER. By giving a short description of the main TBM testing objectives in ITER and assessing the consequences of not using such a material, this paper gives a comprehensive answer to this question. According to the working group author of the study, the use of RAFM steel as structural material for TBM is judged mandatory.

  12. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on impact behavior of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1998-03-01

    Charpy tests were conducted on eight normalized-and-tempered reduced-activation ferritic steels irradiated in two different normalized conditions. Irradiation was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility at 393 C to {approx}14 dpa on steels with 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% Cr (0.1% C) with varying amounts of W, V, and Ta. The different normalization treatments involved changing the cooling rate after austenitization. The faster cooling rate produced 100% bainite in the 2.25 Cr steels, compared to duplex structures of bainite and polygonal ferrite for the slower cooling rate. For both cooling rates, martensite formed in the 5 and 9% Cr steels, and martensite with {approx}25% {delta}-ferrite formed in the 12% Cr steel. Irradiation caused an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy. The difference in microstructure in the low-chromium steels due to the different heat treatments had little effect on properties. For the high-chromium martensitic steels, only the 5 Cr steel was affected by heat treatment. When the results at 393 C were compared with previous results at 365 C, all but a 5 Cr and a 9 Cr steel showed the expected decrease in the shift in DBTT with increasing temperature.

  13. Effects of microalloying with 3d transition metals on glass formation in AlYFe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bondi, K.S.; Gangopadhyay, A.K.; Marine, Z.; Kim, T.H.; Mukhopadhyay, Anindita; Goldman, A.I.; Buhro, William E.; Kelton, K.F.

    2008-05-20

    The effects of microalloying on glass formation and stability were systematically investigated by substituting 0.5 at.% of all 3d transition metals for Al in Al{sub 88}Y{sub 7}Fe{sub 5} alloys. X-ray diffraction and isothermal differential scanning calorimetry studies indicate that samples containing microadditions of Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe and Co were amorphous, while those alloyed with Ni and Cu were not. The onset temperatures for crystallization (devitrification) of the amorphous alloys were increased with microalloying and some showed a supercooled liquid region ({Delta}T{sub x} = T{sub x} - T{sub g}) of up to 40 C. In addition, microalloying changes the glass structure and the devitrification sequence, as determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and high energy X-ray diffraction. The results presented here suggest that the order induced in the alloy by the transition metal microaddition decreases the atomic mobility in the glass and raises the barrier for the nucleation of {alpha}-Al, the primary devitrifying phase in most cases. New intermetallic phases also appear with microalloying and vary for different transition metal additions.

  14. Precipitates in Nb and Nb-V microalloyed X80 pipeline steel.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyi; Liu, Delu; Zhang, Jianping; Tian, Wenhuai

    2013-08-01

    Precipitates in two X80 pipeline steels were studied by transmission electron microscopy equipped with an energy filtering system. The steels are microalloyed with niobium and niobium-vanadium (Nb-V), respectively, and produced by continuous hot rolling. Besides the precipitates TiN and (Ti, Nb) (C, N), which were 10-100 nm in size, a large number of precipitates smaller than 10 nm distributed in the two steels have been observed. In the Nb-V microalloyed steel, only a few titanium nitrides covered by vanadium compounds on the surface have been observed. It is inferred that the vanadium exists mainly in the matrix as a solid solution element. The fact has been accepted that there was no contribution to the precipitation strengthening of the X80 steel by adding 0.04-0.06% vanadium under the present production process. By contrast, the toughness of the Nb-V steel is deteriorated. Therefore, a better toughness property of the Nb microalloyed X80 results from the optimum microalloying composition design and the suitable accelerating cooling after hot rolling.

  15. Experimental Crystallization of Iron Martensite in the Almahata Sitta Ureilite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Aoyagi, Y.; Sugiyama, K.; Yokoyama, Y.; Goodrich, C. A.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2014-09-01

    We performed a crystallization experiment of iron martensite in Almahata Sitta ureilite and found that super-rapid cooling (>1 deg/sec) is required to form the observed martensite, suggesting a secondary disruption of ureilite daughter body(ies).

  16. Thermally Activated Martensite: Its Relationship to Non-Thermally Activated (Athermal) Martensite

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, D E; Jones, N J; Schwartz, A J; Massalski, T B

    2008-10-21

    The classification of martensitic displacive transformations into athermal, isothermal or anisothermal is discussed. Athermal does not mean 'no temperature dependence' as is often thought, but is best considered to be short for the notion of no thermal activation. Processes with no thermal activation do not depend on time, as there is no need to wait for sufficient statistical fluctuations in some specific order parameter to overcome an activation barrier to initiate the process. Clearly, this kind of process contrasts with those that are thermally activated. In the literature, thermally activated martensites are usually termed isothermal martensites, suggesting a constant temperature. Actually such martensites also typically occur with continuous cooling. The important distinctive feature of these martensites is that they are thermally activated and hence are distinguishable in principle from athermal martensites. A third type of process, anisothermal, has been introduced to account for those transformations which are thought to be thermally activated but which occur on continuous cooling. They may occur so rapidly that they do not appear to have an incubation time, and hence could be mistakenly called an athermal transformation. These designations will be reviewed and discussed in terms of activation energies and kinetic processes of the various martensitic transformations.

  17. Time-temperature equivalence in Martensite tempering

    SciTech Connect

    Hackenberg, Robert E.; Thomas, Grant A.; Speer, John G.; Matlock, David K.; Krauss, George

    2008-06-16

    The relationship between time and temperature is of great consequence in many materials-related processes including the tempering of martensite. In 1945, Hollomon and Jaffe quantified the 'degree of tempering' as a function of both tempering time, t, and tempering temperature, T, using the expression, T(log t + c). Here, c is thought to be a material constant and appears to decrease linearly with increasing carbon content. The Hollomon-Jaffe tempering parameter is frequently cited in the literature. This work reviews the original derivation of the tempering parameter concept, and presents the use of the characteristics diffusion distance as an alternative time-temperature relationship during martensite tempering. During the tempering of martensite, interstitial carbon atoms diffuse to form carbides. In addition, austenite decomposes, dislocations and grain boundaries rearrange, associated with iron self diffusion. Since these are all diffusional processes, it is reasonable to expect the degree of tempering to relate to the extent of diffusion.

  18. Martensitic Transformations in B2 Cubic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashley, Jason; Thoma, Dan; Darling, Timothy; Migliori, Albert; Cooley, Jason; Hults, Larry; Singleton, John; Drymiotis, Fivos; Smith, Jim

    2003-03-01

    Many modern shape-memory materials are based on the ordered bcc structure, in particular the B2 structure. These structures may be subjected to a shearing motion to which the material has little resistance. Plausibly, this "Zener instability" can provide the means for these structures to undergo a martensitic phase transition, where the actual distances the atoms move are small enough that exact reversibility (shape-memory) is possible. There are many B2 structures but only some of them exhibit martensitic phase transitions. Some are equi-atomic, highly ordered alloys and some are off-stoichiometry that must be quenched to retain a non-equilibrium B2 structure. We have made thermal, transport, mechanical, Fermi surface topology, and elastic measurements on several B2 martensitic alloys and present our findings in terms of the differences between varios B2 alloys and other structures.

  19. Niobium carbide and tin precipitation in continuously cast microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Julian

    With high yield strength, toughness and good weldability, microalloyed steels are widely used in the automotive, pipeline and transportation industries. Microalloying elements such as niobium (Nb), titanium (Ti) and vanadium (V) in concentrations of less than 0.1 wt. pct. are typical. For optimal benefits in the final product, it is usually desired for Ti to form fine precipitates during and after solidification and for Nb to be in solution prior to hot-rolling. Vanadium precipitates at lower temperatures and is less involved in the solidification/casting process. In one aspect of the investigation, the effects of cooling rate on the titanium nitride (TiN) precipitation size distribution were investigated in a Ti-added low-carbon steel. Prior research reported an inverse relationship between the average TiN precipitation size and the post-solidification cooling rate and the present work was undertaken to examine this behavior over a wider range of cooling rates. Using the GleebleRTM 3500's casting simulation capabilities along with controlled cooling rates, the TiN precipitation behavior in thick-slab, thin-slab and thin-strip material was simulated using a commercially produced 0.04C, 1.23Mn steel with near-stoichiometric Ti and N levels. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of carbon extraction replicas was carried out to characterize the influence of cooling rates on precipitate size distributions. Decreasing particle sizes with increasing cooling rates were found. Average particle sizes as low as 6.7 nm were present in thin-strip simulations and might be of interest, as fine particles could contribute to strengthening of rapidly cooled steels. In a second aspect of the investigation, niobium carbide (NbC) precipitation during the compact strip production (CSP) process was investigated in two Nb-added low-carbon steels. Instead of industrial sampling, the GleebleRTM was used for casting simulations using two CMn(Nb) steels with high and low- Nb

  20. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  1. Laser Beam Welding of Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. Strengths of up to 2 GPa at fracture elongations of 15% can be attained through this. Welding of these materials, as a result, became a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply efficient heat control. For two application cases, tailored blank production in as-rolled condition and welding during assembly in hot stamped condition, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown through metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KS-II concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method.

  2. Analysis of factors responsible for the accelerated creep rupture of 12% Cr martensitic steel weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A. S.; Okhapkin, K. A.; Mikhailov, M. S.; Skutin, V. S.; Zubova, G. E.; Fedotov, B. V.

    2016-06-01

    In the process of the investigation of the heat resistance of a 0.07C-12Cr-Ni-Mo-V-Nb steel of the martensitic-ferritic class, a reduction was revealed in the long-term strength of its welded joints to below the level of the strength of the base metal. To establish the causes for the accelerated failure of the welded joints, an imitation of the thermal cycles was carried out that produce the structure of the heataffected zone using a dilatometer. In the samples with the structure that corresponds to that of the heataffected zone, a local zone of softening was revealed. The investigations of the metal structure using transmission electron microscopy have shown that the reduction in the creep rupture strength was caused by structural changes under the conditions of the thermal cycle of welding upon the staying of the steel in the temperature range between the Ac 1 and Ac 3 points.

  3. Effect of irradiation temperature on void swelling of China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Fei; Qiao Jiansheng; Huang Yina; Wan Farong Ohnuki, Soumei

    2008-03-15

    CLAM is one composition of a Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel (RAFM), which is being studied in a number of institutes and universities in China. The effect of electron-beam irradiation temperature on irradiation swelling of CLAM was investigated by using a 1250 kV High Voltage Electron Microscope (HVEM). In-situ microstructural observations indicated that voids formed at each experimental temperature - 723 K, 773 K and 823 K. The size and number density of voids increased with increasing irradiation dose at each temperature. The results show that CLAM has good swelling resistance. The maximum void swelling was produced at 723 K; the swelling was about 0.3% when the irradiation damage was 13.8 dpa.

  4. Microstructure of ausformed lath martensite in 18%Ni maraging steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morito, S.; Kishida, I.; Maki, T.

    2003-10-01

    The microstructure of ausformed lath martensite in 18%Ni maraging steel was studied by analyzing electron backscatter diffraction pattern obtained by scanning electron microscopy and Kikuchi diffraction pattern obtained by transmission electron microscopy. In non-ausformed lath martensite structure, blocks and packets are clearly observed by optical microscopy. By ausforming of 60% at 773K, packet and block widths of lath martensite decrease whereas the packet is elongated along rolling direction. A packet of ausformedlath martensite contains some laths which belong to a crystallographically different packet. The dislocation density in ausformed lath martensite is higher than that in conventional lath martensite. It is concluded that ausforming refines the effective grain size and increases the dislocation density in lath martensite structure.

  5. Void formation and microstructural development in oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels during electron-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, J.; Suda, T.; Yamashita, S.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Akasaka, N.; Nishida, M.; Ukai, S.

    1998-10-01

    ODS ferritic steels (13Cr-0.5Ti-0.2Y 2O 3) were prepared by the mechanical alloying method followed by the hot extrusion and several heat treatments including recrystallization. ODS steels with different heat treatment and a ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel for the reference were irradiated to 12 dpa at 670-770 K in HVEM. After recrystallization, the dislocation density decreased with increasing grain size, however, the oxide particles did not show any obvious change in the size and the number density. During the electron-irradiation the microstructure was relatively stable, i.e. oxide particles showed good stability and the dislocation density remained almost constant. A limited void formation was observed in the specimens, and the suppressive effect due to dislocations with high number density was confirmed. From these results, the behavior of microstructure and the limited void formation in ODS steels have been discussed.

  6. Kinetics of isochronal austenization in modified high Cr ferritic heat-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chenxi; Liu, Yongchang; Zhang, Dantian; Yan, Zesheng

    2011-12-01

    Employment of high Cr ferritic steels as a main structural material is considered as a way to achieve economical competitiveness of main steam pipe and nuclear reactors in power plants. Differential dilatometry and microstructure observation were employed to investigate the isochronal austenitic transformation of the modified high Cr ferritic steel. The kinetics of the isochronal austenitic transformation were described by a phase-transformation model involving site saturation (pre-existing nuclei), diffusion-controlled growth, and incorporating an impingement correction. The experimental results and kinetic analysis indicate that an increase of the heating rate promotes the diffusion-controlled austenitic transformation. The dissolving degree of precipitates during the austenization process affects the activation energy for diffusion and the undissolved precipitates lead to an increase of the onset temperature of the subsequent martensite transformation upon cooling.

  7. Effect of microalloying on microstructure and hot working behavior for AZ31 based magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Lihong

    The formability of Mg alloy sheet in the as-hot rolled condition depends on the microstructure developed during hot rolling. In general, the formability of Mg alloys is improved by finer grain sizes. 'Microalloying' levels of calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), and cerium (Ce) have been found to refine the as-cast structure, but there is no information as to whether this effect will be reflected in the as-hot worked structure and formability. Thus, in this work, the effects of microalloying levels of calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), and cerium (Ce) on the microstructures (from as-cast to as-hot rolled) and subsequent hot deformation behavior of AZ31, nominally 3% Al, 1% Zn, and 0.3%Mn, were systematically investigated. To include the effect of solidification rate these alloys were cast in different moulds (preheated steel mould, Cu-mould, and water cooled Cu-mould). One-hit compression testing at temperatures between 250°C ˜ 400 °C, strain rates of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 s-1 and strains from 0.2 up to 1.0, was performed to investigate the basic hot compression behavior, while two-hit compression testing was conducted to determine the static softening behavior. Hot rolling of the microalloyed AZ31 alloys was then carried out to study the effects of microalloying on as-hot rolled structure under two sets of rolling schedules. To investigate the formability of these microalloyed sheets, tensile tests were completed over a temperature range between ambient and 450°C, at strain rates between 0.1 and 0.0003 s-1. Results show that Ca and Sr act to refine the as cast grain size and the second phases, consistently promoting fine and uniform as-hot rolled grain structure. With regard to grain refinement, calcium has the strongest effect, whereas Ce is most effective for second phase refinement. In addition, microalloying retards grain growth during hot tensile testing. Multiple alloying presents a combined and complementary effect. A refined and uniform grain structure combined with

  8. Temperature effect on the corrosion mechanism of austenitic and martensitic steels in lead-bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benamati, G.; Fazio, C.; Piankova, H.; Rusanov, A.

    2002-02-01

    Compatibility tests on the austenitic AISI 316L and the martensitic MANET II steels in stagnant PbBi were performed at 573, 673 and 823 K with exposures up to 5000 h. The change of the corrosion mechanism with increasing temperature has been evaluated. The results showed that at 573 and 673 K a thin oxide layer growth on the surface of both steels. By increasing the temperature to 823 K both types of steels were attacked by the liquid metal and dissolution of the steel alloying elements has been observed. The herein-reported experimental activities were performed in collaboration with the IPPE of Obninsk, where preliminary dynamic tests were performed in the experimental facility CU-2. The Russian ferritic-martensitic steel EP823 has been exposed to flowing PbBi at 623, 723 and 823 K for 700 h. After 700 h of testing, the surface of the EP823 samples showed for the three temperatures a compact oxide layer.

  9. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  10. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Tyburska-Puschel, Beata; Sridharan, K.

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  11. Ferritic steels for sodium-cooled fast reactors: Design principles and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2010-09-01

    An overview of the current status of development of ferritic steels for emerging fast reactor technologies is presented in this paper. The creep-resistant 9-12Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are classically known for steam generator applications. The excellent void swelling resistance of ferritic steels enabled the identification of their potential for core component applications of fast reactors. Since then, an extensive knowledge base has been generated by identifying the empirical correlations between chemistry of the steels, heat treatment, structure, and properties, in addition to their in-reactor behavior. A few concerns have also been identified which pertain to high-temperature irradiation creep, embrittlement, Type IV cracking in creep-loaded weldments, and hard zone formation in dissimilar joints. The origin of these problems and the methodologies to overcome the limitations are highlighted. Finally, the suitability of the ferritic steels is re-evaluated in the emerging scenario of the fast reactor technology, with a target of achieving better breeding ratio and improved thermal efficiency.

  12. Austenite Formation Kinetics During Rapid Heating in a Microalloyed Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BURNETT,M.E.; DYKHUIZEN,RONALD C.; KELLEY,J. BRUCE; PUSKAR,JOSEPH D.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.

    1999-09-07

    The model parameters for the normalized 1054V1 material were compared to parameters previously generated for 1026 steel, and the transformation behavior was relatively consistent. Validation of the model predictions by heating into the austenite plus undissolved ferrite phase field and rapidly quenching resulted in reasonable predictions when compared to the measured volume fractions from optical metallography. The hot rolled 1054V1 material, which had a much coarser grain size and a non-equilibrium volume fraction of pearlite, had significantly different model parameters and the on heating transformation behavior of this material was less predictable with the established model. The differences in behavior is consistent with conventional wisdom that normalized micro-structure produce a more consistent response to processing, and it reinforces the need for additional work in this area.

  13. Assessment of microalloying effects on the high temperature fatigue behavior of NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Lerch, B. A.; Rao, K. B. S.

    1995-01-01

    Binary NiAl suffers from a lack of strength and poor creep properties at and above 1000 K. Poor creep resistance in turn affects low cycle fatigue (LCF) lives at low strain ranges due to the additional interactions of creep damage. One approach for improving these properties involved microalloying with either Zr or N. As an integral part of a much larger alloying program the low cycle fatigue behavior of Zr and N doped nickel aluminides produced by extrusion of prealloyed powders has been investigated. Strain controlled LCF tests were performed in air at 1000 K. The influence of these microalloying additions on the fatigue life and cyclic stress response of polycrystalline NiAl are discussed.

  14. Effect of solidification rate on microstructure evolution in dual phase microalloyed steel

    PubMed Central

    Kostryzhev, A. G.; Slater, C. D.; Marenych, O. O.; Davis, C. L.

    2016-01-01

    In steels the dependence of ambient temperature microstructure and mechanical properties on solidification rate is not well reported. In this work we investigate the microstructure and hardness evolution for a low C low Mn NbTi-microalloyed steel solidified in the cooling rate range of 1–50 Cs−1. The maximum strength was obtained at the intermediate solidification rate of 30 Cs−1. This result has been correlated to the microstructure variation with solidification rate. PMID:27759109

  15. Influence of Martensite Fraction on the Stabilization of Austenite in Austenitic-Martensitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiuliang; De Cooman, Bruno C.; Biermann, Horst; Mola, Javad

    2016-05-01

    The influence of martensite fraction ( f α') on the stabilization of austenite was studied by quench interruption below M s temperature of an Fe-13Cr-0.31C (mass pct) stainless steel. The interval between the quench interruption temperature and the secondary martensite start temperature, denoted as θ, was used to quantify the extent of austenite stabilization. In experiments with and without a reheating step subsequent to quench interruption, the variation of θ with f α' showed a transition after transformation of almost half of the austenite. This trend was observed regardless of the solution annealing temperature which influenced the martensite start temperature. The transition in θ was ascribed to a change in the type of martensite nucleation sites from austenite grain and twin boundaries at low f α' to the faults near austenite-martensite (A-M) boundaries at high f α'. At low temperatures, the local carbon enrichment of such boundaries was responsible for the enhanced stabilization at high f α'. At high temperatures, relevant to the quenching and partitioning processing, on the other hand, the pronounced stabilization at high f α' was attributed to the uniform partitioning of the carbon stored at A-M boundaries into the austenite. Reduction in the fault density of austenite served as an auxiliary stabilization mechanism at high temperatures.

  16. Langevin Simulation of Microstructure in Martensitic Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Lookman, T.; Shenoy, S. R.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A. R.

    1996-03-01

    We present a dynamical model to simulate microstructure in martensitic transformations within the context of shape memory alloys. The Hamiltonian of the system includes a triple-well potential (φ^6 model) in local shear strain, (2) strain gradient terms up to second order in strain and fourth order in gradient, and (3) all symmetry allowed compositional fluctuation induced strain gradient terms. We show the formation of twinned martensite below the transformation temperature and tweed precursors above the transformation temperature, as well as indications of hierarchical structures near the habit plane. These phases result from a competition between short range attraction and long range elastic repulsive forces. The long range interaction is incorporated via Fourier spectral methods as discussed by C. Roland and R.C.Desai [Phys. Rev. B 42, 6658 (1990)].

  17. Microstructural Features Controlling Mechanical Properties in Nb-Mo Microalloyed Steels. Part II: Impact Toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isasti, Nerea; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Taheri, Mitra L.; Uranga, Pello

    2014-10-01

    The present paper is the final part of a two-part paper where the influence of coiling temperature on the final microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb-Mo microalloyed steels is described. More specifically, this second paper deals with the different mechanisms affecting impact toughness. A detailed microstructural characterization and the relations linking the microstructural parameters and the tensile properties have already been discussed in Part I. Using these results as a starting point, the present work takes a step forward and develops a methodology for consistently incorporating the effect of the microstructural heterogeneity into the existing relations that link the Charpy impact toughness to the microstructure. In conventional heat treatments or rolling schedules, the microstructure can be properly described by its mean attributes, and the ductile-brittle transition temperatures measured by Charpy tests can be properly predicted. However, when different microalloying elements are added and multiphase microstructures are formed, the influences of microstructural heterogeneity and secondary hard phases have to be included in a modified equation in order to accurately predict the DB transition temperature in Nb and Nb-Mo microalloyed steels.

  18. Precipitation in Microalloyed Steel by Model Alloy Experiments and Thermodynamic Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisk, Karin; Borggren, Ulrika

    2016-10-01

    Precipitation in microalloyed steel has been studied by applying thermodynamic calculations based on a description of the Gibbs energies of the individual phases over the full multicomponent composition range. To validate and improve the thermodynamic description, new experimental investigations of the phase separation in the cubic carbides/nitrides/carbonitrides in alloys containing Nb, V, Mo, and Cr, have been performed. Model alloys were designed to obtain equilibrium carbides/carbonitrides that are sufficiently large for measurements of compositions, making it possible to study the partitioning of the elements into different precipitates, showing distinctly different composition sets. The reliability of the calculations, when applied to multicomponent alloys, was tested by comparing with published experimental studies of precipitation in microalloyed steel. It is shown that thermodynamic calculations accurately describe the observed precipitation sequences. Further, they can reproduce several important features of precipitation processes in microalloyed steel such as the partitioning of Mo between matrix and precipitates and the variation of precipitate compositions depending on precipitation temperature.

  19. Effect of Strain-Induced Age Hardening on Yield Strength Improvement in Ferrite-Austenite Duplex Lightweight Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hyejin; Lee, Seok Gyu; Sohn, Seok Su; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-11-01

    Ferrite-austenite lightweight steels showing TRansformation-induced plasticity were developed by varying the aging temperature with or without prestraining, and their effects on tensile properties were investigated in relation with microstructural evolution of carbide formation. The aged steels contained austenite, pearlite, and martensite in the ferrite matrix, and the austenite volume fraction decreased with the increasing aging temperature because some austenite grains decomposed to pearlites. This austenite decomposition to pearlite was favorable for the improvement of yield strength, but negatively influenced overall tensile properties. The prestraining promoted the austenite decomposition by a diffusion-controlled phase transformation, and changed the morphology of the cementite from a long lamellar shape to a densely agglomerated particle shape. In order to obtain the large increase in yield strength as well as excellent combination of strength and ductility, the strain-induced aging treatment, i.e., prestraining followed by aging, is important like in the prestrained and 673 K (400 °C)-aged steel. This large increase in yield strength, in spite of a reduction of elongation (65 to 43 pct), was basically attributed to an appropriate amount of decomposition of austenite to pearlite ( e.g., 4 vol pct), while having sufficient austenite to martensite transformation ( e.g., 14.5 vol pct martensite).

  20. Hot deformation behavior and processing map of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Sun, Hongying; Zou, Lei; Wang, Man; Li, Shaofu

    2014-12-01

    The hot deformation behavior of 9Cr oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel fabricated through the process of mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) as investigated through hot compression deformation tests on the Gleeble-1500D simulator in the temperature range of 1050-1200 °C and strain rate range of 0.001 s-1-1 s-1. The relationship between the rheological stress and the strain rate was also studied. The activation energy and the stress and material parameters of the hyperbolic-sine equation were resolved according to the data obtained. The processing map was also proposed. The results show that the flow stress decreases as the temperature increases, and that decreasing of the strain rate of the 9Cr ODS steel results in a positive strain rate sensitivity. It is clear that dynamic recrystallization is influenced by both temperature and strain rate. The results of this study may provide a good reference for the selection of hot working parameters for 9Cr ODS steel. The optimum processing domains are at 1200 °C with a strain rate of 1 s-1 and in the range of 1080-1100 °C with a strain rate between 0.018 s-1 and 0.05 s-1.

  1. Low temperature embrittlement behaviour of different ferritic-martensitic alloys for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieth, M.; Dafferner, B.

    1996-10-01

    In the last few years a lot of different low activation CrWVTa steels have been developed world-wide. Without irradiation some of these alloys show clearly a better low temperature embrittlement behaviour than commercial CrNiMoV(Nb) alloys. Within the MANITU project a study was carried out to compare, prior to the irradiation program, the embrittlement behaviour of different alloys in the unirradiated condition performing instrumented Charpy impact bending tests with sub-size specimens. The low activation materials (LAM) considered were different OPTIFER alloys (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe), F82H (JAERI), 9Cr2WVTa (ORNL), and GA3X (PNL). The modified commercial 10-11% CrNiMoVNb steels were MANET and OPTIMAR. A meaningful comparison between these alloys could be drawn, since the specimens of all materials were manufactured and tested under the same conditions.

  2. Boron effect on the microstructure of 9% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenkov, M.; Materna-Morris, E.; Möslang, A.

    2015-07-01

    The microstructure of reduces-activation 9Cr-WTaV steel alloyed with 83 and 1160 wt. ppm 10B was detailed analysed using transmission electron microscopy. The influence of boron content on the precipitation behaviour of M23C6 and MX (VN and TaC) phases and, hence, on the formation process of steel's grain and lath structure was studied. VN precipitates, which play an important role in the stabilisation of the lath structure, exhibit most sensitive reaction on presence of boron. Their spatial density significantly reduces in the alloy with 83 ppm boron. In the steel with 1160 wt. ppm boron, no formation of VN was detected, whereas TaC particles precipitate at the lath and grain boundaries. These changes in the structure stabilisation mechanism lead to an increasing lath width and a decreasing thermal stability of laths and grains. Analytical investigations of several BN particles reveal their complex multi-phase structure and allow conclusions to be drawn with respect to their precipitation sequence.

  3. Tritium permeation experiments using reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel tube and erbium oxide coating

    SciTech Connect

    Takumi Chikada; Masashi Shimada; Robert Pawelko; Takayuki Terai; Takeo Muroga

    2013-09-01

    Low concentration tritium permeation experiments have been performed on uncoated F82H and Er2O3-coated tubular samples in the framework of the Japan-US TITAN collaborative program. Tritium permeability of the uncoated sample with 1.2 ppm tritium showed one order of magnitude lower than that with 100% deuterium. The permeability of the sample with 40 ppm tritium was more than twice higher than that of 1.2 ppm, indicating a surface contribution at the lower tritium concentration. The Er2O3-coated sample showed two orders of magnitude lower permeability than the uncoated sample, and lower permeability than that of the coated plate sample with 100% deuterium. It was also indicated that the memory effect of ion chambers in the primary and secondary circuits was caused by absorption of tritiated water vapor that was generated by isotope exchange reactions between tritium and surface water on the coating.

  4. Acoustic emission and shape memory effect in the martensitic transformation.

    PubMed

    Sreekala, S; Ananthakrishna, G

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic emission signals are known to exhibit a high degree of reproducibility in time and show correlations with the growth and shrinkage of martensite domains when athermal martensites are subjected to repeated thermal cycling in a restricted temperature range. We show that a recently introduced two dimensional model for the martensitic transformation mimics these features. We also show that these features are related to the shape memory effect where near full reversal of morphological features are seen under these thermal cycling conditions.

  5. Transformation temperatures of martensite in beta phase nickel aluminide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    Resistivity and thermal arrest measurements determined that the compositional dependence of Ms (martensite state) temperatures for NiAl martensite was linear between 60 and 69 atomic percent nickel, with Ms = 124 Ni - 7410 K. Resistivity and surface relief experiments indicated the presence of thermoelastic martensite for selected alloys. Some aspects of the transformation were studied by hot stage microscopy and related to the behavior observed for alloys exhibiting the shape-memory effect.

  6. Quench-Condensed Microalloyed Particles: a Microscopic View of Solid Solubility and Metastability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, Vincent Edward

    Solid solubility and metastability in noble-metal and iron-silver alloys have been studied from the perspective of microalloyed particles. Samples were obtained through a novel, gram-scale technique that consisted of cocondensation of two elemental metal vapors with a large excess of inert gas on the reaction surface of a rotating cryostat at 77 K. This technique permitted greater control of both particle size and composition than conventional gas aggregation methods. The chemical and physical characteristics of the microalloys have been elaborated through chemical analysis, x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, temperature-programmed mass spectrometry, EXAFS, XPS and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Electron microscopy indicated the microstructures of copper-gold and copper-silver microalloys prepared in sulfur hexafluoride to consist of discrete collections of crystallites suspended in amorphous "baths". The average dimensions of the crystallites were <100 A, while the aggregates spanned hundreds of nanometers. The microstructures of both systems were metastable. The EXAFS of a copper-silver microalloy showed it to be stiffer, as well as more disordered, than a homometallic copper product. The EXAFS also showed no detectable Cu-Ag contacts, but suggested the existence (through a "missing-atom" effect) of a large number of disordered copper sites. Moessbauer spectra of an iron -silver microalloy prepared in xenon revealed the presence of a superparamagnetic alloy phase characterized by a blocking temperature of approximately 45 K. Cocondensations of iron vapor with excess sulfur hexafluoride produced ultrafine (dimensions ~ 100 A), amorphous particles that were decorated with a -CF_{2^-} polymer. The formation of the polymer was attributed to reaction of the iron with the matrix and adventitious organic compounds--that is, to activation of S-F and C-H bonds. Matrix isolation experiments indicated that, although inert in their ground-state configuration, photoexcited (4p

  7. Drastic influence of minor Fe or Co additions on the glass forming ability, martensitic transformations and mechanical properties of shape memory Zr-Cu-Al bulk metallic glass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Sergio; Pérez, Pablo; Rossinyol, Emma; Suriñach, Santiago; Baró, Maria Dolors; Pellicer, Eva; Sort, Jordi

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of Zr48Cu48 - x Al4M x (M ≡ Fe or Co, x = 0, 0.5, 1 at.%) metallic glass (MG) composites are highly dependent on the amount of Fe or Co added as microalloying elements in the parent Zr48Cu48Al4 material. Addition of Fe and Co promotes the transformation from austenite to martensite during the course of nanoindentation or compression experiments, resulting in an enhancement of plasticity. However, the presence of Fe or Co also reduces the glass forming ability, ultimately causing a worsening of the mechanical properties. Owing to the interplay between these two effects, the compressive plasticity for alloys with x = 0.5 (5.5% in Zr48Cu47.5Al4Co0.5 and 6.2% in Zr48Cu47.5Al4Fe0.5) is considerably larger than for Zr48Cu48Al4 or the alloys with x = 1. Slight variations in the Young’s modulus (around 5-10%) and significant changes in the yield stress (up to 25%) are also observed depending on the composition. The different microstructural factors that have an influence on the mechanical behavior of these composites are investigated in detail: (i) co-existence of amorphous and crystalline phases in the as-cast state, (ii) nature of the crystalline phases (austenite versus martensite content), and (iii) propensity for the austenite to undergo a mechanically-driven martensitic transformation during plastic deformation. Evidence for intragranular nanotwins likely generated in the course of the austenite-martensite transformation is provided by transmission electron microscopy. Our results reveal that fine-tuning of the composition of the Zr-Cu-Al-(Fe,Co) system is crucial in order to optimize the mechanical performance of these bulk MG composites, to make them suitable materials for structural applications.

  8. Processing and application of nanosized ferrite powders

    SciTech Connect

    Drofenik, M.; Rozman, M.

    1995-09-01

    Crystalline MnZn ferrite of nanosize was prepared by the hydrothermal synthesis. The pH value of the starting suspension was found to influence substantially the ferrite composition. The nanosized ferrite powder is very sensitive to oxidation and sinters to nearly theoretical density in nitrogen. The correlation between the eddy-current loss and microstructure is given.

  9. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. J.; Chathoth, S. M.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-09-28

    Extensive efforts have been made to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. In this work, we have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Our results indicate that atomic caging is the primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.

  10. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; Wang, W. H.; Chathoth, S. M.

    2015-09-28

    We've made extensive efforts to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. We have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Finally, our results indicate that atomic caging is the primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.

  11. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, C. J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; Wang, W. H.; Chathoth, S. M.

    2015-09-28

    We've made extensive efforts to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. We have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Finally, our results indicate that atomic caging is themore » primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.« less

  12. High power ferrite microwave switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardash, I.; Roschak, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    A high power ferrite microwave switch was developed along with associated electronic driver circuits for operation in a spaceborne high power microwave transmitter in geostationary orbit. Three units were built and tested in a space environment to demonstrate conformance to the required performance characteristics. Each unit consisted of an input magic-tee hybrid, two non-reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifters, an out short-slot 3 db quadrature coupler, a dual driver electronic circuit, and input logic interface circuitry. The basic mode of operation of the high power ferrite microwave switch is identical to that of a four-port, differential phase shift, switchable circulator. By appropriately designing the phase shifters and electronic driver circuits to operate in the flux-transfer magnetization mode, power and temperature insensitive operation was achieved. A list of the realized characteristics of the developed units is given.

  13. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  14. RF cavities with transversely biased ferrite tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, W.R.; Brophy, T.G.; Carlini, R.D.; Friedrichs, C.C.; Grisham, D.L.; Spalek, G.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1985-10-01

    Earley et al. suggested that ferrite tuned rf cavities have lower ferrite power dissipation if the ferrite bias field is perpendicular rather than parallel to the rf magnetic field. A 50-84 MHz cavity has been constructed in which ferrite can be biased either way. Low power measurements of six microwave ferrites show that the magnetic Q's of these ferrites under perpendicular bias are much higher than under parallel bias, and that the high Q region extends over a much wider range of rf permeability. TDK Y-5 ferrite was found to have a magnetic Q of 10,800, 4,800, 1,200 and 129 at rf permeabilities of 1.2, 2.4, 3.7 and 4.5, respectively. Measurements of perpendicularly biased ferrite at various power levels were made in a coaxial line cavity. The Q of Y-5 ferrite was found to decrease by less than a factor of 2 as the power density in the ferrite was increased to 1.3 W/cmT. A cavity design for a 6 GeV, high current, rapid cycling synchrotron using transversely biased ferrite tuning is described.

  15. Modeling of Developing Inhomogeneities in the Ferrite Microstructure and Resulting Mechanical Properties Induced by Deformation in the Two-Phase Region

    SciTech Connect

    Majta, J; Zurek, A.K.; Pietrzyk, M.

    1999-07-13

    The differences in microstructure development of hot deformed steels in the austenite and two-phase region have been effectively described using an integrated computer modeling process. In general, the complete model presented here takes into account kinetics of recrystallization, precipitation, phase transformation, recrystallized austenite grain size, ferrite grain size, and the resulting mechanical properties. The transformation submodel of niobium-microalloyed steels is based on the nucleation and grain growth theory and additivity rule. The thermomechanical part of the modeling process was effectively carried out using the finite element method. Results were obtained in different temperatures, strain rates, and range of deformation. The thermomechanical treatments are different for two grades of niobium-steels to make possible analysis of the resulting structure and properties for different histories of deformation and chemical composition.

  16. Microstructural analysis of martensite constituents in quenching and partitioning steels

    SciTech Connect

    Santofimia, M.J.; Petrov, R.H.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2014-06-01

    A methodology to distinguish martensite formed in the first quench (M1) from martensite formed in the second quench (M2) of the Quenching and Partitioning process is presented, enabling the study of the structural characteristics of both microstructural constituents. Investigations show that M1 displays larger block size and less lattice imperfections than M2, differences that can be related to their respective carbon contents. - Highlights: • An approach to distinguish “old” from “new” martensite in Q and P steels is presented • Methodology allows separate characterization of microstructure and crystallography “Old” martensite has larger block size and more perfect lattice than the “new” one • The differences between the old and new martensite depend on their carbon contents.

  17. A Nanoindentation Study on Grain-Boundary Contributions to Strengthening and Aging Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced 12Cr Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Jae-il; Shim, Sang Hoon; Komazaki, Shin-ichi; Honda, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    Nanoindentation experiments and microstructural analysis were performed on advanced 12% Cr ferritic steel having extremely fine and complex martensitic microstructures, to answer unsolved questions on the contributions of grain boundaries to strengthening and aging degradation mechanisms in both as-tempered and thermally aged steels. Interesting features of the experimental results led us to suggest that among several high angle boundaries, block boundary is most effective in enhancing the macroscopic strength in as-tempered virgin sample, and that a decrease in matrix strength rather than reduction in grain-boundary strengthening effect is primarily responsible for the macroscopic softening behavior observed during thermal exposure.

  18. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated {approximately}400 C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1998-03-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400 C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400 C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  19. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1997-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved.

  20. Effect of the conditions of REM microalloying of steel on the corrosion activity of nonmetallic inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movenko, D. A.; Kotel'nikov, G. I.; Pavlov, A. V.; Bytsenko, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental heats of low-alloy steel are performed under various conditions of rare-earth metal microalloying and aluminum and calcium deoxidation. Electron-probe microanalysis of nonmetallic inclusions and a metallographic investigation of a metal are used to show that, when interacting with water, nonmetallic cerium oxide inclusions do not form hydrates and, correspondingly, are not aggressive. When aluminum, calcium, and cerium additions are sequentially introduced into a melt, a continuous cerium oxide shell forms on calcium aluminates, protects corrosive nonmetallic inclusions against interaction with water, and weakens local metal corrosion.

  1. Refinement of Ferrite Grain Size near the Ultrafine Range by Multipass, Thermomechanical Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, S.; Neogy, S.; Kumar, Vinod; Chakrabarti, D.; Haldar, A.

    2012-11-01

    Plane-strain compression testing was carried out on a Nb-Ti-V microalloyed steel, in a GLEEBLE3500 simulator using a different amount of roughing, intermediate, and finishing deformation over the temperature range of 1373 K to 1073 K (1100 °C to 800 °C). A decrease in soaking temperature from 1473 K to 1273 K (1200 °C to 1000 °C) offered marginal refinement in the ferrite ( α) grain size from 7.8 to 6.6 μm. Heavy deformation using multiple passes between A e3 and A r3 with true strain of 0.8 to 1.2 effectively refined the α grain size (4.1 to 3.2 μm) close to the ultrafine size by dynamic-strain-induced austenite ( γ) → ferrite ( α) transformation (DSIT). The intensities of microstructural banding, pearlite fraction in the microstructure (13 pct), and fraction of the harmful "cube" texture component (5 pct) were reduced with the increase in finishing deformation. Simultaneously, the fractions of high-angle (>15 deg misorientation) boundaries (75 to 80 pct), beneficial gamma-fiber (ND//<111>) texture components, along with {332}<133> and {554}<225> components were increased. Grain refinement and the formation of small Fe3C particles (50- to 600-nm size) increased the hardness of the deformed samples (184 to 192 HV). For the same deformation temperature [1103 K (830 °C)], the difference in α-grain sizes obtained after single-pass (2.7 μm) and multipass compression (3.2 μm) can be explained in view of the static- and dynamic-strain-induced γ → α transformation, strain partitioning between γ and α, dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization of the deformed α, and α-grain growth during interpass intervals.

  2. Atomic force microscopy applied to the quantification of nano-precipitates in thermo-mechanically treated microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Renteria-Borja, Luciano; Hurtado-Delgado, Eduardo; Garnica-Gonzalez, Pedro; Dominguez-Lopez, Ivan; Garcia-Garcia, Adrian Luis

    2012-07-15

    Quantification of nanometer-size precipitates in microalloyed steels has been traditionally performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in spite of its complicated sample preparation procedures, prone to preparation errors and sample perturbation. In contrast to TEM procedures, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is performed on the as-prepared specimen, with sample preparation requirements similar to those for optical microscopy (OM), rendering three-dimensional representations of the sample surface with vertical resolution of a fraction of a nanometer. In AFM, contrast mechanisms are directly related to surface properties such as topography, adhesion, and stiffness, among others. Chemical etching was performed using 0.5% nital, at time intervals between 4 and 20 s, in 4 s steps, until reaching the desired surface finish. For the present application, an average surface-roughness peak-height below 200 nm was sought. Quantification results of nanometric precipitates were obtained from the statistical analysis of AFM images of the microstructure developed by microalloyed Nb and V-Mo steels. Topography and phase contrast AFM images were used for quantification. The results obtained using AFM are consistent with similar TEM reports. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We quantified nanometric precipitates in Nb and V-Mo microalloyed steels using AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures of the thermo-mechanically treated microalloyed steels were used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Topography and phase contrast AFM images were used for quantification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AFM results are comparable with traditionally obtained TEM measurements.

  3. Twinning and martensite in a 304 austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Li, Xi; Sun, Xin; Wang, Y. D.; Zuo, Liang

    2012-08-30

    The microstructure characteristics and deformation behavior of 304L stainless steel during tensile deformation at two different strain rates have been investigated by means of interrupted tensile tests, electron-backscatter-diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The volume fractions of transformed martensite and deformation twins at different stages of the deformation process were measured using X-ray diffraction method and TEM observations. It is found that the volume fraction of martensite monotonically increases with increasing strain but decreases with increasing strain rate. On the other hand, the volume fraction of twins increases with increasing strain for strain level less than 57%. Beyond that, the volume fraction of twins decreases with increasing strain. Careful TEM observations show that stacking faults (SFs) and twins preferentially occur before the nucleation of martensite. Meanwhile, both {var_epsilon}-martensite and {alpha}{prime}-martensite are observed in the deformation microstructures, indicating the co-existence of stress induced- transformation and strain-induced-transformation. We also discussed the effects of twinning and martensite transformation on work-hardening as well as the relationship between stacking faults, twinning and martensite transformation.

  4. Development of a monolithic ferrite memory array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.; Bhiwandker, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the development and testing of ferrite monolithic memory arrays are presented. This development required the synthesis of ferrite materials having special magnetic and physical characteristics and the development of special processes; (1) for making flexible sheets (laminae) of the ferrite composition, (2) for embedding conductors in ferrite, and (3) bonding ferrite laminae together to form a monolithic structure. Major problems encountered in each of these areas and their solutions are discussed. Twenty-two full-size arrays were fabricated and fired during the development of these processes. The majority of these arrays were tested for their memory characteristics as well as for their physical characteristics and the results are presented. The arrays produced during this program meet the essential goals and demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating monolithic ferrite memory arrays by the processes developed.

  5. High-Q ferrite-tuned cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, L.M.; Thiessen, H.A.; Carlini, R.D.; Potter, J.M.

    1983-08-01

    Rapid-cycling proton synchrotrons, such as the proposed LAMPF II accelerator, require approximately 10 MV per turn rf with 17% tuning range near 50 MHz. The traditional approach to ferrite-tuned cavities uses a ferrite which is longitudinally biased (rf magnetic field parallel to bias field). This method leads to unacceptably high losses in the ferrite. At Los Alamos, we are developing a cavity with transverse bias (rf magnetic field perpendicular to the bias field) that makes use of the tensor permeability of the ferrite. Initial tests of a small (10-cm-diam) quarter-wave singly re-entrant cavity tuned by several different ferrites indicate that the losses in the ferrite can be made negligible compared with the losses due to the surface resistivity of the copper cavity.

  6. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2015-11-13

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6 carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  7. Multifunctionality of nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Atma; Thakur, Awalendra K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite has been synthesized by adopting modified Pechini route. No evidence of impurity or secondary phase has been detected up to the detection of error limit of X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction pattern reveals orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pnma (62).Crystallite size and lattice strain was found to be ˜42.8nm and 0.306% respectively. Optical band gap was found to be 2.109 eV, by UV-Visible diffused reflectance spectrum (DRS). Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area was found to be ˜3.45 m2/g. Magnetization-hysteresis (M-H) loop was recorded at room temperature (300K) reveals weak ferromagnetism in Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite. The weak ferromagnetism in lanthanum ferrite is due to the uncompensated antiferromagnetic spin ordering. Ferroelectric loop hysteresis observed at room temperature at 100Hz depicts the presence of ferroelectric ordering in LaFeO3.Simultanious presence of magnetic and ferroelectric ordering at room temperature makes it suitable candidate of Multiferroic family.

  8. Laser-based welding of 17-4 PH martensitic stainless steel in a tubular butt joint configuration with a built-in backing bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Junjie; Atabaki, Mehdi Mazar; Liu, Wei; Pillai, Raju; Kumar, Biju; Vasudevan, Unnikrishnan; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-08-01

    Laser-based welding of thick 17-4 precipitation hardening (PH) martensitic stainless steel (SS) plates in a tubular butt joint configuration with a built-in backing bar is very challenging because the porosity and cracks are easily generated in the welds. The backing bar blocked the keyhole opening at the bottom surface through which the entrapped gas could escape, and the keyhole was unstable and collapsed overtime in a deep partially penetrated welding conditions resulting in the formation of pores easily. Moreover, the fast cooling rate prompted the ferrite transform to austenite which induced cracking. Two-pass welding procedure was developed to join 17-4 PH martensitic SS. The laser welding assisted by a filler wire, as the first pass, was used to weld the groove shoulder. The added filler wire could absorb a part of the laser beam energy; resulting in the decreased weld depth-to-width ratio and relieved intensive restraint at the weld root. A hybrid laser-arc welding or a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) was used to fill the groove as the second pass. Nitrogen was introduced to stabilize the keyhole and mitigate the porosity. Preheating was used to decrease the cooling rate and mitigate the cracking during laser-based welding of 17-4 PH martensitic SS plates.

  9. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  10. Transformation temperatures of martensite in beta-phase nickel aluminide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Resistivity and thermal arrest measurements determined that the compositional dependence of M sub s temperatures for NiAl martensite was linear between 60 and 69 at. % Ni, with M sub s = (124 Ni - 7410)K. Resistivity and surface relief experiments for selected alloys indicated the presence of thermoelastic martensite. Some aspects of the transformation were studied by hot-stage microscopy and related to the behavior observed for alloys exhibiting the shape-memory effect.

  11. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CREEP-RESISTANT FERRITIC STEEL WELDMENTS THROUGH THERMO-MECHANICAL TREATMENT AND ALLOY DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Prof. Sudarsanam Suresh; Shassere, Benjamin; Yu, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    Two different approaches have been proposed for improvement of cross-weld creep properties of the high temperature ferrous structural materials for fossil-fired energy applications. The traditional creep strength-enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steel weldments suffer from Type IV failures which occur at the fine-grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ). In order to minimize the premature failure at FGHAZ in the existing CSEF steels, such as modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steels (Grade 91), a thermo-mechanical treatment consisting of aus-forging/rolling and subsequent aus-aging is proposed which promotes the formation of stable MX carbonitrides prior to martensitic transformation. Such MX remains undissolved during welding process, even in FGHAZ, which successfully improves the cross-weld creep properties. Another approach is to develop a new fully ferrtic, creep-resistant FeCrAl alloy which is essentially free from Type IV failure issues. Fe-30Cr-3Al base alloys with minor alloying additions were developed which achieved a combination of good oxidation/corrosion resistance and improved tensile and creep performance comparable or superior to Grade 92 steel.

  12. Effects of strain-induced martensite and its reversion on the magnetic properties of AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza Filho, I. R.; Sandim, M. J. R.; Cohen, R.; Nagamine, L. C. C. M.; Hoffmann, J.; Bolmaro, R. E.; Sandim, H. R. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Strain-induced martensite (SIM) and its reversion in a cold-rolled AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel was studied by means of magnetic properties, light optical (LOM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), texture measurements, and Vickers microhardness testing. According to Thermo-calc© predictions, the BCC phase (residual δ-ferrite and SIM) is expected to be stable until 600 °C. The current material was cold rolled up to 60% thickness reduction and submitted to both isothermal and stepwise annealing up to 800 °C. Magnetic measurements were taken during annealing (in situ) of the samples and also for their post mortem conditions. The Curie temperatures (Tc) of residual δ-ferrite and SIM have similar values between 550 and 600 °C. Besides Tc, the focused magnetic parameters were saturation magnetization (Ms), remanent magnetization (MR), and coercive field (Hc). SIM reversion was found to occur in the range of 600-700 °C in good agreement with Thermo-calc© predictions. The microstructures of the material, annealed at 600 and 700 °C for 1 h, were investigated via EBSD. Microtexture measurements for these samples revealed that the texture components were mainly those found for the 60% cold rolled material. This is an evidence that the SIM reversion occurred by an athermal mechanism.

  13. Bulk and thin film microstructures in untwinned martensites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hane, Kevin F.

    1999-09-01

    The microstructure in alloys for which the martensite phase is either the 9R or 18R long-period stacking order structure is investigated. A choice of a new unit cell to describe the lattice of the product phase is made, and it is found to give an exact austenite-martensite interface. A comparison with experimental observations for several different material systems supports this choice of unit cell, and the predictions of the shape strain and habit plane normal vectors are the same as those given by a phenomenological calculation. The approach followed here de-emphasizes the role of the internal defects within the unit cell of the martensite lattice in providing the mechanism by which compatibility between the phases is achieved. It is this reason that the name untwinned martensites is proposed to replace the older name faulted martensites. In addition, microstructures in thin film specimens of the alloys exhibiting the untwinned martensite are studied. In particular, a tent microstructure is constructed in a specially oriented film, and such microstructures have potential applications in micro-devices to act as either a pump or an actuator.

  14. Crystallographic variant selection of martensite at high stress/strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arpan

    2015-07-01

    The phenomenological theory of martensitic transformation is well understood that the displacive phase transformations are mainly influenced by the externally applied stress. Martensitic transformation occurs with 24 possible Kurdjomov-Sachs (K-S) variants, where each variant shows a distinct lattice orientation. The elegant transformation texture model of Kundu and Bhadeshia for crystallographic variant selection of martensite in metastable austenite at various stress/strain levels has been assessed in this present research. The corresponding interaction energies have also been evaluated. Encouraging correlation between model prediction and experimental data generation for martensite pole figures at many deformed austenite grains has been observed at different stress/strain levels. It has been investigated that the mechanical driving force alone is able to explain the observed martensite microtextures at all stress/strain levels under uniaxial tensile deformation of metastable austenite under low temperature at a slow strain rate. The present investigation also proves that the Patel and Cohen's classical theory can be utilized to predict the crystallographic variant selection, if it is correctly used along with the phenomenological theory of martensite crystallography.

  15. High-strength economically alloyed corrosion-resistant steels with the structure of nitrogen martensite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannykh, O.; Blinov, V.; Lukin, E.

    2016-04-01

    The use of nitrogen as the main alloying element allowing one both to increase the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of steels and to improve their processability is a new trend in physical metallurgy of high-strength corrosion resistant steels. The principles of alloying, which are developed for high-nitrogen steel in IMET RAS, ensure the formation of the structure, which contains predetermined amounts of martensite (70-80%) and austenite (20-30%) and is free from δ-ferrite, σ-phase, and Cr23C6 carbide. These principles were used as the base for the creation of new high-strength corrosion-resistant weldable and deformable 0Kh16AN5B, 06Kh16AN4FD, 08Kh14AN4MDB, 09Kh16AN3MF, 27Kh15AN3MD2, 40Kh13AN3M2, and 19Kh14AMB steels, which are operative at temperatures ranging from - 70 to 400°C. The developed nitrogen-containing steels compared with similar carbon steels are characterized by a higher resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion and are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. The new steels successfully passed trial tests as heavy duty articles.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Laser Beam Welded Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. A strength of up to 2 GPa at a fracture strain of 15% can be attained. Welding of these materials became apparently a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply an efficient heat control. For two application cases, production of tailored blanks in as-rolled condition and welding in assembly in hot stamped conditions, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown in metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KSII concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method. For the case of assembly also joining with deep drawing and manganese boron steel was taken into consideration. The strength of the joint is determined by the weaker partner but can benefit from its ductility.

  17. Compatibility of martensitic/austenitic steel welds with liquid lead bismuth eutectic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, J.; Almazouzi, A.

    2009-04-01

    The high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steel T91 and the austenitic stainless steel 316L are to be used in contact with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), under high irradiation doses. Both tungsten inert gas (TIG) and electron beam (EB) T91/316L welds have been examined by means of metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX), Vickers hardness measurements and tensile testing both in inert gas and in LBE. Although the T91/316L TIG weld has very good mechanical properties when tested in air, its properties decline sharply when tested in LBE. This degradation in mechanical properties is attributed to the liquid metal embrittlement of the 309 buttering used in TIG welding of T91/316L welds. In contrast to mixed T91/316L TIG welding, the mixed T91/316L EB weld was performed without buttering. The mechanical behaviour of the T91/316L EB weld was very good in air after post weld heat treatment but deteriorated when tested in LBE.

  18. Beam induced heating of ferrite magnets

    SciTech Connect

    van Asselt, W.K.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1991-01-01

    Alerted by impedance measurements of ferrite kicker magnets and by apparent beam induced pressure increase in the neighborhood of window frame kicker magnets, bench measurements of magnet heating have been done. They confirmed the necessity of interrupting the ferrite yoke. Another method, which can be applied for existing magnets, will be described. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  19. Exchange coupled ferrite nanocomposites through chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qilin; Patel, Ketan; Ren, Shenqiang

    2016-08-16

    Exchange coupling between magnetically hard and soft phases has the potential to yield a large gain in the energy product. In this work, we present a scalable chemical synthetic route to produce magnetic iron oxide based nanocomposites, consisting of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) and strontium ferrite (SrFe12O19) components. PMID:27476744

  20. Surface modification of ferritic steels using MEVVA and duoplasmatron ion sources.

    PubMed

    Kulevoy, Timur V; Chalyhk, Boris B; Fedin, Petr A; Sitnikov, Alexey L; Kozlov, Alexander V; Kuibeda, Rostislav P; Andrianov, Stanislav L; Orlov, Nikolay N; Kravchuk, Konstantin S; Rogozhkin, Sergey V; Useinov, Alexey S; Oks, Efim M; Bogachev, Alexey A; Nikitin, Alexander A; Iskandarov, Nasib A; Golubev, Alexander A

    2016-02-01

    Metal Vapor Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion source (IS) is a unique tool for production of high intensity metal ion beam that can be used for material surface modification. From the other hand, the duoplasmatron ion source provides the high intensity gas ion beams. The MEVVA and duoplasmatron IS developed in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics were used for the reactor steel surface modification experiments. Response of ferritic-martensitic steel specimens on titanium and nitrogen ions implantation and consequent vacuum annealing was investigated. Increase in microhardness of near surface region of irradiated specimens was observed. Local chemical analysis shows atom mixing and redistribution in the implanted layer followed with formation of ultrafine precipitates after annealing.

  1. Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels: a basic research joint program in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutard, J.-L.; Badjeck, V.; Barguet, L.; Barouh, C.; Bhattacharya, A.; Colignon, Y.; Hatzoglou, C.; Loyer-Prost, M.; Rouffié, A. L.; Sallez, N.; Salmon-Legagneur, H.; Schuler, T.

    2014-12-01

    AREVA, CEA, CNRS, EDF and Mécachrome are funding a joint program of basic research on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels (ODISSEE), in support to the development of oxide dispersion strengthened 9-14% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels for the fuel element cladding of future Sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors. The selected objectives and the results obtained so far will be presented concerning (i) physical-chemical characterisation of the nano-clusters as a function of ball-milling process, metallurgical conditions and irradiation, (ii) meso-scale understanding of failure mechanisms under dynamic loading and creep, and, (iii) kinetic modelling of nano-clusters nucleation and α/α‧ unmixing.

  2. Ferritic steel for use in nuclear energy — A report of the snowbird conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. W.

    1984-05-01

    This international conference on ferritic or martensitic steels consisted of a planary session with all invited papers and several parallel sessions of contributed papers. The conference was sponsored by the Metallurgical Society of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME) as well as several industrial organizations. The technical program chairmen were J. W. Davis of MDAC and D. J. Michel of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. The Program committee was composed of representatives from the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Japan, the UK, and the USA. The conference proceedings will be published as a hard bound book by the AIME. Consequently, the present paper is intended to highlight the results of the conference prior to the publication of the proceedings.

  3. Controlling the corrosion and cathodic activation of magnesium via microalloying additions of Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. L.; Hurley, M. F.; Kvryan, A.; Williams, G.; Scully, J. R.; Birbilis, N.

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of corrosion morphology and kinetics for magnesium (Mg) have been demonstrated to be influenced by cathodic activation, which implies that the rate of the cathodic partial reaction is enhanced as a result of anodic dissolution. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated to be moderated by the use of arsenic (As) alloying as a poison for the cathodic reaction, leading to significantly improved corrosion resistance. The pursuit of alternatives to toxic As is important as a means to imparting a technologically safe and effective corrosion control method for Mg (and its alloys). In this work, Mg was microalloyed with germanium (Ge), with the aim of improving corrosion resistance by retarding cathodic activation. Based on a combined analysis herein, we report that Ge is potent in supressing the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (reduction of water) upon Mg, improving corrosion resistance. With the addition of Ge, cathodic activation of Mg subject to cyclic polarisation was also hindered, with beneficial implications for future Mg electrodes.

  4. Hot Deformation Behavior and Microstructural Evolution of a Medium Carbon Vanadium Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutrim, Rialberth M.; Rodrigues, Samuel F.; Reis, Gedeon S.; Silva, Eden S.; Aranas, Clodualdo; Balancin, Oscar

    2016-10-01

    Hot forging of steel requires application of large strains, under which conditions, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) is expected to take place. In this study, torsion tests were carried out on a medium carbon vanadium microalloyed steel (38MnSiVS5) to simulate hot forging. Deformations were applied isothermally in the temperature range 900-1200 °C at strain rates of 0.1-10 s-1 in order to observe for the occurrence of DRX and to investigate for the microstructural evolution during straining. The shape of the flow curves indicated that the recrystallization takes place during deformation. This was supported by optical microscopy performed on the quenched samples which displayed considerable amounts of recrystallized grains. It was shown that the grain size depends on straining conditions such as strain rate and temperature. Finally, it was revealed that these process parameters can considerably affect the evolution of microstructure of industrial grade steels by means of DRX.

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the welding joint filled with microalloying 5183 aluminum welding wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhen; Zhao, Zhi-hao; Wang, Gao-song; Zhang, Chao; Cui, Jian-zhong

    2014-06-01

    In this study, 7A52 aluminum alloy sheets of 4 mm in thickness were welded by tungsten inert gas welding using microalloying welding wires containing traces of Zr and Er. The influence of rare earth elements Zr and Er on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints was analyzed by optical microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, hardness testing, and tensile mechanical properties testing. Systematic analyses indicate that the addition of trace amounts of Er and Zr leads to the formation of fine Al3Er, Al3Zr, and Al3(Zr,Er) phases that favor significant grain refinement in the weld zone. Besides, the tensile strength and hardness of the welded joints were obviously improved with the addition of Er and Zr, as evidenced by the increase in tensile strength and elongation by 40 MPa and 1.4%, respectively, and by the welding coefficient of 73%.

  6. Quantitative analysis of Nb in solution in a microalloyed carburizing steel by electrochemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, A.L. Matlock, D.K. Speer, J.G.

    2008-05-15

    The amount of Nb in solution in a microalloyed carburizing steel (Nb-modified SAE 8620) was evaluated in different heat treated conditions. The test procedure involved electrochemical extraction, filtration and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopic (ICP-AES) analysis. Characterization by X-ray diffraction of the residues collected in the filters was also performed. Results showed that Nb in solution tends to hydrolyze during electrolysis in a 10 vol.% HCl electrolyte, giving misleading measurements of the amount of Nb that dissolved during high temperature heat treatment. Hydrolysis of Nb is prevented by the addition of tartaric acid to the electrolyte. In the full dissolution condition, coarse (Ti,Nb)CN was the only precipitate present. Finer (Nb,Ti)C precipitates were observed after heat treating at 1050 deg. C.

  7. Constitutive Analysis of Dynamic Recrystallization and Flow Behavior of a Medium Carbon Nb-V Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wen-fei; Zhang, Li-wen; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Yi-feng; Shi, Xin-hua

    2016-05-01

    The dynamic recrystallization (DRX) and flow behavior of a medium carbon Nb-V microalloyed steel was investigated using hot isothermal compression experiments in a wide range of temperatures (1123-1473 K) and strain rates (0.01-10 s-1). The flow stress curves were analyzed comprehensively, and it was found that the flow stress of this steel is higher than C-Mn steel and V microalloyed steel. All the curves obtained can be ranged into three principal types: work hardening, dynamic recovery, and DRX. The DRX behavior of this steel was investigated, including critical strain, kinetics of DRX, and microstructure. The constitutive equation to predict the flow stress of the tested steel was also developed, and the analysis result indicates that the developed model has a high accuracy in predicting the flow stress during hot deformation.

  8. The effect of TMCP parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-Nb microalloyed steel.

    PubMed

    Nowotnik, A; Siwecki, T

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of thermo-mechanical controlled process parameters on the refinement of microstructure during processing as well as the final microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb microalloyed steel. The steel was investigated and thermo-mechanical controlled process simulations were carried out using the material testing system 810. The effect of deformation sequences with constant finish rolling temperature and accelerated controlled cooling rate were studied with regard to strength and microstructure of heavy plate. The optimized thermo-mechanical controlled process parameters will be discussed in relation to the microstructure and precipitate evolution, as well as the mechanical properties of high-strength steel, microalloyed with Nb and Ti. The best results for strength were obtained for accelerated controlled cooling rates >5 degrees C s(-1) in the present cases where the finishing temperature was 850 degrees C, for both light and heavy reductions. PMID:20500376

  9. The effect of TMCP parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-Nb microalloyed steel.

    PubMed

    Nowotnik, A; Siwecki, T

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of thermo-mechanical controlled process parameters on the refinement of microstructure during processing as well as the final microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb microalloyed steel. The steel was investigated and thermo-mechanical controlled process simulations were carried out using the material testing system 810. The effect of deformation sequences with constant finish rolling temperature and accelerated controlled cooling rate were studied with regard to strength and microstructure of heavy plate. The optimized thermo-mechanical controlled process parameters will be discussed in relation to the microstructure and precipitate evolution, as well as the mechanical properties of high-strength steel, microalloyed with Nb and Ti. The best results for strength were obtained for accelerated controlled cooling rates >5 degrees C s(-1) in the present cases where the finishing temperature was 850 degrees C, for both light and heavy reductions.

  10. Evaluation of the Effect of Microalloying on Cleavage of Monocrystalline NiAl Using a Miniaturized Disk-Bend Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardell, Alan J.

    1997-01-01

    It was originally proposed to investigate the effect of microalloying on the ductility of monocrystalline NiAl. The idea was to deposit selected elements on oriented crystals of NiAl using magnetron sputtering, followed by annealing at high temperatures to produce the doped specimens. The project was terminated before that stage of the research was reached, but useful results needed for that study were obtained during the lifetime of the program. Those results are described in this report.

  11. Evaluation of the Effect of Microalloying on Cleavage of Monocrystalline NiAl using a Miniaturized Disk-Bend Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardell, Alan J.

    1997-01-01

    It was originally proposed to investigate the effect of microalloying on the ductility of monocrystalline NiAl. The idea was to deposit selected elements on oriented crystals of NiAl using magnetron sputtering, followed by annealing at high temperatures to produce the doped specimens. The project was terminated before that stage of the research was reached, but useful results needed for that study were obtained during the lifetime of the program. Those results are described in this resort.

  12. Martensitic transformation, shape memory effects, and other curious mechanical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Vandermeer, R.A.

    1982-01-08

    The objective of this paper is to review tutorially the subject of martensitic transformations in uranium alloys emphasizing their role in the shape memory effect (SME). We examine first what a martensitic transformation is, illustrating some of its characteristics with specific examples. As well as being athermal in nature, as expected, data are presented indicating that martensitic transformations in some uranium alloys also have a strong isothermal component. In addition, a few alloys are known to exhibit thermoelastic martensitic reactions. The SME, which is associated with these, is defined and demonstrated graphically with data from a uranium-6 wt % niobium alloy. Some of the important variables influencing SME behavior are described. Specifically, these are reheat temperature, amount of deformation, crystal structure, and composition. A mechanism for SME is postulated and the association with martensitic transformation is detailed. A self-induced shape instability in the uranium-7.5 wt % niobium-2.5 wt % zirconium alloy with a rationalization of the behavior in terms of texture and lattice parameter change during aging is reviewed and discussed. 24 figures.

  13. Crystallographic variant selection of martensite during fatigue deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arpan

    2015-03-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels are prone to form deformation-induced martensite under the influence of externally applied stress. Crystallographic variant selection during martensitic transformation of metastable austenite has been investigated thoroughly with respect to the interaction between the applied uniaxial cyclic stress and the resulting accumulated plastic strain during cyclic plastic deformation. The orientation of all the Kurdjomov-Sachs (K-S) variants has been evaluated extensively and compared with the measured orientation of martensite with their corresponding interaction energies by applying the elegant transformation texture model recently developed by Kundu and Bhadeshia. Encouraging correlation between model prediction and experimental data generation for martensite pole figures at many deformed austenite grains has been observed. It has been found that both the applied uniaxial cyclic stress and the accumulated plastic strain are having strong influence on crystallographic variant selection during cyclic plastic deformation. Patel and Cohen's classical theory can be utilized to predict the crystallographic variant selection, if it is correctly used along with the phenomenological theory of martensite crystallography.

  14. Structural analysis of emerging ferrite: Doped nickel zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajinder; Kumar, Hitanshu; Singh, Ragini Raj; Barman, P. B.

    2015-08-28

    Ni{sub 0.6-x}Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.033, 0.264) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method and annealed at 900°C. Structural properties of all prepared samples were examined with X-ray diffraction (XRD). The partial formation of hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) secondary phase with spinel phase cubic structure of undoped and cobalt doped nickel zinc ferrite was found by XRD peaks. The variation in crystallite size and other structural parameters with cobalt doping has been calculated for most prominent peak (113) of XRD and has been explained on the basis of cations ionic radii difference.

  15. Studies on oxidation and deuterium permeation behavior of a low temperature α-Al2O3-forming Fesbnd Crsbnd Al ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Zhao, Si-Xiang; Liu, Feng; Li, Xiao-Chun; Zhao, Ming-Zhong; Wang, Jing; Lu, Tao; Hong, Suk-Ho; Zhou, Hai-Shan; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the capability of Fesbnd Crsbnd Al ferritic steels as tritium permeation barrier in fusion systems, the oxidation behavior together with the permeation behavior of a Fesbnd Crsbnd Al steel was investigated. Gas driven permeation experiments were performed. The permeability of the oxidized Fesbnd Crsbnd Al steel was obtained and a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel CLF-1 was used as a comparison. In order to characterize the oxide layer, SEM, XPS, TEM, HRTEM were used. Al2O3 was detected in the oxide film by XPS, and HRTEM showed that Al2O3 in the α phase was found. The formation of α-Al2O3 layer at a relatively low temperature may result from the formation of Cr2O3 nuclei.

  16. Influence parameters of martensitic transformation during low cycle fatigue for steel AISI 321

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, M.; Kalkhof, D.; Keller, L.; Schell, N.

    2004-07-01

    The volume fraction of martensite continuously increases with the fatigue cycle number. Consequently, the martensite amount can be used for indication of the low cycle fatigue state. Following an exponential decay function, the martensite volume fraction decreases with increasing temperature. No influence of the load frequency was found. The initial material state plays an important role for the martensite formation rate. The amount of martensite formed is much higher after cold-rolling than after solution annealing as final manufacturing process. The martensite shows a fibre texture in the annealed material. The (1 1 0) planes are preferentially oriented parallel and perpendicular to the loading direction. In the cold-rolled material no significant preferred orientation of this phase was found. The martensite is concentrated in the centre of the specimens. The shape of the distribution seems to be independent on the martensite amount.

  17. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  18. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martenstic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, Lizhen; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-05-26

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ~500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimentalmore » results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. Furthermore, the strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9–20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.« less

  19. Response of reduced activation ferritic steels to high-fluence ion-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Ando, M.; Katoh, Y.; Hirose, T.; Sakasegawa, H.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kohyama, A.; Iwai, T.

    2001-09-01

    Effects of high-fluence irradiation in fusion-relevant helium production condition on defect cluster formation and swelling of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFs), JLF-1 (Fe-9Cr-2W-V-Ta) and F82H (Fe-8Cr-2W-V-Ta), have been investigated. Dual-ion (nickel plus helium ions) irradiation using electrostatic accelerators was adopted to simulate fusion neutron environment. The irradiation has been carried out up to a damage level of 100 displacement per atom (dpa) at around 723 K, at the HIT facility in the University of Tokyo. Thin foils for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were prepared with a focused ion beam (FIB) microsampling system. The system enabled not only the broad cross-sectional TEM observation, but also the detailed study of irradiated microstructure, since unfavorable effects of ferromagnetism of a ferritic steel specimen were completely suppressed with this system by sampling a small volume in interests from the irradiated material.

  20. Effects of Annealing Temperature on Microstructure and Tensile Properties in Ferritic Lightweight Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seung Youb; Shin, Sang Yong; Lee, Hyuk-Joong; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Nack J.; Kwak, Jai-Hyun

    2012-03-01

    An investigation was conducted into the effects of annealing temperature on microstructure and tensile properties of ferritic lightweight steels. Two steels were fabricated by varying the C content, and were annealed at 573 K to 1173 K (300 °C to 900 °C) for 1 hour. According to the microstructural analysis results, κ-carbides were formed at about 973 K (700 °C), which was confirmed by equilibrium phase diagrams calculated from a THERMO-CALC program. In the steel containing low carbon content, needle-shaped κ-carbides were homogeneously dispersed in the ferrite matrix, whereas bulky band-shaped martensites were distributed in the steel containing high carbon content. In the 973 K (700 °C)-annealed specimen of the steel containing high carbon content, deformation bands were formed throughout the specimen, while fine carbides were sufficiently deformed inside the deformation bands, thereby resulting in the greatest level of strength and ductility. These results indicated that the appropriate annealing treatment of steel containing high carbon content was useful for the improvement of both strength and ductility over steel containing low carbon content.

  1. Characterization of Solid State Phase Transformation in Continuously Heated and Cooled Ferritic Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, B; Mills, Michael J.; Specht, Eliot D; Santella, Michael L; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2010-12-01

    Arc welding processes involve cooling rates that vary over a wide range (1-100 K/s). The final microstructire is thus a product of the heating and cooling cycles experienced by the weld in addition to the weld composition. It has been shown that the first phase to form under weld cooling conditions may not be that predicted by equilibrium calculations. The partitioning of different interstitial/substitutional alloying elements at high temperatures can dramatically affect the subsequent phase transformations. In order to understand the effect of alloying on phase transformation temperatures and final microstructures time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique has been successfully used for characterization. The work by Jacot and Rappaz on pearlitic steels provided insight into austenitization of hypoeutectic steels using a finite volume model. However there is very little work done on the effect of heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation paths in bainitic/martensitic steels and weld metals. Previous work on a weld with higher aluminum content, deposited with a FCAW-S process indicated that even at aluminum levels where the primary phase to solidify from liquid should be delta ferrite, non-equilibrium austenite was observed. The presence of inhomogeneity in composition of the parent microstructure has been attributed to differences in transformation modes, temperatures and microstructures in dual-phase, TRIP steels and ferritic welds. The objectives of the work included the identification of the stability regions of different phases during heating and cooling, differences in the effect of weld heating and cooling rates on the phase transformation temperatures, and the variation in phase fractions of austenite and ferrite in the two phase regions as a function of temperature. The base composition used for the present work is a Fe-1%Al-2%Mn-1%Ni-0.04%C weld metal. A pseudo-binary phase diagram shows the expected solidification path under equilibrium

  2. Martensitic transformations in high-strength steels at aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovskaya, V. V.; Bannykh, O. A.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of heat treatment and elastic stresses on the texture of maraging NiTi-steels is studied. The interruption of the decomposition of martensite at the early stages is shown to be accompanied by the γ → α transformation, which proceeds upon cooling from the aging temperature and under elastic (σ < σ0.2) tensile stresses. The martensite has a crystallographic texture, which is caused by the evolution of hot-deformation texture as a result of quenching and decomposition of a supersaturated α solid solution.

  3. Influence of magnetic fields on structural martensitic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Lashley, J C; Cooley, J C; Smith, J L; Fisher, R A; Modic, K A; Yang, X- D; Riseborough, P S; Opeil, C P; Finlayson, T R; Goddard, P A; Silhanek, A V

    2009-01-01

    We show evidence that a structural martensitic transition is related to significant changes in the electronic structure, as revealed in thermodynamic measurements made in high-magnetic fields. The magnetic field dependence is considered unusual as many influential investigations of martensitic transitions have emphasized that the structural transitions are primarily lattice dynamical and are driven by the entropy due to the phonons. We provide a theoretical framework which can be used to describe the effect of magnetic field on the lattice dynamics in which the field dependence originates from the dielectric constant.

  4. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  5. Ferrite insertion at Recycler Flying Wire System

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-02-27

    Ferrite rods are installed inside the flying-wire cavity of the Recycler Ring and at entrance and exit beam pipes in order to absorb high-frequency electromagnetic waves excited by the beam. However, these rods may also deteriorate the vacuum pressure of the ring. An investigation is made to analyze the necessity of the ferrite rods at the entrance and exit beam pipes.

  6. Effects of microalloying on hot-rolled and cold-rolled Q&P steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo de Araujo, Ana Luiza

    Third generation advanced high strength steels (AHSS) have been a major focus in steel development over the last decade. The premise of these types of steel is based on the potential to obtain excellent combinations of strength and ductility with low-alloy compositions by forming mixed microstructures containing retained austenite (RA). The development of heat treatments able to achieve the desired structures and properties, such as quenching and partitioning (Q&P) steels, is driven by new requirements to increase vehicle fuel economy by reducing overall weight while maintaining safety and crashworthiness. Microalloying additions of niobium (Nb) and vanadium (V) in sheet products are known to provide strengthening via grain refinement and precipitation hardening and may influence RA volume fraction and transformation behavior. Additions of microalloying elements in Q&P steels have not been extensively studied to date, however. The objective of the present study was to begin to understand the potential roles of Nb and V in hot-rolled and cold-rolled Q&P steel. For that, a common Q&P steel composition was selected as a Base alloy with 0.2C-1.5Si-2.0Mn (wt. %). Two alloys with an addition of Nb (0.02 and 0.04 wt. %) and one with an addition of V (0.06 wt. %) to the Base alloy were investigated. Both hot-rolled and cold-rolled/annealed Q&P simulations were conducted. In the hot-rolled Q&P study, thermomechanical processing was simulated via hot torsion testing in a GleebleRTM 3500, and four coiling temperatures (CT) were chosen. Microstructural evaluation (including RA measurements via electron backscattered diffraction - EBSD) and hardness measurements were performed for all alloys and coiling conditions. The analysis showed that Nb additions led to overall refinement of the prior microstructure. Maximum RA fractions were measured at the 375 °C CT, and microalloying was associated with increased RA in this condition when compared to the Base alloy. A change in

  7. Development and application of ferrite materials for low temperature co-fired ceramic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huai-Wu; Li, Jie; Su, Hua; Zhou, Ting-Chuan; Long, Yang; Zheng, Zong-Liang

    2013-11-01

    Development and application of ferrite materials for low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology are discussed, specifically addressing several typical ferrite materials such as M-type barium ferrite, NiCuZn ferrite, YIG ferrite, and lithium ferrite. In order to permit co-firing with a silver internal electrode in LTCC process, the sintering temperature of ferrite materials should be less than 950 °C. These ferrite materials are research focuses and are applied in many ways in electronics.

  8. Determination of the non-recrystallization temperature (TNR) in multiple microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homsher, Caryn Nicole

    Rolling mill metallurgists must be able to easily and accurately determine critical temperatures such as the non-recrystallization temperature (T NR) to properly plan rolling schedules for desired properties. Microalloyed steels have small additions of alloying elements such as V, Ti, and Nb, to improve mechanical properties through grain size control and precipitation strengthening. The value of TNR is based on both alloying elements and deformation parameters. To easily predict TNR, equations have been developed and utilized in the literature and industry. However, each equation has certain limitations which constrain its applicability. This study was completed using ten laboratory grade low-carbon microalloyed steels designed to meet the API X-70 specification with varying amounts of V, Nb, and Ti. Double-hit deformation tests were conducted on a Gleeble® 3500 system in the standard pocket-jaw configuration at the Colorado School of Mines to determine experimental values of TNR. Double-hit deformation tests involve cylindrical specimens in an axisymmetric compression test. The test method requires six steps: 1) reheat to ensure most precipitates dissolve back into solution, 2) cool to deformation temperature, 3) compress with given strain and strain rate, 4) hold for interpass time, 5) deform specimen again holding everything else constant, and 6) measure the percent recrystallized or percent fractional softening. The TNR is the temperature where fractional softening is equal to 20 %. Niobium plays the largest role in influencing TNR. Complex niobium-vanadium-carbonitride precipitates are believed to play a significant role increasing TNR in the Hi-V alloy The experimental values of TNR were compared with predicted values of TNR from four equations in the literature. The Bai 2011 equation was the most reliable of the existing empirical formulas considered, while the commonly used Boratto equation was not accurate in predicting the TNR for the alloys in this

  9. Microstructure characterization of the non-modulated martensite in Ni-Mn-Ga alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, M. Bennett, J.C.; Gharghouri, M.A.; Chen, J.; Hyatt, C.V.; Mailman, N.

    2008-06-15

    The microstructure of the non-modulated martensite in a Ni-Mn-Ga alloy has been characterized in detail by conventional transmission electron microscopy. Bright field images show that the martensite exhibits an internal substructure consisting of a high density of narrow twins. Using electron diffraction, it is found that the martensite has a tetragonal crystal structure. The lattice correspondence between the parent phase and the non-modulated martensite is investigated. Furthermore, the four twinning elements describing the microtwinning have been graphically and quantitatively determined. The results indicate that the microtwinning within the non-modulated martensite belongs to the compound type.

  10. Martensitic transformation in Cu-doped NiMnGa magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan-Pan; Wang, Jing-Min; Jiang, Cheng-Bao

    2011-02-01

    This paper studies the martensitic transformation in the Cu-doped NiMnGa alloys. The orthorhombic martensite transforms to L21 cubic austenite by Cu substituting for Ni in the Ni50-xCuxMn31Ga19 (x=2-10) alloys, the martensitic transformation temperature decreases significantly with the rate of 40 K per Cu atom addition. The variation of the Fermi sphere radius (kF) is applied to evaluate the change of the martensitic transformation temperature. The increase of kF leads to the increase of the martensitic transformation temperature.

  11. Aspects of thermal martensite in a FeNiMnCo alloy.

    PubMed

    Güler, M; Güler, E; Kahveci, N

    2010-07-01

    Thermal martensite characteristics in Fe-29%Ni-2%Mn-2%Co alloy were investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Mössbauer spectroscopy characterization techniques. SEM observations obviously revealed the lath martensite morphology in the prior austenite phase of examined alloy. As well, the martensitic transformation kinetics was found to be as athermal type. On the other hand, Mössbauer spectroscopy offered the paramagnetic austenite phase and ferromagnetic martensite phase with their volume fractions. Also, the internal magnetic field of the martensite was measured as 32.9T from the Mössbauer spectrometer.

  12. Characteristics of the rough-cut surface of quenched and tempered martensitic stainless steel using wire electrical discharge machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. A.; Tu, G. C.; Yao, H. T.; Kuo, H. H.

    2004-04-01

    This article studies the surface characteristics of quench- and temper-treated AISI 440A martensitic stainless steels, which were rough cut using wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM). The microstructure of the recast layer on the cut surface was investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopes, and the phase compositions were analyzed with an energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometer. Experimental results showed that the thickness of the recast layer varied with the heat-treatment condition of the workpiece, the largest thickness was obtained with a quenched specimen, and the thickness decreased with increasing tempering temperature. Intergranular surface cracks were observed only from the as-quenched specimen, whereas surface cracks were not found in the rough-cut specimens after tempering above 200 °C. It is reckoned that reliefing of the thermal residual stress in the quenched workpiece induced the surface intergranular cracks. Microstructures of the recast layer on the rough-cut surfaces of the 600 °C tempered specimen were examined using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimens. An amorphous layer exists at some parts of the outermost cut surface. A high density of wire electrode droplets of spherical shape, approximately 10 to 60 nm in size, was found throughout the porous recast layer. Besides, many high-chromium containing sigma spheres with sizes of approximately 120 to 200 nm were precipitated at the bottom part of the recast layer, and its formation mechanism was proposed. Adjacent to the recast layer was a heat-affected zone (HAZ) with a thickness of about 4 µm, in which temper-induced carbides were fully dissolved. The HAZ comprised basically two distinct regions: the first region adjacent to the recast layer was composed of a lath martensite structure, while the other region was an annealed ferrite structure.

  13. Understanding of martensitic (TiCu)-based bulk metallic glasses through deformation behavior of a binary Ti{sub 50}Cu{sub 50} martensitic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K. B.; Song, K. A.; Zhang, X. F.; Yi, S.

    2008-06-16

    A binary Ti{sub 50}Cu{sub 50} martensitic alloy having similar atomic clusters to (TiCu)-based martensitic bulk metallic glasses presents a large plastic strain of 18.04% with high fracture strength of 1705 MPa. Detailed microstructural investigations point out that martensite embedded in {gamma}-TiCu matrix is effective to dissipate localization of the shear stress thus leading to rotational propagation, interaction, and multiplication of the shear bands. Furthermore, the propagation of microcracks formed by local stress transition during deformation is hindered by the martensite.

  14. Identification of epsilon martensite in a Fe-based shape memory alloy by means of EBSD.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, K; Van Caenegem, N; Raabe, D

    2009-01-01

    Ferrous shape memory alloys (SMAs) are often thought to become a new, important group of SMAs. The shape memory effect in these alloys is based on the reversible, stress-induced martensitic transformation of austenite to epsilon martensite. The identification and quantification of epsilon martensite is crucial when evaluating the shape memory behaviour of this material. Previous work displayed that promising results were obtained when studying the evolution of the amount of epsilon martensite after different processing steps with Electron BackScatter Diffraction (EBSD). The present work will discuss in detail, on the one hand, the challenges and opportunities arising during the identification of epsilon martensite by means of EBSD and, on the other hand, the possible interpretations that might be given to these findings. It will be illustrated that although the specific nature of the austenite to epsilon martensite transformation can still cause some points of discussion, EBSD has a high potential for identifying epsilon martensite.

  15. On the Mechanical Stability of Austenite Matrix After Martensite Formation in a Medium Mn Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B. B.; Huang, M. X.

    2016-07-01

    The present work employs the nanoindentation technique to investigate the effect of prior martensite formation on the mechanical stability of a retained austenite matrix. It is found that the small austenite grains that were surrounded by martensite laths have higher mechanical stability than the large austenite grains that were free of martensite laths. The higher mechanical stability of small austenite grains is due to its higher amount of defects resulting from the prior martensite formation. These defects act as barriers for the later martensite formation and therefore contribute to the higher mechanical stability of small austenite grains. As a result, the present work suggests that the formation of martensite tends to stabilize the surrounding austenite matrix. Therefore, it may explain the lower transformed amount of martensite after quenching as compared to the theoretical calculation using the Koistinen and Marburger (K-M) equation.

  16. Direct Observations of Austenite, Bainite and Martensite Formation During Arc Welding of 1045 Steel using Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T; Babu, S; Zhang, W; DebRoy, T

    2004-02-17

    In-situ Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) experiments were performed during stationary gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel. These synchrotron-based experiments tracked, in real time, phase transformations in the heat-affected zone of the weld under rapid heating and cooling conditions. The diffraction patterns were recorded at 100 ms intervals, and were later analyzed using diffraction peak profile analysis to determine the relative fraction of ferrite ({alpha}) and austenite ({gamma}) phases in each diffraction pattern. Lattice parameters and diffraction peak widths were also measured throughout the heating and cooling cycle of the weld, providing additional information about the phases that were formed. The experimental results were coupled with a thermofluid weld model to calculate the weld temperatures, allowing time-temperature transformation kinetics of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation to be evaluated. During heating, complete austenitization was observed in the heat affected zone of the weld and the kinetics of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation were modeled using a Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach. The results from the 1045 steel weld were compared to those of a 1005 low carbon steel from a previous study. Differences in austenitization rates of the two steels were attributed to differences in the base metal microstructures, particularly the relative amounts of pearlite and the extent of the allotriomorphic ferrite phase. During weld cooling, the austenite transformed to a mixture of bainite and martensite. In situ diffraction was able to distinguish between these two non-equilibrium phases based on differences in their lattice parameters and their transformation rates, resulting in the first real time x-ray diffraction observations of bainite and martensite formation made during welding.

  17. Microalloying Improves the Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Powder-Extruded NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    There is considerable interest in developing new structural materials in which high use temperatures and strength, coupled with low density, are the minimum requirements. The goal for these new materials is to provide operation well beyond the working range of conventional superalloys. Of the many intermetallics under consideration, NiAl is one of the few systems that has emerged as a promising candidate for further development. This is because of a number of property advantages--including low density, high melting temperature, high thermal conductivity, and excellent environmental resistance. However, binary NiAl lacks strength and creep resistance at elevated temperatures. Also, its poor high-temperature strength results in worse-than-predicted low-cycle fatigue (LCF) lives at low strain ranges at 727 C (1341 F) because of accelerated creep damage mechanisms that result in significant intergranular cracking. One approach for improving these properties involves microalloying NiAl with either Zr or N. As an integral part of this alloy-development program at the NASA Lewis Research Center, the low-cycle fatigue behavior of Zr- and N-doped nickel aluminides produced by extrusion of prealloyed powders was investigated and compared with similarly processed binary NiAl.

  18. Overcoming challenges in the study of nitrided microalloyed steels using atom probe.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kelvin Y; Breen, Andrew J; Yao, Lan; Moody, Michael P; Gault, Baptiste; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2012-01-01

    Nitrided steels are widely used in the engineering field due to their superior hardness and other attractive properties. Atom probe tomography (APT) was employed to study two Nb-microalloyed CASTRIP steels with different N contents. A major challenge of using APT to study this group of materials is the presence of tails after Fe peaks in the mass spectra, which overestimates the composition for alloying elements such as Nb and Cu in the steels. One important factor that contributes to the tails is believed to be delayed field evaporation from Fe²⁺. This artefact of the mass spectrum was observed to be the most severe when voltage pulsing was used. The application of laser pulses with energy ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 nJ successfully reduced the tails and lead to better compositional measurement accuracy. Spatial resolution in the z-direction (along the tip direction) was observed to be less affected by changing laser energy but deteriorates in x-y direction with increasing laser energy. This investigation suggests that pulsed-laser atom probe with ∼0.4 nJ laser energy can be used to study this group of materials with improved mass resolution while still maintaining high spatial resolution.

  19. Controlling the corrosion and cathodic activation of magnesium via microalloying additions of Ge

    PubMed Central

    Liu, R. L.; Hurley, M. F.; Kvryan, A.; Williams, G.; Scully, J. R.; Birbilis, N.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of corrosion morphology and kinetics for magnesium (Mg) have been demonstrated to be influenced by cathodic activation, which implies that the rate of the cathodic partial reaction is enhanced as a result of anodic dissolution. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated to be moderated by the use of arsenic (As) alloying as a poison for the cathodic reaction, leading to significantly improved corrosion resistance. The pursuit of alternatives to toxic As is important as a means to imparting a technologically safe and effective corrosion control method for Mg (and its alloys). In this work, Mg was microalloyed with germanium (Ge), with the aim of improving corrosion resistance by retarding cathodic activation. Based on a combined analysis herein, we report that Ge is potent in supressing the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (reduction of water) upon Mg, improving corrosion resistance. With the addition of Ge, cathodic activation of Mg subject to cyclic polarisation was also hindered, with beneficial implications for future Mg electrodes. PMID:27350286

  20. The mechanism of brittle fracture in a microalloyed steel: Part 2. Mechanistic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, D.P.; Howden, D.G.; Clark, W.A.T.

    2000-03-01

    In Part 1 of this study, cuboidally shaped inclusions were found to be responsible for cleavage initiation in a low-carbon, microalloyed steel. In Part 2, electron microdiffraction was used to identify these inclusions as the fcc phase (NaCl prototype) in the titanium-nitrogen system. A model for cleavage as induced by these inclusions is proposed. A microcrack begins on one side of the TiN inclusion, propagates to the other side, and then transfers into the matrix. Initiation at a particular location in the particle is believed to be caused by dislocation pileup impingement and stress concentrations such as crystal defects and surface irregularities within the TiN. Dislocations in the TiN inclusions were imaged by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After the TiN microcrack transfers into the matrix, propagation spreads radially. From the area of crack transfer, two simultaneous propagation paths reverse directions and rotate around the particle. The particle separates these cracks for a short distance, they travel on different cleavage planes, and upon rejoining, a ridge of torn matrix is created. The location of this ridge can be used to infer where cleavage began in the TiN and where the microcrack transferred into the matrix. Tessellated residual stresses arising from differential thermal contraction between the TiN and the matrix are suggested to increase the cleavage-initiating potency of TiN inclusions.

  1. Multi analysis of the effect of grain size on the dynamic behavior of microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Anna K; Muszka, K; Majta, J; Wielgus, M

    2009-01-01

    This study presents some aspects of multiscale analysis and modeling of variously structured materials behavior in quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. The investigation was performed for two different materials of common application: high strength microalloyed steel (HSLA, X65), and as a reference more ductile material, Ti-IF steel. The MaxStrain technique and one pass hot rolling processes were used to produce ultrafine-grained and coarse-grained materials. The efficiency and inhomogeneity of microstructure refinement were examined because of their important role in work hardening and the initiation and growth of fracture under tensile stresses. It is shown that the combination of microstructures characterized by their different features contributes to the dynamic behavior and final properties of the product. In particular, the role of solute segregation at grain boundaries as well as precipitation of carbonitrides in coarse and ultrafine-grained structures is assessed. The predicted mechanical response of ultrafine-grained structures, using modified KHL model is in reasonable agreement with the experiments. This is a result of proper representation of the role of dislocation structure and the grain boundary and their multiscale effects included in this model.

  2. Post-weld Tempered Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welded Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Manufacturing of hydroelectric turbine components involves the assembly of thick-walled stainless steels using conventional multi-pass arc welding processes. By contrast, hybrid laser-arc welding may be an attractive process for assembly of such materials to realize deeper penetration depths, higher production rates, narrower fusion, and heat-affected zones, and lower distortion. In the present work, single-pass hybrid laser-arc welding of 10-mm thick CA6NM, a low carbon martensitic stainless steel, was carried out in the butt joint configuration using a continuous wave fiber laser at its maximum power of 5.2 kW over welding speeds ranging from 0.75 to 1.2 m/minute. The microstructures across the weldment were characterized after post-weld tempering at 873 K (600 °C) for 1 hour. From microscopic examinations, the fusion zone was observed to mainly consist of tempered lath martensite and some residual delta-ferrite. The mechanical properties were evaluated in the post-weld tempered condition and correlated to the microstructures and defects. The ultimate tensile strength and Charpy impact energy values of the fully penetrated welds in the tempered condition were acceptable according to ASTM, ASME, and industrial specifications, which bodes well for the introduction of hybrid laser-arc welding technology for the manufacturing of next generation hydroelectric turbine components.

  3. Application of martensitic, modified martensitic and duplex stainless steel bar stock for completion equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bhavsar, R.B.; Montani, R.

    1998-12-31

    Martensitic and duplex stainless steel tubing are commonly used for oil and gas applications containing CO{sub 2}. Completion equipment manufacturing requires use of solid round bar or heavy wall hollows. Material properties for this stock are not identical in all cases. Material properties as well as corrosion characteristics are discussed for 13Cr, 13Cr-5Ni-2Mo and 25Cr alloys. Corrosion testing of modified or Enhanced 13Cr solid bar stock, UNS S41425 and other compositions in H{sub 2}S-Cl{sup {minus}} and pH is reported in coupled and uncoupled condition. Corrosion testing of various super duplex bar stock at various H{sub 2}S-chlorides and temperature in CO{sub 2} environment is reported. Impact value requirements, welding issues and special consideration required for these alloys for completion equipment is discussed. Modified 13Cr and Super Duplex Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) are readily available, however, availability of completion equipment raw material compatible with these OCTG is limited.

  4. Precipitation behavior of laves phase and its effect on toughness of 9Cr-2Mo Ferritic-martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, Y.; Wade, N.; Kunimitsu, S.; Urita, T.

    1986-11-01

    This study clarified the ralationship between the toughness of a 9Cr-2Mo dual phase steel and precipitates formed during aging, with special attention to the Laves phase (Fe 2Mo). The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) is increased and the upper shelf energy decreased when the Laves phase begins to precipitate during aging. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicate that elimination of Si in the steel reduces the precipitation of the Laves phase and results in maintaining good toughness. It is also noted that the toughness of the steel is controlled by the total amount of precipitates (Laves + carbides) in the aging at 873 K for more than 3.6 × 10 3 ks. A time-temperature-precipitation diagram for the Laves phase is established and it clearly shows that the precipitation of the Laves phase is markedly retarded by the decrease of Si content. In Si-free steel, no Laves phase is observed in the temperature and time range investigated.

  5. Irradiation response in weldment and HIP joint of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Takanori; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Ando, M.; Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K.; Stoller, Roger E; Odette, G.R.

    2013-11-01

    This work investigates irradiation response in the joints of F82H employed for a fusion breeding blanket. The joints, which were prepared using welding and diffusion welding, were irradiated up to 6 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Post-irradiation tests revealed hardening in weldment (WM) and base metal (BM) greater than 300 MPa. However, the heat affected zones (HAZ) exhibit about half that of WM and BM. Therefore, neutron irradiation decreased the strength of the HAZ, leaving it in danger of local deformation in this region. Further the hardening in WM made with an electron beam was larger than that in WM made with tungsten inert gas welding. However the mechanical properties of the diffusion-welded joint were very similar to those of BM even after the irradiation.

  6. R&D of ferritic-martensitic steel EP450 ODS for fuel pin claddings of prospective fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, A. A.; Ageev, V. S.; Chukanov, A. P.; Tsvelev, V. V.; Porezanov, N. P.; Kruglov, O. A.

    2012-09-01

    Present paper performs research results of structure and mechanical properties of the ODS steel on the base of steel EP450 (Fe-13Cr-2Mo-Nb-V-B-0,12C) on all stages of producing: from powders to thin-walled tubes. Also, the results of research on method of sealing thin-walled tubes from steel EP450 ODS by pressurized resistance welding are shown.

  7. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugavel, T.; Raj, S. Gokul; Rajarajan, G.; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods.

  8. Metallization of ferrite ceramic couplings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, J

    1992-06-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the optimum sputtering conditions for which the strongest metallization adherence could be achieved for the ferrite safing wheel assemblies. The conditions were varied through four separate test runs with a fifth verification run conducted using parameters selected from the first four runs. The parameters tested were the effects of etching, precleaning, chamber pressures, plating materials, plating thickness, soldering pressures, and cooling rates. The results increased the strength of the metallization to two pounds, well in excess of the required one pound minimum. It was also determined that the gold should be sputtered on and not thermally deposited, which caused cracking in the ferrite material.

  9. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  10. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch. Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  11. Intervention of martensite variants on the spatial aspect of microvoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arpan

    2016-06-01

    The spatial aspect of microvoids’ distribution at different strained austenite grains has been investigated through strain rate variation during tensile deformation of metastable austenitic stainless steel at ambient temperature. Ductile fracture micromechanisms of metastable austenite have been investigated through direct measurements of void density, its fraction and their distribution at various levels of stresses/strains for all strain rates. The nature of the distribution of microvoids’ fraction closely corresponds to the local stress-state and strain-state variation and hence is strongly attributed to the crystallographic variant selection of martensite and their spatial nature of distribution. The direct intervention of martensite variants has been looked into for influencing void nucleation, growth and coalescence under tensile deformation of austenitic stainless steel.

  12. An Investigation Into 6-Fold Symmetry in Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, Christopher; Pytlewski, Ken; Qi, Liang; Khachaturyan, Armen G.; Morris, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    Austenite grains that have undergone a martensitic transformation are typically composed of 24 variants that can be categorized by their Bain axis of transformation. There are 3 <001> axes for Bain transformations, therefore the (001) pole figure of a prior austenite grain displays 3-fold symmetry. However, we observed superficially similar prior austenite grains containing 6-fold symmetry in the (001) pole figure. This paper introduces evidence of this 6-fold symmetry and explores the crystallographic origins.

  13. New martensitic steels for fossil power plant: Creep resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaybyshev, R. O.; Skorobogatykh, V. N.; Shchenkova, I. A.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we consider the origin of high-temperature strength of heat-resistant steels belonging to martensitic class developed on the basis of the Fe—9%Cr alloy for the boiler pipes and steam pipelines of power plants at steam temperatures of up to 620°C and pressures to 300 atm. In addition, we give a brief information on the physical processes that determine the creep strength and consider the alloying philosophy of traditional heat-resistant steels. The effect of the chemical and phase composition of heat-resistant steels and their structure on creep strength is analyzed in detail. It is shown that the combination of the solid-solution alloying by elements such as W and Mo, as well as the introduction of carbides of the MX type into the matrix with the formation of a dislocation structure of tempered martensite, ensures a significant increase in creep resistance. The steels of the martensitic class withstand creep until an extensive polygonization starts in the dislocation structure of the tempered martensite(“troostomartensite”), which is suppressed by V(C,N) and Nb(C,N) dispersoids. Correspondingly, the service life of these steels is determined by the time during which the dispersed nanocarbonitrides withstand coalescence, while tungsten and molybdenum remain in the solid solution. The precipitation of the Laves phases Fe2(W,Mo) and the coalescence of carbides lead to the development of migration of low-angle boundaries, and the steel loses its ability to resist creep.

  14. Martensite transformation of epitaxial Ni-Ti films

    SciTech Connect

    Buschbeck, J.; Kozhanov, A.; Kawasaki, J. K.; James, R. D.; Palmstroem, C. J.

    2011-05-09

    The structure and phase transformations of thin Ni-Ti shape memory alloy films grown by molecular beam epitaxy are investigated for compositions from 43 to 56 at. % Ti. Despite the substrate constraint, temperature dependent x-ray diffraction and resistivity measurements reveal reversible, martensitic phase transformations. The results suggest that these occur by an in-plane shear which does not disturb the lattice coherence at interfaces.

  15. Boundaries for martensitic transition of 7Li under pressure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schaeffer, Anne Marie; Cai, Weizhao; Olejnik, Ella; Molaison, Jamie J.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; dos Santos, Antonio M.; Deemyad, Shanti

    2015-08-14

    We report that physical properties of lithium under extreme pressures continuously reveal unexpected features. These include a sequence of structural transitions to lower symmetry phases, metal-insulator-metal transition, superconductivity with one of the highest elemental transition temperatures, and a maximum followed by a minimum in its melting line. The instability of the bcc structure of lithium is well established by the presence of a temperature-driven martensitic phase transition. The boundaries of this phase, however, have not been previously explored above 3 GPa. All higher pressure phase boundaries are either extrapolations or inferred based on indirect evidence. Here we explore the pressuremore » dependence of the martensitic transition of lithium up to 7 GPa using a combination of neutron and X-ray scattering. We find a rather unexpected deviation from the extrapolated boundaries of the hR3 phase of lithium. Furthermore, there is evidence that, above ~3 GPa, once in fcc phase, lithium does not undergo a martensitic transition.« less

  16. Boundaries for martensitic transition of 7Li under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Anne Marie; Cai, Weizhao; Olejnik, Ella; Molaison, Jamie J.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; dos Santos, Antonio M.; Deemyad, Shanti

    2015-01-01

    Physical properties of lithium under extreme pressures continuously reveal unexpected features. These include a sequence of structural transitions to lower symmetry phases, metal-insulator-metal transition, superconductivity with one of the highest elemental transition temperatures, and a maximum followed by a minimum in its melting line. The instability of the bcc structure of lithium is well established by the presence of a temperature-driven martensitic phase transition. The boundaries of this phase, however, have not been previously explored above 3 GPa. All higher pressure phase boundaries are either extrapolations or inferred based on indirect evidence. Here we explore the pressure dependence of the martensitic transition of lithium up to 7 GPa using a combination of neutron and X-ray scattering. We find a rather unexpected deviation from the extrapolated boundaries of the hR3 phase of lithium. Furthermore, there is evidence that, above ∼3 GPa, once in fcc phase, lithium does not undergo a martensitic transition. PMID:26271453

  17. Rapid solidification effects in martensitic Cu-Zn-AI Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Jeff

    1982-08-01

    The effects of rapid solidification on martensitic transformations were studied in Cu-Zn-AI samples prepared by the method of melt-spinning, with an estimated cooling rate of about 106 K per second near the freezing point. A diffusionless solidification reaction L → β occurs, and a very fine-grained β structure is obtained, with highly structured grain boundaries. The average β grain diameter (˜5 µm) is about two orders of magnitude smaller than that obtained by conventional solid state solution and quench treatment. The β:β grain boundaries contain extraordinary features such as large steps, and the matrix dislocation density is abnormally high. The Ms temperature is depressed significantly in as-melt-spun ribbon material, but as the martensitic transformation is cycled, it shifts upward in temperature and obtains a more narrow hysteresis loop. The martensite has the usual 9R structure (ABCBCACAB stacking) found in bulk alloys, and while the morphology is similar to that in bulk alloys, it is finer in scale. It is suggested that the β → 9R transformation is affected through the combined influence of rapid solidification on parent β grain size, disorder, β:β grain boundary structure, internal stresses, and dislocation substructure. Shape memory behavior is qualitatively similar in the rapidly solidified alloys.

  18. Texture evolution during nitinol martensite detwinning and phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E.; Ren, Y.

    2013-12-09

    Nitinol has been widely used to make medical devices for years due to its unique shape memory and superelastic properties. However, the texture of the nitinol wires has been largely ignored due to inherent complexity. In this study, in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction has been carried out during uniaxial tensile testing to investigate the texture evolution of the nitinol wires during martensite detwinning, variant reorientation, and phase transformation. It was found that the thermal martensitic nitinol wire comprised primarily an axial (1{sup ¯}20), (120), and (102)-fiber texture. Detwinning initially converted the (120) and (102) fibers to the (1{sup ¯}20) fiber and progressed to a (1{sup ¯}30)-fiber texture by rigid body rotation. At strains above 10%, the (1{sup ¯}30)-fiber was shifted to the (110) fiber by (21{sup ¯}0) deformation twinning. The austenitic wire exhibited an axial (334)-fiber, which transformed to the near-(1{sup ¯}30) martensite texture after the stress-induced phase transformation.

  19. Hot Ductility Behavior of Boron Containing Microalloyed Steels with Varying Manganese Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Tobias; Senk, Dieter; Walpot, Raphael; Steenken, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    The hot ductility is measured for six different steel grades with different microalloying elements and with varying manganese contents using the hot tensile test machine with melting/solidification unit at the Department of Ferrous Metallurgy RWTH Aachen University. To identify the influence of manganese on hot ductility, tests are performed with varying the manganese content from 0.7 to 18.2 wt pct, a high manganese steel. Additionally, the effect of different cooling and strain rates is analyzed by changing the particular rate for selected samples in the minima. To investigate and detect the cause of cracking during testing, the fracture surfaces in the ductility minima are considered with scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thermodynamic modeling is conducted on basis of the commercial software ThermoCalc©. A sharp decrease of the hot ductility is recognizable at 1398 K (1125 °C), at only 0.7 wt pct manganese because of the low manganese to sulfur ratio. The grades with a Mn content up to 1.9 wt pct show a good ductility with minimal ductility loss. In comparison, the steel grade with 18.2 wt pct has a poor hot ductility. Because of the formation of complex precipitates, where several alloying elements are involved, the influence of boron on hot ductility is not fully clarified. By increasing the cooling rate, the reduction of area values are shifted to smaller values. For high test temperatures, these measured values are decreased for lower strain rates. Thereby, an early drop of the ductility is noticeable for the high temperatures around 1373 K (1100 °C).

  20. Atomic engineering of mixed ferrite and core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Shannon A; Cahill, Christopher L; Carpenter, Everett E; Calvin, Scott; Harris, Vincent G

    2005-09-01

    Nanoparticulate ferrites such as manganese zinc ferrite and nickel zinc ferrite hold great promise for advanced applications in power electronics. The use of these materials in current applications requires fine control over the nanoparticle size as well as size distribution to maximize their packing density. While there are several techniques for the synthesis of ferrite nanoparticles, reverse micelle techniques provide the greatest flexibility and control over size, crystallinity, and magnetic properties. Recipes for the synthesis of manganese zinc ferrite, nickel zinc ferrite, and an enhanced ferrite are presented along with analysis of the crystalline and magnetic properties. Comparisons are made on the quality of nanoparticles produced using different surfactant systems. The importance of various reaction conditions is explored with a discussion on the corresponding effects on the magnetic properties, particle morphology, stoichiometry, crystallinity, and phase purity.

  1. Thermodynamic studies on lithium ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Rakshit, S.K.; Parida, S.C.; Naik, Y.P.; Chaudhary, Ziley Singh; Venugopal, V.

    2011-05-15

    Thermodynamic studies on ternary oxides of Li-Fe-O systems were carried out using differential scanning calorimetry, Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry, and solid-state electrochemical technique based on fluoride electrolyte. Heat capacities of LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8}(s) and LiFeO{sub 2}(s) were determined in the temperature range 127-861 K using differential scanning calorimetry. Gibbs energies of formation of LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8}(s) and LiFeO{sub 2}(s) were determined using Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry and solid-state galvanic cell technique. The combined least squares fits can be represented as {Delta}{sub f}G{sub m}{sup o}(LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8},s,T)/kJ mol{sup -1} ({+-}6)=-2341+0.6764(T/K) (588{<=}T/K{<=}971) {Delta}{sub f}G{sub m}{sup o}(LiFeO{sub 2},s,T)/kJ mol{sup -1} ({+-}3)=-708+0.1656(T/K) (569{<=}T/K{<=}1021) The temperature independent term of the above equations represents {Delta}{sub f}H{sup o}{sub m}(T{sub av}) and temperature dependent term represents negative change in entropy of the respective compounds. Thermodynamic analysis shows that LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8}(s) is more stable compared to LiFeO{sub 2}(s). -- Graphical abstract: Comparison of {Delta}{sub f}G{sub m}{sup o}(T) of lithium ferrites determined using different techniques. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Thermodynamic studies on Li-Fe-O system using DSC, KEQMS and galvanic cell. {yields} Heat capacities of LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8}(s) and LiFeO{sub 2}(s) were determined using DSC 127-861 K. {yields} {Delta}{sub f}G{sup o}{sub m} of these compounds were determined and compared. {yields} Thermodynamic tables for LiFe{sub 5}O{sub 8}(s) and LiFeO{sub 2}(s) were constructed.

  2. Tantalum modified ferritic iron base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.; Blankenship, C. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Strong ferritic alloys of the Fe-CR-Al type containing 0.4% to 2% tantalum were developed. These alloys have improved fabricability without sacrificing high temperature strength and oxidation resistance in the 800 C (1475 F) to 1040 C (1900 F) range.

  3. Twinning and martensitic transformations in nickel-enriched 304 austenitic steel during tensile and indentation deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N; Busby, Jeremy T; Byun, Thak Sang; Parish, Chad M

    2013-01-01

    Twinning and martensitic transformation have been investigated in nickel-enriched AISI 304 stainless steel subjected to tensile and indentation deformation. Using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), the morphology of alpha- and epsilon-martensite and the effect of grain orientation to load axis on phase and structure transformations were analyzed in detail. It was found that the twinning occurred less frequently under indentation than under tension; also, twinning was not observed in [001] and [101] grains. In tensile tests, the martensite particles preferably formed at the deformation twins, intersections between twins, or at twin-grain boundary intersections. Conversely, martensite formation in the indentation tests was not closely associated with twinning; instead, the majority of martensite was concentrated in the dense colonies near grain boundaries. Martensitic transformation seemed to be obstructed in the [001] grains in both tensile and indentation test cases. Under a tensile stress of 800 MPa, both alpha- and epsilon-martensite were found in the microstructure, but at 1100 MPa only -martensite presented in the specimen. Under indentation, alpha- and epsilon-martensite were observed in the material regardless of stress level.

  4. Effect of boron on post irradiation tensile properties of reduced activation ferritic steel (F-82H) irradiated in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Suzuki, Masahide; Hishinuma, Akimichi; Pawel, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F-82H (Fe-8Cr-2W-V-Ta), was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses between 11 and 34 dpa at 400 and 500 C. Post irradiation tensile tests were performed at the nominal irradiation temperature in vacuum. Some specimens included {sup 10}B or natural boron (nB) to estimate the helium effect on tensile properties. Tensile properties including the 0.2% offset yield stress, the ultimate tensile strength, the uniform elongation and the total elongation were measured. The tensile properties were not dependent on helium content in specimens irradiated to 34 dpa, however {sup 10}B-doped specimens with the highest levels of helium showed slightly higher yield strength and less ductility than boron-free specimens. Strength appears to go through a peak, and ductility through a trough at about 11 dpa. The irradiation to more than 21 dpa reduced the strength and increased the elongation to the unirradiated levels. Ferritic steels are one of the candidate alloys for nuclear fusion reactors because of their good thermophysical properties, their superior swelling resistance, and the low corrosion rate in contact with potential breeder and coolant materials.

  5. Effects of Annealing Treatment Prior to Cold Rolling on Delayed Fracture Properties in Ferrite-Austenite Duplex Lightweight Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Seok Su; Song, Hyejin; Kim, Jung Gi; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-02-01

    Tensile properties of recently developed automotive high-strength steels containing about 10 wt pct of Mn and Al are superior to other conventional steels, but the active commercialization has been postponed because they are often subjected to cracking during formation or to the delayed fracture after formation. Here, the delayed fracture behavior of a ferrite-austenite duplex lightweight steel whose microstructure was modified by a batch annealing treatment at 1023 K (750 °C) prior to cold rolling was examined by HCl immersion tests of cup specimens, and was compared with that of an unmodified steel. After the batch annealing, band structures were almost decomposed as strong textures of {100}<011> α-fibers and {111}<112> γ-fibers were considerably dissolved, while ferrite grains were refined. The steel cup specimen having this modified microstructure was not cracked when immersed in an HCl solution for 18 days, whereas the specimen having unmodified microstructure underwent the delayed fracture within 1 day. This time delayed fracture was more critically affected by difference in deformation characteristics such as martensitic transformation and deformation inhomogeneity induced from concentration of residual stress or plastic strain, rather than the difference in initial microstructures. The present work gives a promise for automotive applications requiring excellent mechanical and delayed fracture properties as well as reduced specific weight.

  6. Process development for 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) with high fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hoelzer, David T.; Lee, Yong Bok; Kang, Suk Hoon; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-06-01

    This article is to summarize the process development and key characterization results for the newly-developed Fe-9Cr based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) with high fracture toughness. One of the major drawbacks from pursuing ultra-high strength in the past development of NFAs is poor fracture toughness at high temperatures although a high fracture toughness is essential to prevent cracking during manufacturing and to mitigate or delay irradiation-induced embrittlement in irradiation environments. A study on fracture mechanism using the NFA 14YWT found that the low-energy grain boundary decohesion in fracture process at a high temperature (>200 °C) resulted in low fracture toughness. Lately, efforts have been devoted to explore an integrated process to enhance grain bonding. Two base materials were produced through mechanical milling and hot extrusion and designated as 9YWTV-PM1 and 9YWTV-PM2. Isothermal annealing (IA) and controlled rolling (CR) treatments in two phase region were used to enhance diffusion across the interfaces and boundaries. The PM2 alloy after CR treatments showed high fracture toughness (KJQ) at represented temperatures: 240-280 MPa √m at room temperature and 160-220 MPa √m at 500 °C, which indicates that the goal of 100 MPa √m over possible nuclear application temperature range has been well achieved. Furthermore, it is also confirmed by comparison that the CR treatments on 9YWTV-PM2 result in high fracture toughness similar to or higher than those of the conventional ferritic-martensitic steels such as HT9 and NF616.

  7. Effect of thermomechanical processing on microstructure, texture, and anisotropy in two Nb microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarzadeh, Abbas

    The process parameters that affect the anisotropy of mechanical properties of two Nb microalloyed linepipe steels (grades X-70 and X-80) were examined by controlled rolling and accelerated cooling on a pilot mill. The rolling schedules were first simulated by multi-pass torsion testing so as to determine the critical temperatures, such as Tsbnr and Arsb3. Using the torsion test results, two finish rolling temperatures were chosen so as to be above and below the Asb3 (in the gamma + alpha region). Two reheat temperatures were selected to study the effect of prior austenite grain size. The properties of air cooled samples are compared with those of specimens cooled at two different rates; in each case, cooling was interrupted at one of three different temperatures. The textures were measured by x-ray diffractometry and are presented in the form of ODF plots and skeleton lines. The yield strengths were measured by carrying out tensile tests along directions inclined at increasing angles to the rolling direction. The state of the pancaked austenite before transformation was characterized in terms of the effective interfacial area. It is shown that this parameter determines the sharpness of the transformation texture because it accounts for both the amount of pancaking strain applied to the austenite before transformation and the austenite grain size. Another important factor affecting texture development during transformation is the rate of cooling, as it determines the dislocation density present on each active slip system. The results of hardness testing, texture measurement, and mechanical testing showed that a moderate cooling rate and a medium cooling interruption temperature lead to the best combination of a fine microstructure and a desirable texture. It is shown that accelerated cooling increases both the yield strength and the planar anisotropy of the yield strength, the latter property rising to a maximum in the samples associated with the lowest cooling

  8. Design of ferrite-tuned accelerator cavities using perpendicular-biased high-Q ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Kaspar, K.

    1984-11-01

    Microwave ferrites with dc bias fields perpendicular to the rf fields exhibit magnetic and dielectric quality factors 1 order of magnitude above that of ferrites used in ferrite-tuned synchrotron accelerating cavities built in the past. For the LAMPF II project, these ferrites appear to allow the design of synchrotron cavities with high gap voltages and high efficiency. A simple coaxial quarter-wave-resonator geometry, first considered only as a model for preliminary studies, turned out to be a good basis for the solution of most technical problems such as generation of the bias field, cooling of the ferrites, and installation of a generous high-voltage gap design. Two quarter-wave resonators combined to form one accelerating unit of about 2.5-m length and 0.6-m diameter should be capable of delivering 120 kV of accelerating voltage in the tuning range 50-60 MHz, up to 200 kV in the range 59-60 MHz. The main advantage of the given resonator design is its full rotational symmetry, which allows calculation and optimization of all electrical properties with maximum reliability.

  9. High temperature measurements of martensitic transformations using digital holography.

    PubMed

    Thiesing, Benjamin P; Mann, Christopher J; Dryepondt, Sebastien

    2013-07-01

    During thermal cycling of nickel-aluminum-platinum (NiAlPt) and single crystal iron-chromium-nickel (FeCrNi) alloys, the structural changes associated with the martensite to austenite phase transformation were measured using dual-wavelength digital holography. Real-time in situ measurements reveal the formation of striations within the NiAlPt alloy at 70°C and the FeCrNi alloy at 520°C. The results demonstrate that digital holography is an effective technique for acquiring noncontact, high precision information of the surface evolution of alloys at high temperatures.

  10. Physical metallurgy of BATMAN II Ti-bearing martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilloni, L.; Attura, F.; Calza-Bini, A.; De Santis, G.; Filacchioni, G.; Carosi, A.; Amato, S.

    1998-10-01

    Seven laboratory experimental casts of 7-9% Cr Ti-bearing martensitic steels were obtained via VIM process. Plates of 25 mm thickness were produced by hot rolling. On each cast CCT diagrams and critical temperatures were determined. Several austenitizing treatments were performed to study the grain size evolution. The effect of microstructure on impact properties were finally investigated. This paper discusses the role of chemical composition on microstructural and physical properties and shows the beneficial effect either of low-temperature austenitizing or double-austenitizing steps on impact properties.

  11. High Temperature Measurements Of Martensitic transformations Using Digital Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Thiesing, Benjamin; Mann, Christopher J; Dryepondt, Sebastien N

    2013-01-01

    During thermal cycling of nickel-aluminum-platinum (NiAlPt) and single crystal Fe-15Cr-15Ni alloys, the structural changes associated with the martensite to austenite phase transformation were measured using dual-wavelength digital holography. Real-time in-situ measurements reveal the formation of striations within the NiPtAl alloy at 70 C and the FeCrNi alloy at 520 C. The results demonstrate that digital holography is an effective technique for acquiring non-contact, high precision information of the surface evolution of alloys at high temperatures.

  12. High temperature measurements of martensitic transformations using digital holography.

    PubMed

    Thiesing, Benjamin P; Mann, Christopher J; Dryepondt, Sebastien

    2013-07-01

    During thermal cycling of nickel-aluminum-platinum (NiAlPt) and single crystal iron-chromium-nickel (FeCrNi) alloys, the structural changes associated with the martensite to austenite phase transformation were measured using dual-wavelength digital holography. Real-time in situ measurements reveal the formation of striations within the NiAlPt alloy at 70°C and the FeCrNi alloy at 520°C. The results demonstrate that digital holography is an effective technique for acquiring noncontact, high precision information of the surface evolution of alloys at high temperatures. PMID:23842235

  13. Ferritization treatment of copper in soil by electrokinetic remediation.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomoyuki; Takase, Ken-Ichi; Terui, Norifumi; Tanaka, Shunitz

    2007-05-17

    The usefulness of the combined use of the electrokinetic (EK) remediation and a ferrite treatment zone (FTZ) was demonstrated for a treatment of the contaminated soil with heavy metal ions. Copper ions in contaminated soil were transferred into the FTZ by the EK technology and were ferritized in this system. The distribution of copper in a migration chamber after EK treatment with FTZ for 48h showed the large difference in the total and eluted concentration of copper. This indicated that copper ions transferred by EK into the FTZ were ferritized there with ferrite reagent in soil alkalified by EK process. The copper-ferrite compound, which was not dissolved with diluted acid, was retained in the FTZ and accumulated there. The ratio of the ferritized amount of copper against total copper was 92% in the EK process with FTZ after 48 h. PMID:17374444

  14. The Formation of Crystal Defects in a Fe-Mn-Si Alloy Under Cyclic Martensitic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Bondar, Vladimir I; Danilchenko, Vitaliy E; Iakovlev, Viktor E

    2016-12-01

    Formation of crystalline defects due to cyclic martensitic transformations (CMT) in the iron-manganese Fe-18 wt.% Mn-2 wt.% Si alloy was investigated using X-ray diffractometry. Conditions for accumulation of fragment sub-boundaries with low-angle misorientations and chaotic stacking faults in crystal lattice of austenite and ε-martensite were analyzed.

  15. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1996-10-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ({sup Nat}Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to {approx}7 dpa at 300 and 400{degrees}C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400{degrees}C than at 300{degrees}C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and {sup Nat}Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400{degrees}C. At 300{degrees}C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400{degrees}C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

  16. Stability of the strengthening nanoprecipitates in reduced activation ferritic steels under Fe2+ ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-02-01

    The stability of MX-type precipitates is critical to retain mechanical properties of both reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) and conventional FM steels at elevated temperatures. Radiation resistance of TaC, TaN, and VN nanoprecipitates irradiated up to ∼49 dpa at 500 °C using Fe2+ is investigated in this work. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) utilized in standard and scanning mode (STEM) reveals the non-stoichiometric nature of the nanoprecipitates. Irradiation did not alter their crystalline nature. The radiation resistance of these precipitates, in an order of reduced resistance, is TaC, VN, and TaN. Particle dissolution, growth, and reprecipitation were the modes of irradiation-induced instability. Irradiation also facilitated formation of Fe2W type Laves phase limited to the VN and TaN bearing alloys. This result suggests that nitrogen level should be controlled to a minimal level in alloys to gain greater radiation resistance of the MX-type precipitates at similar temperatures as well as postpone the formation and subsequent coarsening of Laves phase.

  17. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  18. Substituted barium ferrites; sources of anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrish, A. H.; Zhou, X. Z.; Yang, Zheng; Zeng, Hua-Xian

    1994-12-01

    The substituted barium ferrites BaFe12-2 xCo x Sn x O19 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1.4) and BaFe1-2xCo x O19 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.9) have been studied. The site occupancies, as determined from Mössbauer spectra, have been used to interpret the changes in the magnetization and in the crystalline anisotropy.

  19. Non linear effects in ferrite tuned cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.; Walling, L.; Enegren, T.; Hulsey, G. ); Yakoviev, V.; Petrov, V. )

    1993-05-01

    The phenomenon of dependence of the resonance shape and frequency on the RF power level in perpendicular biased ferrite-tuned cavities has been observed by G. Hulsey and C. Friedrichs in the SSC test cavity experiment. This paper presents a theoretical as well as numerical analysis of this phenomenon and compares the results with experimental data. The effect of this nonlinearity on the SSC low energy booster prototype cavity is discussed.

  20. Surface Modification of Micro-Alloyed High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel by Controlled TIG Arcing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P. K.; Kumar, Ravindra

    2015-02-01

    Surface modification of micro-alloyed HSLA steel plate has been carried out by autogenous conventional and pulse current tungsten inert gas arcing (TIGA) processes at different welding parameters while the energy input was kept constant. At a given energy input the influence of pulse parameters on the characteristics of surface modification has been studied in case of employing single and multi-run procedure. The role of pulse parameters has been studied by considering their summarized influence defined by a factor Φ. The variation in Φ and pulse frequency has been found to significantly affect the thermal behavior of fusion and accordingly the width and penetration of the modified region along with its microstructure, hardness and wear characteristics. It is found that pulsed TIGA is relatively more advantageous over the conventional TIGA process, as it leads to higher hardness, improved wear resistance, and a better control over surface characteristics.

  1. A Thermodynamic-Based Model to Predict the Fraction of Martensite in Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyan, Fei; Hedström, Peter; Höglund, Lars; Borgenstam, Annika

    2016-09-01

    A thermodynamic-based model to predict the fraction of martensite in steels with undercooling has been developed. The model utilizes the thermodynamic driving force to describe the transformation curve and it is able to predict the fraction of athermal martensite at quenching to different temperatures for low alloy steels. The only model parameter is a linear function of the martensite start temperature ( M s), and the model predicts that a steel with a higher M s has a lower difference between the martensite start and finish temperatures. When the present model is combined with a previously developed thermodynamic-based model for M s, the model predictions of the full martensite transformation curve with undercooling are in close agreement with literature data.

  2. Morphology transition of deformation-induced lenticular martensite in Fe-Ni-C alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.M.; Li, D.F.; Xing, Z.S. . Inst. of Metal Research); Gautier, E.; Zhang, J.S.; Simon, A. . Lab. de Science et Genie des Materiaux Metalliques)

    1993-06-01

    The morphology and habit planes of deformation-induced lenticular martensite were investigated by optical and transmission electron microscopy in Fe-30Ni and Fe-30Ni-0.11C alloys. Transitions in morphology were observed with progressive deformation levels going from lenticular to butterfly martensite for the Fe-30Ni-0.11C alloy. The habit planes changed from (225)[sub f] or (259)[sub f] for the thermal lenticular martensite to (111)[sub f] for the strain-induced martensite. The morphology and crystallography of the small butterfly martensites was also investigated. A change in the orientation relationships from K-S to N-W relations was also observed. These changes were attributed to the contribution of mobile dislocations which modified the shear mode form twinning to slip, and to a plastic accommodation of transformation strains.

  3. Properties of ferrites important to their friction and wear behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental, chemical and crystallographical effects on the fundamental nature on friction and wear of the ferrites in contact with metals, magnetic tapes and themselves are reviewed. The removal of adsorbed films from the surfaces of ferrites results in very strong interfacial adhesion and high friction in ferrite to metal and ferrite to magnetic tape contacts. The metal ferrite bond at the interface is primarily a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the large oxygen anions in the ferrite surface, and the strength of these bonds is related to the oxygen to metal bond strength in the metal oxide. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. Not only under adhesive conditions, but also under abrasive conditions the friction and wear properties of ferrites are related to the crystallographic orientation. With ferrite to ferrite contact the mating of highest atomic density (most closely packed) direction on matched crystallographic planes, that is, 110 directions on /110/planes, results in the lowest coefficient of friction.

  4. Tunable Dielectric Properties of Ferrite-Dielectric Based Metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Bi, K.; Huang, K.; Zeng, L. Y.; Zhou, M. H.; Wang, Q. M.; Wang, Y. G.; Lei, M.

    2015-01-01

    A ferrite-dielectric metamaterial composed of dielectric and ferrite cuboids has been investigated by experiments and simulations. By interacting with the electromagnetic wave, the Mie resonance can take place in the dielectric cuboids and the ferromagnetic precession will appear in the ferrite cuboids. The magnetic field distributions show the electric Mie resonance of the dielectric cuboids can be influenced by the ferromagnetic precession of ferrite cuboids when a certain magnetic field is applied. The effective permittivity of the metamaterial can be tuned by modifying the applied magnetic field. A good agreement between experimental and simulated results is demonstrated, which confirms that these metamaterials can be used for tunable microwave devices. PMID:25993433

  5. Nanosized copper ferrite materials: Mechanochemical synthesis and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Manova, Elina; Tsoncheva, Tanya; Paneva, Daniela; Popova, Margarita; Velinov, Nikolay; Kunev, Boris; Tenchev, Krassimir; Mitov, Ivan

    2011-05-15

    Nanodimensional powders of cubic copper ferrite are synthesized by two-steps procedure of co-precipitation of copper and iron hydroxide carbonates, followed by mechanochemical treatment. X-ray powder diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy and temperature-programmed reduction are used for the characterization of the obtained materials. Their catalytic behavior is tested in methanol decomposition to hydrogen and CO and total oxidation of toluene. Formation of nanosized ferrite material is registered even after one hour of milling time. It is established that the prolonging of treatment procedure decreases the dispersion of the obtained product with the appearance of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. It is demonstrated that the catalytic behavior of the samples depends not only on their initial phase composition, but on the concomitant ferrite phase transformations by the influence of the reaction medium. -- Graphical abstract: It is demonstrated that the catalytic behavior of the obtained copper ferrites depends not only on their initial phase composition, but on the concomitant phase transformations by the influence of the reaction medium. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Two-step co-precipitation-ball-milling procedure for copper ferrites preparation. {yields} The phase composition of ferrites depends on the milling duration. {yields} Ferrites transforms under the reaction medium, which affects their catalytic behavior. {yields} Ferrites decompose to magnetite and carbides during methanol decomposition. {yields} Agglomeration and further crystallization of ferrite occur during toluene oxidation.

  6. Ferrite microwave electronics Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-07-01

    Research reports on single crystals, thin films, dielectrics, semiconductor devices, integrated circuits, phase shifters, and waveguide components are cited. Studies on the microwave properties of ferrites are included.

  7. Massive strontium ferrite ingestion without acute toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kirrane, Barbara M; Nelson, Lewis S; Hoffman, Robert S

    2006-11-01

    Ingestion of strontium ferrite is previously unreported. We document absorption of strontium without acute toxicity. A 22 year-old schizophrenic man was brought to hospital after he was witnessed to pulverize and ingest flexible adhesive magnets, which later were identified as strontium ferrite. Other than auditory hallucinations his vital signs, physical examination, ECG and routine laboratories were unremarkable. Abdominal radiographs revealed diffuse radiopaque material. He was treated with whole bowel irrigation with polyethylene glycol electrolyte lavage solution (PEG-ELS) until radiographically cleared. His initial blood and urine strontium levels were 2900 microg/l and 15,000 microg/l, respectively (reference range for urine: <240 microg/l, occupational threshold 800 microg/l). A repeat urine level one week later was 370 microg/l. His hospital course was complicated by bacteraemia secondary to a thrombophlebitis at the site of the intravenous catheter, and the patient was treated with intravenous and oral antibiotics. He remained otherwise asymptomatic and was discharged to a psychiatric unit approximately 3 weeks later. Although clearly absorbed, strontium ferrite does not appear to produce acute toxicity. Delayed, and or chronic toxicity cannot be excluded based on this report.

  8. Preferential spin canting in nanosize zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Brajesh; Litterst, F. J.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E. M.

    2015-07-01

    Zinc ferrite nanoparticles powder with average size of 10.0±0.5 nm was synthesized by the citrate precursor route. We studied the structural and magnetic properties using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the synthesized zinc ferrite possesses good spinel structure. Both Mössbauer and magnetization data indicate superparamagnetic ferrimagnetic particles at room temperature. The magnetic behavior is determined by a considerable degree of cation inversion with FeIII in tetrahedral A-sites. Mössbauer spectroscopy at low temperature and in high applied magnetic field reveals that A-site spins are aligned antiparallel to the applied field with some possible angular scatter whereas practically all octahedral B-site spins are canted contrasting some earlier reported partial B-site spin canting in nanosize zinc ferrite. Deviations from the antiferromagnetic arrangement of B-site spins are supposed to be caused by magnetic frustration effects.

  9. Ferritic steel melt and FLiBe/steel experiment : melting ferritic steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Smith, Brandon M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan

    2004-11-01

    In preparation for developing a Z-pinch IFE power plant, the interaction of ferritic steel with the coolant, FLiBe, must be explored. Sandia National Laboratories Fusion Technology Department was asked to drop molten ferritic steel and FLiBe in a vacuum system and determine the gas byproducts and ability to recycle the steel. We tried various methods of resistive heating of ferritic steel using available power supplies and easily obtained heaters. Although we could melt the steel, we could not cause a drop to fall. This report describes the various experiments that were performed and includes some suggestions and materials needed to be successful. Although the steel was easily melted, it was not possible to drip the molten steel into a FLiBe pool Levitation melting of the drop is likely to be more successful.

  10. Constitutive Modeling of High-Temperature Flow Behavior of an Nb Micro-alloyed Hot Stamping Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiqi; Feng, Ding; Huang, Yunhua; Wei, Shizhong; Mohrbacher, Hardy; Zhang, Yue

    2016-03-01

    The thermal deformation behavior and constitutive models of an Nb micro-alloyed 22MnB5 steel were investigated by conducting isothermal uniaxial tensile tests at the temperature range of 873-1223 K with strain rates of 0.1-10 s-1. The results indicated that the investigated steel showed typical work hardening and dynamic recovery behavior during hot deformation, and the flow stress decreased with a decrease in strain rate and/or an increase in temperature. On the basis of the experimental data, the modified Johnson-Cook (modified JC), modified Norton-Hoff (modified NH), and Arrhenius-type (AT) constitutive models were established for the subject steel. However, the flow stress values predicted by these three models revealed some remarkable deviations from the experimental values for certain experimental conditions. Therefore, a new combined modified Norton-Hoff and Arrhenius-type constitutive model (combined modified NH-AT model), which accurately reflected both the work hardening and dynamic recovery behavior of the subject steel, was developed by introducing the modified parameter k ɛ. Furthermore, the accuracy of these constitutive models was assessed by the correlation coefficient, the average absolute relative error, and the root mean square error, which indicated that the flow stress values computed by the combined modified NH-AT model were highly consistent with the experimental values (R = 0.998, AARE = 1.63%, RMSE = 3.85 MPa). The result confirmed that the combined modified NH-AT model was suitable for the studied Nb micro-alloyed hot stamping steel. Additionally, the practicability of the new model was also verified using finite element simulations in ANSYS/LS-DYNA, and the results confirmed that the new model was practical and highly accurate.

  11. High resistance to helium embrittlement in reduced activation martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, A.; Kasada, R.; Morishita, K.; Sugano, R.; Hasegawa, A.; Abe, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Matsui, H.; Yoshida, N.; Wirth, B. D.; Rubia, T. D.

    2002-12-01

    Reduced activation martensitic steels (RAMSs) are the prime candidate structural material for the DEMO reactor and beyond where the material has been considered to suffer severe embrittlement caused by high-dose neutron irradiation and several thousands appm of transmutated helium. However, recent several works show high resistance to helium embrittlement of RAMS. Good performance of RAMS in the presence of rather high concentration of helium is considered to be due to high trapping capacity for helium atoms in the martensitic structure that consists of dislocations, lath boundaries, grain boundaries and carbide/matrix interfaces. To make clear the role of dislocations in trapping helium, thermal helium desorption spectra were measured for iron specimens annealed at different temperatures after cold work. A desorption peak, which increased its height with increasing dislocation density, was observed at around 550 °C, suggesting that dislocations trap helium atoms. A molecular dynamics simulation study for investigating the helium trapping behavior at helium-vacancy complexes suggests that helium is rather strongly bound to the complexes and increases the binding energy of vacancy to the complex, resulting in increasing stability of the complexes at elevated temperatures by reducing thermal emission of vacancies.

  12. Process for making a martensitic steel alloy fuel cladding product

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gerald D.; Lobsinger, Ralph J.; Hamilton, Margaret L.; Gelles, David S.

    1990-01-01

    This is a very narrowly defined martensitic steel alloy fuel cladding material for liquid metal cooled reactors, and a process for making such a martensitic steel alloy material. The alloy contains about 10.6 wt. % chromium, about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, about 0.85 wt. % manganese, about 0.2 wt. % niobium, about 0.37 wt. % silicon, about 0.2 wt. % carbon, about 0.2 wt. % vanadium, 0.05 maximum wt. % nickel, about 0.015 wt. % nitrogen, about 0.015 wt. % sulfur, about 0.05 wt. % copper, about 0.007 wt. % boron, about 0.007 wt. % phosphorous, and with the remainder being essentially iron. The process utilizes preparing such an alloy and homogenizing said alloy at about 1000.degree. C. for 16 hours; annealing said homogenized alloy at 1150.degree. C. for 15 minutes; and tempering said annealed alloy at 700.degree. C. for 2 hours. The material exhibits good high temperature strength (especially long stress rupture life) at elevated temperature (500.degree.-760.degree. C.).

  13. Effect of γ→α Phase Transformation on Refining Austenite Grains of Microalloyed Steel in Continuous Casting by Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiang; Wen, Guanghua; Li, Yunfeng; Tang, Ping; Luo, Linqing

    2016-08-01

    The formation of coarse prior austenite grain is a key factor to promote transverse crack, and the transverse crack susceptibility can be reduced by refining the austenite grain size. In the present study, the high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) was used to simulate and study the effect of two γ→α phase transformation conditions on the refinement of the prior austenite grains. Under the condition of the uniform distribution of the second phase precipitation, the effect of the distribution of the proeutectoid ferrite at different cooling rates and refinement of prior austenite grain were investigated. The results indicate that, at a cooling rate of 5.0°C s-1, the austenite grain size undergoing TH1 thermal cycle was 31% smaller than the austenite grain undergoing TH0 thermal cycle. Under TH0 cooling system, the proeutectoid ferrite was uniformly distributed in the austenite matrix; under TH1 cooling, the proeutectoid ferrite precipitated and mainly concentrated along the austenite grain boundaries to form developed-film-like ferrite, which is favorable to break the prior austenite grain boundaries. After the first phase transformation, the film-like ferrite improved the nucleation conditions of new austenite grains, thus more new austenite grains splitted the prior austenite grains, ultimately refining the prior austenite grains.

  14. Analysis of the effects of microalloying on glass formation in aluminum-yttrium-iron alloys by fluctuation electron microscopy and other techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondi, Karyn Spence

    Metallic glasses offer enhanced properties in processing and wear over their crystalline counterparts. Aluminum-based metallic glasses are further desired for their high strength-to-weight ratio and low cost. It has been observed that additions of very small amounts of additional elements to the base aluminum-based alloys can dramatically improve glass formability. Here, the effects of microalloying on glass formation and stability are systematically investigated by substituting 0.5 atomic percent of all 3-d transition metals for Al in Al88Y7Fe5 alloys. X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, differential thermal analysis, and transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrate enhanced glassy characteristics and stability in the microalloys. Further collaborative investigations using high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction, extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis, and atom probe tomography reveal enhanced short- and medium-range order as well as a suppression of phase separation upon microalloying. A novel investigation method, fluctuation electron microscopy, was employed to quantify the extent of medium range order in the alloys by statistical analysis of microdiffraction patterns. Significant enhancements were made to the methodological protocol for this new technique, allowing for greatly enhanced experimental reproducibility.

  15. Effects of combined silicon and molybdenum alloying on the size and evolution of microalloy precipitates in HSLA steels containing niobium and titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlina, Erik J.; Van Tyne, C.J.; Speer, J.G.

    2015-04-15

    The effects of combined silicon and molybdenum alloying additions on microalloy precipitate formation in austenite after single- and double-step deformations below the austenite no-recrystallization temperature were examined in high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels microalloyed with titanium and niobium. The precipitation sequence in austenite was evaluated following an interrupted thermomechanical processing simulation using transmission electron microscopy. Large (~ 105 nm), cuboidal titanium-rich nitride precipitates showed no evolution in size during reheating and simulated thermomechanical processing. The average size and size distribution of these precipitates were also not affected by the combined silicon and molybdenum additions or by deformation. Relatively fine (< 20 nm), irregular-shaped niobium-rich carbonitride precipitates formed in austenite during isothermal holding at 1173 K. Based upon analysis that incorporated precipitate growth and coarsening models, the combined silicon and molybdenum additions were considered to increase the diffusivity of niobium in austenite by over 30% and result in coarser precipitates at 1173 K compared to the lower alloyed steel. Deformation decreased the size of the niobium-rich carbonitride precipitates that formed in austenite. - Highlights: • We examine combined Si and Mo additions on microalloy precipitation in austenite. • Precipitate size tends to decrease with increasing deformation steps. • Combined Si and Mo alloying additions increase the diffusivity of Nb in austenite.

  16. A phase-field model for incoherent martensitic transformations including plastic accommodation processes in the austenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundin, J.; Raabe, D.; Emmerich, H.

    2011-10-01

    If alloys undergo an incoherent martensitic transformation, then plastic accommodation and relaxation accompany the transformation. To capture these mechanisms we develop an improved 3D microelastic-plastic phase-field model. It is based on the classical concepts of phase-field modeling of microelastic problems (Chen, L.Q., Wang Y., Khachaturyan, A.G., 1992. Philos. Mag. Lett. 65, 15-23). In addition to these it takes into account the incoherent formation of accommodation dislocations in the austenitic matrix, as well as their inheritance into the martensitic plates based on the crystallography of the martensitic transformation. We apply this new phase-field approach to the butterfly-type martensitic transformation in a Fe-30 wt%Ni alloy in direct comparison to recent experimental data (Sato, H., Zaefferer, S., 2009. Acta Mater. 57, 1931-1937). It is shown that the therein proposed mechanisms of plastic accommodation during the transformation can indeed explain the experimentally observed morphology of the martensitic plates as well as the orientation between martensitic plates and the austenitic matrix. The developed phase-field model constitutes a general simulations approach for different kinds of phase transformation phenomena that inherently include dislocation based accommodation processes. The approach does not only predict the final equilibrium topology, misfit, size, crystallography, and aspect ratio of martensite-austenite ensembles resulting from a transformation, but it also resolves the associated dislocation dynamics and the distribution, and the size of the crystals itself.

  17. Modeling non-saturated ferrite-based devices: Application to twin toroid ferrite phase shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gouellec, A.; Vérissimo, G.; Laur, V.; Queffelec, P.; Albert, I.; Girard, T.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes a new set of tools developed to improve the conception and modeling of non-saturated ferrite-based devices such as twin toroid phase shifters. These new simulation tools benefit from a generalized permeability tensor model able to describe the permeability tensor of a ferrite sample whatever its magnetization state. This model is coupled to a homemade 3D multi-scale magnetostatic analysis program, which describes the evolution of the magnetization through the definition of a hysteresis loop in every mesh cell. These computed spectra are then integrated into 3D electromagnetic simulation software that retains the spatial variations of the ferrite properties by using freshly developed macro programming functions. This new approach allows the designers to accurately model complex ferrite devices such as twin toroid phase shifters. In particular, we demonstrated a good agreement between simulated and measured phase shifts as a function of applied current values with a predicted maximum phase shift of 0.96 times the measured value.

  18. Intragranular ferrite nucleation in medium-carbon vanadium steels

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Fusao; Takahashi, Toshihiko ); Ochi, Tatsurou . Muroran R D Lab.)

    1994-05-01

    In this study, the mechanism of intragranular ferrite nucleation is investigated. It is found that intragranular ferrite idiomorphs'' nucleate at vanadium nitrides which precipitate at manganese sulfide particles during cooling in the austenite region. It is observed that intragranular ferrite has the Baker-Nutting orientation relationship with vanadium nitride which precipitated at manganese sulfide. According to classical nucleation theory, the proeutectoid ferrite nucleation rate depends on the following factors: (1) the driving free energy for ferrite nucleation, (2) the diffusivity of carbon atoms in austenite, and (3) the increase in the interfacial energy associated with ferrite nucleation. In the Baker-Nutting orientation relationship, the lattice mismatch across the habit planes is likely to be very small. Depleted zones of solute atoms such as vanadium are assumed to be formed in the austenite matrix around precipitates. The effect of the depleted zones on factors (1) and (2) is estimated thermodynamically and it is proved that those effects are negligibly small. Thus, the authors conclude that the most important factor in nucleation kinetics of intragranular ferrite is the formation of precipitates which can develop coherent, low energy interfaces with ferrite.

  19. Adsorption of oxygen and 1-butene on magnesium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Samuilova, O.K.; Kozlova, M.M.; Yagodovskii, V.D.

    1986-08-01

    The kinetics of the adsorption of oxygen and 1-butene on magnesium ferrite was studied. Conductometry and thermal desorption methods were used to investigate the adsorption of oxygen on magnesium ferrite. Two forms of adsorbed oxygen were found. The formation of these forms affects the kinetics of the adsorption of 1-butene.

  20. Direct evidence for stress-induced transformation between coexisting multiple martensites in a Ni-Mn-Ga multifunctional alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Cong, D. Y.; Wang, Z. L.; Nie, Z. H.; Dong, Y. H.; Zhang, Y.; Ren, Yang; Wang, Y. D.

    2015-07-08

    The structural response of coexisting multiple martensites to stress field in a Ni-Mn-Ga multifunctional alloy was investigated by the in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction technique. Stress-induced transformation between coexisting multiple martensites was observed at 110 K, at which five-layered modulated (5M), seven-layered modulated (7M) and non-modulated (NM) martensites coexist. We found that a tiny stress of as low as 0.5 MPa could trigger the transformation from 5M and 7M martensites to NM martensite and this transformation is partly reversible. Besides the transformation between coexisting multiple martensites, rearrangement of martensite variants also occurs during loading, at least at high stress levels. The present study is instructive for designing advanced multifunctional alloys with easy actuation.

  1. Direct evidence for stress-induced transformation between coexisting multiple martensites in a Ni-Mn-Ga multifunctional alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Cong, D. Y.; Wang, Z. L.; Nie, Z. H.; Dong, Y. H.; Zhang, Y.; Ren, Yang; Wang, Y. D.

    2015-06-03

    The structural response of coexisting multiple martensites to stress field in a Ni-Mn-Ga multifunctional alloy was investigated by the in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction technique. Stress-induced transformation between coexisting multiple martensites was observed at 110 K, at which five-layered modulated (5M), seven-layered modulated (7M) and non-modulated (NM) martensites coexist. We found that a tiny stress of as low as 0.5 MPa could trigger the transformation from 5M and 7M martensites to NM martensite and this transformation is partly reversible. Besides the transformation between coexisting multiple martensites, rearrangement of martensite variants also occurs during loading, at least at high stress levels. The present study is instructive for designing advanced multifunctional alloys with easy actuation.

  2. Electrical transport behavior of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, S.; Sinha, M.; Meikap, A.K.; Pradhan, S.K.

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents the direct current conductivity, alternate current conductivity and dielectric properties of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite below room temperature. The frequency exponent (s) of conductivity shows an anomalous temperature dependency. The magnitude of the temperature exponent (n) of dielectric permittivity strongly depends on frequency and its value decreases with increasing frequency. The grain boundary contribution is dominating over the grain contribution in conduction process and the temperature dependence of resistance due to grain and grain boundary contribution exhibits two activation regions. The ferrite shows positive alternating current magnetoconductivity. The solid state processing technique was used for the preparation of nanocrystalline ferrite powder from oxides of magnesium, zinc and iron. The X-ray diffraction methods were used in determining the structure and composition of obtained ferrite, while multimeter, impedance analyzer, liquid nitrogen cryostat and electromagnet were used in the study of conducting and dielectric properties of ferrite.

  3. Large-strain cyclic response and martensitic transformation of austenitic stainless steel at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamasaki, H.; Nakano, T.; Ishimaru, E.; Yoshida, F.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic tension-compression tests were carried out for austenitic stainless steel (SUS304) at elevated temperatures. The significant Bauschinger effect was found in the obtained stress-strain curve. In addition, stagnation of deformation induced martensitic transformation was observed just after stress reversal until the equivalent stress reached the maximum value in the course of experiment. The constitutive model for SUS304 at room temperature was developed, in which homogenized stress of SUS304 was expressed by the weighed summation of stresses of austenite and martensite phases. The calculated stress-strain curves and predicted martensite volume fraction were well correlated with those experimental results.

  4. Structure and mechanical properties of hot-deformed low-carbon martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, I. D.; Shatsov, A. A.; Zakirova, M. G.; Berezin, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    The structural changes in low-carbon martensitic 15Kh2G2NMFBA steel induced by its hot forging in the temperature range 1150-850°C have been studied. The calculated cracking resistance parameter I c is in agreement with its experimental value. A relation is found between the lath sizes in the martensite structure and the change in the impact toughness characteristics. A combined regime of hot deformation and hot treatment of the low-carbon martensitic steel is proposed to form submicrometer-sized structural elements and high strength and impact toughness characteristics.

  5. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  6. Heavy hydrogen isotopes penetration through austenitic and martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinski, Yu.; Lyasota, I.; Shestakov, A.; Repritsev, Yu.; Zouev, Yu.

    2000-12-01

    Experimental results are presented of deuterium and tritium permeability through samples of nickel, austenitic steel (16Cr-15Ni-3Mo-Ti), and martensitic steel DIN 1.4914 (MANET) exposed to a gaseous phase. Experiments were carried out at the RFNC-VNHTF installation, which has the capability of measuring the permeability of hydrogen isotopes by mass spectrometry over a temperature range of 293-1000 K, hydrogen isotope pressure ranges of 50-1000 Pa. Sample disks (30 and 40 mm diam.) can be assembled in the test chamber by electron-beam welding or mounted (30-mm diam. disks) on gaskets. Diffusion and permeability dependencies on temperature and pressure are determined and corresponding activation energies are presented.

  7. Cyclic wear behavior (fretting) of a tempered martensite steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaul, D. J.; Duquette, D. J.

    1980-09-01

    Cyclic wear experiments were conducted on a 4130 steel with a tempered martensitic structure in laboratory air and in flowing argon. Temperatures of the sliding interfaces were measured and were of the order of + 10 K above the ambient. The interface temperatures were observed to be cyclic and correlated with maxima in sliding velocities between the surfaces. Microhardness measurements and optical and electron metallographic observations of fretted surfaces indicated selective surface hardening and the formation of large numbers of thin metallic flakes. The thickness of the flakes corresponded to the thickness of the hardened layer and were formed from subsurface crack initiation processes. The results of this investigation do not support many previously proposed models for fretting damage. Rather a micromechanical cracking model is proposed which appears to explain observed results in terms of a delamination model.

  8. Soft ferrite cores characterization for integrated micro-inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Yen Mai; Bourrier, David; Charlot, Samuel; Valdez-Nava, Zarel; Bley, Vincent; Combettes, Céline; Lopez, Thomas; Laur, Jean-Pierre; Brunet, Magali

    2014-10-01

    Low-profile soft ferrite films constitute a competitive solution for the integration of micro-inductors on silicon in low-power medium frequency dc-dc conversion applications. The high resistivity of soft ferrites is indeed a major advantage for operating frequencies in the range of 5‒10 MHz. We have studied several soft ferrites, including commercial ferrite films and ferrites made in-house. Test inductors were fabricated at a wafer level using micro-machining and assembling techniques. The proposed process is based on a sintered ferrite core placed between thick electroplated copper windings. The low-profile ferrite cores of 1.2  ×  2.6  ×  0.1 mm3 were produced by two methods using green tape-cast films or ferrite powders. This article presents the magnetic characterization of the fabricated ferrite cores, cut and printed in a rectangular shape and sintered at different temperatures. Comparisons are made in order to find the best material for the core that can offer micro-inductors a high inductance in the range of 200-1000 nH at 6 MHz, and that generate the smallest losses. Thanks to a test inductor, it is demonstrated that with a commercial ferrite core, an inductance density of 215 nH mm-2 up to 6 MHz could be reached. Extracted losses at 6 MHz, under 10 mT are in the range of 0.7 to 2.5 W cm-3.

  9. Corrosion behavior of magnetic ferrite coating prepared by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Wei, Shicheng Tong, Hui; Tian, Haoliang; Liu, Ming; Xu, Binshi

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g while the M{sub s} value of the ferrite powder is 71.916 emu/g. It can be seen that plasma spray process causes deterioration of the room temperature soft magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Spinel ferrite coatings have been prepared by plasma spraying. • The coating consists of nanocrystalline grains. • The saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g. • Corrosion behavior of the ferrite coating was examined in NaCl solution. - Abstract: In this study, spray dried spinel ferrite powders were deposited on the surface of mild steel substrate through plasma spraying. The structure and morphological studies on the ferrite coatings were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. It was showed that spray dried process was an effective method to prepare thermal spraying powders. The coating showed spinel structure with a second phase of LaFeO{sub 3}. The magnetic property of the ferrite samples were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating was 34.417 emu/g. The corrosion behavior of coating samples was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. EIS diagrams showed three corrosion processes as the coating immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results suggested that plasma spraying was a promising technology for the production of magnetic ferrite coatings.

  10. Microstructural origin of the skeletal ferrite morphology of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-04-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy was conducted on welds exhibiting a variety of skeletal, or vermicular ferrite morphologies in addition to one lathy ferrite morphology. These ferrite morphologies result from primary ferrite solidification followed by a solid state transformation upon cooling. During cooling, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite leaving a variety of ferrite morphologies. Comparison of composition profiles and alloy partitioning showed both the skeletal and lathy ferrite structures result from a diffusion controlled solid state transformation. However, the overall measured composition profiles of the weld structure are a result of partitioning during both solidification and the subsequent solid state transformation.

  11. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  12. Phase transformation of strontium hexagonal ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilovol, V.; Martínez-García, R.

    2015-11-01

    The phase transformation of strontium hexagonal ferrite (SrFe12O19) to magnetite (Fe3O4) as main phase and strontium carbonate (SrCO3) as secondary phase is reported here. SrFe12O19 powder was obtained by a heat treatment at 250 °C under controlled oxygen flow. It was observed that the phase transformation occurred when the SrFe12O19 ferrite was heated up to 625 °C in confinement conditions. This transformation took place by a combination of three factors: the presence of stresses in the crystal lattice of SrFe12O19 due to a low synthesis temperature, the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ during the heating up to 625 °C, and the similarity of the coordination spheres of the iron atoms present in the S-block of SrFe12O19 and Fe3O4. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the existence of strain and crystal deformation in SrFe12O19 and the absence of them in the material after the phase transformation. Dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Fe57 Mössbauer spectroscopy provided evidences of the reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ in the SrFe12O19 crystal.

  13. R-curve behavior in ferrite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, E.K.; Monroe, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    The unusual dependence of the fracture mode of ferrite ceramics on the stress intensity factor in the subcritical crack growth regime was used to create flaws with different concentrations of crack-interface bridges. Flaws with numerous bridges were produced by indenting under dry silicone oil, while flaws with essentially no bridges were produced by indenting under water. Plots of log failure stress as a function of log indenter load for the two types of flaws reflect the differences in bridging. Those with extensive bridging showed pronounced R-curve behavior. The curve for those initially devoid of bridges showed no plateau but did show deviations from a {minus}1/3 slope that correspond to those predicted by Bennison and Lawn for this type of flaw. The ferrite studies was 62.4 Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} 26.6 MnO, 11.2nO, and .04 V{sub 2}O{sub 5}. 10 figs.

  14. Temperature-dependent magnetostriction as the key factor for martensite reorientation in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L’vov, Victor A.; Kosogor, Anna

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic field application leads to spatially inhomogeneous magnetostriction of twinned ferromagnetic martensite. When the increasing field and magnetostrictive strain reach certain threshold values, the motion of twin boundaries and magnetically induced reorientation (MIR) of twinned martensite start. The MIR leads to giant magnetically induced deformation of twinned martensite. In the present article, the threshold field (TF) and temperature range of observability of MIR were calculated for the Ni–Mn–Ga martensite assuming that the threshold strain (TS) is temperature-independent. The calculations show that if the TS is of the order of 10‑4, the TF strongly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed only above the limiting temperature (~220 K). If the TS is of the order of 10‑6, the TF weakly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed at extremely low temperatures. The obtained theoretical results are in agreement with available experimental data.

  15. Stabilization of Fe-C Martensitic Phase by Low-Temperature Ageing

    SciTech Connect

    Dabrowski, L.; Winek, T.; Neov, S.

    2007-04-23

    Martensite containing 0.87 wt.% carbon was aged at liquid nitrogen temperature during 30 days. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that ageing does not lead to the phase transition {alpha} {yields} {kappa} up to 800 K.

  16. A Shear Strain Route Dependency of Martensite Formation in 316L Stainless Steel.

    PubMed

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu; Jang, Jinsung; Oh, Kyu Hwan

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the effect of simple shearing on microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of 316L austenitic stainless steel were investigated. Two different shear strain routes were obtained by twisting cylindrical specimens in the forward and backward directions. The strain-induced martensite phase was effectively obtained by alteration of the routes. Formation of the martensite phase clearly resulted in significant hardening of the steel. Grain-size reduction and strain-induced martensitic transformation within the deformed structures of the strained specimens were characterized by scanning electron microscopy - electron back-scattered diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and the TEM-ASTAR (transmission electron microscopy - analytical scanning transmission atomic resolution, automatic crystal orientation/phase mapping for TEM) system. Significant numbers of twin networks were formed by alteration of the shear strain routes, and the martensite phases were nucleated at the twin interfaces.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of the martensitic phase transformation in NiAl alloys.

    PubMed

    Pun, G P Purja; Mishin, Y

    2010-10-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations with an embedded-atom interatomic potential, we study the effect of chemical composition and uniaxial mechanical stresses on the martensitic phase transformation in Ni-rich NiAl alloys. The martensitic phase has a tetragonal crystal structure and can contain multiple twins arranged in domains and plates. The transformation is reversible and is characterized by a significant temperature hysteresis. The magnitude of the hysteresis depends on the chemical composition and stress. We show that applied compressive and tensile stresses reduce and can even eliminate the hysteresis. Crystalline defects such as free surfaces, dislocations and anti-phase boundaries reduce the martensitic transformation temperature and affect the microstructure of the martensite. Their effect can be explained by heterogeneous nucleation of the new phase in defected regions.

  18. Temperature-dependent magnetostriction as the key factor for martensite reorientation in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'vov, Victor A.; Kosogor, Anna

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic field application leads to spatially inhomogeneous magnetostriction of twinned ferromagnetic martensite. When the increasing field and magnetostrictive strain reach certain threshold values, the motion of twin boundaries and magnetically induced reorientation (MIR) of twinned martensite start. The MIR leads to giant magnetically induced deformation of twinned martensite. In the present article, the threshold field (TF) and temperature range of observability of MIR were calculated for the Ni-Mn-Ga martensite assuming that the threshold strain (TS) is temperature-independent. The calculations show that if the TS is of the order of 10-4, the TF strongly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed only above the limiting temperature (~220 K). If the TS is of the order of 10-6, the TF weakly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed at extremely low temperatures. The obtained theoretical results are in agreement with available experimental data.

  19. Effect of Quenching Process on the Microstructure and Hardness of High-Carbon Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qin-tian; Li, Jing; Shi, Cheng-bin; Yu, Wen-tao

    2015-11-01

    The microstructure and hardness of high-carbon martensitic stainless steel (HMSS) were investigated using thermal expansion analyzer, Thermo-calc, scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction, and Ultra-high temperature confocal microscope. The results indicate that the experimental steel should be austenitized in the temperature range of 1025-1075 °C, which can give a maximum hardness of 62 HRc with the microstructure consisting of martensite, retained austenite, and some undissolved carbides. With increasing austenitizing temperature, the amount of retained austenite increases, while the volume fraction of carbides increases first and then decreases. The starting temperature and finish temperature of martensite formation decrease with increasing cooling rates. Air-quenched samples can obtain less retained austenite, more compact microstructure, and higher hardness, compared with that of oil-quenched samples. For HMSS, the martensitic transformation takes place at some isolated areas with a slow nucleation rate.

  20. Strain-induced martensitic transformation in type 321 austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridlova, M.; Hyspecka, L.; Wenger, F.; Ponthiaux, P.; Galland, J.; Kubecka, P.

    2003-10-01

    Strain-induced martensitic transformation in AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel was studied by means of compression, tension and friction tests at room temperature. Compression and tensile tests were done in air and friction tests were realised by using a pin-on-disk apparatus in deionised water. The strain-induced volume fraction of α'-martensite determined by X-ray diffraction analysis was correlated with different imposed pressures and tensile strams. It seems evident that strain induced α'- martensite increases as a function of the normal force and the number of rotations after friction tests; however, the role of sliding rate was negligible. The results were completed by values of friction coefficients. The strain-induced martensite formation is subject to hardening mechanism, which may contribute to cumulative damage of pin-on-disk friction specimens.

  1. Enhancing Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance of Lath Martensite by Introducing Nano-Films of Interlath Austenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meimei; Tasan, C. Cem; Koyama, Motomichi; Ponge, Dirk; Raabe, Dierk

    2015-09-01

    Partial reversion of interlath austenite nano-films is investigated as a potential remedy for hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of martensitic steels. We conducted uniaxial tensile tests on hydrogen-free and pre-charged medium-Mn transformation-induced plasticity-maraging steels with different austenite film thicknesses. Mechanisms of crack propagation and microstructure interaction are quantitatively analyzed using electron channelling contrast imaging and electron backscatter diffraction, revealing a promising strategy to utilize austenite reversion for hydrogen-resistant martensitic steel design.

  2. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON STRAIN-INDUCED MARTENSITE FORMATION IN TYPE 304L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Ps Lam, P

    2008-12-11

    Unstable austenitic stainless steels undergo a strain-induced martensite transformation. The effect of hydrogen on this transformation is not well understood. Some researchers believe that hydrogen makes the transformation to martensite more difficult because hydrogen is an austenite stabilizer. Others believe that hydrogen has little or no effect at all on the transformation and claim that the transformation is simply a function of strain and temperature. Still other researchers believe that hydrogen should increase the ability of the metal to transform due to hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and slip planarity. While the role of hydrogen on the martensite transformation is still debated, it has been experimentally verified that this transformation does occur in hydrogen-charged materials. What is the effect of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen embrittlement? Martensite near crack-tips or other highly strained regions could provide much higher hydrogen diffusivity and allow for quicker hydrogen concentration. Martensite may be more intrinsically brittle than austenite and has been shown to be severely embrittled by hydrogen. However, it does not appear to be a necessary condition for embrittlement since Type 21-6-9 stainless steel is more stable than Type 304L stainless steel but susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. In this study, the effect of hydrogen on strain-induced martensite formation in Type 304L stainless steel was investigated by monitoring the formation of martensite during tensile tests of as-received and hydrogen-charged samples and metallographically examining specimens from interrupted tensile tests after increasing levels of strain. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture mechanisms was also studied by examining the fracture features of as-received and hydrogen-charged specimens and relating them to the stress-strain behavior.

  3. Martensite Transformation and Magnetic Properties of Ni-Fe-Ga Heusler Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Hrusikesh; Phanikumar, Gandham

    2015-11-01

    Compositional instability and phase formation in Ni-Fe-Ga Heusler alloys are investigated. The alloys are synthesized into two-phase microstructure. Their structures are identified as fcc and L 21, respectively. The γ-phase formation could be suppressed with higher Ga-content in the alloy as Ga stabilizes austenite phase, but Ga lowers the martensite transformation temperature. The increase of Fe content improves the magnetization value and the increase of Ni from 52 to 55 at. pct raises the martensite transformation temperature from 216 K to 357 K (-57 °C to 84 °C). Magnetic properties and martensitic transformation behavior in Ni-Fe-Ga Heusler alloys follow opposite trends, while Ni replaces either Fe or Ga, whereas they follow similar trends, while Fe replaces Ga. Modulated martensite structure has low twinning stress and high magneto crystalline anisotropic properties. Thus, the observation of 10- and 14 M-modulated martensite structures in the studied Ni-Fe-Ga Heusler alloys is beneficial for shape memory applications. The interdependency of alloy composition, phase formation, magnetic properties, and martensite transformation are discussed.

  4. Size effects in martensitic microstructures: Finite-strain phase field model versus sharp-interface approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tůma, K.; Stupkiewicz, S.; Petryk, H.

    2016-10-01

    A finite-strain phase field model for martensitic phase transformation and twinning in shape memory alloys is developed and confronted with the corresponding sharp-interface approach extended to interfacial energy effects. The model is set in the energy framework so that the kinetic equations and conditions of mechanical equilibrium are fully defined by specifying the free energy and dissipation potentials. The free energy density involves the bulk and interfacial energy contributions, the latter describing the energy of diffuse interfaces in a manner typical for phase-field approaches. To ensure volume preservation during martensite reorientation at finite deformation within a diffuse interface, it is proposed to apply linear mixing of the logarithmic transformation strains. The physically different nature of phase interfaces and twin boundaries in the martensitic phase is reflected by introducing two order-parameters in a hierarchical manner, one as the reference volume fraction of austenite, and thus of the whole martensite, and the second as the volume fraction of one variant of martensite in the martensitic phase only. The microstructure evolution problem is given a variational formulation in terms of incremental fields of displacement and order parameters, with unilateral constraints on volume fractions explicitly enforced by applying the augmented Lagrangian method. As an application, size-dependent microstructures with diffuse interfaces are calculated for the cubic-to-orthorhombic transformation in a CuAlNi shape memory alloy and compared with the sharp-interface microstructures with interfacial energy effects.

  5. Nanoscale Twinning and Martensitic Transformation in Shock-Deformed BCC Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L L

    2005-03-22

    Shock-induced twinning and martensitic transformation in BCC-based polycrystalline metals (Ta and U-6wt%Nb) have been observed and studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The length-scale of domain thickness for both twin lamella and martensite phase is found to be smaller than 100 nm. While deformation twinning of {l_brace}112{r_brace}<111>-type is found in Ta when shock-deformed at 15 GPa, both twinning and martensitic transformation are found in Ta when shock-deformed at 45 GPa. Similar phenomena of nanoscale twinning and martensitic transformation are also found in U6Nb shock-deformed at 30 GPa. Since both deformation twinning and martensitic transformation occurred along the {l_brace}211{r_brace}{sub b} planes associated with high resolved shear stresses, it is suggested that both can be regarded as alternative paths for shear transformations to occur in shock-deformed BCC metals. Heterogeneous nucleation mechanisms for shock-induced twinning and martensitic transformation are proposed and discussed.

  6. Fast ferrite tuner for the BNL synchrotron light source

    SciTech Connect

    Pivit, E. ); Hanna, S.M.; Keane, J. )

    1991-01-01

    A new type of ferrite tuner has been tested at the BNL. The ferrite tuner uses garnet slabs partially filling a stripline. One of the important features of the tuner is that the ferrite is perpendicularly biased for operation above FMR, thus reducing the magnetic losses. A unique design was adopted to achieve the efficient cooling. The principle of operation of the tuner as well as our preliminary results on tuning a 52 MHz cavity are reported. Optimized conditions under which we demonstrated linear tunability of 80 KHz are described. The tuner's losses and its effect on higher-order modes in the cavity are discussed. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Effect of aging temperature on the microstructures and mechanical properties of ZG12Cr9Mo1Co1NiVNbNB ferritic heat-resistant steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue; Sun, Lan; Xiong, Ji; Zhou, Ping; Fan, Hong-yuan; Liu, Jian-yong

    2016-02-01

    The effect of aging on the mechanical properties and microstructures of a new ZG12Cr9Mo1Co1NiVNbNB ferritic heat resistant steel was investigated in this work to satisfy the high steam parameters of the ultra-supercritical power plant. The results show that the main precipitates during aging are Fe(Cr, Mo)23C6, V(Nb)C, and (Fe2Mo) Laves in the steel. The amounts of the precipitated phases increase during aging, and correspondingly, the morphologies of phases are similar to be round. Fe(Cr, Mo)23C6 appears along boundaries and grows with increasing temperature. In addition, it is revealed that the martensitic laths are coarsened and eventually happen to be polygonization. The hardness and strength decrease gradually, whereas the plasticity of the steel increases. What's more, the hardness of this steel after creep is similar to that of other 9%-12%Cr ferritic steels. Thus, ZG12Cr9Mo1Co1NiVNbNB can be used in the project.

  8. Crystallographic texture and the preferential orientation of a martensite in the polycrystalline Ni2.08Mn0.96Ga0.96 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musabirov, I. I.; Mulyukov, R. R.; Koledov, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    A study of the relationship of the crystallographic texture, the preferential orientation of martensite twins and the geometry changes during the martensite transformation of polycrystalline NiMnGa alloy is shown. Two states of alloy are investigated: as-cast state and the state after annealing at 923 K for 5 hours. It is shown that in the initial state the austenite phase has crystallographic axial texture <001>, while martensite has the two-component texture of the <001> and <110>. The preferential orientation of the martensitic twins in the martensitic structure is found. The crystallographic texture of the alloy after annealing is not changed, however, no preferential orientation of the martensitic twins is observed. In the martensitic phase structure martensitic twins are oriented randomly. Anisotropy of the thermal expansion during the martensitic transformation is shown, while in the annealed state such effect is not found.

  9. Synergistic effects on dislocation loops in reduced-activation martensitic steel investigated by single and sequential hydrogen/helium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiping; Luo, Fengfeng; Yu, Yanxia; Zheng, Zhongcheng; Shen, Zhenyu; Guo, Liping; Ren, Yaoyao; Suo, Jinping

    2016-10-01

    Single-beam and sequential-beam irradiations were performed to investigate the H/He synergistic effect on dislocation loops in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels. The irradiations were carried out with 10 keV H+, 18 keV He+ and 160 keV Ar+, alone and in combination at 723 K. He+ single-beam irradiation induced much larger dislocation loops than that induced by both H+ and Ar+ single-beam irradiation. H+ post-irradiation after He+ irradiation further increased the size of dislocation loops, whilst He+ post-irradiation or Ar+ post-irradiation following H+ irradiation only slightly increased the size of dislocation loops. The experiment results indicate that pre-implanted H+ can drastically inhibit the growth while post-implanted H+ can significantly enhance the growth of dislocation loops induced by He+ irradiation. The mechanisms behind the complex synergistic phenomena between H and He and the different roles that H and He played in the growth of dislocation loops are discussed.

  10. Magnetooptical and crystalline properties of sputtered garnet ferrite film on spinel ferrite buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Akinori; Sasaki, Ai-ichiro; Morimura, Hiroki; Kagami, Osamu; Tanabe, Takaya

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide garnet films for volumetric magnetic holography. Volumetric magnetic holography usually employs an easily obtainable short-wavelength laser (visible light, not infrared light) with a large diffraction intensity. Bi-substituted garnet ferrite with a large Faraday rotation is promising for volumetric magnetic holography applications in the visible light region. However, a garnet film without a deteriorated layer must be obtained because a deteriorated layer (minute polycrystalline grains containing an amorphous phase) is formed during the initial deposition on a glass substrate. In particular, the required magnetooptical properties have not been obtained in a thin garnet film (100 nm or less) after annealing (1 h, 700 °C, oxygen atmosphere). Therefore, there is a need for excellent garnet films with the required magnetooptical (MO) properties even if the films are thin. By using a spinel ferrite buffer layer for garnet film deposition, we could obtain a thin garnet film with excellent MO properties. We determined the effect of the initial buffer layer on the crystallinity of the deposited garnet films by observing the film cross section. In addition, we undertook a qualitative estimation of the influence of the crystallinity and optical properties of the garnet film on a glass substrate with a spinel ferrite buffer layer.

  11. High-temperature Tensile Properties and Creep Life Assessment of 25Cr35NiNb Micro-alloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, Amitava; Robi, P. S.

    2016-05-01

    Reformer tubes in petrochemical industries are exposed to high temperatures and gas pressure for prolonged period. Exposure of these tubes at severe operating conditions results in change in the microstructure and degradation of mechanical properties which may lead to premature failure. The present work highlights the high-temperature tensile properties and remaining creep life prediction using Larson-Miller parametric technique of service exposed 25Cr35NiNb micro-alloyed reformer tube. Young's modulus, yield strength, and ultimate tensile strength of the steel are lower than the virgin material and decreases with the increase in temperature. Ductility continuously increases with the increase in temperature up to 1000 °C. Strain hardening exponent increases up to 600 °C, beyond which it starts decreasing. The tensile properties are discussed with reference to microstructure and fractographs. Based on Larson-Miller technique, a creep life of at least 8.3 years is predicted for the service exposed material at 800 °C and 5 MPa.

  12. Comparison of Extensive Thermal Cycling Effects on Microstructure Development in Micro-alloyed Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver E.; Boesenberg, Adam; Harringa, Joel; Riegner, David; Steinmetz, Andrew; Hillman, David

    2011-09-28

    Pb-free solder alloys based on the Sn-Ag-Cu (SAC) ternary eutectic have promise for widespread adoption across assembly conditions and operating environments, but enhanced microstructural control is needed. Micro-alloying with elements such as Zn was demonstrated for promoting a preferred solidification path and joint microstructure earlier in simple (Cu/Cu) solder joints studies for different cooling rates. This beneficial behavior now has been verified in reworked ball grid array (BGA) joints, using dissimilar SAC305 (Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu, wt.%) solder paste. After industrial assembly, BGA components joined with Sn-3.5Ag-0.74Cu-0.21Zn solder were tested in thermal cycling (-55 C/+125 C) along with baseline SAC305 BGA joints beyond 3000 cycles with continuous failure monitoring. Weibull analysis of the results demonstrated that BGA components joined with SAC + Zn/SAC305 have less joint integrity than SAC305 joints, but their lifetime is sufficient for severe applications in consumer, defense, and avionics electronic product field environments. Failure analysis of the BGA joints revealed that cracking did not deviate from the typical top area (BGA component side) of each joint, in spite of different Ag3Sn blade content. Thus, SAC + Zn solder has not shown any advantage over SAC305 solder in these thermal cycling trials, but other characteristics of SAC + Zn solder may make it more attractive for use across the full range of harsh conditions of avionics or defense applications.

  13. The influence of ageing on martensite ordering and stabilization in shape memory Cu-Al-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Aydogdu, A.; Aydogdu, Y.; Adiguzel, O.

    1997-05-01

    The martensitic transformation and the associated mechanical shape reversibility in copper-based shape memory alloys is strongly influenced by quenching and ageing treatments. Ageing of martensite in as-quenched Cu-Al-Ni alloys can result in loss of memory behavior. Structural studies have been carried out to measure the changes in the degree of order that develop during martensitic ageing of two Cu-Al-Ni alloys. Stabilization is directly related to disordering in martensitic state and the spacing differences ({Delta}d) between selected pairs of diffraction planes reflect the degree of ordering in martensite. The changes in degree of order are shown to be similar in as-quenched and post-quenched {beta}-phase annealed alloys, thereby leading to the conclusion that loss of memory in as-quenched alloys is not solely attributable to any extra changes in degree of order brought about by excess vacancies during martensitic ageing.

  14. Characterization of Irradiated Nanostructured Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, James; Hoelzer, David T; Tanigawa, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, George R.

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of a new class of mechanically alloyed (MA) ferritic steels with outstanding mechanical properties that come, at least in part, from the presence of high concentrations (>10{sup 23} m{sup -3}) of Ti-, Y-, and O-enriched nanoclusters (NC). From the outset, there has been much interest in their potential use for applications to fission and proposed fusion reactors, not only because of their attractive high-temperature strength, but also because the presence of NC may result in a highly radiation-resistant material by efficiently trapping point defects to enhance recombination. Of special interest for fusion applications is the potential of NC to trap transmutation-produced He in high concentrations of small cavities, rather than in fewer but larger cavities that lead to greater radiation-induced swelling and other degraded properties.

  15. High strength ferritic alloy-D53

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic alloy is described having from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight nickel, from about 2.5% to about 3.6% by weight chromium, from about 2.5% to about 3.5% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight vanadium, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight silicon, from about 0.1% to about 0.6% by weight manganese, from about 0.12% to about 0.20% by weight carbon, from about 0.02% to about 0.1% by weight boron, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, and the balance iron.

  16. Transport in Manganese-Zinc Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, David J.; Gupta, M.; Gupta, R.

    2002-03-01

    Density functional studies of the electronic and magnetic structure of the spinel ferrites ZnFe_2O4 and MnFe_2O4 are reported. Correct magnetic orderings are obtained. ZnFe_2O4 is predicted to be a small gap insulator in agreement with experiment. MnFe_2O4 is found to be a low carrier density half-metal in the fully ordered state. However, strong effects on the band structure near the band edges are found upon partial interchange of Fe and Mn atoms. These are above the criterion for disorder induced localization. This indicates that the insulating character may well be due to Anderson localization associated with the intersite Mn-Fe disorder in contrast to the usual picture of a Mott insulating ground state. This possibility is discussed in relation to experimental data.

  17. Ethanol sensor based on nanocrystallite cadmium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Gadkari, Ashok B.; Shinde, Tukaram J.; Vasambekar, Pramod N.

    2015-06-24

    The cadmium ferrite was synthesized by oxalate co-precipitation method. The crystal structure and surface morphology were examined by X-ray diffraction and SEM techniques, respectively. The nanocrystallite CdFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} sensor was tested for LPG, Cl{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH. The sensitivity was measured at various operating temperatures in the range of 100-400°C. The sensor shows highest sensitivity and selectivity to C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH at 350°C. The response and recovery time was measured at operating temperature of 350°C. The sensor exhibits a lower response and recovery time for LPG and Cl{sub 2} as compared to ethanol.

  18. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Boberg, R.E.; Lee, R.S.; Weingart, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto. 10 figs.

  19. Ferrite core coupled slapper detonator apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Boberg, Ralph E.; Lee, Ronald S.; Weingart, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for coupling a temporally short electric power pulse from a thick flat-conductor power cable into a thin flat-conductor slapper detonator circuit. A first planar and generally circular loop is formed from an end portion of the power cable. A second planar and generally circular loop, of similar diameter, is formed from all or part of the slapper detonator circuit. The two loops are placed together, within a ferrite housing that provides a ferrite path that magnetically couples the two loops. Slapper detonator parts may be incorporated within the ferrite housing. The ferrite housing may be made vacuum and water-tight, with the addition of a hermetic ceramic seal, and provided with an enclosure for protecting the power cable and parts related thereto.

  20. Dielectric investigations of polycrystalline samarium bismuth ferrite ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Palaimiene, E.; Macutkevic, J.; Banys, J.; Karpinsky, D. V.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2015-01-05

    Results of broadband dielectric investigations of samarium doped bismuth ferrite ceramics are presented in wide temperature range (20–800 K). At temperatures higher than 400 K, the dielectric properties of samarium bismuth ferrite ceramics are governed by Maxwell-Wagner relaxation and electrical conductivity. The DC conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with samarium concentration. In samarium doped bismuth ferrite, the ferroelectric phase transition temperature decreases with samarium concentration and finally no ferroelectric order is observed at x = 0.2. At lower temperatures, the dielectric properties of ferroelectric samarium doped bismuth ferrite are governed by ferroelectric domains dynamics. Ceramics with x = 0.2 exhibit the relaxor-like behaviour.

  1. Sustainable synthesis of monodispersed spinel nano-ferrites

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sustainable approach for the synthesis of various monodispersed spinel ferrite nanoparticles has been developed that occurs at water-toluene interface under both conventional and microwave hydrothermal conditions. This general synthesis procedure utilizes readily available and ...

  2. Controlled ferrite content improves weldability of corrosion-resistant steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, C. O.

    1967-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant steel that adds restrictions on chemical composition to ensure sufficient ferrite content decreases the tendency of CRES to develop cracks during welding. The equations restricting composition are based on the Schaeffler constitution diagram.

  3. Thermal Desorption Analysis of Hydrogen in High Strength Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, M.; Hirakami, D.; Tarui, T.

    2012-02-01

    Thermal desorption analyses (TDA) were conducted in high strength martensitic steels containing carbon from 0.33 to 1.0 mass pct, which were charged with hydrogen at 1223 K (950 °C) under hydrogen of one atmospheric pressure and quenched to room temperature. In 0.33C steel, which had the highest M s temperature, only one desorption peak was observed around 373 K (100 °C), whereas two peaks, one at a similar temperature and the other around and above 573 K (300 °C), were observed in the other steels, the height of the second peak increasing with carbon content. In 0.82C steel, both peaks disappeared during exposure at room temperature in 1 week, whereas the peak heights decreased gradually over 2 weeks in specimens electrolytically charged with hydrogen and aged for varying times at room temperature. From computer simulation, by means of the McNabb-Foster theory coupled with theories of carbon segregation, these peaks are likely to be due to trapping of hydrogen in the strain fields and cores of dislocations, and presumably to a lesser extent in prior austenite grain boundaries. The results also indicate that carbon atoms prevent and even expel hydrogen from trapping sites during quenching and aging in these steels.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  5. Modeling the Flow Curve of AISI 410 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, A.; Dehghani, K.; Heidari, M.; Vaseghi, M.

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, hot deformation behavior of AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel was investigated and modeled after conducting compression tests at the temperature range of 900-1150 °C and strain rate range of 0.001-1 s-1. At the studied temperature and strain rates, the flow curves were typical of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) showing a hardening peak followed by a softening one, and a steady state. The flow curves up to the peaks were modeled using the Estrin and Mecking equation. The softening due to DRX was also considered to increase the consistency of the developed model. The experimental equation proposed by Cingara and McQueen was also used to model the work hardening region. The results showed that the phenomenological model based on the Estrin and Mecking equation resulted in a better model for the work hardening region. Based on the Avrami equation, a model was developed to estimate the flow softening due to DRX between the peak and the starting point of steady state. The average value of the Avrami exponent was determined as 2.2, and it decreased with the increasing Zener-Hollomon parameter.

  6. Cold Spray Repair of Martensitic Stainless Steel Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccoli, M.; Cornacchia, G.; Maestrini, D.; Marconi, G. P.; Roberti, R.

    2014-12-01

    The possibility of using cold spray as repair technique of martensitic stainless steel components was evaluated through laboratory investigations. An austenitic stainless steel feedstock powder was chosen, instead of soft metals powders like nickel, copper, or aluminum, used for repairing components made in light alloy or cast iron. The present study directly compares the microstructure, the residual stresses, and the micro-hardness of repairs obtained by cold spray and by TIG welding, that is commonly used as repair technique in large steel components. XRD and optical metallographic analysis of the repairs showed that cold spray offers some advantages, inducing compressive residual stresses in the repair and avoiding alterations of the interface between repair and base material. For these reasons, a heat treatment after the cold spray repair is not required to restore the base material properties, whereas a post-weld heat treatment is needed after the welding repair. Cold spray repair also exhibits a higher micro-hardness than the welding repair. In addition, the cavitation erosion resistance of a cold spray coating was investigated through ultrasonic cavitation tests, and the samples worn surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  7. DARHT-II Injector Transients and the Ferrite Damper

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Will; Reginato, Lou; Chow, Ken; Houck, Tim; Henestroza, Enrique; Yu, Simon; Kang, Michael; Briggs, Richard

    2006-08-04

    This report summarizes the transient response of the DARHT-II Injector and the design of the ferrite damper. Initial commissioning of the injector revealed a rise time excited 7.8 MHz oscillation on the diode voltage and stalk current leading to a 7.8 MHz modulation of the beam current, position, and energy. Commissioning also revealed that the use of the crowbar to decrease the voltage fall time excited a spectrum of radio frequency modes which caused concern that there might be significant transient RF electric field stresses imposed on the high voltage column insulators. Based on the experience of damping the induction cell RF modes with ferrite, the concept of a ferrite damper was developed to address the crowbar-excited oscillations as well as the rise-time-excited 7.8 MHz oscillations. After the Project decided to discontinue the use of the crowbar, further development of the concept focused exclusively on damping the oscillations excited by the rise time. The design was completed and the ferrite damper was installed in the DARHT-II Injector in February 2006. The organization of this report is as follows. The suite of injector diagnostics are described in Section 2. The data and modeling of the injector transients excited on the rise-time and also by the crowbar are discussed in Section 3; the objective is a concise summary of the present state of understanding. The design of the ferrite damper, and the small scale circuit simulations used to evaluate the ferrite material options and select the key design parameters like the cross sectional area and the optimum gap width, are presented in Section 4. The details of the mechanical design and the installation of the ferrite damper are covered in Section 5. A brief summary of the performance of the ferrite damper following its installation in the injector is presented in Section 6.

  8. Epitaxial single crystalline ferrite films for high frequency applications

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Dover, R.B. van; Korenivski, V.; Werder, D.; Chen, C.H.; Felder, R.J.; Phillips, J.M.

    1996-11-01

    The successful growth of single crystal ferrites in thin film form is an important step towards their future incorporation into integrated circuits operating at microwave frequencies. The authors have successfully grown high quality single crystalline spinel ferrite thin films of (Mn,Zn)Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} on (100) and (110) SrTiO{sub 3} and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} at low temperature. These ferrite films are buffered with spinel structure layers that are paramagnetic at room temperature. In contrast to ferrite films grown directly on the substrates, ferrite films grown on buffered substrates exhibit excellent crystallinity and bulk saturation magnetization values, thus indicating the importance of lattice match and structural similarity between the film and the immediately underlying layer. X-ray, RBS, AFM and TEM analysis provide a consistent picture of the structural properties of these ferrite films. The authors then use this technique to grow exchange-coupled bilayers of single crystalline CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and (Mn,Zn)Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. In these bilayers, they observe strong exchange coupling across the interface that is similar in strength to the exchange coupling in the individual layers.

  9. Exchange-spring mechanism of soft and hard ferrite nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Manjura Hoque, S.; Srivastava, C.; Kumar, V.; Venkatesh, N.; Das, H.N.; Saha, D.K.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Exchange-spring behaviour of soft and hard ferrites was studied. • XRD patterns indicated soft and hard ferrites as fcc and hcp structure. • Hysteresis loops indicate wide difference in coercivity of soft and hard phases. • Nanocomposites produced convex hysteresis loop characteristic of single-phase. - Abstract: The paper reports exchange-spring soft and hard ferrite nanocomposites synthesized by chemical co-precipitation with or without the application of ultrasonic vibration. The composites contained BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} as the hard phase and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} as the soft phase. X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples in the optimum calcined condition indicated the presence of soft ferrites as face-centred cubic (fcc) and hard ferrites as hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure respectively. Temperature dependence of magnetization in the range of 20–700 °C demonstrated distinct presence of soft and hard ferrites as magnetic phases which are characterized by wide difference in magnetic anisotropy and coercivity. Exchange-spring mechanism led these nanocomposite systems to exchange-coupled, which ultimately produced convex hysteresis loops characteristic of a single-phase permanent magnet. Fairly high value of coercivity and maximum energy product were observed for the samples in the optimum calcined conditions with a maximum applied field of 1600 kA/m (2 T)

  10. Cr segregation at the FeCr surface and the origin of corrosion resistance in ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    De Caro, M S; Morse, B; Egiebor, N; Farmer, J; Caro, A

    2008-11-22

    Structural materials in Gen-IV nuclear reactors will face severe conditions of high operating temperatures, high neutron flux exposure, and corrosive environment. Radiation effects and corrosion and chemical compatibility issues are factors that will limit the materials lifetime. Low-chromium (9-12 Cr wt.%) ferritic martensitic (F/M) steels are being considered as possible candidates because they offer good swelling resistance and good mechanical properties under extreme conditions of radiation dose and irradiation temperature. The surface chemistry of FeCr alloys, responsible for the corrosion properties, is complex. It exists today a controversy between equilibrium thermodynamic calculations, which suggest Cr depletion at the surface driven by the higher surface energy of Cr, and experimental data which suggest the oxidation process occurs in two stages, first forming a Fe-rich oxide, followed by a duplex oxide layer, and ending with a Cr-rich oxide. Moreover, it has been shown experimentally that corrosion resistance of F/M steels depends significantly on Cr content, increasing with increasing Cr content and with a threshold around 10% Cr, below which, the alloy behaves as pure Fe. In an attempt to rationalize these two contradicting observations and to understand the physical mechanism behind corrosion resistance in these materials we perform atomistic simulations using our FeCr empirical potential and analyze Cr equilibrium distributions at different compositions and temperatures in single and polycrystalline samples. We analyze the controversy in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic considerations.

  11. Modeling the coupling between martensitic phase transformation and plasticity in shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchiraju, Sivom

    The thermo-mechanical response of NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) is predominantly dictated by two inelastic deformation processes---martensitic phase transformation and plastic deformation. This thesis presents a new microstructural finite element (MFE) model that couples these processes and anisotropic elasticity. The coupling occurs via the stress redistribution induced by each mechanism. The approach includes three key improvements to the literature. First, transformation and plasticity are modeled at a crystallographic level and can occur simultaneously. Second, a rigorous large-strain finite element formulation is used, thereby capturing texture development (crystal rotation). Third, the formulation adopts recent first principle calculations of monoclinic martensite stiffness. The model is calibrated to experimental data for polycrystalline NiTi (49.9 at% Ni). Inputs include anisotropic elastic properties, texture, and DSC data as well as a subset of pseudoelastic and load-biased thermal cycling data. This calibration process provides updated material values---namely, larger self-hardening between similar martensite plates. It is then assessed against additional pseudoelastic and load-biased thermal cycling experimental data and neutron diffraction measurements of martensite texture evolution. Several experimental trends are captured---in particular, the transformation strain during thermal cycling monotonically increases with increasing bias stress, reaching a peak and then decreasing due to intervention of plasticity---a trend which existing MFE models are unable to capture. Plasticity is also shown to enhance stress-induced martensite formation during loading and generate retained martensite upon unloading. The simulations even enable a quantitative connection between deformation processing and two-way shape memory effect. Some experimental trends are not captured---in particular, the ratcheting of macrostrain with repeated thermal cycling. This may

  12. Effect of Austenitizing Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Hardness of Martensitic Stainless Steel AISI 420

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, L. D.; Du Toit, M.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of austenitizing on the microstructure and hardness of two martensitic stainless steels was examined with the aim of supplying heat-treatment guidelines to the user that will ensure a martensitic structure with minimal retained austenite, evenly dispersed carbides and a hardness of between 610 and 740 HV (Vickers hardness) after quenching and tempering. The steels examined during the course of this examination conform in composition to medium-carbon AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, except for the addition of 0.13% vanadium and 0.62% molybdenum to one of the alloys. Steel samples were austenitized at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 °C, followed by oil quenching. The as-quenched microstructures were found to range from almost fully martensitic structures to martensite with up to 35% retained austenite after quenching, with varying amounts of carbides. Optical and scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the microstructures, and X-ray diffraction was employed to identify the carbide present in the as-quenched structures and to quantify the retained austenite contents. Hardness tests were performed to determine the effect of heat treatment on mechanical properties. As-quenched hardness values ranged from 700 to 270 HV, depending on the amount of retained austenite. Thermodynamic predictions (using the CALPHAD™ model) were employed to explain these microstructures based on the solubility of the carbide particles at various austenitizing temperatures.

  13. Hydrogen permeation and diffusion in a 0. 2C-13Cr martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Sun, X.K. . State Key Lab. of RSA); Yuan, X.Z.; Wei, B.M. . Dept. of Applied Chemistry)

    1993-10-01

    The phenomenon of hydrogen embrittlement for engineering alloys, especially for alloy steels, has long attracted the attention of material researchers. Presently, it is thought that the occurrence of the phenomenon correlates with the processes of hydrogen entry and transport in metals. Therefore, a great effort has been made to understand the hydrogen permeation and diffusion in metals and alloys. Even so, the knowledge of the hydrogen permeation and diffusion in steels with a martensitic structure is still limited. In most of the investigations performed on martensite, the electrochemical permeation technique was employed for measurement; hence, only limited data near ambient temperature have been determined. A few results obtained at higher temperature are very scattered also. For instance, the hydrogen diffusivity of AISI 4130 steel in the quenched and tempered (martensite) condition is 2 orders of magnitude higher than of cryoformed 301 stainless steel (containing 90% of [alpha][prime] martensite). In the present work, the hydrogen permeability and diffusivity of a 0.2C-13Cr martensitic stainless steel (2Cr13), roughly corresponding to AISI 420, was determined by means of the gaseous permeation technique. Measurements were made above ambient temperature.

  14. Crystallographic features of the structure of a martensite packet of the NiMn intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikova, Yu. V.; Egorova, L. Yu.; Rodionov, D. P.; Belosludtseva, E. S.; Kazantsev, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction are used to show that a pseudosingle crystal forms upon cooling of an alloy Ni49Mn51 single crystal below the temperature of the β→θ (bcc → fct) transformation. At room temperature, this pseudosingle crystal has the structure of tetragonal L10 martensite with parameters a = 0.3732 nm and c = 0.3537 nm and a tetragonality c/ a = 0.94775. The temperatures of the forward and reverse B2 → L10 transformations are determined. The crystallographic features of martensite packet formation are analyzed. As shown by EBSD, neighboring martensite packets always have three kinds of tetragonal martensite plates, which are in a twin position and have different tetragonality axis directions. Repeated heating and quenching of the pseudosingle crystal result in recrystallization with the formation of coarse grains. The packet structure of the tetragonal martensite is retained in this case, and the sizes of the packets formed within a grain decrease by a factor of 2-3 as compared to the initial pseudosingle crystal.

  15. Ferromagnetic interactions and martensitic transformation in Fe doped Ni-Mn-In shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, D. N.; Priolkar, K. R.; Emura, S.; Nigam, A. K.

    2014-11-14

    The structure, magnetic, and martensitic properties of Fe doped Ni-Mn-In magnetic shape memory alloys have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry, magnetization, resistivity, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and EXAFS. While Ni{sub 2}MnIn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6) alloys are ferromagnetic and non martensitic, the martensitic transformation temperature in Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.5}In{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y} and Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.6}In{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y} increases for lower Fe concentrations (y ≤ 0.05) before decreasing sharply for higher Fe concentrations. XRD analysis reveals presence of cubic and tetragonal structural phases in Ni{sub 2}MnIn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x} at room temperature with tetragonal phase content increasing with Fe doping. Even though the local structure around Mn and Ni in these Fe doped alloys is similar to martensitic Mn rich Ni-Mn-In alloys, presence of ferromagnetic interactions and structural disorder induced by Fe affect Mn-Ni-Mn antiferromagnetic interactions resulting in suppression of martensitic transformation in these Fe doped alloys.

  16. Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nb-Ti-V Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opiela, M.

    2014-09-01

    The paper presents the results of thermomechanical treatment via forging on the microstructure and mechanical properties of newly obtained microalloyed steel containing 0.28% C, 1.41% Mn, 0.027% Nb, 0.028% Ti, and 0.019% V. The investigated steel is assigned to the production of forged elements for the automotive industry. Conditions of forging using the thermomechanical processing method were developed based on plastometric tests. Continuous and double-hit compression tests were conducted using the Gleeble 3800 thermomechanical simulator. The samples were investigated in a temperature range from 900 to 1100 °C and a strain rate of 1 and 10 s-1. To determine the recrystallization kinetics of plastically deformed austenite, discontinuous compression tests of samples using the applied deformation were conducted in a temperature range from 900 to 1100 °C with isothermal holding of the specimens between successive deformations for 2-100 s. Observations of the microstructures of thin foils were conducted using a TITAN80-300 FEI transmission electron microscope. The applied thermomechanical treatment allows to obtain a fine-grained microstructure of the austenite during hot-working and production of forged parts. These acquire advantageous mechanical properties and guaranteed crack resistance after controlled cooling from the end plastic deformation temperature and successive tempering. Forgings produced using the thermomechanical treatment method, consecutively subjected to tempering in a temperature range from 550 to 650 °C, reveal values of YS0.2 which equal from 994 to 892 MPa, UTS from 1084 to 958 MPa, KV from 69 to 109 J, KV-40 from 55 to 83 J, and a hardness ranging from 360 to 300 HBW.

  17. Some Metallurgical Issues Concerning Austenite Conditioning in Nb-Ti and Nb-Mo Microalloyed Steels Processed by Near-Net-Shape Casting and Direct Rolling Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Beatriz; Rodriguez-Ibabe, Jose M.

    2016-08-01

    As thin slab direct rolling technologies are moving to the production of higher quality steel grades, chemical compositions based on Nb-Ti and Nb-Mo become a good option. However, with the use of multiple microalloying additions, the as-cast austenite conditioning becomes more complex. This paper analyzes some of the microstructural features that should be taken into account during the as-cast austenite conditioning in Nb-Ti and Nb-Mo microalloyed steel grades. In the case of Nb-Ti grades, it has been observed that the process parameters during solidification and post-solidification steps affect the austenite evolution during hot rolling. This is due to the differences in the size and volume fraction of TiN particles that can be formed. Fine TiN precipitates have been shown to be able to delay recrystallization kinetics. Moreover, the solute drag effect of Ti cannot be ignored in the case of hyperstoichiometric Ti/N ratios. It is observed that Nb-Ti grades tend to have lower non-recrystallization temperatures compared to Nb grades, which means that pancaking of the austenite is more difficult for these steels. The opposite is observed for the Nb-Mo grades, although in both cases the behavior is affected by the nominal content of Nb.

  18. Evidence of martensitic phase transitions in magnetic Ni-Mn-In thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A.; Zhang, Le; Dubenko, I.; Samanta, T.; Ali, N.; Stadler, S.

    2013-02-18

    Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} Heusler alloy thin films (with thicknesses of about 10 nm) have been grown on single crystal MgO and SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) (100) substrates using a laser-assisted molecular beam epitaxy method. Films of mixed austenitic and martensitic phases and of pure martensitic phase have been detected for those grown on MgO and STO substrates, respectively. Thermomagnetic curves were measured using a SQUID magnetometer and are consistent with those of off-stoichiometric In-based bulk Heusler alloys, including a martensitic transition at T = 315 K for films grown on MgO. The differences in the properties of the films grown on MgO and STO are discussed.

  19. A New XRD Method to Quantify Plate and Lath Martensites of Hardened Medium-Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Quanshun

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a new technique to separately measure the volume fraction and tetragonal ratio of co-existing lath and plate martensites in ultrahigh strength steel, and to calculate their different carbon contents. First, the two martensites are assumed to have body-centered tetragonal lattice structures of different tetragonal ratios. X-ray diffraction is then applied to obtain the overlapping {200} diffraction peak, which is subsequently separated as four sub-peaks using a self-made multiple Gaussian peak-fitting method to allow the measurement of the individual lattice parameters c and a. Finally, a modified equation is applied to calculate the carbon contents from the obtained tetragonal ratios. The new technique is then applied to investigate the effect of subsequent tempering on the decarbonization of the as-quenched martensites.

  20. Spontaneous strain glass to martensite transition in ferromagnetic Ni-Co-Mn-Ga strain glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Huang, Chonghui; Wu, Haijun; Gao, Jinghui; Yang, Sen; Wang, Dong; Ding, Xiangdong; Song, Xiaoping; Ren, Xiaobing

    2013-04-01

    We report that a spontaneous strain glass to martensite (STG-M) transition occurs in a Ni45Co10Mn20Ga25 ferromagnetic strain glass. The signatures of the spontaneous STG-M transition of Ni45Co10Mn20Ga25 ferromagnetic strain glass are stronger than those of Ti50Ni44.5Fe5.5 strain glass reported previously. Such a difference is attributed to that the martensitic terminal of the former has larger elastic anisotropy than that of the later. The spontaneous STG-M transition in this ferromagnetic strain glass is due to that the delicate competition between the kinetic limitation and the martensitic thermodynamic driving force changes with temperature.

  1. Characterization of preferential orientation of martensitic variants in a single crystal of NiMnGa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guodong; Chen, Jinglan; Cui, Yuting; Liu, Zhuhong; Zhang, Ming; Wu, Guangheng; Brück, E.; de Boer, F. R.; Meng, Fanbin; Li, Yangxian; Qu, Jingping

    2004-06-01

    We report the detailed observation of martensitic variants in NiMnGa single crystals. The variants that are twinned with each other in different ways can be clearly identified in our single crystals by optical observation. We also investigated the preferential orientation of the martensitic variants in NiMnGa single crystals. We observed the motion of the variant boundary in response to application of a magnetic field. This observation can be used to explain phenomenologically the magnetic-field-induced strain. In the single crystal with composition Ni 52Mn 24Ga 24, martensite with seven modulated layers (7M) shows preferentially oriented variants. A completely recoverable two-way shape-memory behavior was also observed by measuring the free sample in three different directions during a complete temperature cycle. It was found that the largest strains in the [001] and [010] directions occur in different temperature ranges.

  2. Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transformation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Zablotskii, V; Pérez-Landazábal, J I; Recarte, V; Gómez-Polo, C

    2010-08-11

    Temperature dependences of low-field quasistatic magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transitions in an NiFeGa alloy are studied both by experiment and analytically. Pronounced reversible jumps of the magnetic susceptibility were observed near the martensitic transition temperature. A general description of the temperature dependences of the susceptibility in ferromagnetic austenite and martensite phases and the susceptibility jump at the transition is suggested. As a result, the main factors governing the temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility in the magnetic shape memory alloys are revealed. The magnetic susceptibility jump value is found to be related to changes of: (i) magnetic anisotropy; (ii) magnetic domain wall geometrical constraints (those determined by the alignment and size of twin variants) and (iii) mean magnetic domain spacing.

  3. Temperature Coefficients of the Elastic Moduli and Dissipation in B2 Martensites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Timothy; Migliori, Albert; Thoma, Dan; Hugo, Richard; Freibert, Franz; Louca, Despina

    2000-03-01

    We have measured the temperature dependence of the elastic moduli and the internal friction of the B2 structure martensites NiTi, Ni_0.62Al_0.38, and AuZn using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). In the high temperature austenite phase the moduli show an anomalous positive temperature coefficient, and below the martensite transition the materials display a high dissipation which seems glass-like. We believe that the fundamental shear instability of the body-centered phase and subtle disorder in the martensite phase are responsible for these behaviors. We have also carried out neutron PDF, transport and TEM measurements to detect the subtle structural effects which are producing the anomalies in the ultrasound data.

  4. Iterative Determination of the Orientation Relationship Between Austenite and Martensite from a Large Amount of Grain Pair Misorientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyyssönen, Tuomo; Isakov, Matti; Peura, Pasi; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    2016-06-01

    An automatic, iterative method to determine the orientation relationship between parent austenite and martensite is described. The algorithm generates the orientation relationship from grain boundary misorientations through an iterative procedure based on correct symmetry operator assignment. The automatic method is demonstrated to work on both martensitic and bainitic steels and to provide comparable results to a manual grain selection method.

  5. Synthesis of Novel Ferrite Based Recyclable Catalyst Used to Clean Dye and Emerging Contaminates from Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein, we describe synthesis of novel palladium, copper, cobalt and vanadium ferrites. The ferrites were synthesized by combustion method using polyvinyl alcohol. The particles phases were confirmed using X-ray diffraction and sizes were determined using particle size analyzer. ...

  6. Performance of ferrite fillers on electrical behavior of polymer nanocomposite electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Kamlesh; Mauli Dwivedi, Mrigank; Singh, Markandey; Agrawal, S. L.

    2011-04-01

    Dispersal of nanofillers in polymer electrolytes have shown to improve the ionic properties of Polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based polymer electrolytes in recent times. The effects of different nanoferrite fillers (i.e., Al-Zn ferrite, Mg-Zn ferrite, and Zn ferrite) on the electrical transport properties have been studied here on the composite polymer electrolyte system. The interaction of salt/filler with electrolyte has been investigated by XRD studies. SEM image and infrared spectral studies give an indication of nanocomposite formation. In conductivity studies, all electrolyte systems are seen to follow universal power law. Composition dependence (with ferrite filler) gives the maximum conductivity in [93PEO-7NH4SCN]: X ferrite (where X = 2% in Al-Zn ferrite, 1% Mg-Zn ferrite, and 1% Zn ferrite) system.

  7. A biosensor system using nickel ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prachi; Rathore, Deepshikha

    2016-05-01

    NiFe2O4 ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method and the structural characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction technique, where single cubic phase formation of nanoparticles was confirmed. The average particle size of NiFe2O4 was found to be 4.9 nm. Nanoscale magnetic materials are an important source of labels for biosensing due to their strong magnetic properties which are not found in biological systems. This property of the material was exploited and the fabrication of the NiFe2O4 nanoparticle based biosensor was done in the form of a capacitor system, with NiFe2O4 as the dielectric material. The biosensor system was tested towards different biological materials with the help of electrochemical workstation and the same was analysed through Cole-Cole plot of NiFe2O4. The performance of the sensor was determined based on its sensitivity, response time and recovery time.

  8. Feedback controlled hybrid fast ferrite tuners

    SciTech Connect

    Remsen, D.B.; Phelps, D.A.; deGrassie, J.S.; Cary, W.P.; Pinsker, R.I.; Moeller, C.P.; Arnold, W.; Martin, S.; Pivit, E.

    1993-09-01

    A low power ANT-Bosch fast ferrite tuner (FFT) was successfully tested into (1) the lumped circuit equivalent of an antenna strap with dynamic plasma loading, and (2) a plasma loaded antenna strap in DIII-D. When the FFT accessible mismatch range was phase-shifted to encompass the plasma-induced variation in reflection coefficient, the 50 {Omega} source was matched (to within the desired 1.4 : 1 voltage standing wave ratio). The time required to achieve this match (i.e., the response time) was typically a few hundred milliseconds, mostly due to a relatively slow network analyzer-computer system. The response time for the active components of the FFT was 10 to 20 msec, or much faster than the present state-of-the-art for dynamic stub tuners. Future FFT tests are planned, that will utilize the DIII-D computer (capable of submillisecond feedback control), as well as several upgrades to the active control circuit, to produce a FFT feedback control system with a response time approaching 1 msec.

  9. Development of advanced barium ferrite tape media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Osamu; Oyanagi, Masahito; Morooka, Atsushi; Mori, Masahiko; Kurihashi, Yuich; Tada, Toshio; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    We developed an advanced particulate magnetic tape using fine barium ferrite (BaFe) particles for magnetic-tape storage systems. The new tape showed a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that was 3.5 dB higher than that of the commercially available BaFe tape used for the Linear Tape Open generation 6 tape-storage system, at a linear density of 300 kfci measured with a giant magnetoresistive head with a reader width of 0.45 μm. Such significant increase in SNR was achieved by reducing the magnetic particle volume from 1950 to 1350 nm3, while maintaining a sufficiently high thermal stability, improving the perpendicular squareness ratio from 0.66 to 0.83, and improving the surface roughness from 2.5 to 2.0 nm when measured by atomic force microscopy and from 2.4 to 0.9 nm when measured by optical interferometry. This paper describes the characteristics of the new BaFe particles and media, which are expected to be employed for future high-capacity linear-tape systems.

  10. Tuning the magnetism of ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viñas, S. Liébana; Simeonidis, K.; Li, Z.-A.; Ma, Z.; Myrovali, E.; Makridis, A.; Sakellari, D.; Angelakeris, M.; Wiedwald, U.; Spasova, M.; Farle, M.

    2016-10-01

    The importance of magnetic interactions within an individual nanoparticle or between adjacent ones is crucial not only for the macroscopic collective magnetic behavior but for the AC magnetic heating efficiency as well. On this concept, single-(MFe2O4 where M=Fe, Co, Mn) and core-shell ferrite nanoparticles consisting of a magnetically softer (MnFe2O4) or magnetically harder (CoFe2O4) core and a magnetite (Fe3O4) shell with an overall size in the 10 nm range were synthesized and studied for their magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency. Magnetic measurements indicate that the coating of the hard magnetic phase (CoFe2O4) by Fe3O4 provides a significant enhancement of hysteresis losses over the corresponding single-phase counterpart response, and thus results in a multiplication of the magnetic hyperthermia efficiency opening a novel pathway for high-performance, magnetic hyperthermia agents. At the same time, the existence of a biocompatible Fe3O4 outer shell, toxicologically renders these systems similar to iron-oxide ones with significantly milder side-effects.

  11. Energy of domain walls in ferrite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, M. E.; Prieto, P.; Mendoza, A.; Guzman, O.

    2007-03-01

    MnZn Ferrite films were deposited by RF sputtering on (001) single crystal MgO substrates. AFM images show an increment in grain size with the film thickness. Grains with diameter between φ ˜ 70 and 700 nm have been observed. The coercive field Hc as a function of the grain size reaches a maximum value of about 80 Oe for φc˜ 300 nm. The existence of a multidomain structure associated with a critical grain size was identified by Magneto-optical Kerr effect technique (MOKE). The transition of the one-domain regime to the two-domain regime was observed at a critical grain size of Dc˜ 530 nm. This value agree with values predicted previously. The Jiles-Atherton model (JAM) was used to discuss the experimental hysteresis loops. The k pinning parameter obtained from JAM shows a maximum value of k/μo = 67 Am^2 for grains with Lc˜ 529 nm. The total energy per unit area E was correlated with k and D. We found a simple phenomenological relationship given by E α kD; where D is the magnetic domain width.

  12. Chemical looping coal gasification with calcium ferrite and barium ferrite via solid--solid reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani; Tian, Hanjing; Richards, George

    2016-01-01

    Coal gasification to produce synthesis gas by chemical looping was investigated with two oxygen carriers, barium ferrite (BaFe2O4) and calcium ferrite (CaFe2O4). Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and fixed-bed flow reactor data indicated that a solid–solid interaction occurred between oxygen carriers and coal to produce synthesis gas. Both thermodynamic analysis and experimental data indicated that BaFe2O4 and CaFe2O4 have high reactivity with coal but have a low reactivity with synthesis gas, which makes them very attractive for the coal gasification process. Adding steam increased the production of hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO), but carbon dioxide (CO2) remained low because these oxygen carriers have minimal reactivity with H2 and CO. Therefore, the combined steam–oxygen carrier produced the highest quantity of synthesis gas. It appeared that neither the water–gas shift reaction nor the water splitting reaction promoted additional H2 formation with the oxygen carriers when steam was present. Wyodak coal, which is a sub-bituminous coal, had the best gasification yield with oxygen carrier–steam while Illinois #6 coal had the lowest. The rate of gasification and selectivity for synthesis gas production was significantly higher when these oxygen carriers were present during steam gasification of coal. The rates and synthesis gas yields during the temperature ramps of coal–steam with oxygen carriers were better than with gaseous oxygen.

  13. Coupled Model for Carbon Partitioning from Martensite into Austenite During the Quenching Process in Fe-C Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peixing; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Yilin; Zhang, Yisheng

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a coupled model for carbon partitioning from martensite into austenite during the quenching process in Fe-C steels is constructed where the carbon is permitted to partition while the martensite is continuously forming. A diffusion model of carbon at the `martensite/austenite interface' is created where the interface does not move during the carbon partitioning process, and the driving force for carbon partitioning originates from the chemical potential difference. The results show that the martensitic transformation and carbon partitioning affect each other, and that the cooling rate between the martensite start temperature ( M s) and room temperature has a major effect on the volume fraction of the final retained austenite. The simulation results are shown to be in good agreement with experiments.

  14. Large anisotropy of spin polarization in Heusler alloy Ni2MnGa induced by martensitic transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z. Y.; Zhang, H. W.; Xu, S. F.; Chen, J. L.; Cao, Z. X.; Wu, G. H.

    2008-05-01

    Spin polarization both in the cubic austenitic and tetragonal martensitic phases of the Ni2MnGa alloy has been investigated using first-principles calculations combined with classical Bloch-Boltzmann transport theory. It is shown that the degree of spin polarization, while decreasing from 42% in the ⟨001⟩ directions of the austenitic phase to 30% in the [100] direction of the martensitic phase, rises to 75% in the [001] direction of the martensitic phase, resulting from a preferential reconstruction of the spin-down Fermi surfaces upon martensitic transformation. With this finding, various recent intriguing electrical measurements upon Ni2MnGa across the martensitic transformation can find an explanation. This also opens a way of searching for giant magnetoresistance materials.

  15. Micromagnetic and Mössbauer spectroscopic investigation of strain-induced martensite in austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, L.; Kéldor, M.; Hidasi, B.; Vértes, A.; Czakó-Nagy, I.

    1996-08-01

    Strain-induced martensite in 18/8 austenitic stainless steel was studied. Magnetic measurements and Mössbauer spectroscopic investigations were performed to characterize the amount of α’-martensite due to room-temperature plastic tensile loading. The effects of cold work and annealing heat treatment were explored using magnetic Barkhausen noise, saturation polarization, coercive force, hardness, and conversion electron Mössbauer spectra measurements. The results of the magnetic measurements were compared to results obtained by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The suggested Barkhausen noise measurement technique proved to be a useful quantitative and nondestructive method for determining the ferromagnetic phase ratio of the studied alloy.

  16. Investigating the martensite-austenite transformation on mechanically alloyed FeNi solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Bianco, D.; Gorria, P.; Blanco, J. A.; Smith, R. I.

    2011-10-01

    The martensite-austenite transformation on Fe70Ni30 and Fe75Ni25 nanostructured solid solutions has been investigated by neutron thermo-diffraction experiments carried out between 300 and 1000 K. We observe that the difference between the temperatures at which the martensitic transformation starts (Ai) and finishes (Af) exceeds 250 K, being five times larger than that of the as-cast coarse-grained conventional alloys. The main reason for this striking phenomenon is the drastic microstructural changes produced during the severe mechanical milling process, giving rise to a large reduction of the crystalline mean size (below 20 nm) and the generation of a considerable microstain (reaching 1%).

  17. Liquid-metal-induced fracture mode of martensitic T91 steels

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.L.; Auger, T.; Johnson, Duane, Robertson, I.M.

    2012-04-04

    The liquid–metal-induced fracture mode of T91 martensitic steel was investigated by using transmission electron microscopy techniques to characterize the microstructure and crack network in specimens obtained from focused-ion beam machining at and immediately below the fracture surface. Contrary to previous claims of quasi-cleavage fracture, the dominant fracture mode is intergranular cracking at martensite laths and prior austenite grain boundaries. These fracture mode results clarify an outstanding issue in liquid–metal embrittlement of steels that generally occur in a heavily-deformed microstructure. Several cracks were arrested at intergranular carbides, suggesting a metallurgical strategy for impeding liquid–metal-induced crack propagation.

  18. Finite Element Calculation of Local Variation in the Driving Force for Austenite to Martensite Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, K.; Post, J.; Dinsdale, A.; Geijselaers, H. J. M.; Huétink, J.

    2007-04-01

    The mechanics and thermodynamics of strain induced martensitic transformation are coupled for a metastable alloy steel and implemented in FE models of forming processes. The basic formulations are based on a fifty year old treaty by Patel and Cohen. The variation in Gibbs energy due to local variation in strain, strain rate, temperature and state of stress of a forming part is calculated by FE codes. The local variation in Gibbs energy gives a probabilistic image of the potential sites for strain induced martensitic transformations.

  19. Influence of Dilute Hf Additions on Precipitation and Martensitic Transformation in Ni-Ti-Pd Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppa, Anne C.; Kapoor, Monica; Hornbuckle, B. Chad; Weaver, Mark L.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Thompson, Gregory B.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of Hf (0-1 at.%) additions in a Ni-Ti-Pd alloy on P-phase precipitation and martensitic transformations was studied. The addition of hafnium resulted in the refinement of precipitates with an increase in number density. The overlapping strain fields created due to the decrease in inter-precipitate spacing are suspected to reduce the matrix volume to be less than the critical free volume size needed for the martensitic transformation over the temperature range studied (183-573 K). Hafnium was also found to delay the aging time to achieve peak hardness, suggesting a reduction in growth and coarsening kinetics.

  20. Strong and moldable cellulose magnets with high ferrite nanoparticle content.

    PubMed

    Galland, Sylvain; Andersson, Richard L; Ström, Valter; Olsson, Richard T; Berglund, Lars A

    2014-11-26

    A major limitation in the development of highly functional hybrid nanocomposites is brittleness and low tensile strength at high inorganic nanoparticle content. Herein, cellulose nanofibers were extracted from wood and individually decorated with cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles and then for the first time molded at low temperature (<120 °C) into magnetic nanocomposites with up to 93 wt % inorganic content. The material structure was characterized by TEM and FE-SEM and mechanically tested as compression molded samples. The obtained porous magnetic sheets were further impregnated with a thermosetting epoxy resin, which improved the load-bearing functions of ferrite and cellulose material. A nanocomposite with 70 wt % ferrite, 20 wt % cellulose nanofibers, and 10 wt % epoxy showed a modulus of 12.6 GPa, a tensile strength of 97 MPa, and a strain at failure of ca. 4%. Magnetic characterization was performed in a vibrating sample magnetometer, which showed that the coercivity was unaffected and that the saturation magnetization was in proportion with the ferrite content. The used ferrite, CoFe2O4, is a magnetically hard material, demonstrated by that the composite material behaved as a traditional permanent magnet. The presented processing route is easily adaptable to prepare millimeter-thick and moldable magnetic objects. This suggests that the processing method has the potential to be scaled-up for industrial use for the preparation of a new subcategory of magnetic, low-cost, and moldable objects based on cellulose nanofibers. PMID:25331121

  1. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates.

    PubMed

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T; Asta, Mark D; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E; Liaw, Peter K

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  2. Reducing ferrite tuner power loss by bias field rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, W.R.

    1983-08-01

    It has been suggested that ferrite tuners for rf cavities with the magnetic bias field perpendicular to the rf magnetic field would have greatly reduced rf losses. Recent measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory appear to confirm this effect. A simple model proposed here allows the calculation of tuning characteristics for a variety of bias schemes. The model shows that the perpendicular bias scheme mentioned above requires very much larger bias levels than does the parallel bias scheme in order to achieve the same tuning range with a particular ferrite tuner. However, further investigation with the model has led to the discovery that the use of perpendicular bias at low frequency and parallel bias at high frequency requires only a modest increase in the bias field. In effect, the ferrite is kept highly magnetized, reducing ferrite losses, and is tuned primarily by rotating the bias field direction with respect to the rf field direction. The resulting reduction in dissipation can significantly reduce the amount of ferrite required per cavity.

  3. Strong and moldable cellulose magnets with high ferrite nanoparticle content.

    PubMed

    Galland, Sylvain; Andersson, Richard L; Ström, Valter; Olsson, Richard T; Berglund, Lars A

    2014-11-26

    A major limitation in the development of highly functional hybrid nanocomposites is brittleness and low tensile strength at high inorganic nanoparticle content. Herein, cellulose nanofibers were extracted from wood and individually decorated with cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles and then for the first time molded at low temperature (<120 °C) into magnetic nanocomposites with up to 93 wt % inorganic content. The material structure was characterized by TEM and FE-SEM and mechanically tested as compression molded samples. The obtained porous magnetic sheets were further impregnated with a thermosetting epoxy resin, which improved the load-bearing functions of ferrite and cellulose material. A nanocomposite with 70 wt % ferrite, 20 wt % cellulose nanofibers, and 10 wt % epoxy showed a modulus of 12.6 GPa, a tensile strength of 97 MPa, and a strain at failure of ca. 4%. Magnetic characterization was performed in a vibrating sample magnetometer, which showed that the coercivity was unaffected and that the saturation magnetization was in proportion with the ferrite content. The used ferrite, CoFe2O4, is a magnetically hard material, demonstrated by that the composite material behaved as a traditional permanent magnet. The presented processing route is easily adaptable to prepare millimeter-thick and moldable magnetic objects. This suggests that the processing method has the potential to be scaled-up for industrial use for the preparation of a new subcategory of magnetic, low-cost, and moldable objects based on cellulose nanofibers.

  4. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  5. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; et al

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones.more » These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.« less

  6. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  7. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  8. Concepts for the Development of Nanoscale Stable Precipitation-Strengthened Steels Manufactured by Conventional Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yablinsky, C. A.; Tippey, K. E.; Vaynman, S.; Anderoglu, O.; Fine, M. E.; Chung, Y.-W.; Speer, J. G.; Findley, K. O.; Dogan, Ö. N.; Jablonski, P. D.; Maloy, S. A.; Hackenberg, R. E.; Clarke, A. J.; Clarke, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    The development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferrous alloys has shown that microstructures designed for excellent irradiation resistance and thermal stability ideally contain stable nanoscale precipitates and dislocation sinks. Based upon this understanding, the microstructures of conventionally manufactured ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels can be designed to include controlled volume fractions of fine, stable precipitates and dislocation sinks via specific alloying and processing paths. The concepts proposed here are categorized as advanced high-Cr ferritic-martensitic (AHCr-FM) and novel tailored precipitate ferritic (TPF) steels, which have the potential to improve the in-reactor performance of conventionally manufactured alloys. AHCr-FM steels have modified alloy content relative to current reactor materials (such as alloy NF616/P92) to maximize desirable precipitates and control phase stability. TPF steels are designed to incorporate nickel aluminides, in addition to microalloy carbides, in a ferritic matrix to produce fine precipitate arrays with good thermal stability. Both alloying concepts may also benefit from thermomechanical processing to establish dislocation sinks and modify phase transformation behaviors. Alloying and processing paths toward designed microstructures are discussed for both AHCr-FM and TPF material classes.

  9. Concepts for the development of nanoscale stable precipitation-strengthened steels manufactured by conventional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Yablinsky, C. A.; Tippey, K. E.; Vaynman, S.; Anderoglu, O.; Fine, M. E.; Chung, Y. -W.; Speer, J. G.; Findley, K. O.; Dogan, O. N.; Jablonski, P. D.; Maloy, S. A.; Hackenberg, R. E.; Clarke, A. J.; Clarke, K. D.

    2014-11-11

    In this study, the development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferrous alloys has shown that microstructures designed for excellent irradiation resistance and thermal stability ideally contain stable nanoscale precipitates and dislocation sinks. Based upon this understanding, the microstructures of conventionally manufactured ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels can be designed to include controlled volume fractions of fine, stable precipitates and dislocation sinks via specific alloying and processing paths. The concepts proposed here are categorized as advanced high-Cr ferritic-martensitic (AHCr-FM) and novel tailored precipitate ferritic (TPF) steels, which have the potential to improve the in-reactor performance of conventionally manufactured alloys. AHCr-FM steels have modified alloy content relative to current reactor materials (such as alloy NF616/P92) to maximize desirable precipitates and control phase stability. TPF steels are designed to incorporate nickel aluminides, in addition to microalloy carbides, in a ferritic matrix to produce fine precipitate arrays with good thermal stability. Both alloying concepts may also benefit from thermomechanical processing to establish dislocation sinks and modify phase transformation behaviors. Alloying and processing paths toward designed microstructures are discussed for both AHCr-FM and TPF material classes.

  10. Concepts for the development of nanoscale stable precipitation-strengthened steels manufactured by conventional methods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yablinsky, C. A.; Tippey, K. E.; Vaynman, S.; Anderoglu, O.; Fine, M. E.; Chung, Y. -W.; Speer, J. G.; Findley, K. O.; Dogan, O. N.; Jablonski, P. D.; et al

    2014-11-11

    In this study, the development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferrous alloys has shown that microstructures designed for excellent irradiation resistance and thermal stability ideally contain stable nanoscale precipitates and dislocation sinks. Based upon this understanding, the microstructures of conventionally manufactured ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels can be designed to include controlled volume fractions of fine, stable precipitates and dislocation sinks via specific alloying and processing paths. The concepts proposed here are categorized as advanced high-Cr ferritic-martensitic (AHCr-FM) and novel tailored precipitate ferritic (TPF) steels, which have the potential to improve the in-reactor performance of conventionally manufactured alloys. AHCr-FM steels have modifiedmore » alloy content relative to current reactor materials (such as alloy NF616/P92) to maximize desirable precipitates and control phase stability. TPF steels are designed to incorporate nickel aluminides, in addition to microalloy carbides, in a ferritic matrix to produce fine precipitate arrays with good thermal stability. Both alloying concepts may also benefit from thermomechanical processing to establish dislocation sinks and modify phase transformation behaviors. Alloying and processing paths toward designed microstructures are discussed for both AHCr-FM and TPF material classes.« less

  11. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  14. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10223 - Styrenyl surface treated manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). 721.10223 Section 721.10223 Protection of Environment... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses... manganese ferrite with acrylic ester polymer (PMN P-09-582) is subject to reporting under this section...

  16. Sol-gel coating of lithium zinc ferrite powders

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, K.G.; Amarakoon, V.R.W. )

    1991-04-01

    This paper reports on lithium zinc ferrite powders of composition Li{sub 0 {minus} 3} Zn{sup 0 {minus}4}Mn{sub 0.05}Fe{sub 2.25}O{sub 4} were prepared by solid-state synthesis. Liquid-phase borosilicate sintering additives were applied to the ferrite particle surfaces at room temperature via a sol-gel coating technique. Calcined and comminuted ferrite powder was dispersed in methanol with predetermined quantities of tetraethyl orthosilicate and triethyl borate. Hydrofluoric acid was used to catalyze the sol-gel reactions. Amorphous coatings of 10 to 20 nm thickness were observed on particle surfaces by TEM. Chemical bonding in the coatings was studied using diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy.

  17. Impedimetric detection of alcohol vapours using nanostructured zinc ferrite.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Saraswathi, Ramiah

    2014-11-01

    A comparative study on the sensing characteristics of nanostructured zinc ferrite to three primary alcohols viz. methanol, ethanol and propanol has been carried out. The zinc ferrite has been prepared by a combustion method and characterized by XRD, FTIR, AFM and SEM. Impedance studies in the alcohol concentration range varying from 100 to 1000 ppm show definite variations in response to both the nature of the alcohol and its concentration. The nanostructured zinc ferrite shows the highest sensor response to methanol and least to propanol. Equivalent circuit modelling and calibration have been made for all the three alcohol sensors. The material shows a better selectivity to the alcohols compared to formaldehyde, ammonia and acetone vapours.

  18. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V.

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  19. Magnetic properties of manganese ferrite films grown at atomic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo Xu; Yang, Aria; Yoon, Soack-Dae; Christodoulides, Joe A.; Harris, Vincent G.; Vittoria, Carmine

    2005-05-15

    Manganese ferrite is a partial inverse spinel which, when prepared by conventional growth techniques, has {approx}20% of the Mn{sup 2+} ions on the octahedral sublattice. Here we describe a layer-by-layer growth scheme at atomic scale by which the percentage of Mn{sup 2+} ions on the octahedral sublattice can be artificially controlled. Manganese ferrite films grown by this technique exhibits different degrees of cation inversion when grown on {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace} MgO substrates. It was observed that saturation magnetization varied in a wide range of values depending on chemical composition and oxygen pressure. Although bulk manganese ferrite was low anisotropy magnetic material, uniaxial anisotropy was observed at room temperature in the films deposited on {l_brace}100{r_brace} MgO substrates, and its magnitude and direction sensitively depended on chemical composition and oxygen pressure during deposition.

  20. Magnetic Properties of Manganese Ferrite Films Grown at Atomic Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo,X.; Yang, A.; Yoon, S.; Christodoulides, I.; Harris, V.; Vittoria, C.

    2005-01-01

    Manganese ferrite is a partial inverse spinel which, when prepared by conventional growth techniques, has {approx}20% of the Mn{sup 2+} ions on the octahedral sublattice. Here we describe a layer-by-layer growth scheme at atomic scale by which the percentage of Mn{sup 2+} ions on the octahedral sublattice can be artificially controlled. Manganese ferrite films grown by this technique exhibits different degrees of cation inversion when grown on {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace} MgO substrates. It was observed that saturation magnetization varied in a wide range of values depending on chemical composition and oxygen pressure. Although bulk manganese ferrite was low anisotropy magnetic material, uniaxial anisotropy was observed at room temperature in the films deposited on {l_brace}100{r_brace} MgO substrates, and its magnitude and direction sensitively depended on chemical composition and oxygen pressure during deposition.

  1. Nanosized copper ferrite materials: Mechanochemical synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manova, Elina; Tsoncheva, Tanya; Paneva, Daniela; Popova, Margarita; Velinov, Nikolay; Kunev, Boris; Tenchev, Krassimir; Mitov, Ivan

    2011-05-01

    Nanodimensional powders of cubic copper ferrite are synthesized by two-steps procedure of co-precipitation of copper and iron hydroxide carbonates, followed by mechanochemical treatment. X-ray powder diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy and temperature-programmed reduction are used for the characterization of the obtained materials. Their catalytic behavior is tested in methanol decomposition to hydrogen and CO and total oxidation of toluene. Formation of nanosized ferrite material is registered even after one hour of milling time. It is established that the prolonging of treatment procedure decreases the dispersion of the obtained product with the appearance of Fe 2O 3. It is demonstrated that the catalytic behavior of the samples depends not only on their initial phase composition, but on the concomitant ferrite phase transformations by the influence of the reaction medium.

  2. Comparison of conventional and microwave sintering on Y-ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obulesu, K. Rama; James Raju, K. C.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we are comparing the results of the conventional and microwave sintered samples of Zn2-Y(Ba2Zn2Fe12O22) ferrite. Y ferrite sample was synthesized using the commercial solid-state reaction method. In CS process, the sample was sintered in muffle furnace at 1200°C for 6 h. In MS process, the sample was sintered at 1120 °C for 30 min in air at the rate of 10°C per min. X-ray powder diffraction revealed that a single phase rhombohedral structure with space group R3m (166) for both samples. The average grain size of CS sample is 1.5-2μm which is greater than MS sample. Magnetic properties also changed with the microwave sintering. These results demonstrate that the strong microwave method is an alternative way to synthesize high performance Y ferrite.

  3. CaO segregation in MnZn-ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, I.N.; Mishra, R.K.; Thomas, G.

    1982-06-01

    The reaction between CaO and MnZn ferrite is investigated by in-situ heating in a scanning electron microscope. The existence of an intermediate phase and a eutectic liquid at about 1300/sup 0/C is observed. The CaO segregation behavior of low loss MnZn ferrite is studies by in-situ heating in transmission electron microscope and Auger electron spectroscopy. The Ca is observed to stay at the grain boundaries in the form of amorphous intermediate phase at low temperatures and in a liquid phase at the sintering temperature. 5 figures.

  4. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Baltich, L.K.

    1987-02-23

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  5. Magnetodielectric effect of Mn-Zn ferrite at resonant frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengfei, Pan; Ning, Zhang

    2016-10-01

    The dielectric properties and the magnetodielectric effect in Mn-Zn ferrite at resonant frequency have been studied in this paper. Dimensional-resonance-induced abnormal dielectric spectrum was observed at f≈1 MHz. The relatively large magnetodielectric ratio of 4500% in a magnetic field of 3.5 kOe was achieved from the Mn-Zn ferrite sample with the initial permeability of 15 K at resonant frequency at room temperature. Theoretical analysis suggests that the large MD effect at resonant frequency is attributed to the enhanced magnetostriction effect.

  6. Control of magnetization reversal in oriented strontium ferrite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Debangsu Anil Kumar, P. S.

    2014-02-21

    Oriented Strontium Ferrite films with the c axis orientation were deposited with varying oxygen partial pressure on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrate using Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. The angle dependent magnetic hysteresis, remanent coercivity, and temperature dependent coercivity had been employed to understand the magnetization reversal of these films. It was found that the Strontium Ferrite thin film grown at lower (higher) oxygen partial pressure shows Stoner-Wohlfarth type (Kondorsky like) reversal. The relative importance of pinning and nucleation processes during magnetization reversal is used to explain the type of the magnetization reversal with different oxygen partial pressure during growth.

  7. Nanoindentation studies of nickel zinc ferrite embedded mesoporous silica template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, S.; Hajra, P.; Mada, M. R.; Bandopadhyay, S.; Chakravorty, D.

    2013-02-01

    Nickel zinc ferrite (NZF) embedded mesoporous silica KIT-6 nanocomposite (NZFMS) was synthesized via impregnation method. The microstructure of the samples was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Nanoindentation (NI) studies were carried out on both mesoporous silica (MS) and the nanocomposite NZFMS. It was found that the young's modulus (E) and hardness (H) of the NZFMS were higher than that of the MS. From creep measurement it was observed that the creep-strain rate was greater for NZFMS compared to MS. This arose due to diffusion of Fe3+ ions from nickel zinc ferrite to the silica glass. The results indicate that the NZFMS material shows superplastic behaviour at room temperature.

  8. Gas atomization of cobalt ferrite-phosphate melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; O'Handley, R. C.; Kalonji, G.

    1989-01-01

    XRD, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and EDXS have been used to characterize a rapidly-solidified (Co,Fe)3O4 spinel generated in a cobalt-iron-phosphate glass matrix by gas atomization of melts. Of the two compositions tested, that containing 20 mol pct P2O5 exhibited randomly-oriented ferrite crystallization whose growth appears to have been diffusion-controlled. Unlike the ferrite, in which the iron has both tetrahedral and octahedral coordination, the iron in the glassy matrix was primarily of distorted-octahedral coordination. Calculations indicate that the cooling rates obtained with oxide melts vary strongly with droplet size, but less strongly with melt temperature.

  9. Study of some Mg-based ferrites as humidity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezlescu, N.; Rezlescu, E.; Doroftei, C.; Popa, P. D.

    2005-01-01

    The micostructure and humidity sensitivity of MgFe2O4 + CaO, Mg0.5Cu0.5Fe1.8Ga0.2O4, Mg0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 + KCl and MgMn0.2Fe1.8O4 ferrites were investigated. We have found that the humidity sensitivity largely depends on composition, crystallite size, surface area and porosity. The best results concerning humidity sensitivity were obtained for MgMn0.2Fe1.8O4 ferrite.

  10. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, A. Banerjee, M. Basu, S.; Pal, M.

    2014-04-24

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  11. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  12. Modeling ferrite electromagnetic response in the time domain

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.; DeFord, J.F.; Craig, G.D.

    1989-04-06

    The behavior of ferrite loads commonly found in induction accelertors has important consequences for the performance of these accelerators. Previous work by the authors on modeling the electromagnetic fields in induction cavities has focussed upon use of a simple, phenomenological model for the process of magnetization reversal in these ferrite loads. In this paper we consider a model for magnetization reversal which is more deeply rooted in theory, and present a simulation of the reversal process based upon this model for an idealized set of boundary conditions. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Baltich, L.K.; Berggren, M.H.

    1987-05-18

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  14. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Silaban, A.; Harrison, D.P. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1989-05-02

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  15. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1988-11-14

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  16. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Baltich, L.K.; Berggren, M.H.

    1987-08-28

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  17. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1988-08-19

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  18. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

    1989-03-06

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

  19. Connection between micro and macro hardness pearlitic-ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duka, Edlira; Oettel, Heinrich; Dilo, Teuta

    2012-09-01

    Many physical and mechanical properties of materials are closely related to their microstructure, technologies to control the microstructure of materials have been well developed to obtain suitable properties. We measured the volume fraction of perlite and ferrite, micro Vickers hardness in pearlite and ferrite and macro hardness using different sample with different carbon content. The volume fraction of pearlite increases by increasing carbon content. By increasing carbon content, micro and macro hardness increase. We can conclude that for those conditional the mixing rule can't be use.

  20. Factors influencing the elastic moduli, reversible strains and hysteresis loops in martensitic Ti-Nb alloys.

    PubMed

    Bönisch, Matthias; Calin, Mariana; van Humbeeck, Jan; Skrotzki, Werner; Eckert, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    While the current research focus in the search for biocompatible low-modulus alloys is set on β-type Ti-based materials, the potential of fully martensitic Ti-based alloys remains largely unexplored. In this work, the influence of composition and pre-straining on the elastic properties of martensitic binary Ti-Nb alloys was studied. Additionally, the phase formation was compared in the as-cast versus the quenched state. The elastic moduli and hardness of the studied martensitic alloys are at a minimum of 16wt.% Nb and peak between 23.5 and 28.5wt.% Nb. The uniaxial deformation behavior of the alloys used is characterized by the absence of distinct yield points. Monotonic and cyclic (hysteretic) loading-unloading experiments were used to study the influence of Nb-content and pre-straining on the elastic moduli. Such experiments were also utilized to assess the recoverable elastic and anelastic deformations as well as hysteretic energy losses. Particular attention has been paid to the separation of non-linear elastic from anelastic strains, which govern the stress and strain limits to which a material can be loaded without deforming it plastically. It is shown that slight pre-straining of martensitic Ti-Nb alloys can lead to considerable reductions in their elastic moduli as well as increases in their total reversible strains.

  1. Determining Experimental Parameters for Thermal-Mechanical Forming Simulation considering Martensite Formation in Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Philipp; Liewald, Mathias

    2011-08-01

    The forming behavior of metastable austenitic stainless steel is mainly dominated by the temperature-dependent TRIP effect (transformation induced plasticity). Of course, the high dependency of material properties on the temperature level during forming means the temperature must be considered during the FE analysis. The strain-induced formation of α'-martensite from austenite can be represented by using finite element programs utilizing suitable models such as the Haensel-model. This paper discusses the determination of parameters for a completely thermal-mechanical forming simulation in LS-DYNA based on the material model of Haensel. The measurement of the martensite evolution in non-isothermal tensile tests was performed with metastable austenitic stainless steel EN 1.4301 at different rolling directions between 0° and 90 °. This allows an estimation of the influence of the rolling direction to the martensite formation. Of specific importance is the accuracy of the martensite content measured by magnetic induction methods (Feritscope). The observation of different factors, such as stress dependence of the magnetisation, blank thickness and numerous calibration curves discloses a substantial important influence on the parameter determination for the material models. The parameters obtained for use of Haensel model and temperature-dependent friction coefficients are used to simulate forming process of a real component and to validate its implementation in the commercial code LS-DYNA.

  2. Austenite Formation from Martensite in a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P. F.; Sietsma, J.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of austenitization treatment of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) on austenite formation during reheating and on the fraction of austenite retained after tempering treatment is measured and analyzed. The results show the formation of austenite in two stages. This is probably due to inhomogeneous distribution of the austenite-stabilizing elements Ni and Mn, resulting from their slow diffusion from martensite into austenite and carbide and nitride dissolution during the second, higher temperature, stage. A better homogenization of the material causes an increase in the transformation temperatures for the martensite-to-austenite transformation and a lower retained austenite fraction with less variability after tempering. Furthermore, the martensite-to-austenite transformation was found to be incomplete at the target temperature of 1223 K (950 °C), which is influenced by the previous austenitization treatment and the heating rate. The activation energy for martensite-to-austenite transformation was determined by a modified Kissinger equation to be approximately 400 and 500 kJ/mol for the first and the second stages of transformation, respectively. Both values are much higher than the activation energy found during isothermal treatment in a previous study and are believed to be effective activation energies comprising the activation energies of both mechanisms involved, i.e., nucleation and growth.

  3. Dissecting the Mechanism of Martensitic Transformation via Atomic-Scale Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu-Sheng; Sun, Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Evan; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2014-08-01

    Martensitic transformation plays a pivotal role in the microstructural evolution and plasticity of many engineering materials. However, so far the underlying atomic processes that accomplish the displacive transformation have been obscured by the difficulty in directly observing key microstructural signatures on atomic scale. To resolve this long-standing problem, here we examine an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel that has a strain/microstructure-gradient induced by surface mechanical attrition, which allowed us to capture in one sample all the key interphase regions generated during the γ(fcc) --> ɛ(hcp) --> α'(bcc) transition, a prototypical case of deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations confirm the crucial role of partial dislocations, and reveal tell-tale features including the lattice rotation of the α' martensite inclusion, the transition lattices at the ɛ/α' interfaces that cater the shears, and the excess reverse shear-shuffling induced γ necks in the ɛ martensite plates. These direct observations verify for the first time the 50-year-old Bogers-Burgers-Olson-Cohen (BBOC) model, and enrich our understanding of DIMT mechanisms. Our findings have implications for improved microstructural control in metals and alloys.

  4. Improved bounds on the energy-minimizing strains in martensitic polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peigney, Michaël

    2016-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the theoretical prediction of the energy-minimizing (or recoverable) strains in martensitic polycrystals, considering a nonlinear elasticity model of phase transformation at finite strains. The main results are some rigorous upper bounds on the set of energy-minimizing strains. Those bounds depend on the polycrystalline texture through the volume fractions of the different orientations. The simplest form of the bounds presented is obtained by combining recent results for single crystals with a homogenization approach proposed previously for martensitic polycrystals. However, the polycrystalline bound delivered by that procedure may fail to recover the monocrystalline bound in the homogeneous limit, as is demonstrated in this paper by considering an example related to tetragonal martensite. This motivates the development of a more detailed analysis, leading to improved polycrystalline bounds that are notably consistent with results for single crystals in the homogeneous limit. A two-orientation polycrystal of tetragonal martensite is studied as an illustration. In that case, analytical expressions of the upper bounds are derived and the results are compared with lower bounds obtained by considering laminate textures.

  5. Thermal stability and phase transformations of martensitic Ti-Nb alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bönisch, Matthias; Calin, Mariana; Waitz, Thomas; Panigrahi, Ajit; Zehetbauer, Michael; Gebert, Annett; Skrotzki, Werner; Eckert, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    Aiming at understanding the governing microstructural phenomena during heat treatments of Ni-free Ti-based shape memory materials for biomedical applications, a series of Ti-Nb alloys with Nb concentrations up to 29 wt% was produced by cold-crucible casting, followed by homogenization treatment and water quenching. Despite the large amount of literature available concerning the thermal stability and ageing behavior of Ti-Nb alloys, only few studies were performed dealing with the isochronal transformation behavior of initially martensitic Ti-Nb alloys. In this work, the formation of martensites (α‧ and α″) and their stability under different thermal processing conditions were investigated by a combination of x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, dilatometry and electron microscopy. The effect of Nb additions on the structural competition in correlation with stable and metastable phase diagrams was also studied. Alloys with 24 wt% Nb or less undergo a \\alpha '/\\alpha '' \\to \\alpha + \\beta \\to \\beta transformation sequence on heating from room temperature to 1155 K. In alloys containing >24 wt% Nb α″ martensitically reverts back to β0, which is highly unstable against chemical demixing by formation of isothermal ωiso. During slow cooling from the single phase β domain α precipitates and only very limited amounts of α″ martensite form.

  6. Prediction of diffusion assisted hydrogen embrittlement failure in high strength martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q.; Zikry, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    A stress assisted hydrogen diffusion transport model, a dislocation-density-based multiple-slip crystalline plasticity formulation, and an overlapping fracture method were used to investigate hydrogen diffusion and embrittlement in lath martensitic steels with distributions of M23C6 carbide precipitates. The formulation accounts for variant morphologies based on orientation relationships (ORs) that are uniquely inherent to lath martensitic microstructures. The interrelated effects of martensitic block and packet boundaries and carbide precipitates on hydrogen diffusion, hydrogen assisted crack nucleation and growth, are analyzed to characterize the competition between cleavage fracture and hydrogen diffusion assisted fracture along preferential microstructural fracture planes. Stresses along the three cleavage planes and the six hydrogen embrittlement fracture planes are monitored, such that crack nucleation and growth can nucleate along energetically favorable planes. High pressure gradients result in the accumulation of hydrogen, which embrittles martensite, and results in crack nucleation and growth along {110} planes. Cleavage fracture occurs along {100} planes when there is no significant hydrogen diffusion. The predictions indicate that hydrogen diffusion can suppress the emission and accumulation of dislocation density, and lead to fracture with low plastic strains.

  7. X-ray measurements of the self-organization of martensitic variants during thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Daniel; Sutton, Mark; Rogers, Michael

    The deformation of most types of metals involves an irreversible flow of crystallographic dislocations. This allows for their ductility. The deformation of a metallic shape memory alloy (SMA), on the other hand, is accommodated by a solid-solid phase transition. If deformed in the low-temperature martensitic phase, an SMA can be returned to its original shape by raising its temperature to the point where it changes back to its high-temperature parent phase. When the reverse occurs and the transformation is from parent to martensitic phase, an SMA goes from a high-symmetry to a low-symmetry state in which a number of martensitic variants are produced. We monitored the self-organization of these variants during cycles of periodic thermal driving. This was done using in situ X-ray Photon Correlation Scectroscopy (XPCS), which uses correlation from X-ray speckle to quantify the degree of microstructural change in a material. Our measurements revealed enhanced reversibility in the organization of the martensitic variants as the system evolved during repeated thermal cycling.

  8. Probing Martensitic Transition in Nitinol Wire: A Comparison of X-ray Diffraction and Other Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.; Tiernan, P.; Tofail, S. A. M.; Ghandi, A. A.

    2011-01-17

    Martensitic to austenite transformation in Nitinol wire can be measured by a number of techniques such as XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry), BFR (Bend and Free Recovery) and Vickers indentation recovery. A comparison of results from these varied characterisation techniques is reported here to obtain a greater understanding of the thermal-elastic-structural changes associated with martensitic transformation. The transformation temperatures measured by DSC were found to correspond well with the structural and mechanical information obtained from XRD, BFR and Vickers indent recovery methods. Indent recovery is a relatively new and accurate method of monitoring stress induced martensitic transformations in NiTi and is one of only a few methods of stress inducing martensitic transformation in large scale samples. It is especially useful for NiTi in the as-cast billet form, where tensile testing is impossible. BFR is uniquely popular in the NiTi wire manufacturing sector and is recognised as the most accurate method of measuring the transformation temperature. Here the material is stressed to a representative in-service stress level during the test. No other test uses the shape memory effect for measuring the transformation temperature of NiTi. The results show that the DSC thermogram and XRD diffractogram have a peak overlap which is a common occurrence in NiTi that has been extensively processed. The XRD method further explains the observations in the DSC thermogram and in combination they confirm the transformation temperature.

  9. Dissecting the mechanism of martensitic transformation via atomic-scale observations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xu-Sheng; Sun, Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Evan; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2014-08-21

    Martensitic transformation plays a pivotal role in the microstructural evolution and plasticity of many engineering materials. However, so far the underlying atomic processes that accomplish the displacive transformation have been obscured by the difficulty in directly observing key microstructural signatures on atomic scale. To resolve this long-standing problem, here we examine an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel that has a strain/microstructure-gradient induced by surface mechanical attrition, which allowed us to capture in one sample all the key interphase regions generated during the γ(fcc) → ε(hcp) → α'(bcc) transition, a prototypical case of deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations confirm the crucial role of partial dislocations, and reveal tell-tale features including the lattice rotation of the α' martensite inclusion, the transition lattices at the ε/α' interfaces that cater the shears, and the excess reverse shear-shuffling induced γ necks in the ε martensite plates. These direct observations verify for the first time the 50-year-old Bogers-Burgers-Olson-Cohen (BBOC) model, and enrich our understanding of DIMT mechanisms. Our findings have implications for improved microstructural control in metals and alloys.

  10. Tensile and impact behaviour of BATMAN II steels, Ti-bearing reduced activation martensitic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchioni, G.; Casagrande, E.; De Angelis, U.; De Santis, G.; Ferrara, D.; Pilloni, L.

    Two series of Reduced Activation Ferrous alloys (RAF) have been produced and studied by Casaccia's Laboratories. These martensitic alloys are named BATMAN steels. They are among the few presently developed RAF materials to exploit Ti as a carbide forming and grain size stabilizing element instead of Ta. In this work their mechanical properties are illustrated.

  11. Intra-variant substructure in Ni–Mn–Ga martensite: Conjugation boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Muntifering, B.; Pond, R. C.; Kovarik, L.; Browning, N. D.; Müllner, P.

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure of a Ni–Mn–Ga alloy in the martensitic phase was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. Inter-variant twin boundaries were observed separating non-modulated tetragonal martensite variants. In addition, intra-variant boundary structures, referred to here as “conjugation boundaries”, were also observed. We propose that conjugation boundaries originate at the transformation interface between austenite and a nascent martensite variant. In the alloy studied, deformation twinning was observed, consistent with being the mode of lattice-invariant deformation, and this can occur on either of two crystallographically equivalent conjugate View the MathML source{101}(101⁻) twinning systems: conjugation boundaries separate regions within a single variant in which the active modes were distinct. The defect structure of conjugation boundaries and the low-angle of misorientation across them are revealed in detail using high-resolution microscopy. Finally, we anticipate that the mobility of such boundaries is lower than that of inter-variant boundaries, and is therefore likely to significantly affect the kinetics of deformation in the martensitic phase.

  12. Ab Initio Simulations of Temperature Dependent Phase Stability and Martensitic Transitions in NiTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskins, Justin B.; Thompson, Alexander E.; Lawson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    For NiTi based alloys, the shape memory effect is governed by a transition from a low-temperature martensite phase to a high-temperature austenite phase. Despite considerable experimental and computational work, basic questions regarding the stability of the phases and the martensitic phase transition remain unclear even for the simple case of binary, equiatomic NiTi. We perform ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to describe the temperature-dependent behavior of NiTi and resolve several of these outstanding issues. Structural correlation functions and finite temperature phonon spectra are evaluated to determine phase stability. In particular, we show that finite temperature, entropic effects stabilize the experimentally observed martensite (B19') and austenite (B2) phases while destabilizing the theoretically predicted (B33) phase. Free energy computations based on ab initio thermodynamic integration confirm these results and permit estimates of the transition temperature between the phases. In addition to the martensitic phase transition, we predict a new transition between the B33 and B19' phases. The role of defects in suppressing these phase transformations is discussed.

  13. A theory of thin films of martensitic materials withapplications to microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, K.; James, R. D.

    1999-03-01

    A direct derivation is given of a theory for single crystal thin films, starting from threedimensional nonlinear elasticity theory augmented by a term for interfacial energy. The deri-vation involves no a priori choice of asymptotic expansion or ansatz. It yields a frame-indifferentCosserat membrane theory with one Cosserat vector field. The theory is applied to multi-wellenergy functions appropriate to martensitic materials. It is found that, unlike in bulk materials,which generally only support finely twinned austenite/martensite interfaces as energyminimizing states, the thin film theory predicts the existence of exact, untwinnedaustenite/martensite interfaces. These are used to construct some simple energy minimizingdeformations—"tents" and "tunnels"—that could possibly be the basis of simple large-deformationmicroactuators. Explicit results are given for martensitic materials in the systems NiMnGa, NiTi,NiTiCu, and NiAl. A certain alloy of precise composition Ni 30.5 Ti 49.5 Cu 20.0 is predicted to support a four-sided "tent" on an (001) film, which furthermore ispredicted to collapse to the substrate upon heating. A formal derivation is given of higher ordertheories, which yields two additional Cosserat vectors and an explicit form of the bendingenergy. The derivation indicates an approach to plate-shell-thin film theories that is ratherdifferent from the ones usually followed.

  14. Minimum activation martensitic alloys for surface disposal after exposure to neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Steel alloys for long-term exposure to neutron flux have a martensitic microstructure and contain chromium, carbon, tungsten, vanadium and preferably titanium. Activation of the steel is held to within acceptable limits for eventual surface disposal by stringently controlling the impurity levels of Ni, Mo, Cu, N, Co, Nb, Al and Mn.

  15. Cobalt ferrite based magnetostrictive materials for magnetic stress sensor and actuator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiles, David C. (Inventor); Paulsen, Jason A. (Inventor); Snyder, John E. (Inventor); Lo, Chester C. H. (Inventor); Ring, Andrew P. (Inventor); Bormann, Keith A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Magnetostrictive material based on cobalt ferrite is described. The cobalt ferrite is substituted with transition metals (such manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) or mixtures thereof) by substituting the transition metals for iron or cobalt to form substituted cobalt ferrite that provides mechanical properties that make the substituted cobalt ferrite material effective for use as sensors and actuators. The substitution of transition metals lowers the Curie temperature of the material (as compared to cobalt ferrite) while maintaining a suitable magnetostriction for stress sensing applications.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of strain pseudospins: Athermal martensites, incubation times, and entropy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankaraiah, N.; Murthy, K. P. N.; Lookman, T.; Shenoy, S. R.

    2011-08-01

    We study martensitic transition kinetics through temperature-quench Monte Carlo simulations for a square/rectangle ferroelastic transition, described by a Hamiltonian of three-state pseudospins S, without extrinsic disorder. Here S=0 for high-temperature austenite, and S=±1 for the two martensite variants. The temperature-dependent pseudospin Hamiltonian comes from the total scaled free energy functional, evaluated at the three minima of Landau polynomials in order-parameter strains. It includes power-law anisotropic interactions from the St. Venant compatibility constraint, which orient the elastic domain walls in a symmetry-breaking diagonal direction. We find that temperature-time-transformation (TTT) plots for domain-wall phase evolution have phase crossover temperatures, which are understood through an effective-droplet energy parametrization. For temperature cycling through the phases, there are hysteretic peaks in physical quantities. For temperature quenches, a “vapor” of martensitic droplets converts at a time tm(T) to a vibrating “liquid” of bidiagonal domain walls, which then orient at a time tC(T) to a static “crystal” of single-diagonal martensitic twins, which can have bound residual austenite. Focusing on the conversion time tm, we find a material-parameter phase diagram, which has regions of nonactivated “athermal” and activated “isothermal” martensites. In an athermal, nonactivated regime, there are explosive austenite-martensite conversions at temperatures below a residual-austenite spinodal in the TTT diagram, while above it, there are conversion tails, as in experiment. We find tm(T) has a quasi-universal Vogel-Fulcher divergence at transition, with a log-normal conversion-rate distribution. The incubation times tm,tC are attributed to entropy barriers, with signatures of flat energies, during pathway searches for finite-scale transition textures, which are explicitly identified through textural and internal-stress snapshots

  17. Processus de réorientation des variantes de martensite dans un monocristal de Cu Al NiReorientation process of martensite variants in a Cu Al Ni monocrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Pascal; Lexcellent, Christian

    2003-04-01

    On the one hand, Chu (Thesis, Minnesota, 1993), Abeyaratne et al. (Philos. Mag. A 73 (2) (1996) 457-497) performed biaxial tensile tests on a single crystal Cu-Al-Ni plate, in order to analyze the reorientation process of martensite variants. On the other hand, use is made of a constitutive model with n+1 internal variables (the volume fractions of austenite and of the n martensite variants) specific to the thermomechanical behavior of SMA single crystals in order to simulate the martensite variant reorientation. The comparison between experimental results and model prediction is fairly good. To cite this article: P. Blanc, C. Lexcellent, C. R. Mecanique 331 (2003).

  18. Martensite aging effect in a Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50} high temperature shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, W.; Otsuka, Kazuhiro

    1999-11-19

    Ti-Pd alloy system is one of the potential high temperature shape memory alloys due to its high martensitic transformation temperatures. Thus, many researches including shape memory characteristics, martensitic transformations and mechanical behavior of the alloys have been done in recent yeas. However, martensite aging effect in the alloy, which is an important issue as to the stability of martensite at high temperature, has not been reported yet. Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50} transforms from B2 parent phase to B19 martensite upon cooling, and M{sub s} is 823 K (25) and T{sub m} is 1,673 K (26). Thus M{sub s}/T{sub m} ratio of the alloy is about 0.49, and the alloy may show strong martensite aging effect according to the above proposal. It is now of interest to examine whether the Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50} alloy show martensite aging effect. As will be shown, the Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50} alloy indeed shows the aging effect, as expected; however, the aging effect of this alloy exhibits a unique feature, which is not found in other shape memory alloys.

  19. Local strain evolution due to athermal γ→ε martensitic transformation in biomedical CoCrMo alloys.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Kenta; Mori, Manami; Koizumi, Yuichiro; Chiba, Akihiko

    2014-04-01

    Locally developed strains caused by athermal γ face-centered cubic (fcc)→ε hexagonal close-packed (hcp) martensitic transformation were investigated for the γ matrix of Ni-free Co-29Cr-6Mo (wt%) alloys prepared with or without added nitrogen. Electron-backscatter-diffraction-(EBSD)-based strain analysis revealed that in addition to ε-martensite interiors, the N-free alloy that had a duplex microstructure consisting of the γ matrix and athermal ε-martensite plates showed larger magnitudes of both elastic and plastic strains in the γ phase matrix than the N-doped counterpart that did not have a ε-martensite phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results indicated that the ε-martensite microplates were aggregates of thin ε-layers, which were formed by three different {111}γ〈112¯〉γ Shockley partial dislocations in accordance with a previously proposed mechanism (Putaux and Chevalier, 1996) that canceled the shear strains of the individual variants. The plastic strains are believed to have originated from the martensitic transformation itself, and the activity of dislocations is believed to be the origin of the transformation. We have revealed that the elastic strains in the γ matrix originate from interactions among the ε-martensite phase, extended dislocations, and/or thin ε-layers. The dislocations highly dissociated into stacking faults, making stress relaxation at intersections difficult and further introducing local strain evolution.

  20. Stress Induce Martensitic Transformations in Hydrogen Embrittlement of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenak, Paul

    2013-04-01

    In austenitic type stainless steels, hydrogen concentration gradients formed during electrochemical charging and followed by hydrogen loss during aging, at room temperature, surface stresses, and martensitic phases α'-BCC and ɛ-HCP developed. The basic relationship between the X-ray diffraction peak broadening and the hydrogen gradients, formed during charging and aging at room temperature in such austenitic stainless steels, were analyzed. The results demonstrate that the impact of stresses must be considered in the discussion of phase transformations due to hydrogenation. Austenitic stainless steels based on iron-nickel-chromium, have relatively low stacking fault energy γSFE and undergo: quenching to low temperatures, plastic deformation, sensitization heat treatments, high pressure (≥3-5 × 109 Pa) by hydrogen or other gases, electrochemical charging (when the sample is cathode) and when is irradiation by various ions the samples in vacuum. All the above mentioned induce formation of ɛ and α' in the face-centered cubic (FCC) austenite γ matrix. The highest stresses cause formation of mainly α' phase and ɛ-martensite, and both are involved in plastic deformation processes and promoting crack propagation at the surface. In 310 steel, the crack propagation is based on deformation processes following ɛ-martensitic formation only. Formations of ɛ- and α'-martensites were noted along the fracture surfaces and ahead of the crack tip. The cracks propagated through the ɛ-martensitic plates, which formed along the active slip planes, while α' phase was always found in the high-stress region on the ends of the ligaments from both sides of the crack surfaces undergoing propagation.