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Sample records for ferrite-martensite steel surface

  1. Small punch tensile/fracture test data and 3D specimen surface data on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel from cryogenic to room temperature.

    PubMed

    Bruchhausen, Matthias; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Ripplinger, Stefan; Austin, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Raw data from small punch tensile/fracture tests at two displacement rates in the temperature range from -196 °C to room temperature on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel are presented. A number of specimens were analyzed after testing by means of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Based on the CT volume data detailed 3D surface maps of the specimens were established. All data are open access and available from Online Data Information Network (ODIN)https://odin.jrc.ec.europa.eu. The data presented in the current work has been analyzed in the research article "On the determination of the ductile to brittle transition temperature from small punch tests on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel" (M. Bruchhausen, S. Holmström, J.-M. Lapetite, S. Ripplinger, 2015) [1].

  2. Small punch tensile/fracture test data and 3D specimen surface data on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel from cryogenic to room temperature.

    PubMed

    Bruchhausen, Matthias; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Ripplinger, Stefan; Austin, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Raw data from small punch tensile/fracture tests at two displacement rates in the temperature range from -196 °C to room temperature on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel are presented. A number of specimens were analyzed after testing by means of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Based on the CT volume data detailed 3D surface maps of the specimens were established. All data are open access and available from Online Data Information Network (ODIN)https://odin.jrc.ec.europa.eu. The data presented in the current work has been analyzed in the research article "On the determination of the ductile to brittle transition temperature from small punch tests on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel" (M. Bruchhausen, S. Holmström, J.-M. Lapetite, S. Ripplinger, 2015) [1]. PMID:27660812

  3. Tritium retention in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Y.; Abe, S.; Matsuyama, M.; Alimov, V.K.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Bobyr, N.P.; Cherkez, D.I.; Khripunov, B.I.; Golubeva, A.V.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Klimov, N.S.; Chernov, V.M.; Oyaidzu, M.; Yamanishi, T.

    2015-03-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are structural material candidates for breeding blankets of future fusion reactors. Therefore, tritium (T) retention in RAFM steels is an important problem in assessing the T inventory of blankets. In this study, specimens of RAFM steels were subjected to irradiation of 20 MeV W ions to 0.54 displacements per atom (dpa), exposure to high flux D plasmas at 400 and 600 K and that to pulsed heat loads. The specimens thus prepared were exposed to DT gas at 473 K. Despite severe modification in the surface morphology, heat loads had negligible effects on T retention. Significant increase in T retention at the surface and/or subsurface was observed after D plasma exposure. However, T trapped at the surface/subsurface layer was easily removed by maintaining the specimens in the air at about 300 K. Displacement damage led to increase in T retention in the bulk due to the trapping effects of defects, and T trapped was stable at 300 K. It was therefore concluded that displacement damages had the largest influence on T retention under the present conditions.

  4. Carbides in a High-Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yin Zhong; Ji, Bo; Zhou, Xiao Ling; Zhu, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The precipitate phases in an 11 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic steel normalized at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 0.5 hour and tempered at 1053 K (780 °C) for 1.5 hours have been investigated. Except for dominant phases, Cr-rich M23C6 carbide and Nb-rich, Ta-Nb-rich, and V-rich MC carbides, needle-like precipitates with a typical size of 70 to 310 and 10 to 30 nm for the length of the long and short axis of the needles, respectively, were also observed on the extraction carbon replica of the steel. The typical metallic element composition of the needle-like precipitates is about 53-82Fe, 14-26Cr, 0.5-18Ta, 1-6W, and 2-5Co in atomic pct. Through energy dispersive X-ray analysis and electron diffraction along with calculations regarding lattice parameter and interplanar spacing, the needle-like precipitates were identified as a Fe-rich M5C2 carbide, which is not known to have been reported previously in high-chromium steels. The M5C2 carbide has a base-centered monoclinic crystal structure with the approximate lattice parameters a/ b/ c = 1.142/0.5186/0.5383 nm and β = 104.68 deg. The formation of the Fe-rich M5C2 carbides in the steel has been discussed. The effect of chromium content in matrix and boron addition on the precipitate phases in ferritic/martensitic steels has also been discussed.

  5. Irradiation-induced grain growth in nanocrystalline reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W. B.; Chen, L. Q.; Zhang, C. Yang, Z. G.; Ji, Y. Z.; Zang, H.; Shen, T. L.

    2014-09-22

    In this work, we investigate the microstructure evolution of surface-nanocrystallized reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels upon high-dose helium ion irradiation (24.3 dpa). We report a significant irradiation-induced grain growth in the irradiated buried layer at a depth of 300–500 nm, rather than at the peak damage region (at a depth of ∼840 nm). This phenomenon can be explained by the thermal spike model: minimization of the grain boundary (GB) curvature resulting from atomic diffusion in the cascade center near GBs.

  6. Nanosized MX Precipitates in Ultra-Low-Carbon Ferritic/Martensitic Heat-Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Feng-Shi; Jung, Woo-Sang

    2009-02-01

    Nanosized MX precipitates in ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant 9Cr-W-Mo-VNbTiN steels were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) using carbon film replicas. The steels were prepared by vacuum induction melting followed by hot forging and rolling into plates. The plates were normalized at 1100 °C for 1 hour, cooled in air, and tempered at 700 °C for 1 hour. The results show that bimodal nanosized MX precipitates distribute densely and homogeneously in the matrix within martensitic lath after normalizing-and-tempering heat treatment. The larger nanosized MX precipitates with the size of 30 to 50 nm are rich in Nb, while the smaller ones with the size of about 10 nm contain less Nb but more V. Small addition of Ti causes an increase in the number of the larger nanosized MX precipitates. The total number density of the nanosized MX precipitates in the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic steels is measured to be over 300/ μm2, much higher than that in conventional ferritic/martensitic steels. Short-term creep test results show that the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic steels with high dense nanosized MX precipitates have much higher creep rupture strength than conventional ASME-P92 steel. The strength degradation of the ultra-low-carbon ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels during creep is also discussed in this article.

  7. Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations.

  8. Corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of ferritic/martensitic steel in super critical pressurized water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, T.; Shiba, K.; Enoeda, M.; Akiba, M.

    2007-08-01

    A water-cooled solid breeder (WCSB) blanket cooled by high temperature SCPW (super critical pressurized water) is a practical option of DEMO reactor. Therefore, it is necessary to check the compatibility of the steel with SCPW. In this work, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H has been tested through slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in 23.5 MPa SCPW. And weight change behavior was measured up to 1000 h. F82H did not demonstrated stress corrosion cracking and its weight simply increased with surface oxidation. The weight change of F82H was almost same as commercial 9%-Cr steels. According to a cross-sectional analysis and weight change behavior, corrosion rate of F82H in the 823 K SCPW is estimated to be 0.04 mm/yr.

  9. Current status and future R&D for reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishinuma, A.; Kohyama, A.; Klueh, R. L.; Gelles, D. S.; Dietz, W.; Ehrlich, K.

    1998-10-01

    International research and development programs on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels, the primary candidate-alloys for a DEMO fusion reactor and beyond, are briefly summarized, along with some information on conventional steels. An International Energy Agency (IEA) collaborative test program to determine the feasibility of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion is in progress and will be completed within this century. Baseline properties including typical irradiation behavior for Fe-(7-9)%Cr reduced-activation ferritic steels are shown. Most of the data are for a heat of modified F82H steel, purchased for the IEA program. Experimental plans to explore possible problems and solutions for fusion devices using ferromagnetic materials are introduced. The preliminary results show that it should be possible to use a ferromagnetic vacuum vessel in tokamak devices.

  10. Summary of the IEA workshop/working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    An International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Group on Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for Fusion Applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, the European Union, the United States, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, United Kingdom, 24-25 October 1996. At the meeting preliminary data generated on the large heats of steel purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. The second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The next meeting will be held in conjunction with the International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) in Sendai, Japan, 23-31 October 1997.

  11. Corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaowei

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels and Ni-based alloys in supercritical water (SCW) has been studied due to their potential applications in future nuclear reactor systems, fossil fuel power plants and waste treatment processes. 9˜12% chromium ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit good radiation resistance and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Ni-based alloys with an austenitic face-centered cubic (FCC) structure are designed to retain good mechanical strength and corrosion/oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Corrosion tests were carried out at three temperatures, 360°C, 500°C and 600°C, with two dissolved oxygen contents, 25 ppb and 2 ppm for up to 3000 hours. Alloys modified by grain refinement and reactive element addition were also investigated to determine their ability to improve the corrosion resistance in SCW. A duplex oxide structure was observed in the F/M steels after exposure to 25 ppb oxygen SCW, including an outer oxide layer with columnar magnetite grains and an inner oxide layer constituted of a mixture of spinel and ferrite phases in an equiaxed grain structure. An additional outermost hematite layer formed in the SCW-exposed samples when the oxygen content was increased to 2 ppm. Weight gain in the F/M steels increased with exposure temperatures and times, and followed parabolic growth kinetics in most of the samples. In Ni-based alloys after exposure to SCW, general corrosion and pitting corrosion were observed, and intergranular corrosion was found when exposed at 600°C due to formation of a local healing layer. The general oxide structure on the Ni-based alloys was characterized as NiO/Spinel/(CrxFe 1-x)2O3/(Fe,Ni). No change in oxidation mechanism was observed in crossing the critical point despite the large change in water properties. Corrosion resistance of the F/M steels was significantly improved by plasma-based yttrium surface treatment because of restrained outward diffusion of iron by the

  12. Influence of combined thermomechanical treatment on impurity segregation in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, A. M.; Neustroev, V. S.; Shamardin, V. K.; Shestakov, V. P.; Tazhibaeva, I. L.; Krivchenkoa, V. A.

    2000-12-01

    In this study 13Cr2MoVNb ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) and 16Cr15Ni3MoNb austenitic stainless steel (ASS) tensile specimens were subjected to standard heat treatments and divided into two groups. Specimens in group 1 (FMS only) were aged at 400°C in a stress free and in an elastically stressed state with a tensile load (100 MPa) then doped with hydrogen in an electrolytic cell. Specimens in group 2 were subjected to cold work (up to 10%) and exposed to short-time heating at 500° for 0.5 h. All specimens were fractured at room temperature in an Auger spectrometer and Auger analysis of the fracture surfaces was performed in situ after fracturing. A noticeable increase of N and P segregation levels and a widening of the depth distribution on the grain boundary facets were observed in the FMS after aging in the stressed state. Cold-worked FMS and ASS showed a ductile dimple mode of fracture, but relatively high levels of S, P and N were observed on the dimple surfaces. We consider the origin of such effects in terms of the stressed state and plastic-deformation-enhanced segregation.

  13. Recent Progress of R&D Activities on Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Q.; Baluc, N.; Dai, Y.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, A.; Konys, J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Lindau, R.; Muroga, T.; Odette, George R.; Raj, B.; Stoller, Roger E.; Tan, L.; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Tavassoli, A,-A.F.; Yamamoto, Takuya; Wan, F.; Wu, Y.

    2013-01-03

    Several types of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel have been developed over the past 30 years in China, Europe, India, Japan, Russia and the USA for application in ITER TBM and future fusion DEMO and power reactors. The progress has been particularly important during the past few years with evaluation of mechanical porperties of these steels before and after irradiation and in contact with different cooling media. This paper presents recent RAFM steel results obtained in ITER partner countries in relation with different TBM and DEMO options

  14. Using nonlinear ultrasound measurements to track thermal aging in modified 9%Cr ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Daniel; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Ruiz, Alberto; Joo, Young-Sang

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates early thermal aging in 9%Cr ferritic martensitic (FM) steel, which is caused by the formation of second phases during high temperature exposure. This study employs a recently developed nonlinear ultrasonic technique to explore the sensitivity of the nonlinearity parameter. Experimental results show that the nonlinearity parameter is sensitive to certain changes in material's properties such as thermal embrittlement and hardness changes; therefore, it can be used as an indicator of the thermal damage. The specimens investigated are heat treated for different holding times ranging from 200h to 3000h at 650°C. Nonlinear ultrasonic experiments are conducted for each specimen using a wedge transducer to generate and an air-coupled transducer to detect Raleigh surface waves. The amplitudes of the first and second order harmonics are measured at different propagation distances and these amplitudes are used to obtain the relative nonlinearity parameter for each specimen with a different holding time. The nonlinear ultrasonic results are compared with independent mechanical measurements and metallographic images. This research proposes the nonlinear ultrasonic technique as a nondestructive evaluation tool not only to detect thermal damage in early stages, and also to qualitatively assess the stage of thermal damage.

  15. Report on thermal aging effects on tensile properties of ferritic-martensitic steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.; Listwan, J.T.; Natesan, K.

    2012-05-10

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of thermal-aging induced degradation of tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic steels. The report is the first deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030103), under the Work Package A-11AN040301, 'Advanced Alloy Testing' performed by Argonne National Laboratory, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing tensile data on aged alloys and a mechanistic model, validated by experiments, with a predictive capability on long-term performance. The scope of work is to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on the tensile properties of advanced alloys such as ferritic-martensitic steels, mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616, and advanced austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS. The aging experiments have been conducted over a temperature of 550-750 C for various time periods to simulate the microstructural changes in the alloys as a function of time at temperature. In addition, a mechanistic model based on thermodynamics and kinetics has been used to address the changes in microstructure of the alloys as a function of time and temperature, which is developed in the companion work package at ANL. The focus of this project is advanced alloy testing and understanding the effects of long-term thermal aging on the tensile properties. Advanced materials examined in this project include ferritic-martensitic steels mod.9Cr-1Mo and NF616, and austenitic steel, HT-UPS. The report summarizes the tensile testing results of thermally-aged mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 ferritic-martensitic steels. NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 experienced different thermal-mechanical treatments before thermal aging experiments. NF616 H1 was normalized and tempered, and NF616 H2 was normalized and tempered and cold-rolled. By examining these two heats, we evaluated the effects of thermal-mechanical treatments on material microstructures and

  16. Radiation hardening and deformation behavior of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Shiba, K.

    1998-03-01

    Tensile data from several 8--12% Cr alloys irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses up to 34 dpa at temperatures ranging from 90 to 600 C are discussed in this paper. One of the critical questions surrounding the use of ferritic-martensitic steels in a fusion environment concerns the loss of uniform elongation after irradiation at low temperatures. Irradiation and testing at temperatures below 200--300 C results in uniform elongations less than 1% and stress-strain curves in which plastic instability immediately follows yielding, implying dislocation channeling and flow localization. Reductions in area and total elongations, however, remain high.

  17. A preliminary ferritic-martensitic stainless steel constitution diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, M.C.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary research to develop a constitution diagram that will more accurately predict the microstructure of ferritic and martensitic stainless steel weld deposits. A button melting technique was used to produce a wide range of compositions using mixtures of conventional ferritic and martensitic stainless steels, including types 403, 409, 410, 430, 439 and 444. These samples were prepared metallographically, and the vol-% ferrite and martensite was determined quantitatively. In addition, the hardness and ferrite number (FN) were measured. Using this data, a preliminary constitution diagram is proposed that provides a more accurate method for predicting the microstructures of arc welds in ferritic and martensitic stainless steels.

  18. Microstructure and properties of pipeline steel with a ferrite/martensite dual-phase microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Li Rutao Zuo Xiurong Hu Yueyue Wang Zhenwei Hu, Dingxu

    2011-08-15

    In order to satisfy the transportation of the crude oil and gas in severe environmental conditions, a ferrite/martensite dual-phase pipeline steel has been developed. After a forming process and double submerged arc welding, the microstructure of the base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The pipe showed good deformability and an excellent combination of high strength and toughness, which is suitable for a pipeline subjected to the progressive and abrupt ground movement. The base metal having a ferrite/martensite dual-phase microstructure exhibited excellent mechanical properties in terms of uniform elongation of 7.5%, yield ratio of 0.78, strain hardening exponent of 0.145, an impact energy of 286 J at - 10 deg. C and a shear area of 98% at 0 deg. C in the drop weight tear test. The tensile strength and impact energy of the weld metal didn't significantly reduce, because of the intragranularly nucleated acicular ferrites microstructure, leading to high strength and toughness in weld metal. The heat affected zone contained complete quenching zone and incomplete quenching zone, which exhibited excellent low temperature toughness of 239 J at - 10 deg. C. - Research Highlights: {yields}The pipe with ferrite/martensite microstructure shows high deformability. {yields}The base metal of the pipe consists of ferrite and martensite. {yields}Heat affected zone shows excellent low temperature toughness. {yields}Weld metal mainly consists of intragranularly nucleated acicular ferrites. {yields}Weld metal shows excellent low temperature toughness and high strength.

  19. Corrosion of austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Anderson, Mark; Taylor, D; Allen, Todd R.

    2011-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) is a potential coolant for advanced nuclear reactors. The corrosion behavior of austenitic steels (alloys 800H and AL-6XN) and ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels (F91 and HCM12A) exposed to S-CO{sub 2} at 650 C and 20.7 MPa is presented in this work. Oxidation was identified as the primary corrosion phenomenon. Alloy 800H had oxidation resistance superior to AL-6XN. The FM steels were less corrosion resistant than the austenitic steels, which developed thick oxide scales that tended to exfoliate. Detailed microstructure characterization suggests the effect of alloying elements such as Al, Mo, Cr, and Ni on the oxidation of the steels.

  20. Load partitioning between ferrite/martensite and dispersed nanoparticles of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Zhou, Zhangjian; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-06-18

    In this study, a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray technique was used to investigate the tensile deformation processes of a 9Cr-ODS ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel at different temperatures. Two minor phases within the 9Cr-ODS F/M steel matrix were identified as Y2Ti2O7 and TiN by the high-energy X-ray diffraction, and confirmed by the analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The lattice strains of the matrix and particles were measured through the entire tensile deformation process. During the tensile tests, the lattice strains of the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) showed a strong temperature dependence, decreasing with increasing temperature. Analysis of the internal stress at three temperatures showed that the load partitioning between the ferrite/martensite and the particles (TiN and Y2Ti2O7) was initiated during sample yielding and reached to a peak during sample necking. At three studied temperatures, the internal stress of minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN) was about 2 times that of F/M matrix at yielding position, while the internal stress of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN reached about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times that of the F/M matrix at necking position, respectively. It indicates that the strengthening of the matrix is due to minor phases (Y2Ti2O7 and TiN), especially Y2Ti2O7 particles. Although the internal stresses of all phases decreased with increasing temperature from RT to 600 degrees C, the ratio of internal stresses of each phase at necking position stayed in a stable range (internal stresses of Y2Ti2O7 and TiN were about 4.5-6 times and 3-3.5 times of that of F/M matrix, respectively). The difference between internal stress of the F/M matrix and the applied stress at 600 degrees C is slightly lower than those at RI and 300 degrees C, indicating that the nanoparticles still have good strengthening effect at 600 degrees C. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  2. Development of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and fabrication technologies for Indian test blanket module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Jayakumar, T.

    2011-10-01

    For the development of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel (RAFMS), for the Indian Test Blanket Module for ITER, a 3-phase programme has been adopted. The first phase consists of melting and detailed characterization of a laboratory scale heat conforming to Eurofer 97 composition, to demonstrate the capability of the Indian industry for producing fusion grade steel. In the second phase which is currently in progress, the chemical composition will be optimized with respect to tungsten and tantalum for better combination of mechanical properties. Characterization of the optimized commercial scale India-specific RAFM steel will be carried out in the third phase. The first phase of the programme has been successfully completed and the tensile, impact and creep properties are comparable with Eurofer 97. Laser and electron beam welding parameters have been optimized and welding consumables were developed for Narrow Gap - Gas Tungsten Arc welding and for laser-hybrid welding.

  3. Mechanical Performance of Ferritic Martensitic Steels for High Dose Applications in Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderoglu, Osman; Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are considered for core applications and pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors as well as first walls and blankets for fusion reactors. There are significant scientific data on testing and industrial experience in making this class of alloys worldwide. This experience makes F/M steels an attractive candidate. In this article, tensile behavior, fracture toughness and impact property, and creep behavior of the F/M steels under neutron irradiations to high doses with a focus on high Cr content (8 to 12) are reviewed. Tensile properties are very sensitive to irradiation temperature. Increase in yield and tensile strength (hardening) is accompanied with a loss of ductility and starts at very low doses under irradiation. The degradation of mechanical properties is most pronounced at <0.3 T M ( T M is melting temperature) and up to 10 dpa (displacement per atom). Ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit a high fracture toughness after irradiation at all temperatures even below 673 K (400 °C), except when tested at room temperature after irradiations below 673 K (400 °C), which shows a significant reduction in fracture toughness. Creep studies showed that for the range of expected stresses in a reactor environment, the stress exponent is expected to be approximately one and the steady state creep rate in the absence of swelling is usually better than austenitic stainless steels both in terms of the creep rate and the temperature sensitivity of creep. In short, F/M steels show excellent promise for high dose applications in nuclear reactors.

  4. The Z-Phase in 9Cr Ferritic/martensitic Heat Resistant Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Fengshi; Chen, Fuxia; Jiang, Xuebo; Xue, Bing; Zhou, Li; Jung, Woosang

    The precipitation behavior of Z-phase was investigated during long-term aging at 650°C in an ultra low carbon 9Cr ferritic/martensitic heat resistant steel. The steel was prepared by vacuum induction melting followed by hot forging and rolling into a plate. The plate was normalized at 1100°C for 1h, cooled in air and tempered at 700°C for 1h. Bimodal nano-sized MX precipitates distribute densely and homogeneously in the matrix within martensitic lath after normalizing-and-tempering heat treatment. After aging at 650°C for 1200h, the Z-phase was found to nucleate on the larger nano-sized MX. The Z-phase and MX have the following orientation relationship: <112>Z-phase//<001>MX and (1bar 10){Z-phase}//(200){MX} .

  5. Oxidation behavior of ferritic-martensitic and ODS steels in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Jeremy

    water corroded much faster than those in steam (1.5 to 2 times faster). Additionally, during these corrosion tests a marker experiment was performed with the deposition of micrometric palladium markers on the surface of some samples prior to oxidation. The markers were found at the outer-inner layer interface, consistent with a corrosion mechanism of outward migration of iron to form the outer layer and inward migration of oxygen to form the inner layer. The discrepancy between the SCW and steam environments suggests that the outward migration of iron may be the rate-limiting step. A detailed study of the oxide advancement was performed using the TEM by analyzing the inner and diffusion layer structure. Energy-filtered TEM images were acquired to analyze the micrometric and nanometric distribution of elements in these layers. Such images from the inner layer revealed the presence of localized chromium enrichment regions associated with the presence of pores. Additionally, an iron-chromium nanometric segregation was observed and may be associated with the mixture of Fe3O4 and FeCr2O4. In the diffusion layer, small nanometric chromium-rich oxide particles were seen within metal grains. The (Fe,Cr)3O4 spinel oxide has an inverse spinel structure as Fe3O4 but becomes normal spinel as FeCr 2O4, thus the structure changes depending on the chromium content. Additionally, the spinel structure was analyzed using the ligand theory and showed that chromium does not migrate and that the main diffusing species is the Fe2+ ion. Calculations of the amount of iron leaving the inner layer showed that this amount accounted for the amount of iron necessary to form the outer layer, thus no dissolution of oxide in SCW is observed. Additionally, the differences in oxidation behavior in steam and SCW suggest that the rate-limiting step for the corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels is the iron outward migration. The iron migration is driven by the gradient in the Fe2+/Fe 3+ ratio and is

  6. Resistance spot weldability of 11Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Yano, Yasuhide; Ito, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    Resistance spot welding of 11Cr-0.4Mo-2W, V, Nb ferritic/martensitic steel sheets with different thicknesses was examined to develop a manufacturing technology for a fast reactor fuel subassembly with an inner duct structure. In the spot welding, welding current, electrode force, welding time and holding time were varied as welding parameters to investigate the appropriate welding conditions. Welding conditions under which spot weld joints did not have either crack or void defects in the nugget could be found when the electrode force was increased to 9.8 kN. It was also found that the electrode cap with a longer tip end length was effective for preventing weld defect formations. Strength of the spot welded joint was characterized from micro hardness and shear tension tests. In addition, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the spot welded joint was measured by Charpy impact tests with specimens that had notches in the welded zone.

  7. Effect of mechanical restraint on weldability of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel thick plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serizawa, Hisashi; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Manabu; Kawahito, Yousuke; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Katayama, Seiji

    2011-10-01

    As one of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, the weldability of thick F82H plate was experimentally examined using new heat sources in order to minimize the total heat input energy in comparison with TIG welding. A full penetration of 32 mm thick plate could be produced as a combination of a 12 mm deep first layer generated by a 10 kW fiber laser beam and upper layers deposited by a plasma MIG hybrid welding with Ar + 2%O shielding gas. Also, the effect of mechanical restraint on the weldability under EB welding of thick F82H plate was studied by using FEM to select an appropriate specimen size for the basic test. The appropriate and minimum size for the basic test of weldability under EB welding of 90 mm thick plate might be 200 mm in length and 400 mm in width where the welding length should be about 180 mm.

  8. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Luzginova, N.; Tanigawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe-Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7-9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe-8%Cr-2%W-TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe-9%Cr-1%W-TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  9. Metallography studies and hardness measurements on ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in STIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Long, B.; Dai, Y.

    2008-06-01

    In this work metallography investigations and microhardness measurements have been performed on 15 ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels and 6 weld metals irradiated in the SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP). The results demonstrate that all the steels have quite similar martensite lath structures. However, the sizes of the prior austenite grain (PAG) of these steels are quite different and vary from 10 to 86 μm. The microstructure in the fusion zones (FZ) of electron-beam welds (EBWs) of 5 steels (T91, EM10, MANET-II, F82H and Optifer-IX) is similar in respect to the martensite lath structure and PAG size. The FZ of the inert-gas-tungsten weld (TIGW) of the T91 steel shows a duplex structure of large ferrite gains and martensite laths. The microhardness measurements indicate that the normalized and tempered FM steels have rather close hardness values. The unusual high hardness values of the EBW and TIGW of the T91 steel were detected, which suggests that these materials are without proper tempering or post-welding heat treatment.

  10. Gas bubbles evolution peculiarities in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels and alloys under helium-ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, I. I.; Kalashnikov, A. N.; Kalin, B. A.; Binyukova, S. Yu

    2003-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the gas bubble evolution in model alloys of the Fe-C system, ferritic-martensitic steels of 13Cr type, nickel and austenitic steels under 40-keV helium-ion irradiation up to a fluence of 5 × 10 20 m -2 at the temperature of 920 K. It was shown that helium-ion irradiation at high temperature resulted in formation of bubbles with a greater size and a smaller density in Fe and ferritic-martensitic steels than those in nickel and austenitic steels. Large gaseous bubbles in ferritic component are uniformly distributed in grains body in Fe-C alloys as well as in ferritic-martensitic steels. The bubbles with a higher density and a smaller size than those in ferritic component are formed in martensitic grains of steels and Fe-C alloys with a high carbon content ( NC>0.01 wt%), which leads to a small level of swelling of martensite in comparison with that of ferrite. In addition, the bubbles in martensitic grains have a tendency to ordered distribution.

  11. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Dissimilar Friction Stir Welds of 11Cr-Ferritic/Martensitic Steel to 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Hiromichi T.; Yano, Yasuhide; Sekio, Yoshihiro

    2015-12-01

    Dissimilar joints between ferritic and austenitic steels are of interest for selected applications in next generation fast reactors. In this study, dissimilar friction-stir welding of an 11 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic steel to a 316 austenitic stainless steel was attempted and the mechanical properties and microstructure of the resulting welds were examined. Friction-stir welding produces a stir zone without macroscopic weld-defects, but the two dissimilar steels are not intermixed. The two dissimilar steels are interleaved along a sharp zigzagging interface in the stir zone. During small-sized tensile testing of the stir zone, this sharp interface did not act as a fracture site. Furthermore, the microstructure of the stir zone was refined in both the ferritic/martensitic steel and the 316 stainless steel resulting in improved mechanical properties over the adjacent base material regions. This study demonstrates that friction-stir welding can produce welds between dissimilar steels that contain no macroscopic weld-defects and display suitable mechanical properties.

  12. Studies on A-TIG welding of Low Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (LAFM) steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.

    2012-02-01

    Low Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steels (LAFM) are chosen as the candidate material for structural components in fusion reactors. The structural components are generally fabricated by welding processes. Activated Tungsten Inert Gas (A-TIG) welding is an emerging process for welding of thicker components. In the present work, attempt was made to develop A-TIG welding technology for LAFM steel plates of 10 mm thick. Activated flux was developed for LAFM steel by carrying out various bead-on-plate TIG welds without flux and with flux. The optimum flux was identified as one which gave maximum depth of penetration at minimum heat input values. With the optimized flux composition, LAFM steel plate of 10 mm thickness was welded in square butt weld joint configuration using double side welding technique. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy was used for characterizing the microstructures. Microhardness measurements were made across the weld cross section for as welded and post weld heat treated samples. Tensile and impact toughness properties were determined. The mechanical properties values obtained in A-TIG weld joint were comparable to that obtained in weld joints of LAFM steel made by Electron beam welding process.

  13. Evolution of the mechanical properties and microstructure of ferritic-martensitic steels irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamardin, V. K.; Golovanov, V. N.; Bulanova, T. M.; Povstyanko, A. V.; Fedoseev, A. E.; Ostrovsky, Z. E.; Goncharenko, Yu. D.

    2002-12-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of low-activation ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels 0.1C-9Cr-1W, V, Ta, B and 0.1C-12Cr-2W, V, Ti, B is studied under tension at temperatures of 330-540 °C and doses of 50 dpa. Steel 0.1C-13Cr-Mo, V, Nb, B was chosen for comparison. At irradiation temperatures of 330-340 °C, the radiation hardening of steel with 9%Cr achieves saturation at a dose of 10 dpa. In this case as compared to steels with 12%Cr, the fracture surface is characterized as ductile without cleavage traces. At irradiation temperatures higher than 420 °C, there is no difference in the behavior of the materials under investigation. The data on radiation creep obtained by direct measurement and from the profilometry data satisfy a model ɛ¯/ σ¯=B 0+D Ṡ, when B0 and D have the values typical for steels of FM type.

  14. Precipitate phases in normalized and tempered ferritic/martensitic steel P92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yinzhong; Liu, Huan; Shang, Zhongxia; Xu, Zhiqiang

    2015-10-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steel P92 is a promising candidate for cladding and duct applications in Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor. The precipitate phases of the P92 steel normalized at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 30 min and tempered at 1038 K (765 °C) for 1 h have been investigated using transmission electron microscopes. Four types of phases consisting of M23C6, MX, M2X and sigma-FeCr were identified in the steel. MX phases consist of Nb-rich M(C,N) carbonitride, Nb-rich MC carbide, V-rich M(C,N) carbonitride, V-rich MC carbide, V-rich MN nitride, and complex MC carbides with Nb-rich MC core and V-rich MC wings. M2X phases consist of Cr-rich M2(C,N) carbonitride, Cr-rich M2C carbide and M2N nitride. Sigma-FeCr has a simple tetragonal lattice and a typical chemical formula of Fe0.45Cr0.45W0.1. M23C6 and MX are the dominant phases, while the sigma-FeCr has the lowest content. The formation of sigma-FeCr and M2X phases in the steel is also discussed.

  15. On the (in)adequacy of the Charpy impact test to monitor irradiation effects of ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaouadi, R.

    2007-02-01

    Irradiation embrittlement studies rely very often on Charpy impact data, in particular the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). However, while the DBTT-shift is equivalent to the increase of the fracture toughness transition temperature of ferritic steels, it is not the case for ferritic/martensitic steels. The aim of this study is to critically assess experimental data obtained on a 9%Cr-ferritic/martensitic steel, Eurofer-97, to better understand the underlying mechanisms involved during the fracture process. More specifically, a dedicated analysis using the load diagram approach allows to unambiguously reveal the actual effects of irradiation on physically rather than empirically based parameters. A comparison is made between a ferritic and ferritic/martensitic steel to better identify the possible similarities and differences. Tensile, Charpy impact and fracture toughness tests data are examined in a global approach to assess the actual rather than apparent irradiation effects. The adequacy or inadequacy of the Charpy impact test to monitor irradiation effects is extensively discussed.

  16. Microstructural evolution of ferritic-martensitic steels under heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topbasi, Cem

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are primary candidate materials for fuel cladding and internal applications in the Sodium Fast Reactor, as well as first-wall and blanket materials in future fusion concepts because of their favorable mechanical properties and resistance to radiation damage. Since microstructure evolution under irradiation is amongst the key issues for these materials in these applications, developing a fundamental understanding of the irradiation-induced microstructure in these alloys is crucial in modeling and designing new alloys with improved properties. The goal of this project was to investigate the evolution of microstructure of two commercial ferritic-martensitic steels, NF616 and HCM12A, under heavy ion irradiation at a broad temperature range. An in situ heavy ion irradiation technique was used to create irradiation damage in the alloy; while it was being examined in a transmission electron microscope. Electron-transparent samples of NF616 and HCM12A were irradiated in situ at the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory with 1 MeV Kr ions to ˜10 dpa at temperatures ranging from 20 to 773 K. The microstructure evolution of NF616 and HCM12A was followed in situ by systematically recording micrographs and diffraction patterns as well as capturing videos during irradiation. In these irradiations, there was a period during which no changes are visible in the microstructure. After a threshold dose (˜0.1 dpa between 20 and 573 K, and ˜2.5 dpa at 673 K) black dots started to become visible under the ion beam. These black dots appeared suddenly (from one frame to the next) and are thought to be small defect clusters (2-5 nm in diameter), possibly small dislocation loops with Burgers vectors of either ½ or . The overall density of these defect clusters increased with dose and saturated around 6 dpa. At saturation, a steady-state is reached in which defects are eliminated and created at the same rates so that the

  17. Microstructural evolution of ferritic-martensitic steels under heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topbasi, Cem

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are primary candidate materials for fuel cladding and internal applications in the Sodium Fast Reactor, as well as first-wall and blanket materials in future fusion concepts because of their favorable mechanical properties and resistance to radiation damage. Since microstructure evolution under irradiation is amongst the key issues for these materials in these applications, developing a fundamental understanding of the irradiation-induced microstructure in these alloys is crucial in modeling and designing new alloys with improved properties. The goal of this project was to investigate the evolution of microstructure of two commercial ferritic-martensitic steels, NF616 and HCM12A, under heavy ion irradiation at a broad temperature range. An in situ heavy ion irradiation technique was used to create irradiation damage in the alloy; while it was being examined in a transmission electron microscope. Electron-transparent samples of NF616 and HCM12A were irradiated in situ at the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory with 1 MeV Kr ions to ˜10 dpa at temperatures ranging from 20 to 773 K. The microstructure evolution of NF616 and HCM12A was followed in situ by systematically recording micrographs and diffraction patterns as well as capturing videos during irradiation. In these irradiations, there was a period during which no changes are visible in the microstructure. After a threshold dose (˜0.1 dpa between 20 and 573 K, and ˜2.5 dpa at 673 K) black dots started to become visible under the ion beam. These black dots appeared suddenly (from one frame to the next) and are thought to be small defect clusters (2-5 nm in diameter), possibly small dislocation loops with Burgers vectors of either ½ or . The overall density of these defect clusters increased with dose and saturated around 6 dpa. At saturation, a steady-state is reached in which defects are eliminated and created at the same rates so that the

  18. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Snead, L. L.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-09-01

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ∼500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimental results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. The strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9-20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  19. Parametric study of irradiation effects on the ductile damage and flow stress behavior in ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-10-01

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are currently being considered as structural materials in fusion and Gen-IV nuclear reactors. These materials are expected to experience high dose radiation, which can increase their ductile to brittle transition temperature and susceptibility to failure during operation. Hence, to estimate the safe operational life of the reactors, precise evaluation of the ductile to brittle transition temperatures of ferritic-martensitic steels is necessary. Owing to the scarcity of irradiated samples, particularly at high dose levels, micro-mechanistic models are being employed to predict the shifts in the ductile to brittle transition temperatures. These models consider the ductile damage evolution, in the form of nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids; and the brittle fracture, in the form of probabilistic cleavage initiation, to estimate the influence of irradiation on the ductile to brittle transition temperature. However, the assessment of irradiation dependent material parameters is challenging and influences the accuracy of these models. In the present study, the effects of irradiation on the overall flow stress and ductile damage behavior of two ferritic-martensitic steels is parametrically investigated. The results indicate that the ductile damage model parameters are mostly insensitive to irradiation levels at higher dose levels though the resulting flow stress behavior varies significantly.

  20. Microstructural analysis of ferritic-martensitic steels irradiated at low temperature in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, N.; Robertson, J.P.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Wakai, E.

    1998-09-01

    Disk specimens of ferritic-martensitic steel, HT9 and F82H, irradiated to damage levels of {approximately}3 dpa at irradiation temperatures of either {approximately}90 C or {approximately}250 C have been investigated by using transmission electron microscopy. Before irradiation, tempered HT9 contained only M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide. Irradiation at 90 C and 250 C induced a dislocation loop density of 1 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3} and 8 {times} 10{sup 21} m{sup {minus}3}, respectively. in the HT9 irradiated at 250 C, a radiation-induced phase, tentatively identified as {alpha}{prime}, was observed with a number density of less than 1 {times} 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3}. On the other hand, the tempered F82H contained M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and a few MC carbides; irradiation at 250 C to 3 dpa caused minor changes in these precipitates and induced a dislocation loop density of 2 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3}. Difference in the radiation-induced phase and the loop microstructure may be related to differences in the post-yield deformation behavior of the two steels.

  1. Void swelling in high dose ion-irradiated reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Monterrosa, Anthony M.; Zhang, Feifei; Huang, Hao; Yan, Qingzhi; Jiao, Zhijie; Was, Gary S.; Wang, Lumin

    2015-07-01

    To determine the void swelling resistance of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels CNS I and CNS II at high doses, ion irradiation was performed up to 188 dpa (4.6 × 1017 ion/cm2) at 460 °C using 5 MeV Fe++ ions. Helium was pre-implanted at levels of 10 and 100 appm at room temperature to investigate the role of helium on void swelling. Commercial FM steel T91 was also irradiated in this condition and the swelling results are of included in this paper as a reference. Voids were observed in all conditions. The 9Cr CNS I samples implanted with 10 appm helium exhibited lower swelling than 9Cr T91 irradiated at the same condition. The 12Cr CNS II with 10 and 100 appm helium showed significantly lower swelling than CNS I and T91. The swelling rate for CNS I and CNS II were determined to be 0.02%/dpa and 0.003%/dpa respectively. Increasing the helium content from 10 to 100 appm shortened the incubation region and increased the void density but had no effect on the swelling rates.

  2. Tensile properties of ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in STIP-I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Y.; Long, B.; Tong, Z. F.

    2008-06-01

    Specimens of ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels T91, F82H, Optimax-A and the electron beam weld (EBW) of F82H were irradiated in the Swiss spallation neutron source (SINQ) Target-3 in a temperature range of 90-370 °C to displacement doses between 3 and 12 dpa. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature and the irradiation temperatures. The tensile test results demonstrated that the irradiation hardening increased with dose up to about 10 dpa. Meanwhile, the uniform elongation decreased to less than 1%, while the total elongation remained greater than 5%, except for an F82H specimen of 9.8 dpa tested at room temperature, which failed in elastic deformation regime. At higher doses of 11-12 dpa, the ductility of some specimens recovered, which could be due to the annealing effect of a short period of high temperature excursion. The results do not show significant differences in tensile properties for the different FM steels in the present irradiation conditions.

  3. Assessment of Tungsten Content on Tertiary Creep Deformation Behavior of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar

    2015-10-01

    Tertiary creep deformation behavior of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels having different tungsten contents has been assessed. Creep tests were carried out at 823 K (550 °C) over a stress range of 180 to 260 MPa on three heats of the RAFM steel (9Cr-W-0.06Ta-0.22V) with tungsten content of 1, 1.4, and 2.0 wt pct. With creep exposure, the steels exhibited minimum in creep rate followed by progressive increase in creep rate until fracture. The minimum creep rate decreased, rupture life increased, and the onset of tertiary stage of creep deformation delayed with the increase in tungsten content. The tertiary creep behavior has been assessed based on the relationship, , considering minimum creep rate () instead of steady-state creep rate. The increase in tungsten content was found to decrease the rate of acceleration of tertiary parameter ` p.' The relationships between (1) tertiary parameter `p' with minimum creep rate and time spent in tertiary creep deformation and (2) the final creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the same first-order reaction rate theory prevailed in the minimum creep rate as well as throughout the tertiary creep deformation behavior of the steel. A master tertiary creep curve of the steels has been developed. Scanning electron microscopic investigation revealed enhanced coarsening resistance of carbides in the steel on creep exposure with increase in tungsten content. The decrease in tertiary parameter ` p' with tungsten content with the consequent decrease in minimum creep rate and increase in rupture life has been attributed to the enhanced microstructural stability of the steel.

  4. End Closure Joining of Ferritic-Martensitic and Oxide-Dispersion Strengthened Steel Cladding Tubes by Magnetic Pulse Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Gu; Park, Jin-Ju; Lee, Min-Ku; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Kyu; Spirin, Alexey; Krutikov, Vasiliy; Paranin, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic pulse welding (MPW) technique was employed for the end closure joining of fuel pin cladding tubes made of ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel and oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel. The technique is a solid-state impact joining process based on the electromagnetic force, similar to explosive welding. For a given set of optimal process parameters, e.g., the end-plug geometry, the rigid metallurgical bonding between the tube and end plug was obtained by high-velocity impact collision accompanied with surface jetting. The joint region showed a typical wavy morphology with a narrow grain boundary-like bonding interface. There was no evidence of even local melting, and only the limited grain refinement was observed in the vicinity of the bonding interface without destructing the original reinforcement microstructure of the FM-ODS steel, i.e., a fine grain structure with oxide dispersion. No leaks were detected during helium leakage test, and moreover, the rupture occurred in the cladding tube section without leaving any joint damage during internal pressure burst test. All of the results proved the integrity and durability of the MPWed joints and signified the great potential of this method of end closure joining for advanced fast reactor fuel pin fabrication.

  5. Blister formation on 13Cr2MoNbVB ferritic-martensitic steel exposed to hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. V.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Ruzhytskyi, V. V.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Kopanets, I. E.; Karpov, S. A.; Vasilenko, R. L.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of pre-irradiation specimen deformation level on surface blister formation and sub-surface cracking of dual-phase 13Cr2MoNbVB ferritic-martensitic steel was studied using glow discharge hydrogen plasma with ion energy of 1 keV to fluences of 2 × 1025 H/m2. Protium was used for most studies, but deuterium was used for measuring the depth dependence of hydrogen diffusion. Formation of blisters was observed in the temperature range 230-340 K. It was found that pre-irradiation deformation caused changes in the threshold fluences of blister formation and also in blister size distribution. Subsurface cracks located on grain boundaries far beyond the implantation zone were formed concurrently with blisters, arising from hydrogen diffusion and trapping at defects. It was observed that cracks as long as 1 mm in length were formed in 95% deformed steel at depths up to 500 μm from surface.

  6. Influence of structural-phase state of ferritic-martensitic steels on the helium porosity development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, I. I.; Staltsov, M. S.; Kalin, B. A.; Bogachev, I. A.; Guseva, L. Yu; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Drozhzhina, M. V.; Manukovsky, K. V.; Nikolaeva, I. D.

    2016-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to study the effect of the initial structural-phase state (SPhS) of ferritic-martensitic steels EK-181, EP-450 and EP-450- ODS (with 0.5 wt.% nanoparticles of Y2O3) on the of helium porosity formation and gas swelling. Different SPhS of steel EK-181 was produced by water quenching, annealing, normalizing plus tempered, intensive plastic deformation by torsion (HPDT). Irradiation was carried out by He+-40 keV ions at 923 K up to fluence of 5-1020 He+/m2. It is shown that the water quenching causes the formation of uniformly distributed small bubbles (d¯ ∼ 2 nm) of the highest density (ρ∼ 1025 m-3). After normalization followed by tempering as well as after annealing bubbles distribution is highly non-uniform both by volume and in size. Very large faceted bubbles (pre-equilibrium gas-filled voids) are formed in ferrite grains resulting in high level of gas swelling of the irradiated layer with S = 4,9 ± 1,2 and 3.8 ± 0.9% respectively. Nano- and microcrystalline structure created by HPDT completely degenerate at irradiation temperature and ion irradiation formed bubbles of the same parameters as in the annealed steel. Bubbles formed in EP-450-ODS steel are smaller in size and density, which led to a decrease of helium swelling by 4 times (S = 0.8 ± 0.2%) as compared to the swelling of the matrix steel EP-450 (S = 3.1 ± 0.7%).

  7. A reassessment of the effects of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.; Hankin, G.L.

    1998-03-01

    To test the effect of helium on Charpy impact properties of ferritic/martensitic steels, two approaches are reviewed: quantification of results of tests performed on specimens irradiated in reactors with very different neutron spectra, and isotopic tailoring experiments. Data analysis can show that if the differences in reactor response are indeed due to helium effects, then irradiation in a fusion machine at 400 C to 100 dpa and 1000 appm He will result in a ductile to brittle transition temperature shift of over 500 C. However, the response as a function of dose and helium level is unlikely to be simply due to helium based on physical reasoning. Shear punch tests and microstructural examinations also support this conclusion based on irradiated samples of a series of alloys made by adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation in HFIR. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys. However, helium itself, up to 75 appm at over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys. This behavior is instead understood to result from complex precipitation response. The database for effects of helium on embrittlement based on nickel additions is therefore probably misleading and experiments should be redesigned to avoid nickel precipitation.

  8. Formation and Oxidation Performance of Low-Temperature Pack Aluminide Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Ying; Pint, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    A pack cementation process was developed to coat commercial 9% Cr ferritic-martensitic steel T91 at temperatures below its normal tempering temperature to avoid any potential detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of the coated alloy. In order to prevent the formation of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} coatings, the Al activity in the pack cementation process was reduced by substituting the pure Al masteralloy with binary Cr-Al masteralloys containing either 15 or 25 wt.% Al. When the Cr-25Al masteralloy was used, a duplex coating was formed at 700 C, consisting of a thin Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} outer layer and an inner layer of FeAl. With the Cr-15Al masteralloy, an FeAl coating of {approx} 12 {micro}m thick was achieved at 700 C. The pack aluminide coatings fabricated at 700 C are being evaluated in air + 10 vol.% H{sub 2}O at 650 C and 700 C to determine their long-term oxidation performance.

  9. A closer look at the fracture toughness of ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucon, Enrico

    2007-08-01

    SCK·CEN has characterized the mechanical properties of several ferritic/martensitic steels, both unirradiated and irradiated. Fracture toughness has been evaluated using Charpy impact and fracture mechanics tests. Two safety-related features have emerged: (a) the applicability of the master curve approach (ASTM E1921-05) appears questionable; and (b) irradiation embrittlement is systematically larger when quantified in terms of quasi-static fracture toughness than when measured from Charpy tests. Both issues are examined in detail and possible interpretations are proposed; potential improvements given by the application of more advanced fracture toughness analysis methodologies are discussed. In order to clarify whether the Charpy/fracture toughness difference in embrittlement is due to loading rate effects, dynamic toughness tests have been performed in the unirradiated condition and for two irradiation doses (0.3 and 1.6 dpa). The corresponding dynamic T0 shifts have been compared with the shifts of Charpy and master curve quasi-static transition temperatures. Other possible contributions are examined and discussed.

  10. The development of ferritic-martensitic steels with reduced long-term activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kelzenberg, S.; Röhrig, H.-D.; Schäfer, L.; Schirra, M.

    1994-09-01

    Ferritic-martensitic 9-12% CrMoVNb steels of MANET type possess a number of advantageous properties for fusion reactor application. Their optimization has led to improved creep and fracture-toughness properties. New 9-10% CrWVTa alloys have been developed by KfK/IMF in collaboration with the SAARSTAHL GmbH which have a reduced long-term activation and show in addition superior fracture toughness properties. The calculation of dose rate and other radiological parameters with the presently available FISPACT/EAF codes, extended by KfK files for sequential reactions has shown that the long-term dose-rate in these alloys is governed by the remaining 'impurity level' of Nb and the alloying elements W and Ta. Sequential reactions — though relevant for single alloying elements like Cr, Mn, V and N — provide only a second order effect in Fe-based alloys. A challenge for the future materials development is the production of alloys with the desired narrow specification of elements and impurities, which necessitates new ways of steelmaking.

  11. Diffusive transport parameters of deuterium through China reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Liu, Lingbo; Xiang, Xin; Rao, Yongchu; Ye, Xiaoqiu; Chen, Chang An

    2016-03-01

    Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels have been considered as the most promising candidate structure materials for a fusion reactor. In the recent decades, two new types of RAFM steels, called China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel and China Low-activation Ferritic (CLF-1) steel, have been developed. The gas evolution permeation technique has been used to investigate diffusive transport parameters of deuterium through CLAM and CLF-1 over the temperature range 623 ∼ 873 K at deuterium pressure of 105 Pa. The resultant transport parameters are: Φ (mol. m-1 s-1 Pa-1/2) = 5.40 × 10-8 exp (-46.8 (kJ. mol-1)/RT), D(m2 s-1) = 3.81 × 10-7 exp(-24.0(kJ. mol-1)/RT) and S (mol. m-3 Pa-1/2) = 1.42 × 10-1 exp(-22.8(kJ. mol-1)/RT) for CLAM; while Φ(mol m-1 s-1 Pa-1/2) = 1.76 × 10-8 exp(-43.9(kJ. mol-1)/RT), D(m2. s-1) = 1.02 × 10-7 exp(-16.9(kJ. mol-1)/RT) and S(mol. m-1 Pa-1/2) = 1.73 × 10-1 exp(-27.0(kJ. mol-1) /RT) for CLF-1. The results show that CLAM is more permeable than CLF-1, thus it is easier for hydrogen isotopes to transport and be removed.

  12. TIG and HIP joining of Reduced Activation Ferrite/Martensitic steel for the Korean ITER-TBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Duck Young; Oh, Seungjin; Ahn, Mu-Young; Yu, In-Keun; Kim, Duck-Hoi; Cho, Seungyon; Choi, Im-Sub; Kwon, Ki-Bum

    2011-10-01

    Korea is developing a Helium Cooled Solid Breeder Test Blanket Module for ITER. The primary candidate structural material is a Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel. The complex TBM structure requires developing joining technologies for successful fabrication. The characteristics of Tungsten Inert Gas welding and Hot Isostatic Pressing joining of RAFM steel were investigated. Metallurgical examinations showed that the steel grain size was increased after HIP joining and recovered by post joining heat treatment. Both TIG welding and HIP joining are found to be acceptable for ITER TBM based on mechanical tests and microstructure examination.

  13. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry.

  14. Fractographic examination of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel charpy specimens irradiated to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.; Schubert, L.E.

    1996-10-01

    Fractographic examinations are reported for a series of reduced activation ferritic/Martensitic steel Charpy impact specimens tested following irradiation to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C in FFTF. One-third size specimens of six low activation steels developed for potential application as structural materials in fusion reactors were examined. A shift in brittle fracture appearance from cleavage to grain boundary failure was noted with increasing manganese content. The results are interpreted in light of transmutation induced composition changes in a fusion environment.

  15. Gap Analysis of Material Properties Data for Ferritic/Martensitic HT-9 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Neil R.; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena; Rodriguez, Edward A.

    2012-08-28

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), is supporting the development of an ASME Code Case for adoption of 12Cr-1Mo-VW ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel, commonly known as HT-9, primarily for use in elevated temperature design of liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFR) and components. In 2011, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) nuclear engineering staff began assisting in the development of a small modular reactor (SMR) design concept, previously known as the Hyperion Module, now called the Gen4 Module. LANL staff immediately proposed HT-9 for the reactor vessel and components, as well as fuel clad and ducting, due to its superior thermal qualities. Although the ASME material Code Case, for adoption of HT-9 as an approved elevated temperature material for LMFR service, is the ultimate goal of this project, there are several key deliverables that must first be successfully accomplished. The most important key deliverable is the research, accumulation, and documentation of specific material parameters; physical, mechanical, and environmental, which becomes the basis for an ASME Code Case. Time-independent tensile and ductility data and time-dependent creep and creep-rupture behavior are some of the material properties required for a successful ASME Code case. Although this report provides a cursory review of the available data, a much more comprehensive study of open-source data would be necessary. This report serves three purposes: (a) provides a list of already existing material data information that could ultimately be made available to the ASME Code, (b) determines the HT-9 material properties data missing from available sources that would be required and (c) estimates the necessary material testing required to close the gap. Ultimately, the gap analysis demonstrates that certain material properties testing will be required to fulfill the necessary information package for an ASME Code Case.

  16. Effect of V and Ta on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Xiang; Liu, Guoquan; Hu, Benfu; Wang, Jinsan; Ullah, Asad

    2013-08-15

    12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels are promising candidate materials for good corrosion and irradiation resistance used for supercritical water-cooled reactor cladding and in-core components. V and Ta are considered to have improved the creep strength of high Cr steels by precipitating as MX phase. In this paper, a series of trial products microalloyed with V and V–Ta are produced, and the microstructure is characterized after quenching at 1050 °C and tempering at 780 °C by using TEM method to investigate the effect of these elements on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel. The results from both the experimental observations and thermodynamic and kinetic calculations reveal that V and V–Ta can promote the stable MX precipitation instead of M{sub 2}X, thus increasing the volume fraction of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. Two-phase separation behavior of the (Ta, V)(C, N) carbonitride into a Ta(V)C(N) phase and a V(Ta)N(C) phase in 12Cr3WVTa steel is observed and further discussed. - Highlights: • Microalloyed with V and V-Ta can promote the precipitation of MX instead of M{sub 2}X. • The presence of delta-ferrite in microstructure affects the morphology of MX. • Two-phase separation of MX carbonitride was observed in 12Cr3WVTa steel.

  17. Ferritic-Martensitic steel Test Blanket Modules: Status and future needs for design criteria requirements and fabrication validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavy, J.-F.; Aiello, G.; Aubert, P.; Boccaccini, L. V.; Daichendt, M.; De Dinechin, G.; Diegele, E.; Giancarli, L. M.; Lässer, R.; Neuberger, H.; Poitevin, Y.; Stephan, Y.; Rampal, G.; Rigal, E.

    2009-04-01

    The Helium-Cooled Lithium-Lead and the Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed are the two breeding blankets concepts for the DEMO reactor which have been selected by EU to be tested in ITER in the framework of the Test Blanket Module projects. They both use a 9%CrWVTa Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steel, called EUROFER, as structural material and helium as coolant. This paper gives an overview of the status of the EUROFER qualification program and discusses the future needs for design criteria requirements and fabrication validation.

  18. Development of Advanced 9Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and Austenitic Stainless Steels for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Sam; Tan, Lizhen; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel Grade 92, with or without thermomechanical treatment (TMT), and austenitic stainless steels HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine precipitate strengthening) and NF709 were selected as potential candidate structural materials in the U.S. Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) program. The objective is to develop advanced steels with improved properties as compared with reference materials such as Grade 91 and Type 316H steels that are currently in nuclear design codes. Composition modification and/or processing optimization (e.g., TMT and cold-work) were performed to improve properties such as resistance to thermal aging, creep, creep-fatigue, fracture, and sodium corrosion. Testings to characterize these properties for the advanced steels were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory, the Argonne National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the U.S. SFR program. This paper focuses on the resistance to thermal aging and creep of the advanced steels. The advanced steels exhibited up to two orders of magnitude increase in creep life compared to the reference materials. Preliminary results on the weldment performance of the advanced steels are also presented. The superior performance of the advanced steels would improve reactor design flexibility, safety margins and economics.

  19. Diffusion Bonding Beryllium to Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel: Development of Processes and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ryan Matthew

    Only a few materials are suitable to act as armor layers against the thermal and particle loads produced by magnetically confined fusion. These candidates include beryllium, tungsten, and carbon fiber composites. The armor layers must be joined to the plasma facing components with high strength bonds that can withstand the thermal stresses resulting from differential thermal expansion. While specific joints have been developed for use in ITER (an experimental reactor in France), including beryllium to CuCrZr as well as tungsten to stainless steel interfaces, joints specific to commercially relevant fusion reactors are not as well established. Commercial first wall components will likely be constructed front Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, which will need to be coating with one of the three candidate materials. Of the candidates, beryllium is particularly difficult to bond, because it reacts during bonding with most elements to form brittle intermetallic compounds. This brittleness is unacceptable, as it can lead to interface crack propagation and delamination of the armor layer. I have attempted to overcome the brittle behavior of beryllium bonds by developing a diffusion bonding process of beryllium to RAFM steel that achieves a higher degree of ductility. This process utilized two bonding aids to achieve a robust bond: a. copper interlayer to add ductility to the joint, and a titanium interlayer to prevent beryllium from forming unwanted Be-Cu intermetallics. In addition, I conducted a series of numerical simulations to predict the effect of these bonding aids on the residual stress in the interface. Lastly, I fabricated and characterized beryllium to ferritic steel diffusion bonds using various bonding parameters and bonding aids. Through the above research, I developed a process to diffusion bond beryllium to ferritic steel with a 150 M Pa tensile strength and 168 M Pa shear strength. This strength was achieved using a Hot Isostatic

  20. Production and preliminary characterization of ferritic-martensitic steel T91 cladding tubes for LBE or Pb cooled nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, J.; Almazouzi, A.; Mueller, G.; Rusanov, A.

    2011-08-01

    Thin wall tubes with suitable dimensions for possible future use as nuclear fuel cladding based on ferritic-martensitic steel T91 have been produced. Several rolling routes for thin wall tube rolling have been successfully explored to produce T91 tubes of 8.5 mm OD and 0.5 mm wall thickness as well as 6.5 mm OD and 0.5 mm wall thickness. The results show that the cold rolled Т91 steel thin walled tubes remain ductile and the material easily carries fractional strains. Finally the microstructure of the resulting tubes was examined and preliminary burst and tensile tests were performed showing properties comparable to those of T91 plate material.

  1. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wei; Chen, Gaoqiang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Frederick, David Alan; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  2. IRRADIATION CREEP AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TWO FERRITIC-MARTENSITIC STEELS IRRADIATED IN THE BN-350 FAST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Porollo, S. I.; Konobeev, Yu V.; Dvoriashin, A. M.; Budylkin, N. I.; Mironova, E. G.; Leontyeva-Smirnova, M. V.; Loltukhovsky, A. G.; Bochvar, A. A.; Garner, Francis A.

    2002-09-01

    Russian ferritic/martensitic steels EP-450 and EP-823 were irradiated to 20-60 dpa in the BN-350 fast reactor in the form of pressurized creep tubes and small rings used for mechanical property tests. Data derived from these steels serves to enhance our understanding of the general behavior of this class of steels. It appears that these steels exhibit behavior that is very consistent with that of Western steels. Swelling is relatively low at high neutron exposure and confined to temperatures less then 420 degrees C, but may be camouflaged somewhat by precipitation-related densification. The irradiation creep studies confirm that the creep compliance of F/M steels is about one-half that of austenitic steels, and that the loss of strength at test temperatures above 500 degrees C is a problem generic to all F/M steels. This conclusion is supported by post-irradiation measurement of short-term mechanical properties. At temperatures below 500 degrees C both steels retain their high strength (yield stress 0.2=550-600 MPa), but at higher test temperatures a sharp decrease of strength properties occurs. However, the irradiated steels still retain high post-irradiation ductility at test temperatures in the range of 20-700 degrees C.

  3. Oxidation behavior of ferritic/martensitic steels in stagnant liquid LBE saturated by oxygen at 600 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Quanqiang; Liu, Jian; Luan, He; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Wei; Yan, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2015-02-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are primary candidates for application as cladding and structural materials in the Generation IV Nuclear Reactor, especially accelerator driven sub-critical system (ADS). The compatibility of F/M steels with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is a critical issue for development of ADS using liquid LBE as the coolant. In this work, the corrosion tests of two F/M steels, including a novel 9-12 Cr modified F/M steel named SIMP steel and a commercial T91 steel, were conducted in the static oxygen-saturated liquid LBE at 600 °C up to 1000 h, the microstructure of the oxide scale formed on these two steels was analyzed, the relationship between the microstructure and the oxidation behavior was studied, and the reason why the SIMP steel showed better oxidation resistance compared to T91 steel was analyzed. The results of this study confirmed that the oxidation behavior of the F/M steels in liquid metals is influenced by their alloying elements and microstructures.

  4. Determining the shear fracture properties of HIP joints of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel by a torsion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Noh, Sanghoon; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2012-08-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is a key technology used to fabricate a first wall with cooling channels for the fusion blanket system utilizing a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel. To qualify the HIPped components, small specimen test techniques are beneficial not only to evaluate the thin-wall cooling channels containing the HIP joint but also to use in neutron irradiation studies. This study aims to develop the torsion test method with special emphasis on providing a reasonable and comprehensive method to determine interfacial shear properties of HIP joints during the torsional fracture process. Torsion test results identified that the torsion process shows yield of the base metal followed by non-elastic deformation due to work hardening of the base metal. By considering this work hardening issue, we propose a reasonable and realistic solution to determine the torsional yield shear stress and the ultimate torsional shear strength of the HIPped interface. Finally, a representative torsion fracture process was identified.

  5. The effect of tempering temperature on the features of phase transformations in the ferritic-martensitic steel EK-181

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polekhina, N. A.; Litovchenko, I. Yu.; Tyumentsev, A. N.; Astafurova, Е. G.; Chernov, V. M.; Leontyeva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2014-12-01

    Using the methods of dilatometry and differential scanning calorimetry, critical points of phase transformations in the low-activation ferritic-martensitic steel EK-181 (RUSFER-EK-181) are identified. The characteristic temperature intervals of precipitation of carbide phases are revealed. It is shown that particles of the metastable carbide M3C are formed within the temperature range (500-600) °C. Formation of the stable phases М23С6 and V(CN) begins at the temperatures higher than Т = 650 °С. An important feature of microstructure after tempering at Т = 720 °С is high density of nanoparticles (⩽10 nm) of vanadium carbonitride V(CN).

  6. Effect of Austenization Temperature on the Microstructure and Strength of 9% and 12% Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Terry C. Totemeier

    2004-10-01

    The effect of reduced-temperature austenization on the microstructure and strength of two ferritic-martensitic steels was studied. Prototypic 9% and 12% Cr steels, grade 91 (9Cr-1MoVNb) and type 422 stainless (12Cr-1MoVW), respectively, were austenized at 925°C and 1050°C and tempered at 760°C. The reduced austenization temperature was intended to simulate potential inadequate austenization during field construction of large structures and also the thermal cycle experienced in the Type IV region of weld heat affected zones (HAZ). The microstructure, tensile behavior, and creep strength were characterized for both steels treated at each condition. The reduced austenization temperature resulted in general coarsening of carbides in both steels and polygonization of the tempered martensite structure in type 422. For this steel, a marked reduction in microhardness was observed, while there was little change in microhardness for grade 91. Slight reductions in tensile strength were observed for both steels at room temperature and elevated temperatures of 450 and 550°C. The strength reduction was greater for type 422 than for grade 91. At 650°C the tensile strength reduction was minimal for both steels. Marked reductions in creep rupture lives were observed for both steels at 650°C; the reductions were less at 600°C and minimal at 550°C. Overall, the higher Cr content steel was observed to be more sensitive to variations in heat treatment conditions.

  7. Microstructural evolution of P92 ferritic/martensitic steel under Ar{sup +} ion irradiation at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Shuoxue; Guo Liping; Li Tiecheng; Chen Jihong; Yang Zheng; Luo Fengfeng; Tang Rui; Qiao Yanxin; Liu Feihua

    2012-06-15

    Irradiation damage in P92 ferritic/martensitic steel irradiated by Ar{sup +} ion beams to 7 and 12 dpa at elevated temperatures of 290 Degree-Sign C, 390 Degree-Sign C and 550 Degree-Sign C has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The precipitate periphery (the matrix/carbide interface) was amorphized only at 290 Degree-Sign C, while higher irradiation temperature could prevent the amorphization. The formation of the small re-precipitates occurred at 290 Degree-Sign C after irradiation to 12 dpa. With the increase of irradiation temperature and dose, the phenomenon of re-precipitation became more severe. The voids induced by irradiation were observed after irradiation to 7 dpa at 550 Degree-Sign C, showing that high irradiation temperature ({>=} 550 Degree-Sign C) was a crucial factor which promoted the irradiation swelling. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis revealed that segregation of Cr and W in the voids occurred under irradiation, which may influence mechanical properties of P92 F/M steel. - Graphical Abstract: High density of small voids, about 2.5 nm in diameter, was observed after irradiation to 12 dpa at 550 Degree-Sign C, which was shown in panel a (TEM micrograph). As shown in panel b (SEM image), a large number of nanometer-sized hillocks were formed in the surface irradiated at 550 Degree-Sign C, and the mean size was {approx} 30 nm. The formation of the nanometer-sized hillocks might be due to the voids that appeared as shown in TEM images (panel a). High irradiation temperature ({>=} 550 Degree-Sign C) was a crucial factor for the formation of void swelling. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small carbides re-precipitated in P92 matrix irradiated to 12 dpa at 290 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High density of voids was observed at 550 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Segregation of Cr and W in voids occurred under irradiation.

  8. Summary Report of Summer Work: High Purity Single Crystal Growth & Microstructure of Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pestovich, Kimberly Shay

    2015-08-18

    Harnessing the power of the nuclear sciences for national security and to benefit others is one of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s missions. MST-8 focuses on manipulating and studying how the structure, processing, properties, and performance of materials interact at the atomic level under nuclear conditions. Within this group, single crystal scintillators contribute to the safety and reliability of weapons, provide global security safeguards, and build on scientific principles that carry over to medical fields for cancer detection. Improved cladding materials made of ferritic-martensitic alloys support the mission of DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program to close the nuclear fuel cycle, aiming to solve nuclear waste management challenges and thereby increase the performance and safety of current and future reactors.

  9. Effect of Carbon Content on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 9 to 12 pct Cr Ferritic/Martensitic Heat-Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Feng-Shi; Tian, Li-Qian; Xue, Bing; Jiang, Xue-Bo; Zhou, Li

    2012-07-01

    Two heats of 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels were prepared. One has an ultralow carbon content of 0.01 wt pct, whereas another heat has a normal carbon content of 0.09 wt pct. The effect of carbon content on microstructure and mechanical properties of 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels was studied. The results show that the ultralow-carbon steel contains bimodal, nanosized MX precipitates with high density in the matrix but few M23C6 carbide particles in the normalized-and-tempered state. The smaller nanosized MX precipitates have two kinds of typical morphology: One is cubic and another is rectangular. The cubic MX precipitate contains Nb, Ti, and V, whereas the rectangular one only contains Nb and V. The normal carbon steel has abundant M23C6 carbide particles along the grain and lath boundaries and much less density of nanosized MX precipitates after the same heat treatments. After long-term aging at 923 K (650 °C) for 10,000 hours, the stress rupture properties of the ultralow carbon content steel degrades more significantly. The strength degradation mechanism of the 9 to 12 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic heat-resistant steels is discussed in this article.

  10. Effect of Tungsten on Primary Creep Deformation and Minimum Creep Rate of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar; Mathew, M. D.

    2014-10-01

    Effect of tungsten on transient creep deformation and minimum creep rate of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel has been assessed. Tungsten content in the 9Cr-RAFM steel has been varied between 1 and 2 wt pct, and creep tests were carried out over the stress range of 180 and 260 MPa at 823 K (550 °C). The tempered martensitic steel exhibited primary creep followed by tertiary stage of creep deformation with a minimum in creep deformation rate. The primary creep behavior has been assessed based on the Garofalo relationship, , considering minimum creep rate instead of steady-state creep rate . The relationships between (i) rate of exhaustion of transient creep r' with minimum creep rate, (ii) rate of exhaustion of transient creep r' with time to reach minimum creep rate, and (iii) initial creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the first-order reaction-rate theory has prevailed throughout the transient region of the RAFM steel having different tungsten contents. The rate of exhaustion of transient creep r' and minimum creep rate decreased, whereas the transient strain ɛ T increased with increase in tungsten content. A master transient creep curve of the steels has been developed considering the variation of with . The effect of tungsten on the variation of minimum creep rate with applied stress has been rationalized by invoking the back-stress concept.

  11. Microstructural characterization of weld joints of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel fabricated by different joining methods

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Paul, V.; Saroja, S.; Albert, S.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed electron microscopy study on the microstructure of various regions of weldment fabricated by three welding methods namely tungsten inert gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding in an indigenously developed 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. Electron back scatter diffraction studies showed a random micro-texture in all the three welds. Microstructural changes during thermal exposures were studied and corroborated with hardness and optimized conditions for the post weld heat treatment have been identified for this steel. Hollomon–Jaffe parameter has been used to estimate the extent of tempering. The activation energy for the tempering process has been evaluated and found to be corresponding to interstitial diffusion of carbon in ferrite matrix. The type and microchemistry of secondary phases in different regions of the weldment have been identified by analytical transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Comparison of microstructural parameters in TIG, electron beam and laser welds of RAFM steel • EBSD studies to illustrate the absence of preferred orientation and identification of prior austenite grain size using phase identification map • Optimization of PWHT conditions for indigenous RAFM steel • Study of kinetics of tempering and estimation of apparent activation energy of the process.

  12. Fracture toughness of the IEA heat of F82H ferritic/martensitic stainless steel as a function of loading mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaxin; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1997-04-01

    Mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness tests were performed for the IEA heat of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel F82H at ambient temperature in order to provide comparison with previous measurements on a small heat given a different heat treatment. The results showed that heat to heat variations and heat treatment had negligible consequences on Mode I fracture toughness, but behavior during mixed-mode testing showed unexpected instabilities.

  13. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Tavassoli, A. -A. F.; Henry, J.; Rieth, M.; Sakasegawa, H.; Tanigawa, H.; Huang, Q.

    2016-07-26

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. Additionally, to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti,more » X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M23C6 (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. We present and compare limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ~70 displacements per atom at ~300–325 °C.« less

  14. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Henry, J.; Rieth, M.; Sakasegawa, H.; Tanigawa, H.; Huang, Q.

    2016-10-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. In addition to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti, X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M23C6 (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. Limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic are presented and compared with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ∼70 displacements per atom at ∼300-325 °C.

  15. Influence of liquid lead and lead-bismuth eutectic on tensile, fatigue and creep properties of ferritic/martensitic and austenitic steels for transmutation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorse, D.; Auger, T.; Vogt, J.-B.; Serre, I.; Weisenburger, A.; Gessi, A.; Agostini, P.; Fazio, C.; Hojna, A.; Di Gabriele, F.; Van Den Bosch, J.; Coen, G.; Almazouzi, A.; Serrano, M.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, the tensile, fatigue and creep properties of the Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steel T91 and of the Austenitic Stainless (AS) Steel 316L in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) or lead, obtained in the different organizations participating to the EUROTRANS-DEMETRA project are reviewed. The results show a remarkable consistency, referring to the variety of metallurgical and surface state conditions studied. Liquid Metal Embrittlement (LME) effects are shown, remarkable on heat-treated hardened T91 and also on corroded T91 after long-term exposure to low oxygen containing Liquid Metal (LM), but hardly visible on passive or oxidized smooth T91 specimens. For T91, the ductility trough was estimated, starting just above the melting point of the embrittler ( TM,E = 123.5 °C for LBE, 327 °C for lead) with the ductility recovery found at 425 °C. LME effects are weaker on 316L AS steel. Liquid Metal Assisted Creep (LMAC) effects are reported for the T91/LBE system at 550 °C, and for the T91/lead system at 525 °C. Today, if the study of the LME effects on T91 and 316L in LBE or lead can be considered well documented, in contrast, complementary investigations are necessary in order to quantify the LMAC effects in these systems, and determine rigorously the threshold creep conditions.

  16. Fabrication and integrity test preparation of HIP-joined W and ferritic-martensitic steel mockups for fusion reactor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Won; Shin, Kyu In; Kim, Suk Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae Sung; Choi, Bo Guen; Moon, Se Youn; Hong, Bong Guen

    2014-10-01

    Tungsten (W) and ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) as armor and structural materials, respectively, are the major candidates for plasma-facing components (PFCs) such as the blanket first wall (BFW) and the divertor, in a fusion reactor. In the present study, three W/FMS mockups were successfully fabricated using a hot isostatic pressing (HIP, 900 °C, 100 MPa, 1.5 hrs) with a following post-HIP heat treatment (PHHT, tempering, 750 °C, 70 MPa, 2 hrs), and the W/FMS joining method was developed based on the ITER BFW and the test blanket module (TBM) development project from 2004 to the present. Using a 10-MHz-frequency flat-type probe to ultrasonically test of the joint, we found no defects in the fabricated mockups. For confirmation of the joint integrity, a high heat flux test will be performed up to the thermal lifetime of the mockup under the proper test conditions. These conditions were determined through a preliminary analysis with conventional codes such as ANSYS-CFX for thermal-hydraulic conditions considering the test facility, the Korea heat load test facility with an electron beam (KoHLT-EB), and its water coolant system at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI).

  17. Microstructure and mechanical property of ferritic-martensitic steel cladding under a 650 °C liquid sodium environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, Sung Ho

    2013-11-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the effect of liquid sodium on the microstructural and mechanical property of ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) used for a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) cladding tube. A quasi-dynamic device characterized by natural circulation was constructed and a compatibility test between FMS and liquid sodium was performed. HT9 (12Cr-1MoWVN) and Gr.92 (9Cr-2WNbVNB) coupons as well as a Gr.92 cladding tube were immersed in the 650 °C liquid sodium up to 3095 h and a microstructural observation, a mechanical property evaluation such as nanoindentation, and a ring tension test were also done in this study. The results showed that both HT9 and Gr.92 exhibited macroscopic weight loss behavior where pitting and decarburization took place. Weight loss as well as the decarburization process decreased as the chromium content increased. A compatibility test over the cladding tube revealed that a decrease of the mechanical property caused by the aging process governed the whole mechanical property of the cladding tube.

  18. Microstructural evolution in a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel and its relation to high-temperature deformation and rupture models

    SciTech Connect

    DiMelfi, R.J.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The ferritic-martensitic stainless steel HT-9 exhibits an anomalously high creep strength in comparison to its high-temperature flow strength from tensile tests performed at moderate rates. A constitutive relation describing its high-temperature tensile behavior over a wide range of conditions has been developed. When applied to creep conditions the model predicts deformation rates orders of magnitude higher than observed. To account for the observed creep strength, a fine distribution of precipitates is postulated to evolve over time during creep. The precipitate density is calculated at each temperature and stress to give the observed creep rate. The apparent precipitation kinetics thereby extracted from this analysis is used in a model for the rupture-time kinetics that compares favorably with observation. Properly austenitized and tempered material was aged over times comparable to creep conditions, and in a way consistent with the precipitation kinetics from the model. Microstructural observations support the postulates and results of the model system. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Dynamic Strain Aging and Oxidation Effects on the Thermomechanical Fatigue Deformation of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagesha, A.; Kannan, R.; Srinivasan, V. S.; Sandhya, R.; Choudhary, B. K.; Laha, K.

    2016-03-01

    Thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) behavior of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel was investigated under in-phase (IP) and out-of-phase (OP) conditions under different mechanical strain amplitudes and temperature regimes. OP TMF was generally observed to result in the lowest cyclic lives compared to both IP TMF and isothermal low cycle fatigue (IF) at the maximum temperature ( T max). The stress-strain hysteresis loops under TMF were marked by extensive serrations associated with dynamic strain aging (DSA) at the strain amplitudes of ±0.4 and ±0.6 pct. The serrations were noticed during the downward ramp of temperature that resulted in IP and OP TMF exhibiting jerky flow in the compressive and tensile portions, respectively. However, no evidence of serrated flow was seen under IF cycling at any of the temperatures within the TMF cycle. The stress response during IP TMF was marked by a near-saturation regime over 65 to 70 pct of life in contrast to continuous cyclic softening in the case of OP TMF. The marked life reduction observed under OP cycling at the strain amplitudes of ±0.4 and ±0.6 pct was attributed to the deleterious influence associated with oxidation, DSA, and tensile mean stress. The findings assume importance in the context of elevated temperature fatigue design, considering the fact that the IF data at T max are deemed adequately conservative in traditional design approaches.

  20. Low cycle fatigue properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels after high-dose neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaganidze, E.; Petersen, C.; Aktaa, J.; Povstyanko, A.; Prokhorov, V.; Diegele, E.; Lässer, R.

    2011-08-01

    This paper focuses on the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviour of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated to a displacement damage dose of up to 70 dpa at 330-337 °C in the BOR 60 reactor within the ARBOR 2 irradiation programme. The influence of neutron irradiation on the fatigue behaviour was determined for the as-received EUROFER97, pre-irradiation heat-treated EUROFER97 HT and F82H-mod steels. Strain-controlled push-pull loading was performed using miniaturized cylindrical specimens at a constant temperature of 330 °C with total strain ranges between 0.8% and 1.1%. Comparison of the LCF behaviour of irradiated and reference unirradiated specimens was performed for both the adequate total and inelastic strains. Neutron irradiation-induced hardening may have various effects on the fatigue behaviour of the steels. The reduction of inelastic strain in the irradiated state compared with the reference unirradiated state at common total strain amplitudes may increase fatigue lifetime. The increase in the stress at the adequate inelastic strain, by contrast, may accelerate fatigue damage accumulation. Depending on which of the two effects mentioned dominates, neutron irradiation may either extend or reduce the fatigue lifetime compared with the reference unirradiated state. The results obtained for EUROFER97 and EUROFER97 HT confirm these considerations. Most of the irradiated specimens show fatigue lifetimes comparable to those of the reference unirradiated state at adequate inelastic strains. Some irradiated specimens, however, show lifetime reduction or increase in comparison with the reference state at adequate inelastic strains.

  1. Modification in the Microstructure of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo Ferritic Martensitic Steel Exposed to Sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanthi, T. N.; Sudha, Cheruvathur; Paul, V. Thomas; Bharasi, N. Sivai; Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2014-09-01

    Mod. 9Cr-1Mo is used as the structural material in the steam generator circuit of liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors. Microstructural modifications on the surface of this steel are investigated after exposing to flowing sodium at a temperature of 798 K (525 °C) for 16000 hours. Sodium exposure results in the carburization of the ferritic steel up to a depth of ~218 µm from the surface. Electron microprobe analysis revealed the existence of two separate zones with appreciable difference in microchemistry within the carburized layer. Differences in the type, morphology, volume fraction, and microchemistry of the carbides present in the two zones are investigated using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Formation of separate zones within the carburized layer is understood as a combined effect of leaching, diffusion of the alloying elements, and thermal aging. Chromium concentration on the surface in the α-phase suggested possible degradation in the corrosion resistance of the steel. Further, concentration-dependent diffusivities for carbon are determined in the base material and carburized zones using Hall's and den Broeder's methods, respectively. These are given as inputs for simulating the concentration profiles for carbon using numerical computation technique based on finite difference method. Predicted thickness of the carburized zone agrees reasonably well with that of experiment.

  2. Mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness of a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaxin; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1993-10-01

    The critical J-integrals of mode I (J{sub IC}), mixed-mode I/III (J{sub MC}), and mode III (J{sub IIIC}) were examined for a ferritic stainless steel (F-82H) at ambient temperature. A determination of J{sub MC} was made using modified compact-tension specimens. Different ratios of tension/shear stress were achieved by varying the principal axis of the crack plane between 0 and 55 degrees from the load line. Results showed that J{sub MC} and tearing modulus (T{sub M}) values varied with the crack angles and were lower than their mode I and mode III counterparts. Both the minimum J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values occurred at a crack angle between 40 and 50 degrees, where the load ratio of {sigma}{sub i}/{sigma}{sub iii} was 1.2 to 0.84. The J{sub min} was 240 Kj/M{sup 2}, and ratios of J{sub IC}/J{sub min} and J{sub IIIC}/J{sub min} were 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. The morphology of fracture surfaces was consistent with the change of J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values. While the upper shelf-fracture toughness of F-82H depends on loading mode, the J{sub min} remains very high. Other important considerations include the effect of mixed-mode loading on the DBT temperature, and effects of hydrogen and irradiation on J{sub min}.

  3. Hot deformation behavior and processing map of a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Sun, Hongying; Zou, Lei; Wang, Man; Li, Shaofu

    2014-12-01

    The hot deformation behavior of 9Cr oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel fabricated through the process of mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) as investigated through hot compression deformation tests on the Gleeble-1500D simulator in the temperature range of 1050-1200 °C and strain rate range of 0.001 s-1-1 s-1. The relationship between the rheological stress and the strain rate was also studied. The activation energy and the stress and material parameters of the hyperbolic-sine equation were resolved according to the data obtained. The processing map was also proposed. The results show that the flow stress decreases as the temperature increases, and that decreasing of the strain rate of the 9Cr ODS steel results in a positive strain rate sensitivity. It is clear that dynamic recrystallization is influenced by both temperature and strain rate. The results of this study may provide a good reference for the selection of hot working parameters for 9Cr ODS steel. The optimum processing domains are at 1200 °C with a strain rate of 1 s-1 and in the range of 1080-1100 °C with a strain rate between 0.018 s-1 and 0.05 s-1.

  4. Boron effect on the microstructure of 9% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenkov, M.; Materna-Morris, E.; Möslang, A.

    2015-07-01

    The microstructure of reduces-activation 9Cr-WTaV steel alloyed with 83 and 1160 wt. ppm 10B was detailed analysed using transmission electron microscopy. The influence of boron content on the precipitation behaviour of M23C6 and MX (VN and TaC) phases and, hence, on the formation process of steel's grain and lath structure was studied. VN precipitates, which play an important role in the stabilisation of the lath structure, exhibit most sensitive reaction on presence of boron. Their spatial density significantly reduces in the alloy with 83 ppm boron. In the steel with 1160 wt. ppm boron, no formation of VN was detected, whereas TaC particles precipitate at the lath and grain boundaries. These changes in the structure stabilisation mechanism lead to an increasing lath width and a decreasing thermal stability of laths and grains. Analytical investigations of several BN particles reveal their complex multi-phase structure and allow conclusions to be drawn with respect to their precipitation sequence.

  5. Fracture mechanisms in dual phase steels based on the acicular ferrite + martensite/austenite microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poruks, Peter

    The fracture mechanisms of low carbon microalloyed plate steels based on the acicular ferrite + marten site/austenite microstructure (AF + M/A) are investigated. The final microstructure consists of a dispersed phase of submicron equi-axed martensite particles with a bainitic ferrite matrix. A series of plates with M/A volume fractions of 0.076--0.179 are studied. Brittle fracture is investigated by Instrumented Charpy impact testing of samples at -196°C and subsequent metallography. The M/A particles are identified as the crack nucleation sites and the cleavage fracture stress calculated to be 2400 MPa in a complete AF microstrucuture. This value is significantly larger than in steels that contain significant proportions of conventional bainite. Standard Charpy and Instrumented Charpy impact testing is conducted through a temperature range from -80 to + 22°C to study ductile fracture behaviour. The total absorbed energy is separated into energies of crack nucleation and of crack propagation. It is found that the energy of crack nucleation is weakly dependent on the volume fraction of M/A and completely independent of temperature over the range studied. The crack propagation energy varies significantly with both variables, decreasing with increased volume fraction of M/A and with decreasing temperature. The peak load in the instrumented Charpy data is used to calculate the dynamic fracture toughness, KId, which is found to be 105--120 MPa-m1/2. The void nucleation and void growth stages of ductile fracture are studied by metallographic examination of tensile bars. The sites of void nucleation are identified as inclusions and M/A particles. Voids nucleate at the M/A particles by decohesion of the particle-matrix interface. A constant void nucleation strain of epsilon = 0.90 +/- 0.05 is measured for all of the samples independent of the volume fraction of M/A. A stress-based criterion is used to predict void nucleation and the interface strength is determined to be

  6. Tritium permeation experiments using reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel tube and erbium oxide coating

    SciTech Connect

    Takumi Chikada; Masashi Shimada; Robert Pawelko; Takayuki Terai; Takeo Muroga

    2013-09-01

    Low concentration tritium permeation experiments have been performed on uncoated F82H and Er2O3-coated tubular samples in the framework of the Japan-US TITAN collaborative program. Tritium permeability of the uncoated sample with 1.2 ppm tritium showed one order of magnitude lower than that with 100% deuterium. The permeability of the sample with 40 ppm tritium was more than twice higher than that of 1.2 ppm, indicating a surface contribution at the lower tritium concentration. The Er2O3-coated sample showed two orders of magnitude lower permeability than the uncoated sample, and lower permeability than that of the coated plate sample with 100% deuterium. It was also indicated that the memory effect of ion chambers in the primary and secondary circuits was caused by absorption of tritiated water vapor that was generated by isotope exchange reactions between tritium and surface water on the coating.

  7. Fabrication of 13Cr-2Mo Ferritic/Martensitic Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Steel Components by Mechanical Alloying and Spark-Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, I.; Grigoryev, E.; Khasanov, O. L.; Olevsky, E.

    2014-06-01

    The outcomes of the mechanical alloying of 13Cr-2Mo ferritic/martensitic steel and yttria (oxide-dispersion-strengthened steel) powders in a ball mill are reported in terms of the powder particle size and morphology evolution. The optimal ball mill rotation speed and the milling time are discussed. The densification kinetics of the mechanically alloyed powder during the process of spark-plasma sintering is analyzed. An optimal set of the compaction processing parameters, including the maximum temperature, the dwell time, and the heating rate, is determined. The specifics of the densification are discussed in terms of the impact of major spark-plasma sintering parameters as well as the possible phase transformations occurring during compaction processing.

  8. IRRADIATION CREEP AND SWELLING OF RUSSIAN FERRITIC-MARTENSITIC STEELS IRRADIATED TO VERY HIGH EXPOSURES IN THE BN-350 FAST REACTOR AT 305-335 DEGREES C

    SciTech Connect

    Konobeev, Yu V.; Dvoraishin, A. M.; Porollo, S. I.; Shulepin, S. V.; Budylkin, N. I.; Mironova, E. G.; Garner, Francis A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2003-09-03

    Russian ferritic martensitic (F(slash)M) steels EP(dash)450, EP(dash)852 and EP(dash)823 were irradiated in the BN(dash)350 fast reactor in the form of gas-pressurized creep tubes. The first steel is used in Russia for hexagonal wrappers in fast reactors. The other steels were developed for compatibility with Pb(dash)Bi coolants and serve to enhance our understanding of the general behavior of this class of steels. In an earlier paper we published data on irradiation creep of EP(dash)450 and EP(dash) 823 at temperatures between 390 and 520 degrees C, with dpa levels ranging from 20 to 60 dpa. In the current paper new data on the irradiation creep and swelling of EP(dash)450 and EP(dash)852 at temperatures between 305 and 335 degrees C and doses ranging from 61 to 89 dpa are presented. Where comparisons are possible, it appears that these steels exhibit behavior that is very consistent with that of Western steels. Swelling is relatively low at high neutron exposure and confined to temperatures less then 420 degrees C, but may be camouflaged somewhat by precipitation related densification. These irradiation creep studies confirm that the creep compliance of F(slash)M steels is about one half that of austenitic steels.

  9. Relationship Between Grain Boundary Structure and Radiation Induced Segregation in a Neutron Irradiated 9 wt. % Cr Model Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Miller, Brandon; Chichester, Heather J.M.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-01-01

    Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels with high Cr content posses the high temperature strength and low swelling rates required for advanced nuclear reactor designs. Radiation induced segregation (RIS) occurs in F/M steels due to solute atoms preferentially coupling to point defect fluxes to defect sinks, such as grain boundaries (GBs). The RIS response of F/M steels and austenitic steels has been shown to be dependent on the local structure of GBs but has only been demonstrated in ion irradiated specimens. A 9 wt. % Cr model alloy steel was irradiated to 3 dpa using neutrons at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the effect of neutron radiation environment on the RIS-GB structure dependence. This investigation found the relationship between GB structure and RIS is also active for F/M steels irradiated using neutrons. The data generated from the neutron irradiation is also compared to RIS data generated using proton irradiations on the same heat of model alloy.

  10. Relationship between lath boundary structure and radiation induced segregation in a neutron irradiated 9 wt.% Cr model ferritic/martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Miller, Brandon D.; Chichester, Heather J. M.; Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-02-01

    Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) steels with high Cr content posses the high temperature strength and low swelling rates required for advanced nuclear reactor designs. Radiation induced segregation (RIS) occurs in F/M steels due to solute atoms preferentially coupling to point defect fluxes which migrate to defect sinks, such as grain boundaries (GBs). The RIS response of F/M steels and austenitic steels has been shown to be dependent on the local structure of GBs where low energy structures have suppressed RIS responses. This relationship between local GB structure and RIS has been demonstrated primarily in ion-irradiated specimens. A 9 wt.% Cr model alloy steel was irradiated to 3 dpa using neutrons at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to determine the effect of a neutron radiation environment on the RIS response at different GB structures. This investigation found the relationship between GB structure and RIS is also active for F/M steels irradiated using neutrons. The data generated from the neutron irradiation is also compared to RIS data generated using proton irradiations on the same heat of model alloy.

  11. Silicon-containing ferritic/martensitic steel after exposure to oxygen-containing flowing lead-bismuth eutectic at 450 and 550 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, Carsten; Koch, Verena; Wedemeyer, Olaf; Skrypnik, Aleksandr; Konys, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    A ferritic/martensitic (f/m) steel with 9 and 3 mass% of chromium (Cr) and silicon (Si), respectively, was tested on performance in flowing lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 450 and 550 °C, each at concentrations of solved oxygen of both 10-7 and 10-6 mass%. The 9Cr-3Si steel generally exhibits the same basic corrosion modes as other f/m materials with 9 mass% Cr and typically lower Si content, namely Steel T91. The Si-rich steel shows an overall improved performance in comparison to T91 at 450 °C and 10-7 mass% solved oxygen, but especially at 450 °C and 10-6 mass% solved oxygen. The advantage of higher Si-content in 9Cr steel is less clear at 550 °C. Especially high oxygen content in flowing LBE at 550 °C, between >10-6 mass% and oxygen saturation, seems detrimental for the high-Si material in respect of the initiation and progress of a solution-based corrosion.

  12. Void swelling and microstructure evolution at very high damage level in self-ion irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getto, E.; Sun, K.; Monterrosa, A. M.; Jiao, Z.; Hackett, M. J.; Was, G. S.

    2016-11-01

    The void swelling and microstructure evolution of ferritic-martensitic alloys HT9, T91 and T92 were characterized following irradiation with Fe++ ions at 460 °C to damage levels of 75-650 displacements per atom with 10 atom parts per million pre-implanted helium. Steady state swelling rate of 0.033%/ dpa was determined for HT9, the least swelling resistant alloy, and 0.007%/ dpa in T91. In T91, resistance was due to suppression of void nucleation. Swelling resistance was greatest in T92, with a low density (∼1 × 1020 m-3) of small voids that had not grown appreciably, indicating suppression of nucleation and growth. Additional heats of T91 indicated that alloy composition was not the determining factor of swelling resistance. Carbon and chromium-rich M2X precipitates formed at 250 dpa and were correlated with decreased nucleation in T91 and T92, but did not affect void growth in HT9. Dislocation and G-phase microstructure evolution was analyzed up to 650 dpa in HT9.

  13. Dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature for a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to investigate the dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature in the range of {minus}95{degrees}C to 25{degrees}C for a low activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel (F82-H). Mode I and mixed Mode I/III fracture toughnesses were investigated in the range of {minus}95 to 25{degree}C for a F82-H steel heat-treated in the following way; 1000{degree}C/20 h/air-cooled (AC), 1100{degree}C/7 min/AC, and 700{degree}C/2 h/AC. The results indicate that crack tip plasticity was increased by mixed mode loading, and suggest that at low temperature, mode I fracture toughness is the critical design parameter, but at temperatures above room temperature, expecially concerning fatigure and creep-fatigue crack growth rate, a mixed mode loading may be more harmful than a mode I loading for this steel because a mixed mode loading results in lower fracture toughness and higher crack tip plasticity (or dislocation activity).

  14. Effect of transient thermal cycles in a supercritical water-cooled reactor on the microstructure and properties of ferritic martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totemeier, T. C.; Clark, D. E.

    2006-09-01

    Microstructural and mechanical property changes in modified 9Cr-1Mo and HCM12A ferritic-martensitic steels resulting from short-duration thermal transients that occur during loss of feedwater flow events in a supercritical water reactor (SCWR) were studied. Specimen blanks were exposed to reference transients with 810 and 840 °C maximum temperatures using a thermal cycle simulator, and the subsequent microstructure, hardness, and creep-rupture strength were evaluated. Exposure to five consecutive cycles at either temperature resulted in no significant changes - only very slight indications of overtempering. Subsequent study of a wider variety of transient conditions showed that significant ferrite-to-austenite transformation occurred during thermal transients whose maximum temperature exceeded 860 °C, or during transients with holds exceeding 10 s at 840 °C maximum temperature. The subsequent presence of untempered martensite in the microstructure, coupled with severe overtempering, resulted in an order of magnitude decrease in creep-rupture strength at 600 °C. The findings were consistent with measured Ac1 temperatures for the two steels and the dependence of Ac1 on heating rate.

  15. High heat flux test with HIP-bonded Ferritic Martensitic Steel mock-up for the first wall of the KO HCML TBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won Lee, Dong; Dug Bae, Young; Kwon Kim, Suk; Yun Shin, Hee; Guen Hong, Bong; Cheol Bang, In

    2011-10-01

    In order for a Korean Helium Cooled Molten Lithium (HCML) Test Blanket Module (TBM) to be tested in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), fabrication method for the TBM FW such as Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP, 1050 °C, 100 MPa, 2 h) has been developed including post HIP heat treatment (PHHT, normalizing at 950 °C for 2 h and tempering at 750 °C for 2 h) with Ferritic Martensitic Steel (FMS). Several mock-ups were fabricated using the developed methods and one of them, three-channel mock-up, was used for performing a High Heat Flux (HHF) test to verify the joint integrity. Test conditions were determined using the commercial code, ANSYS-11, and the test was performed in the Korea Heat Load Test (KoHLT) facility, which was used a radiation heating with a graphite heater. The mock-up survived up to 1000 cycles under 1.0 MW/m 2 heat flux and there is no delamination or failure during the test.

  16. Compatibility of ferritic-martensitic steel T91 welds with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic: Comparison between TIG and EB welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, J.; Coen, G.; Van Renterghem, W.; Almazouzi, A.

    2010-01-01

    The 9 wt.% chromium ferritic-martensitic steel T91 is being considered as candidate structural material for a future experimental accelerator driven system (XT-ADS). This material and its welded connections would need to be used in contact with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), under high irradiation doses. Both unirradiated tungsten inert gas (TIG) and electron beam (EB) welds of T91 have been examined by means of metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Vickers hardness measurements and tensile testing in both gas and liquid lead-bismuth environment. The TIG weld was commercially produced and post weld heat treated by a certified welding company while the post weld heat treatment of the experimental EB weld was optimized in terms of the Vickers hardness profile across the welded joint. The mechanical properties of the T91 TIG and EB welds in contact with LBE have been examined using slow strain rate tensile testing (SSRT) in LBE at 350 °C. All welds showed good mechanical behaviour in gas environment but total elongation was strongly reduced due to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) when tested in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic environment. The reduction in total elongation due to LME was larger for the commercially TIG welded joint than for the EB welded joint.

  17. R&D of ferritic-martensitic steel EP450 ODS for fuel pin claddings of prospective fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitina, A. A.; Ageev, V. S.; Chukanov, A. P.; Tsvelev, V. V.; Porezanov, N. P.; Kruglov, O. A.

    2012-09-01

    Present paper performs research results of structure and mechanical properties of the ODS steel on the base of steel EP450 (Fe-13Cr-2Mo-Nb-V-B-0,12C) on all stages of producing: from powders to thin-walled tubes. Also, the results of research on method of sealing thin-walled tubes from steel EP450 ODS by pressurized resistance welding are shown.

  18. Effects of boron and phosphorus on creep properties of a ferritic/martensitic steel for fast reactor cladding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The thermal efficiencies of both conventional and supercritical fossil-fueled power plants can be improved by increasing the operating temperatures and pressures. Increased thermal efficiency would also result in significant fuel cost savings, as well as reduced environmental emissions per megawatt generated. Creep properties of materials currently used as tubes in the hottest areas of the boiler, the superheater and reheater sections, limit the operating temperature. As such, steels with improved creep strength compared to these conventional alloys are needed to increase the operational efficiencies of thermal-electric generating stations. A new class of creep-resistant, 10%Cr martensitic steel has been developed for use as high temperature components, especially in the electric utility, petrochemical & chemical industries. The steel differs from other 9-12%Cr steels in two important ways: It is strengthened by a uniform dispersion of very fine, coarsening-resistant TiC particles rather than chromium-rich, M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates; and the TiC particles are precipitated in austenite prior to the martensitic transformation, not during tempering. By carefully controlling the thermo-mechanical treatment, three TiC sizes were incorporated into the matrix: 4, 12 and 25 nm; grain size and precipitate volume fraction (0.005) were kept constant. Creep tests on these three specimen types were done at 550{degrees}C, 600{degrees}C and 650{degrees}C. Results indicate that reducing the average particle size from 25 to 4 nm (thereby also reducing the average inter-particle spacing) decreases the steady-state creep rate by more than four orders of magnitude. The prototype steel`s composition must now be optimized, and in doing so the effects of boron and phosphorus are investigated.

  19. Precipitation behavior of laves phase and its effect on toughness of 9Cr-2Mo Ferritic-martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, Y.; Wade, N.; Kunimitsu, S.; Urita, T.

    1986-11-01

    This study clarified the ralationship between the toughness of a 9Cr-2Mo dual phase steel and precipitates formed during aging, with special attention to the Laves phase (Fe 2Mo). The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) is increased and the upper shelf energy decreased when the Laves phase begins to precipitate during aging. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicate that elimination of Si in the steel reduces the precipitation of the Laves phase and results in maintaining good toughness. It is also noted that the toughness of the steel is controlled by the total amount of precipitates (Laves + carbides) in the aging at 873 K for more than 3.6 × 10 3 ks. A time-temperature-precipitation diagram for the Laves phase is established and it clearly shows that the precipitation of the Laves phase is markedly retarded by the decrease of Si content. In Si-free steel, no Laves phase is observed in the temperature and time range investigated.

  20. Analysis of stress-induced Burgers vector anisotropy in pressurized tube specimens of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steel: JLF-1

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Shibayama, T.

    1998-09-01

    A procedure for determining the Burgers vector anisotropy in irradiated ferritic steels allowing identification of all a<100> and all a/2<111> dislocations in a region of interest is applied to a pressurized tube specimen of JLF-1 irradiated at 430 C to 14.3 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV) or 61 dpa. Analysis of micrographs indicates large anisotropy in Burgers vector populations develop during irradiation creep.

  1. Microstructural Variations Across a Dissimilar 316L Austenitic: 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel Weld Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Karthikeyan, T.; Dasgupta, Arup; Sudha, C.; Hajra, R. N.; Albert, S. K.; Saroja, S.; Jayakumar, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discuss the microstructural variations across a dissimilar weld joint between SS316 and 9Cr-RAFM steel and its modifications on post weld heat treatments (PWHT). Detailed characterization showed a mixed microstructure of austenite and martensite in the weld which is in agreement with the phases predicted using Schaeffler diagram based on composition measurements. The presence of very low volume fraction of δ-ferrite in SS316L has been identified employing state of the art electron back-scattered diffraction technique. PWHT of the ferritic steel did not reduce the hardness in the weld metal. Thermal exposure at 973 K (700 °C) showed a progressive reduction in hardness of weld joint with duration of treatment except in austenitic base metal. However, diffusion annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) for 100 hours resulted in an unexpected increase in hardness of weld metal, which is a manifestation of the dilution effects and enrichment of Ni on the transformation characteristics of the weld zone. Migration of carbon from ferritic steel aided the precipitation of fine carbides in the austenitic base metal on annealing at 973 K (700 °C); but enhanced diffusion at 1073 K (880 °C) resulted in coarsening of carbides and thereby reduction of hardness.

  2. Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Peter

    2013-09-30

    The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV

  3. Effect of sodium environment on the low cycle fatigue properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, R.; Sandhya, R.; Ganesan, V.; Valsan, M.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2009-02-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is the material of current interest for the steam generator components of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). The steam generator has been designed to operate for 30-40 years. It is important to accurately determine the life of the components in the actual environment in order to consider the extension of life beyond the design life. With this objective in view, a programme has been initiated at our laboratory to evaluate the effects of flowing sodium on the LCF behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. LCF tests conducted in flowing sodium environment at 823 K and 873 K exhibited cyclic softening behaviour both in air and sodium environments. The fatigue lives are significantly improved in sodium environment when compared to the data obtained in air environment under identical testing conditions. The lack of oxidation in sodium environment is considered to be responsible for the delayed crack initiation and consequent increase in fatigue life. Comparison of experimental lifetimes with RCC-MR design code predictions indicated that the design curve based on air tests is too conservative.

  4. Study of MHD Corrosion and Transport of Corrosion Products of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in the Flowing PbLi and its Application to Fusion Blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidi, Sheida

    Two important components of a liquid breeder blanket of a fusion power reactor are the liquid breeder/coolant and the steel structure that the liquid is enclosed in. One candidate combination for such components is Lead-Lithium (PbLi) eutectic alloy and advanced Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel. The research performed here is aimed at: (1) better understanding of corrosion processes in the system including RAFM steel and flowing PbLi in the presence of a strong magnetic field and (2) prediction of corrosion losses in conditions of a Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) blanket, which is at present the key liquid metal blanket concept in the US. To do this, numerical and analytical tools have been developed and then applied to the analysis of corrosion processes. First, efforts were taken to develop a computational suite called TRANSMAG (Transport phenomena in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows) as an analysis tool for corrosion processes in the PbLi/RAFM system, including transport of corrosion products in MHD laminar and turbulent flows. The computational approach in TRANSMAG is based on simultaneous solution of flow, energy and mass transfer equations with or without a magnetic field, assuming mass transfer controlled corrosion and uniform dissolution of iron in the flowing PbLi. Then, the new computational tool was used to solve an inverse mass transfer problem where the saturation concentration of iron in PbLi was reconstructed from the experimental data resulting in the following correlation: CS = e 13.604--12975/T, where T is the temperature of PbLi in K and CS is in wppm. The new correlation for saturation concentration was then used in the analysis of corrosion processes in laminar flows in a rectangular duct in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field. As shown in this study, the mass loss increases with the magnetic field such that the corrosion rate in the presence of a magnetic field can be a few times higher compared to purely

  5. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ Xray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  6. Use of double and triple-ion irradiation to study the influence of high levels of helium and hydrogen on void swelling of 8-12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriiyanova, Y. E.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    In accelerator-driven spallation (ADS) devices, some of the structural materials will be exposed to intense fluxes of very high energy protons and neutrons, producing not only displacement damage, but very high levels of helium and hydrogen. Unlike fission flux-spectra where most helium and hydrogen are generated by transmutation in nickel and only secondarily in iron or chromium, gas production in ADS flux-spectra are rather insensitive to alloy composition, such that Fe-Cr base ferritic alloys also generate very large gas levels. While ferritic alloys are known to swell less than austenitic alloys in fission spectra, there is a concern that high gas levels in fusion and especially ADS facilities may strongly accelerate void swelling in ferritic alloys. In this study of void swelling in response to helium and hydrogen generation, irradiation was conducted on three ferritic-martensitic steels using the Electrostatic Accelerator with External Injector (ESUVI) facility that can easily produce any combination of helium to dpa and/or hydrogen to dpa ratios. Irradiation was conducted under single, dual and triple beam modes using 1.8 MeV Cr+3, 40 keV He+, and 20 keV H+. In the first part of this study we investigated the response of dual-phase EP-450 to variations in He/dpa and H/dpa ratio, focusing first on dual ion studies and then triple ion studies, showing that there is a diminishing influence on swelling with increasing total gas content. In the second part we investigated the relative response of three alloys spanning a range of starting microstructure and composition. In addition to observing various synergisms between He and H, the most important conclusion was that the tempered martensite phase, known to lag behind the ferrite phase in swelling in the absence of gases, loses much of its resistance to void nucleation when irradiated at large gas/dpa levels.

  7. Surface modification of structural materials by low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, A. V. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Kazachenok, M. S. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Sinyakova, E. A.; Borodovitsina, O. M.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Leontieva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2014-11-14

    Microstructure formation in surface layers of pure titanium and ferritic-martensitic steel subjected to electron beam treatment is studied. It is shown that low energy high-current pulsed electron beam irradiation leads to the martensite structure within the surface layer of pure titanium. Contrary, the columnar ferrite grains grow during solidification of ferritic-martensitic steel. The effect of electron beam energy density on the surface morphology and microstructure of the irradiated metals is demonstrated.

  8. Comparative Tensile Flow and Work-Hardening Behavior of 9 Pct Chromium Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in the Framework of the Estrin-Mecking Internal-Variable Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. K.; Christopher, J.

    2016-06-01

    The comparative tensile flow and work-hardening behavior of P9 steel in two different product forms, normalized and tempered plate and thick section tube plate forging, and P91 steel were investigated in the framework of the dislocation dynamics based Estrin-Mecking (E-M) one-internal-variable approach. The analysis indicated that the flow behavior of P9 and P91 steels was adequately described by the E-M approach in a wide range of temperatures. It was suggested that dislocation dense martensite lath/cell boundaries and precipitates together act as effective barriers to dislocation motion in P9 and P91 steels. At room and intermediate temperatures, the evolution of the internal-state variable, i.e., the dislocation density with plastic strain, exhibited insignificant variations with respect to temperature. At high temperatures, a rapid evolution of dislocation density with plastic strain toward saturation with increasing temperature was observed. The softer P9 steel tube plate forging exhibited higher work hardening in terms of larger gains in the dislocation density and flow stress contribution from dislocations than the P9 steel plate and P91 steel at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 873 K (27 °C to 600 °C). The evaluation of activation energy suggests that the deformation is controlled by cross-slip of dislocations at room and intermediate temperatures, and climb of dislocations at high temperatures. The relative influence of initial microstructure on flow and work-hardening parameters associated with the E-M approach was discussed in the three temperature regimes displayed by P9 and P91 steels.

  9. Microstructural Evolution and Recrystallization Kinetics of a Cold-Rolled, Ferrite-Martensite Structure During Intercritical Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etesami, S. A.; Enayati, M. H.

    2016-07-01

    The recrystallization behavior of 80 pct, cold-rolled, low-carbon, dual-phase steel during intercritical annealing for different times was studied. The annealed microstructures showed that the recrystallization initially occurred in the deformed martensitic regions. The values of Avrami exponent for recrystallization varied from 3.8 to 4 with an activation energy of 46.9 kJ/mol. This study also introduced a novel method for the production of bimodal grain structures in low-carbon, ferrite-martensite steel.

  10. Creep behavior of pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic martensitic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Zhang, Ying; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    The creep behavior of various pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel was investigated at 650 C in laboratory air. The coatings were fabricated in two temperature regimes, i.e., 650 or 700 C (low temperature) and 1050 C(high temperature), and consisted of a range of Al levels and thicknesses. For comparison, uncoated specimens heat-treated at 1050 C to simulate the high temperature coating cycle also were included in the creep test. All coated specimens showed a reduction in creep resistance, with 16 51% decrease in rupture life compared to the as-received bare substrate alloy. However, the specimens heat-treated at 1050 C exhibited the lowest creep resistance among all tested samples, with a surprisingly short rupture time of < 25 h, much shorter than the specimen coated at 1050 C. Factors responsible for the reduction in creep resistance of both coated and heat-treated specimens were discussed.

  11. Kinetics of Ferrite Recrystallization and Austenite Formation During Intercritical Annealing of the Cold-Rolled Ferrite/Martensite Duplex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, Y.; Kermanpur, A.; Najafizadeh, A.; Kalashami, A. Ghatei

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafine-grained, dual-phase (UFG DP) steels were produced by a new route using an uncommon cold-rolling and subsequent intercritical annealing of ferrite/martensite duplex starting microstructures. The effects of processing parameters such as rolling reduction, intercritical annealing temperature, and time on the microstructural evaluations have been studied. UFG DP steels with an average grain size of about 1 to 2 μm were achieved by short intercritical annealing of the 80 pct cold-rolled duplex microstructures. The kinetics of ferrite recrystallization and austenite formation were studied based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model. The proposed model for describing the isothermal austenite formation kinetics was applied successfully to the nonisothermal conditions. It was found that complete recrystallization of ferrite before the austenite formation led to the formation of a large extent randomly distributed austenite in the ferrite matrix and a chain-networked structure.

  12. Surface modification of ferritic steels using MEVVA and duoplasmatron ion sources.

    PubMed

    Kulevoy, Timur V; Chalyhk, Boris B; Fedin, Petr A; Sitnikov, Alexey L; Kozlov, Alexander V; Kuibeda, Rostislav P; Andrianov, Stanislav L; Orlov, Nikolay N; Kravchuk, Konstantin S; Rogozhkin, Sergey V; Useinov, Alexey S; Oks, Efim M; Bogachev, Alexey A; Nikitin, Alexander A; Iskandarov, Nasib A; Golubev, Alexander A

    2016-02-01

    Metal Vapor Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion source (IS) is a unique tool for production of high intensity metal ion beam that can be used for material surface modification. From the other hand, the duoplasmatron ion source provides the high intensity gas ion beams. The MEVVA and duoplasmatron IS developed in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics were used for the reactor steel surface modification experiments. Response of ferritic-martensitic steel specimens on titanium and nitrogen ions implantation and consequent vacuum annealing was investigated. Increase in microhardness of near surface region of irradiated specimens was observed. Local chemical analysis shows atom mixing and redistribution in the implanted layer followed with formation of ultrafine precipitates after annealing.

  13. Oxidation of ferritic martensitic alloys T91, HCM12A and HT-9 in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampornrat, Pantip; Was, Gary S.

    2007-09-01

    The oxidation behavior of ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloys in supercritical water (SCW) was studied in order to evaluate the suitability of these alloys for use in the Gen IV supercritical water reactor (SCWR) concept. A series of exposure tests in SCW were performed with three F-M alloys: T91, HCM12A, and HT-9. The effect of temperature was evaluated over the range of 400-600 °C and the dissolved oxygen concentration was controlled at <10 ppb (deaerated condition), 100 and 300 ppb. The oxidation behavior was determined from weight gain measurements along with oxide structure analysis. The results indicated that the oxidation rate was strongly dependent on temperature and followed an Arrhenius behavior. Activation energies for oxidation were 172, 177, and 189 kJ/mol for HT-9, HCM12A, and T91, respectively. The time dependence of the oxidation rate followed an exponential law with time exponents ˜0.3-0.42. Reduction in oxidation rate was observed at intermediate values (100-300 ppb) of dissolved oxygen concentration. The oxide formed on the alloy surface consisted of an outer layer of porous magnetite (Fe 3O 4) and an inner layer of iron chromium oxide, (Fe, Cr) 3O 4 with spinel structure. A transition region lies beneath the inner oxide in which the metal content increases to bulk values and the oxygen content decreases to nearly zero. Iron chromium oxide, (Fe, Cr)O, with the wustite structure was observed in the transition layer at 600 °C. The relatively good agreement between the activation energies for oxidation and that for grain boundary diffusion of oxygen support an oxidation mechanism based on short circuit oxygen diffusion to the oxide-metal interface.

  14. Mechanism of the Formation of a Protective Fluoride Coating on Steel Surfaces Contacting Freons as Candidates for Brest-Type Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrebaev, S. A.; Orlova, E. A.; Alekseev, V. V.; Zhmurin, V. G.; Orlov, M. A.; Shirshov, Ya. N.; Torbenkova, I. Yu.; Tychinskii, P. I.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of the formation of MgF2 coatings on ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels contacting liquid magnesium and gaseous silicon tetrafluoride (SiF4) has been investigated. An MgF2 coating on steel possesses high plastic properties. The proposed method can be used to improve corrosion resistance of steels contacting freons and other fluorine-containing materials.

  15. Investigation of Magnetic Signatures and Microstructures for Heat-Treated Ferritic/Martensitic HT-9 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; McCloy, John S.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan

    2013-05-01

    There is increased interest in improved methods for in-situ nondestructive interrogation of materials for nuclear reactors in order to ensure reactor safety and quantify material degradation (particularly embrittlement) prior to failure. Therefore, a prototypical ferritic/martensitic alloy, HT-9, of interest to the nuclear materials community was investigated to assess microstructure effects on micromagnetics measurements – Barkhausen noise emission, magnetic hysteresis measurements, and first-order reversal curve analysis – for samples with three different heat-treatments. Microstructural and physical measurements consisted of high-precision density, resonant ultrasound elastic constant determination, Vickers microhardness, grain size, and texture. These were varied in the HT-9 alloy samples and related to various magnetic signatures. In parallel, a meso-scale microstructure model was created for alpha iron and effects of polycrystallinity and demagnetization factor were explored. It was observed that Barkhausen noise emission decreased with increasing hardness and decreasing grain size (lath spacing) while coercivity increased. The results are discussed in terms of the use of magnetic signatures for nondestructive interrogation of radiation damage and other microstructural changes in ferritic/martensitic alloys.

  16. Effect of Cr content on the nanostructural evolution of irradiated ferritic/martensitic alloys: An object kinetic Monte Carlo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Malerba, L.; Becquart, C. S.

    2015-10-01

    Self-interstitial cluster diffusivity in Fe-Cr alloys, model materials for high-Cr ferritic/martensitic steels, is known to be reduced in a non-monotonic way as a function of Cr concentration: it first decreases, then increases. This non-monotonic behaviour is caused by a relatively long-ranged attractive interaction between Cr atoms and crowdions and correlates well with the experimentally observed swelling in these alloys under neutron irradiation, also seen to first decrease and then increase with increasing Cr content, under comparable irradiation conditions. Moreover, recent studies reveal that C atoms dispersed in the Fe matrix form under irradiation complexes with vacancies which, in turn, act as trap for one-dimensionally migrating self-interstitial clusters. The mobility of one-dimensional migrating clusters is considered key to determine swelling susceptibility. However, no model has ever been built that quantitatively describes the dependence of swelling on Cr content, allowing for the presence of C in the matrix. In this work we developed physically-based sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations intended to study the nanostructure evolution under irradiation in Fe-Cr-C alloys. The nanostructural evolution in Fe-C and in four Fe-Cr-C alloys (containing 2.5, 5, 9 and 12 wt.% Cr) neutron irradiated up to ∼0.6 dpa at 563 K was simulated according to the model and reference experiments were reproduced. Our model shows that the SIA cluster reduced mobility has a major influence on the nanostructural evolution: it increases the number of vacancy-SIA recombinations and thus leads to the suppression of voids formation. This provides a clear framework to interpret the non-monotonic dependence of swelling in Fe-Cr alloys versus Cr content. Our model also suggests that the amount of C in the matrix has an equally important role: high amounts of it may counteract the beneficial effect that Cr has in reducing swelling.

  17. Cr segregation at the FeCr surface and the origin of corrosion resistance in ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    De Caro, M S; Morse, B; Egiebor, N; Farmer, J; Caro, A

    2008-11-22

    Structural materials in Gen-IV nuclear reactors will face severe conditions of high operating temperatures, high neutron flux exposure, and corrosive environment. Radiation effects and corrosion and chemical compatibility issues are factors that will limit the materials lifetime. Low-chromium (9-12 Cr wt.%) ferritic martensitic (F/M) steels are being considered as possible candidates because they offer good swelling resistance and good mechanical properties under extreme conditions of radiation dose and irradiation temperature. The surface chemistry of FeCr alloys, responsible for the corrosion properties, is complex. It exists today a controversy between equilibrium thermodynamic calculations, which suggest Cr depletion at the surface driven by the higher surface energy of Cr, and experimental data which suggest the oxidation process occurs in two stages, first forming a Fe-rich oxide, followed by a duplex oxide layer, and ending with a Cr-rich oxide. Moreover, it has been shown experimentally that corrosion resistance of F/M steels depends significantly on Cr content, increasing with increasing Cr content and with a threshold around 10% Cr, below which, the alloy behaves as pure Fe. In an attempt to rationalize these two contradicting observations and to understand the physical mechanism behind corrosion resistance in these materials we perform atomistic simulations using our FeCr empirical potential and analyze Cr equilibrium distributions at different compositions and temperatures in single and polycrystalline samples. We analyze the controversy in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic considerations.

  18. Low temperature embrittlement behaviour of different ferritic-martensitic alloys for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieth, M.; Dafferner, B.

    1996-10-01

    In the last few years a lot of different low activation CrWVTa steels have been developed world-wide. Without irradiation some of these alloys show clearly a better low temperature embrittlement behaviour than commercial CrNiMoV(Nb) alloys. Within the MANITU project a study was carried out to compare, prior to the irradiation program, the embrittlement behaviour of different alloys in the unirradiated condition performing instrumented Charpy impact bending tests with sub-size specimens. The low activation materials (LAM) considered were different OPTIFER alloys (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe), F82H (JAERI), 9Cr2WVTa (ORNL), and GA3X (PNL). The modified commercial 10-11% CrNiMoVNb steels were MANET and OPTIMAR. A meaningful comparison between these alloys could be drawn, since the specimens of all materials were manufactured and tested under the same conditions.

  19. Interdiffusion Behavior of Al-Rich Oxidation Resistant Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Velraj, S.; Zhang, Ying; Hawkins, W. E.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2012-06-21

    We investigated interdiffusion of thin Al-rich coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation on 9Cr ferritic–martensitic alloys in the temperature range of 650–700°C. The compositional changes after long-term exposures in laboratory air and air + 10 vol% H2O were examined experimentally. Interdiffusion was modeled by a modified coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model (COSIM) program. The modification enabled the program to directly input the concentration profiles of the as-deposited coating determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Reasonable agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental Al profiles after exposures. Moreover, the model was also applied to predict coating lifetime at 650–700°C based on a minimum Al content (Cb) required at the coating surface to re-form protective oxide scale. In addition to a Cb value established from the failure of a thin CVD coating at 700°C, values reported for slurry aluminide coatings were also included in lifetime predictions.

  20. High strength, high ductility low carbon steel

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jayoung; Thomas, Gareth

    1978-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility low carbon steel consisting essentially of iron, 0.05-0.15 wt% carbon, and 1-3 wt% silicon. Minor amounts of other constituents may be present. The steel is characterized by a duplex ferrite-martensite microstructure in a fibrous morphology. The microstructure is developed by heat treatment consisting of initial austenitizing treatment followed by annealing in the (.alpha. + .gamma.) range with intermediate quenching.

  1. Irradiation response in weldment and HIP joint of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Takanori; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Ando, M.; Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K.; Stoller, Roger E; Odette, G.R.

    2013-11-01

    This work investigates irradiation response in the joints of F82H employed for a fusion breeding blanket. The joints, which were prepared using welding and diffusion welding, were irradiated up to 6 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Post-irradiation tests revealed hardening in weldment (WM) and base metal (BM) greater than 300 MPa. However, the heat affected zones (HAZ) exhibit about half that of WM and BM. Therefore, neutron irradiation decreased the strength of the HAZ, leaving it in danger of local deformation in this region. Further the hardening in WM made with an electron beam was larger than that in WM made with tungsten inert gas welding. However the mechanical properties of the diffusion-welded joint were very similar to those of BM even after the irradiation.

  2. Dual-phase steel structure visualized by extremely slow electrons.

    PubMed

    Mikmeková, Šárka; Yamada, Katsumi; Noro, Hisato

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical properties of complex steels are affected by their multi-phase structure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is routinely used for characterizing dual-phase (DP) steels, although the identification of steel constituents is not straightforward. In fact, there are several ways of enabling the ferrite-martensite segmentation by SEM, and a wide range of electron energies can be utilized. This study demonstrates the phase identification of DP steels at high, low and extremely low landing energies of the primary electrons from tens of keV to tens of eV. Visualization of the specimen surface at very low landing energies has been achieved by inserting an earthed detector between the pole piece and the negatively biased specimen. This 'cathode lens mode' enables the use of the full energy range up to the primary electron energies. It has been found that extremely slow electrons (<100 eV) are exceptionally suitable for separation of the martensite from the ferrite matrix due to high surface sensitivity, enabling visualization of very fine features. Moreover, the channelling contrast is significantly suppressed at the landing energy of tens of eV of the primary electrons, which enables separation of the phases clearly even in the images acquired at low magnification. The contrast between the phases at tens of eV can be explained by the different thickness of native oxide covering the martensite and the ferrite phase.

  3. Multiscale Modeling of the Deformation of Advanced Ferritic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nasr M. Ghoniem; Nick Kioussis

    2009-04-18

    The objective of this project is to use the multi-scale modeling of materials (MMM) approach to develop an improved understanding of the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of high-temperature structural materials that are being developed or proposed for Gen IV applications. In particular, the research focuses on advanced ferritic/ martensitic steels to enable operation up to 650-700°C, compared to the current 550°C limit on high-temperature steels.

  4. Temperature effect on the corrosion mechanism of austenitic and martensitic steels in lead-bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benamati, G.; Fazio, C.; Piankova, H.; Rusanov, A.

    2002-02-01

    Compatibility tests on the austenitic AISI 316L and the martensitic MANET II steels in stagnant PbBi were performed at 573, 673 and 823 K with exposures up to 5000 h. The change of the corrosion mechanism with increasing temperature has been evaluated. The results showed that at 573 and 673 K a thin oxide layer growth on the surface of both steels. By increasing the temperature to 823 K both types of steels were attacked by the liquid metal and dissolution of the steel alloying elements has been observed. The herein-reported experimental activities were performed in collaboration with the IPPE of Obninsk, where preliminary dynamic tests were performed in the experimental facility CU-2. The Russian ferritic-martensitic steel EP823 has been exposed to flowing PbBi at 623, 723 and 823 K for 700 h. After 700 h of testing, the surface of the EP823 samples showed for the three temperatures a compact oxide layer.

  5. Assessment of the Critical Parameters Influencing the Edge Stretchability of Advanced High-Strength Steel Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, N.; Butcher, C.; Worswick, M.

    2016-09-01

    The edge formability of ferritic-martensitic DP (dual-phase) and ferritic-bainitic CP (complex-phase) steels was evaluated using a hole expansion test for different edge conditions. Hole expansion tests involving the standard conical punch as well as a custom flat punch were performed to investigate formability when the hole is expanded out-of-plane (conical punch) and in-plane using the flat punch. A range of edge conditions were considered, in order to isolate the influence of a range of factors thought to influence edge formability. The results demonstrate that work hardening and void damage at the sheared edge govern formability, while the sheared surface quality plays a minor or secondary role. A comparison of the edge stretching limits of DP and CP steels demonstrates the advantages of a ferritic-bainitic microstructure for forming operations with severe local deformation as in a stretch-flanging operation. A comparison of a traditional DP780 steel with a CP steel of similar strength showed that the edge stretching limit of the CP steel was three times larger than that of the DP780.

  6. A comparative study of the mechanical properties and the behavior of carbon and boron in stainless steel cladding tubes fabricated by PM HIP and traditional technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    The ring tensile test method was optimized and successfully used to obtain precise data for specimens of the cladding tubes of AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steels and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. The positive modifications in the tensile properties of the stainless steel cladding tubes fabricated by powder metallurgy and hot isostatic pressing of melt atomized powders (PM HIP) when compared with the cladding tubes produced by traditional technology were found. Presently, PM HIP is also used in the fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels. The high degree of homogeneity of the distribution of carbon and boron as well the high dispersivity of the phase-structure elements in the specimens manufactured via PM HIP were determined by direct autoradiography methods. These results correlate well with the increase of the tensile properties of the specimens produced by PM HIP technology.

  7. Joining techniques for a reduced activation 12Cr steel for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R. M.; El-Dasher, B.; Choi, B. W.; Torres, S. G.

    2014-10-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are developing a reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel that is based on the ferritic martensitic steel HT-9. As a part of the development of this steel, we tested a series of welding processes for characterization, including conventional welds (electron beam, tungsten inert gas, and laser) as well as solid-state welds (hot isostatic pressing). We also heat treated the joints at various temperatures between 750 °C and 1050 °C to find a suitable normalization scheme. The modified HT-9 reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel appears highly suitable to welding and diffusion bonding. All welds showed good quality fusion zones with insignificant cracking or porosity. Additionally, a heat treatment schedule of 950 °C for one hour caused minimal grain growth while still converging the hardness of the base metal with that of the fusion and heat-affected zones. Also, modified HT-9 diffusion bonds that were created at temperatures of at least 950 °C for two hours at 103 MPa had interface tensile strengths of greater than 600 MPa. The diffusion bonds showed no evidence of increased hardness nor void formation at the diffusion bonded interface.

  8. Thermophysical and mechanical properties of Fe-(8-9)%Cr reduced activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.

    1998-09-01

    The key thermophysical and mechanical properties for 8--9%Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are summarized, including temperature-dependent tensile properties in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions, stress-rupture behavior, elastic constants, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, specific heat, and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. The estimated lower and upper temperatures limits for structural applications are 250 and 550 C due to radiation hardening/embrittlement and thermal creep considerations, respectively.

  9. SCC and corrosion evaluations of the F/M steels for a supercritical water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Byung Hak; Kim, Jung Gu; Jang, Jinsung

    2008-01-01

    As one of the Generation IV nuclear reactors, a supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) is being considered as a candidate reactor due to its high thermal efficiency and simple reactor design without steam generators and steam separators. For the application of a structural material to a core's internals and a fuel cladding, the material should be evaluated in terms of its corrosion and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. Stress corrosion cracking and general corrosion tests of ferritic-martensitic (F/M) steels, high Ni alloys and an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy were performed. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was not observed on the fractured surface of the T 91 steel in the supercritical water at 500, 550 and 600 °C. As the test temperature increased, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and yield strength (YS) of T 91 decreased, and a high dissolved oxygen level induced corrosion and low ductility. The F/M steels showed a high corrosion rate whereas the Ni base alloys showed a little corrosion at 500 and 550 °C. Corrosion rate of the F/M steels at 600 °C test was up to three times larger than that at 500 °C. A thin layer composed of Mo and Ni seems to retard the Cr diffusion into the out layer of the corrosion product of T 92 and T 122.

  10. Microstructure evolution during helium irradiation and post-irradiation annealing in a nanostructured reduced activation steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. B.; Ji, Y. Z.; Tan, P. K.; Zhang, C.; He, C. H.; Yang, Z. G.

    2016-10-01

    Severe plastic deformation, intense single-beam He-ion irradiation and post-irradiation annealing were performed on a nanostructured reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel to investigate the effect of grain boundaries (GBs) on its microstructure evolution during these processes. A surface layer with a depth-dependent nanocrystalline (NC) microstructure was prepared in the RAFM steel using surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT). Microstructure evolution after helium (He) irradiation (24.8 dpa) at room temperature and after post-irradiation annealing was investigated using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Experimental observation shows that GBs play an important role during both the irradiation and the post-irradiation annealing process. He bubbles are preferentially trapped at GBs/interfaces during irradiation and cavities with large sizes are also preferentially trapped at GBs/interfaces during post-irradiation annealing, but void denuded zones (VDZs) near GBs could not be unambiguously observed. Compared with cavities at GBs and within larger grains, cavities with smaller size and higher density are found in smaller grains. The average size of cavities increases rapidly with the increase of time during post-irradiation annealing at 823 K. Cavities with a large size are observed just after annealing for 5 min, although many of the cavities with small sizes also exist after annealing for 240 min. The potential mechanism of cavity growth behavior during post-irradiation annealing is also discussed.

  11. Bioinspired steel surfaces with extreme wettability contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Her, Eun Kyu; Ko, Tae-Jun; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Moon, Myoung-Woon

    2012-04-01

    The exterior structures of natural organisms have continuously evolved by controlling wettability, such as the Namib Desert beetle, whose back has hydrophilic/hydrophobic contrast for water harvesting by mist condensation in dry desert environments, and some plant leaves that have hierarchical micro/nanostructures to collect or repel liquid water. In this work, we have provided a method for wettability contrast on alloy steels by both nano-flake or needle patterns and tuning of the surface energy. Steels were provided with hierarchical micro/nanostructures of Fe oxides by fluorination and by a subsequent catalytic reaction of fluorine ions on the steel surfaces in water. A hydrophobic material was deposited on the structured surfaces, rendering superhydrophobicity. Plasma oxidization induces the formation of superhydrophilic surfaces on selective regions surrounded by superhydrophobic surfaces. We show that wettability contrast surfaces align liquid water within patterned hydrophilic regions during the condensation process. Furthermore, this method could have a greater potential to align other liquids or living cells.The exterior structures of natural organisms have continuously evolved by controlling wettability, such as the Namib Desert beetle, whose back has hydrophilic/hydrophobic contrast for water harvesting by mist condensation in dry desert environments, and some plant leaves that have hierarchical micro/nanostructures to collect or repel liquid water. In this work, we have provided a method for wettability contrast on alloy steels by both nano-flake or needle patterns and tuning of the surface energy. Steels were provided with hierarchical micro/nanostructures of Fe oxides by fluorination and by a subsequent catalytic reaction of fluorine ions on the steel surfaces in water. A hydrophobic material was deposited on the structured surfaces, rendering superhydrophobicity. Plasma oxidization induces the formation of superhydrophilic surfaces on selective

  12. Phase analysis on dual-phase steel using band slope of electron backscatter diffraction pattern.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun-Yun; Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Man-Been

    2013-08-01

    A quantitative and automated phase analysis of dual-phase (DP) steel using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was attempted. A ferrite-martensite DP microstructure was produced by intercritical annealing and quenching. An EBSD map of the microstructure was obtained and post-processed for phase discrimination. Band slope (BS), which was a measure of pattern quality, exhibited much stronger phase contrast than another conventional one, band contrast. Owing to high sensitivity to lattice defect and little orientation dependence, BS provided handiness in finding a threshold for phase discrimination. Its grain average gave a superior result on the discrimination and volume fraction measurement of the constituent phases in the DP steel.

  13. Temperature dependence of liquid metal embrittlement susceptibility of a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel under low cycle fatigue in lead-bismuth eutectic at 160-450 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xing; Marmy, Pierre; Qin, Ling; Verlinden, Bert; Wevers, Martine; Seefeldt, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue properties of a 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel (T91) have been tested in a low oxygen concentration (LOC) lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) environment and in vacuum at 160-450 °C. The results show a clear fatigue endurance "trough" in LOC LBE, while no such a strong temperature dependence of the fatigue endurance is observed when the steel is tested in vacuum. The fractographic observations by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show that ductile microdimples are prevalent on the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in vacuum, whereas the fracture surfaces produced in LOC LBE at all the temperatures are characterized by quasi-cleavage. Interestingly, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), martensitic laths close to the fatigue crack walls or to the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in vacuum are found to have transformed into very fine equiaxed subgrains. Nevertheless, such microstructural modifications do not happen to the specimens tested in LOC LBE at 160-450 °C. These interesting microstructural distinctions indicate that liquid metal embrittlement (LME) is able to occur throughout the fatigue crack propagation phase in the full range of the temperatures investigated, i.e. LME is not very sensitive to temperature during the fatigue crack propagation.

  14. Irradiation creep of 11Cr-0.5Mo-2W,V,Nb ferritic-martensitic, modified 316, and 15Cr-20Ni austenitic S.S. irradiated in FFTF to 103-206 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehira, A.; Mizuta, S.; Ukai, S.; Puigh, R. J.

    2000-12-01

    The irradiation creep of 11Cr-0.5Mo-2W-0.2V-0.05Nb ferritic-martensitic (PNC-FMS), modified 316 (PNC316) and 15Cr-20Ni base austenitic S.S. were determined by the gas pressurized capsule irradiation test using MOTA in FFTF. The pressurized capsules and open tubes were irradiated at 678-943 K to a peak dose of 206 dpa. The irradiation creep coefficients were derived from the diametral change differences between the capsules and open tubes, accounting for the stress-induced swelling. The creep compliance B0 and creep-swelling coupling coefficient D for PNC-FMS were found to be 0.43-0.76×10-6 MPa-1 dpa-1 and 0.85-2.5×10-2 MPa-1 for volumetric swelling, respectively. For both PNC316 and 15Cr-20Ni base S.S. the irradiation creep properties were very similar. B0 and D range from 0.55 to -1.5×10-6 MPa-1 dpa-1 and from 1.2 to -2.8×10-3 MPa-1, respectively.

  15. Hydrogen compatibility handbook for stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    This handbook compiles data on the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of stainless steels and discusses this data within the context of current understanding of hydrogen compatibility of metals. All of the tabulated data derives from continuing studies of hydrogen effects on materials that have been conducted at the Savannah River Laboratory over the past fifteen years. Supplementary data from other sources are included in the discussion. Austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardenable stainless steels have been studied. Damage caused by helium generated from decay of tritium is a distinctive effect that occurs in addition to the hydrogen isotopes protium and deuterium. The handbook defines the scope of our current knowledge of hydrogen effects in stainless steels and serves as a guide to selection of stainless steels for service in hydrogen.

  16. Behaviour of the steel T91 under uniaxial and multiaxial slow loading in contact with liquid lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojná, Anna; Di Gabriele, Fosca; Klecka, Jakub; Burda, Jaroslav

    2015-11-01

    This work deals with the interaction between liquid lead and the ferritic-martensitic steel, T91. Mechanical properties of specimens loaded in contact with liquid lead were tested in laboratory and boundary conditions necessary to ascertain the sensitivity to Liquid Metal Embrittlement (LME) were studied. Three effects, temperature, deformation rate and surface treatment were selected to stimulate the LME initiation on smooth tensile specimens, then the notch effect was selected as an additional factor. Some specimens were pre-treated by application of a flux followed by dipping into liquid lead to simulate wetting. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of specimens immersed in liquid lead were performed applying strain rates from 10-2 to 10-8 1/s from 350° to 450 °C in test cell CALLISTO. Two types of tensile specimens were tested, smooth and notched. After tests, the fracture mode and the status of specimen surface was examined. Results of the specimens immersed in lead were compared with the results obtained in air. The most significant was the strain rate effect on the stress-strain curves of smooth specimens. Moreover, while no LME was observed for the smooth specimens, clear evidence of LME was observed for the notched specimens.

  17. Multipulse nanosecond laser modification of steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumakov, A. N.; Nikonchuk, I. S.; Gaković, B.; Petrović, S.; Trtica, M.

    2014-09-01

    Results of surface modification are presented for MnNiCrMo-steel samples exposed to a Nd:YAG laser operating in a pulse-periodic mode (10 Hz frequency, 532 nm wavelength and 17 ns pulse duration). The steel samples were irradiated in air by a series of laser pulses at a fluence of 10.7 J cm-2 close to a plasma formation threshold. Surface structures were examined by optical, scanning electron and confocal optical microscopy. The appearance of the detected surface structures strongly depends on the number of laser pulses and power density of laser radiation. Significant differences were found between laser-induced structures in the center of the laser spot, at its edges and in the nearest surrounding of the laser spot. The reasons for such differences are discussed.

  18. Influence of a doping by Al stainless steel on kinetics and character of interaction with the metallic nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, S. N.; Shornikov, D. P.; Tarasov, B. A.; Baranov, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic nuclear fuel is a perspective kind of fuel for fast reactors. In this paper we conducted a study of the interaction between uranium-molybdenum alloy and ferritic- martensitic steels with additions of aluminum at a temperature of 700 ° C for 25 hours. The rate constants of the interaction layer growth at 700 °C is about 2.8.10-14 m2/s. It is established that doping Al stainless steel leads to decrease in interaction with uranium-molybdenum alloys. The phase composition of the interaction layer is determined.

  19. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Wang, S.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.

    2007-08-01

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N +, O + and SiF 3+, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF 3+-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N +-implanted steel, O +-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  20. Thermal expansion and phase changes of 16Kh12V2FTaR steel in temperature range from 20 to 1000 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskii, Yu. M.; Stankus, S. V.; Yatsuk, O. S.; Agazhanov, A. Sh.; Komarov, S. G.; Anufriyev, I. S.

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results of investigation of thermal expansion of 16Kh12V2FTaR steel in the temperature range 20-1000 °C. Measurements were carried out by dilatometric method with the error (1.5-2)×10-7 K-1. The temperature dependences of thermal coefficient of linear expansion of steel have been obtained in ferrite-martensite and ferrite-perlite states, and reference tables have been calculated. Influence of samples cooling rate on martensite phase formation is shown.

  1. Laser Surface Hardening of AISI 1045 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruifeng; Jin, Yajuan; Li, Zhuguo; Qi, Kai

    2014-09-01

    The study investigates laser surface hardening in the AISI 1045 steel using two different types of industrial laser: a high-power diode laser (HPDL) and a CO2 laser, respectively. The effect of process parameters such as beam power, travel speed on structure, case depth, and microhardness was examined. In most cases, a heat-affected zone (HAZ) formed below the surface; a substantial increase in surface hardness was achieved. In addition, big differences were found between the hardened specimens after HPDL surface hardening and CO2 laser surface hardening. For HPDL, depths of the HAZ were almost equal in total HAZ o, without surface melting. For CO2 laser, the depths changed a lot in the HAZ, with surface melting in the center. To better understand the difference of laser hardening results when use these two types of laser, numerical (ANSYS) analysis of the heat conduction involved in the process was also studied. For HPDL method, a rectangular beam spot and uniform energy distribution across the spot were assumed, while for CO2 laser, a circular beam spot and Gaussian energy distribution were assumed. The results showed that the energy distribution variety altered the thermal cycles of the HAZ dramatically. The rectangular HPDL laser beam spot with uniform energy distribution is much more feasible for laser surface hardening.

  2. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding of 10-mm-Thick Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM: As-Welded Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-07-01

    Cast CA6NM martensitic stainless steel plates, 10 mm in thickness, were welded using hybrid laser-arc welding. The effect of different welding speeds on the as-welded joint integrity was characterized in terms of the weld bead geometry, defects, microstructure, hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and impact energy. Significant defects such as porosity, root humping, underfill, and excessive penetration were observed at a low welding speed (0.5 m/min). However, the underfill depth and excessive penetration in the joints manufactured at welding speeds above 0.75 m/min met the specifications of ISO 12932. Characterization of the as-welded microstructure revealed untempered martensite and residual delta ferrite dispersed at prior-austenite grain boundaries in the fusion zone. In addition, four different heat-affected zones in the weldments were differentiated through hardness mapping and inference from the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary phase diagram. The tensile fracture occurred in the base metal for all the samples and fractographic analysis showed that the crack path is within the martensite matrix, along primary delta ferrite-martensite interfaces and within the primary delta ferrite. Additionally, Charpy impact testing demonstrated slightly higher fracture energy values and deeper dimples on the fracture surface of the welds manufactured at higher welding speeds due to grain refinement and/or lower porosity.

  3. Characterization of microstructural and mechanical properties of a reduced activation ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselt, Ch. Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.

    2011-09-01

    For specific blanket and divertor applications in future fusion power reactors a replacement of presently considered Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steels as structural material by suitable oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic martensitic steels would allow a substantial increase of the operating temperature from ˜823 K to about 923 K. Temperatures above 973 K in the He cooled modular divertor concept necessitate the use of Reduced Activation Ferritic (RAF)-ODS-steels, which are not limited by a phase transition. The development concentrates on the ferritic ODS-steel Fe-13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3. The microstructures of a mechanically alloyed powder particle are observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ageing experiments for 1000 h and 3000 h at 1123.5 K and 1223.5 K of compacted Fe-13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 were executed. The impact especially on the oxide particles in terms of segregation and decomposition effects were monitored by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Long term vacuum creep experiments have been performed with rolled Fe-13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 at 923.5 K and 1023.5 K, which will be compared to reference alloys.

  4. Concepts for the Development of Nanoscale Stable Precipitation-Strengthened Steels Manufactured by Conventional Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yablinsky, C. A.; Tippey, K. E.; Vaynman, S.; Anderoglu, O.; Fine, M. E.; Chung, Y.-W.; Speer, J. G.; Findley, K. O.; Dogan, Ö. N.; Jablonski, P. D.; Maloy, S. A.; Hackenberg, R. E.; Clarke, A. J.; Clarke, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    The development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferrous alloys has shown that microstructures designed for excellent irradiation resistance and thermal stability ideally contain stable nanoscale precipitates and dislocation sinks. Based upon this understanding, the microstructures of conventionally manufactured ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels can be designed to include controlled volume fractions of fine, stable precipitates and dislocation sinks via specific alloying and processing paths. The concepts proposed here are categorized as advanced high-Cr ferritic-martensitic (AHCr-FM) and novel tailored precipitate ferritic (TPF) steels, which have the potential to improve the in-reactor performance of conventionally manufactured alloys. AHCr-FM steels have modified alloy content relative to current reactor materials (such as alloy NF616/P92) to maximize desirable precipitates and control phase stability. TPF steels are designed to incorporate nickel aluminides, in addition to microalloy carbides, in a ferritic matrix to produce fine precipitate arrays with good thermal stability. Both alloying concepts may also benefit from thermomechanical processing to establish dislocation sinks and modify phase transformation behaviors. Alloying and processing paths toward designed microstructures are discussed for both AHCr-FM and TPF material classes.

  5. Concepts for the development of nanoscale stable precipitation-strengthened steels manufactured by conventional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Yablinsky, C. A.; Tippey, K. E.; Vaynman, S.; Anderoglu, O.; Fine, M. E.; Chung, Y. -W.; Speer, J. G.; Findley, K. O.; Dogan, O. N.; Jablonski, P. D.; Maloy, S. A.; Hackenberg, R. E.; Clarke, A. J.; Clarke, K. D.

    2014-11-11

    In this study, the development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferrous alloys has shown that microstructures designed for excellent irradiation resistance and thermal stability ideally contain stable nanoscale precipitates and dislocation sinks. Based upon this understanding, the microstructures of conventionally manufactured ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels can be designed to include controlled volume fractions of fine, stable precipitates and dislocation sinks via specific alloying and processing paths. The concepts proposed here are categorized as advanced high-Cr ferritic-martensitic (AHCr-FM) and novel tailored precipitate ferritic (TPF) steels, which have the potential to improve the in-reactor performance of conventionally manufactured alloys. AHCr-FM steels have modified alloy content relative to current reactor materials (such as alloy NF616/P92) to maximize desirable precipitates and control phase stability. TPF steels are designed to incorporate nickel aluminides, in addition to microalloy carbides, in a ferritic matrix to produce fine precipitate arrays with good thermal stability. Both alloying concepts may also benefit from thermomechanical processing to establish dislocation sinks and modify phase transformation behaviors. Alloying and processing paths toward designed microstructures are discussed for both AHCr-FM and TPF material classes.

  6. Concepts for the development of nanoscale stable precipitation-strengthened steels manufactured by conventional methods

    DOE PAGES

    Yablinsky, C. A.; Tippey, K. E.; Vaynman, S.; Anderoglu, O.; Fine, M. E.; Chung, Y. -W.; Speer, J. G.; Findley, K. O.; Dogan, O. N.; Jablonski, P. D.; et al

    2014-11-11

    In this study, the development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferrous alloys has shown that microstructures designed for excellent irradiation resistance and thermal stability ideally contain stable nanoscale precipitates and dislocation sinks. Based upon this understanding, the microstructures of conventionally manufactured ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels can be designed to include controlled volume fractions of fine, stable precipitates and dislocation sinks via specific alloying and processing paths. The concepts proposed here are categorized as advanced high-Cr ferritic-martensitic (AHCr-FM) and novel tailored precipitate ferritic (TPF) steels, which have the potential to improve the in-reactor performance of conventionally manufactured alloys. AHCr-FM steels have modifiedmore » alloy content relative to current reactor materials (such as alloy NF616/P92) to maximize desirable precipitates and control phase stability. TPF steels are designed to incorporate nickel aluminides, in addition to microalloy carbides, in a ferritic matrix to produce fine precipitate arrays with good thermal stability. Both alloying concepts may also benefit from thermomechanical processing to establish dislocation sinks and modify phase transformation behaviors. Alloying and processing paths toward designed microstructures are discussed for both AHCr-FM and TPF material classes.« less

  7. Laser surface texturing of tool steel: textured surfaces quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šugár, Peter; Šugárová, Jana; Frnčík, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this experimental investigation the laser surface texturing of tool steel of type 90MnCrV8 has been conducted. The 5-axis highly dynamic laser precision machining centre Lasertec 80 Shape equipped with the nano-second pulsed ytterbium fibre laser and CNC system Siemens 840 D was used. The planar and spherical surfaces first prepared by turning have been textured. The regular array of spherical and ellipsoidal dimples with a different dimensions and different surface density has been created. Laser surface texturing has been realized under different combinations of process parameters: pulse frequency, pulse energy and laser beam scanning speed. The morphological characterization of ablated surfaces has been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. The results show limited possibility of ns pulse fibre laser application to generate different surface structures for tribological modification of metallic materials. These structures were obtained by varying the processing conditions between surface ablation, to surface remelting. In all cases the areas of molten material and re-cast layers were observed on the bottom and walls of the dimples. Beside the influence of laser beam parameters on the machined surface quality during laser machining of regular hemispherical and elipsoidal dimple texture on parabolic and hemispherical surfaces has been studied.

  8. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this work, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  9. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-14

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this paper, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW onmore » grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Finally, post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.« less

  10. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-14

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this paper, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Finally, post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  11. Surface design methodology - challenge the steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, M.; Rosen, B.-G.; Eriksson, L.; Anderberg, C.

    2014-03-01

    The way a product or material is experienced by its user could be different depending on the scenario. It is also well known that different materials and surfaces are used for different purposes. When optimizing materials and surface roughness for a certain something with the intention to improve a product, it is important to obtain not only the physical requirements, but also the user experience and expectations. Laws and requirements of the materials and the surface function, but also the conservative way of thinking about materials and colours characterize the design of medical equipment. The purpose of this paper is to link the technical- and customer requirements of current materials and surface textures in medical environments. By focusing on parts of the theory of Kansei Engineering, improvements of the companys' products are possible. The idea is to find correlations between desired experience or "feeling" for a product, -customer requirements, functional requirements, and product geometrical properties -design parameters, to be implemented on new improved products. To be able to find new materials with the same (or better) technical requirements but a higher level of user stimulation, the current material (stainless steel) and its surface (brushed textures) was used as a reference. The usage of focus groups of experts at the manufacturer lead to a selection of twelve possible new materials for investigation in the project. In collaboration with the topical company for this project, three new materials that fulfil the requirements -easy to clean and anti-bacterial came to be in focus for further investigation in regard to a new design of a washer-disinfector for medical equipment using the Kansei based Clean ability approach CAA.

  12. Response of nanoclusters in a 9Cr ODS steel to 1 dpa, 525 ?C proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Certain, Alicia; Field, Kevin G; Allen, Todd R.; Sridharan, K.; Miller, Michael K; Bentley, James; Busby, Jeremy T

    2010-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (F/M) alloys are expected to play an important role as cladding or structural components in Generation IV and other advanced nuclear systems operating in the temperature range 350-700 C and to doses up to 200 displacements per atom (dpa). Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) F/M steels have been developed to operate at higher temperatures than traditional F/M steels. These steels contain nanometer-sized Y-Ti-O nanoclusters for additional strengthening. A proton irradiation to 1 dpa at 525 C has been performed on a 9Cr ODS steel to determine the nanocluster stability at low dose. The evolution of the nanocluster population and the composition at the nanocluster-matrix interface were studied using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The data from this study are contrasted to those from a previous study on heavy-ion irradiated 9Cr ODS steel.

  13. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

  14. High-throughput design of low-activation, high-strength creep-resistant steels for nuclear-reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Xu, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are prime candidate materials for structural applications in nuclear power reactors. However, their creep strength is much lower than that of creep-resistant steel developed for conventional fossil-fired power plants as alloying elements with a high neutron activation cannot be used. To improve the creep strength and to maintain a low activation, a high-throughput computational alloy design model coupling thermodynamics, precipitate-coarsening kinetics and an optimization genetic algorithm, is developed. Twelve relevant alloying elements with either low or high activation are considered simultaneously. The activity levels at 0-10 year after the end of irradiation are taken as optimization parameter. The creep-strength values (after exposure for 10 years at 650 °C) are estimated on the basis of the solid-solution strengthening and the precipitation hardening (taking into account precipitate coarsening). Potential alloy compositions leading to a high austenite fraction or a high percentage of undesirable second phase particles are rejected automatically in the optimization cycle. The newly identified alloys have a much higher precipitation hardening and solid-solution strengthening at the same activity level as existing reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels.

  15. Structural-phase states and wear resistance of surface formed on steel by surfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Kapralov, Evgenie V.; Raykov, Sergey V.; Vaschuk, Ekaterina S.; Budovskikh, Evgenie A. Gromov, Victor E.; Ivanov, Yuri F.

    2014-11-14

    Investigations of elementary and phase structure, state of defect structure and tribological characteristics of a surfacing, formed on a low carbon low-alloy steel by a welding method were carried out. It was revealed that a surfacing, formed on a steel surface is accompanied by the multilayer formation, and increases the wear resistance of the layer surfacing as determined.

  16. Characteristic results and prospects of the 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselt, Ch. Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.

    2009-04-01

    For specific blanket and divertor applications in future fusion power reactors a replacement of presently considered reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels as structural material by suitable oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic martensitic steels would allow a substantial increase of the operating temperature from ˜550 °C to about 650 °C. Temperatures above 700 °C in the He cooled modular divertor concept necessitates the use of ferritic (RAF) ODS steels, which are not limited by a phase transition. Therefore a 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 ferritic ODS steel is being developed, using an Attritor with varying milling parameters. Afterwards the mechanically alloyed powders were encapsulated, sealed and consolidated in a hot isostatic press device. In this work, the effects of several parameter variations on the microstructure of the produced ferritic ODS-alloys, analysed by optical microscopy (OM) and high resolution TEM, as well as results of conducted mechanical tests are presented.

  17. Void formation and microstructural development in oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels during electron-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, J.; Suda, T.; Yamashita, S.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.; Akasaka, N.; Nishida, M.; Ukai, S.

    1998-10-01

    ODS ferritic steels (13Cr-0.5Ti-0.2Y 2O 3) were prepared by the mechanical alloying method followed by the hot extrusion and several heat treatments including recrystallization. ODS steels with different heat treatment and a ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel for the reference were irradiated to 12 dpa at 670-770 K in HVEM. After recrystallization, the dislocation density decreased with increasing grain size, however, the oxide particles did not show any obvious change in the size and the number density. During the electron-irradiation the microstructure was relatively stable, i.e. oxide particles showed good stability and the dislocation density remained almost constant. A limited void formation was observed in the specimens, and the suppressive effect due to dislocations with high number density was confirmed. From these results, the behavior of microstructure and the limited void formation in ODS steels have been discussed.

  18. The effect of processing variables on steel surface chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.S.

    1993-12-31

    Differences in processing at all stages in the steel making process can effect the surface chemistry of steel. The surface chemistry can dictate the performance of many different products and processes including electrogalvanized steel. If the steel chemistry is not controlled sufficiently, the zinc electrodeposit will be subject to hydrogen blistering. This dissertation examined the effect of many processing variables on both the organic and inorganic contaminants on steel surfaces. Processes both before the electrogalvanizing line and those after the electrogalvanizing line were examined. Mechanisms were determined for reactions of organic oils with the steel surface. Reaction between the carbonyl functionality, present as an acid or an ester, and iron hydroxide to form a tenaciously adherent iron soap was demonstrated using infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Thermodynamics and kinetics of segregation of metallic elements to the surface of the steel were determined. It was shown that the primary mechanism for segregation of elements such as aluminum, silicon, chromium, and titanium is oxidation during the anneal. Analysis of the kinetics indicated the feasibility of this mechanism. The mechanism of electrocleaning were elucidated, based on both electrochemical and physical effects. Improved methods of electrocleaning were described based upon optimization of the cleaning frequency. It was found that increasing the frequency of anodic and cathodic cycling increasing the cleaning efficiency up to about 5 Hz. Above this frequency bubbles, which provide physical scrubbing and convection near the interface, can not form rapidly enough to be effective. Increased current density was shown to be effective in improving electrocleaning.

  19. Technical Issues for the Fabrication of a CN-HCCB-TBM Based on RAFM Steel CLF-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pinghuai; Chen, Jiming; Fu, Haiying; Liu, Shi; Li, Xiongwei; Xu, Zengyu

    2013-02-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (RAFM) is recognized as the primary candidate structural material for ITER's test blanket module (TBM). To provide a material and property database for the design and fabrication of the Chinese helium cooled ceramic breeding TBM (CN HCCB TBM), a type of RAFM steel named CLF-1 was developed and characterized at the Southwestern Institute of Physics (SWIP), China. In this paper, the R&D status of CLF-1 steel and the technical issues in using CLF-1 steel to manufacture CN HCCB TBM were reviewed, including the steel manufacture and different welding technologies. Several kinds of property data have been obtained for its application to the design of the ITER TBM.

  20. Antibacterial effect of silver nanofilm modified stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F.; Kennedy, J.; Dhillon, M.; Flint, S.

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria can attach to stainless steel surfaces, resulting in the colonization of the surface known as biofilms. The release of bacteria from biofilms can cause contamination of food such as dairy products in manufacturing plants. This study aimed to modify stainless steel surfaces with silver nanofilms and to examine the antibacterial effectiveness of the modified surface. Ion implantation was applied to produce silver nanofilms on stainless steel surfaces. 35 keV Ag ions were implanted with various fluences of 1 × 1015 to 1 × 1017 ions•cm-2 at room temperature. Representative atomic force microscopy characterizations of the modified stainless steel are presented. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry spectra revealed the implanted atoms were located in the near-surface region. Both unmodified and modified stainless steel coupons were then exposed to two types of bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Streptococcus thermophilus, to determine the effect of the surface modification on bacterial attachment and biofilm development. The silver modified coupon surface fluoresced red over most of the surface area implying that most bacteria on coupon surface were dead. This study indicates that the silver nanofilm fabricated by the ion implantation method is a promising way of reducing the attachment of bacteria and delay biofilm formation.

  1. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: • Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels • Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes • Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys

  2. Electrochemically induced annealing of stainless-steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Burstein, G T; Hutchings, I M; Sasaki, K

    2000-10-19

    Modification of the surface properties of metals without affecting their bulk properties is of technological interest in demanding applications where surface stability and hardness are important. When austenitic stainless steel is heavily plastically deformed by grinding or rolling, a martensitic phase transformation occurs that causes significant changes in the bulk and surface mechanical properties of the alloy. This martensitic phase can also be generated in stainless-steel surfaces by cathodic charging, as a consequence of lattice strain generated by absorbed hydrogen. Heat treatment of the steel to temperatures of several hundred degrees can result in loss of the martensitic structure, but this alters the bulk properties of the alloy. Here we show that martensitic structures in stainless steel can be removed by appropriate electrochemical treatment in aqueous solutions at much lower temperature than conventional annealing treatments. This electrochemically induced annealing process allows the hardness of cold-worked stainless steels to be maintained, while eliminating the brittle martensitic phase from the surface. Using this approach, we are able to anneal the surface and near-surface regions of specimens that contain rolling-induced martensite throughout their bulk, as well as those containing surface martensite induced by grinding. Although the origin of the electrochemical annealing process still needs further clarification, we expect that this treatment will lead to further development in enhancing the surface properties of metals.

  3. Electrochemically induced annealing of stainless-steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstein, G. T.; Hutchings, I. M.; Sasaki, K.

    2000-10-01

    Modification of the surface properties of metals without affecting their bulk properties is of technological interest in demanding applications where surface stability and hardness are important. When austenitic stainless steel is heavily plastically deformed by grinding or rolling, a martensitic phase transformation occurs that causes significant changes in the bulk and surface mechanical properties of the alloy. This martensitic phase can also be generated in stainless-steel surfaces by cathodic charging, as a consequence of lattice strain generated by absorbed hydrogen. Heat treatment of the steel to temperatures of several hundred degrees can result in loss of the martensitic structure, but this alters the bulk properties of the alloy. Here we show that martensitic structures in stainless steel can be removed by appropriate electrochemical treatment in aqueous solutions at much lower temperature than conventional annealing treatments. This electrochemically induced annealing process allows the hardness of cold-worked stainless steels to be maintained, while eliminating the brittle martensitic phase from the surface. Using this approach, we are able to anneal the surface and near-surface regions of specimens that contain rolling-induced martensite throughout their bulk, as well as those containing surface martensite induced by grinding. Although the origin of the electrochemical annealing process still needs further clarification, we expect that this treatment will lead to further development in enhancing the surface properties of metals.

  4. Bactericidal behavior of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Huang, Xiaobo; Ma, Yong; Lin, Naiming; Fan, Ailan; Tang, Bin

    2012-10-01

    Stainless steels are one of the most common materials used in health care environments. However, the lack of antibacterial advantage has limited their use in practical application. In this paper, antibacterial stainless steel surfaces with different Cu contents have been prepared by plasma surface alloying technology (PSAT). The steel surface with Cu content 90 wt.% (Cu-SS) exhibits strong bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) within 3 h. Although the Cu-containing surface with Cu content 2.5 wt.% (CuNi-SS) can also kill all tested bacteria, this process needs 12 h. SEM observation of the bacterial morphology and an agarose gel electrophoresis were performed to study the antibacterial mechanism of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces against E. coli. The results indicated that Cu ions are released when the Cu-containing surfaces are in contact with bacterial and disrupt the cell membranes, killing the bacteria. The toxicity of Cu-alloyed surfaces does not cause damage to the bacterial DNA. These results provide a scientific explanation for the antimicrobial applications of Cu-containing stainless steel. The surfaces with different antibacterial abilities could be used as hygienic surfaces in healthcare-associated settings according to the diverse requirement of bactericidal activities.

  5. Surface microanalytical studies of nitrogen ion-implanted steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Charles G.; Meeker, G. P.; Baumann, Scott M.; Norberg, James C.; Legg, Keith O.

    1985-03-01

    Five types of industrial steels, 1018, 52100, M-2, 440C, and 304 were ion implanted with nitrogen and subjected to surface microanalysis by three independent surface techniques: AES, RBS, and SIMS. The results provided understanding for earlier observations of the properties of various types of steel after nitrogen implantation. The steels that retained the most nitrogen and that have been reported to benefit the most in improved tribological properties from ion implantation were ferritic carbon and austenitic stainless steels, such as soft 1018 and 304, respectively. Heat-treated martensitic carbon steels such as 52100 and M-2 tool steel were found to retain the least nitrogen, and they have been reported to benefit less from nitrogen implantation; however, the interaction of transition metal carbides in M-2 with nitrogen has not been clarified. The data showed that 440C steel retained as much nitrogen as 1018 and 304, but treatment benefits may be limited to improvements in properties related to toughness and impact resistance.

  6. Size-dependent characteristics of ultra-fine oxygen-enriched nanoparticles in austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yinbin; Mo, Kun; Zhou, Zhangjian; Liu, Xiang; Lan, Kuan-Che; Zhang, Guangming; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.; Stubbins, James F.

    2016-11-01

    Here, a coordinated investigation of the elemental composition and morphology of ultra-fine-scale nanoparticles as a function of size within a variety of austenitic oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels is reported. Atom probe tomography was utilized to evaluate the elemental composition of these nanoparticles. Meanwhile, the crystal structures and orientation relationships were determined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The nanoparticles with sufficient size (>4 nm) to maintain a Y2Ti2-xO7-2x stoichiometry were found to have a pyrochlore structure, whereas smaller YxTiyOz nanoparticles lacked a well-defined structure. The size-dependent characteristics of the nanoparticles in austenitic ODS steels differ from those in ferritic/martensitic ODS steels.

  7. Tensile properties of CLAM steel irradiated up to 20.1 dpa in STIP-V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hongen; Peng, Lei; Dai, Yong; Huang, Qunying; Ye, Minyou

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of China low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) were irradiated in the fifth experiment of SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP-V) up to 20.1 dpa/1499 appm He/440 °C. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature (R.T) and irradiation temperatures (Tirr) in the range of 25-450 °C. The tensile results demonstrated strong effect of irradiation dose and irradiation temperature on hardening and embrittlement. With Tirr below ˜314 °C, CLAM steel specimens tested at R.T and Tirr showed similar evolution trend with irradiation dose, compared to other reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels in similar irradiation conditions. At higher Tirr above ˜314 °C, it is interesting that the hardening effect decreases and the ductility seems to recover, probably due to a strong effect of high irradiation temperature.

  8. Work of adhesion of dairy products on stainless steel surface

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Patrícia Campos; Araújo, Emiliane Andrade; dos Santos Pires, Ana Clarissa; Queiroz Fialho Júnior, José Felício; Lelis, Carini Aparecida; de Andrade, Nélio José

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of the solids presents in food can difficult the process of surface cleaning and promotes the bacterial adhesion process and can trigger health problems. In our study, we used UHT whole milk, chocolate based milk and infant formula to evaluate the adhesion of Enterobacter sakazakii on stainless steel coupons, and we determine the work of adhesion by measuring the contact angle as well as measured the interfacial tension of the samples. In addition we evaluated the hydrophobicity of stainless steel after pre-conditioning with milk samples mentioned. E. sakazakii was able to adhere to stainless steel in large numbers in the presence of dairy products. The chocolate based milk obtained the lower contact angle with stainless steel surface, higher interfacial tension and consequently higher adhesion work. It was verified a tendency of decreasing the interfacial tension as a function of the increasing of protein content. The preconditioning of the stainless steel coupons with milk samples changed the hydrophobic characteristics of the surfaces and became them hydrophilic. Therefore, variations in the composition of the milk products affect parameters important that can influence the procedure of hygiene in surface used in food industry. PMID:24031951

  9. Designing high-temperature steels via surface science and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Cameron T.; Jiang, Zilin; Mathai, Allan; Chung, Yip-Wah

    2016-06-01

    Electricity in many countries such as the US and China is produced by burning fossil fuels in steam-turbine-driven power plants. The efficiency of these power plants can be improved by increasing the operating temperature of the steam generator. In this work, we adopted a combined surface science and computational thermodynamics approach to the design of high-temperature, corrosion-resistant steels for this application. The result is a low-carbon ferritic steel with nanosized transition metal monocarbide precipitates that are thermally stable, as verified by atom probe tomography. High-temperature Vickers hardness measurements demonstrated that these steels maintain their strength for extended periods at 700 °C. We hypothesize that the improved strength of these steels is derived from the semi-coherent interfaces of these thermally stable, nanosized precipitates exerting drag forces on impinging dislocations, thus maintaining strength at elevated temperatures.

  10. Laser-ultrasonic hardening of the surface of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gureev, D M

    1998-03-31

    An investigation was made of the feasibility of laser-ultrasonic hardening of the surface of steel with a controlled change in the structurally stressed state of the surface layer. The advantages of the laser-ultrasonic treatment were demonstrated by the formation of harder and deeper surface hardening zones with simultaneous control of their structure and phase composition and of the formation of residual stresses. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  11. Irradiation effects in ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-08-01

    Since 1979 the Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance (ADIP) task funded by the US Department of Energy has been studying the 2-12Cr class of ferritic steels to establish the feasibility of using them in fusion reactor first wall/breeding blanket (FW/B) applications. The advantages of ferritic steels include superior swelling resistance, low thermal stresses compared to austenitic stainless steels, attractive mechanical properties up to 600°C. and service histories exceeding 100 000 h. These steels are commonly used in a range of microstructural conditions which include ferritic, martensitic. tempered martensitic, bainitic etc. Throughout this paper where the term "ferritic" is used it should be taken to mean any of these microstructures. The ADIP task is studying several candidate alloy systems including 12Cr-1MoWV (HT-9), modified 9Cr-1MoVNb, and dual-phased steels such as EM-12 and 2 {1}/{4}Cr-Mo. These materials are ferromagnetic (FM), body centered cubic (bcc), and contain chromium additions between 2 and 12 wt% and molybdenum additions usually below 2%. The perceived issues associated with the application of this class of steel to fusion reactors are the increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) with neutron damage, the compatibility of these steels with liquid metals and solid breeding materials, and their weldability. The ferromagnetic character of these steels can also be important in reactor design. It is the purpose of this paper to review the current understanding of these bcc steels and the effects of irradiation. The major points of discussion will be irradiation-induced or -enhanced dimensional changes such as swelling and creep, mechanical properties such as tensile strength and various measurements of toughness, and activation by neutron interactions with structural materials.

  12. Studies on oxidation and deuterium permeation behavior of a low temperature α-Al2O3-forming Fesbnd Crsbnd Al ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Zhao, Si-Xiang; Liu, Feng; Li, Xiao-Chun; Zhao, Ming-Zhong; Wang, Jing; Lu, Tao; Hong, Suk-Ho; Zhou, Hai-Shan; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the capability of Fesbnd Crsbnd Al ferritic steels as tritium permeation barrier in fusion systems, the oxidation behavior together with the permeation behavior of a Fesbnd Crsbnd Al steel was investigated. Gas driven permeation experiments were performed. The permeability of the oxidized Fesbnd Crsbnd Al steel was obtained and a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel CLF-1 was used as a comparison. In order to characterize the oxide layer, SEM, XPS, TEM, HRTEM were used. Al2O3 was detected in the oxide film by XPS, and HRTEM showed that Al2O3 in the α phase was found. The formation of α-Al2O3 layer at a relatively low temperature may result from the formation of Cr2O3 nuclei.

  13. Improving high temperature creep resistance of reduced activation steels by addition of nitrogen and intermediate heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. B.; Zhang, C.; Xia, Z. X.; Yang, Z. G.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we report an enhanced high-temperature creep resistance in reduced activation ferrite/martensite (RAFM) steels, by introducing nitrogen (0.035 wt%, M3 steel) and employing a novel intermediate heat treatment I-Q-T (intermediate treatment, quenching and tempering). In comparison with all the control groups, the uniaxial tests of the I-Q-T treated M3 steel showed significant increase in rupture time and decrease in elongation. The microstructures of the samples were further characterized to elucidate the origin of the enhanced creep resistance. It is found that, by introducing nitrogen, the primary TaC particles were refined; by employing the I-Q-T heat treatment, the dispersed fine secondary MX precipitates, as well as the lath subgrains containing high-density dislocations, were increased: all are responsible for the improved creep resistance.

  14. Tribological performance analysis of textured steel surfaces under lubricating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. C.; Pandey, R. K.; Rooplal; Ranganath, M. S.; Maji, S.

    2016-09-01

    The tribological analysis of the lubricated conformal contacts formed between the smooth/textured surfaces of steel discs and smooth surface of steel pins under sliding conditions have been considered. Roles of dimples’ pitch of textured surfaces have been investigated experimentally to understand the variations of coefficient of friction and wear at the tribo-contacts under fully flooded lubricated conditions. Substantial reductions in coefficient of friction and wear at the tribo-interfaces have been observed in presence of textures on the rotating discs for both fully flooded and starved conditions in comparison to the corresponding lubricating conditions of the interfaces formed between the smooth surfaces of disc and pin. In presence of surface texture, the coefficient of friction reduces considerable at elevated sliding speeds (>2 m/s) and unit loads (>0.5 MPa) for the set of operating parameters considered in the analysis.

  15. Effect of tempering on the microstructure, electrical, and magnetic properties of Eurofer-97 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandim, M. J. R.; Farrão, F. U.; Oliveira, V. B.; Bredda, E. H.; Santos, A. D.; dos Santos, C. A. M.; Sandim, H. R. Z.

    2015-06-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic Eurofer-97 steel is a potential candidate for structural application in future nuclear fusion reactors. Samples of Eurofer-97 steel were cold rolled to 80% reduction in thickness, austenitized at 1050 and 1150 °C for 30 min and tempered at several temperatures up to 800 °C for 2 h each. The microstructural characterization of the samples was performed using Vickers microhardness testing and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Electrical resistivity and coercive field measurements were also performed to follow microstructural changes during isothermal tempering. Results were discussed with focus on the precipitation of MX and M23C6 carbides and related changes in these properties.

  16. Evolution of Carbides during Aging of a Spray-Formed Chromium-Containing Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yaojun; McHugh, Kevin M.; Zhou, Yizhang; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2008-02-01

    The evolution of carbides during aging of a spray-formed chromium-containing tool steel was studied. In the as-spray-formed steel, there are two prominent types of carbides: the V-rich proeutectoid MC and the Fe-rich M3C in lower bainite. Evolution of the carbides during aging can be described as follows. While the proeutectoid MC remains unchanged, a portion of the M3C dissolves into the bainitic ferrite matrix, and another portion of it is transformed into Cr-rich M7C3. In addition, fine alloyed carbides, such as M7C3, MC, Cr-rich M23C6, and Mo-rich M6C, precipitate from the matrix consisting of bainitic ferrite, martensite, and retained austenite.

  17. Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels: a basic research joint program in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutard, J.-L.; Badjeck, V.; Barguet, L.; Barouh, C.; Bhattacharya, A.; Colignon, Y.; Hatzoglou, C.; Loyer-Prost, M.; Rouffié, A. L.; Sallez, N.; Salmon-Legagneur, H.; Schuler, T.

    2014-12-01

    AREVA, CEA, CNRS, EDF and Mécachrome are funding a joint program of basic research on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels (ODISSEE), in support to the development of oxide dispersion strengthened 9-14% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels for the fuel element cladding of future Sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors. The selected objectives and the results obtained so far will be presented concerning (i) physical-chemical characterisation of the nano-clusters as a function of ball-milling process, metallurgical conditions and irradiation, (ii) meso-scale understanding of failure mechanisms under dynamic loading and creep, and, (iii) kinetic modelling of nano-clusters nucleation and α/α‧ unmixing.

  18. Effects of hydrogen isotopes in the irradiation damage of CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M. Z.; Liu, P. P.; Zhu, Y. M.; Wan, F. R.; He, Z. B.; Zhan, Q.

    2015-11-01

    The isotope effect of hydrogen in irradiation damage plays an important role in the development of reduced activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels in nuclear reactors. The evolutions of microstructures and mechanical properties of China low active martensitic (CLAM) steel subjected to hydrogen and deuterium ions irradiation are studied comparatively. Under the same irradiation conditions, larger size and smaller density of dislocation loops are generated by deuterium ion than by hydrogen ion. Irradiation hardening occurs under the ion irradiation and the hardening induced by hydrogen ion is higher than by deuterium ion. Moreover, the coarsening of M23C6 precipitates is observed, which can be explained by the solute drag mechanisms. It turns out that the coarsening induced by deuterium ion irradiation is more distinct than by hydrogen ion irradiation. No distinct variations for the compositions of M23C6 precipitates are found by a large number of statistical data after hydrogen isotopes irradiation.

  19. Femtosecond laser surface patterning of steel and titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanović, D. S.; Gaković, B.; Radu, C.; Zamfirescu, M.; Radak, B.; Petrović, S.; Rogić Miladinović, Z.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we present the results obtained by femtosecond laser processing of AISI D2 steel and the widely applicable titanium-based alloy, Ti6Al4V. Patterning the materials’ surfaces was done by a Ti:sapphire system at 775 nm wavelength and 200 fs pulse duration, while varying the output pulse energies and the scanning speed. The formation of laser-induced periodical surface structures were found for both materials.

  20. SQA(TM): Surface Quality Assured Steel Bar Program

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Tzyy-Shuh; Shi, Jianjun; Zhou, Shiyu

    2009-03-03

    OG Technologies, Inc. (OGT) has led this SQA (Surface Quality Assured Steel Bar) program to solve the major surface quality problems plaguing the US special quality steel bars and rods industry and their customers, based on crosscutting sensors and controls technologies. Surface defects in steel formed in a hot rolling process are one of the most common quality issues faced by the American steel industry, accounting for roughly 50% of the rejects or 2.5% of the total shipment. Unlike other problems such as the mechanical properties of the steel product, most surface defects are sporadic and cannot be addressed based on sampling techniques. This issue hurts the rolling industry and their customers in their process efficiency and operational costs. The goal of this program is to develop and demonstrate an SQA prototype, with synergy of HotEye® and other innovations, that enables effective rolling process control and efficient quality control. HotEye®, OGT’s invention, delivers high definition images of workpieces at or exceeding 1,450°C while the workpieces travel at 100 m/s. The elimination of surface defect rejects will be achieved through the integration of imaging-based quality assessment, advanced signal processing, predictive process controls and the integration with other quality control tools. The SQA program team, composed of entities capable of and experienced in (1) research, (2) technology manufacturing, (3) technology sales and marketing, and (4) technology end users, is very strong. There were 5 core participants: OGT, Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), University of Wisconsin (UW), Charter Steel (Charter) and ArcelorMittal Indiana Harbor (Inland). OGT served as the project coordinator. OGT participated in both research and commercialization. GIT and UW provided significant technical inputs to this SQA project. The steel mills provided access to their rolling lines for data collection, design of experiments, host of technology test and

  1. Fabrication of superhydrophobic and lyophobic slippery surface on steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Xiong, Dangsheng; Pan, Sai; Deng, Yaling; Shi, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Superhydrophobic/oleophilic coating was prepared on steel via wet chemical etching, and followed by surface modification. Surface grafting was manifested to be realized mainly on the oxidized area. Slippery liquid infused porous surface(s) (SLIPS) was prepared by infusing perfluorinated lubricant into the prepared superhydrophobic coating, to repel water, coffee, kerosene, and even hexane, suggesting a transition from superoleophilicity to lyophobicity. Furthermore, the lyohobicity was accessible only when the substrate is fluorinated. Moreover, the kinematic viscosity was demonstrated to be negatively correlated to the traveling speed of the liquids on the SLIPS.

  2. Surface interactions of cesium and boric acid with stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman-Canfield, N.

    1995-08-01

    In this report, the effects of cesium hydroxide and boric acid on oxidized stainless steel surfaces at high temperatures and near one atmosphere of pressure are investigated. This is the first experimental investigation of this chemical system. The experimental investigations were performed using a mass spectrometer and a mass electrobalance. Surfaces from the different experiments were examined using a scanning electron microscope to identify the presence of deposited species, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis to identify the species deposited on the surface. A better understanding of the equilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetics of the steam-accelerated volatilizations, and the release kinetics are gained by these experiments. The release rate is characterized by bulk vaporization/gas-phase mass transfer data. The analysis couples vaporization, deposition, and desorption of the compounds formed by cesium hydroxide and boric acid under conditions similar to what is expected during certain nuclear reactor accidents. This study shows that cesium deposits on an oxidized stainless steel surface at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 Kelvin. Cesium also deposits on stainless steel surfaces coated with boric oxide in the same temperature ranges. The mechanism for cesium deposition onto the oxide layer was found to involve the chemical reaction between cesium and chromate. Some revaporization in the cesium hydroxide-boric acid system was observed. It has been found that under the conditions given, boric acid will react with cesium hydroxide to form cesium metaborate. A model is proposed for this chemical reaction.

  3. Surface modification of SKD-61 steel by ion implantation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, F. L.; Lo, Y.-L.; Yu, Y.-C.

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how ion implantation affects the surface characteristics and nitrogenizing depth of the thin film by the use of a NEC 9SDH-2 3 MV Pelletron accelerator that implants nitrogen ions into SKD-61 tool steels for surface modification. Nitrogen ions were implanted into the surface layer of materials so that the hardness of modified films could be improved. Also, the nitride film stripping problems of the traditional nitrogenizing treatment could be overcome by a new approach in surface process engineering. As nitrogen ions with high velocity impacted on the surface of the substrate, the ions were absorbed and accumulated on the surface of the substrate. The experiments were performed with two energies (i.e., 1 and 2 MeV) and different doses (i.e., 2.5x10{sup 15}, 7.5x10{sup 15}, and 1.5x10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}). Nitrogen ions were incorporated into the interface and then diffused through the metal to form a nitride layer. Analysis tools included the calculation of stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM), the detection of a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and nanoindentation testing. Through the depth analysis of SIMS, the effects of the ion-implanted SKD-61 steels after heating at 550 deg. C in a vacuum furnace were examined. The nanoindenting results indicate the variation of hardness of SKD-61 steels with the various ion doses. It reaches two to three times the original hardness of SKD-61 steels.

  4. Technology of Strengthening Steel Details by Surfacing Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. G.; Bataev, A. A.; Rakhimyanov, Kh M.; Mul, D. O.

    2016-04-01

    The article considers the problem of forming wear resistant meal ceramic coatings on steel surfaces using the results of our own investigations and the analysis of achievements made in the country and abroad. Increasing the wear resistance of surface layers of steel details is achieved by surfacing composite coatings with carbides or borides of metals as disperse particles in the strengthening phase. The use of surfacing on wearing machine details and mechanisms has a history of more than 100 years. But still engineering investigations in this field are being conducted up to now. The use of heating sources which provide a high density of power allows ensuring temperature and time conditions of surfacing under which composites with peculiar service and functional properties are formed. High concentration of energy in the zone of melt, which is created from powder mixtures and the hardened surface layer, allows producing the transition zone between the main material and surfaced coating. Surfacing by the electron beam directed from vacuum to the atmosphere is of considerable technological advantages. They give the possibility of strengthening surface layers of large-sized details by surfacing powder mixtures without their preliminary compacting. A modified layer of the main metal with ceramic particles distributed in it is created as a result of heating surfaced powders and the detail surface layer by the electron beam. Technology of surfacing allows using powders of refractory metals and graphite in the composition of powder mixtures. They interact with one another and form the particles of the hardening phase of the composition coating. The chemical composition of the main and surfaced materials is considered to be the main factor which determines the character of metallurgical processes in local zones of melt as well as the structure and properties of surfaced composition.

  5. Production and segregation of transmutation elements Ca, Ti, Sc in the F82H steel under mixed spectrum irradiation of high energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuksenko, Viacheslav; Pareige, Cristelle; Pareige, Philippe; Dai, Yong

    2014-04-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steel F82H was irradiated at 345 °C in a mixed proton-neutron spectrum in the Swiss spallation neutron source up to 20.3 dpa. Nanoscale investigations using the atom probe tomography (APT) technique were performed in order to study the atomic scale evolution of the microstructure of the F82H steel under irradiation. Spallation products Ca, Ti and Sc have been detected. The irradiation led to the production of about 370 appm of Ca, 90 appm of Sc and 800 appm of Ti. APT experiments revealed that regardless their low bulk concentrations, the spallation products extensively participate in the evolution of the microstructure: formation of radiation-induced clusters, segregation at the dislocation loops and alteration of the microchemistry of carbides. In this paper, a quantitative description of the observed features is presented and results are compared with TEM data of the literature obtained on the same steel and under similar irradiation conditions.

  6. Effect of Surface Treatment on the Surface Characteristics of AISI 316L Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trigwell, Steve; Selvaduray, Guna

    2005-01-01

    The ability of 316L stainless steel to maintain biocompatibility, which is dependent upon the surface characteristics, is critical to its effectiveness as an implant material. The surfaces of mechanically polished (MP), electropolished (EP) and plasma treated 316L stainless steel coupons were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) for chemical composition, Atomic Force Microscopy for surface roughness, and contact angle measurements for critical surface tension. All surfaces had a Ni concentration that was significantly lower than the bulk concentration of -43%. The Cr content of the surface was increased significantly by electropolishing. The surface roughness was also improved significantly by electropolishing. Plasma treatment had the reverse effect - the surface Cr content was decreased. It was also found that the Cr and Fe in the surface exist in both the oxide and hydroxide states, with the ratios varying according to surface treatment.

  7. Must we use ferritic steel in TBM?

    SciTech Connect

    Salavy, Jean-Francois; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Cho, Seungyon; Enoeda, Mikio; Giancarli, Luciano; Kurtz, Richard J.; Luo, Tian Y.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Wong, Clement

    2010-12-13

    Mock-ups of DEMO breeding blankets, called Test Blanket Modules (TBMs), inserted and tested in ITER in dedicated equatorial ports directly facing the plasma, are expected to provide the first experimental answers on the necessary performance of the corresponding DEMO breeding blankets. Several DEMO breeding blanket designs have been studied and assessed in the last 20 years. At present, after considering various coolant and breeder combinations, all the TBM concepts proposed by the seven ITER Parties use Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel as the structural material. In order to perform valuable tests in ITER, the TBMs are expected to use the same structural material as corresponding DEMO blankets. However, due to the fact that this family of steels is ferromagnetic, their presence in the ITER vacuum vessel will create perturbations of the ITER magnetic fields that could reduce the quality of the plasma confinement during H-mode. As a consequence, a legitimate question has been raised on the necessity of using RAFM steel for TBMs structural material in ITER. By giving a short description of the main TBM testing objectives in ITER and assessing the consequences of not using such a material, this paper gives a comprehensive answer to this question. According to the working group author of the study, the use of RAFM steel as structural material for TBM is judged mandatory.

  8. Atomic diffusion in laser surface modified AISI H13 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqida, S. N.; Brabazon, D.; Naher, S.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a laser surface modification process of AISI H13 steel using 0.09 and 0.4 mm of laser spot sizes with an aim to increase surface hardness and investigate elements diffusion in laser modified surface. A Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 slab laser was used to process AISI H13 steel samples. Samples of 10 mm diameter were sectioned to 100 mm length in order to process a predefined circumferential area. The parameters selected for examination were laser peak power, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and overlap percentage. The hardness properties were tested at 981 mN force. Metallographic study and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) were performed to observe presence of elements and their distribution in the sample surface. Maximum hardness achieved in the modified surface was 1017 HV0.1. Change of elements composition in the modified layer region was detected in the laser modified samples. Diffusion possibly occurred for C, Cr, Cu, Ni, and S elements. The potential found for increase in surface hardness represents an important method to sustain tooling life. The EDXS findings signify understanding of processing parameters effect on the modified surface composition.

  9. Dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Puli, Ramesh Janaki Ram, G.D.

    2012-12-15

    Friction surfacing involves complex thermo-mechanical phenomena. In this study, the nature of dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L coatings was investigated using electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the alloy 316L undergoes discontinuous dynamic recrystallization under conditions of moderate Zener-Hollomon parameter during friction surfacing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L friction surfaced coatings is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfacing leads to discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain rates in friction surfacing exceed 400 s{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated grain size matches well with experimental observations in 316L coatings.

  10. Iodine susceptibility of pseudomonads grown attached to stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, B. H.; McFeters, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonads were adapted to grow in phosphate-buffered water and on stainless steel surfaces to study the iodine sensitivity of attached and planktonic cells. Cultures adapted to low nutrient growth were incubated at room temperature in a circulating reactor system with stainless steel coupons to allow biofilm formation on the metal surfaces. In some experiments, the reactor was partially emptied and refilled with buffer at each sampling time to simulate a "fill-and-draw" water system. Biofilms of attached bacteria, resuspended biofilm bacteria, and reactor suspension, were exposed to 1 mg l-1 iodine for 2 min. Attached bacterial populations which established on coupons within 3 to 5 days displayed a significant increase in resistance to iodine. Increased resistance was also observed for resuspended cells from the biofilm and planktonic bacteria in the system suspension. Generally, intact biofilms and resuspended biofilm cells were most resistant, followed by planktonic bacteria and phosphate buffer cultures. Thus, biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces within water systems can result in significantly increased disinfection resistance of commonly-occurring water-borne bacteria that may enhance their ability to colonise water treatment and distribution systems.

  11. Adsorption of ammonia on treated stainless steel and polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaittinen, O.; Metsälä, M.; Persijn, S.; Vainio, M.; Halonen, L.

    2014-05-01

    Adsorption of dynamically diluted ammonia at part-per-billion to low part-per-million concentrations in dry nitrogen was studied with treated and non-treated stainless steel and polymer test tubes. The treatments included electropolishing and two types of coatings based on amorphous silicon. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an external cavity diode laser operating in the near-infrared wavelength range was used to monitor the adsorption process in real time in continuous-flow conditions to obtain quantitative assessment of the adsorptive properties of the studied surfaces. The investigated polymers were all less adsorptive than any of the treated or non-treated stainless steel surfaces. Some of the commercial coatings reduced the adsorption loss of stainless steel by a factor of ten or more. Polyvinylidene fluoride was found to be superior (less adsorption) to the four other studied polymer coatings. The number of adsorbed ammonia molecules per surface area obtained at different ammonia gas phase concentrations was modeled with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The time behavior of the adsorption-desorption process occurring in the time scale of seconds and minutes was simulated with a simple kinetic model.

  12. Formation of highly corrosion resistant stainless steel surface alloys for marine environments by laser surface alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Sridhar, K.; Deshmukh, M.B.; Khanna, A.S.; Wissenbach, K.

    1998-12-31

    Austenitic stainless steels (SS) such as UNS S30403 are being used for numerous industrial applications due to their goad mechanical properties and weldability. However in aggressive marine environments such as seawater, they suffer from localized corrosion. Even though newly developed highly alloyed SS`s possess very high pitting resistance, they are susceptible to the formation of secondary phases. In the present study, a laser surface alloying technique was employed for the formation of highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel surfaces on conventional 304 SS substrate. Microstructural characterization by optical and SEM revealed finer cells of austenitic phase in the laser alloyed zones with molybdenum contents in the range of 3 to 15 wt%. The pitting corrosion resistance of the surface alloys were ascertained by immersion and potentiodynamic polarization tests and the repassivation behavior by cyclic polarization tests. Also the influence of microstructural features on pitting behavior of highly alloyed and laser surface alloyed steels is studied.

  13. Formation of Surface Corrosion-Resistant Nanocrystalline Structures on Steel.

    PubMed

    Nykyforchyn, Hryhoriy; Kyryliv, Volodymyr; Maksymiv, Olha; Slobodyan, Zvenomyra; Tsyrulnyk, Oleksandr

    2016-12-01

    Engineering materials with nanocrystalline structure could be exploited under simultaneous action of mechanical loading and corrosion environments; therefore, their corrosion resistance is important. Surface nanocrystalline structure was generated on middle carbon steels by severe plastic deformation using the method of mechanical pulse friction treatment. This treatment additionally includes high temperature phase transformation and alloying. Using a complex of the corrosive, electrochemical and physical investigations, it was established that nanocrystalline structures can be characterized by lower or increased corrosion resistance in comparison with the reference material. It is caused by the action of two confronting factors: arising energy level and anticorrosive alloying of the surface layer.

  14. Microstructure in Worn Surface of Hadfield Steel Crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F. C.; Lv, B.; Wang, T. S.; Zheng, C. L.; Li, M.; Zhang, M.

    In this paper a failed Hadfield (high manganese austenite) steel crossing used in railway system was studied. The microstructure in the worn surfaces of the crossing was investigated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The results indicated that a nanocrystallization layer formed on the surface of the crossing served. The formation mechanism of the nanocrystalline is the discontinuous dynamic recrystallization. The energy for the recrystallization nucleus formation originates from the interactions between the twins, the dislocations, as well as twin and dislocation. High-density vacancies promoted the recrystallization process including the dislocation climb and the atom diffusion.

  15. Formation of Surface Corrosion-Resistant Nanocrystalline Structures on Steel.

    PubMed

    Nykyforchyn, Hryhoriy; Kyryliv, Volodymyr; Maksymiv, Olha; Slobodyan, Zvenomyra; Tsyrulnyk, Oleksandr

    2016-12-01

    Engineering materials with nanocrystalline structure could be exploited under simultaneous action of mechanical loading and corrosion environments; therefore, their corrosion resistance is important. Surface nanocrystalline structure was generated on middle carbon steels by severe plastic deformation using the method of mechanical pulse friction treatment. This treatment additionally includes high temperature phase transformation and alloying. Using a complex of the corrosive, electrochemical and physical investigations, it was established that nanocrystalline structures can be characterized by lower or increased corrosion resistance in comparison with the reference material. It is caused by the action of two confronting factors: arising energy level and anticorrosive alloying of the surface layer. PMID:26831689

  16. Formation of Surface Corrosion-Resistant Nanocrystalline Structures on Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykyforchyn, Hryhoriy; Kyryliv, Volodymyr; Maksymiv, Olha; Slobodyan, Zvenomyra; Tsyrulnyk, Oleksandr

    2016-02-01

    Engineering materials with nanocrystalline structure could be exploited under simultaneous action of mechanical loading and corrosion environments; therefore, their corrosion resistance is important. Surface nanocrystalline structure was generated on middle carbon steels by severe plastic deformation using the method of mechanical pulse friction treatment. This treatment additionally includes high temperature phase transformation and alloying. Using a complex of the corrosive, electrochemical and physical investigations, it was established that nanocrystalline structures can be characterized by lower or increased corrosion resistance in comparison with the reference material. It is caused by the action of two confronting factors: arising energy level and anticorrosive alloying of the surface layer.

  17. Oxidation of tritium atoms at a stainless steel surface

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.; VanDeventer, E.H.

    1986-10-01

    The dynamic reaction of oxygen and tritium on a stainless steel surface was studied for low oxygen concentrations (less than 1 ppM oxygen in helium). The oxygen was swept over a stainless surface through which 20 to 90 ..mu..Ci/d of tritium permeated. Dynamic conditions were maintained for three to five days with gas flow rates maintained at 40 to 100 mL/min. The ratio between the tritiated water collected and the tritium gas collected was less than one. At oxygen levels greater than 50 ppM, the ratio of tritiated water to tritium gas appears to be greater than 10.

  18. Development of ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Corwin, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    Chromium-molybdenum ferritic (martensitic) steels are leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment will produce long-lived radioactive isotopes that will lead to difficult waste-disposal problems. Such problems could be reduced by replacing the elements in the steels (i.e., Mo, Nb, Ni, N, and Cu) that lead to long-lived radioactive isotopes. We have proposed the development of ferritic steels analogous to conventional Cr-Mo steels, which contain molybdenum and niobium. It is proposed that molybdenum be replaced by tungsten and niobium be replaced by tantalum. Eight experimental steels were produced. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% were used (all concentrations are in wt %). Steels with these chromium compositions, each containing 2% W and 0.25% V, were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, 2.25 Cr steels were produced with 2% W and no vanadium and with 0.25% V and O and 1% W. A 9Cr steel containing 2% W, 0.25 V, and 0.07% Ta was also studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1%. Tempering studies on the normalized steels indicated that the tempering behavior of the new Cr-W steels was similar to that of the analogous Cr-Mo steels. Microscopy studies indicated that 2% tungsten was required in the 2.25 Cr steels to produce 100% bainite in 15.9-mm-thick plate during normalization. The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100% martensite, but the 12 Cr steel contained about 75% martensite with the balance delta-ferrite. 33 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Influence of surface finish on the cleanability of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Frank, J F; Chmielewski, R

    2001-08-01

    Stainless steel for fabricating food processing equipment is available with various surface finishes. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of surface finish on cleanability. Nine samples of stainless steel, type 304, from various manufacturers including no finish (hot rolled and pickled), #4 finish, 2B mechanical polished, and electropolished were tested. Cleanability was assessed by using coupon samples soiled with either cultured milk inoculated with spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus or by growth of a Pseudomonas sp. biofilm. Samples were cleaned by immersion in a turbulent bath of 1.28% sodium hydroxide at 66 degrees C for 3 min followed by a sterile water rinse, neutralizing in 0.1% phosphoric acid for 30 s, rinsing in phosphate buffer, sanitizing in 100 ppm hypochlorite, neutralizing in sodium thiosulfate, and drying. To determine residual milk soil, coupon samples were covered with PM indicator agar and incubated for 25 h at 58 degrees C. Other coupons were subjected to an additional 10 soiling or cleaning cycles, and the residual protein was measured by using epifluorescent microscopy and image analysis. Results indicate that the spore count was more precise for measuring initial cleanability of the finished samples, and the protein residue determination was useful for determining the effect of repeated cleaning. Data on the removal of milk soil suggest that stainless steel should be purchased based on measures of surface defects rather than finish type. Surface defects, as determined using a surface roughness gauge, produced a correlation of 0.82 with spore counts. Data also indicated that biofilm was more difficult to remove than milk-based soil. PMID:11510656

  20. Surface hardening of steel by laser and electron beam. (Latest citations from METADEX). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning electron beam hardening of steels and alloys. Among the materials surface hardened are carbon and alloy steels, aircraft spur gears, nitrocarburized steel, turbine blades, titanium-carbon steel, titanium, and rolling bearings. Effect of transformation plasticity on residual stress fields in laser surface hardening treatment is also examined. (Contains a minimum of 93 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Surface hardening of steel by laser and electron beam. (Latest citations from Metadex). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning electron beam hardening of steels and alloys. Among the materials surface hardened are carbon and alloy steels, aircraft spur gears, nitrocarburized steel, turbine blades, titanium-carbon steel, titanium, and rolling bearings. Effect of transformation plasticity on residual stress fields in laser surface hardening treatment is also examined.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  2. Bulk Nanostructured FCC Steels With Enhanced Radiation Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinghang; Hartwig, K. Ted; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2012-10-27

    The objective of this project is to increase radiation tolerance in austenitic steels through optimization of grain size and grain boundary (GB) characteristics. The focus will be on nanocrystalline austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys with an fcc crystal structure. The long-term goal is to design and develop bulk nanostructured austenitic steels with enhanced void swelling resistance and substantial ductility, and to enhance their creep resistance at elevated temperatures via GB engineering. The combination of grain refinement and grain boundary engineering approaches allows us to tailor the material strength, ductility, and resistance to swelling by 1) changing the sink strength for point defects, 2) by increasing the nucleation barriers for bubble formation at GBs, and 3) by changing the precipitate distributions at boundaries. Compared to ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels (SS) possess good creep and fatigue resistance at elevated temperatures, and better toughness at low temperature. However, a major disadvantage of austenitic SS is that they are vulnerable to significant void swelling in nuclear reactors, especially at the temperatures and doses anticipated in the Advanced Burner Reactor. The lack of resistance to void swelling in austenitic alloys led to the switch to ferritic/martensitic steels as the preferred material for the fast reactor cladding application. Recently a type of austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS, was developed at ORNL, and is expected to show enhanced void swelling resistance through the trapping of point defects at nanometersized carbides. Reducing the grain size and increasing the fraction of low energy grain boundaries should reduce the available radiation-produced point defects (due to the increased sink area of the grain boundaries), should make bubble nucleation at the boundaries less likely (by reducing the fraction of high-energy boundaries), and improve the strength and ductility under radiation by producing a higher

  3. Effect of irradiation temperature on void swelling of China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Fei; Qiao Jiansheng; Huang Yina; Wan Farong Ohnuki, Soumei

    2008-03-15

    CLAM is one composition of a Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel (RAFM), which is being studied in a number of institutes and universities in China. The effect of electron-beam irradiation temperature on irradiation swelling of CLAM was investigated by using a 1250 kV High Voltage Electron Microscope (HVEM). In-situ microstructural observations indicated that voids formed at each experimental temperature - 723 K, 773 K and 823 K. The size and number density of voids increased with increasing irradiation dose at each temperature. The results show that CLAM has good swelling resistance. The maximum void swelling was produced at 723 K; the swelling was about 0.3% when the irradiation damage was 13.8 dpa.

  4. Surface preparation for non-destructive detection of surface cracks in stainless steel and carbon steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Funderburg, I.M.

    1996-07-01

    Engineers within the chemical process industries are among other things, charged with the task of determining the reliability of piping and equipment. As part of this evaluation, the surfaces of process equipment and piping are often examined for evidence of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) or other tightly closed surface cracks. Presently there is no consensus as to which is the ``best`` technique for preparing and inspecting carbon steel and stainless steel vessels or piping for surface cracks. The specific concern within industry is that Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) might go undetected if the surface preparation closes over such tight cracks. This paper presents results of a study, MTI commissioned to collect additional data, examine the literature, and interview industrial materials engineers, independent inspection specialists, non-destructive examination consultants, and other representatives of industries that have equipment which must be inspected for surface cracks. Discussed are the differing surface preparation techniques used, the use of standards for evaluating the effectiveness of the techniques, and what is felt to be the ``Key Learnings`` from the investigation.

  5. Sub-surface defect detection in a steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atzlesberger, J.; Zagar, B. G.; Cihal, R.; Brummayer, M.; Reisinger, P.

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, the focus on quality control in the steel industry has shifted from offline to inline non-destructive testing in order to detect defects at the earliest possible stage in the production process. The detection and elimination of such defects is vital for sustaining product quality and reducing costs. Various measurement principles (e.g. ultrasonic testing, electromagnetic acoustic transducer, x-ray inspection) were analyzed and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed regarding their usability in a steel plant. Based on these findings a magnetic method combined with a new sensor concept was chosen. By using highly sensitive sensors based on the giant magnetoresistive effect, it is possible to detect magnetic flux leakage variations on the surface of a magnetized steel strip caused by defects or inhomogeneities inside the material. Based on promising measurement results of preliminary tests and simulation results obtained by finite element method-models, a prototype is now being built for offline measurements and the optimization of the measurement method. In the event that the development of this second prototype is successful, an inline configuration will be implemented.

  6. Mechanical Properties and Microstructures of the HAZs of 11Cr F/M Steel for Gen-IV Nuclear Power Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongkui; Wang, Jian; Lu, Shanping; Rong, Lijian; Li, Dianzhong

    2015-02-01

    The weldability of a newly developed 11Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel to be used in Pb-Bi liquid cooled ADS for the fourth generation nuclear power station was studied by experiments and numerical simulation. In this work, an appropriate method for obtaining simulated heat-affected zones (HAZs) was developed. HAZs, including CG-HAZ, FG-HAZ, and IC-HAZ, were successfully simulated by Gleeble at heating rates of 209, 176, and 149 °C/s and peak temperatures of 1314, 1138, and 998 °C, respectively. Results of tension and impact tests indicated that the simulated HAZs had much higher strength and poorer toughness than the base metal. The poor toughness is caused by high carbon, silicon contents, and quenched martensitic microstructures. The tempering treatment is necessary for the developed steel before application in nuclear reactor.

  7. Thermal treatment effects on laser surface remelting duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, Alex M.; Ierardi, Maria Clara F.; Aparecida Pinto, M.; Tavares, Sérgio S. M.

    2008-10-01

    In this paper the microstructural changes and effects on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels UNS S32304 and UNS S32205, commonly used by the petroleum industry, were studied, following the execution of laser surface remelting (LSM) and post-thermal treatments (TT). In this way, data was obtained, which could then be compared with the starting condition of the alloys. In order to analyze the corrosion behaviour of the alloys in the as-received conditions, treated with laser and after post-thermal treatments, cyclic polarization tests were carried out. A solution of 3.5% NaCl (artificial sea water) was used, as duplex stainless steels are regularly used by the petroleum industry in offshore locations. The results obtained showed that when laser surface treated, due to rapid resolidification, the alloys became almost ferritic, and since the level of nitrogen in the composition of both alloys is superior to their solubility limit in ferrite, a precipitation of Cr2N (chromium nitrides) occurred in the ferritic matrix, causing loss of corrosion resistance, thus resulting in an increase in surface hardness. However, after the post-thermal treatment the alloys corrosion resistance was restored to values close to those of the as-received condition.

  8. Evaluation of Alternate Stainless Steel Surface Passivation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Elliot A.

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  9. Femtosecond laser color marking stainless steel surface with different wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqiang; Li, Jiawen; Hu, Yanlei; Zhang, Chenchu; Li, Xiaohong; Chu, Jiaru; Huang, Wenhao

    2015-03-01

    The femtosecond laser color marking stainless steel surfaces with different incident wavelengths were investigated theoretically and experimentally. It indicates that the spectral regions of the colors firstly increase and then reduce with increasing spatial periods of the ripples induced by laser irradiation. Additionally, the colors are gradually changed from blue to red due to the elongation of the diffracted light wavelengths. As a result, the color effects are distinctly different. This study offers a new controllable parameter to produce diverse colors, which may find a wide range of applications in the laser color marking, art designing and so on.

  10. Drill stem steels for use in geothermal environments

    SciTech Connect

    Salzbrenner, R.

    1980-01-01

    Steels which are used in drill stem for conventional drilling have been selected primarily to satisfy certain static strength requirements and cost considerations. As the environments in which drilling is performed become more severe (e.g., in geothermal fluids) additional considerations must be given to the design of alloys which are resistant to general corrosion, stress corrosion, and corrosion fatigue. General design considerations for steel alloys which should provide an enhanced resistance to geothermal drilling operations are presented. These considerations include discussion of the chemistry and metallurgical substructure, and how their variation affects the mechanical and corrosion properties of steel used for drill stem applications. A duplex ferritic-martensitic steel has an advantageous combination of compositional and microstructural features which should lead to improved chemical resistance (particularly to hydrogen sulfide) as well as provide a good combination of strength and toughness properties. This duplex steel is based on the iron-2.0 weight percent silicon-0.1 weight percent carbon system, and offers the potential of enhanced performance in geothermal drilling as well as low alloy cost.

  11. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  12. Surface and Bulk Carbide Transformations in High-Speed Steel.

    PubMed

    Godec, M; Večko Pirtovšek, T; Šetina Batič, B; McGuiness, P; Burja, J; Podgornik, B

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the transformation of carbides in AISI M42 high-speed steels in the temperature window used for forging. The annealing was found to result in the partial transformation of the large, metastable M2C carbides into small, more stable grains of M6C, with an associated change in the crystal orientation. In addition, MC carbides form during the transformation of M2C to M6C. From the high-speed-steel production point of view, it is beneficial to have large, metastable carbides in the cast structure, which later during annealing, before the forging, transform into a structure of polycrystalline carbides. Such carbides can be easily decomposed into several small carbides, which are then randomly distributed in the microstructure. The results also show an interesting difference in the carbide-transformation reactions on the surface versus the bulk of the alloy, which has implications for in-situ studies of bulk phenomena that are based on surface observations. PMID:26537780

  13. Surface and Bulk Carbide Transformations in High-Speed Steel

    PubMed Central

    Godec, M.; Večko Pirtovšek, T.; Šetina Batič, B.; McGuiness, P.; Burja, J.; Podgornik, B.

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the transformation of carbides in AISI M42 high-speed steels in the temperature window used for forging. The annealing was found to result in the partial transformation of the large, metastable M2C carbides into small, more stable grains of M6C, with an associated change in the crystal orientation. In addition, MC carbides form during the transformation of M2C to M6C. From the high-speed-steel production point of view, it is beneficial to have large, metastable carbides in the cast structure, which later during annealing, before the forging, transform into a structure of polycrystalline carbides. Such carbides can be easily decomposed into several small carbides, which are then randomly distributed in the microstructure. The results also show an interesting difference in the carbide-transformation reactions on the surface versus the bulk of the alloy, which has implications for in-situ studies of bulk phenomena that are based on surface observations. PMID:26537780

  14. Unsaturated fatty acids in alkane solution: adsorption to steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Sarah M; Persson, Karin; Mueller, Gregor; Kronberg, Bengt; Clarke, Jim; Chtaib, Mohammed; Claesson, Per M

    2007-10-01

    The adsorption of the unsaturated fatty acids oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acid on steel surfaces has been investigated by means of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Two different solvents were used, n-hexadecane and its highly branched isomer, viz., 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane. The area occupied per molecule of oleic acid at 1 wt % corresponds to what is needed for adsorption parallel to the surface. At the same concentration, the adsorbed amount of linoleic acid and linolenic acid indicates that they adsorb in multilayers. The chemisorbed amount estimated from static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) measurements was found to be similar for the three unsaturated fatty acids. In the case of linolenic acid, it was found that the presence of water significantly alters the adsorption, most likely because of the precipitation of fatty acid/water aggregates. Furthermore, static SIMS results indicate that the amount of water used here inhibits the chemisorption of linolenic acid.

  15. PLEPS study of ions implanted RAFM steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojak, S.; Slugeň, V.; Egger, W.; Ravelli, L.; Petriska, M.; Veterníková, J.; Stacho, M.; Sabelová, V.

    2014-04-01

    Current nuclear power plants (NPP) require radiation, heat and mechanical resistance of their structural materials with the ability to stay operational during NPP planned lifetime. Radiation damage much higher, than in the current NPP, is expected in new generations of nuclear power plants, such as Generation IV and fusion reactors. Investigation of perspective structural materials for new generations of nuclear power plants is among others focused on study of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels. These steels have good characteristics as reduced activation, good resistance to volume swelling, good radiation, and heat resistance. Our experiments were focused on the study of microstructural changes of binary Fe-Cr alloys with different chromium content after irradiation, experimentally simulated by ion implantations. Fe-Cr alloys were examined, by Pulsed Low Energy Positron System (PLEPS) at FRM II reactor in Garching (Munich), after helium ion implantations at the dose of 0.1 C/cm2. The investigation was focused on the chromium effect and the radiation defects resistivity. In particular, the vacancy type defects (monovacancies, vacancy clusters) have been studied. Based on our previous results achieved by conventional lifetime technique, the decrease of the defects size with increasing content of chromium is expected also for PLEPS measurements.

  16. The effect of surface roughness on the fretting corrosion of 316L stainless steel biomaterial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Aarti

    The medical device industry is still seeking answers to the mechanically-assisted corrosion (MAC) problem, which becomes increasingly important due to modularity in design. MAC manifests in various forms, some of which are fretting corrosion, crevice corrosion and stress corrosion. Several studies have been conducted to understand the causes and the factors that affect fretting corrosion. Some of the factors are the applied load, surface potential, oxide film characteristics and solution chemistry near the interface. Surface properties such as surface roughness determine the topography of the surface and the nature of asperity-asperity contact, which is a factor that would determine the mechanically assisted corrosion behavior of the interface, like the stem-neck and head-neck taper junctions in modular hip replacement devices. This study aims to understand the correlation between surface roughness of 316L stainless steel samples and fretting corrosion behavior using a variable load pin-on-disc test. It was found that the smoother surfaces are associated with lower fretting currents. However, smoother surfaces also created the conditions for fretting initiated crevice corrosion to occur more readily. Fretting corrosion regimes and the severity are thus dependent upon the surface roughness. A possible explanation could be due to the inverse relationship between the interasperity distance parameter, Delta, and fretting currents. The coefficient of friction between the two surfaces in contact however remained unaffected by surface roughness, but decreased with increasing load. Smoother surfaces, while lowering fretting corrosion reactions can enhance crevice corrosion reactions in 316L stainless steel interfaces.

  17. Characterization of corrosion products formed on different surfaces of steel exposed to simulated groundwater solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiufa; Gao, Kewei; Wang, Yanbin; Pang, Xiaolu

    2015-08-01

    The corrosion behavior of a low alloy steel in simulated groundwater was investigated. The upward surface of the steel underwent more serious corrosion than the downward surface. The corrosion products formed on the upward and downward surfaces were characterized by SEM, EDX, and XRD, and the electrochemical properties of bare and rusted samples were analyzed. The difference in the corrosion rates of the different surfaces of the steel could be attributed to the potential difference between the upward and downward surfaces as well as the higher amount of CaCO3 deposits on the downward surface leading to a compact corrosion product.

  18. Designing Pulse Laser Surface Modification of H13 Steel Using Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqida, S. N.; Brabazon, D.; Naher, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a design of experiment (DOE) for laser surface modification process of AISI H13 tool steel in achieving the maximum hardness and minimum surface roughness at a range of modified layer depth. A Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 slab laser was used to process AISI H13 tool steel samples. Samples of 10 mm diameter were sectioned to 100 mm length in order to process a predefined circumferential area. The parameters selected for examination were laser peak power, overlap percentage and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The response surface method with Box-Behnken design approach in Design Expert 7 software was used to design the H13 laser surface modification process. Metallographic study and image analysis were done to measure the modified layer depth. The modified surface roughness was measured using two-dimensional surface profilometer. The correlation of the three laser processing parameters and the modified surface properties was specified by plotting three-dimensional graph. The hardness properties were tested at 981 mN force. From metallographic study, the laser modified surface depth was between 37 μm and 150 μm. The average surface roughness recorded from the 2D profilometry was at a minimum value of 1.8 μm. The maximum hardness achieved was between 728 and 905 HV0.1. These findings are significant to modern development of hard coatings for wear resistant applications.

  19. SURFACE PREPARATION OF STEEL SUBSTRATES USING GRIT-BLASTING

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; D. J. Varacalle, Jr.; D. Deason; W. Rhodaberger; E. Sampson

    2005-05-01

    The primary purpose of grit blasting for thermal spray applications is to ensure a strong mechanical bond between the substrate and the coating by the enhanced roughening of the substrate material. This study presents statistically designed experiments that were accomplished to investigate the effect of abrasives on roughness for A36/1020 steel. The experiments were conducted using a Box statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. Three grit blasting parameters and their effect on the resultant substrate roughness were investigated. These include blast media, blast pressure, and working distance. The substrates were characterized for roughness using surface profilometry. These attributes were correlated with the changes in operating parameters. Twin-Wire Electric Arc (TWEA) coatings of aluminum and zinc/aluminum were deposited on the grit-blasted substrates. These coatings were then tested for bond strength. Bond strength studies were conducted utilizing a portable adhesion tester following ASTM standard D4541.

  20. PARAMETERS OF TREATED STAINLESS STEEL SURFACES IMPORTANT FOR RESISTANCE TO BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of materials that are resistant to bacterial contamination could enhance food safety during processing. Common finishing treatments of stainless steel surfaces used for components of poultry processing equipment were tested for resistance to bacterial attachment. Surface char...

  1. Online aptitude automatic surface quality inspection system for hot rolled strips steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jin; Xie, Zhi-jiang; Wang, Xue; Sun, Nan-Nan

    2005-12-01

    Defects on the surface of hot rolled steel strips are main factors to evaluate quality of steel strips, an improved image recognition algorithm are used to extract the feature of Defects on the surface of steel strips. Base on the Machine vision and Artificial Neural Networks, establish a defect recognition method to select defect on the surface of steel strips. Base on these research. A surface inspection system and advanced algorithms for image processing to hot rolled strips is developed. Preparing two different fashion to lighting, adopting line blast vidicon of CCD on the surface steel strips on-line. Opening up capacity-diagnose-system with level the surface of steel strips on line, toward the above and undersurface of steel strips with ferric oxide, injure, stamp etc of defects on the surface to analyze and estimate. Miscarriage of justice and alternate of justice rate not preponderate over 5%.Geting hold of applications on some big enterprises of steel at home. Experiment proved that this measure is feasible and effective.

  2. Comparison of corrosion behavior of EUROFER and CLAM steels in flowing Pb-15.7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konys, J.; Krauss, W.; Zhu, Z.; Huang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Ferritic martensitic steels are envisaged to be applied as structural materials in HCLL blanket systems. Their compatibility with the liquid breeder, which is in direct contact with the structural alloy, will be essential for reliable and safe operation of the designed blankets. Formerly performed corrosion tests of RAFM steels in PICOLO loop of KIT were mainly done at high flow velocities, e.g., 0.22 m/s and delivered severe attack with material loss rates above 400 μm/yr at 823 K. Meanwhile, flow velocities for corrosion testing have been reduced into the 'cm range' to be near fusion relevant conditions. Among the international ITER-partners, many varieties of RAFM steels have been developed and manufactured within the last decade, e.g., the so-called Chinese Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM). In this paper, the long term corrosion behavior of EUROFER and CLAM steel in flowing Pb-15.7Li will be presented at a flow velocity of about 0.10 m/s and compared with earlier obtained results of RAFM steels exposed at other operation parameters of PICOLO loop. The observed corrosion attack is near 220 μm/yr and fits well to predictions made by MATLIM-modeling for low flow velocities in the turbulent flow regime.

  3. Microstructural Analysis of Orientation-Dependent Recovery and Recrystallization in a Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Deformed by Compression at a High Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Zhang, Yubin; Mishin, Oleg V.; Tao, Nairong; Pantleon, Wolfgang; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2016-09-01

    The evolution of the microstructure and texture during annealing of a modified ferritic/martensitic 9Cr-1Mo steel compressed by dynamic plastic deformation (DPD) to a strain of 2.3 has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. It is found that the duplex <111> + <100> fiber texture formed by DPD is transformed during annealing to a dominant <111> fiber texture, and that crystallites of the <111> component have an advantage during both nucleation and growth. Detailed characterization of the microstructural morphology, and estimation of the stored energies in <111>- and <100>-oriented regions in deformed and annealed samples, as well as investigations of the growth of recrystallizing grains, are used to analyze the annealing behavior. It is concluded that recrystallization in the given material occurs by a combination of oriented nucleation and oriented growth.

  4. Compatibility Assessment of Advanced Stainless Steels in Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Type 316L stainless steel capsules containing commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS (austenitic, 14Cr-16Ni), NF-616 (ferritic/martensitic, 9Cr-2W-0.5Mo), or 316L (austenitic, 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo) stainless steel were exposed at 600 or 700 C for 100 and 400 h as a screening test for compatibility. Using weight change, tensile testing, and metallographic analysis, HT-UPS and 316L were found to be largely immune to changes resulting from sodium exposure, but NF-616 was found susceptible to substantial decarburization at 700 C. Subsequently, two thermal convection loops (TCLs) constructed of 316L and loaded with commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS and 316L were operated for 2000 h each one between 500 and 650 C, the other between 565 and 725 C at a flow rate of about 1.5 cm/s. Changes in specimen appearance, weight, and tensile properties were observed to be very minor in all cases, and there was no metallographic evidence of microstructure changes, composition gradients, or mass transfer resulting from prolonged exposure in a TCL. Thus, it appears that HT-UPS and 316L stainless steels are similarly compatible with commercially pure sodium under these exposure conditions.

  5. Raman mapping of intact biofilms on stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Julie K.; Heighton, Lynne; Xu, Yunfeng; Nou, Xiangwu; Schmidt, Walter F.

    2016-05-01

    Many issues occur when microbial bacteria contaminates human food or water; it can be dangerous to the public. Determining how the microbial are growing, it can help experts determine how to prevent the outbreaks. Biofilms are a tightly group of microbial cells that grow on living surfaces or surrounding themselves. Though biofilms are not necessarily uniform; when there are more than one type of microbial bacteria that are grown, Raman mapping is performed to determine the growth patterns. Depending on the type of microbial bacteria, they can grow in various patterns such as symmetrical or scattered on the surface. The biofilms need to be intact in order to preclude and potentially figuring out the relative intensity of different components in a biofilm mixture. In addition, it is important to determine whether one biofilms is a substrate for another biofilm to be detected. For example, it is possible if layer B appears above layer A, but layer A doesn't appear above layer B. In this case, three types of biofilms that are grown includes Listeria(L), Ralstonia(R), and a mixture of the two (LR). Since microbe deposits on metal surfaces are quite suitable, biofilms were grown on stainless steel surface slides. Each slide was viewed under a Raman Microscope at 100X and using a 532nm laser to provide great results and sharp peaks. The mapping of the laser helps determine how the bacteria growth, at which intensity the bacteria appeared in order to identify specific microbes to signature markers on biofilms.

  6. Anticoagulant surface of 316 L stainless steel modified by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weihua; Zhu, Jian; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhang, Zhengbiao; Zhu, Xiulin

    2011-05-01

    Polished 316 L stainless steel (SS) was first treated with air plasma to enhance surface hydrophilicity and was subsequently allowed to react with 2-(4-chlorosulfonylphenyl)ethyltrimethoxysilane to introduce an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator. Accordingly, the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of polyethylene glycol methacrylate (PEGMA) was carried out on the surface of the modified SS. The grafting progress was monitored by water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The polymer thickness as a function different polymerization times was characterized using a step profiler. The anticoagulative properties of the PEGMA modified SS surface were investigated. The results showed enhanced anticoagulative to acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD) blood after grafting PEGMA on the SS surface. PMID:21528878

  7. Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee; Natesan, Krishnamurti; Rink, David L.

    2010-03-16

    An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

  8. Three-Dimensional Surface Parameters and Multi-Fractal Spectrum of Corroded Steel

    PubMed Central

    Shanhua, Xu; Songbo, Ren; Youde, Wang

    2015-01-01

    To study multi-fractal behavior of corroded steel surface, a range of fractal surfaces of corroded surfaces of Q235 steel were constructed by using the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot method under a high total accuracy. The multi-fractal spectrum of fractal surface of corroded steel was calculated to study the multi-fractal characteristics of the W-M corroded surface. Based on the shape feature of the multi-fractal spectrum of corroded steel surface, the least squares method was applied to the quadratic fitting of the multi-fractal spectrum of corroded surface. The fitting function was quantitatively analyzed to simplify the calculation of multi-fractal characteristics of corroded surface. The results showed that the multi-fractal spectrum of corroded surface was fitted well with the method using quadratic curve fitting, and the evolution rules and trends were forecasted accurately. The findings can be applied to research on the mechanisms of corroded surface formation of steel and provide a new approach for the establishment of corrosion damage constitutive models of steel. PMID:26121468

  9. Three-Dimensional Surface Parameters and Multi-Fractal Spectrum of Corroded Steel.

    PubMed

    Shanhua, Xu; Songbo, Ren; Youde, Wang

    2015-01-01

    To study multi-fractal behavior of corroded steel surface, a range of fractal surfaces of corroded surfaces of Q235 steel were constructed by using the Weierstrass-Mandelbrot method under a high total accuracy. The multi-fractal spectrum of fractal surface of corroded steel was calculated to study the multi-fractal characteristics of the W-M corroded surface. Based on the shape feature of the multi-fractal spectrum of corroded steel surface, the least squares method was applied to the quadratic fitting of the multi-fractal spectrum of corroded surface. The fitting function was quantitatively analyzed to simplify the calculation of multi-fractal characteristics of corroded surface. The results showed that the multi-fractal spectrum of corroded surface was fitted well with the method using quadratic curve fitting, and the evolution rules and trends were forecasted accurately. The findings can be applied to research on the mechanisms of corroded surface formation of steel and provide a new approach for the establishment of corrosion damage constitutive models of steel.

  10. Superhydrophobic surfaces fabricated by microstructuring of stainless steel using a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo; Zhou, Ming; Li, Jian; Ye, Xia; Li, Gang; Cai, Lan

    2009-10-01

    Fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces induced by femtosecond laser is a research hotspot of superhydrophobic surface studies nowadays. We present a simple and easily-controlled method for fabricating stainless steel-based superhydrophobic surfaces. The method consists of microstructuring stainless steel surfaces by irradiating samples with femtosecond laser pulses and silanizing the surfaces. By low laser fluence, we fabricated typical laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on the submicron level. The apparent contact angle (CA) on the surface is 150.3°. With laser fluence increasing, we fabricated periodic ripples and periodic cone-shaped spikes on the micron scale, both covered with LIPSS. The stainless steel-based surfaces with micro- and submicron double-scale structure have higher apparent CAs. On the surface of double-scale structure, the maximal apparent CA is 166.3° and at the same time, the sliding angle (SA) is 4.2°.

  11. Adhesion of a fluorinated poly(amic acid) with stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Youngsuk; Song, Sunjin; Kim, Sangmo; Yang, Yooseong; Chae, Jungha; Park, Tai-Gyoo; Dong Cho, Myung

    2013-01-01

    The authors elucidate an origin and probable mechanism of adhesion strength change at an interface of fluorinated poly(amic acid) and stainless steel. Fluorination provides favorable delamination with release strength weaker than 0.08 N/mm from a metal surface, once the amount of residual solvent becomes less than 35 wt. %. However, the release strength critically depends on film drying temperature. Characterization on stainless steel surfaces and thermodynamic analyses on wet films reveal a drying temperature of 80 °C fosters interaction between the metal oxides at stainless steel surface and the free electron donating groups in poly(amic acid).

  12. Corrosion behavior of EUROFER steel in flowing eutectic Pb?17Li alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konys, J.; Krauss, W.; Voss, Z.; Wedemeyer, O.

    2004-08-01

    Reduced-activation-ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels are considered for application in fusion technology as structural materials. The alloy EUROFER 97 was developed on the basis of the experience gained with steels of the OPTIFER, MANET and F82H-mod. type. These alloys will be in contact with the liquid breeder Pb-17Li and their corrosion behavior is of significance for their successful application. Corrosion tests of EUROFER 97 in flowing Pb-17Li at 480 °C were performed up to about 12 000 h to evaluate the kinetics of the dissolution attack. The exposed samples were analysed by metallography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with EDX. The results show that EUROFER 97 is attacked by flowing liquid Pb-17Li with a flow velocity of about 0.3 m/s similar to the earlier examined steels and that the typical steel elements are dissolved. The observed attack is of uniform type with values of about 90 μm/year. The corrosion rate is a somewhat smaller for EUROFER compared to the other RAFM steels but with equal activation energy.

  13. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1997-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved.

  14. Ferritic steels for sodium-cooled fast reactors: Design principles and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2010-09-01

    An overview of the current status of development of ferritic steels for emerging fast reactor technologies is presented in this paper. The creep-resistant 9-12Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are classically known for steam generator applications. The excellent void swelling resistance of ferritic steels enabled the identification of their potential for core component applications of fast reactors. Since then, an extensive knowledge base has been generated by identifying the empirical correlations between chemistry of the steels, heat treatment, structure, and properties, in addition to their in-reactor behavior. A few concerns have also been identified which pertain to high-temperature irradiation creep, embrittlement, Type IV cracking in creep-loaded weldments, and hard zone formation in dissimilar joints. The origin of these problems and the methodologies to overcome the limitations are highlighted. Finally, the suitability of the ferritic steels is re-evaluated in the emerging scenario of the fast reactor technology, with a target of achieving better breeding ratio and improved thermal efficiency.

  15. Peculiarities of helium porosity formation in the surface layer of the structural materials used for the first wall of fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, I. I.; Stal'tsov, M. S.; Kalin, B. A.; Bogachev, I. A.; Guseva, L. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is used to study the formation of helium porosity in the nearsurface layer of ferritic-martensitic steels and vanadium irradiated by 40-keV He+ ions at a temperature of 923 K up to fluence of 5 × 1020 He+/m2 and, then, by 7.5-MeV Ni2+ ions at 923 K up to dose of 100 dpa. Large gas bubbles are found to form in the zone with the maximum concentration of radiation vacancies during He+ ion irradiation. Moreover, small bubbles form in some grains at the depths that are larger than the He+ ion range in the irradiated material. Sequential irradiation by He+ and Ni2+ ions leads to the nucleation of helium bubbles at still larger depths due to helium atom transport via recoil and/or ion mixing. The precipitation hardening of the steels by Y2O3 oxide nanoparticles is found to suppress helium swelling substantially.

  16. Finite element simulation for damage detection of surface rust in steel rebars using elastic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qixiang; Yu, Tzuyang

    2016-04-01

    Steel rebar corrosion reduces the integrity and service life of reinforced concrete (RC) structures and causes their gradual and sudden failures. Early stage detection of steel rebar corrosion can improve the efficiency of routine maintenance and prevent sudden failures from happening. In this paper, detecting the presence of surface rust in steel rebars is investigated by the finite element method (FEM) using surface-generated elastic waves. Simulated wave propagation mimics the sensing scheme of a fiber optic acoustic generator mounted on the surface of steel rebars. Formation of surface rust in steel rebars is modeled by changing material's property at local elements. In this paper, various locations of a fiber optic acoustic transducer and a receiver were considered. Megahertz elastic waves were used and different sizes of surface rust were applied. Transient responses of surface displacement and pressure were studied. It is found that surface rust is most detectable when the rust location is between the transducer and the receiver. Displacement response of intact steel rebar is needed in order to obtain background-subtracted response with a better signal-to-noise ratio. When the size of surface rust increases, reduced amplitude in displacement was obtained by the receiver.

  17. Effects of surface condition on the stress corrosion cracking of line pipe steel

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Christman, T.K.; Parkins, R.N.

    1988-04-01

    The relationship between surface properties of line pipe steels and external stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is reviewed. Surface factors discussed include mill scale, surface pitting, decarburization, surface residual stresses, and near-surface stress state. Recent research results have demonstrated that the susceptibility of a line pipe steel to SCC initiation is dependent on complicated interaction among these properties. However, these studies also show that relatively simple surface preparation procedures such as grit blasting can be effective in reducing the susceptibility of pipelines to crack initiation.

  18. The influence of cell surface properties of thermophilic streptococci on attachment to stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Flint, S H; Brooks, J D; Bremer, P J

    1997-10-01

    The quality of milk products is threatened by the formation of biofilms of thermophilic streptococci on the internal surfaces of plate heat exchangers used in milk processing. Although attachment to stainless steel surfaces is one of the first stages in the development of a biofilm, the mechanisms involved in attachment have not been reported. The cell surface properties of 12 strains of thermophilic streptococci were examined to determine their importance in attachment to stainless steel surfaces. Hydrophobicity, extracellular polysaccharide production and cell surface charge varied between the different strains but could not be related to numbers attaching. Treating the cells with sodium metaperiodate, lysozyme or trichloroacetic acid to disrupt cell surface polysaccharide had no effect on attachment. Treatment with trypsin or sodium dodecyl sulphate to remove cell surface proteins resulted in a 100-fold reduction in the number of bacteria attaching. This result suggests that the surface proteins of the thermophilic streptococci are important in their attachment to stainless steel. PMID:9351231

  19. Increasing corrosion resistance of carbon steels by surface laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsky, V. I.; Yakushin, V. L.; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Petrovsky, V. N.; Safonov, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents results of investigation of the microstructure, elemental composition and corrosion resistance of the samples of low-alloy steel widely used in the engineering, after the application of laser cladding. The level of corrosion damage and the corrosion mechanism of cladded steel samples were established. The corrosion rate and installed discharge observed at the total destruction of cladding were obtained. The regularities of structure formation in the application of different powder compositions were obtained. The optimal powder composition that prevents corrosion of samples of low-carbon low-alloy steel was established.

  20. Extremely durable biofouling-resistant metallic surfaces based on electrodeposited nanoporous tungstite films on steel

    PubMed Central

    Tesler, Alexander B.; Kim, Philseok; Kolle, Stefan; Howell, Caitlin; Ahanotu, Onye; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Formation of unwanted deposits on steels during their interaction with liquids is an inherent problem that often leads to corrosion, biofouling and results in reduction in durability and function. Here we report a new route to form anti-fouling steel surfaces by electrodeposition of nanoporous tungsten oxide (TO) films. TO-modified steels are as mechanically durable as bare steel and highly tolerant to compressive and tensile stresses due to chemical bonding to the substrate and island-like morphology. When inherently superhydrophilic TO coatings are converted to superhydrophobic, they remain non-wetting even after impingement with yttria-stabilized-zirconia particles, or exposure to ultraviolet light and extreme temperatures. Upon lubrication, these surfaces display omniphobicity against highly contaminating media retaining hitherto unseen mechanical durability. To illustrate the applicability of such a durable coating in biofouling conditions, we modified naval construction steels and surgical instruments and demonstrated significantly reduced marine algal film adhesion, Escherichia coli attachment and blood staining. PMID:26482559

  1. Extremely durable biofouling-resistant metallic surfaces based on electrodeposited nanoporous tungstite films on steel.

    PubMed

    Tesler, Alexander B; Kim, Philseok; Kolle, Stefan; Howell, Caitlin; Ahanotu, Onye; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2015-10-20

    Formation of unwanted deposits on steels during their interaction with liquids is an inherent problem that often leads to corrosion, biofouling and results in reduction in durability and function. Here we report a new route to form anti-fouling steel surfaces by electrodeposition of nanoporous tungsten oxide (TO) films. TO-modified steels are as mechanically durable as bare steel and highly tolerant to compressive and tensile stresses due to chemical bonding to the substrate and island-like morphology. When inherently superhydrophilic TO coatings are converted to superhydrophobic, they remain non-wetting even after impingement with yttria-stabilized-zirconia particles, or exposure to ultraviolet light and extreme temperatures. Upon lubrication, these surfaces display omniphobicity against highly contaminating media retaining hitherto unseen mechanical durability. To illustrate the applicability of such a durable coating in biofouling conditions, we modified naval construction steels and surgical instruments and demonstrated significantly reduced marine algal film adhesion, Escherichia coli attachment and blood staining.

  2. Dynamics of cathode spots in low-pressure arc plasma removing oxide layer on steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Z. L.; Yang, K.; Liu, H. X.; Zhang, Y. C.; Li, H.; Zhu, X. D.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of cathode spots has been investigated in low-pressure arc plasma for removing oxide layer on low carbon steel surfaces. The motion of cathode spots was observed with a high speed camera, and the arc voltage was analyzed by fast Fourier transform. The spots move on clean steel surface as a random walk, and the low-frequency components dominated the voltage waveform. However, the spots on steel surfaces with oxide layer tend to burn on the rim of the eroded area formed in the previous arcing, and the low-frequency components decrease correspondingly. The "color" of the colored random noise for arc voltage varies from the approximate brown noise for clean steel surface to pink noise for thick oxide layer, where the edge effect of boundary is considered to play a significant role.

  3. Effect of Surface Roughness on Contact Angle Measurement of Nanofluid on Surface of Stainless Steel 304 by Sessile Drop Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajitno, D. H.; Maulana, A.; Syarif, D. G.

    2016-08-01

    Contact angles play an important role in the mass and heat transfer. Stainless steel 304 has been used for nuclear power plan structure material until now. An experiment to measure contact angle of demineralized aqua and nanofluid containing nano particle of zirconia on metal surface of stainless steel 304 with sessile drop method was conducted. The measurement to measure the static contact angle and drop of nano fluid containing nano particle zirconia on stainless steel with different surface roughness was carried out. It was observed that stainless steel 304 was good hydrophylic properties with decreasing surface roughness of stainless steel during drop of aqua demineralized and nano fluid respectively. As a result the contact angle of demineralized aqua is decreased from 97.39 to 78.42 and contact angle of nano fluid from 94.3 to 67.50, respectively with decreasing surface roughness of stainless stee 304. Wettability of nanofluid on surface stainless steel 304 is better than aqua demineralized.

  4. High temperature tensile deformation behavior of Grade 92 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan; Shrestha, Triratna; Charit, Indrajit

    2014-10-01

    Candidate structural materials for advanced reactors need to have superior high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties among other characteristics. The ferritic-martensitic Grade 92 steel (Fe-9Cr-2W-0.5Mo, wt.%) is considered such a candidate structural material. Tensile tests were performed at temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 °C in the strain rate range of 10-5-10-3 s-1. After analyzing the tensile results using the Bird-Mukherjee-Dorn (BMD) equation, a stress exponent of about 9.5 and an activation energy of about 646 kJ/mol were obtained. In the light of high values of the stress exponent and activation energy, the threshold stress concept was used to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. As a result of this modification, the true activation energy and stress exponent of the high temperature deformation in Grade 92 steel were found to be about 245 kJ/mol and 5, respectively. Thus, the dominant high temperature deformation mechanism was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed.

  5. Mössbauer study on the deformed surface of high-manganese steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasu, S.; Tanimoto, H.; Fujita, F. E.

    1990-07-01

    Conversion electron, X-ray backscattering and conventional transmission57Fe Mössbauer measurements have been performed to investigate the origin of the remarkable work hardening at the surface of a high-manganese steel which is called Hadfield steel. Mössbauer results show that α' martensite has no relation to work hardening. From the comparison of conversion electron to X-ray backscattering spectra, the occurrence of decarbonization is suggested at the surface. The transmission Mössbauer spectrum at 20 K for deformed specimen shows the existence of ɛ martensite which could be related to the work hardening of Hadfield steel.

  6. A Hybrid Laser Surface Treatment for Refurbishment of Stress Corrosion Cracking Damaged 304L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Sundar, R.; Kumar, B. Sunil; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Ranganathan, K.; Bindra, K. S.; Kain, V.; Oak, S. M.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2015-06-01

    The paper describes a new hybrid laser surface treatment approach, combining laser surface melting and laser shock peening treatments, for refurbishment stress corrosion cracking damaged type 304L stainless steel specimens. Hybrid laser surface treatment produced crack-free compressively stressed surface. With respect to as-machined specimens, laser-rejuvenated specimens demonstrated significantly reduced susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking in chloride environment with minor increase in mean surface roughness. The results of the study, although particularly applicable to shallow stress corrosion cracking damage, are important for life extension of in-service stainless steel components operating in corrosive chloride environment.

  7. The Irradiation Performance and Microstructural Evolution in 9Cr-2W Steel Under Ion Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan; Charit, Indrajit; Pasebani, Somayeh

    2016-02-01

    Grade 92 steel (9Cr-2W) is a ferritic-martensitic steel with good mechanical and thermal properties. It is being considered for structural applications in Generation IV reactors. Still, the irradiation performance of this alloy needs more investigation as a result of the limited available data. The irradiation performance investigation of Grade 92 steel would contribute to the understanding of engineering aspects including feasibility of application, economy, and maintenance. In this study, Grade 92 steel was irradiated by iron ion beam to 10, 50, and 100 dpa at 30 and 500 °C. In general, the samples exhibited good radiation damage resistance at these testing parameters. The radiation-induced hardening was higher at 30 °C with higher dislocation density; however, the dislocation density was less pronounced at higher temperature. Moreover, the irradiated samples at 30 °C had defect clusters and their density increased at higher doses. On the other hand, dislocation loops were found in the irradiated sample at 50 dpa and 500 °C. Further, the irradiated samples did not show any bubble or void.

  8. Friction stir welding of F82H steel for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Ando, Masami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Kimura, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, friction stir welding was employed to join F82H steels and develop a potential joining technique for a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. The microstructures and mechanical properties on the joint region were investigated to evaluate the applicability of friction stir welding. F82H steel sheets were successfully butt-joined with various welding parameters. In welding conditions, 100 rpm and 100 mm/min, the stirred zone represented a comparable hardness distribution with a base metal. Stirred zone induced by 100 rpm reserved uniformly distributed precipitates and very fine ferritic grains, whereas the base metal showed a typical tempered martensite with precipitates on the prior austenite grain boundary and lath boundary. Although the tensile strength was decreased at 550 °C, the stirred zone treated at 100 rpm showed comparable tensile behavior with base metal up to 500 °C. Therefore, friction stir welding is considered a potential welding method to preserve the precipitates of F82H steel.

  9. Effects of tantalum content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of low-carbon RAFM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianguo; Liu, Chenxi; Liu, Yongchang; Yan, Biyu; Li, Huijun

    2016-10-01

    In order to explore the influence of tantalum content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of low carbon RAFM (reduced activation ferritic/martensitic) steels, three low carbon RAFM steels with different tantalum contents (0%, 0.027%, 0.073%) were designed. The precipitation behavior and effect of precipitates on the mechanical properties of the Low-C RAFM steel were investigated. The results indicate that increase of tantalum content causes decrease of the prior austenite grain size and the amount of M23C6 carbides precipitated along prior austenite grain boundaries and packet boundaries as well as increase of the amount of MX nano-sized particles within intragranular regions. The impact properties of low carbon RAFM steels are excellent regardless of the tantalum content. The impact properties and hardness are obviously improved by increasing tantalum content, which may be related to increase of the number of MX and decrease of M23C6. Furthermore, the tensile properties at elevated temperature below 600 °C are hardly changed with increase of tantalum content, yet those at 800 °C are improved with increasing tantalum content. This implies that MX carbides would be more important for tensile properties at higher temperature.

  10. Thermal annealing recovery of fracture toughness in HT9 steel after irradation to high doses

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Anderoglu, Osman; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2013-08-03

    The HT9 ferritic/martensitic steel with a nominal chemistry of Fe(bal.)–12%Cr–1%MoVW has been used as a primary core material for fast fission reactors such as FFTF because of its high resistance to radiationinduced swelling and embrittlement. Both static and dynamic fracture test results have shown that the HT9 steel can become brittle when it is exposed to high dose irradiation at a relatively low temperature 430 °C). This article aims at a comprehensive discussion on the thermal annealing recovery of fracture toughness in the HT9 steel after irradiation up to 3–148 dpa at 378–504 °C. A specimen reuse technique has been established and applied to this study: the fracture specimens were tested Charpy specimens or broken halves of Charpy bars (13 3 4 mm). The post-anneal fracture test results indicated that much of the radiation-induced damage can be recovered by a simple thermal annealing schedule: the fracture toughness was incompletely recovered by 550 °C annealing, while nearly complete or complete recovery occurred after 650 °C annealing. This indicates that thermal annealing is a feasible damage mitigation technique for the reactor components made of HT9 steel. The partial recovery is probably due to the non-removable microstructural damages such as void or gas bubble formation, elemental segregation and precipitation.

  11. Ozone decay on stainless steel and sugarcane bagasse surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza-Corrêa, Jorge A.; Oliveira, Carlos; Amorim, Jayr

    2013-07-01

    Ozone was generated using dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure to treat sugarcane bagasse for bioethanol production. It was shown that interaction of ozone molecules with the pretreatment reactor wall (stainless steel) needs to be considered during bagasse oxidation in order to evaluate the pretreatment efficiency. The decomposition coefficients for ozone on both materials were determined to be (3.3 ± 0.2) × 10-8 for stainless steel and (2.0 ± 0.3) × 10-7 for bagasse. The results have indicated that ozone decomposition has occurred more efficiently on the biomass material.

  12. Surface modification of titanium using steel slag ball and shot blasting treatment for biomedical implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifvianto, Budi; Suyitno; Mahardika, Muslim

    2013-08-01

    Surface modification is often performed using grit or shot blasting treatment for improving the performances of biomedical implants. The effects of blasting treatments using steel slag balls and spherical shots on the surface and subsurface of titanium were studied in this paper. The treatments were conducted for 60-300 s using 2-5 mm steel slag balls and 3.18 mm spherical shots. The surface morphology, roughness, and elemental composition of titanium specimens were examined prior to and after the treatments. Irregular and rough titanium surfaces were formed after the treatment with the steel slag balls instead of the spherical shots. The former treatment also introduced some bioactive elements on the titanium surface, but the latter one yielded a harder surface layer. In conclusion, both steel slag ball and shot blasting treatment have their own specialization in modifying the surface of metallic biomaterials. Steel slag ball blasting is potential for improving the osseointegration quality of implants; but the shot blasting is more appropriate for improving the mechanical properties of temporary and load bearing implants, such as osteosynthesis plates.

  13. An Overview of Dual-Phase Steels: Advances in Microstructure-Oriented Processing and Micromechanically Guided Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasan, C. C.; Diehl, M.; Yan, D.; Bechtold, M.; Roters, F.; Schemmann, L.; Zheng, C.; Peranio, N.; Ponge, D.; Koyama, M.; Tsuzaki, K.; Raabe, D.

    2015-07-01

    Dual-phase (DP) steel is the flagship of advanced high-strength steels, which were the first among various candidate alloy systems to find application in weight-reduced automotive components. On the one hand, this is a metallurgical success story: Lean alloying and simple thermomechanical treatment enable use of less material to accomplish more performance while complying with demanding environmental and economic constraints. On the other hand, the enormous literature on DP steels demonstrates the immense complexity of microstructure physics in multiphase alloys: Roughly 50 years after the first reports on ferrite-martensite steels, there are still various open scientific questions. Fortunately, the last decades witnessed enormous advances in the development of enabling experimental and simulation techniques, significantly improving the understanding of DP steels. This review provides a detailed account of these improvements, focusing specifically on (a) microstructure evolution during processing, (b) experimental characterization of micromechanical behavior, and (c) the simulation of mechanical behavior, to highlight the critical unresolved issues and to guide future research efforts.

  14. Surface Changes in Mild Steel Coupons from the Action of Corrosion-Causing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Obuekwe, Christian O.; Westlake, Donald W. S.; Cook, Fred D.; William Costerton, J.

    1981-01-01

    Changes which occur on the surface of mild steel coupons submerged in cultures of an Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, isolated from corroded pipe systems carrying crude oil, were studied microscopically to investigate the interaction between the corrosion-causing bacterium and the corroding mild steel coupon. Under micro-aerobic conditions and in the absence of the bacteria, a dense, crystalline, amorphous coat formed on the surface of the steel coupons. In the presence of bacteria the surface coat was extensively removed, exposing the bare metal to the environment. After about 2 weeks of exposure, the removal of the surface coating was followed by colonization of the metal surface by the bacteria. Colonization was mediated by fibrous, exopolysaccharidic material formed by the bacteria. Extension of studies to other bacteria isolated from crude oil and corroded pipes reveals that the formation of exopolysaccharide fibers and possession of adherent properties are common characteristics of bacteria from crude oil systems. Images PMID:16345735

  15. Oxide formation and alloying elements enrichment on TRIP steel surface during inter-critical annealing.

    PubMed

    Gong, Y F; Birosca, S; Kim, H S; De Cooman, B C

    2008-06-01

    The gas atmosphere in continuous annealing and galvanizing lines alters both composition and microstructure of the surface and sub-surface of sheet steels. The alloying element enrichments and the oxide morphology on transformation-induced plasticity steel surfaces are strongly influenced by the dew point of the furnace atmosphere and annealing temperature. The formation of a thin oxide film and enrichment of the alloying elements during annealing may result in surface defects on galvanized sheet products. The present contribution reports on the use of microanalysis techniques such as electron backscatter diffraction, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and electron probe micro-analysis for the detailed surface analysis of inter-critically annealed transformation-induced plasticity steel such as oxide phase determination, microstructure and microtexture evolutions.

  16. A real-time surface inspection system for precision steel balls based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ji; Tsai, Jhy-Cherng; Hsu, Ya-Chen

    2016-07-01

    Precision steel balls are one of the most fundament components for motion and power transmission parts and they are widely used in industrial machinery and the automotive industry. As precision balls are crucial for the quality of these products, there is an urgent need to develop a fast and robust system for inspecting defects of precision steel balls. In this paper, a real-time system for inspecting surface defects of precision steel balls is developed based on machine vision. The developed system integrates a dual-lighting system, an unfolding mechanism and inspection algorithms for real-time signal processing and defect detection. The developed system is tested under feeding speeds of 4 pcs s-1 with a detection rate of 99.94% and an error rate of 0.10%. The minimum detectable surface flaw area is 0.01 mm2, which meets the requirement for inspecting ISO grade 100 precision steel balls.

  17. A real-time surface inspection system for precision steel balls based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ji; Tsai, Jhy-Cherng; Hsu, Ya-Chen

    2016-07-01

    Precision steel balls are one of the most fundament components for motion and power transmission parts and they are widely used in industrial machinery and the automotive industry. As precision balls are crucial for the quality of these products, there is an urgent need to develop a fast and robust system for inspecting defects of precision steel balls. In this paper, a real-time system for inspecting surface defects of precision steel balls is developed based on machine vision. The developed system integrates a dual-lighting system, an unfolding mechanism and inspection algorithms for real-time signal processing and defect detection. The developed system is tested under feeding speeds of 4 pcs s‑1 with a detection rate of 99.94% and an error rate of 0.10%. The minimum detectable surface flaw area is 0.01 mm2, which meets the requirement for inspecting ISO grade 100 precision steel balls.

  18. Non-vacuum electron-beam carburizing and surface hardening of mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bataev, I. A.; Golkovskii, M. G.; Losinskaya, A. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Popelyukh, A. I.; Hassel, T.; Golovin, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we study the structure, microhardness, and tribological properties of surface layers of mild (0.19% C) steel, which was formed by electron-beam cladding with an iron-graphite powder mixture followed by quenching and tempering. A 1.4 MeV electron beam that was extracted into air was used. Cladding of steel with the iron-graphite mixture at a beam current of 24 and 26 mA formed a hypoeutectic cast iron layer (2.19% C) and a hypereutectoid steel (1.57% C) layer, which were 2.0 and 2.6 mm thick, respectively. The microhardness of the surface-quenched and tempered steel and cast iron layers was 7 and 8 GPa, respectively. Electron-beam quenching of the surface layers of hypoeutectic cast iron was accompanied with multiple cracking. During the quenching of the 1.57% C steel layer, crack formation was not observed. In friction tests against fixed and loose abrasive particles, the surface layers of hypereutectoid steel and hypoeutectic cast iron that were produced by electron-beam cladding and quenching had lower wear rates than mild steel after pack carburizing, quenching, and tempering. In the sliding wear tests, the cast iron clad layer, which was subjected to electron-beam quenching and tempering, exhibited the highest wear resistance. Electron-beam treatment can be used to harden local areas of large workpieces. It is reasonable to treat clad layers of high-carbon steel with electron-beam quenching and tempering. To prevent multiple cracking, white cast iron layers should not be quenched.

  19. Hardness of Carburized Surfaces in 316LN Stainless Steel after Low Temperature Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, TS

    2005-01-31

    A proprietary surface carburization treatment is being considered to minimize possible cavitation pitting of the inner surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the SNS. The treatment gives a large supersaturation of carbon in the surface layers and causes substantial hardening of the surface. To answer the question of whether such a hardened layer will remain hard and stable during neutron irradiation, specimens of the candidate materials were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to an atomic displacement level of 1 dpa. Considerable radiation hardening occurred in annealed 316LN stainless steel and 20% cold rolled 316LN stainless steel, and lesser radiation hardening in Kolsterised layers on these materials. These observations coupled with optical microscopy examinations indicate that the carbon-supersaturated layers did not suffer radiation-induced decomposition and softening.

  20. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System for Protection of Embedded Steel Surfaces from Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Joseph; MacDowell, Louis; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem for the Kennedy Space Center, government agencies, and the general public. Existing corrosion protection systems on the market are costly, complex, and time-consuming to install, require continuous maintenance and monitoring, and require specialized skills for installation. NASA's galvanic liquid-applied coating offers companies the ability to conveniently protect embedded steel rebar surfaces from corrosion. Liquid-applied inorganic galvanic coating contains one ore more of the following metallic particles: magnesium, zinc, or indium and may contain moisture attracting compounds that facilitate the protection process. The coating is applied to the outer surface of reinforced concrete so that electrical current is established between metallic particles and surfaces of embedded steel rebar; and electric (ionic) current is responsible for providing the necessary cathodic protection for embedded rebar surfaces.

  1. Surface hardening of steel by boriding in a cold rf plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finberg, I.; Avni, R.; Grill, A.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    Scanning electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, and microhardness measurements, are used to study the surfaces of 4340-steel samples that have been borided in a cold RF plasma which had been initiated in a gas mixture of 2.7 percent diborane in Ar. As a result of the dislocation of the diborane in the plasma, boron is deposited on the surface of the steel substrate and two crystalline phases, tetragonal Fe2B and orthorhombic FeB, are formed. The formation of boride phases then increases the surface microhardness from 2650 MPa to a maximum value of 7740 MPa.

  2. A new method for preparing bionic multi scale superhydrophobic functional surface on X70 pipeline steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sirong; Wang, Xiaolong; Wang, Wei; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Jun; Xiong, Wei

    2013-04-01

    The hydrophobic property of a rough surface with a low free energy coating was theoretically analyzed in this paper. In order to obtain a superhydrophobic surface, a rough surface morphology must be formed in addition to the low free energy coating on the surface. Through the shot blasting, chemical etching with concentrated hydrochloric acid, and low free energy modification with myristic acid ethanol solution, the superhydrophobic surface was obtained on X70 pipeline steel. The better process parameters for preparing superhydrophobic surface on X70 pipeline steel were obtained. The diameter of the stainless steel shot used in the shot blasting was 0.8-1.0 mm. The concentration of hydrochloric acid was 6 mol/L. The chemical etching time was 320 min. The concentration of myristic acid ethanol solution was 0.1 mol/L. The soaking time in myristic acid ethanol solution was 72 h. After X70 pipeline steel surface was treated using the process parameters mentioned above, the biggest contact angle between the specimen surface and distilled water was 153.5°, and the sliding angle was less than 5°.

  3. Improved Criteria for Acceptable Yield Point Elongation in Surface Critical Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David Matlock; Dr. John Speer

    2007-05-30

    Yield point elongation (YPE) is considered undesirable in surface critical applications where steel is formed since "strain lines" or Luders bands are created during forming. This project will examine in detail the formation of luders bands in industrially relevant strain states including the influence of substrate properties and coatings on Luders appearance. Mechanical testing and surface profilometry were the primary methods of investigation.

  4. Softening Behavior of Hardness and Surface Fatigue of Rolling-Sliding Contact in the Case of Developed Alloy Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redda, Daniel Tilahun; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Deng, Gang

    To get high performance, downsizing and weight saving of the power transmission systems, the improvement of machine elements has been required. In this study, case-carburized gear materials for a high load-carrying capacity were developed. Low-alloyed steels with 1%Cr-0.2%Mo, 1%Cr-0.2%Mo-1%Si and 1%Cr-0.2%Mo-2%Ni (Cr-Mo steel, Cr-Mo-Si steel and Cr-Mo-Ni steel) were melted in a hypoxia vacuum. Test rollers were made of the developed steels, and they were carburized (Type A and Type B), hardened and tempered. Heating retention tests were carried out to investigate the softening behavior of hardness at high heating temperatures in the case of the developed steels. Roller tests were conducted under the rolling-sliding contact and high-load conditions to study the surface fatigue of the developed steels. From the obtained test results, it was found that the softening behavior of surface hardness at high temperatures in the cases of Cr-Mo-Si steel (Type A) and Cr-Mo-Ni steel (Type B) is lower than that in the cases of Cr-Mo steel (Type A) and Cr-Mo steel (Type B). In the cases of Cr-Mo-Si steel (A) and Cr-Mo-Ni steel (B), micro- and small-pitting area ratios are smaller and large-pitting life is longer than those in the cases of Cr-Mo steel(A) and Cr-Mo steel(B) under the same carburizing treatment method and high-load conditions. Furthermore, the relationship between the softening behavior of surface hardness on the heating pattern and the surface fatigue on the rolling-sliding contact of the developed alloy steels was clarified.

  5. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martenstic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Lizhen; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-05-26

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ~500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimentalmore » results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. Furthermore, the strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9–20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.« less

  6. Effect of Martensite Volume Fraction on Forming Limit Diagrams of Dual-Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaeimi, Mohammad; Basti, Ali; Alitavoli, Majid

    2015-05-01

    Prediction of the onset of failure due to localized necking has an important role on the determination of the formability of sheet metal, especially dual-phase steels, because of their increasing applications in the automotive industry. In the present study, a new application of the M-K model and theoretical forming limit diagram has been proposed. It is shown that this model can be useful in predicting the effect of microstructural aspects on the formability of dual-phase steels. For this purpose, the limiting strains of the dual-phase (ferrite-martensite) steel under different martensite volume fractions have been calculated. Furthermore, the effect of the heating rate on the formability of the DP samples has been predicted. To solve the non-linear system of equations, the modified Newton-Raphson method has been used. The results show that the limiting strains decrease by increasing the amount of martensite volume fractions. Furthermore, by increasing the heating rate, the dependence of the forming limit curves on the martensite volume fraction will be decreased.

  7. COMPARISON OF SCANNING ELECTRON AND ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY OF SURFACE FINISHES ON STAINLESS STEEL THAT REDUCE BACTERIAL ATTACHMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria adhere to food products and processing surfaces that can cross-contaminate other products and work surfaces (Arnold, 1998). Using materials for food processing surfaces that are resistant to bacterial contamination could enhance food safety. Stainless steel, although sus...

  8. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Improved Surface Quality of Exposed Automotive Sheet Steels

    SciTech Connect

    John G. Speer; David K. Matlock; Noel Meyers; Young-Min Choi

    2002-10-10

    Surface quality of sheet steels is an important economic and technical issue for applications such as critical automotive surfaces. This project was therefore initiated to develop a more quantitative methodology for measuring surface imperfections, and to assess their response to forming and painting, particularly with respect to their visibility or invisibility after painting. The objectives were met, and included evaluation of a variety of imperfections present on commercial sheet surfaces or simulated using methods developed in the laboratory. The results are expected to have significant implications with respect to the methodology for assessing surface imperfections, development of quantitative criteria for surface inspection, and understanding and improving key painting process characteristics that influence the perceived quality of sheet steel surfaces.

  9. Surface Selective Oxidation of Sn-Added CMnSi TRIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Lawrence; Seo, Eun Jung; Jung, Geun Su; Suh, Dong Woo; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of the addition of Sn on the selective oxidation and the reactive wetting of CMnSi transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels was studied by means of galvanizing simulator tests. A reference TRIP steel and TRIP steels containing Sn in the range of 0.05 to 1 wt pct were intercritically annealed at 1093 K (820 °C) in an N2+ 5 pct H2 gas atmosphere with a dew point of -60 °C. The thin-film oxides formed on the surface of the Sn-added CMnSi TRIP steel were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and 3-dimensional atom probe tomography. The addition of Sn (≥0.05 wt pct) changed the morphology of the xMnO·SiO2 surface oxides from a continuous film morphology to a lens-shaped island morphology. It also suppressed the formation of the Mn-rich oxides of MnO and 2MnO·SiO2. The changes in the morphology and chemistry of the surface oxides were clearly related to the surface segregation of Sn, which appeared to result in a decrease of the oxygen permeability at the surface. The formation of lens-shaped oxides improved the wettability of the CMnSi TRIP steel surface by the molten Zn. The improved wetting effect was attributed to an increased area fraction of the surface where the oxide layer was thinner. This enabled a direct, unhindered reaction between Fe and the Al in the liquid Zn and the formation of the inhibition layer in the initial stages of the hot dipping. The addition of a small amount of Sn was also found to decrease significantly the density of Zn-coating defects on CMnSi TRIP steel.

  10. Proton irradiation creep of FM steel T91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Cheng; Was, Gary S.

    2015-04-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel T91 was subjected to irradiation with 3 MeV protons while under load at stresses of 100-200 MPa, temperatures between 400 °C and 500 °C, and dose rates between 1.4 × 10-6 dpa/s and 5 × 10-6 dpa/s to a total dose of less than 1 dpa. Creep behavior was analyzed for parametric dependencies. The temperature dependence was found to be negligible between 400 °C and 500 °C, and the dose rate dependence was observed to be linear. Creep rate was proportional to stress at low stress values and varied with stress to the power 14 above 160 MPa. The large stress exponent of the proton irradiation creep experiments under high stress suggested that dislocation glide was driving both thermal and irradiation creep. Microstructure observations of anisotropic dislocation loops also contributed to the total creep strain. After subtracting the power law creep and anisotropic dislocation loop contributions, the remaining creep strain was accounted for by dislocation climb enabled by stress induced preferential absorption (SIPA) and preferential dislocation glide (PAG).

  11. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CREEP-RESISTANT FERRITIC STEEL WELDMENTS THROUGH THERMO-MECHANICAL TREATMENT AND ALLOY DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Prof. Sudarsanam Suresh; Shassere, Benjamin; Yu, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    Two different approaches have been proposed for improvement of cross-weld creep properties of the high temperature ferrous structural materials for fossil-fired energy applications. The traditional creep strength-enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steel weldments suffer from Type IV failures which occur at the fine-grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ). In order to minimize the premature failure at FGHAZ in the existing CSEF steels, such as modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steels (Grade 91), a thermo-mechanical treatment consisting of aus-forging/rolling and subsequent aus-aging is proposed which promotes the formation of stable MX carbonitrides prior to martensitic transformation. Such MX remains undissolved during welding process, even in FGHAZ, which successfully improves the cross-weld creep properties. Another approach is to develop a new fully ferrtic, creep-resistant FeCrAl alloy which is essentially free from Type IV failure issues. Fe-30Cr-3Al base alloys with minor alloying additions were developed which achieved a combination of good oxidation/corrosion resistance and improved tensile and creep performance comparable or superior to Grade 92 steel.

  12. Insoluble surface carbon on steel sheet annealed in hydrogen-nitrogen atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biber, H. E.; Takacs, R. C.; Dickey, A. E.

    1983-09-01

    The way in which heating in hydrogen-nitrogen atmosphere affects the pyrolysis of the residual lubricant on cold-reduced steel sheet was studied to discover the factors responsible for the formation of carbonaceous films on the steel surface. These films, referred to as insoluble surface carbon, cannot be removed with the usual solvents or water-base cleaners and adversely affect the paintability of the steel. A surprising result was the observation that the full-hard steel surface has a significant amount of insoluble surface carbon; amounts in excess of 0.010 gm/m2 (1 mg/ft2) were observed. The origin of this “initial” insoluble carbon can be traced to the pickling operation after hot rolling. During annealing much of the residual rolling lubricant on the surface is driven off by evaporation, but concurrently insoluble pyrolysis products are formed. The amount of insoluble pyrolysis product formed is directly related to the amount of “initial” insoluble carbon on the surface before annealing. The results show that at some point during annealing the total amount of insoluble carbon on the surface is more than double the amount of “initial” insoluble carbon. These insoluble pyrolysis products can also be driven from the surface at higher temperatures than are required for evaporation of the oil. The results suggest that removal of the “initial” insoluble carbon prior to cold reduction might be very beneficial with respect to decreasing the amount of insoluble carbon on the surface of steel sheet after annealing.

  13. Mathematical model for strip surface roughness of stainless steel in cold rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinshan; Li, Changsheng; Zhu, Tao; Han, Wenlong; Cao, Yong

    2013-05-01

    Surface roughness control is one of the most important subjects during producing stainless steel strips. In this paper, under the conditions of introducing to the concepts of transferring ratio and genetic factor and through the further theoretical analysis, a set of theoretical models about strip surface roughness were put forward in stainless steel cold tandem rolling. Meanwhile, the lubrication experiment in cold rolling process of SUS430 stainless steel strip was carried out in order to comprehensively study surface roughness. The effect of main factors on transferring ratio and genetic factor was analyzed quantitatively, such as reduction, initial thickness, deformation resistance, emulsion technological parameters and so on. Attenuation function equations used for describing roll surface roughness were set up, and also strip surface roughness at the entry of last mill was solved approximately. Ultimately, mathematical model on strip surface roughness for cold tandem rolling of stainless steel was built, and then it was used into the practical production. A great number of statistical results show that experimental data is in excellent agreement with the given regression equations, and exactly, the relative deviation on roughness between calculated and measured is less than 6.34%.

  14. Effect of elastic excitations on the surface structure of hadfield steel under friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolubaev, A. V.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Sizova, O. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Aleshina, E. A.; Gromov, V. E.

    2008-02-01

    The structure of the Hadfield steel (H13) surface layer forming under dry friction is examined. The deformation of the material under the friction surface is studied at a low slip velocity and a low pressure (much smaller than the yields stress of H13 steel). The phase composition and defect substructure on the friction surface are studied using scanning, optical, and diffraction electron microscopy methods. It is shown that a thin highly deformed nanocrystalline layer arises near the friction surface that transforms into a polycrystalline layer containing deformation twins and dislocations. The nanocrystalline structure and the presence of oxides in the surface layer and friction zone indicate a high temperature and high plastic strains responsible for the formation of the layer. It is suggested that the deformation of the material observed far from the surface is due to elastic wave generation at friction.

  15. Surface modifications of stainless steel to minimise contamination in mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abda, J.; Douce, D.; Jones, G.; Skeldon, P.; Thompson, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of electrochemically grown and vapour deposited coatings on the build-up of contamination on stainless steel surfaces in the electrospray ionisation source of a mass spectrometer is investigated, together with their influence on the robustness of the instrument response. Quantification of the contamination build-up on flat samples, using white light interferometry, allowed the identification of the most beneficial treatments. Coating with electrochemically-grown anodic oxide and cathodic oxide films and amorphous carbon films doped with silicon or nitrogen resulted in reduced contamination compared with the uncoated stainless steel surface, and provided improved robustness of the instrument response.

  16. Surface Relief and Internal Structure in Fatigued Stainless Sanicro 25 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polák, Jaroslav; Mazánová, Veronika; Kuběna, Ivo; Heczko, Milan; Man, Jiří

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution images of persistent slip markings developed on the surface of Sanicro 25 stainless steel during cyclic loading obtained from the FIB-produced surface lamella in TEM simultaneously with the underlying dislocation structure are reported. Extrusions, intrusions, incipient cracks, and the dislocation arrangement corresponding to the bands of intensive cyclic slip are documented and discussed in relation to the models of surface relief formation in cyclic loading.

  17. Study of microstructure of surface layers of low-carbon steel after turning and ultrasonic finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevskaya, Zh. G.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Perevalova, O. B.; Klimenov, V. A.; Uvarkin, P. V.

    2013-01-01

    Profilometry and optical and transmission electron microscopy are used to examine the microstructure of surface layers of a low-carbon ferrite-pearlite steel subjected to turning and ultrasonic finishing. It is shown that turning peaks and valleys have different microstructures, which stipulates manifestation of technological hereditary when processing surfaces of machined parts. Ultrasonic finishing causes the severe plastic deformation of the surface layer, which favors the elimination of a technological heredity that is acquired during turning.

  18. Cost-Benefit Analysis For Alternative Low-Emission Surface Preparation/ Depainting Technologies for Structural Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie

    2007-01-01

    Stennis Space Center (SSC), Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) identified particulate emissions and waste generated from the depainting process of steel structures as hazardous materials to be eliminated or reduced. A Potential Alternatives Report, Potential Alternatives Report for Validation of Alternative Low Emission Surface Preparation/Depainting Technologies for Structural Steel, provided a technical analyses of identified alternatives to the current coating removal processes, criteria used to select alternatives for further analysis, and a list of those alternatives recommended for testing. The initial coating removal alternatives list was compiled using literature searches and stakeholder recommendations. The involved project participants initially considered approximately 13 alternatives. In late 2003, core project members selected the following depainting processes to be further evaluated: (1) Plastic Blast Media-Quickstrip(R)-A. (2) Hard Abrasive-Steel-Magic(R). (3) Sponge Blasting-Sponge-Jet(R). (4) Liquid Nitrogen-NItroJet(R). (5) Mechanical Removal with Vacuum Attachment-DESCO and OCM Clean-Air (6) Laser Coating Removal Alternatives were tested in accordance with the Joint Test Protocol for Validation of Alternative Low-Emission Surface Preparation/Depainting Technologies for Structural Steel, and the Field Evaluation Test Plan for Validation of Alternative Low-Emission Surface Preparation/Depainting Technologies for Structural Steel. Results of the testing are documented in the Joint Test Report. This Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA) focuses on the three alternatives (Quickstrip(R)-A, SteelMagic (R), and Sponge-Jet(R)) that were considered viable alternatives for large area operations based on the results of the field demonstration and lab testing. This CBA was created to help participants determine if implementation of the candidate alternatives is economically justified. Each of the alternatives examined reduced Environmental

  19. High surface area stainless steel brushes as cathodes in microbial electrolysis cells.

    PubMed

    Call, Douglas F; Merrill, Matthew D; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-03-15

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are an efficient technology for generating hydrogen gas from organic matter, but alternatives to precious metals are needed for cathode catalysts. We show here that high surface area stainless steel brush cathodes produce hydrogen at rates and efficiencies similar to those achieved with platinum-catalyzed carbon cloth cathodes in single-chamber MECs. Using a stainless steel brush cathode with a specific surface area of 810 m2/m3, hydrogen was produced at a rate of 1.7 +/- 0.1 m3-H2/m3-d (current density of 188 +/- 10 A/m3) at an applied voltage of 0.6 V. The energy efficiency relative to the electrical energy input was 221 +/- 8%, and the overall energy efficiency was 78 +/- 5% based on both electrical energy and substrate utilization. These values compare well to previous results obtained using platinum on flat carbon cathodes in a similar system. Reducing the cathode surface area by 75% decreased performance from 91 +/- 3 A/m3 to 78 +/- 4 A/m3. A brush cathode with graphite instead of stainless steel and a specific surface area of 4600 m2/m3 generated substantially less current (1.7 +/- 0.0 A/m3), and a flat stainless steel cathode (25 m2/m3) produced 64 +/- 1 A/m3, demonstrating that both the stainless steel and the large surface area contributed to high current densities. Linear sweep voltammetry showed that the stainless steel brush cathodes both reduced the overpotential needed for hydrogen evolution and exhibited a decrease in overpotential over time as a result of activation. These results demonstrate for the first time that hydrogen production can be achieved at rates comparable to those with precious metal catalysts in MECs without the need for expensive cathodes. PMID:19368232

  20. Surface Nb-ALLOYING on 0.4C-13Cr Stainless Steel: Microstructure and Tribological Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shengwang; You, Kai; Liu, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Yihui; Wang, Zhenxia; Liu, Xiaoping

    2016-02-01

    0.4C-13Cr stainless steel was alloyed with niobium using double glow plasma surface alloying and tribological properties of Nb-alloyed steel such as hardness, friction and wear were measured. Effects of the alloying temperature on microstructure and the tribological behavior of the alloyed steel were investigated compared with untreated steel. Formation mechanisms of Nb-alloyed layers and increased wear resistance were also studied. The result shows that after surface Nb-alloying treatment, the 0.4C-13Cr steel exhibits a diffusion adhesion at the alloyed layer/substrate interface and improved tribological property. The friction coefficient of Nb-alloyed steel is decreased by about 0.3-0.45 and the wear rate after Nb-alloying is only 2-5% of untreated steel.

  1. Laser Surface Modification of H13 Die Steel using Different Laser Spot Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqida, S. N.; Naher, S.; Brabazon, D.

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a laser surface modification process of AISI H13 tool steel using three sizes of laser spot with an aim to achieve reduced grain size and surface roughness. A Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 slab laser was used to process AISI H13 tool steel samples. Samples of 10 mm diameter were sectioned to 100 mm length in order to process a predefined circumferential area. The parameters selected for examination were laser peak power, overlap percentage and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Metallographic study and image analysis were done to measure the grain size and the modified surface roughness was measured using two-dimensional surface profilometer. From metallographic study, the smallest grain sizes measured by laser modified surface were between 0.51 μm and 2.54 μm. The minimum surface roughness, Ra, recorded was 3.0 μm. This surface roughness of the modified die steel is similar to the surface quality of cast products. The grain size correlation with hardness followed the findings correlate with Hall-Petch relationship. The potential found for increase in surface hardness represents an important method to sustain tooling life.

  2. Nanoscale evaluation of laser-based surface treated 12Ni maraging steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grum, J.; Slabe, J. M.

    2005-07-01

    Maraging steels are used in several high-tech areas. Among them are highly thermo-mechanically loaded vital parts of die casting dies for pressure die casting of aluminium and magnesium alloys. From the economic point of view, the operation life of dies is extremely important to the price of the castings. Operational life can be successfully extended by a regular maintenance of die parts. Laser surfacing is a very promising process for rebuilding of worn out surfaces of vital die parts. In this research, the state in the maraging steel 1.2799 (DIN) after the application of laser surfacing process has been analysed using scanning electron microscope. The analysis revealed diverse microstructure through-depth of the laser-surfaced specimens. On the basis of the estimated size and volume fraction of the nano-precipitates in the individual microstructure zones located through-depth of the heat-affected zone, a through-depth variation of microhardness was predicted. The results are supported by Vickers microhardness tests. It was confirmed that the mechanical properties of the 1.2799 maraging steel strongly depend on the characteristic at the nano or micro level. Some of the results obtained can be also applied to laser surface heat treatment of maraging steels.

  3. Aluminide coatings on iron-chromium-molybdenum steel synthesized by pack cementation for power generation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongqing

    Aluminide coatings on ferritic/martensite Fe-9Cr-1Mo steel substrates for power generation applications were developed via a pack cementation process at both high temperatures (1050°C) and low temperatures (650 and 700°C). Thermodynamic analysis was first conducted using HSC 5.0 software to provide a guideline for the selection of a masteralloy and the amount of the activator in the pack. Equilibrium partial pressures of halide gaseous species were calculated for packs containing Cr-Al binary alloys with Al contents varying from 5wt%Al to pure Al at both 1050°C and 700°C (Except for 650°C, at which only pure Al masteralloy was used). The calculation was also made for packs containing Hf, HfO2 or HfCl4 for developing Hf-modified aluminide coatings. At 1050°C, both simple and Hf-modified aluminide coatings were synthesized using a Cr-25wt.%Al binary masteralloy with a noncontact pack arrangement. Oxidation testing in air + 10vol.% H2O at 700°C indicates that simple pack aluminide coatings exhibited similar oxidation behavior to the model coatings fabricated via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). For up to 4,600h, Hf-modified aluminide coatings showed an improved oxidation resistance to CVD coatings. Low temperature aluminide coatings were synthesized at temperatures of 650 and 700°C, below the tempering temperature of the ferritic/martensite steel substrate. Initial coating development showed that a continuous Fe 2Al5 coating layer was deposited at 650°C with pure Al masteralloy. However, the coating thickness was not uniform and cracks were observed in the coatings. Cr-25wt%Al and Cr-15wt.%Al binary alloys with reduced Al activities were used to reduce the tendency of forming the brittle, Al-rich Fe2Al5 phase. With Cr-25wt.%Al masteralloy at 700°C, the synthesized coating consisted of a thin layer of Fe2Al 5 and an underlying layer of FeAl. The masteralloy of Cr-15wt.%Al was then utilized to further reduce the Al activity, and FeAl coatings with improved

  4. Biocompatible carbohydrate-functionalized stainless steel surfaces: a new method for passivating biomedical implants.

    PubMed

    Slaney, Anne M; Wright, Vincent A; Meloncelli, Peter J; Harris, Kenneth D; West, Lori J; Lowary, Todd L; Buriak, Jillian M

    2011-05-01

    A convenient method for passivating and functionalizing stainless steel is described. Several methods of coating stainless steel (SS) samples with silica were investigated and of these methods, a thin (less than 15 nm thick) layer of silica created by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was found to give superior performance in electrochemical testing. These interfaces were then used as a platform for further functionalization with molecules of biological interest. Specifically, the SS samples were functionalized with biologically significant carbohydrates [N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) and D-galactose (Gal)] that contain trialkoxysilane derivatives as chemical handles for linking to the surface. The presence and biological availability of these moieties on the silica coated SS were confirmed by XPS analysis and an enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) using complementary lectins that specifically recognize the surface-bound carbohydrate. This method has the potential of being adapted to the functionalization of stainless steel biomedical implants with other biologically relevant carbohydrates.

  5. Uncertainty studies of topographical measurements on steel surface corrosion by 3D scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kang, K W; Pereda, M D; Canafoglia, M E; Bilmes, P; Llorente, C; Bonetto, R

    2012-02-01

    Pitting corrosion is a damage mechanism quite serious and dangerous in both carbon steel boiler tubes for power plants which are vital to most industries and stainless steels for orthopedic human implants whose demand, due to the increase of life expectation and rate of traffic accidents, has sharply increased. Reliable methods to characterize this kind of damage are becoming increasingly necessary, when trying to evaluate the advance of damage and to establish the best procedures for component inspection in order to determine remaining lives and failure mitigation. A study about the uncertainties on the topographies of corrosion pits from 3D SEM images, obtained at low magnifications (where errors are greater) and different stage tilt angles were carried out using an in-house software previously developed. Additionally, measurements of pit depths on biomaterial surfaces, subjected to two different surface treatments on stainless steels, were carried out. The different depth distributions observed were in agreement with electrochemical measurements.

  6. Surface electrical properties of stainless steel fibres: An AFM-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jun; D'Haese, Cécile; Nysten, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) electrical modes were used to study the surface electrical properties of stainless steel fibres. The surface electrical conductivity was studied by current sensing AFM and I-V spectroscopy. Kelvin probe force microscopy was used to measure the surface contact potential. The oxide film, known as passivation layer, covering the fibre surface gives rise to the observation of an apparently semiconducting behaviour. The passivation layer generally exhibits a p-type semiconducting behaviour, which is attributed to the predominant formation of chromium oxide on the surface of the stainless steel fibres. At the nanoscale, different behaviours are observed from points to points, which may be attributed to local variations of the chemical composition and/or thickness of the passivation layer. I-V curves are well fitted with an electron tunnelling model, indicating that electron tunnelling may be the predominant mechanism for electron transport.

  7. Role of surface finishing on pitting corrosion of a duplex stainless steel in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah-Rousset, N. Ben; Chaouachi, M. A.; Chellouf, A.

    1996-04-01

    Localized corrosion of duplex UNS S32550 stainless steel in seawater was investigated in the laboratory and in field trials for several surface finish conditions: polished, ground, and sandblasted. Electrochemical data obtained by polarization curves showed that the smoother, polished surface had better characteristics (higher pitting and protection potentials) than the ground or sandblasted surfaces. However, despite its high degree of roughness, the sandblasted surface was the most resistant in field conditions, exhibiting the lowest number of sites attacked. Internal compressive stresses created by sandblasting seem also to have an “unsensitizing” effect on sensitized zones that exist in cast steel (due to repairs of mold defects), reducing its susceptibility to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Such stresses are not generated in polished or ground surfaces, and localized MIC attack can occur.

  8. Fabrication of biomimetic superhydrophobic steel surface under an oxygen rich environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Liang; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Yuyang; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Ruimin; Chen, Weiping; Liu, Xiaowei

    2016-09-01

    A novel and facile approach was proposed to fabricate superhydrophobic surface with similar micro- and nanostructures of lotus leaf on the steel foil. The acidic solution was used to grow Fe3O4 nanosheet films consisted of hydrochloric acid and potassium chloride under an O2 rich environment. The as-prepared superhydrophobic steel surfaces had water CA (contact angle) of 166 ± 2°. The water SA (sliding angle) was less than 2°. In order to estimate the drag reduction property of the as-prepared surface, the experimental setup of the liquid-solid friction drag was proposed. The drag reduction ratio for superhydrophobic surface was 61.3% compare with untreated surface at a flow velocity of 1.66 m s-1.

  9. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Tyburska-Puschel, Beata; Sridharan, K.

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  10. Surface characteristics of Bacillus cereus and its adhesion to stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Peng, J S; Tsai, W C; Chou, C C

    2001-04-11

    The ability of a Bacillus cereus strain, isolated from spoiled milk, to adhere to the surface of stainless steel chips was evaluated during its growth in diluted tryptic soy broth (DTSB). The number of cells that adhered to the surface increased markedly as the culture reached the end of the log phase and entered stationary phase, and continued to increase with further incubation. The surface properties of cells from the log, stationary, and late stationary phases were measured by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and electrostatic interaction chromatography (ESIC). It was found that surface hydrophobicity of B. cereus vegetative cells from the late stationary phase was the highest followed by those from the stationary phase and the log phase cultures. While the vegetative cells prepared from stationary phase and log phase cultures, respectively, had the highest and the lowest surface charges. Adhesion of B. cereus vegetative cells to stainless steel was positively correlated with the cell surface hydrophobicity (R = 0.979). Surface hydrophobicity and surface positive charge noted on the spores harvested from diluted tryptic soy agar (DTSA) and Mn2+-tryptone glucose extract agar were higher than those harvested from the sucrose or lactose-added DTSA. A wide variation in the surface charge values was noted on the surface of various spores prepared from cultures grown on the four different media tested, while their ability to adhere to stainless steel chips in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). Similarly, the number of spores or vegetative cells adhering to stainless steel suspended in PBS, milk or diluted milk (1000 x) did not differ significantly (p > 0.05).

  11. Extremely durable biofouling-resistant metallic surfaces based on electrodeposited nanoporous tungstite films on steel

    SciTech Connect

    Tesler, Alexander B.; Kim, Philseok; Kolle, Stefan; Howell, Caitlin; Ahanotu, Onye; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2015-10-20

    Formation of unwanted deposits on steels during their interaction with liquids is an inherent problem that often leads to corrosion, biofouling and results in reduction in durability and function. Here we report a new route to form anti-fouling steel surfaces by electrodeposition of nanoporous tungsten oxide (TO) films. TO-modified steels are as mechanically durable as bare steel and highly tolerant to compressive and tensile stresses due to chemical bonding to the substrate and island-like morphology. When inherently superhydrophilic TO coatings are converted to superhydrophobic, they remain non-wetting even after impingement with yttria-stabilized-zirconia particles, or exposure to ultraviolet light and extreme temperatures. Upon lubrication, these surfaces display omniphobicity against highly contaminating media retaining hitherto unseen mechanical durability. Furthermore, to illustrate the applicability of such a durable coating in biofouling conditions, we modified naval construction steels and surgical instruments and demonstrated significantly reduced marine algal film adhesion, Escherichia coli attachment and blood staining.

  12. Extremely durable biofouling-resistant metallic surfaces based on electrodeposited nanoporous tungstite films on steel

    DOE PAGES

    Tesler, Alexander B.; Kim, Philseok; Kolle, Stefan; Howell, Caitlin; Ahanotu, Onye; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2015-10-20

    Formation of unwanted deposits on steels during their interaction with liquids is an inherent problem that often leads to corrosion, biofouling and results in reduction in durability and function. Here we report a new route to form anti-fouling steel surfaces by electrodeposition of nanoporous tungsten oxide (TO) films. TO-modified steels are as mechanically durable as bare steel and highly tolerant to compressive and tensile stresses due to chemical bonding to the substrate and island-like morphology. When inherently superhydrophilic TO coatings are converted to superhydrophobic, they remain non-wetting even after impingement with yttria-stabilized-zirconia particles, or exposure to ultraviolet light and extrememore » temperatures. Upon lubrication, these surfaces display omniphobicity against highly contaminating media retaining hitherto unseen mechanical durability. Furthermore, to illustrate the applicability of such a durable coating in biofouling conditions, we modified naval construction steels and surgical instruments and demonstrated significantly reduced marine algal film adhesion, Escherichia coli attachment and blood staining.« less

  13. Microconstituents of the Modified Surface Layer of Austenitic Steel With Nanofibres of Aluminium Oxyhydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, M. A.; Zernin, E. A.; Danilov, V. I.; Zhuravkov, S. P.; Dementyev, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    In the paper the authors provide the results of experimental study of the effect caused by introduction of nanostructured fibres of aluminium oxyhydroxide into the surface layer of austenitic steel upon its microconstituents. The authors show that, due to introduction of given fibres dendrite size is reduced and equilibrium structure is formed.

  14. Nanoindentation of the surface layer of Hadfield's steel after sliding friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolubaev, A. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Sizova, O. V.

    2007-12-01

    We have measured the nanohardness of a deformed near-surface layer of Hadfield’s steel upon friction testing. The phenomenon of shape recovery upon indentation has been observed, which is retained for several days after tribological tests. It s suggested that the strained material exhibits behavior analogous to nonlinear elasticity.

  15. Grafting of ionic liquids on stainless steel surface for antibacterial application.

    PubMed

    Pang, Li Qing; Zhong, Li Juan; Zhou, Hui Fang; Wu, Xue E; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2015-02-01

    Stainless steel (SS) is favored for many uses due to its excellent chemical resistance, thermal stability and mechanical properties. Biofilms can be formed on stainless steel and may lead to serious hygiene problems and economic losses in many areas, e.g. food processing, public infrastructure and healthcare. For the first time, our work endeavored to make SS having antibacterial properties, ionic liquids (ILs) were grafted on SS surface via silane treatment followed by thiol-ene click reaction. The chemical structure and composition of the ILs grafted stainless-steel coupon surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The antibacterial activity has been investigated, and the results showed that the ILs grafted SS surface exhibited significant antibacterial effects against Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Additionally, the results obtained here indicated that the ILs used here having bromide anion showed much better antibacterial activity against E. coli than the corresponding ILs with tetrafluoroborate and hexafluorophosphate as anions. These results obtained here can help to design novel and more efficient stainless steel having antibacterial surface.

  16. Compatibility of martensitic/austenitic steel welds with liquid lead bismuth eutectic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, J.; Almazouzi, A.

    2009-04-01

    The high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steel T91 and the austenitic stainless steel 316L are to be used in contact with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), under high irradiation doses. Both tungsten inert gas (TIG) and electron beam (EB) T91/316L welds have been examined by means of metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX), Vickers hardness measurements and tensile testing both in inert gas and in LBE. Although the T91/316L TIG weld has very good mechanical properties when tested in air, its properties decline sharply when tested in LBE. This degradation in mechanical properties is attributed to the liquid metal embrittlement of the 309 buttering used in TIG welding of T91/316L welds. In contrast to mixed T91/316L TIG welding, the mixed T91/316L EB weld was performed without buttering. The mechanical behaviour of the T91/316L EB weld was very good in air after post weld heat treatment but deteriorated when tested in LBE.

  17. Positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy study on Fe-ion irradiated NHS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huiping; Wang, Zhiguang; Gao, Xing; Cui, Minghuan; Li, Bingsheng; Sun, Jianrong; Yao, Cunfeng; Wei, Kongfang; Shen, Tielong; Pang, Lilong; Zhu, Yabin; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Ji; Song, Peng; Zhang, Peng; Cao, Xingzhong

    2015-02-01

    In order to study the evolution of irradiation-induced vacancy-type defects at different irradiation fluences and temperatures, a new type of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel named NHS (Novel High Silicon) was irradiated by 3.25 MeV Fe-ion at room temperature and 723 K to fluences of 4.3 × 1015 and 1.7 × 1016 ions/cm2. After irradiation, vacancy-type defects were investigated with variable-energy positron beam Doppler broadening spectra. Energetic Fe-ions produced a large number of vacancy-type defects in the NHS steel, but one single main type of vacancy-type defect was observed in both unirradiated and irradiated samples. The concentration of vacancy-type defects decreased with increasing temperature. With the increase of irradiation fluence, the concentration of vacancy-type defects increased in the sample irradiated at RT, whereas for the sample irradiated at 723 K, it decreased. The enhanced recombination between vacancies and excess interstitial Fe atoms from deeper layers, and high diffusion rate of self-interstitial atoms further improved by diffusion via grain boundary and dislocations at high temperature, are thought to be the main reasons for the reversed trend of vacancy-type defects between the samples irradiated at RT and 723 K.

  18. Response of reduced activation ferritic steels to high-fluence ion-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Ando, M.; Katoh, Y.; Hirose, T.; Sakasegawa, H.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kohyama, A.; Iwai, T.

    2001-09-01

    Effects of high-fluence irradiation in fusion-relevant helium production condition on defect cluster formation and swelling of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFs), JLF-1 (Fe-9Cr-2W-V-Ta) and F82H (Fe-8Cr-2W-V-Ta), have been investigated. Dual-ion (nickel plus helium ions) irradiation using electrostatic accelerators was adopted to simulate fusion neutron environment. The irradiation has been carried out up to a damage level of 100 displacement per atom (dpa) at around 723 K, at the HIT facility in the University of Tokyo. Thin foils for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were prepared with a focused ion beam (FIB) microsampling system. The system enabled not only the broad cross-sectional TEM observation, but also the detailed study of irradiated microstructure, since unfavorable effects of ferromagnetism of a ferritic steel specimen were completely suppressed with this system by sampling a small volume in interests from the irradiated material.

  19. Low activation steels welding with PWHT and coating for ITER test blanket modules and DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, P.; Tavassoli, F.; Rieth, M.; Diegele, E.; Poitevin, Y.

    2011-02-01

    EUROFER weldability is investigated in support of the European material properties database and TBM manufacturing. Electron Beam, Hybrid, laser and narrow gap TIG processes have been carried out on the EUROFER-97 steel (thickness up to 40 mm), a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel developed in Europe. These welding processes produce similar welding results with high joint coefficients and are well adapted for minimizing residual distortions. The fusion zones are typically composed of martensite laths, with small grain sizes. In the heat-affected zones, martensite grains contain carbide precipitates. High hardness values are measured in all these zones that if not tempered would degrade toughness and creep resistance. PWHT developments have driven to a one-step PWHT (750 °C/3 h), successfully applied to joints restoring good material performances. It will produce less distortion levels than a full austenitization PWHT process, not really applicable to a complex welded structure such as the TBM. Different tungsten coatings have been successfully processed on EUROFER material. It has shown no really effect on the EUROFER base material microstructure.

  20. Effects of Strain Rates on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mechanism of DP780 Dual Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengci; Kang, Yonglin; Zhu, Guoming; Kuang, Shuang

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of DP780 dual phase steel were measured by quasi-static and high-speed tensile tests at strain rates between 0.001 and 1000 s-1 at room temperature. The deformation and fracture mechanisms were analyzed by observation of the tensile fracture and microstructure near the fracture. Dynamic factor and feret ratio quantitative methods were applied to study the effect of strain rate on the microstructure and properties of DP780 steel. The constitutive relation was described by a modified Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong model. The results showed that the strain rate sensitivity of yield strength is bigger than that of ultimate tensile strength; as strain rate increased, the formation of microcracks and voids at the ferrite/martensite interface can be alleviated; the strain rate effect is unevenly distributed in the plastic deformation region. Moreover, both models can effectively describe the experimental results, while the modified Zerilli-Armstrong model is more accurate because the strain-hardening rate of this model is independent of strain rate.

  1. Mechanism of Secondary Hardening in Rapid Tempering of Dual-Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Dulal Chandra; Nayak, Sashank S.; Biro, Elliot; Gerlich, Adrian P.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Dual-phase steel with ferrite-martensite-bainite microstructure exhibited secondary hardening in the subcritical heat affected zone during fiber laser welding. Rapid isothermal tempering conducted in a Gleeble simulator also indicated occurrence of secondary hardening at 773 K (500 °C), as confirmed by plotting the tempered hardness against the Holloman-Jaffe parameter. Isothermally tempered specimens were characterized by analytic transmission electron microscopy and high-angle annular dark-field imaging. The cementite (Fe3C) and TiC located in the bainite phase of DP steel decomposed upon rapid tempering to form needle-shaped Mo2C (aspect ratio ranging from 10 to 25) and plate-shaped M4C3 carbides giving rise to secondary hardening. Precipitation of these thermodynamically stable and coherent carbides promoted the hardening phenomenon. However, complex carbides were only seen in the tempered bainite and were not detected in the tempered martensite. The martensite phase decomposed into ferrite and spherical Fe3C, and interlath-retained austenite decomposed into ferrite and elongated carbide.

  2. Novel technique to suppress hydrocarbon contamination for high accuracy determination of carbon content in steel by FE-EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Takako; Tanaka, Yuji; Yagoshi, Masayasu; Ishida, Kiyohito

    2016-07-01

    In multiphase steels, control of the carbon contents in the respective phases is the most important factor in alloy design for achieving high strength and high ductility. However, it is unusually difficult to determine the carbon contents in multiphase structures with high accuracy by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) due to the unavoidable effect of hydrocarbon contamination during measurements. We have investigated new methods for suppressing hydrocarbon contamination during field emission (FE) EPMA measurements as well as a conventional liquid nitrogen trap. Plasma cleaner inside the specimen chamber results in a improvement of carbon-content determination by point analysis, increasing precision tenfold from the previous 0.1 mass%C to 0.01 mass%C. Stage heating at about 100 °C dramatically suppresses contamination growth during continuous point measurement and mapping. By the combination of above two techniques, we successfully visualized the two-dimensional carbon distribution in a dual-phase steel. It was also noted that the carbon concentrations at the ferrite/martensite interfaces were not the same across all interfaces, and local variation was observed. The developed technique is expected to be a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms of mechanical properties and microstructural evolution, thereby contributing to the design of new steel products with superior properties.

  3. Novel technique to suppress hydrocarbon contamination for high accuracy determination of carbon content in steel by FE-EPMA

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Takako; Tanaka, Yuji; Yagoshi, Masayasu; Ishida, Kiyohito

    2016-01-01

    In multiphase steels, control of the carbon contents in the respective phases is the most important factor in alloy design for achieving high strength and high ductility. However, it is unusually difficult to determine the carbon contents in multiphase structures with high accuracy by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) due to the unavoidable effect of hydrocarbon contamination during measurements. We have investigated new methods for suppressing hydrocarbon contamination during field emission (FE) EPMA measurements as well as a conventional liquid nitrogen trap. Plasma cleaner inside the specimen chamber results in a improvement of carbon-content determination by point analysis, increasing precision tenfold from the previous 0.1 mass%C to 0.01 mass%C. Stage heating at about 100 °C dramatically suppresses contamination growth during continuous point measurement and mapping. By the combination of above two techniques, we successfully visualized the two-dimensional carbon distribution in a dual-phase steel. It was also noted that the carbon concentrations at the ferrite/martensite interfaces were not the same across all interfaces, and local variation was observed. The developed technique is expected to be a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms of mechanical properties and microstructural evolution, thereby contributing to the design of new steel products with superior properties. PMID:27431281

  4. Novel technique to suppress hydrocarbon contamination for high accuracy determination of carbon content in steel by FE-EPMA.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Takako; Tanaka, Yuji; Yagoshi, Masayasu; Ishida, Kiyohito

    2016-01-01

    In multiphase steels, control of the carbon contents in the respective phases is the most important factor in alloy design for achieving high strength and high ductility. However, it is unusually difficult to determine the carbon contents in multiphase structures with high accuracy by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) due to the unavoidable effect of hydrocarbon contamination during measurements. We have investigated new methods for suppressing hydrocarbon contamination during field emission (FE) EPMA measurements as well as a conventional liquid nitrogen trap. Plasma cleaner inside the specimen chamber results in a improvement of carbon-content determination by point analysis, increasing precision tenfold from the previous 0.1 mass%C to 0.01 mass%C. Stage heating at about 100 °C dramatically suppresses contamination growth during continuous point measurement and mapping. By the combination of above two techniques, we successfully visualized the two-dimensional carbon distribution in a dual-phase steel. It was also noted that the carbon concentrations at the ferrite/martensite interfaces were not the same across all interfaces, and local variation was observed. The developed technique is expected to be a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms of mechanical properties and microstructural evolution, thereby contributing to the design of new steel products with superior properties. PMID:27431281

  5. Chromia scale adhesion on 430 stainless steel: Effect of different surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogolovsky, I.; Hou, P. Y.; Jacobson, C. P.; Visco, S. J.

    In the context of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications, the adhesion strength and failure location of chromia scale that developed on 430 stainless steel after various surface modifications prior to oxidations between 600 and 800 °C were evaluated. Results demonstrated that the tensile strength and nature of adhesion of the oxide/alloy interface on 430 stainless steel can be compromised by polishing, but can be improved by reducing surface impurities, increasing surface roughness and applying a coating that contains a reactive element, such as Y-nitrate. Optimally, a combination of firing in a reducing atmosphere and applying a thin yttrium nitrate coating was found to be especially effective. These findings identify surface modification techniques that improve scale adhesion for Cr 2O 3-forming metallic interconnects whether independently or beneath a protective coating.

  6. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Surfaces of Thixoformed HP9/4/30 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, M. Z.; Jaharah, A. G.; Atkinson, H. V.; Kapranos, P.

    2007-04-07

    Most work in semi-solid metal processing has been focused on relatively low-melting temperature materials such as aluminium, magnesium, tin, lead and their composites. Because of the high melting temperatures and related measurement difficulties, there is relatively small amount of experimental data available on the thixoforming of high temperature materials such as steels. This paper discusses the relationships between tensile tests data and the fracture surfaces of HP9/4/30 steel samples, in as-received and as-thixoformed conditions. Some of the as-thixoformed samples were subjected to commercial heat treatments before the tests were carried out. The as-received samples showed a typical ductile fracture of 'cup' and 'cone' surface appearance. The thixoformed samples, although showing some significant increase in tensile strength values, failed in a brittle manner, with the fracture surfaces showing a 'cobbled' surface appearance. The application of the commercial heat treatment to the thixoformed samples has significantly improved their ductility.

  7. Removal of the long-lived {sup 222}Rn daughters from steel and germanium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, Marcin; Zuzel, Grzegorz; Majorovits, Bela

    2011-04-27

    Removal of the long-lived {sup 222}Rn daughters ({sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Bi and {sup 210}Po) from stainless steel and germanium surfaces was investigated. As cleaning technique etching was applied to samples in a form of discs exposed earlier to a strong radon source. Reduction of the {sup 210}Pb activity was tested using a HPGe spectrometer, for {sup 210}Bi a beta spectrometer and for {sup 210}Po an alpha spectrometer was used. According to the conducted measurements all the isotopes were removed very efficiently from germanium. Results obtained for stainless steel were worse but still better than those achieved for copper.

  8. Corrosion behavior of surface films on boron-implanted high purity iron and stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. J.; Carter, W. B.; Hochman, R. F.; Meletis, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    Boron (dose, 2 x 10 to the 17th ions/sq cm) was implanted into high purity iron, AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel, and AISI 440C martensitic stainless steel, at 40 keV. The film structure of implanted samples was examined and characterized by contrast and diffraction analyses utilizing transmission electron microscopy. The effect of B(+) ion implantation on the corrosion behavior was studied using the potentiodynamic polarization technique. Tests were performed in deaerated 1 N H2SO4 and 0.1 M NaCl solutions. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology of the corroded surfaces after testing.

  9. Modification of the Steel Surface Treated by a Volume Discharge Plasma in Nitrogen at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, M. V.; Shulepov, M. A.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Oskomov, K. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2016-03-01

    Effect of volume discharge plasma initiated by an avalanche electron beam on the composition, structure, and properties of the surface steel layer is investigated. Voltage pulses with incident wave amplitude up to 30 kV, full width at half maximum of about 4 ns, and wave front of about 2.5 ns were applied to the gap with an inhomogeneous electric field. Changes indicating the hardening effect of the volume discharge initiated by an avalanche electron beam are revealed in St3-grade steel specimens treated by the discharge of this type.

  10. Effects Of Milling On Surface Integrity Of Low-Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Alessandro Roger; Matsumoto, Hidekasu; Yamakami, Wyser Jose; Tokimatsu, Ruis Camargo; Menezes, Miguel Angelo; Suyama, Daniel Iwao; Norcino, Adriana Bruno; Vendrame, Saimon

    2011-01-17

    This work measured the effect of milling parameters on the surface integrity of low-carbon alloy steel. The Variance Analysis showed that only depth of cut did not influence on the workpiece roughness and the Pearson's Coefficient indicated that cutting speed was more influent than tool feed. All cutting parameters introduced tensile residual stress in workpiece surface. The chip formation mechanism depended specially on cutting speed and influenced on the roughness and residual stress of workpiece.

  11. Surface Preparation of Powder Metallurgical Tool Steels by Means of Wire Electrical Discharge Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatami, Sepehr; Shahabi-Navid, Mehrdad; Nyborg, Lars

    2012-09-01

    The surface of two types of powder metallurgical (PM) tool steels ( i.e., with and without nitrogen) was prepared using wire electrical discharge machining (WEDM). From each grade of tool steel, seven surfaces corresponding to one to seven passes of WEDM were prepared. The WEDM process was carried out using a brass wire as electrode and deionized water as dielectric. After each WEDM pass the surface of the tool steels was thoroughly examined. Surface residual stresses were measured by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The measured stresses were found to be of tensile nature. The surface roughness of the WEDM specimens was measured using interference microscopy. The surface roughness as well as the residual stress measurements indicated an insignificant improvement of these parameters after four passes of WEDM. In addition, the formed recast layer was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), XRD, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The characterization investigation clearly shows diffusion of copper and zinc from the wire electrode into the work material, even after the final WEDM step. Finally, the importance of eliminating excessive WEDM steps is thoroughly discussed.

  12. The effect of surface morphology on the friction of electrogalvanized sheet steel in forming processes

    SciTech Connect

    Skarpelos, P. N.

    1993-12-01

    The effect in the drawbead simulator test were evaluated for a set of commercially coated steels and a set of laboratory coated steels with underlying surfaces produced by laser textured, shot blast, and electro-discharge textured rolls. In general, surfaces with higher roughness (R{sub a} parameter) measured lower friction in the DBS tests. The requisite roughness amplitude necessary for low friction was moderated somewhat by having a more closely spaced roughness as described by the median wavelength, {lambda}m, of the power spectrum. This effect is due to interaction with the lubricant by the micro-roughness imparted by the galvanizing process. The lubricant tends to be retained better by the surfaces with the micro-roughness, thereby increasing the amount of elasto- and plasto-hydrodynamic support of the load. Other variables, such as large variations in thickness of the sheet can mask the effect of the surface by changing the actual distance of sliding contact during the DBS test. For tests where the amount of sliding is similar, the effect of roughness is significant. The friction measured for EG steels in the DBS test is dominated by deformation of the surface with plowing by the asperities of the tooling adding to that caused by the deformation. The size of the plow marks in the deformed surfaces corresponds to the roughness of the tooling and no significant evidence of wear particles was observed.

  13. A facile electrodeposition process to fabricate corrosion-resistant superhydrophobic surface on carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yi; He, Yi; Luo, Pingya; Chen, Xi; Liu, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Superhydrophobic Fe film with hierarchical micro/nano papillae structures is prepared on C45 steel surface by one-step electrochemical method. The superhydrophobic surface was measured with a water contact angle of 160.5 ± 0.5° and a sliding angle of 2 ± 0.5°. The morphology of the fabricated surface film was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and the surface structure seems like accumulated hierarchical micro-nano scaled particles. Furthermore, according to the results of Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the chemical composition of surface film was iron complex with organic acid. Besides, the electrochemical measurements showed that the superhydrophobic surface improved the corrosion resistance of carbon steel in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution significantly. The superhydrophobic layer can perform as a barrier and provide a stable air-liquid interface which inhibit penetration of corrosive medium. In addition, the as-prepared steel exhibited an excellent self-cleaning ability that was not favor to the accumulation of contaminants.

  14. Surface Characterization of Stainless Steel Part by Eddy Current

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Eric S.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Prince, James M.; Good, Morris S.

    2003-10-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has nearly a 40 year history of research and development in the field of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). One area of NDE expertise at PNNL is electromagnetic testing which includes a field of eddy current testing (ET). One benefit is that ET can typically be performed at high speeds, and as a result has found many applications in process monitoring and poduction lines. ET has been used in the nuclear, aerospace, and automotive industries for many years. Et technology lends itself well to the detection of near-surface or surface breaking defects such as surface scratches. This paper provides an overview of theory regarding the usage of ET, selected application studies performed by PNNL, a safety analysis, and a wrtie up pertaining to the operations of ET to detect surface scratches.

  15. Spreading of lithium on a stainless steel surface at room temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2015-11-10

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices and liquid lithium plasma facing components are under consideration for future machines. A key factor in the performance of liquid lithium components is the wetting by lithium of its container. We have observed the surface spreading of lithium from a mm-scale particle to adjacent stainless steel surfaces using a scanning Auger microprobe that has elemental discrimination. Here, the spreading of lithium occurred at room temperature (when lithium is a solid) from one location at a speed of 0.62 μm/day under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Separatemore » experiments using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) investigated bonding energetics between monolayer-scale films of lithium and stainless steel. While multilayer lithium desorption from stainless steel begins to occur just above 500 K (Edes = 1.54 eV), sub-monolayer Li desorption occurred in a TPD peak at 942 K (Edes = 2.52 eV) indicating more energetically favorable lithium-stainless steel bonding (in the absence of an oxidation layer) than lithium lithium bonding.« less

  16. Spreading of lithium on a stainless steel surface at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Roszell, J. P.; Koel, B. E.

    2015-11-10

    Lithium conditioned plasma facing surfaces have lowered recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices and liquid lithium plasma facing components are under consideration for future machines. A key factor in the performance of liquid lithium components is the wetting by lithium of its container. We have observed the surface spreading of lithium from a mm-scale particle to adjacent stainless steel surfaces using a scanning Auger microprobe that has elemental discrimination. Here, the spreading of lithium occurred at room temperature (when lithium is a solid) from one location at a speed of 0.62 μm/day under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Separate experiments using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) investigated bonding energetics between monolayer-scale films of lithium and stainless steel. While multilayer lithium desorption from stainless steel begins to occur just above 500 K (Edes = 1.54 eV), sub-monolayer Li desorption occurred in a TPD peak at 942 K (Edes = 2.52 eV) indicating more energetically favorable lithium-stainless steel bonding (in the absence of an oxidation layer) than lithium lithium bonding.

  17. Portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system for detection of biofilms on stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Won; Lee, Kangjin; Millner, Patricia; Sharma, Manan; Chao, Kuanglin; Kim, Moon S.

    2008-04-01

    A rapid nondestructive technology is needed to detect bacterial contamination on the surfaces of food processing equipment to reduce public health risks. A portable hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system was used to evaluate potential detection of microbial biofilm on stainless steel typically used in the manufacture of food processing equipment. Stainless steel coupons were immersed in bacterium cultures, such as E. coli, Pseudomonas pertucinogena, Erwinia chrysanthemi, and Listeria innocula. Following a 1-week exposure, biofilm formations were assessed using fluorescence imaging. In addition, the effects on biofilm formation from both tryptic soy broth (TSB) and M9 medium with casamino acids (M9C) were examined. TSB grown cells enhance biofilm production compared with M9C-grown cells. Hyperspectral fluorescence images of the biofilm samples, in response to ultraviolet-A (320 to 400 nm) excitation, were acquired from approximately 416 to 700 nm. Visual evaluation of individual images at emission peak wavelengths in the blue revealed the most contrast between biofilms and stainless steel coupons. Two-band ratios compared with the single-band images increased the contrast between the biofilm forming area and stainless steel coupon surfaces. The 444/588 nm ratio images exhibited the greatest contrast between the biofilm formations and stainless coupon surfaces.

  18. Advance Complex Liquid Nitriding of Stainless Steel AISI 321 Surface at 430 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuanhua; Wang, Jun; Zeng, Dezhi; Huang, Runbo; Fan, Hongyuan

    2013-09-01

    Liquid nitriding of type 321 austenite stainless steel was conducted at low temperature at 430 °C, using a type of a complex chemical heat-treatment; and the properties of the nitrided surface were evaluated. Experimental results revealed that a modified layer was formed on the surface with the thickness ranging from 2 to 30 μm varying with changing treatment time. When the stainless steel subjected to the advanced liquid nitriding less than 8 h at 430 °C, the main phase of the nitrided coating layer was the S phase generally. When the treatment time prolonged up to 16 h, S phase formed and partially transformed to CrN subsequently; and then the fine secondary CrN phase precipitated. All treatments performed in the current study can effectively improve the surface hardness. The nitrided layer thickness changed intensively with the increasing nitrided time. The growth of the nitride layer took place mainly by nitrogen diffusion according to the expected parabolic rate law. The highest hardness value obtained in this experiment was about 1400 Hv0.25. Low-temperature nitriding can improve the corrosion resistance of the 321 stainless steel against diluted vitriolic acid. The immerse test results revealed that the sample nitrided for 16 h had the best corrosion resistance than the others. SEM examinations indicated that after nitriding, the corrosion mechanisms of the steel had changed from serious general corrosion of untreated sample to selectivity corrosion of nitrided samples in the diluted vitriolic acid.

  19. Removal of the long-lived 222Rn daughters from copper and stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuzel, G.; Wójcik, M.

    2012-06-01

    Removal of the long-lived 222Rn daughters from copper and stainless steel surfaces was investigated. Etching and electropolishing were applied to discs exposed earlier to a strong radon source for 210Pb, 210Bi and 210Po deposition. Cleaning efficiency for 210Pb was tested with a n-type high purity germanium spectrometer, for 210Bi a beta spectrometer and for 210Po an alpha spectrometer was used. According to the performed measurements electropolishing removes very effectively all the isotopes from copper and stainless steel. Copper etching reduces efficiently lead and bismuth however for polonium the effect is negligible because of its fast re-deposition. For stainless steel, etching is much more effective compared to copper and it also works for 210Po.

  20. Effect of Initial Microtopography and Ultrasonic Treatment Mode on Steel Surface Layer Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, K. V.; Lychagin, D. V.; Arkhipova, D. A.

    2016-04-01

    The article presents results of studies on the effect of pre-lathed surface micro-relief on surface micro-hardness after ultrasonic plastic treatment, as well as the effect of ultrasonic treatment on structure and properties of surface layers of steels 20 and 40X. The effect of ultrasonic treatment processing modes on roughness and micro-hardness of the surface layers was studied. It is shown that roughness values as well as form of ridges and grooves, obtained by pre-lathing, effect the growth of micro-hardness values after ultrasonic plastic treatment.

  1. Protection of Oil Casing Tube Steel via Surface Treatment in China: a Literature Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jiaojuan; Lin, Naiming; Qin, Lin; Tang, Bin; Xie, Faqin

    2013-04-01

    Oil casing tube is the foundation member of an oil well and it plays an important role in oil exploration and exploitation. The oil casing tubes are prone to failure induced by corrosion and wear during applications. Based on the fact that the damages caused by corrosion and wear are first generated on the surface of oil casing tube, adopting an appropriate surface treatment technology would be a promising approach to protect itself from deterioration. Surface treatments can fabricate protective layers with different composition or structure from the substrate. This paper reviewed the existing literatures about the protection of oil casing tube steel via surface treatment in China.

  2. Surface Characterization of Stainless Steel Part by Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Batishko, Charles R.; Good, Morris S.

    2003-10-01

    Based on written requirements provided by the Savannah River Site (SRS), and discussions with Ms. Sproul of SRS, the objective for the proposed development is a turnkey, automated system for three-dimensional characterization of a metallic part, resulting in: *x-y-z positions of a three-dimensional cloud of surface points which are sufficient for and will be used to generate as-built engineering drawings of the part. *detection of surface anomalies and their high precision spatial mapping to provide iput into accept/reject decisions. *alarm capability comparing the surface anomaly data, based on client provided accept/reject criteria, and resulting in an alarm or flagging the part.

  3. Effect of surface polishing and vacuum firing on electron stimulated desorption from 316LN stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, Oleg B. Hogan, Benjamin T.; Pendleton, Mark

    2014-09-01

    The reduction of thermal outgassing from stainless steel by surface polishing or vacuum firing is well-known in vacuum technology, and the consequent use of both techniques allows an even further reduction of outgassing. The aim of this study was to identify the effectiveness of surface polishing and vacuum firing for reducing electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) from 316LN stainless steel, which is a frequently used material for particle accelerator vacuum chambers and components. It was found that, unlike for thermal outgassing, surface polishing does not reduce the ESD yield and may even increase it, while vacuum firing of nonpolished sample reduces only the H{sub 2} ESD yield by a factor 2.

  4. Surface Treatments for Improved Performance of Spinel-coated AISI 441 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Riel, Eric M.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steels are promising candidates for IT-SOFC interconnect applications due to their low cost and resistance to oxidation at SOFC operating temperatures. However, steel candidates face several challenges; including long term oxidation under interconnect exposure conditions, which can lead to increased electrical resistance, surface instability, and poisoning of cathodes due to volatilization of Cr. To potentially extend interconnect lifetime and improve performance, a variety of surface treatments were performed on AISI 441 ferritic stainless steel coupons prior to application of a protective spinel coating. The coated coupons were then subjected to oxidation testing at 800 and 850°C in air, and electrical testing at 800°C in air. While all of the surface-treatments resulted in improved surface stability (i.e., increased spallation resistance) compared to untreated AISI 441, the greatest degree of improvement (through 20,000 hours of testing at 800°C and 14,000 hours of testing at 850°C) was achieved by surface blasting.

  5. Laser surface pretreatment of 100Cr6 bearing steel - Hardening effects and white etching zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buling, Anna; Sändker, Hendrik; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Krupp, Ulrich; Hamann-Steinmeier, Angela

    2016-08-01

    In order to achieve a surface pretreatment of the bearing steel 100Cr6 (1-1.5 wt.% Cr) a laser-based process was used. The obtained modification may result in an optimization of the adhesive properties of the surface with respect to an anticorrosion polymer coating on the basis of PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone), which is applied on the steel surface by a laser melting technique. This work deals with the influence of the laser-based pretreatment regarding the surface microstructure and the micro-hardness of the steel, which has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy and automated micro-hardness testing. The most suitable parameter set for the laser-based pretreatment leads to the formation of very hard white etching zones (WEZ) with a thickness of 23 μm, whereas this pretreatment also induces topographical changes. The occurrence of the white etching zones is attributed to near-surface re-austenitization and rapid quenching. Moreover, dark etching zones (DEZ) with a thickness of 32 μm are found at the laser path edges as well as underneath the white etching zones (WEZ). In these areas, the hardness is decreased due to the formation of oxides as a consequence of re-tempering.

  6. Surface microstructures and antimicrobial properties of copper plasma alloyed stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Huang, Xiaobo; Jiang, Li; Ma, Yong; Fan, Ailan; Tang, Bin

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial adhesion to stainless steel surfaces is one of the major reason causing the cross-contamination and infection in many practical applications. An approach to solve this problem is to enhance the antibacterial properties on the surface of stainless steel. In this paper, novel antibacterial stainless steel surfaces with different copper content have been prepared by a plasma surface alloying technique at various gas pressures. The microstructure of the alloyed surfaces was investigated using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The viability of bacteria attached to the antibacterial surfaces was tested using the spread plate method. The antibacterial mechanism of the alloyed surfaces was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that gas pressure has a great influence on the surface elements concentration and the depth of the alloyed layer. The maximum copper concentration in the alloyed surface obtained at the gas pressure of 60 Pa is about 7.1 wt.%. This alloyed surface exhibited very strong antibacterial ability, and an effective reduction of 98% of Escherichia coli (E. coli) within 1 h was achieved by contact with the alloyed surface. The maximum thickness of the copper alloyed layer obtained at 45 Pa is about 6.5 μm. Although the rate of reduction for E. coli of this alloyed surface was slower than that of the alloyed surface with the copper content about 7.1 wt.% over the first 3 h, few were able to survive more than 12 h and the reduction reached over 99.9%. The XPS analysis results indicated that the copper ions were released when the copper alloyed stainless steel in contact with bacterial solution, which is an important factor for killing bacteria. Based on an overall consideration of bacterial killing rate and durability, the alloyed surface with the copper content of 2.5 wt.% and the thickness of about 6.5 μm obtained at the gas pressure of 45 Pa is expected

  7. Characterization of the thrombogenic potential of surface oxides on stainless steel for implant purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chun-Che; Shih, Chun-Ming; Su, Yea-Yang; Chang, Mau-Song; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2003-12-01

    Marketed stents are manufactured from various metals and passivated with different degrees of surface oxidation. The functional surface oxides on the degree of antithrombotic potential were explored through a canine femoral extracorporeal circuit model. Related properties of these oxide films were studied by open-circuit potential, current density detected at open-circuit potential, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Auger spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy. Experimental evidences showed that blood clot weight after a 30-min follow-up was significantly lower for the stainless steel wire passivated with amorphous oxide (AO) compared to the wire passivated with polycrystalline oxide (PO) or commercial as-received wire coils (AS). Surface characterizations showed that a stable negative current density at open-circuit potential and a significant lower potential were found for the wire surface passivated with AO than for the surface passivated with PO. Time constant of AO is about 25 times larger than that of polycrystalline oxide. Significant difference in oxide grain sizes was found between PO and AO. Surface chemistries revealed by the AES and XPS spectra indicated the presence of a Cr- and oxygen-rich surface oxide for AO, and a Fe-rich and oxygen-lean surface oxide for PO. These remarkable characteristics of AO surface film might have a potential to provide for excellent antithrombotic characteristics for the 316L stainless steel stents.

  8. Measuring the sticking of mefenamic acid powders on stainless steel surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zihua; Shah, Umang V; Olusanmi, Dolapo; Narang, Ajit S; Hussain, Munir A; Gamble, John F; Tobyn, Michael J; Heng, Jerry Y Y

    2015-12-30

    This study proposes an approach for quantifying the amount of pharmaceutical powder adhering (quality attribute) to the metals surfaces. The effect of surface roughness (detrimental attribute) on the amount of powder sticking to a stainless steel surface for a model pharmaceutical material is also qualitatively determined. Methodology to quantify powder adhesion to surfaces utilises a texture analyser and HPLC. The approach was validated to qualitatively investigate effect of metal surface roughness on adhesion of mefenamic acid. An increase in metal surface roughness resulted in an increase in cohesion. By increasing the average roughness from 289nm to 407nm, a 2.5 fold increase in amount adhering to metal was observed, highlighting the role of surface roughness on adhesion. The simplicity in experimental design with no requirement of specialised equipment and operational ease makes the approach very easy to adopt. Further, ease in interpreting results makes this methodology very attractive. PMID:26456293

  9. An Evaluation of the Corrosion and Mechanical Performance of Interstitially Surface-Hardened Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jennifer L.; Koul, Michelle G.; Schubbe, Joel J.

    2014-06-01

    A surface hardening technique called "interstitial hardening" is commercially available, whereby interstitial carbon atoms are introduced into stainless steel surfaces without the formation of carbides. Surface hardening of machine elements such as impellors or fasteners would improve performance regarding cavitation and galling resistance, and has intensified interest in this process. However, there remains a need to characterize and validate the specific performance characteristics of the hardened materials. This paper describes experimental testing conducted on 316L stainless steel that has been surface hardened using available commercial techniques, using carbon as the interstitial atom. The corrosion performance of the hardened surface is assessed using electrochemical potentiodynamic testing to determine the breakdown potential in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution to identify the most promising method. The hardness and thickness of the surface-hardened layer is characterized and compared using metallography and microhardness profiling. Corrosion fatigue and slow strain rate testing of untreated, hardened, and damaged, hardened surfaces exposed to ASTM seawater is conducted. Finally, critical galling stresses are determined and compared. Post-test examination of damage attempts to identify mechanisms of material failure and characterize how corrosion-assisted cracks initiate and grow in surface-hardened materials.

  10. Improving electrochemical properties of AISI 1045 steels by duplex surface treatment of plasma nitriding and aluminizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haftlang, Farahnaz; Habibolahzadeh, Ali; Sohi, Mahmoud Heydarzadeh

    2015-02-01

    Improvement in electrochemical behavior of AISI 1045 steel after applying aluminum nitride coating was investigated in 3.5% NaCl solution, using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analyses. Aluminum nitride coating was applied on the steel surface by duplex treatment of pack aluminizing and plasma nitriding. Some specimens were plasma nitrided followed by aluminizing (PN-Al), while the others were pack aluminized followed by plasma nitriding (Al-PN). Topological and structural studies of the modified surfaces were conducted using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS), and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The electrochemical measurements showed that the highest corrosion and polarization (Rp) resistances were obtained in PN-Al specimens, having single phase superficial layer of AlN. Pitting mechanism was dominant reason of lower corrosion resistance in the Al-PN specimens.

  11. Metallurgical, manufacturing and surface finish requirements for high purity stainless steel system components.

    PubMed

    Mangan, D

    1991-01-01

    The stainless steel piping systems that distribute water for injection (WFI) and other critical fluids in pharmaceutical and biotechnology plants will be the subject of this paper. We will confine our focus to the two major components of such systems--tubing and fittings. It should be noted that the discussions here can certainly be applied in the selection of other components such as valves, filter housings, pumps, and tanks used in these industries. The purpose of this paper will be to guide user choices with regard to raw material selection, surface preparation, and surface analysis within the context of system requirements. A suggested material specification for stainless steel tubing and fittings will also be presented. PMID:1770409

  12. Application of multi-scale feature extraction to surface defect classification of hot-rolled steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ke; Ai, Yong-hao; Wu, Xiu-yong

    2013-01-01

    Feature extraction is essential to the classification of surface defect images. The defects of hot-rolled steels distribute in different directions. Therefore, the methods of multi-scale geometric analysis (MGA) were employed to decompose the image into several directional subbands at several scales. Then, the statistical features of each subband were calculated to produce a high-dimensional feature vector, which was reduced to a lower-dimensional vector by graph embedding algorithms. Finally, support vector machine (SVM) was used for defect classification. The multi-scale feature extraction method was implemented via curvelet transform and kernel locality preserving projections (KLPP). Experiment results show that the proposed method is effective for classifying the surface defects of hot-rolled steels and the total classification rate is up to 97.33%.

  13. Facile fabrication of biomimetic superhydrophobic surface with anti-frosting on stainless steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Bai, Yuan; Jin, Jingfu; Tian, Limei; Han, Zhiwu; Ren, Luquan

    2015-11-01

    Inspired by typical plant surfaces with super-hydrophobic character such as lotus leaves and rose petals, a superhydrophobic surface was achieved successfully by a chemical immersion process. Here, 304 SS (stainless steel) was used as substrates and a micro-nano hierarchical structure was obtained by chemical etching with a mixed solution containing ferric chloride. The results showed that the water contact angle (WAC) decreased obviously due to surface morphology changing after chemical etching process. However, we obtained a superhydrophobic surface with a WAC of 158.3 ± 2.8° after modification by DTS (CH3(CH2)11Si(OCH3)3). Furthermore, the superhydrophobic surface showed an excellent anti-frosting character compared to pure staining steel. The surface morphology, chemical composition and wettability are characterized by means of SEM, XPS and water contact angle measurements. This method could provide a facile, low-cost and stable route to fabricate a large-area superhydrophobic surface with anti-frosting for application in various environments including in humid condition.

  14. Mechanically robust superhydrophobic steel surface with anti-icing, UV-durability, and corrosion resistance properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Xiong, Dangsheng; Deng, Yaling; Shi, Yan; Wang, Kun

    2015-03-25

    A superhydrophobic steel surface was prepared through a facile method: combining hydrogen peroxide and an acid (hydrochloric acid or nitric acid) to obtain hierarchical structures on steel, followed by a surface modification treatment. Empirical grid maps based on different volumes of H2O2/acid were presented, revealing a wettability gradient from "hydrophobic" to "rose effect" and finally to "lotus effect". Surface grafting has been demonstrated to be realized only on the oxidized area. As-prepared superhydrophobic surfaces exhibited excellent anti-icing properties according to the water-dripping test under overcooled conditions and the artificial "steam-freezing" (from 50 °C with 90% humidity to the -20 °C condition) test. In addition, the surfaces could withstand peeling with 3M adhesive tape at least 70 times with an applied pressure of 31.2 kPa, abrasion by 400 grid SiC sandpaper for 110 cm under 16 kPa, or water impacting for 3 h without losing superhydrophobicity, suggesting superior mechanical durability. Moreover, outstanding corrosion resistance and UV-durability were obtained on the prepared surface. This successful fabrication of a robust, anti-icing, UV-durable, and anticorrosion superhydrophobic surface could yield a prospective candidate for various practical applications. PMID:25749123

  15. Morphological analysis of stainless steel scale like surface morphology using STM and AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Vignal, V.; Olive, J.M.; Desjardins, D.; Roux, J.C.; Genton, V.

    1997-12-19

    A combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) investigation of stainless steel like surface morphology formed either in electropolishing bath or in HNO{sub 3} medium is reported. A new numerical technique using the Nanoscope III software is proposed. The dimension, slope and orientation of scales can be easily determined. Moreover, grain boundaries structure and probable oxides present in the upper part of the film can be deduced.

  16. Secondary electron yield from stainless steel surface coated with titanium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, O. S.; Meshkov, I. N.; Rudakov, A. Yu.; Philippov, A. V.

    2014-09-01

    The experiment on measurement of secondary electron yield from surface of a stainless steel Kh189 sample covered with titanium nitride is performed at stand "Recuperator". This work is related to known problem of electron clouds formation in a vacuum chamber by a propagating charge particle beam. An original method of secondary electron yield measurement was developed in this experiment. The obtained results allow one to estimate efficiency of coating nitride titanium.

  17. Effect of boron on post irradiation tensile properties of reduced activation ferritic steel (F-82H) irradiated in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Suzuki, Masahide; Hishinuma, Akimichi; Pawel, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F-82H (Fe-8Cr-2W-V-Ta), was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses between 11 and 34 dpa at 400 and 500 C. Post irradiation tensile tests were performed at the nominal irradiation temperature in vacuum. Some specimens included {sup 10}B or natural boron (nB) to estimate the helium effect on tensile properties. Tensile properties including the 0.2% offset yield stress, the ultimate tensile strength, the uniform elongation and the total elongation were measured. The tensile properties were not dependent on helium content in specimens irradiated to 34 dpa, however {sup 10}B-doped specimens with the highest levels of helium showed slightly higher yield strength and less ductility than boron-free specimens. Strength appears to go through a peak, and ductility through a trough at about 11 dpa. The irradiation to more than 21 dpa reduced the strength and increased the elongation to the unirradiated levels. Ferritic steels are one of the candidate alloys for nuclear fusion reactors because of their good thermophysical properties, their superior swelling resistance, and the low corrosion rate in contact with potential breeder and coolant materials.

  18. Roughness Reduction in AISI 316L Stainless Steel after Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifvianto, B.; Suyitno, Suyitno; Mahardika, M.

    2011-12-01

    Surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) enhances the strength of metals by generating nanocrystallites at the surface layer. During the treatment, multiple impacts of milling balls are subjected to the treated surface. Consequently, the structure and roughness of the treated surface are also modified. In this paper, the effect of SMAT on the surface structure and roughness of an initially rough AISI 316L stainless steel is investigated. The SMAT was conducted for 0-20 minutes. The surface morphology, roughness, and volume loss due to the SMAT were studied. The result shows a decreasing roughness by the SMAT. An apparently deformed structure is also observed after 15 minutes of the treatment. However, no significant change in the volume loss is reported due to this treatment. Deformation by the multiple impacts is proposed to be the mechanism of the roughness reduction instead of microcutting by the milling balls during the SMAT.

  19. Laser surface modification of 316 L stainless steel with bioactive hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Das, Mitun; Bose, Sreyashree; Ram, G D Janaki; Manna, Indranil

    2013-12-01

    Laser-engineered net shaping (LENS™), a commercial additive manufacturing process, was used to modify the surfaces of 316 L stainless steel with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HAP). The modified surfaces were characterized in terms of their microstructure, hardness and apatite forming ability. The results showed that with increase in laser energy input from 32 J/mm(2) to 59 J/mm(2) the thickness of the modified surface increased from 222±12 μm to 355±6 μm, while the average surface hardness decreased marginally from 403±18 HV0.3 to 372±8 HV0.3. Microstructural studies showed that the modified surface consisted of austenite dendrites with HAP and some reaction products primarily occurring in the inter-dendritic regions. Finally, the surface-modified 316 L samples immersed in simulated body fluids showed significantly higher apatite precipitation compared to unmodified 316 L samples.

  20. Surface Roughness of Stainless Steel Bender Mirrors for FocusingSoft X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; Irick, Steve C.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Salmassi,Farhad; Warwick, Tony; Metz, James P.; Tonnessen, Thomas W.

    2005-10-11

    We have used polished stainless steel as a mirror substrate to provide focusing of soft x-rays in grazing incidence reflection. The substrate is bent to an elliptical shape with large curvature and high stresses in the substrate require a strong elastic material. Conventional material choices of silicon or of glass will not withstand the stress required. The use of steel allows the substrates to be polished and installed flat, using screws in tapped holes. The ultra-high-vacuum bender mechanism is motorized and computer controlled. These mirrors are used to deliver focused beams of soft x-rays onto the surface of a sample for experiments at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). They provide an illumination field that can be as small as the mirror demagnification allows, for localized study, and can be enlarged, under computer control,for survey measurements over areas of the surface up to several millimeters. The critical issue of the quality of the steel surface, polished and coated with gold, which limits the minimum achievable focused spot size is discussed in detail. Comparison is made to a polished, gold coated, electroless nickel surface, which provides a smoother finish. Surface measurements are presented as power spectral densities, as a function of spatial frequency. The surface height distributions measured with an interferometric microscope, and complemented by atomic force microscope measurements, are used to compute power spectral densities and then to evaluate the surface roughness. The effects of roughness in reducing the specular reflectivity are verified by soft x-ray measurements.

  1. Stainless steel surface functionalization for immobilization of antibody fragments for cardiovascular applications.

    PubMed

    Foerster, A; Hołowacz, I; Sunil Kumar, G B; Anandakumar, S; Wall, J G; Wawrzyńska, M; Paprocka, M; Kantor, A; Kraskiewicz, H; Olsztyńska-Janus, S; Hinder, S J; Bialy, D; Podbielska, H; Kopaczyńska, M

    2016-04-01

    Stainless steel 316 L material is commonly used for the production of coronary and peripheral vessel stents. Effective biofunctionalization is a key to improving the performance and safety of the stents after implantation. This paper reports the method for the immobilization of recombinant antibody fragments (scFv) on stainless steel 316 L to facilitate human endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) growth and thus improve cell viability of the implanted stents for cardiovascular applications. The modification of stent surface was conducted in three steps. First the stent surface was coated with titania based coating to increase the density of hydroxyl groups for successful silanization. Then silanization with 3 aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) was performed to provide the surface with amine groups which presence was verified using FTIR, XPS, and fluorescence microscopy. The maximum density of amine groups (4.8*10(-5) mol/cm(2)) on the surface was reached after reaction taking place in ethanol for 1 h at 60 °C and 0.04M APTS. On such prepared surface the glycosylated scFv were subsequently successfully immobilized. The influence of oxidation of scFv glycan moieties and the temperature on scFv coating were investigated. The fluorescence and confocal microscopy study indicated that the densest and most uniformly coated surface with scFv was obtained at 37 °C after oxidation of glycan chain. The results demonstrate that the scFv cannot be efficiently immobilized without prior aminosilanization of the surface. The effect of the chemical modification on the cell viability of EPC line 55.1 (HucPEC-55.1) was performed indicating that the modifications to the 316 L stainless steel are non-toxic to EPCs.

  2. Quantitative characterization of the atomic-scale structure of oxyhydroxides in rusts formed on steel surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, M.; Suzuki, S. . E-mail: ssuzuki@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Kimura, M.; Suzuki, T.; Kihira, H.; Waseda, Y.

    2005-11-15

    Quantitative X-ray structural analysis coupled with anomalous X-ray scattering has been used for characterizing the atomic-scale structure of rust formed on steel surfaces. Samples were prepared from rust layers formed on the surfaces of two commercial steels. X-ray scattered intensity profiles of the two samples showed that the rusts consisted mainly of two types of ferric oxyhydroxide, {alpha}-FeOOH and {gamma}-FeOOH. The amounts of these rust components and the realistic atomic arrangements in the components were estimated by fitting both the ordinary and the environmental interference functions with a model structure calculated using the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique. The two rust components were found to be the network structure formed by FeO{sub 6} octahedral units, the network structure itself deviating from the ideal case. The present results also suggest that the structural analysis method using anomalous X-ray scattering and the reverse Monte Carlo technique is very successful in determining the atomic-scale structure of rusts formed on the steel surfaces.

  3. Destruction of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris spores in apple juice on stainless steel surfaces by chemical disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Podolak, Richard; Elliott, Philip H; Taylor, Bradley J; Khurana, Aakash; Black, Darryl G

    2009-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of three commercially available disinfectants on the reduction of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris spores in single-strength apple juice applied to stainless steel surfaces. Apple juice was inoculated with A. acidoterrestris spores, spread onto the surface of stainless steel chips (SSC), dried to obtain spore concentrations of approximately 10(4) CFU/cm2, and treated with disinfectants at temperatures ranging from 40 to 90 degrees C. The concentrations of disinfectants were 200, 500, 1,000, and 2,000 ppm of total chlorine for Clorox (CL) (sodium hypochlorite); 50, 100, and 200 ppm of total chlorine for Carnebon 200 (stabilized chlorine dioxide); and 1,500, 2,000, and 2,600 ppm for Vortexx (VOR) (hydrogen peroxide, peroxyacetic acid, and octanoic acid). For all temperatures tested, VOR at 2,600 ppm (90 degrees C) and CL at 2,000 ppm (90 degrees C) were the most inhibitory against A. acidoterrestris spores, resulting in 2.55- and 2.32-log CFU/cm2 reductions, respectively, after 2 min. All disinfectants and conditions tested resulted in the inactivation of A. acidoterrestris spores, with a maximum reduction of > 2 log CFU/cm2. Results from this study indicate that A. acidoterrestris spores, in single-strength apple juice, may be effectively reduced on stainless steel surface by VOR and CL, which may have practical applications in the juice industry.

  4. Nanoscale surface analysis on second generation advanced high strength steel after hot dip galvanizing.

    PubMed

    Arndt, M; Duchoslav, J; Preis, K; Samek, L; Stifter, D

    2013-09-01

    Second generation advanced high strength steel is one promising material of choice for modern automotive structural parts because of its outstanding maximal elongation and tensile strength. Nonetheless there is still a lack of corrosion protection for this material due to the fact that cost efficient hot dip galvanizing cannot be applied. The reason for the insufficient coatability with zinc is found in the segregation of manganese to the surface during annealing and the formation of manganese oxides prior coating. This work analyses the structure and chemical composition of the surface oxides on so called nano-TWIP (twinning induced plasticity) steel on the nanoscopic scale after hot dip galvanizing in a simulator with employed analytical methods comprising scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (SAES), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and focused ion beam (FIB) for cross section preparation. By the combination of these methods, it was possible to obtain detailed chemical images serving a better understanding which processes exactly occur on the surface of this novel kind of steel and how to promote in the future for this material system galvanic protection.

  5. Nanoscale surface analysis on second generation advanced high strength steel after hot dip galvanizing.

    PubMed

    Arndt, M; Duchoslav, J; Preis, K; Samek, L; Stifter, D

    2013-09-01

    Second generation advanced high strength steel is one promising material of choice for modern automotive structural parts because of its outstanding maximal elongation and tensile strength. Nonetheless there is still a lack of corrosion protection for this material due to the fact that cost efficient hot dip galvanizing cannot be applied. The reason for the insufficient coatability with zinc is found in the segregation of manganese to the surface during annealing and the formation of manganese oxides prior coating. This work analyses the structure and chemical composition of the surface oxides on so called nano-TWIP (twinning induced plasticity) steel on the nanoscopic scale after hot dip galvanizing in a simulator with employed analytical methods comprising scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (SAES), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and focused ion beam (FIB) for cross section preparation. By the combination of these methods, it was possible to obtain detailed chemical images serving a better understanding which processes exactly occur on the surface of this novel kind of steel and how to promote in the future for this material system galvanic protection. PMID:23404132

  6. Surface-protein interactions on different stainless steel grades: effects of protein adsorption, surface changes and metal release.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Y; Wang, X; Hedberg, J; Lundin, M; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2013-04-01

    Implantation using stainless steels (SS) is an example where an understanding of protein-induced metal release from SS is important when assessing potential toxicological risks. Here, the protein-induced metal release was investigated for austenitic (AISI 304, 310, and 316L), ferritic (AISI 430), and duplex (AISI 2205) grades in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) solution containing either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or lysozyme (LSZ). The results show that both BSA and LSZ induce a significant enrichment of chromium in the surface oxide of all stainless steel grades. Both proteins induced an enhanced extent of released iron, chromium, nickel and manganese, very significant in the case of BSA (up to 40-fold increase), whereas both proteins reduced the corrosion resistance of SS, with the reverse situation for iron metal (reduced corrosion rates and reduced metal release in the presence of proteins). A full monolayer coverage is necessary to induce the effects observed.

  7. Slurry Erosion Studies on Surface Modified 13Cr-4Ni Steels: Effect of Angle of Impingement and Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manisekaran, T.; Kamaraj, M.; Sharrif, S. M.; Joshi, S. V.

    2007-10-01

    Hydroturbine steels, such as 13Cr-4Ni martensitic steels, are generally subjected to heavy-erosive wear and loss of efficiency due to solid particulate entrainment in the water. Surface-modified steels have proven to give better performance in terms of erosive wear resistance. In the present study, an attempt is made to investigate the effect of angle of impingement and particle size on slurry-jet erosion behavior of pulsed plasma nitrided and laser hardened 13Cr-4Ni steels. Laser hardening process has shown good performance at all angles of impingement due to martensitic transformation of retained austenite. Plastic deformation mode of material removal was also an evident feature of all laser-hardened surface damage locations. However, pulsed-plasma nitrided steels have exhibited chip formation and micro-cutting mode of erosive wear. Erosion with 150-300 μm size was twice compared to 150 μm size slurry particulates.

  8. SURFACE FINISHES ON STAINLESS STEEL REDUCE BACTERIAL ATTACHMENT AND EARLY BIOFILM FORMATION: SCANNING ELECTRON AND ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three common finishing treatments of stainless steel that are used for equipment during poultry processing were tested for resistance to bacterial contamination. Methods were developed to measure attached bacteria and to identify factors that make surface finishes susceptible or ...

  9. Application of steel 40Kh surface hardened by high-frequency currents in the production of gate valve parts

    SciTech Connect

    Veliev, T.K.; Arifulin, R.K.; Fataliev, N.S.; Safarov, R.S.

    1986-09-01

    Bench tests were performed to determine the change in roughness, planeness, and hardness of the sealing surfaces of parts of gate valves made with steel 40Kh surface-hardened by high-frequency currents (HFC). Most parts of the gate valves for oil wells are now made of steel 38Kh2MYuA containing molybdenum. It was of interest to conduct tests to find another steel (40Kh) with less precious alloying elements and to increase the hardness of the sealing surfaces. The tests showed that steel 40Kh with HFC surface hardening may be recommended for gate parts of straight-through gate valves with specific contact pressure of up to 70 MPa. The torque for controlling the gate must be 0.8-1kN. Tests were also conducted on an experimental batch of Christmas trees and tubing heads; those results are presented.

  10. Near surface chemistry and corrosion behavior of excimer laser surface-melted AISI type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, D.R.; Frydrych, D.J.; Jervis, T.R.

    1988-05-01

    The effects of excimer laser surface melting on the near-surface chemistry, and corrosion behavior of AISI 304 stainless steel have been examined as a function of total energy deposited on the specimen. The surface chemistry resulting from the laser treatments has been examined using Auger electron spectroscopy. Electrochemical methods were used to monitor the corrosion behavior of the specimens in deaerated 0.1 M NaCl. Electron microscopy was used to characterize the extent of local corrosion of the specimens. Laser treatment was observed to increase the chromium concentration of the surface oxide and to reduce the number of pits. Two types of pits were observed on untreated material, but only one type of pit occurred after laser treatment. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Helium effects on mechanical properties and microstructure of high fluence ion-irradiated RAFM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, H.; Kohyama, A.; Tanigawa, H.; Sakasegawa, H.

    2007-08-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels, RAFS, are leading candidates for the blanket and first wall of fusion reactors, and effects of displacement damage and helium production on mechanical properties and microstructures are important to these applications. Because it is the most effective way to obtain systematic and accurate information about microstructural response under fusion environment, single-(Fe 3+) and dual-(Fe 3+ + He +) irradiations were performed followed by TEM observation and nano-indentation hardness measurement. Dual-ion irradiation at 420 °C induced finer defect clusters compared to single-ion irradiation. These fine defect clusters caused large differences in the hardness increase between these irradiations. TEM analysis clarified that radiation induced precipitates were MX precipitates (M: Ta, W). Small defects invisible to TEM possibly caused the large increase in hardness, in addition to the hardness increment produced by radiation induced MX. In this work, radiation hardening and microstructural evolution accompanied by the synergistic effects to high fluences are discussed.

  12. Stability of the strengthening nanoprecipitates in reduced activation ferritic steels under Fe2+ ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-02-01

    The stability of MX-type precipitates is critical to retain mechanical properties of both reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) and conventional FM steels at elevated temperatures. Radiation resistance of TaC, TaN, and VN nanoprecipitates irradiated up to ∼49 dpa at 500 °C using Fe2+ is investigated in this work. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) utilized in standard and scanning mode (STEM) reveals the non-stoichiometric nature of the nanoprecipitates. Irradiation did not alter their crystalline nature. The radiation resistance of these precipitates, in an order of reduced resistance, is TaC, VN, and TaN. Particle dissolution, growth, and reprecipitation were the modes of irradiation-induced instability. Irradiation also facilitated formation of Fe2W type Laves phase limited to the VN and TaN bearing alloys. This result suggests that nitrogen level should be controlled to a minimal level in alloys to gain greater radiation resistance of the MX-type precipitates at similar temperatures as well as postpone the formation and subsequent coarsening of Laves phase.

  13. Characterization of dual-phase steel microstructure by combined submicrometer EBSD and EPMA carbon measurements.

    PubMed

    Pinard, Philippe T; Schwedt, Alexander; Ramazani, Ali; Prahl, Ulrich; Richter, Silvia

    2013-08-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) measurements are combined to characterize an industrial produced dual-phase steel containing some bainite fraction. High-resolution carbon mappings acquired on a field emission electron microprobe are utilized to validate and improve the identification of the constituents (ferrite, martensite, and bainite) performed by EBSD using the image quality and kernel average misorientation. The combination eliminates the ambiguity between the identification of bainite and transformation-induced dislocation zones, encountered if only the kernel average misorientation is considered. The detection of carbon in high misorientation regions confirms the presence of bainite. These results are corroborated by secondary electron images after nital etching. Limitations of this combined method due to differences between the spatial resolution of EBSD and EPMA are assessed. Moreover, a quantification procedure adapted to carbon analysis is presented and used to measure the carbon concentration in martensite and bainite on a submicrometer scale. From measurements on reference materials, this method gives an accuracy of 0.02 wt% C and a precision better than 0.05 wt% C despite unavoidable effects of hydrocarbon contamination.

  14. The generation of wear-resistant antimicrobial stainless steel surfaces by active screen plasma alloying with N and nanocrystalline Ag.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yangchun; Li, Xiaoying; Sammons, Rachel; Dong, Hanshan

    2010-04-01

    Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), a large proportion of which are derived from contact transmission, represent a massive global challenge. In this study a novel active screen plasma (ASP) alloying technology has been developed to generate highly durable antimicrobial surfaces by combining a wear-resistant S-phase with nanocrystalline silver for medical grade stainless steel. The phase constituent, microstructure, composition and surface roughness of the alloyed surfaces were fully characterized, and the surface hardness, wear resistance and antimicrobial efficiency of the treated surfaces were evaluated. Experimental results showed that the surface hardness and sliding wear resistance of medical grade 316LVM stainless steel can be effectively improved by the ASP alloying treatment; furthermore, the Ag alloyed S-phase can achieve 93% reduction in Escherichia coli (E. coli) after 6 h contact time. Therefore, the novel ASP alloying treatment can not only improve wear resistance but also confer antibacterial activity to stainless steel surfaces.

  15. Surface layer structure of AISI 1020 steel at different stages of dry sliding under electric current of high density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleutdinov, K. A.; Rubtsov, V. Ye; Fadin, V. V.; Aleutdinova, M. I.

    2016-02-01

    Wear intensity of the sliding electric contact steel 1020/steel 1045 depending on sliding time is presented at the contact current density higher than 100 A/cm2 without lubricant. It is shown that wear intensity of 1020 steel decreases at increasing of sliding time. Wear intensity is stabilized after some sliding time. This time (burn-in time) decreases at reduction of current density. Structural changes are realized in surface layer. Signs of liquid phase are observed on sliding surface. This liquid isn't a result of melting. It is established using Auger spectrometry that the contact layer contains up to 50 at.% of oxygen.

  16. Shaping of steel mold surface of lens array by electrical discharge machining with single rod electrode.

    PubMed

    Takino, Hideo; Hosaka, Takahiro

    2014-11-20

    We propose a method for fabricating a lens array mold by electrical discharge machining (EDM). In this method, the tips of rods are machined individually to form a specific surface, and then a number of the machined rods are arranged to construct an electrode for EDM. The repetition of the EDM process using the electrode enables a number of lens elements to be produced on the mold surface. The effectiveness of our proposed method is demonstrated by shaping a lens array mold made of stainless steel with 16 spherical elements, in which the EDM process with a single rod electrode is repeatedly conducted.

  17. Influence of Alginate on Attachment of Vibrio spp. to Stainless Steel Surfaces in Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Andrew S.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of alginate on the attachment of Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio pelagius biovar II to stainless steel was investigated. When the bacteria were in stationary phase, alginate decreased the number of attached bacteria in the case of each Vibrio sp. In contrast, when V. pelagius biovar II was grown on alginate and harvested in log phase, attachment was increased. This effect may be due to nutrient availability at the surface or to receptors on the bacterial surface which interact with alginate adsorbed to the metal. PMID:16347345

  18. Calibration of mass spectrometric measurements of gas phase reactions on steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, H.; Falk, M.; Wuttke, T.

    2015-03-01

    The sampling of the surface-near gas composition using a mass spectrometer (MS-Probe) is a valuable tool within a hot dip process simulator. Since reference samples with well characterized surface coverage are usually not available, steel samples can deliver quantifiable amounts of the process relevant species H2O, CO and H2 using the decarburization reaction with water vapor. Such "artificial calibration samples" (ACS) can be used for the calibration of the MS-Probe measurements. The carbon release rate, which is governed by the diffusion law, was determined by GDOES, since the diffusion coefficients of carbon in steel samples are usually not known. The measured carbon concentration profiles in the ACS after the thermal treatment confirmed the validity of the diffusion model described in this paper. The carbon bulk concentration > 100 ppm is sufficient for the use of a steel material as ACS. The experimental results reported in this paper reveal, that with the MS-Probe the LOQ of less than one monolayer of iron oxide can be achieved.

  19. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATE STAINLESS STEEL SURFACE TREATMENTS FOR MASS SPECTROSCOPY AND OTHER TRITIUM SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.; Mauldin, C.; Neikirk, K.

    2012-02-29

    There are specific components in the SRS Tritium Facilities that are required to introduce as few chemical impurities (such as protium and methane) as possible into the process gas. Two such components are the inlet systems for the mass spectroscopy facilities and hydrogen isotope mix standard containers. Two vendors now passivate stainless steel components for these systems, and both are relatively small businesses whose future viability can be questioned, which creates the need for new sources. Stainless steel containers were designed to evaluate alternate surface treatment vendors for tritium storage and handling for these high purity tritium systems. Five vendors applied their own 'best' surface treatments to two containers each - one was a current vendor, another was a chemical vapor deposited silicon coating, and the other three were electropolishing and chemical cleaning vendors. Pure tritium gas was introduced into all ten containers and the composition was monitored over time. The only observed impurities in the gas were some HT, less CT{sub 4}, and very small amounts of T{sub 2}O in all cases. The currently used vendor treated containers contained the least impurities. The chemical vapor deposited silicon treatment resulted in the highest impurity levels. Sampling one set of containers after about one month of tritium exposure revealed the impurity level to be nearly the same as that after more than a year of exposure - this result suggests that cleaning new stainless steel components by tritium gas contact for about a month may be a worthy operation.

  20. Effect of microbial treatment on the prevention and removal of paraffin deposits on stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meng; Li, Wen-Hong; Lu, Mang; Zhang, Zhong-Zhi; Luo, Yi-Jing; Qiao, Wei; Sun, Shan-Shan; Zhong, Wei-Zhang; Zhang, Min

    2012-11-01

    In this study, biosurfactant-producing strain N2 and non-biosurfactant producing stain KB18 were used to investigate the effects of microbial treatment on the prevention and removal of paraffin deposits on stainless steel surfaces. Strain N2, with a biosurfactant production capacity, reduced the contact angle of stainless steel to 40.04°, and the corresponding adhesion work of aqueous phase was decreased by 26.5 mJ/m(2). By contrast, KB18 could only reduce the contact angle to 50.83°, with a corresponding 7.6 mJ/m(2) decrease in the aqueous phase work adhesion. The paraffin removal test showed that the paraffin removal efficiencies of strain N2 and KB18 were 79.0% and 61.2%, respectively. Interestingly, the N2 cells could attach on the surface of the oil droplets to inhibit droplets coalescence. These results indicate that biosurfactant-producing strains can alter the wettability of stainless steel and thus eliminate paraffin deposition.

  1. Reduction of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms on stainless steel and polystyrene surfaces by essential oils.

    PubMed

    Desai, Monil A; Soni, Kamlesh A; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna; Schilling, M Wes; Silva, Juan L

    2012-07-01

    Plant-derived essential oils were tested for their ability to eliminate biofilms of Listeria monocytogenes on polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces. Various concentrations of essential oils were tested with different contact times on biofilms of various ages. Preliminarily screening of nine essential oils and related phenolic compounds in a disk diffusion assay revealed that thyme oil, oregano oil, and carvacrol had the highest antimicrobial activity. Further screening of these three compounds against 21 L. monocytogenes strains representing all 13 serotypes indicated some strain-specific variations in antimicrobial activity. For 1-day-old biofilms of mixed L. monocytogenes strains produced at 22°C on polystyrene microtiter plates, only 0.1% concentrations of thyme oil, oregano oil, and carvacrol were needed to eliminate 7 log CFU per well. On the stainless steel coupons, a 0.5% concentration of these compounds was adequate to completely eliminate 4-day-old biofilms at 7 log CFU per coupon. Our findings indicate that these compounds are potential candidates for elimination of L. monocytogenes biofilms on stainless steel and polystyrene surfaces.

  2. Fabrication of spectrally selective solar surfaces by the thermal treatment of austenitic stainless steel aisi 321

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V.C.

    1981-05-19

    The spectrally selective solar surfaces have been produced after heating the austenitic stainless steel aisi 321 at a firing temperature of 843* K. And for firing times ranging from 10 to 20 minutes. The heating was carried out in a constant temperature oven under normal atmospheric conditions. The optimum values of solar absorptance alpha S and near-normal emittance epsilon S were found to be alpha S 0.92+0.02, epsilon S 0.22 + or - 0.02 respectively. The corresponding values for the unheated steel were 0.50 + or - 0.02 and 0.22 + or - 0.22. Severe temperature treatments like quenching in liquid nitrogen at 77* K. Produced no adverse visible affect on the quality of the selective surfaces. It shows that the thermal coatings so produced are very tough and durable. The value of solar absorptance and near-normal thermal emittance remained unchanged after quenching in liquod nitrogen. The thermal coatings so produced not only offer a technical advantage but also economic advantage over any of the existing techniques for the manufacture of stainless steel solar panels.

  3. Facile fabrication of micro-nano-rod structures for inducing a superamphiphobic property on steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Yu, Sirong

    2016-01-01

    The development of the lyophobic surface has potentially practical value in many fields. In this study, a superamphiphobic ZnO film was fabricated on X90 pipeline steel surface via a combined approach using electrodeposition, hydrothermal treatment and chemical modification. The ZnO with micro-nano-rod structures was in situ grown on the deposited Zn coating, and the chemical modification achieved superomniphobic property of the ZnO film. The contact angles of water and glycerol on this film were about 157.59° and 153.76°, respectively, and the sliding angles of them were <10°. In addition, the superamphiphobic ZnO film was excellent repellent to other liquids, including salted water, ethanol-water, crude oil and wax. Both the morphology and the low-surface-energy material play key roles in fabricating the superamphiphobic ZnO film on the steel surface. Importantly, the deposited Zn coating and the superamphiphobic ZnO film ensure the surface with corrosion resistance and excellent lyophobic property, respectively.

  4. An investigation of phase transformation and crystallinity in laser surface modified H13 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqida, S. N.; Brabazon, D.; Naher, S.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a laser surface modification process of AISI H13 tool steel using 0.09, 0.2 and 0.4 mm size of laser spot with an aim to increase hardness properties. A Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 slab laser was used to process AISI H13 tool steel samples. Samples of 10 mm diameter were sectioned to 100 mm length in order to process a predefined circumferential area. The parameters selected for examination were laser peak power, overlap percentage and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was conducted to measure crystallinity of the laser-modified surface. X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples were recorded using a Bruker D8 XRD system with Cu K α ( λ=1.5405 Å) radiation. The diffraction patterns were recorded in the 2 θ range of 20 to 80°. The hardness properties were tested at 981 mN force. The laser-modified surface exhibited reduced crystallinity compared to the un-processed samples. The presence of martensitic phase was detected in the samples processed using 0.4 mm spot size. Though there was reduced crystallinity, a high hardness was measured in the laser-modified surface. Hardness was increased more than 2.5 times compared to the as-received samples. These findings reveal the phase source of the hardening mechanism and grain composition in the laser-modified surface.

  5. Angle-dependent lubricated tribological properties of stainless steel by femtosecond laser surface texturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuo; Li, Yang-Bo; Bai, Feng; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Lubricated tribological properties of stainless steel were investigated by femtosecond laser surface texturing. Regular-arranged micro-grooved textures with different spacing and micro-groove inclination angles (between micro-groove path and sliding direction) were produced on AISI 304L steel surfaces by an 800 nm femtosecond laser. The spacing of micro-groove was varied from 25 to 300 μm, and the inclination angles of micro-groove were measured as 90° and 45°. The tribological properties of the smooth and textured surfaces with micro-grooves were investigated by reciprocating ball-on-flat tests against Al2O3 ceramic balls under starved oil lubricated conditions. Results showed that the spacing of micro-grooves significantly affected the tribological property. With the increase of micro-groove spacing, the average friction coefficients and wear rates of textured surfaces initially decreased then increased. The tribological performance also depended on the inclination angles of micro-grooves. Among the investigated patterns, the micro-grooves perpendicular to the sliding direction exhibited the lowest average friction coefficient and wear rate to a certain extent. Femtosecond laser-induced surface texturing may remarkably improve friction and wear properties if the micro-grooves were properly distributed.

  6. Surface chemistry of stainless steel and evaporated titanium layers in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Staib, P.; Dylla, H.F.; Rossenagel, S.M.

    1980-08-01

    The combined use of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy is shown to be a powerful tool in the investigation of the chemical modifications of a surface in interaction with a plasma. The reported investigations are performed in-situ in the surface analysis station of the PDX tokamak. The evolution of stainless steel surfaces is followed after various treatments such as hydrogen glow discharge conditioning (GDC), exposure to tokamak discharges, and ion sputtering. Iron oxides are shown to be partially reduced by exposure to GDC; the metal-oxide binding is converted to metal-hydroxide binding from which water can be desorbed. The oxygen behavior on evaporated titanium films is substantially different: the oxide layer evolves to higher oxidation states during exposure to GDC. In contrast, the behavior of carbon is identical on both stainless steel and titanium surfaces: carbon is removed during exposure to GDC via the formation of methane which can spontaneously desorb from the surface.

  7. Correlation of outgassing of stainless steel and aluminum with various surface treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Dylla; D. M. Manos; P. H. LaMarche

    1993-09-01

    A number of important applications of ultrahigh vacuum technology involve the use of vacuum systems which cannot be baked in situ, e.g., materials processing equipment and various designs of accelerators and fusion devices. A choice of vessel material and surface treatment which minimizes outgassing in unbaked systems has obvious advantages. We report on a systematic comparison of outgassing measurements from type 304 stainless steels and type 6061/63 aluminum alloys after various standard and advanced surface treatments. Correlations were made with high-resolution secondary ion mass spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiles of the passivation oxide layer and profilometry measurements of the surface roughness. The observed outgassing rates Q obeyed a power law Q=Q{sub 0}t{sup -n} where n varied from 0.94 to 1.27. Over the standard observation period (50 h), the outgassing was dominated ([lte(approx)] 85%) by H{sub 2}O. The absolute outgassing rates varied by only a factor of 2.8 for the stainless steels and by a factor of 1.4 for the aluminum alloys, even though the surface roughness differed by more than two orders of magnitude. The high-value-added surface treatments (i.e., electropolishing) did not have significantly lower outgassing in comparison to simple detergent washes.

  8. Laser Treatment on the Coating Surface Having Been Performed by Means of Plasma Surfacing With Powder Made of M2 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaidarova, A. A.; Silantiev, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    In this study researches were carried out about the impact of pulsed laser irradiation on the surface of M2 steel which had been surfaced beforehand on steel 20 by poweder-pasma surfacing technique. The surface treatment was performed by the single point laser action and by successive imposition of overlapped impulses. During the surfacing the average irradiation power was varied from 15.8 to 21.0 W. The impulse duration in all points was constant and it was 7 msec. In this study it was researched the influence of laser-beam power change on the depth of penetration, changes in the structure and microhardness of treated areas.

  9. RESULTS OF CHARACTERIZATION TESTS OF THE SURFACES OF A COMMERCIALLY CARBURIZED AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K

    2004-01-07

    A commercial surface carburization treatment that shows promise for hardening the surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the Spallation Neutron Source against cavitation erosion and pitting caused by the action of pulsed pressure waves in the liquid mercury target has been investigated. To verify promotional claims for the treatment and to uncover any factors that might be of concern for the integrity of a carburized target vessel, some characterization tests of the nature of the surface layers of carburized austenitic 316LN stainless steel were conducted. The findings support most of the claims. The carburized layer is about 35 {micro}m thick. Its indentation hardness is about five times larger than that of the substrate steel and declines rapidly with depth into the layer. The surface is distorted by the treatment, and the austenite lattice is enlarged. The corrosion resistance of the carburized layer in an acid medium is greater than that for untreated austenite. The layer is not brittle; it is plastically deformable and is quite resistant to cracking during straining. Contrary to the provider's assertations, the maximum carbon content of the layer is much less than 6-7 wt% carbon, and the carbon is not simply contained in supersaturated solid solution; some of it is present in a previously unreported iron carbide phase located at the very surface. Large variations were found in the thickness of the layer, and they signify that controls may be needed to ensure a uniform thickness for treatment of the SNS target vessel. Inclusion stringers and {delta}-ferrite phase embraced in the treated layer are less resistant to chemical attack than the treated austenite. From a cavitation pitting perspective under SNS bombardment, such non-austenitic phases may provide preferential sites for pitting. The shallow depth of the hardened layer will require use of protection measures to avoid mishandling damage to the layer during assembly and installation of a target

  10. The use of physicochemical methods to detect organic food soils on stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, K A; Benson, P; Smith, L A; Verran, J

    2009-11-01

    Food processing surfaces fouled with organic material pose problems ranging from aesthetic appearance, equipment malfunction and product contamination. Despite the importance of organic soiling for subsequent product quality, little is known about the interaction between surfaces and organic soil components. A range of complex and defined food soils was applied to 304 stainless steel (SS) surfaces to determine the effect of type and concentration of soil on surface physicochemical parameters, viz surface hydrophobicity (DeltaG(iwi)), surface free energy (gamma(s)), Lifshitz van der Waals (gamma_LW(s)), Lewis acid base (gamma_AB(s)), electron acceptor (gamma_+(s) ) and electron donor (gamma_-(s) ) measurements. When compared to the control surface, changes in gamma_AB(s), gamma_+(s) and gamma_-(s) were indicative of surface soiling. However, soil composition and surface coverage were heterogeneous, resulting in complex data being generated from which trends could not be discerned. These results demonstrate that the retention of food soil produces changes in the physicochemical parameters of the surface that could be used to indicate the hygienic status of a surface. PMID:20183133

  11. Effect of Shot Peening on Surface Chracteristics of Carbon Steel with Different Heat Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Yasunori; Yakura, Ryota

    2011-01-01

    The shot peening process is one of the surface treatments. The peening effects are characterized by the fact that the surface layer undergoes large plastic deformation due to the collision of shots. This action imparts compressive residual stress on the surface, thus improving the fatigue life of the component. Therefore, this process has been utilized in order to improve the performance of engineering components. Researchers have been found a number of new phenomena in the shot peening process. It is well known that the peening effects are greatly influenced by the processing history or the thermal history of material. The hardness near the surface of the deformed material or heat treated material was often decreased by shot peening. Presently, little is known about the relation between hardness of the shot peened surface and the processing history of materials. In the present study, the effects of shot peening conditions on the surface characteristics of medium carbon steels with different heat treatments were investigated. In the experiment, the shot peening process was performed with an air-type machine using cast steel balls. Air pressure is in the range from 0.4 to 0.8 MPa and coverage is from 200 to 2000%. The workpiece was used the commercial medium carbon steel JIS-S45C. These are annealed at 900° C for 7.2 ks and quenched and tempered from 850° C in oil. Hardness, surface roughness, and compressive residual stress in the peened workpieces were measured. When the tempered workpiece was shot peened, the hardness of the surface was considerably lowered. The hardness distribution shows work softening near the surface. This amount increases with increasing coverage. This is due to the influence of processing heat generated by the plastic deformation during shot peening. The maximum residual stress appears about 840 MPa at about 0.180 mm in depth from the surface. It was found that the difference of the thermal history of the workpiece influences the hardness

  12. Surface modification of superaustenitic and maraging stainless steels by low-temperature gas-phase carburization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentil, Johannes

    Low-temperature gas-phase carburization of 316L austenitic stainless steel was developed in recent years by the Swagelok company. This process generates great mechanical and electrochemical surface properties. Hardness, wear resistance, fatigue behavior, and corrosion resistance are dramatically improved, while the formation of carbides is effectively suppressed. This new technique is of technical, economical, but especially of scientific interest because the surface properties of common stainless steel can be enhanced to a level of more sophisticated and more expensive superalloys. The consequential continuation of previous research is the application of the carburization process to other steel grades. Differences in chemical composition, microstructure, and passivity between the various alloys may cause technical problems and it is expected that the initial process needs to be optimized for every specific material. This study presents results of low-temperature carburization of AL-6XN (superaustenitic stainless steel) and PH13-8Mo (precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel). Both alloys have been treated successfully in terms of creating a hardened surface by introducing high amounts of interstitially dissolved carbon. The surface hardness of AL-6XN was increased to 12GPa and is correlated with a colossal carbon supersaturation at the surface of up to 20 at.%. The hardened case develops a carburization time-dependent thickness between 10mum after one carburization cycle and up to 35mum after four treatments and remains highly ductile. Substantial broadening of X-ray diffraction peaks in low-temperature carburized superaustenitic stainless steels are attributed to the generation of very large compressive biaxial residual stresses. Those large stresses presumably cause relaxations of the surface, so-called undulations. Heavily expanded regions of carburized AL-6XN turn ferromagnetic. Non-carburized AL-6XN is known for its outstanding corrosion resistance

  13. Assessment of precipitation in alloy steel using nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Sebastian; Matlack, Kathryn H.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Wall, James J.; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear ultrasonic waves have shown to be sensitive to various microstructural changes in metals including coherent precipitates; these precipitates introduce a strain field in the lattice structure. The thermal aging of certain alloy steels leads to the formation of coherent precipitates, which pin dislocations and contribute to the generation of a second harmonic component. A precipitate hardenable material namely 17-4 PH stainless steel is thermally treated in this research to obtain different precipitation stages, and then the influence of precipitates on the acoustic nonlinearity parameter is assessed. Conclusions about the microstrucutural changes in the material are drawn based on the results from a nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave measurement and complementary thermo-electric power, hardness and ultrasonic velocity measurements. The results show that the nonlinear parameter is sensitive to coherent precipitates in the material and moreover that precipitation characteristics can be characterized based on the obtained experimental data.

  14. Corrosion in Supercritical carbon Dioxide: Materials, Environmental Purity, Surface Treatments, and Flow Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2013-12-10

    The supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle is gaining importance for power conversion in the Generation IV fast reactor system because of its high conversion efficiencies. When used in conjunction with a sodium fast reactor, the supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle offers additional safety advantages by eliminating potential sodium-water interactions that may occur in a steam cycle. In power conversion systems for Generation IV fast reactors, supercritical CO{sub 2} temperatures could be in the range of 30°C to 650°C, depending on the specific component in the system. Materials corrosion primarily at high temperatures will be an important issue. Therefore, the corrosion performance limits for materials at various temperatures must be established. The proposed research will have four objectives centered on addressing corrosion issues in a high-temperature supercritical CO{sub 2} environment: Task 1: Evaluation of corrosion performance of candidate alloys in high-purity supercritical CO{sub 2}: The following alloys will be tested: Ferritic-martensitic Steels NF616 and HCM12A, austenitic alloys Incoloy 800H and 347 stainless steel, and two advanced concept alloys, AFA (alumina forming austenitic) steel and MA754. Supercritical CO{sub 2} testing will be performed at 450°C, 550°C, and 650°C at a pressure of 20 MPa, in a test facility that is already in place at the proposing university. High purity CO{sub 2} (99.9998%) will be used for these tests. Task 2: Investigation of the effects of CO, H{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} impurities in supercritical CO{sub 2} on corrosion: Impurities that will inevitably present in the CO{sub 2} will play a critical role in dictating the extent of corrosion and corrosion mechanisms. These effects must be understood to identify the level of CO{sub 2} chemistry control needed to maintain sufficient levels of purity to manage corrosion. The individual effects of important impurities CO, H{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2} will be investigated by adding them

  15. Influence of Thermal Aging on the Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Dual Phase Precipitation Hardened Powder Metallurgy Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Increasing demand for high strength powder metallurgy (PM) steels has resulted in the development of dual phase PM steels. In this work, the effects of thermal aging on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels of varying ferrite-martensite content were examined. Quantitative analyses of the inherent porosity and phase fractions were conducted on the steels and no significant differences were noted with respect to aging temperature. Tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation to fracture all increased with increasing aging temperature reaching maxima at 538°C in most cases. Increased strength and decreased ductility were observed in steels of higher martensite content. Nanoindentation of the individual microconstituents was employed to obtain a fundamental understanding of the strengthening contributions. Both the ferrite and martensite hardness values increased with aging temperature and exhibited similar maxima to the bulk tensile properties. Due to the complex non-uniform stresses and strains associated with conventional nanoindentation, micropillar compression has become an attractive method to probe local mechanical behavior while limiting strain gradients and contributions from surrounding features. In this study, micropillars of ferrite and martensite were fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) milling of dual phase precipitation hardened powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steels. Compression testing was conducted using a nanoindenter equipped with a flat punch indenter. The stress-strain curves of the individual microconstituents were calculated from the load-displacement curves less the extraneous displacements of the system. Using a rule of mixtures approach in conjunction with porosity corrections, the mechanical properties of ferrite and martensite were combined for comparison to tensile tests of the bulk material, and reasonable agreement was found for the ultimate tensile

  16. Machining Performance and Surface Integrity of AISI D2 Die Steel Machined Using Electrical Discharge Surface Grinding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Rajesh; Kumar, Harmesh; Singh, Shankar

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study is to establish optimum machining conditions for EDSG of AISI D2 die steel through an experimental investigation using Taguchi Methodology. To achieve combined grinding and electrical discharge machining, metal matrix composite electrodes (Cu-SiCp) were processed through powder metallurgy route. A rotary spindle attachment was developed to perform the EDSG experimental runs on EDM machine. Relationships were developed between various input parameters such as peak current, speed, pulse-on time, pulse-off time, abrasive particle size, and abrasive particle concentration, and output characteristics such as material removal rate and surface roughness. The optimized parameters were further validated by conducting confirmation experiments.

  17. Method of Electrolyte-Plasma Surface Hardening of 65G and 20GL Low-Alloy Steels Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhadilov, Bauyrzhan; Zhurerova, Laila; Pavlov, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    This work is devoted to formation of modified surface layers in 65G and 20GL steels which using for the manufacture of railway transport parts, as well as the study of influence of the parametersof electrolyte-plasma surface hardening methodon the changes in structural-phase states, improving of wear-resistance. The process of electrolyte-plasma surface hardening of 65G and 20GL steels samples conducted in the electrolyte from water solution of 20% sodium carbonate, in the mode ~850°C - 2 seconds, ∼⃒1200°C - 3 seconds. It is established that in the initial state 20GL steel has ferrite-pearlite structure, and the 60G steel consists of pearlite and cement structure. After application of electrolyte-plasma surface hardening is observed the formation of carbides particles and martensite phase components in the structure of 20GL and 60G steels. It is determined that after electrolyte-plasma surface hardening with heating time - 2 seconds, the abrasive wear-resistance of 65G and 20GL steels increased to 1.3 times and 1.2 times, respectively, and the microhardness is increased to 1.6 times and 1.3 times, respectively.

  18. Effect of Surface Integrity of Hard Turned AISI 52100 Steel on Fatigue Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Watkins, Thomas R; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Riester, Laura

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses the relationship between surface integrity and fatigue life of hard turned AISI 52100 steel (60-62 HRC), with grinding as a benchmark. The impact of superfinishing on the fatigue performance of hard turned and ground surfaces is also discussed. Specifically, the surface integrity and fatigue life of the following five distinct surface conditions are examined: hard turned with continuous white layer, hard turned with no white layer, ground, and superfinished hard turned and ground specimens. Surface integrity of the specimens is characterized via surface topography measurement, metallography, residual stress measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and nano-indentation tests. High cycle tension-tension fatigue tests show that the presence of white layer does not adversely affect fatigue life and that, on average, the hard turned surface performs as well or better than the ground surface. The effect of superfinishing is to exaggerate these differences in performance. The results obtained from this study suggest that the effect of residual stress on fatigue life is more significant than the effect of white layer. For the hard turned surfaces, the fatigue life is found to be directly proportional to both the surface compressive residual stress and the maximum compressive residual stress. Possible explanations for the observed effects are discussed.

  19. Influence of cryogenic cooling on surface grinding of stainless steel 316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manimaran, G.; Pradeep kumar, M.; Venkatasamy, R.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation is to evaluate the improvements in the grinding force and surface roughness by the application of LN2 (liquid nitrogen) as a coolant in the cryogenic grinding process. Cryogenic machining is an environment concerned green manufacturing process. The grinding experiments were conducted on stainless steel 316 in three environments, namely, dry, wet and cryogenic cooling. The experimental results show that a reduction in the grinding zone temperature leads to excellent benefits in the machining performance. The cryogenic coolant offers 37% and 13% reduction in the grinding forces compared to dry and wet cooling. The surface roughness under cryogenic cooling is found to produce 59% and 32% lesser values and fewer defects, compared to surfaces ground with dry and wet cooling. The enhancements realized by the delivery pressure of the cryogen, with respect to the grinding forces, and surface roughness were also studied.

  20. Improving the Surface Roughness of Pickled Steel Strip by Control of Rolling Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yao-Nan; Lin, Szu-Ning; Liou, Horng-Yih; Chang, Chu-Wei; Wu, Chia-Chan; Wang, Ying-Chun

    2013-01-01

    This investigation is to analyze the surface roughness problem of low carbon pickled steel strips from the view points of prior hot rolling conditions and the hot-rolled scales. The results showed that, compared with other parameters, the most important factor in hot rolling to affect the surface roughness was the rolling temperature. As the temperature was increased, the amount of the outer brittle α-Fe2O3 increased, leading to rough scale/substrate interface and rough surface after pickling. However, the effect of coiling temperature was almost negligible because no further rolling existed after that stage. Quantitative estimation showed that decrease in rolling temperature in this investigation reduced the surface roughness, Ra, from 1.06-1.78 μm to 0.88-1.10 μm after pickling in laboratory. Similar degree of improvement in roughness was also observed after pickling in mill.

  1. Evaluation of a Surface Treatment on the Performance of Stainless Steels for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Holcomb, Adler, T.A.; G.R.; Wilson, R.D.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-04-01

    Pack cementation-like Cerium based surface treatments have been found to be effective in enhancing the oxidation resistance of ferritic steels (Crofer 22APU) for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The application of either a CeN- or CeO2 based surface treatment results in a decrease in weight gain by a factor of three after 4000 hours exposure to air+3%H2O at 800oC. Similar oxide scales formed on treated and untreated surfaces, with a continuous Cr-Mn outer oxide layer and a continuous inner Cr2O3 layer formed on the surface. However, the thickness of the scales, and the amount of internal oxidation were significantly reduced with the treatment, leading to the decrease in oxidation rate. This presentation will detail the influence of the treatment on the electrical properties of the interconnect. Half-cell experiments (LSM cathode sandwiched between two steel interconnects) and full SOFC button cell experiments were run with treated and untreated interconnects. Preliminary results indicate the Ce treatment can improve SOFC performance.

  2. Surface modification of AISI H13 tool steel by laser cladding with NiTi powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norhafzan, B.; Aqida, S. N.; Chikarakara, E.; Brabazon, D.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents laser cladding of NiTi powder on AISI H13 tool steel surface for surface properties enhancement. The cladding process was conducted using Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 laser system with wavelength of 10.6 µm. NiTi powder was pre-placed on H13 tool steel surface. The laser beam was focused with a spot size of 90 µm on the sample surface. Laser parameters were set to 1515 and 1138 W peak power, 18 and 24 % duty cycle and 2300-3500 Hz laser pulse repetition frequency. Hardness properties of the modified layer were characterized by Wilson Hardness tester. Metallographic study and chemical composition were conducted using field emission scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDXS) analysis. Results showed that hardness of NiTi clad layer increased three times that of the substrate material. The EDXS analysis detected NiTi phase presence in the modified layer up to 9.8 wt%. The metallographic study shows high metallurgical bonding between substrate and modified layer. These findings are significant to both increased hardness and erosion resistance of high-wear-resistant components and elongating their lifetime.

  3. Effects of inoculation level, material hydration, and stainless steel surface roughness on the transfer of listeria monocytogenes from inoculated bologna to stainless steel and high-density polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Andrés; Autio, Wesley R; McLandsborough, Lynne A

    2007-06-01

    The influence of inoculation level, material hydration, and stainless steel surface roughness on the transfer of Listeria monocytogenes from inoculated bologna to processing surfaces (stainless steel and polyethylene) was assessed. Slices of bologna (14 g) were inoculated with Listeria at different levels, from 10(5) to 10(9) CFU/cm2. Transfer experiments were done at a constant contact time (30 s) and pressure (45 kPa) with a universal testing machine. After transfer, cells that had been transferred to sterile stainless steel and polyethylene were removed and counted, and the efficiency of transfer (EOT) was calculated. As the inoculation level increased from 10(5) to 10(9) CFU/cm(2), the absolute level of transfer increased in a similar fashion. By calculating EOTs, the data were normalized, and the initial inoculation level had no effect on the transfer (P > 0.05). The influence of hydration level on stainless steel, high-density polyethylene, and material type was investigated, and the EOTs ranged from 0.1 to 1 under all the conditions tested. Our results show that transfers to wetted processing surfaces (mean EOT = 0.43) were no different from dried processing surfaces (mean EOT = 0.35) (P > 0.05). Material type was shown to be a significant factor, with greater numbers of Listeria transferring from bologna to stainless steel (mean EOT = 0.49) than from bologna to polyethylene (mean EOT = 0.28) (P < 0.01). Stainless steel with three different surface roughness (Ra) values of <0.8 microm (target Ra = 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 Vmicrom) and two different finishes (mechanically polished versus mechanically polished and further electropolished) was used to evaluate its effect on the transfer. The surface roughness and finish on the stainless steel did not have any effect on the transfer of Listeria (P > 0.05). Our results showed that when evaluating the transfer of Listeria, the use of EOTs rather than the absolute transfer values is essential to allow comparisons of

  4. Detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in diffusion bonding of steel hollow structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Li, H.; Li, M. Q.

    2016-05-01

    This study focused on the detailed analysis of surface asperity deformation mechanism in similar diffusion bonding as well as on the fabrication of high quality martensitic stainless steel hollow structural components. A special surface with regular patterns was processed to be joined so as to observe the extent of surface asperity deformation under different bonding pressures. Results showed that an undamaged hollow structural component has been obtained with full interfacial contact and the same shear strength to that of base material. Fracture surface characteristic combined with surface roughness profiles distinctly revealed the enhanced surface asperity deformation as the applied pressure increases. The influence of surface asperity deformation mechanism on joint formation was analyzed: (a) surface asperity deformation not only directly expanded the interfacial contact areas, but also released deformation heat and caused defects, indirectly accelerating atomic diffusion, then benefits to void shrinkage; (b) surface asperity deformation readily introduced stored energy difference between two opposite sides of interface grain boundary, resulting in strain induced interface grain boundary migration. In addition, the influence of void on interface grain boundary migration was analyzed in detail.

  5. Fatigue Properties of SUS304 Stainless Steel after Ultrasonic Nanocrystal Surface Modification (unsm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K. Y.; Pyoun, Y. S.; Cao, X. J.; Wu, B.; Murakami, R.

    The changing of materials surface properties method always was taken into improving the fatigue strength. In this paper, an ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification(UNSM) technique was used on the SUS 304 stainless steel to form a nanostructured surface layer with different static load(70N, 90N, 110N, 130N) and the vibration strike number was about 20,000times/mm2. The untreated and different condition specimens fatigue strength was all tested by a dual-spindle rotating bending fatigue test machine. SPring-8(a large synchrotron radiation facility) was used to test the surface nanocrystallization components. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscope and a micro-Vickers hardness tester (MVK-E3, Akashi) were separately used to get the surface residual stresses, fracture surface after fatigue testing, metallographic structure and the microhardness of the nanostructured surface layer. The result showed that martensite transformation took place on the surface of specimens, the surface residual stresses had only a small increase and some cracks occurred between the martensite layer and the austenite layer, but the fatigue strength of 90N improved 81%.

  6. Surface preparation effects on GTA (gas tungsten arc) weld penetration in JBK-75 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.D.; Heiple, C.R.; Sturgill, P.L.; Robertson, A.M.; Jamsay, R.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a study are reported here on the effects of surface preparation on the shape of GTA welds on JBK-75, an austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steel similar to A286. Minor changes in surface (weld groove) preparation produced substantial changes in the penetration characteristics and welding behavior of this alloy. Increased and more consistent weld penetration (higher d/w ratios) along with improved arc stability and less arc wander result from wire brushing and other abrasive surface preparations, although chemical and machining methods did not produce any improvement in penetration. Abrasive treatments roughen the surface, increase the surface area, and increase the surface oxide thickness. The increased weld d/w ratio is attributed to oxygen added to the weld pool from the surface oxide on the base metal. The added oxygen alters the surface-tension driven fluid flow pattern in the weld pool. Similar results were observed with changes in filler wire surface oxide thickness, caused by changes in wire production conditions. 15 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Ultralow friction induced by tribochemical reactions: a novel mechanism of lubrication on steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Amann, Tobias; Walter, Michael; Moseler, Michael; Kailer, Andreas; Rühe, Jürgen

    2013-04-30

    The tribological properties of two steel surfaces rubbing against each other are measured while they are in contact with 1,3-diketones of varying structure. Such systems show after a short running-in period ultralow friction properties with a coefficient of friction of as low as μ = 0.005. It is suggested that the extremely favorable friction properties are caused by a tribochemical reaction between the 1,3-diketones and the steel surfaces, leading to formation of a chelated iron-diketo complex. The influence of temperature and the molecular structure of the 1,3 diketo-lubricants onto the friction properties of the system is elucidated under both static and dynamic conditions. With progression of the tribochemical reaction, the sliding surfaces become very conformal and smooth, so that the pressure is greatly reduced and further wear is strongly reduced. All iron particles potentially generated by wear during the initial running-in period are completely dissolved through complex formation. It is proposed that the tribochemical polishing reaction causes a transition from boundary lubrication to fluid lubrication.

  8. Self-affine parameters of fracture surfaces of high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa, Moisés; Schaeffer, Elisa; Guzmán, Yoshua; Aldaco, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    We report the experimental study of crack nucleation and propagation on AISI 4340 and Premomet steels, submitted to different thermal treatments that resulted in different properties and microstructures. Crack initiation and propagation under fatigue, tension and impact conditions were analyzed at different lengthscales. The SEM fractographic study allowed the correlation of the observed mechanisms with the patterns observed on the fracture surfaces. The scaling properties were explored and correlated to the observed mechanisms. Using the topographic data of 3D reconstructed surfaces obtained by laser scanning, we calculated both global and local roughness exponents using different variable-bandwidth methods, obtaining the statistical distributions as a function of the orientation. Although the results tend to the same average global value (close to 0.8) for both steels regardless of the heat-treating condition, their statistical distributions are sensitive to the anisotropy of the microstructure, we also found a correlation of the local roughness exponents with the local orientation of the microstructure and the dimples observed on the fracture surfaces.

  9. Surface Integrity in Grinding Medium Carbon Steel with Miniature Electroplated Monolayer cBN Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashista, Meghanshu; Kumar, Shobhit; Ghosh, Amitava; Paul, Soumitra

    2010-12-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the role of process parameters on grindability of medium carbon steel with particular emphasis on surface integrity. Grinding with miniature monolayer electroplated cBN wheels provided compressive residual stress throughout the experimental domain unlike conventional grinding. This can be attributed to desirable temperature control as the wheel takes away substantial part of grinding heat flux owing to its better thermal conductivity. Micromagnetic or Barkhausen Noise (BN) parameters correlated linearly with the residual stress indicating its applicability in assessing surface integrity of cBN ground products. Increase in maximum grit depth of cut ( h m) provided more grain elongation and surface hardness due to more chip load during chip formation.

  10. Detergency of stainless steel surface soiled with human brain homogenate: an XPS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, M.; Le Mogne, Th.; Perret-Liaudet, A.; Rauwel, G.; Criquelion, J.; De Barros, M. I.; Cêtre, J. C.; Martin, J. M.

    2005-02-01

    In the detergency field of re-usable medical devices, a special attention is focused on the non conventional transmissible agent called prions which is a proteinaceous infectious agent. Few cleaning procedures are effective against prions and few techniques are available to study cleaning effectiveness with respect to proteins in general. In our study, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to evaluate the effectiveness of detergent formulations to remove proteins from stainless steel surface soiled with a brain homogenate (BH) from human origin. Our results showed that XPS is a reliable surface analysis technique to study chemical species remaining on surface and substrate properties after cleaning procedures. A semi-quantitative evaluation of the detergency effectiveness could also be performed.

  11. Correlation of outgassing of stainless steel and aluminum with various surface treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F. ); Manos, D.M. ); LaMarche, P.H. )

    1993-09-01

    A number of important applications of ultrahigh vacuum technology involve the use of vacuum systems which cannot be baked [ital in] [ital situ], e.g., materials processing equipment and various designs of accelerators and fusion devices. A choice of vessel material and surface treatment which minimizes outgassing in unbaked systems has obvious advantages. We report on a systematic comparison of outgassing measurements from type 304 stainless steels and type 6061/63 aluminum alloys after various standard and advanced surface treatments. Correlations were made with high-resolution secondary ion mass spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiles of the passivation oxide layer and profilometry measurements of the surface roughness. The observed outgassing rates [ital Q] obeyed a power law [ital Q]=[ital Q][sub 0][ital t][sup [minus][ital n

  12. Corrosion resistance of the AISI 304, 316 and 321 stainless steel surfaces modified by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szubzda, B.; Antończak, A.; Kozioł, P.; Łazarek, Ł.; Stępak, B.; Łęcka, K.; Szmaja, A.; Ozimek, M.

    2016-02-01

    The article presents the analysis results of the influence of laser fluence on physical and chemical structure and corrosion resistance of stainless steel surfaces modified by irradiating with nanosecond-pulsed laser. The study was carried out for AISI 304, AISI 316 and AISI 321 substrates using Yb:glass fiber laser. All measurements were made for samples irradiated in a broad range of accumulated fluence (10÷400 J/cm2). The electrochemical composition (by EDX) and surface morphology (by SEM) of the prepared surfaces were carried out. Finally, corrosion resistance was analyzed by a potentiodynamic electrochemical test. The obtained results showed very high corrosion resistance for samples made by fluency of values lower than 100 J/cm2. In this case, higher values of corrosion potentials and breakdown potentials were observed. A correlation between corrosion phenomena, the range of laser power (fluence) and the results of chemical and structural tests were also found.

  13. Plasma-enhanced synthesis of bactericidal quaternary ammonium thin layers on stainless steel and cellulose surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jampala, Soujanya N; Sarmadi, M; Somers, E B; Wong, A C L; Denes, F S

    2008-08-19

    We have investigated bottom-up chemical synthesis of quaternary ammonium (QA) groups exhibiting antibacterial properties on stainless steel (SS) and filter paper surfaces via nonequilibrium, low-pressure plasma-enhanced functionalization. Ethylenediamine (ED) plasma under suitable conditions generated films rich in secondary and tertiary amines. These functional structures were covalently attached to the SS surface by treating SS with O 2 and hexamethyldisiloxane plasma prior to ED plasma treatment. QA structures were formed by reaction of the plasma-deposited amines with hexyl bromide and subsequently with methyl iodide. Structural compositions were examined by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and surface topography was investigated with atomic force microscopy and water contact angle measurements. Modified SS surfaces exhibited greater than a 99.9% decrease in Staphylococcus aureus counts and 98% in the case of Klebsiella pneumoniae. The porous filter paper surfaces with immobilized QA groups inactivated 98.7% and 96.8% of S. aureus and K. pneumoniae, respectively. This technique will open up a novel way for the synthesis of stable and very efficient bactericidal surfaces with potential applications in development of advanced medical devices and implants with antimicrobial surfaces.

  14. On Optimization of Surface Roughness of Selective Laser Melted Stainless Steel Parts: A Statistical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrbaey, K.; Wimpenny, D.; Tosi, R.; Manning, W.; Moroz, A.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, the effects of re-melting parameters for postprocessing the surface texture of Additively Manufactured parts using a statistical approach are investigated. This paper focuses on improving the final surface texture of stainless steel (316L) parts, built using a Renishaw SLM 125 machine. This machine employs a fiber laser to fuse fine powder on a layer-by-layer basis to generate three-dimensional parts. The samples were produced using varying angles of inclination in order to generate range of surface roughness between 8 and 20 µm. Laser re-melting (LR) as post-processing was performed in order to investigate surface roughness through optimization of parameters. The re-melting process was carried out using a custom-made hybrid laser re-cladding machine, which uses a 200 W fiber laser. Optimized processing parameters were based on statistical analysis within a Design of Experiment framework, from which a model was then constructed. The results indicate that the best obtainable final surface roughness is about 1.4 µm ± 10%. This figure was obtained when laser power of about 180 W was used, to give energy density between 2200 and 2700 J/cm2 for the re-melting process. Overall, the obtained results indicate LR as a post-build process has the capacity to improve surface finishing of SLM components up to 80%, compared with the initial manufactured surface.

  15. Temperature effects on the static and dynamic fracture behaviors of low-silicon CA-15 tempered stainless steel castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsun; Teng, Hwei-Yuan

    2005-04-01

    In this research we studied the effect of testing temperature on both static and dynamic fracturing behaviors of low-silicon CA-15 martensitic stainless steel (MSS) castings after austenitizing and tempering treatments. The results showed that the material's microstructure was influenced by heat treatment and various testing temperatures would cause different fracturing mechanisms. In static tensile tests, the 573-673 K tempered specimens occurred secondary strengthening at 423 K and 298 K testing temperatures. However, there is a contrast of weakening occurred at 123 K for the same type of tempered samples. The phenomenon was mainly triggered by local cracking at the ferrite/martensitic interface and incoherent precipitate site in the materials because of the existence of shrinkage stress under subzero temperature. In the dynamic strain-rate tests, impact embrittlement occurred in the 573-673 K tempered samples as a result of the tempered martensite embrittlement (TME) phenomenon. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the tempered material was obviously lower than that of the as-cast material. Also, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were performed to correlate the properties attained to the microstructural observation.

  16. Oxidation mechanism of T91 steel in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic: with consideration of internal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhongfei; Wang, Pei; Dong, Hong; Li, Dianzhong; Zhang, Yutuo; Li, Yiyi

    2016-10-01

    Clarification of the microscopic events that occur during oxidation is of great importance for understanding and consequently controlling the oxidation process. In this study the oxidation product formed on T91 ferritic/martensitic steel in oxygen saturated liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 823 K was characterized at the nanoscale using focused-ion beam and transmission electron microscope. An internal oxidation zone (IOZ) under the duplex oxide scale has been confirmed and characterized systematically. Through the microscopic characterization of the IOZ and the inner oxide layer, the micron-scale and nano-scale diffusion of Cr during the oxidation in LBE has been determined for the first time. The micron-scale diffusion of Cr ensures the continuous advancement of IOZ and inner oxide layer, and nano-scale diffusion of Cr gives rise to the typical appearance of the IOZ. Finally, a refined oxidation mechanism including the internal oxidation and the transformation of IOZ to inner oxide layer is proposed based on the discussion. The proposed oxidation mechanism succeeds in bridging the gap between the existing models and experimental observations.

  17. Oxidation mechanism of T91 steel in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic: with consideration of internal oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhongfei; Wang, Pei; Dong, Hong; Li, Dianzhong; Zhang, Yutuo; Li, Yiyi

    2016-01-01

    Clarification of the microscopic events that occur during oxidation is of great importance for understanding and consequently controlling the oxidation process. In this study the oxidation product formed on T91 ferritic/martensitic steel in oxygen saturated liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 823 K was characterized at the nanoscale using focused-ion beam and transmission electron microscope. An internal oxidation zone (IOZ) under the duplex oxide scale has been confirmed and characterized systematically. Through the microscopic characterization of the IOZ and the inner oxide layer, the micron-scale and nano-scale diffusion of Cr during the oxidation in LBE has been determined for the first time. The micron-scale diffusion of Cr ensures the continuous advancement of IOZ and inner oxide layer, and nano-scale diffusion of Cr gives rise to the typical appearance of the IOZ. Finally, a refined oxidation mechanism including the internal oxidation and the transformation of IOZ to inner oxide layer is proposed based on the discussion. The proposed oxidation mechanism succeeds in bridging the gap between the existing models and experimental observations. PMID:27734928

  18. Evidence of extensive diversity in bacterial adherence mechanisms that exploit unanticipated stainless steel surface structural complexity for biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elisabeth M; Li, Dongyang; Shahrooei, Mohammad; Yu, Bin; Muruve, Daniel; Irvin, Randall T

    2013-04-01

    Three protease-resistant bioorganic 304 stainless steel surfaces were created through the reaction of synthetic peptides consisting of the D-enantiomeric isomer (D-K122-4), the retro-inverso D-enantiomeric isomer (RI-K122-4), and a combination of the two peptides (D+RI) of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PilA receptor binding domain with steel surfaces. The peptides used to produce the new materials differ only in handedness of their three-dimensional structure, but they reacted with the steel to yield materials that differed in their surface electron work function (EWF) while displaying an identical chemical composition and equivalent surface adhesive force properties. These surfaces allowed for an assessment of the relative role of surface EWF in initial biofilm formation. We examined the ability of various bacteria (selected strains of Listeria monocytogenes, L. innocua, Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis) to initiate biofilm formation. The D-K1224 generated surface displayed the lowest EWF (classically associated with greater molecular interactions and more extensive biofilm formation) but was observed to be least effectively colonized by bacteria (>50% decrease in bacterial adherence of all strains). The highest surface EWF with the lowest surface free energy (RI-K122-4 generated) was more extensively colonized by bacteria, with the binding of some strains being equivalent to unmodified steel. The D+RI generated surface was least effective in minimizing biofilm formation, where some strains displayed enhanced bacterial colonization. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that the D and RI peptides displayed similar but clearly different binding patterns, suggesting that the peptides recognized different sites on the steel, and that differential binding of the peptides to the steel surfaces influences the binding of different bacterial strains and species. We have demonstrated that stainless steel surfaces can be easily modified by peptides to generate surfaces with

  19. Survival of Salmonella Enteritidis on four types of stainless steel surface under a dry condition and recovery by swabbing.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Norinaga; Konuma, Hirotaka; Kumagai, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    The survival and recovery of Salmonella Enteritidis inoculated on stainless steel surfaces with different metal contents and surface finishes were examined. Two S. Enteritidis strains possessing different levels of biofilm productivity were inoculated with tryptone soya broth (TSB) and egg yolk emulsion (EY) on the surface of stainless steel squares (1 cm × 1 cm) and stored at 22℃ under a dry condition. After storage, cells were recovered from the stainless steel surfaces by swabbing with a cotton swab. The numbers of cells recovered by swabbing and the cells remaining on the stainless steel squares were counted. The survival ratio of the strain possessing high biofilm productivity was greater than that of the strain possessing low biofilm productivity. The survival ratio of S. Enteritidis suspended in TSB was often higher than that in EY. There were no significant differences in the survival and recovery ratios of S. Enteritidis based on stainless steel composition or surface finish. From all except one sample, more than 98% of viable cells of S. Enteritidis were recovered by swabbing with a cotton swab.

  20. Austenite Grain Growth and the Surface Quality of Continuously Cast Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dippenaar, Rian; Bernhard, Christian; Schider, Siegfried; Wieser, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    Austenite grain growth does not only play an important role in determining the mechanical properties of steel, but certain surface defects encountered in the continuous casting industry have also been attributed to the formation of large austenite grains. Earlier research has seen innovative experimentation, the development of metallographic techniques to determine austenite grain size and the building of mathematical models to simulate the conditions pertaining to austenite grain growth during the continuous casting of steel. Oscillation marks and depressions in the meniscus region of the continuously casting mold lead to retarded cooling of the strand surface, which in turn results in the formation of coarse austenite grains, but little is known about the mechanism and rate of formation of these large austenite grains. Relevant earlier research will be briefly reviewed to put into context our recent in situ observations of the delta-ferrite to austenite phase transition. We have confirmed earlier evidence that very large delta-ferrite grains are formed very quickly in the single-phase region and that these large delta-ferrite grains are transformed to large austenite grains at low cooling rates. At the higher cooling rates relevant to the early stages of the solidification of steel in a continuously cast mold, delta-ferrite transforms to austenite by an apparently massive type of transformation mechanism. Large austenite grains then form very quickly from this massive type of microstructure and on further cooling, austenite transforms to thin ferrite allotriomorphs on austenite grain boundaries, followed by Widmanstätten plate growth, with almost no regard to the cooling rate. This observation is important because it is now well established that the presence of a thin ferrite film on austenite grain boundaries is the main cause of reduction in hot ductility. Moreover, this reduction in ductility is exacerbated by the presence of large austenite grains.

  1. Dwell Time and Surface Parameter Effects on Removal of Silicone Oil From D6ac Steel Using TCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boothe, R. E.

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the impact of dwell time, surface roughness, and the surface activation state on 1,1,1-trichloroethane's (TCA's) effectiveness for removing silicone oil from D6ac steel. Silicone-contaminated test articles were washed with TCA solvent, and then the surfaces were analyzed for residue, using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The predominant factor affecting the ability to remove the silicone oil was surface roughness.

  2. Deposition of wear-resistant steel surfaces by the plasma rotating electrode coating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michael Robert

    A high-deposition rate thermal spray method was investigated for the purpose of coating aluminum cylinder bores with a wear resistant surface. This method, the plasma rotating electrode coating system (PROTEC) utilized transferred-arc melting of a rapidly rotating consumable electrode to create a droplet stream via centrifugal atomization. A cylindrical substrate was placed around the rotating rod, in the flight path of the droplets, to deposit a coating onto the internal surface of the cylinder. Selected coatings of 1045 steel deposited by the PROTEC coating method exhibited lower wear loss in lubricated sliding than wire-arc sprayed carbon steel coatings and gray cast iron. Splat cohesion was shown to be a significant factor in the wear resistance of PROTEC coatings. The relationship between deposition enthalpy and cooling rate of the coating was found to have the greatest effect on coating microstructure, and the coating cohesion. The most rapidly solidified coatings showed inferior splat cohesion in comparison to coatings that cooled more slowly. The increase in splat cohesion with decreased cooling rate was accompanied by the formation of a directionally oriented coating microstructure, likely formed during cellular solidification of the coating. A model describing the thermal state of the deposition process was used to predict the deposition conditions that would result in a cellular structure, and the level of splat cohesion required to produce a wear resistant coating.

  3. Corrosion behavior of surface treated steel in liquid sodium negative electrode of liquid metal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeonghyeon; Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Jung Ki; Choi, Sungyeol; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-03-01

    While liquid metal batteries are attractive options for grid-scale energy storage applications as they have flexible siting capacities and small footprints, the compatibility between structural materials such as current collectors and negative electrode such as sodium is one of major issues for liquid metal batteries. Non-metallic elements such as carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen in the liquid sodium influence the material behaviors of the cell construction materials in the battery system. In this study, the compatibility of structural materials with sodium is investigated in high temperature liquid sodium, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to monitor in-situ the corrosion behavior at the surface of materials in sodium. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings of SiC and Si3N4 are applied as protective barriers against dissolution and corrosion on the steel surface. The results show that CVD coating of Si compounds can delay corrosion of steel in high temperature liquid sodium comparing to the result of as-received specimens, while SiC coating is more durable than Si3N4 coating in high temperature liquid sodium.

  4. Nano- and Macro-wear of Bio-carbo-nitrided AISI 8620 Steel Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Emmanuel Kwesi; Ampaw, Edward; Zebaze Kana, M. G.; Adetunji, A. R.; Olusunle, S. O. O.; Adewoye, O. O.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of nano- and macro-scale wear in a carbo-nitrided AISI 8620 steel. Carbo-nitriding is carried out using a novel method that involves the use of dried, cyanide-containing cassava leaves, as sources of carbon and nitrogen. These are used in a pack cementation that is used to diffuse carbon and nitrogen into case layers at intermediate temperatures [673.15 K, 723.15 K, 773.15 K, and 823.15 K (400 °C, 450 °C, 500 °C, and 550 °C)]. Nano- and macro-scale wear properties are studied in the case-hardened surfaces, using a combination of nano-scratch and pin-on-disk experiments. The measured wear volumes (at both nano- and macro-length scales) are shown to increase with decreasing pack cyaniding temperature. The nano- and macro-wear resistances are also shown to be enhanced by the in situ diffusion of carbon and nitrogen from cyanide-containing bio-processed waste. The underlying wear mechanisms are also elucidated via atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations of the wear tracks. The implications of the results are discussed for the design of hardened carbo-nitrided steel surfaces with improved wear resistance.

  5. Effect of surface finishing on early-stage corrosion of a carbon steel studied by electrochemical and atomic force microscope characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the early-stage corrosion of a carbon steel with various surface roughness, which was created by different levels of surface finishing treatment, was characterized by an atomic force microscope and electrochemical measurements. It is found that the resulting surface roughness is at nano-meter scale. As the surface roughness increases, the corrosion activity of the steel is increased. The early-stage corrosion of the steel is featured with two stages of dissolution. While the first stage involves a rapid dissolution and increasing surface roughness of the steel, stage two is in an equilibrium state to have an approximately constant corrosion rate and surface roughness. Generally, the corrosion rate of the steel decreases when the surface finish of the specimen becomes finer. Local preferential corrosion occurs at surface irregularities, resulting in the deepening and widening of the features such as scratches with time.

  6. Durable, superhydrophobic, superoleophobic and corrosion resistant coating on the stainless steel surface using a scalable method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valipour Motlagh, N.; Birjandi, F. Ch.; Sargolzaei, J.; Shahtahmassebi, N.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, superamphiphobic coating was produced using low surface energy materials and fabrication of hierarchical structures on stainless steel surface. Hierarchical structure was fabricated by silica multilayer coatings and adequate control of particles size in each layer. The surface energy was decreased by fluoropolymer compounds. The maximum static contact angle of DI water, ethylene glycol and fuel oil droplets on the prepared surface increased from 64° to 166°, from 33° to 157° and from 0° to 116°, respectively. Also, the minimum sliding angles of DI water, ethylene glycol and fuel oil droplets on the prepared surface were less than 2°, 5° and 12°, respectively. These results confirmed the superhydrophobicity and superoleophobicity of coated surfaces. These films maintained their superamphiphobicity after 16 days of immersion in water. In electrochemical corrosion evaluation, the highest protection efficiency of fabricated films reached as high as 97.33%. These satisfied results confirmed that this simple method can be used to fabricate large scale samples.

  7. Shaping of steel mold surface of lens array by electrical discharge machining with spherical ball electrode.

    PubMed

    Takino, Hideo; Hosaka, Takahiro

    2016-06-20

    We propose a method for fabricating a spherical lens array mold by electrical discharge machining (EDM) with a ball-type electrode. The electrode is constructed by arranging conductive spherical balls in an array. To fundamentally examine the applicability of the proposed EDM method to the fabrication of lens array molds, we use an electrode having a single ball to shape a lens array mold made of stainless steel with 16 spherical elements, each having a maximum depth of 0.5 mm. As a result, a mold surface is successfully shaped with a peak-to-valley shape accuracy of approximately 10 μm, and an average surface roughness of 0.85 μm. PMID:27409126

  8. Parameters important in the oxidation of tritium at a stainless steel surface

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.; Van Deventer, E.H.

    1988-01-01

    The heterogeneous reaction between oxygen gas and permeating tritium is being studied at the back surface of an oxidized 316-stainless steel tube. The ratio between the reaction products collected at the back surface, tritiated water and molecular tritium, is determined as a function of oxygen level, tritium concentration, protium concentration, flow rate, and temperature. This report describes the results from two sets of runs done at 550/sup 0/C with and without 15 ppm protium in the oxygen/helium gas. At oxygen levels of 1200-2000 ppm, the ratio of tritiated water to molecular tritium was >40, i.e., a 98% conversion. At oxygen levels of 40 ppm, the presence of excess protium in the oxygen/helium resulted in a reduced yield of tritiated water.

  9. Shaping of steel mold surface of lens array by electrical discharge machining with spherical ball electrode.

    PubMed

    Takino, Hideo; Hosaka, Takahiro

    2016-06-20

    We propose a method for fabricating a spherical lens array mold by electrical discharge machining (EDM) with a ball-type electrode. The electrode is constructed by arranging conductive spherical balls in an array. To fundamentally examine the applicability of the proposed EDM method to the fabrication of lens array molds, we use an electrode having a single ball to shape a lens array mold made of stainless steel with 16 spherical elements, each having a maximum depth of 0.5 mm. As a result, a mold surface is successfully shaped with a peak-to-valley shape accuracy of approximately 10 μm, and an average surface roughness of 0.85 μm.

  10. Absorptivity modulation on wavy molten steel surfaces: The influence of laser wavelength and angle of incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, A. F. H.

    2012-10-08

    The modulation of the angle-dependent Fresnel absorptivity across wavy molten steel surfaces during laser materials processing, like drilling, cutting, or welding, has been calculated. The absorptivity is strongly altered by the grazing angle of incidence of the laser beam on the processing front. Owing to its specific Brewster-peak characteristics, the 10.64 {mu}m wavelength CO{sub 2}-laser shows an opposite trend with respect to roughness and angle-of-incidence compared to lasers in the wavelength range of 532-1070 nm. Plateaus or rings of Brewster-peak absorptivity can lead to hot spots on a wavy surface, often in close proximity to cold spots caused by shadow domains.

  11. Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J; Hsu, Julia

    2010-11-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

  12. Enhanced human osteoblast cell adhesion and proliferation on 316 LS stainless steel by means of CO2 laser surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Hao, L; Lawrence, J; Phua, Y F; Chian, K S; Lim, G C; Zheng, H Y

    2005-04-01

    An effective and novel technique for improving the biocompatibility of a biograde 316 LS stainless steel through the application of CO(2) laser treatment to modify the surface properties of the material is described herein. Different surface properties, such as surface roughness, surface oxygen content, and surface energy for CO(2) laser-treated 316 LS stainless steel, untreated, and mechanically roughened samples were analyzed, and their effects on the wettability characteristics of the material were studied. It was found that modification of the wettability characteristics of the 316 LS stainless steel following CO(2) laser treatment was achieved. This improvement was identified as being mainly due to the change in the polar component of the surface energy. One-day cell adhesion tests showed that cells not only adhered and spread better, but also grew faster on the CO(2) laser-treated sample than on either the untreated or mechanically roughened sample. Further, compared with the untreated sample, MTT cell proliferation analysis revealed that the mechanically roughed surface resulted in a slight enhancement, and CO(2) laser treatment brought about a significant increase in cell proliferation. An increase in the wettability of the 316 LS stainless steel was observed to positively correlate with the cell proliferation.

  13. Surface hardening of austenitic stainless steels via low-temperature colossal supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yan

    The Swagelok Company has recently developed a low-temperature (470°C) carburization technology for austenitic stainless steels, that increases the surface hardness from 200 to 1200 HV25 without sacrificing corrosion resistance. In order to investigate the microstructural changes responsible for these outstanding properties, bulk specimens, thin foils, and powder specimens of several different low-temperature carburized 316 stainless steels have been studied. XRD studies revealed that the low-temperature carburization of 316 austenitic stainless steels lead to a colossal supersaturation of interstitial carbon in the austenite. While the equilibrium solubility of carbon is 0.03 at% at the carburization temperature of 470°C, high-precision XRD determination of the lattice parameter after carburization indicated a carbon concentration of >10at% in solid solution---a colossal supersaturation! This astonishing result was confirmed by a completely independent experimental method, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). Residual stress measurements indicated that low-temperature carburization caused an enormous compressive residual stress of 2 GPa at the surface. The enormous compressive residual stress and a high density of stacking faults caused broadening and shifting of the austenite peaks in X-ray diffraction scans. Analysis of the underlying thermodynamics and kinetics indicate that the key to colossal supersaturation is to kinetically suppress the formation of M23C6. The colossal supersaturation of carbon in the austenite is the dominant feature responsible for the unusual hardness. Only during the extended (>40h) carburization times, M5C 2 carbide (Hagg carbide), instead of M23C6, was observed to form. In addition, TEM studies indicated the presence of a small amount of a second carbide phase, M7C3. The particles of both carbides have the shape of long needles, containing a high density of planar defects normal to the long axis of the needles. The concept of "low

  14. Verification of the effect of surface preparation on Hot Isostatic Pressing diffusion bonding joints of CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanyun; Li, Chunjing; Huang, Bo; Liu, Shaojun; Huang, Qunying

    2014-12-01

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) diffusion bonding with CLAM steel is the primary candidate fabrication technique for the first wall (FW) of DFLL-TBM. Surface state is one of the key factors for the joints quality. The effect of surface state prepared with grinder and miller on HIP diffusion bonding joints of CLAM steel was investigated. HIP diffusion bonding was performed at 140 MPa and 1373 K within 3 h. The mechanical properties of the joints were investigated with instrumented Charpy V-notch impact tests and the microstructures of the joints were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the milled samples with fine surface roughness were more suitable for CLAM steel HIP diffusion bonding.

  15. Removal of Metal-Oxide Layers Formed on Stainless and Carbon Steel Surfaces by Excimer Laser Irradiation in Various Atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kameo, Yutaka; Nakashima, Mikio; Hirabayashi, Takakuni

    2002-02-15

    To apply the laser ablation technique for decontamination of metal wastes contaminated with radioactive nuclides, the effect of irradiation atmospheres on removal of oxide layers on steel surfaces by laser ablation was studied. Based on the assumption that the absorption of laser light follows the Lambert-Beer law, ablation parameters, such as absorption length and threshold fluence for ablation, of sintered Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and stainless and carbon steels were measured in He, O{sub 2}, Kr, or SF{sub 6} atmospheres. The results indicated that SF{sub 6} was the most effective gas of all irradiation atmospheres studied for the exclusive removal of oxide layers formed on stainless and carbon steel samples in high-temperature pressurized water. Secondary ion mass spectroscopic measurement and scanning electron microscopic observation confirmed that no oxide layer existed on the steel samples after the exclusive removal with laser irradiation.

  16. Surface working of 304L stainless steel: Impact on microstructure, electrochemical behavior and SCC resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Acharyya, S.G.; Khandelwal, A.; Kain, V.; Kumar, A.; Samajdar, I.

    2012-10-15

    The effect of surface working operations on the microstructure, electrochemical behavior and stress corrosion cracking resistance of 304L stainless steel (SS) was investigated in this study. The material was subjected to (a) solution annealing (b) machining and (c) grinding operations. Microstructural characterization was done using stereo microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. The electrochemical nature of the surfaces in machined, ground and solution annealed condition were studied using potentiodynamic polarization and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in borate buffer solution. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of 304L SS in different conditions was studied by exposing the samples to boiling MgCl{sub 2} environment. Results revealed that the heavy plastic deformation and residual stresses present near the surface due to machining and grinding operations make 304L SS electrochemically more active and susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. Ground sample showed highest magnitude of current density in the passive potential range followed by machined and solution annealed 304L SS. Micro-electrochemical studies established that surface working promotes localized corrosion along the surface asperities which could lead to crack initiation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding produce extensive grain fragmentation near the surface of 304L SS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding result in martensitic transformation near the surface of 304L SS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding drastically reduce the SCC resistance of 304L SS in chloride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding make the surface of 304L SS electrochemically much more active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SECM study reveal that preferential dissolution takes place along surface asperities.

  17. Surface modifications of steels to improve corrosion resistance in sulfidizing-oxidizing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrani, Vikas

    Industrial and power generation processes employ units like boilers and gasifiers to burn sulfur containing fuels to produce steam and syn gas (H 2 and CO), which can generate electricity using turbines and fuel cells. These units often operate under environments containing gases such as H 2S, SO2, O2 etc, which can attack the metallic structure and impose serious problems of corrosion. Corrosion control in high temperature sulfur bearing environments is a challenging problem requiring information on local gaseous species at the surface of alloy and mechanisms of degradation in these environments. Coatings have proved to be a better alternative for improving corrosion resistance without compromising the bulk mechanical properties. Changes in process conditions may result in thermal and/or environment cycling between oxidizing and sulfidizing environments at the alloy surface, which can damage the protective scale formed on the alloy surface, leading to increase in corrosion rates. Objective of this study was to understand the effect of fluctuating environments on corrosion kinetics of carbon steels and develop diffusion based coatings to mitigate the high temperatures corrosion under these conditions. More specifically, the focus was: (1) to characterize the local gaseous environments at the surface of alloys in boilers; (2) optimizing diffusion coatings parameters for carbon steel; (3) understand the underlying failure mechanisms in cyclic environments; (4) to improve aluminide coating behavior by co-deposition of reactive elements such as Yttrium and Hafnium; (5) to formulate a plausible mechanism of coating growth and effects of alloying elements on corrosion; and (6) to understand the spallation behavior of scale by measuring stresses in the scales. The understanding of coating mechanism and effects of fluctuating gaseous environments provides information for designing materials with more reliable performance. The study also investigates the mechanism behind

  18. Changing the surface properties on naval steel as result of non-thermal plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnatiuc, B.; Sabău, A.; Dumitrache, C. L.; Hnatiuc, M.; Crețu, M.; Astanei, D.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of corrosion, related to Biofouling formation, is an issue with very high importance in the maritime domain. According to new rules, the paints and all the technologies for the conditioning of naval materials must fulfil more restrictive environmental conditions. In order to solve this issue, different new clean technologies have been proposed. Among them, the use of non-thermal plasmas produced at atmospheric pressure plays a very important role. This study concerns the opportunity of plasma treatment for preparation or conditioning of naval steel OL36 type. The plasma reactors chosen for the experiments can operate at atmospheric pressure and are easy to use in industrial conditions. They are based on electrical discharges GlidArc and Spark, which already proved their efficiency for the surface activation or even for coatings of the surface. The non-thermal character of the plasma is ensured by a gas flow blown through the electrical discharges. One power supply has been used for reactors that provide a 5 kV voltage and a maximum current of 100 mA. The modifications of the surface properties and composition have been studied by XPS technique (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). There were taken into consideration 5 samples: 4 of them undergoing a Mini-torch plasma, a Gliding Spark, a GlidArc with dry air and a GlidArc with CO2, respectively the fifth sample which is the untreated witness. Before the plasma treatment, samples of naval steel were processed in order to obtain mechanical gloss. The time of treatment was chosen to 12 minutes. In the spectroscopic analysis, done on a ULVAC-PHI, Inc. PHI 5000 Versa Probe scanning XPS microprobe, a monocromated Al Kα X-ray source with a spot size of 100 μm2 was used to scan each sample while the photoelectrons were collected at a 45-degree take-off angle. Differences were found between atomic concentrations in each individual case, which proves that the active species produced by each type of plasma affects

  19. How to guide lubricants - Tailored laser surface patterns on stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grützmacher, Philipp G.; Rosenkranz, Andreas; Gachot, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    In this experimental study, periodic line-like structures with different periodicities (5, 10, 19, and 300 μm) and structural depths (approximately 1 and 4 μm) were fabricated on stainless steel samples (AISI-304) by short-pulse laser interference and ultrashort-pulse laser patterning. A detailed characterization of the resulting surface topography was performed by white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy. The spreading dynamics of additive-free synthetic polyalphaolefine oil on a polished reference sample are compared to laser patterned surfaces. These studies are conducted using a newly developed test rig, which allowed for controlled temperature gradients and a precise recording of the spreading dynamics of lubricants on sample surfaces. It could be demonstrated that the spreading velocity parallel to the surface pattern is higher for all samples which can be explained by increased capillary forces and liquid pinning induced by the surface patterning. Furthermore, a decline of the spreading velocity over time for all samples and orientations is clearly visible which can be traced back to a viscosity increase induced by the temperature gradient and a reduced droplet volume. For parallel orientation, the experimental findings are in good agreement with the Lucas-Washburn equation and established models.

  20. Non-destructive enhancement of latent fingerprints on stainless steel surfaces by electrochemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Linru; Li, Yan; He, Yayun; Su, Bin

    2013-04-21

    Visualization and detection of latent fingerprints (LFPs) on metal surfaces are of highly practical importance, e.g., in identifying gun cartridges. We report herein the visualization of LFPs on stainless steel surfaces by electrochemiluminescence (ECL). Since organic residues, such as fatty acids, in the fingerprint deposit make the underlying surface electrochemically inert or less active, an ECL reaction occurs only on the metal portions untouched by the fingertip, hence generating a negative image of the fingerprint. The popular ECL reaction solution, consisting of ruthenium(ii) tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) and tri-n-propylamine, was used for this imaging purpose. Factors, including the applied potential and the concentration of ECL luminophore, as well as the stability of ECL negative images, were investigated to achieve a satisfactory visualization enhancement. This imaging approach is simple, rapid, non-invasive, and no pre-treatment either on the background or on the fingerprint itself is needed. It constitutes a powerful tool for visualizing LFPs on metal surfaces. This method was also demonstrated to be suitable for enhancing LFPs collected from various surfaces.

  1. Homogenous photocatalytic decontamination of prion infected stainless steel and titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Berberidou, Chrysanthi; Xanthopoulos, Konstantinos; Paspaltsis, Ioannis; Lourbopoulos, Athanasios; Polyzoidou, Eleni; Sklaviadis, Theodoros; Poulios, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Prions are notorious for their extraordinary resistance to traditional methods of decontamination, rendering their transmission a public health risk. Iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (iCJD) via contaminated surgical instruments and medical devices has been verified both experimentally and clinically. Standard methods for prion inactivation by sodium hydroxide or sodium hypochlorite have failed, in some cases, to fully remove prion infectivity, while they are often impractical for routine applications. Prion accumulation in peripheral tissues and indications of human-to-human bloodborne prion transmission, highlight the need for novel, efficient, yet user-friendly methods of prion inactivation. Here we show both in vitro and in vivo that homogenous photocatalytic oxidation, mediated by the photo-Fenton reagent, has the potential to inactivate the pathological prion isoform adsorbed on metal substrates. Photocatalytic oxidation with 224 μg mL(-1) Fe (3+), 500 μg mL(-1) h(-1) H 2O 2, UV-A for 480 min lead to 100% survival in golden Syrian hamsters after intracranial implantation of stainless steel wires infected with the 263K prion strain. Interestingly, photocatalytic treatment of 263K infected titanium wires, under the same experimental conditions, prolonged the survival interval significantly, but failed to eliminate infectivity, a result that we correlate with the increased adsorption of PrP(Sc) on titanium, in comparison to stainless steel. Our findings strongly indicate that our, user--and environmentally--friendly protocol can be safely applied to the decontamination of prion infected stainless steel surfaces.

  2. Plasma surface oxidation of 316L stainless steel for improving adhesion strength of silicone rubber coating to metal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifi, Afrooz; Imani, Mohammad; Khorasani, Mohammad Taghi; Daliri Joupari, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    Stainless steel 316L is one of the most widely used materials for fabricating of biomedical devices hence, improving its surface properties is still of great interest and challenging in biomaterial sciences. Plasma oxidation, in comparison to the conventional chemical or mechanical methods, is one of the most efficient methods recently used for surface treatment of biomaterials. Here, stainless steel specimens were surface oxidized by radio-frequency plasma irradiation operating at 34 MHz under pure oxygen atmosphere. Surface chemical composition of the samples was significantly changed after plasma oxidation by appearance of the chromium and iron oxides on the plasma-oxidized surface. A wettable surface, possessing high surface energy (83.19 mN m-1), was observed after plasma oxidation. Upon completion of the surface modification process, silicone rubber was spray coated on the plasma-treated stainless steel surface. Morphology of the silicone rubber coating was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A uniform coating was formed on the oxidized surface with no delamination at polymer-metal interface. Pull-off tests showed the lowest adhesion strength of coating to substrate (0.12 MPa) for untreated specimens and the highest (0.89 MPa) for plasma-oxidized ones.

  3. Application of diffuse discharges of atmospheric pressure formed by runaway electrons for modification of copper and stainless steel surface

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, V. F. Shulepov, M. A.; Erofeev, M. V.

    2015-12-15

    The results of studies devoted to the influence of a runaway electron pre-ionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) formed in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure on the surface of copper and stainless steel are presented. Nanosecond high-voltage pulses were used to obtain REP DD in different gases at high pressures in a chamber with a flat anode and a cathode possessing a small radius of curvature. This mode of discharge was implemented owing to the generation of runaway electrons and X-rays. The conditions under which the surface of copper and stainless steel was cleaned from carbon and oxidized are described.

  4. Application of diffuse discharges of atmospheric pressure formed by runaway electrons for modification of copper and stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.; Erofeev, M. V.

    2015-12-01

    The results of studies devoted to the influence of a runaway electron pre-ionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) formed in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure on the surface of copper and stainless steel are presented. Nanosecond high-voltage pulses were used to obtain REP DD in different gases at high pressures in a chamber with a flat anode and a cathode possessing a small radius of curvature. This mode of discharge was implemented owing to the generation of runaway electrons and X-rays. The conditions under which the surface of copper and stainless steel was cleaned from carbon and oxidized are described.

  5. Fatigue life improvements of the AISI 304 stainless steel ground surfaces by wire brushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Fredj, Nabil; Ben Nasr, Mohamed; Ben Rhouma, Amir; Sidhom, Habib; Braham, Chedly

    2004-10-01

    The surface and subsurface integrity of metallic ground components is usually characterized by an induced tensile residual stress, which has a detrimental effect on the fatigue life of these components. In particular, it tends to accelerate the initiation and growth of the fatigue cracks. In this investigation, to deliberately generate compressive residual stresses into the ground surfaces of the AISI 304 stainless steel (SS), wire brushing was applied. It was found that under the experimental conditions selected in this investigation, while the surface roughness was slightly improved by the brushing process, the surface residual stress shifted from a tensile stress (σ‖=+450 MPa) to a compressive stress (σ‖=-435 MPa). On the other hand, the work-hardened deformation layer was almost two times deeper after wire brushing. Concerning the fatigue life, an improvement of 26% in terms of endurance limit at 2×106 cycles was realized. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of the fatigue fracture location and size were carried out to explain the fatigue life improvement. It was found that the enhancement of the fatigue strength could be correlated with the distribution and location of the fatigue fracture nucleation sites. Concerning the ground surfaces, it was seen that the fatigue cracks initiated at the bottom of the grinding grooves and were particularly long (150-200 µm). However, the fatigue cracks at the brushed surfaces were shorter (20-40 µm) and appeared to initiate sideways to the plowed material caused by the wire brushing. The results of the wire-brushed surface characterization have shown that significant advantages can be realized regarding surface integrity by the application of this low-cost process compared to shot peening.

  6. Influence of pre-heating on the surface modification of powder-metallurgy processed cold-work tool steel during laser surface melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šturm, Roman; Štefanikova, Maria; Steiner Petrovič, Darja

    2015-01-01

    In this study we determine the optimal parameters for surface modification using the laser surface melting of powder-metallurgy processed, vanadium-rich, cold-work tool steel. A combination of steel pre-heating, laser surface melting and a subsequent heat treatment creates a hardened and morphologically modified surface of the selected high-alloy tool steel. The pre-heating of the steel prior to the laser surface melting ensures a crack- and pore-free modified surface. Using a pre-heating temperature of 350 °C, the extremely fine microstructure, which typically evolves during the laser-melting, became slightly coarser and the volume fraction of retained austenite was reduced. In the laser-melted layer the highest values of microhardness were achieved in the specimens where a subsequent heat treatment at 550 °C was applied. The performed thermodynamic calculations were able to provide a very valuable assessment of the liquidus temperature and, especially, a prediction of the chemical composition as well as the precipitation and dissolution sequence for the carbides.

  7. Effect of Food Residues on Norovirus Survival on Stainless Steel Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hajime; Ohuchi, Ayumi; Miya, Satoko; Izawa, Yukino; Kimura, Bon

    2011-01-01

    Background In households and food processing plants, minute food residues left behind from improper cleaning may influence the survivability of human norovirus on surfaces. In this study, the survivability of norovirus on desiccated food residue-attached stainless steel coupons was investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings Using murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) as a surrogate of human norovirus, the survivability of norovirus was investigated on lettuce, cabbage, or ground pork-attached stainless steel coupons. A 6.2 log MPN/ml of MNV-1 infectivity was completely lost at day 30 in residue-free coupons, whereas only a 1.4 log MPN/ml reduction was observed in coupons with residues. Moreover, the disinfective effect of sodium hypochlorite was reduced when residues were present on the coupons. Conclusions/Significance This study revealed that the food residues increased the survivability and the resistance to chemicals of norovirus, indicating the need of thorough cleaning in food processing plants and household settings. PMID:21887215

  8. Niobium boride layers deposition on the surface AISI D2 steel by a duplex treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kon, O.; Pazarlioglu, S.

    2015-03-30

    In this paper, we investigated the possibility of deposition of niobium boride layers on the surface of AISI D2 steel by a duplex treatment. At the first step of duplex treatment, boronizing was performed on AISI D2 steel samples at 1000{sup o}C for 2h and then pre-boronized samples niobized at 850°C, 900°C and 950°C using thermo-reactive deposition method for 1–4 h. The presence of the niobium boride layers such as NbB, NbB{sub 2} and Nb{sub 3}B{sub 4} and also iron boride phases such as FeB, Fe{sub 2}B were examined by X-ray diffraction analysis. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and micro-hardness measurements were realized. Experimental studies showed that the depth of the coating layers increased with increasing temperature and times and also ranged from 0.42 µm to 2.43 µm, depending on treatment time and temperature. The hardness of the niobium boride layer was 2620±180 HV{sub 0.005}.

  9. Modification of Low-Alloy Steel Surface by Plasma Electrolytic Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmanov, S. A.; Smirnov, A. A.; Silkin, S. A.; Belkin, P. N.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of the low-alloy steel after plasma electrolytic nitriding (PEN) in electrolyte containing ammonium nitrate was investigated. The cross-sectional microstructure, composition, and phase constituents of modified layer under different processing conditions were characterized. It is shown that anode PEN provides the saturation of steel with nitrogen and formation of α-Fe2O3, FeO, and Fe3O4 oxides, Fe2-3N nitride, and martensite. The aqueous solution that contained 15 wt.% NH4Cl and 5 wt.% NH4NO3 allows one to obtain the hardened layer with a thickness of 80 μm and a microhardness up to 740 HV during 5 min at 850 °C. Surface roughness decreases from 1.5 to 0.8 μm after 5-min PEN at 650 °C. The proposed electrolyte and processing mode (750 °C, 10 min) enable to obtain the decrease in the weight loss after lubricate wear testing by a factor of 2.7. The base-nitrate electrolyte conditioned a decrease in the corrosion current density by a factor of 9 due to passivating effect of the oxide and nitride of iron.

  10. Characterization of Bimetallic Castings with an Austenitic Working Surface Layer and an Unalloyed Cast Steel Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents the technology of bimetallic castings based on the founding method of layer coating directly in the cast process of the so-called method of mold cavity preparation. The prepared castings consist of two fundamental parts, i.e., the base and the working surface layer. The base part of the bimetallic casting is typical foundry material, i.e., unalloyed cast steel, whereas the working layer is a plate of austenitic alloy steel sort X2CrNi 18-9. The quality of the joint between the base part and the working layer was evaluated on the basis of ultrasonic non-destructive testing and structure examinations containing metallographic macro- and microscopic studies with the use of a light microscope (LOM) with microhardness measurements and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with microanalysis of the chemical composition (energy dispersive spectroscopy—EDS). On the basis of the obtained results it was confirmed that the decisive phenomena needed to create a permanent joint between the two components of the bimetallic casting are carbon and heat transport in the direction from the high-carbon and hot base material which was poured into the mold in the form of liquid metal to the low-carbon and cold material of the working layer which was placed in the mold cavity in the form of a monolithic insert.

  11. Correlation between surface physicochemical properties and the release of iron from stainless steel AISI 304 in biological media.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda; Karlsson, Maria-Elisa; Blomberg, Eva; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Hedberg, Jonas

    2014-10-01

    Stainless steel is widely used in biological environments, for example as implant material or in food applications, where adsorption-controlled ligand-induced metal release is of importance from a corrosion, health, and food safety perspective. The objective of this study was to elucidate potential correlations between surface energy and wettability of stainless steel surfaces and the release of iron in complexing biological media. This was accomplished by studying changes in surface energies calculated from contact angle measurements, surface oxide composition (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), and released iron (graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy) for stainless steel grade AISI 304 immersed in fluids containing bovine serum albumin or citric acid, and non-complexing fluids such as NaCl, NaOH, and HNO3. It was shown that the surface wettability and polar surface energy components were all influenced by adventitious atmospheric carbon (surface contamination of low molecular weight), rather than differences in surface oxide composition in non-complexing solutions. Adsorption of both BSA and citrate, which resulted in ligand-induced metal release, strongly influenced the wettability and the surface energy, and correlated well with the measured released amount of iron.

  12. Melt expulsion during ultrasonic vibration-assisted laser surface processing of austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Alavi, S Habib; Harimkar, Sandip P

    2015-05-01

    Simultaneous application of ultrasonic vibrations during conventional materials processing (casting, welding) and material removal processes (machining) has recently been gaining widespread attention due to improvement in metallurgical quality and efficient material removal, respectively. In this paper, ultrasonic vibration-assisted laser surface melting of austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316) is reported. While the application of ultrasonic vibrations during laser processing delays the laser interaction with material due to enhancement of surface convection, it resulted in expulsion of melt from the irradiated region (forming craters) and transition from columnar to equiaxed dendritic grain structure in the resolidified melt films. Systematic investigations on the effect of ultrasonic vibrations (with vibrations frequency of 20 kHz and power output in the range of 20-40%) on the development of microstructure during laser surface melting (with laser power of 900 W and irradiation time in the range of 0.30-0.45 s) are reported. The results indicate that the proposed ultrasonic vibration-assisted laser processing can be designed for efficient material removal (laser machining) and improved equiaxed microstructure (laser surface modifications) during materials processing.

  13. Examination of surface conditions and other physical properties of commonly used stainless steel acupuncture needles

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yi Min; Xu, Shanqing; Zhang, Claire Shuiqing; Xue, Charlie Changli

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The present work examined the surface conditions and various other physical properties of sterilised single-use stainless steel acupuncture needles from two of the most popular brands widely used in many countries. Methods Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were taken for 10 randomly chosen needles from each brand. Further SEM images were taken after each of these needles underwent a standard manipulation with an acupuncture needling practice gel. A comparison of forces and torques during the needling process was also carried out. Results The SEM images revealed significant surface irregularities and inconsistencies at the needle tips, especially for needles from one of the two brands. Metallic lumps and small, loosely attached pieces of material were observed on the surfaces of some needles. Some of the lumps and pieces of material seen on the needle surfaces disappeared after the acupuncture manipulation. If these needles had been used on patients, the metallic lumps and small pieces of material could have been deposited in human tissues, which could have caused adverse events such as dermatitis. Malformed needle tips might also cause other adverse effects including bleeding, haematoma/bruising, or strong pain during needling. An off-centre needle tip could result in the needle altering its direction during insertion and consequently failing to reach the intended acupuncture point or damaging adjacent tissues. Conclusions These findings highlight the need for improved quality control of acupuncture needles, with a view to further enhancing the safety and comfort of acupuncture users. PMID:24522003

  14. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  15. Study of micro/nanostructures formed by a nanosecond laser in gaseous environments for stainless steel surface coloring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Fangfang; Ong, Weili; Guan, Yingchun; Li, Fengping; Sun, Shufeng; Lim, G. C.; Hong, Minghui

    2015-02-01

    Micro/nanostructures are fabricated on the stainless steel surfaces by a nanosecond laser in different gaseous environments, including air, O2, N2 and Ar. Our results indicate that the dimensional feature of the micro/nanostructures is greatly affected by laser scanning speed as well as gaseous environment. The chemical composition of the structures can be flexibly adjusted by laser processing parameters. Oxygen-rich environment is found to boost the growth of the nanostructures. The coloring by the laser processing can be achieved on the laser treated stainless steel surfaces. The multicolor effect on the surfaces is found to be attributed to both feature dimension and chemical composition of the structures. The coloring of the metal surfaces has promising applications in surface marking and code identifying.

  16. Activity of disinfectants against foodborne pathogens in suspension and adhered to stainless steel surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cabeça, Tatiane Karen; Pizzolitto, Antonio Carlos; Pizzolitto, Elisabeth Loshchagin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the efficacy of various disinfectants on planktonic cells and biofilm cells of Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Numbers of viable biofilm cells decreased after treatment with all tested disinfectants (iodine, biguanide, quaternary ammonium compounds, peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite). Sodium hypochlorite was the most effective disinfectant against biofilm cells, while biguanide was the least effective. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed that cells adhered on stainless steel surface after treatment with the disinfectants. No viable planktonic cells were observed after treatment with the same disinfectants. Based on our findings, we concluded that biofilm cells might be more resistant to disinfectants than plancktonic cells. PMID:24031935

  17. Preparation, characterization and dissolution of passive oxide film on the 400 series stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyaseelan, V. S.; Rufus, A. L.; Chandramohan, P.; Subramanian, H.; Velmurugan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Full system decontamination of Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) resulted in low decontamination factors (DF) on stainless steel (SS) surfaces. Hence, studies were carried out with 403 SS and 410 SS that are the material of construction of "End-Fitting body" and "End-Fitting Liner tubes". Three formulations were evaluated for the dissolution of passive films formed over these alloys viz., i) Two-step process consisting of oxidation and reduction reactions, ii) Dilute Chemical Decontamination (DCD) and iii) High Temperature Process. The two-step and high temperature processes could dissolve the oxide completely while the DCD process could remove only 60%. Various techniques like XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDX were used for assessing the dissolution process. The two-step process is time consuming, laborious while the high temperature process is less time consuming and is recommended for SS decontamination.

  18. HYDROGEN OUTGASSING AND SURFACE PROPERTIES OF TIN COATED STAINLESS STEEL CHAMBERS.

    SciTech Connect

    HE,P.; HSEUH,H.C.; MAPES,M.; TODD,R.; WEISS,D.; WILSON,D.

    2002-11-11

    The stainless steel vacuum chambers of the 248m accumulator ring of Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) are coated with {approx} 100 nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield. The coating is produced by DC magnetron sputtering using a long cathode imbedded with permanent magnets. The outgassing rates of several SNS half-cell chambers were measured with and without TiN coating, and before and after in-situ bake. One potential benefit of a TiN coating is to serve as hydrogen permeation barrier that reduces the ultimate outgassing rate. By varying the coating parameters, films of different surface roughness were produced and analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to illustrate the dependence of the outgassing on the film structure.

  19. Corrosive characteristics of surface-modified stainless steel bipolar plate in solid polymer fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaowen; Wang, Lixia; Sun, Juncai

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, corrosion behavior of an AISI 304 stainless steel modified by niobium or niobium nitride (denoted as niobized 304 SS and Nb-N 304 SS, respectively) is investigated in simulated solid polymer fuel cell (SPFC) operating conditions. Potentiodynamic polarizations show that the corrosion potentials of surface modified 304 SS shift to positive direction while the corrosion current densities decrease greatly comparing with the bare 304 SS in simulated anodic SPFC environments. The order of corrosive resistance in corrosive potential, corrosive current density and pitting potential is: Nb-N 304 SS > niobized 304 SS > bare 304 SS. In the methanol-fueled SPFC operating conditions, the results show that the corrosion resistance of bare and niobized 304 SS increases with the methanol concentration increasing in the test solutions.

  20. Ion implantation modified stainless steel as a substrate for hydroxyapatite deposition. Part I. Surface modification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Pramatarova, L; Pecheva, E; Krastev, V; Riesz, F

    2007-03-01

    Material surfaces play critical role in biology and medicine since most biological reactions occur on surfaces and interfaces. There are many examples showing that the surface properties of the materials control and are directly involved in biological reactions and processes in-vitro like blood compatibility, protein absorption, cell development, etc. The rules that govern the diversity of biological surface phenomenon are fundamental physical laws. Stainless steel doped with Cr, Ni and Mo is widely used material in medicine and dentistry due to its excellent corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. The interest in this material has stimulated extensive studies on improving its bone-bonding properties. This paper describes the surface modification of Cr-Ni stainless steel (AISI 316) by a whole surface sequential implantation of Ca and P ions (the basic ions of hydroxyapatite). Three groups of stainless steel samples are prepared: (i) ion-implanted, (ii) ion-implanted and thermally treated at 600( composite function)C in air for 1 h and (iii) initials. The surface chemistry and topography before and after the surface modification are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, magic mirror method, atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements.

  1. Enhancement of Corrosion Resistance of Type 304 Stainless Steel Through a Novel Thermo-mechanical Surface Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppo, Anita; Kaul, R.; Pujar, M. G.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2013-02-01

    The paper describes a novel thermo-mechanical surface treatment approach, involving conventional shot blasting followed by laser surface heating, to engineer microstructural modification in type 304 austenitic stainless steel for enhancing its corrosion resistance. Thermo-mechanical surface treatment resulted in the formation of fine recrystallized grains with some strain-induced martensite on the modified surface. Surface treatment of type 304 stainless steel brought about significant improvement in its resistance against uniform as well as pitting corrosion. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic studies showed improved polarization resistance ( R p) value for thermo-mechanically treated surface indicating formation of a more protective passive film than that formed on the untreated surface. In contrast to untreated type 304 stainless steel specimens where pits preferentially initiated at the site of Al2O3 inclusions, thermo-mechanically treated specimen exhibited only general dissolution with a few repassivated and shallow pits. Grain refinement and dispersion of alumina inclusions on the modified surface are considered to be the key factors responsible for improvement in uniform and pitting corrosion resistance of type 304SS.

  2. Influence of a Cerium surface treatment on the oxidation behavior of type 347 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-04-01

    A surface treatment was applied to the surface of Type 347 stainless steel to enhance oxidation resistance. The treatment consisted of dip coating coupons in a CeO2 and halide activator slurry, followed by a thermal treatment at 900C in an inert atmosphere for 12 hours. Cyclical oxidation tests were conducted at 800C in either dry air or air+3%H2O. In dry air, the treatment reduced the oxidation rate (reduced the magnitude of weight gain) of the alloy by a factor of three. Protective chromium based oxide and spinel ((Mn,Cr)3O4 and (Cr,Fe)2O3) phases formed on the surface of the untreated and treated alloy. More significantly, the treatment suppressed the oxide scale spallation that occurred upon cyclical exposure of this alloy to moist air. In moist air, less protective chromite (FeCr2O4), magnetite (Fe+2Fe2+3O4), and hematite (Fe2O3) formed as oxide products on the surface of the base alloy. The treated alloy did not spall during exposure to moist air, and interestingly, the treated alloy possessed similar oxidation rates (magnitude of weight gain) in both moist and dry air. The same protective chromium based oxide and spinel ((Mn,Cr)3O4 and (Cr,Fe)2O3) phases formed on the surface of the treated alloy exposed to both moist and dry air. In the aggressive moist environment, the Ce surface treatment suppressed the formation of less protective iron-oxides, and concomitant oxide scale spallation during thermal cycling.

  3. Surface microstructure and antibacterial property of an active-screen plasma alloyed austenitic stainless steel surface with Cu and N.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y; Li, X; Bell, T; Sammons, R; Dong, H

    2010-10-01

    Antibacterial modification of medical materials has already been developed as a potentially effective method for preventing device-associated infections. However, the thin layer generated, often less than 1 µm, cannot ensure durability for metal devices in constant use. A novel stainless steel surface with both a quick bacterial killing rate and durability has been developed by synthesizing Cu and a supersaturated phase (S-phase) using a new active screen plasma alloying technology. This paper investigated the microstructure of a multilayer (using EDS/WDS, SEM, TEM and XRD) and the viability of bacteria attached to biofunctional surfaces (using the spread plate method). The experimental results demonstrate that the plasma alloyed multilayered surface case consists of three sublayers: a nano-crystalline (Fe, Cr, Ni)3N deposition layer (∼200 nm), a unique Cu-containing face-centred cubic (f.c.c.) γ'-M4N (M=Fe, Cr, Ni, Cu) layer and a Cu/N S-phase layer. The thicknesses of the total treated case and the Cu-containing layers are 15 and 8 µm, respectively. Copper exists as substitutional atoms in the γ'-M4N (with a constant concentration of about 5 at%) and in the S-phase lattice (reduces from 5 to 0 at%). The crystal constant of the Cu/N S-phase layer ranged from 0.386 to 0.375 nm, which is expanded by γ from 4.4% to 7.5%. An effective reduction of 99% of Escherichia coli (E. coli) within 3 h was achieved by contact with the homogeneous Cu alloyed surface. No viable E. coli was found after 6 h (100% killed). PMID:20876967

  4. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Investigation of the Structure of Adsorbed Soybean Oil and Methyl Oleate onto Steel Surface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adsorption of soybean oil (SBO) and methyl oleate (MO) onto steel was investigated using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Adsorption of both SBO and MO increased with increasing concentrations. At full surface coverage, SBO and MO formed rigid thin films and ach...

  5. Studies on the determination of surface deuterium in AISI 1062, 4037, and 4140 steels by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastri, V. S.; Donepudi, V. S.; McIntyre, N. S.; Johnston, D.; Revie, R. W.

    1988-12-01

    The concentration of deuterium at the surface of cathodically charged high strength steels AISI 1062, 4037, and 4140 has been determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The beneficial effects of pickling in NAP (a mixture of nitric, acetic, and phosphoric acids) to remove surfacebound deuterium have been observed.

  6. Recrystallization and modification of the stainless-steel surface relief under photonic heat load in powerful plasma discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Budaev, V. P. Martynenko, Yu. V.; Khimchenko, L. N.; Zhitlukhin, A. M.; Klimov, N. S.; Pitts, R. A.; Linke, J.; Bazylev, B.; Belova, N. E.; Karpov, A. V.; Kovalenko, D. V.; Podkovyrov, V. L.; Yaroshevskaya, A. D.

    2013-11-15

    Targets made of ITER-grade 316L(N)-IG stainless steel and Russian-grade 12Cr18Ni10Ti stainless steel with a close composition were exposed at the QSPA-T plasma gun to plasma photonic radiation pulses simulating conditions of disruption mitigation in ITER. After a large number of pulses, modification of the stainless-steel surface was observed, such as the formation of a wavy structure, irregular roughness, and cracks on the target surface. X-ray and optic microscopic analyses of targets revealed changes in the orientation and dimensions of crystallites (grains) over a depth of up to 20 μm for 316L(N)-IG stainless steel after 200 pulses and up to 40 μm for 12Cr18Ni10Ti stainless steel after 50 pulses, which is significantly larger than the depth of the layer melted in one pulse (∼10 μm). In a series of 200 tests of ITER-grade 316L(N)-IG ITER stainless steel, a linear increase in the height of irregularity (roughness) with increasing number of pulses at a rate of up to ∼1 μm per pulse was observed. No alteration in the chemical composition of the stainless-steel surface in the series of tests was revealed. A model is developed that describes the formation of wavy irregularities on the melted metal surface with allowance for the nonlinear stage of instability of the melted layer with a vapor/plasma flow above it. A decisive factor in this case is the viscous flow of the melted metal from the troughs to tops of the wavy structure. The model predicts saturation of the growth of the wavy structure when its amplitude becomes comparable with its wavelength. Approaches to describing the observed stochastic relief and roughness of the stainless-steel surface formed in the series of tests are considered. The recurrence of the melting-solidification process in which mechanisms of the hill growth compete with the spreading of the material from the hills can result in the formation of a stochastic relief.

  7. NEAMS-ATF M3 Milestone Report: Literature Review of Modeling of Radiation-Induced Swelling in Fe-Cr-Al Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xianming; Biner, Suleyman Bulent; Jiang, Chao

    2015-12-01

    Fe-Cr-Al steels are proposed as accident-tolerant-fuel (ATF) cladding materials in light water reactors due to their excellent oxidation resistance at high temperatures. Currently, the understanding of their performance in reactor environment is still limited. In this review, firstly we reviewed the experimental studies of Fe-Cr-Al based alloys with particular focus on the radiation effects in these alloys. Although limited data are available in literature, several previous and recent experimental studies have shown that Fe-Cr-Al based alloys have very good void swelling resistance at low and moderate irradiation doses but the growth of dislocation loops is very active. Overall, the behavior of radiation damage evolution is similar to that in Fe-Cr ferritic/martensitic alloys. Secondly, we reviewed the rate theory-based modeling methods for modeling the coevolution of voids and dislocation loops in materials under irradiation such as Frenkel pair three-dimensional diffusion model (FP3DM) and cluster dynamics. Finally, we summarized and discussed our review and proposed our future plans for modeling radiation damage in Fe-Cr-Al based alloys.

  8. Synergistic effects on dislocation loops in reduced-activation martensitic steel investigated by single and sequential hydrogen/helium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiping; Luo, Fengfeng; Yu, Yanxia; Zheng, Zhongcheng; Shen, Zhenyu; Guo, Liping; Ren, Yaoyao; Suo, Jinping

    2016-10-01

    Single-beam and sequential-beam irradiations were performed to investigate the H/He synergistic effect on dislocation loops in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels. The irradiations were carried out with 10 keV H+, 18 keV He+ and 160 keV Ar+, alone and in combination at 723 K. He+ single-beam irradiation induced much larger dislocation loops than that induced by both H+ and Ar+ single-beam irradiation. H+ post-irradiation after He+ irradiation further increased the size of dislocation loops, whilst He+ post-irradiation or Ar+ post-irradiation following H+ irradiation only slightly increased the size of dislocation loops. The experiment results indicate that pre-implanted H+ can drastically inhibit the growth while post-implanted H+ can significantly enhance the growth of dislocation loops induced by He+ irradiation. The mechanisms behind the complex synergistic phenomena between H and He and the different roles that H and He played in the growth of dislocation loops are discussed.

  9. Surface turbulence in a physical model of a steel thin slab continuous caster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajari, A.; Meratian, M.

    2010-12-01

    In the thin slab continuous casting (TSCC) of steel, the issue of optimum fluid flow is very important due to higher casting speeds and has direct influence on the formation of solidified shells and the quality of final products. In the current work, a full-scale physical modeling of a thin slab caster on the basis of dimensionless Reynolds and Froude similarity criteria was constructed. The flow pattern in the funnel shaped mold with a new tetra-furcated submerged entry nozzle (SEN) was investigated. To determinate optimum operational parameters, some experiments were carried out under various casting conditions. The results show that the tetra-furcated design of the nozzle leads to a special flow pattern in the mold cavity with three-dimensional recirculating flow. It is also shown that the increase of casting speed and gas injection results in surface turbulence. On the other hand, using a higher depth of SEN decreases the vortex in the free surface of the caster. To avoid surface turbulent and related casting problems, it is recommended to use 30-cm and 40-cm SEN depth at the casting speeds of 3.5 and 4.5 m/min, respectively.

  10. Carbon and steel surfaces modified by Leptothrix discophora SP-6: characterization and implications.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Lu, Yuzhuo; Yang, Xinghong; Shi, Xianming

    2007-12-01

    Leptothrix discophora SP-6, a type of manganese(Mn)-oxidizing bacteria, has been known to accumulate Mn oxides from the aqueous environment and thus play a key role in microbiologically influenced corrosion by increasing the electrochemical potential of steel and other metals. Similarly, this bacterium was found to modify the surface of glassy carbon in aqueous solution and increase its potential (i.e., ennoblement). In the latter case, biomineralized Mn oxides can be used as cathodic reactants for a new generation of microbial fuel cells featuring a biocathode. In this preliminary study, factors affecting the biofilm formation and biomineralization processes were examined. The inflow of air into the culture medium was found essential to sustain the ennoblement of substrate electrodes. The OCP and FESEM/EDS data indicated that a smoother initial substrate surface generally led to better ennoblement. Polarizing the carbon electrode at +500 mV(SCE) for 15 min was found to facilitate the ennoblement on carbon electrodes, and so did coating it with a poly(L-lysine) layer. Independent of substrate material, initial surface roughness, and pretreatment, there were three parameters in the EIS equivalent circuit that correlated well with the OCP indicating the level of ennoblement by L. discophora SP-6, i.e., electrolyte resistance, double-layer capacitance, and low-frequencies capacitance. These fascinating findings merit further investigation as they may shed light on the fundamental bacteria/substrate interactions and help advance the knowledge base needed forthe engineering applications. PMID:18186327

  11. High temperature oxidation behavior of AISI 304L stainless steel-Effect of surface working operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Swati; Kumar, M. Kiran; Kain, Vivekanand

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of grade 304L stainless steel (SS) subjected to different surface finishing (machining and grinding) operations was followed in situ by contact electric resistance (CER) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements using controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) technique in high purity water (conductivity < 0.1 μS cm-1) at 300 °C and 10 MPa in an autoclave connected to a recirculation loop system. The results highlight the distinct differences in the oxidation behavior of surface worked material as compared to solution annealed material in terms of specific resistivity and low frequency Warburg impedance. The resultant oxide layer was characterized for (a) elemental analyses by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and (b) morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Oxide layers with higher specific resistivity and chromium content were formed in case of machined and ground conditions. Presence of an additional ionic transport process has also been identified for the ground condition at the metal/oxide interface. These differences in electrochemical properties and distinct morphological features of the oxide layer as a result of surface working were attributed to the prevalence of heavily fragmented grain structure and presence of martensite.

  12. Investigations on Surface Milling of Hardened AISI 4140 Steel with Pulse Jet MQL Applicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Mahmood Al; Mia, Mozammel; Dhar, Nikhil Ranjan

    2016-06-01

    In this article, an experimental investigation was performed in milling hardened AISI 4140 steel of hardness 40 HRC. The machining was performed in both dry and minimal quantity lubricant (MQL) conditions, as part of neat machining, to make a strong comparison of the undertaken machining environments. The MQL was impinged int the form of pulse jet, by using the specially developed pulse-jet-attachment, to ensure that the cutting fluid can be applied in different timed pulses and quantities at critical zones. The tool wear, cutting force and surface roughness were taken as the quality responses while cutting speed, table feed rate and flow rate of the pulse were considered as influential factors. The depth of cut was kept constant at 1.50 mm because of its less significant effects and the straight oil was adopted as cutting fluid in pulse-jet-MQL. The effects of different factors, on the quality responses, are analyzed using ANOVA. It is observed that MQL applicator system exhibits overall better performance when compared to dry milling by reducing surface roughness, cutting force and prolonging tool life but a flow rate of 150 ml/h has tremendous effects on the responses. This investigation and afterward results are expected to aid the industrial practitioner and researcher to adopt the pulse-MQL in high speed milling to prolong tool life, reduce tool wear, diminish cutting force generation and promote better surface finish.

  13. Carbon and steel surfaces modified by Leptothrix discophora SP-6: characterization and implications.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Lu, Yuzhuo; Yang, Xinghong; Shi, Xianming

    2007-12-01

    Leptothrix discophora SP-6, a type of manganese(Mn)-oxidizing bacteria, has been known to accumulate Mn oxides from the aqueous environment and thus play a key role in microbiologically influenced corrosion by increasing the electrochemical potential of steel and other metals. Similarly, this bacterium was found to modify the surface of glassy carbon in aqueous solution and increase its potential (i.e., ennoblement). In the latter case, biomineralized Mn oxides can be used as cathodic reactants for a new generation of microbial fuel cells featuring a biocathode. In this preliminary study, factors affecting the biofilm formation and biomineralization processes were examined. The inflow of air into the culture medium was found essential to sustain the ennoblement of substrate electrodes. The OCP and FESEM/EDS data indicated that a smoother initial substrate surface generally led to better ennoblement. Polarizing the carbon electrode at +500 mV(SCE) for 15 min was found to facilitate the ennoblement on carbon electrodes, and so did coating it with a poly(L-lysine) layer. Independent of substrate material, initial surface roughness, and pretreatment, there were three parameters in the EIS equivalent circuit that correlated well with the OCP indicating the level of ennoblement by L. discophora SP-6, i.e., electrolyte resistance, double-layer capacitance, and low-frequencies capacitance. These fascinating findings merit further investigation as they may shed light on the fundamental bacteria/substrate interactions and help advance the knowledge base needed forthe engineering applications.

  14. Electrochemical behaviour and surface conductivity of niobium carbide-modified austenitic stainless steel bipolar plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lixia; Sun, Juncai; Kang, Bin; Li, Song; Ji, Shijun; Wen, Zhongsheng; Wang, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    A niobium carbide diffusion layer with a cubic NbC phase surface layer (∼6 μm) and a Nb and C diffusion subsurface layer (∼1 μm) is fabricated on the surface of AISI 304 stainless steel (304 SS) bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) using plasma surface diffusion alloying. The electrochemical behaviour of the niobium carbide diffusion-modified 304 SS (Nb-C 304 SS) is investigated in simulated PEMFC environments (0.5 M H2SO4 and 2 ppm HF solution at 80 °C). Potentiodynamic, potentiostatic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that the niobium carbide diffusion layer considerably improves the corrosion resistance of 304 SS compared with untreated samples. The corrosion current density of Nb-C 304 SS is maintained at 0.058 μA cm-2 and 0.051 μA cm-2 under simulated anodic and cathodic conditions, respectively. The interfacial contact resistance of Nb-C 304 SS is 8.47 mΩ cm2 at a compaction force of 140 N cm-2, which is significantly lower than that of the untreated sample (100.98 mΩ cm2). Moreover, only a minor increase in the ICR of Nb-C 304 SS occurs after 10 h potentiostatic tests in both cathodic and anodic environments.

  15. Accumulation of radioactive corrosion products on steel surfaces of VVER type nuclear reactors. I. 110mAg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Gábor; Baradlai, Pál; Varga, Kálmán; Myburg, Gerrit; Schunk, János; Tilky, Péter; Stoddart, Paul

    Formation, presence and deposition of corrosion product radionuclides (such as 60Co, 51Cr, 54Mn, 59Fe and/or 110mAg) in the primary circuits of water-cooled nuclear reactors (PWRs) throw many obstacles in the way of normal operation. During the course of the work presented in this series, accumulations of such radionuclides have been studied at austenitic stainless steel type 08X18H10T (GOST 5632-61) surfaces (this austenitic stainless steel corresponds to AISI 321). Comparative experiments have been performed on magnetite-covered carbon steel (both materials are frequently used in some Soviet VVER type PWRs). For these laboratory-scale investigations a combination of the in situ radiotracer `thin gap' method and voltammetry is considered to be a powerful tool due to its high sensitivity towards the detection of the submonolayer coverages of corrosion product radionuclides. An independent technique (XPS) is also used to characterize the depth distribution and chemical state of various contaminants in the passive layer formed on austenitic stainless steel. In the first part of the series the accumulation of 110mAg has been investigated. Potential dependent sorption of Ag + ions (cementation) is found to be the predominant process on austenitic steel, while in the case of magnetite-covered carbon steel the silver species are mainly depleted in the form of Ag 2O. The XPS depth profile of Ag gives an evidence about the embedding of metallic silver into the entire passive layer of the austenitic stainless steel studied.

  16. Microstructure and its effect on toughness and wear resistance of laser surface melted and post heat treated high speed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åhman, Leif

    1984-10-01

    High speed steel hacksaw blade blanks were laser surface melted and rapidly solidified along one edge. The laser melting resulted in complete carbide dissolution. By subsequent machining and heat treatments saw teeth were manufactured with a refined internal structure of the edges and corners. The structure was fully martensitic with a uniform and dense dispersion of small primary carbides. Sawing tests in quenched and tempered steel showed that blade life was somewhat improved, as compared to conventionally heat treated blades. The increased wear resistance is believed to be due to improved toughness along with high hardness caused by the refined carbide structure. Sawing tests in austenitic stainless steel did not give any significant improvement in performance. The effect of the altered microstructure on performance is likely to be more or less pronounced depending on application, tool and work material.

  17. Thermo-mechanical processing of austenitic steel to mitigate surface related degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idell, Yaakov Jonathan

    Thermo-mechanical processing plays an important role in materials property optimization through microstructure modification, required by demanding modern materials applications. Due to the critical role of austenitic stainless steels, such as 316L, as structural components in harsh environments, e.g. in nuclear power plants, improved degradation resistance is desirable. A novel two-dimensional plane strain machining process has shown promise achieving significant grain size refinement through severe plastic deformation (SPD) and imparting large strains in the surface and subsurface regions of the substrate in various metals and alloys. The deformation process creates a heavily deformed 20 -- 30 micron thick nanocrystalline surface layer with increased hardness and minimal martensite formation. Post-deformation processing annealing treatments have been applied to assess stability of the refined scale microstructures and the potential for obtaining grain boundary engineered microstructures with increased fraction of low-energy grain boundaries and altered grain boundary network structure. Varying the deformation and heat treatment process parameters, allows for development of a full understanding of the nanocrystalline layer and cross-section of the surface substrate created. Micro-characterization was performed using hardness measurements, magnetometry, x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy to assess property and microstructural changes. This study provides a fundamental understanding of two-dimensional plane strain machining as a thermo-mechanical processing technique, which may in the future deliver capabilities for creating grain boundary engineered surface modified components, typified by a combination of grain refinement with improved grain boundary network interconnectivity attributes suitable for use in harsh environments, such as those in commercial nuclear power plants where improved resistance to irradiation stress corrosion

  18. Effects of molybdenum on the composition and nanoscale morphology of passivated austenitic stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Vincent; Peng, Hao; Klein, Lorena H; Seyeux, Antoine; Zanna, Sandrine; Marcus, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Surface analysis by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy has been applied to provide new insight on Mo effects on the composition and nanostructure of the passive films grown in sulfuric acid on well-controlled Fe-17Cr-14.5Ni-2.3Mo(100) austenitic stainless steel single crystal surfaces. A duplex hydroxylated oxide matrix, 1.8-1.9 nm thick, is formed with a strong partition between Cr(iii) and Fe(iii) in the inner and outer layers, respectively. Cr(iii) is increasingly enriched by preferential iron oxide dissolution upon passivation and ageing. Ni, only present as oxide traces in the film, is enriched in the alloy underneath. Mo, mostly present as Mo(iv) in the Cr-rich inner layer prior to anodic polarisation, becomes increasingly enriched (up to 16% of cations) mostly as Mo(vi) in the Fe-rich outer layer of the passive film, with ageing promoting this effect. Metallic Mo is not significantly enriched below the passive film produced from the native oxide covered surface. Mo does not markedly impact the nanogranular morphology of the native oxide film nor its local thickness variations assigned to substrate site effects on Cr(iii) enrichment. Site specific preferential passivation still takes place at the (native) oxide-covered step edges of the alloy surface, and transient dissolution remains preferentially located on the terraces. Nanostructures, possibly Mo-containing, and healing local depressions formed by transient dissolution during passivation, appear as a specific effect of the Mo presence. Another Mo effect, observed even after 20 h of passivation, is to prevent crystallisation at least in the Fe-rich outer part of the passive film where it is concentrated mostly as Mo(vi) (i.e. molybdate) species. PMID:25898180

  19. Effects of molybdenum on the composition and nanoscale morphology of passivated austenitic stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Vincent; Peng, Hao; Klein, Lorena H; Seyeux, Antoine; Zanna, Sandrine; Marcus, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Surface analysis by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy has been applied to provide new insight on Mo effects on the composition and nanostructure of the passive films grown in sulfuric acid on well-controlled Fe-17Cr-14.5Ni-2.3Mo(100) austenitic stainless steel single crystal surfaces. A duplex hydroxylated oxide matrix, 1.8-1.9 nm thick, is formed with a strong partition between Cr(iii) and Fe(iii) in the inner and outer layers, respectively. Cr(iii) is increasingly enriched by preferential iron oxide dissolution upon passivation and ageing. Ni, only present as oxide traces in the film, is enriched in the alloy underneath. Mo, mostly present as Mo(iv) in the Cr-rich inner layer prior to anodic polarisation, becomes increasingly enriched (up to 16% of cations) mostly as Mo(vi) in the Fe-rich outer layer of the passive film, with ageing promoting this effect. Metallic Mo is not significantly enriched below the passive film produced from the native oxide covered surface. Mo does not markedly impact the nanogranular morphology of the native oxide film nor its local thickness variations assigned to substrate site effects on Cr(iii) enrichment. Site specific preferential passivation still takes place at the (native) oxide-covered step edges of the alloy surface, and transient dissolution remains preferentially located on the terraces. Nanostructures, possibly Mo-containing, and healing local depressions formed by transient dissolution during passivation, appear as a specific effect of the Mo presence. Another Mo effect, observed even after 20 h of passivation, is to prevent crystallisation at least in the Fe-rich outer part of the passive film where it is concentrated mostly as Mo(vi) (i.e. molybdate) species.

  20. A Black Phosphate Conversion Coating on Steel Surface Using Antimony(III)-Tartrate as an Additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Wang, Guiping

    2016-05-01

    A novel black phosphate conversion coating was formed on steel surface through a Zn-Mn phosphating bath containing mainly ZnO, H3PO4, Mn(H2PO4)2, and Ca(NO3)2, where antimony(III)-tartrate was used as the blackening agent of phosphatization. The surface morphology and composition of the coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Corrosion resistance of the coating was studied by potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The pH value of the solution had significant influence on the formation and corrosion resistance of the coating. The experimental results indicated that the Sb plays a vital role in the blackening of phosphate conversion coating. The optimal concentration of antimony(III)-tartrate in the phosphating bath used in this experiment was 1.0 g L-1, as higher values reduced the corrosion resistance of the coating. In addition, by saponification and oil seals, the corrosion duration of the black phosphate coating in a copper sulfate spot test can be as long as 20 min.

  1. Laser surface melting of Martensitic stainless steel 440C for enhancing corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Chi-Tat; Lo, Ka-Hing; Cheng, Fai-Tsun; Man, Hau-Chung

    2003-03-01

    Surface modification of martensitic stainless steel 440C was achieved by laser surface melting using a 2-kW continuous wave Nd:YAG laser. The corrosion characteristics of laser-melted specimens fabricated under different processing parameters in 3.5% NaCl solution at 23°C were studied by potentiodynamic polarization technique. The pitting corrosion resistance of all laser-melted specimens was significantly improved, as evidenced by a shift of the pitting potential in the noble direction, a wider passive range, and a lower passive current density. The pitting potential of the laser-melted specimen fabricated under a power density of 4.2 kW/cm2 and a scanning speed of 25 mm/s (specimen P12-440C-25) was increased to 200 mV (SCE), which was much higher than that of annealed and conventionally heat-treated 440C. The pitting corrosion characteristics of the laser-melted specimens were strongly dependent on the processing conditions which resulted in different microstructures. The enhanced pitting resistance resulted from the combined effect of dissolution or refinement of carbide particles and the presence of retained austenite. By using different processing parameters, it was found that the pitting resistance of the laser-melted specimen P12-440C-25 was the highest by virtue of a high volume fraction of retained austenite and a small amount of precipitated carbide.

  2. The Performance of Ce Surface Treated Ferritic Stainless Steels for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-09-01

    This research deals with the effect of a Ce surface treatment on the behavior of Fe-Cr-Mn ferritic stainless steels which may have application in SOFC technology. This treatment consisted of applying a slurry of CeO2 and a halide activator to the surface of coupons. After the slurry dried the coupons were heated to 900C in a controlled atmosphere furnace for 12 hours. The effectiveness of the treatment on commercial (Type 409 (12Cr), Type 430 (18Cr), Crofer 22APU (22Cr), Type 446(26Cr)) and experimental (NETL F9 (12Cr) and NETL F5 (22Cr)) alloys as a function of Cr content will be presented. The oxidation behavior of the alloys was assessed by exposing coupons (untreated and treated) to moist air at 800C. Area specific resistance (ASR) was measured at 800C. In general, the rare earth treatment effectively reduced the oxidation rate, resulting in thinner oxide scales and less internal oxidation.

  3. Manganese-Cobalt Mixed Spinel Oxides as Surface Modifiers for Stainless Steel Interconnects of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Gordon; Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2006-11-06

    Ferritic stainless steels are promising candidates for interconnect applications in low- and mid-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A couple of issues however remain for the particular application, including the chromium poisoning due to chromia evaporation, and long-term surface and electrical stability of the scale grown on these steels. Application of a manganese colbaltite spinel protection layer on the steels appears to be an effective approach to solve the issues. For an optimized performance, Mn{sub 1+x}Co{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} (-1 {le} x {le} 2) spinels were investigated against properties relative for protection coating applications on ferritic SOFC interconnects. Overall it appears that the spinels with x around 0.5 demonstrate a good CTE match to ceramic cell components, a relative high electrical conductivity, and a good thermal stability up to 1,250 C. This was confirmed by a long-term test on the Mn{sub 1.5}Co{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} protection layer that was thermally grown on Crofer22 APU, indicating the spinel protection layer not only significantly decreased the contact resistance between a LSF cathode and the stainless steel interconnects, but also inhibited the sub-scale growth on the stainless steels.

  4. Effect of surface oxidization on the spectral emissivity of steel 304 at the elevated temperature in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Deheng; Zou, Fenghui; Wang, Shuai; Zhu, Zunlue; Sun, Jinfeng

    2014-09-01

    Effect of surface oxidization on the spectral emissivity of steel 304 is studied over the temperature range from 830 to 1100 K at 1.5 μm. The experimental setup is composed of three modules: the optical receiving system, the specimen heating and temperature-controlling system, and the signal-controlling and data-computing system. The temperature of steel 304 specimens is measured by averaging the two R-type platinum-rhodium thermocouples. The radiant energy stemming from the surface specimens is received by an InGaAs photodiode detector. The growth law of oxidization film on the surface of steel 304 specimens is observed carefully. The variation of spectral emissivity with the heating-duration time is studied at a given elevated temperature. The dependence of spectral emissivity on the temperature is evaluated at a definite heating-duration time. The interference enhancement of spectral emissivity appears mainly during the initial heating-duration period, in particular at a relatively low elevated temperature. The interference effect between the radiation stemming from the oxidization film on the specimen surface and the radiation coming from the surface of specimens is discussed, which has been affirmed to be responsible for the interference enhancement of spectral emissivity. The analytic model between the spectral emissivity of steel 304 specimens and the temperature of specimen surface is evaluated at several definite heating-duration times. The conclusion is derived that the polynomial functional form is very suitable for fitting the experimental results obtained at a given heating-duration time at 830-1100 K.

  5. High temperature deformation behavior, thermal stability and irradiation performance in Grade 92 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan

    The 9Cr-2W ferritic-martensitic steel (i.e. Grade 92 steel) possesses excellent mechanical and thermophysical properties; therefore, it has been considered to suit more challenging applications where high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties are required. The high temperature deformation mechanism was investigated through a set of tensile testing at elevated temperatures. Hence, the threshold stress concept was applied to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. It was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations due to the particle-dislocation interactions and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed. In addition, the microstructural evolution at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. For instance, the microstructural evolution under loading was more pronounced and carbide precipitation showed more coarsening tendency. The growth of these carbide precipitates, by removing W and Mo from matrix, significantly deteriorates the solid solution strengthening. The MX type carbonitrides exhibited better coarsening resistance. To better understand the thermal microstructural stability, long tempering schedules up to 1000 hours was conducted at 560, 660 and 760°C after normalizing the steel. Still, the coarsening rate of M23C 6 carbides was higher than the MX-type particles. Moreover, the Laves phase particles were detected after tempering the steel for long periods before they dissolve back into the matrix at high temperature (i.e. 720°C). The influence of the tempering temperature and time was studied for Grade 92 steel via Hollomon-Jaffe parameter. Finally, the irradiation performance of Grade 92 steel was evaluated to examine the feasibility of its eventual reactor use. To that end, Grade 92 steel was irradiated with iron (Fe2+) ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 and 500°C. Overall, the irradiated samples showed some irradiation-induced hardening which was more noticeable at 30°C. Additionally

  6. Study of the surface roughness evolution in fatigued 316L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye

    life. Scanning Whitelight Interferometric Microscope (SWLI) was applied to quantitatively study the surface roughness evolution of polycrystalline 316L stainless steel fatigue specimen. We demonstrated that the surface roughness increased with fatigue cycles during the entire fatigue process. In addition, we discovered that surface roughness increases at early fatigue stage were contributed by slip band formation while surface roughness increases at later-stage fatigue were due to the out-of-plane displacement of adjacent grains. Crack initiation and development has also been identified.

  7. Report on sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Rink, D.L.; Soppet, W.K.; Listwan, J.T.

    2012-07-09

    alloys was comparable after sodium exposures at 550 C; the weight loss of ferritic-martensitic steels, G92 and G91 is more significant than that of austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS after sodium exposures at 650 C. Sodium exposures up to 2700 h at 550 C had no significant influence on tensile properties, while sodium exposures up to 5064 h at 650 C dramatically lowered the tensile strengths of the four alloys. The ultimate tensile strength of H1 G92, H2 G92, and G91 ferritic-martensitic steels was reduced to as much as nearly half of its initial value after sodium exposures at 650 C. Though the uniform elongation was recovered to some extent, these three ferritic-martensitic steels showed considerable strain softening after sodium exposures. The yield stress of HT-UPS austenitic stainless steel increased, the ultimate tensile strength decreased, and the total elongation was reduced after sodium exposures at 650 C. The dynamic strain aging effect observed in the as-received HT-UPS specimens became less pronounced after sodium exposures at 650 C. Microstructural characterization of sodium-exposed specimens showed no appreciable surface deterioration or grain structure changes under an optical microscope, except for the H2 G92 steel, in which the martensite structure transformed to large grain ferrite after sodium exposures at 650 C. TEM observations of the sodium-exposed H2 G92 steel showed significant recrystallization after sodium exposure for 2700 h at 550 C, and transformation of martensite to ferrite and high density of precipitates in nearly dislocation-free matrix after sodium exposures at 650 C. Further microstructural analysis and evaluation of decarburization/carburization behavior is needed to understand the dramatic changes in the tensile strengths of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels after sodium exposures at 650 C.

  8. Surface Studies of Ultra Strength Drilling Steel after Corrosion Fatigue in Simulated Sour Environment

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ziomek-Moroz; J.A. Hawk; R. Thodla; F. Gui

    2012-05-06

    The Unites States predicted 60% growth in energy demand by 2030 makes oil and natural gas primary target fuels for energy generation. The fact that the peak of oil production from shallow wells (< 5000 m) is about to be reached, thereby pushing the oil and natural gas industry into deeper wells. However, drilling to depths greater than 5000 m requires increasing the strength-to weight ratio of the drill pipe materials. Grade UD-165 is one of the ultra- high yield strength carbon steels developed for ultra deep drilling (UDD) activities. Drilling UDD wells exposes the drill pipes to Cl{sup -}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and H{sub 2}S-containig corrosive environments (i.e., sour environments) at higher pressures and temperatures compared to those found in conventional wells. Because of the lack of synergism within the service environment, operational stresses can result in catastrophic brittle failures characteristic for environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). Approximately 75% of all drill string failures are caused by fatigue or corrosion fatigue. Since there is no literature data on the corrosion fatigue performance of UD-165 in sour environments, research was initiated to better clarify the fatigue crack growth (FCGR) behavior of this alloy in UDD environments. The FCGR behavior of ultra-strength carbon steel, grade UD-165, was investigated by monitoring crack growth rate in deaerated 5%NaCl solution buffered with NaHCO{sub 3}/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and in contact with H{sub 2}S. The partial pressure of H{sub 2}S (p{sub H2S}) was 0.83 kPa and pH of the solution was adjusted by NaOH to 12. The fatigue experiments were performed at 20 and 85 C in an autoclave with surface investigations augmented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. In this study, research focused on surface analyses supported by the fatigue crack growth rate measurements. Fig. 1 shows an SEM micrograph of the crack that propagated from the

  9. Effect of gas nitriding on CO2 corrosion for 35CrMo steel after surface nanocrystallization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bingying; Zhou, Shengnan; Wang, Jingjing; Zhao, Bin

    2014-10-01

    This paper studies the influence of ultrasonic surface rolling procession (USRP) and gas nitriding on CO2 corrosion for 35CrMo steel. The microstructure of the nanocrystallized surface caused by USRP and the nitrided layer were studied by means of HRTEM and optical microscope, respectively. High temperature high pressure autoclave was adopted to study the CO2 corrosion behavior of 35CrMo steel. The characteristics of CO2 corrosion scales on 35CrMo steel were investigated by the SEM, EDS and XRD techniques. The experimental results show that after USRP about 250 μm rheological layer forms on the metal surface, and the average grain size is 25 nm. USRP thicken the nitrided layer, 10 hours' gas nitriding at 550 degrees C lower the corrosion rate while the combine of gas nitriding and USRP enhances the corrosion resistance furthest; and the surface nanocrystallization increases the content of Cr and changes the corrosion product film from FeCO3 to FeCO3 and Cr2O3, and from loose crystal structure to amorphous flocculent structure. The corrosion resistance of 35CrMo has been improved significantly by USRP and gas nitriding. PMID:25942927

  10. Effect of gas nitriding on CO2 corrosion for 35CrMo steel after surface nanocrystallization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bingying; Zhou, Shengnan; Wang, Jingjing; Zhao, Bin

    2014-10-01

    This paper studies the influence of ultrasonic surface rolling procession (USRP) and gas nitriding on CO2 corrosion for 35CrMo steel. The microstructure of the nanocrystallized surface caused by USRP and the nitrided layer were studied by means of HRTEM and optical microscope, respectively. High temperature high pressure autoclave was adopted to study the CO2 corrosion behavior of 35CrMo steel. The characteristics of CO2 corrosion scales on 35CrMo steel were investigated by the SEM, EDS and XRD techniques. The experimental results show that after USRP about 250 μm rheological layer forms on the metal surface, and the average grain size is 25 nm. USRP thicken the nitrided layer, 10 hours' gas nitriding at 550 degrees C lower the corrosion rate while the combine of gas nitriding and USRP enhances the corrosion resistance furthest; and the surface nanocrystallization increases the content of Cr and changes the corrosion product film from FeCO3 to FeCO3 and Cr2O3, and from loose crystal structure to amorphous flocculent structure. The corrosion resistance of 35CrMo has been improved significantly by USRP and gas nitriding.

  11. The performance of a surface-applied corrosion inhibitor for the carbon steel in saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Haibing; Li, Weihua; Ma, Fubin; Kong, Qinglin

    2014-01-15

    In the present work, the performance of an amino alcohol based surface applied inhibitor was studied by the electrochemical techniques in saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions. The surface morphology of the carbon steel was observed by scanning electron microscope, and the energy diffraction spectrum was also tested. Results showed that the inhibitor used in this work demonstrated obvious inhibition efficiency on the carbon steel in saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions. The inhibition mechanism of the inhibitor lies in the quick adsorption of the active component on carbon steel surface.

  12. Hydrophilic property of 316L stainless steel after treatment by atmospheric pressure corona streamer plasma using surface-sensitive analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hamarneh, Ibrahim; Pedrow, Patrick; Eskhan, Asma; Abu-Lail, Nehal

    2012-10-01

    Surgical-grade 316L stainless steel (SS 316L) had its surface hydrophilic property enhanced by processing in a corona streamer plasma reactor using O2 gas mixed with Ar at atmospheric pressure. Reactor excitation was 60 Hz ac high-voltage (0-10 kVRMS) applied to a multi-needle-to-grounded screen electrode configuration. The treated surface was characterized with a contact angle tester. Surface free energy (SFE) for the treated stainless steel increased measurably compared to the untreated surface. The Ar-O2 plasma was more effective in enhancing the SFE than Ar-only plasma. Optimum conditions for the plasma treatment system used in this study were obtained. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization of the chemical composition of the treated surfaces confirms the existence of new oxygen-containing functional groups contributing to the change in the hydrophilic nature of the surface. These new functional groups were generated by surface reactions caused by reactive oxidation of substrate species. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images were generated to investigate morphological and roughness changes on the plasma treated surfaces. The aging effect in air after treatment was also studied.

  13. Formation of amorphous Ti alloy layers by excimer laser mixing of Ti on AISI 304 stainless-steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jervis, T. R.; Nastasi, M.; Zocco, T. G.; Martin, J. A.

    1988-07-01

    We used excimer laser radiation at 308 nm to mix thin layers of Ti into AISI 304 stainless steel. Different numbers of shots at a fluence about twice the threshold for melting varied the amount of mixing. When mixing is sufficiently complete, an amorphous surface layer is formed with Ti substituting for Fe on a one-to-one basis in the alloy. The laser mixing process, unlike Ti ion implantation, does not result in high incorporation of C in the processed layer, although some C from surface and interface contamination is incorporated into the surface layer.

  14. The Evolution of the Surface Morphologies and Microstructures of an Unleveled Hot-Rolled Steel Strip During Cold Rolling After Hydrogen Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yu-An; Shang, Qiuyue; Zang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Lei; Peng, Xingdong; Jia, Pinfeng

    2016-01-01

    The removal of oxide scale from a hot-rolled strip surface can completely eliminate environmental pollution if performed by hydrogen-reduction descaling instead of traditional pickling descaling. However, a large number of cracks appear on the surface of a leveled hot-rolled steel strip after hydrogen reduction. This effect is likely to impede the application of reduction descaling to cold-rolled products. Nevertheless, there are almost no cracks on the surface of an unleveled hot-rolled steel strip if the hot-rolled steel strip is not subjected to repeated bending by the leveler machine. The surface quality of a reduced steel strip will be better than that of a pickled steel strip. To investigate the evolution of the surface morphologies, microstructures, and properties of an unleveled strip steel during cold rolling, unleveled strip steel samples were rolled using a four-high mill after hydrogen reduction and after pickling. The surface morphologies and cross-sectional microstructures of the samples were observed by SEM, and the surface-roughness values were measured using a TR200 profilometer before and after cold-rolling deformation. The evolution of the surface morphologies and cross-sectional microstructures of the sample after cold rolling were analyzed. The results show that the oxide scale formed on the surface turns into a metallic iron layer, and a decarburization layer appears between the metallic iron layer and the steel matrix after hydrogen reduction. Few cracks, besides pores, and bubbles, appeared on the surface of the sample after hydrogen reduction. The pores and bubbles were roll-flattened after five passes of cold rolling. The work hardening degree and mechanical properties of the reduced sample are similar to those of the pickled sample after cold rolling. Compared with the rolled sample after pickling, the surface qualities of the reduced samples are better than those of the pickled samples and better than those of the reduced samples that

  15. Evaluation of the surface damage to stainless steel caused by a micro-jet in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Sang-Ok; Kim, Seong-Jong; Jeong, Jae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    As high-speed machines have been developed in marine and offshore industry cavitation damage due to the high speed of rotation of a fluid has been gradually increasing. The damage on the material's surface is a combination of electrochemical corrosion due to the passivity of the films being destroyed by Cl- and cavitation erosion due to the collapse of cavity bubbles. Hence, in this paper, the damage mechanisms for electrochemical corrosion and physical pressure for 415 stainless-steel cavities were evaluated in seawater solutions. The experiments included a galvanostatic experiment in a cavitation environment and a cavitation test with an ultrasonic amplitude of 30 µm at various times. The complex damage behaviors were compared and analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and 3D microscopy after completion of the experiment. As a result of the galvanostatic experiment under a cavitation condition in seawater, damage under a cavitation condition owing to the water cavitation peening effect was relatively less compared to that under a static condition.

  16. A Stainless-Steel, Uranium-Dioxide, Potassium-Heatpipe-Cooled Surface Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Amiri, Benjamin W.; Sims, Bryan T.; Poston, David I.; Kapernick, Richard J.

    2006-01-20

    One of the primary goals in designing a fission power system is to ensure that the system can be developed at a low cost and on an acceptable schedule without compromising reliability. The Heatpipe Power System (HPS) is one possible approach for producing near-term, low-cost, space fission power. The Heatpipe Operated Moon Exploration Reactor (HOMER-25) is a HPS designed to produce 25-kWe on the lunar surface for 5 full-power years. The HOMER-25 core is made up of 93% enriched UO2 fuel pins and stainless-steel (SS)/potassium (K) heatpipes in a SS monolith. The heatpipes transport heat generated in the core through the water shield to a potassium boiler, which drives six Stirling engines. The operating heatpipe temperature is 880 K and the peak fast fluence is 1.6e21 n/cm2, which is well within an established database for the selected materials. The HOMER-25 is designed to be buried in 1.5 m of lunar regolith during operation. By using technology and materials which do not require extensive technology development programs, the HOMER-25 could be developed at a relatively low cost. This paper describes the attributes, specifications, and performance of the HOMER-25 reactor system.

  17. Simulation of the state of carbon steel n years after disposal with n years of corrosion product on its surface in a bentonite environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Yoichi; Tsujikawa, Shigeo; Hioki, Toshinobu |

    1995-12-31

    The use of bentonite as buffer and carbon steel as overpack material for the geological disposal of nuclear waste is under investigation. To better assess the long term integrity of the carbon steel overpack, a quantitative analysis of the corrosion behavior on the steel surface for time frames beyond that of feasible empirical determination is required. The state n years after disposal, consisting of Carbon Steel/Corrosion products + Bentonite/Water, was simulated and the corrosion behavior of the carbon steel in this state investigated. The following facts became apparent. Both the corrosion rate and the non-uniformity of it increased with increase in the corrosion product content in the compacted bentonite. When the corrosion product layer was formed between the carbon steel and the bentonite, it enabled the corrosion potential and increased the corrosion rate.

  18. Ionic fluids in lubrication of aluminium-steel contacts. Surface and tribochemical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez Ballesta, Ana Eva

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are high performance fluids with a wide thermal stability range. They are being studied as new lubricants in a variety of sliding contacts. One of their more interesting tribological applications is that of steel-aluminium lubrication. In this work we study the influence of the lateral alkyl chain length and of the anion on the lubricating ability of six imidazolium ILs, a pyridinium and a phosphonium derivative. For first time, these ILs have been studied as neat lubricants and as 1wt.% base oil additives in variable conditions of velocity, load and temperature in pin-on-disk tests for AISI 52100 steel-ASTM 2011 aluminium contacts. In this work we present the first study of ILs as lubricants under extreme temperature conditions. The tribological performance of ILs has been compared with that of a mineral oil and of a synthetic ester. Under these conditions, ILs show lower friction and wear values than conventional oils at all temperatures. As 1wt.% additives, the conditions of optimum lubrication and the transitions between regimes and lubrication mechanisms have been determined. We have also studied the performance of ILs as 1wt.% additives of the synthetic oil. A relationship between additive polarity and wear index has been established. If the more soluble phosphonium IL additive is used, no friction or wear reduction takes place due to competition between solvation and adsorption processes. Electronic microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopies have been used to study the wear mechanisms and tribochemical processes that take place in the contact. Finally, we have studied the performance of three aluminium alloys in corrosion and erosion-corrosion tests. In immersion tests with free-water ILs, the aluminium alloy 2011 shows a good resistance to corrosion, but dilution of 1-ethyl, 3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate in water produces the hydrolysis of the anion and the corrosion of

  19. Decontamination of uranium-contaminated steel surfaces by hydroxycarboxylic acid with uranium recovery.

    PubMed

    Francis, A J; Dodge, C J; McDonald, J A; Halada, G P

    2005-07-01

    We developed a simple, safe method to remove uranium from contaminated metallic surfaces so that the materials can be recycled or disposed of as low-level radioactive or nonradioactive waste. Surface analysis of rusted uranium-contaminated plain carbon-steel coupons by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy showed that uranium was predominantly associated with ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite, and magnetite, or occluded in the matrix of the corrosion product as uranyl hydroxide and schoepite (UO3 x 2H2O). Citric acid formulations, consisting of oxalic acid-hydrogen peroxidecitric acid (OPC) or citric acid-hydrogen peroxidecitric acid (CPC), were used to remove uranium from the coupons. The efficiency of uranium removal varied from 68% to 94% depending on the extent of corrosion, the association of uranium with the iron oxide matrix, and the accessibility of the occluded contaminant. Decontaminated coupons clearly showed evidence of the extensive removal of rust and uranium. The waste solutions containing uranium and iron from decontamination by OPC and CPC were treated first by subjecting them to biodegradation followed by photodegradation. Biodegradation of a CPC solution by Pseudomonas fluorescens resulted in the degradation of the citric acid with concomitant precipitation of Fe (>96%), whereas U that remained in solution was recovered (>99%) by photodegradation as schoepite. In contrast, in an OPC solution citric acid was biodegraded but not oxalic acid, and both Fe and U remained in solution. Photodegradation of this OPC solution resulted in the precipitation of iron as ferrihydrite and uranium as uranyl hydroxide. PMID:16053105

  20. Decontamination of uranium-contaminated steel surfaces by hydroxycarboxylic acid with uranium recovery.

    PubMed

    Francis, A J; Dodge, C J; McDonald, J A; Halada, G P

    2005-07-01

    We developed a simple, safe method to remove uranium from contaminated metallic surfaces so that the materials can be recycled or disposed of as low-level radioactive or nonradioactive waste. Surface analysis of rusted uranium-contaminated plain carbon-steel coupons by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy showed that uranium was predominantly associated with ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite, and magnetite, or occluded in the matrix of the corrosion product as uranyl hydroxide and schoepite (UO3 x 2H2O). Citric acid formulations, consisting of oxalic acid-hydrogen peroxidecitric acid (OPC) or citric acid-hydrogen peroxidecitric acid (CPC), were used to remove uranium from the coupons. The efficiency of uranium removal varied from 68% to 94% depending on the extent of corrosion, the association of uranium with the iron oxide matrix, and the accessibility of the occluded contaminant. Decontaminated coupons clearly showed evidence of the extensive removal of rust and uranium. The waste solutions containing uranium and iron from decontamination by OPC and CPC were treated first by subjecting them to biodegradation followed by photodegradation. Biodegradation of a CPC solution by Pseudomonas fluorescens resulted in the degradation of the citric acid with concomitant precipitation of Fe (>96%), whereas U that remained in solution was recovered (>99%) by photodegradation as schoepite. In contrast, in an OPC solution citric acid was biodegraded but not oxalic acid, and both Fe and U remained in solution. Photodegradation of this OPC solution resulted in the precipitation of iron as ferrihydrite and uranium as uranyl hydroxide.

  1. Identification of lactobacilli with inhibitory effect on biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria on stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ait Ouali, Fatma; Al Kassaa, Imad; Cudennec, Benoit; Abdallah, Marwan; Bendali, Farida; Sadoun, Djamila; Chihib, Nour-Eddine; Drider, Djamel

    2014-11-17

    Two hundred and thirty individual clones of microorganisms were recovered from milk tanks and milking machine surfaces at two distinct farms (Bejaja City, Algeria). Of these clones, 130 were identified as lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In addition Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa species were identified in the remaining 100 isolates-spoilage isolate. These isolates were assayed for ability to form biofilms. S. aureus, Lactobacillus brevis strains LB1F2, LB14F1 and LB15F1, and Lactobacillus pentosus strains LB2F2 and LB3F2 were identified as the best biofilm formers. Besides, these LAB isolates were able to produce proteinaceous substances with antagonism against the aforementioned spoilage isolates, when grown in MRS or TSB-YE media. During the screening, L. pentosus LB3F2 exhibited the highest antibacterial activity when grown in TSB-YE medium at 30 °C. Additionally, L. pentosus LB3F2 was able to strongly hamper the adhesion of S. aureus SA3 on abiotic surfaces as polystyrene and stainless steel slides. LAB isolates did not show any hemolytic activity and all of them were sensitive to different families of antibiotic tested. It should be pointed out that LB3F2 isolate was not cytotoxic on the intestinal cells but could stimulate their metabolic activity. This report unveiled the potential of LB1F2, LB14F1, LB15F1, LB2F2, and LB3F2 isolates to be used as natural barrier or competitive exclusion organism in the food processing sector as well as a positive biofilm forming bacteria.

  2. Two-surface plasticity Model and Its Application to Spring-back Simulation of Automotive Advanced High Strength Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taejoon; Seok, Dong-Yoon; Lee, Chul-Hwan; Noma, Nobuyasu; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Stoughton, Thomas B.; Chung, Kwansoo

    2011-08-01

    A two-surface isotropic-kinematic hardening law was developed based on a two-surface plasticity model previously proposed by Lee et al., (2007, Int. J. Plast. 23, 1189-1212). In order to properly represent the Bauschinger and transient behaviors as well as permanent softening during reverse loading with various pre-strains, both the inner yield surface and the outer bounding surface expand (isotropic hardening) and translate (kinematic hardening) in this two-surface model. As for the permanent softening, both the isotropic hardening and the kinematic hardening evolution of the outer bounding surface were modified by introducing softening parameters. The numerical formulation was also developed based on the incremental plasticity theory and the developed constitutive law was implemented into the commercial finite element program, ABAQUS/Explicit and ABAQUS/Standard using the user-defined material subroutines. In this work, a dual phase (DP) steel was considered as an advanced high strength steel sheet and uni-axial tension tests and uni-axial tension-compression-tension tests were performed for the characterization of the material property. For a validation purpose, the developed two-surface plasticity model was applied to the 2-D draw bending test proposed as a benchmark problem of the NUMISHEET 2011 conference and successfully validated with experiments.

  3. Performance Optimization of Cold Rolled Type 316L Stainless Steel by Sand Blasting and Surface Linishing Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, B.; Heine, B.; Engelberg, D. L.

    2016-03-01

    Sand blasting followed by a surface linishing treatment was applied to optimize the near-surface microstructure of cold rolled type 316L stainless steel. The introduction of cold rolling led to the formation of α-martensite. Specimens with large thickness reductions (40, 53%) were more susceptible to localized corrosion. The application of sand blasting produced a near-surface deformation layer containing compressive residual stresses with significantly increased surface roughness, resulting in reduced corrosion resistance. The most resistant microstructure was obtained with the application of a final linishing treatment after sand blasting. This treatment produced microstructures with compressive near-surface residual stresses, reduced surface roughness, and increased resistance to localized corrosion.

  4. Effect of laser-remelting of surface cracks on microstructure and residual stresses in 12Ni maraging steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grum, J.; Slabe, J. M.

    2006-04-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on possible application of laser-remelting to repair of narrow and comparatively deep cracks at the surface of highly thermo-mechanically loaded parts made of 12% Ni hot-working maraging tool steel. Laser-remelting of maraging steel is, due to very good weldability and flexibility of the process, very prospective for repair of fatigued surfaces of parts made of this steel at which the presence of surface microcracks may be observed. In addition to the efficiency of crack remelting, the influence of laser-remelting on the heat-affected zone in terms of its microstructure and residual stresses was also studied. The microstructure in the laser-remelted track is cellular/dendritic. In the heat-affected zone surrounding the laser-remelted track, the microstructure varies considerably. A microstructure analysis revealed, in the heat-affected zone, five microstructural zones and sub-zones. Residual stresses measured after laser-remelting are with reference to gradual through-depth changing of the stresses favourable.

  5. Trapping and surface permeation of deuterium in Fe, Ni, and stainless steel: an ion-beam study

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    Ion implantation and ion beam analysis were used to investigate trapping and surface permeability for deuterium (D) in Fe, Ni, and 304 stainless steel. In He-implanted Fe containing approx. 1 nm He bubbles, D was trapped with an enthalpy of 0.75 + - 0.07 eV, referenced to a solution site. The proposed trapping mechanism is chemisorption on the walls of the bubbles. Deuterium was also bound to implantation defects, hypothesized to be vacancies and vacancy clusters, with enthalpies of 0.5 and 0.7 eV respectively. The permeability of the electropolished and air-exposed Fe surface was characterized by a recombination coefficient of K/sub L/ = 10/sup -14/ /sup + -/ /sup 0/ /sup 7/ mm/sup 4//s at a temperature of 500 K. Trapping of D was also observed in Ni and 304 stainless steel implanted with He, the measured binding enthalpy being about 0.5 eV in both cases. Bubble traps similar to those observed in Fe are presumed responsible. No surface-barrier effect was detected for Ni, implying K/sub L/ greater than or equal to 10/sup -15/ mm/sup 4//s at approx. 350 K. In contrast, for electropolished and air-exposed stainless steel, K/sub L/ less than or equal to 10/sup -19/ mm/sup 4//s at approx. 500 K.

  6. Thermal fatigue resistance of H13 steel treated by selective laser surface melting and CrNi alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Xin; Dai, Ming-jiang; Zhang, Zhi-hui

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the selective laser surface melting and laser surface alloying technologies were adopted to improve the thermal fatigue resistance of medium carbon hot-work die steel (H13) by a CO2 laser. Two kinds of mixed chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) powders were used as the laser alloying materials, and the effects of the mixing ratio on the thermal fatigue resistance were investigated thoroughly. Some important results such as cross-sectional morphology, phases, hardness and thermal fatigue behavior were analyzed and evaluated. It indicates that the laser surface alloying technique using mixed powder with ratio of 75%Cr-25%Ni can considerably enhance the thermal fatigue resistance of the H13 steel. The laser alloyed zone has excellent properties such as preventing crack initiation and oxidation corrosion compared with original H13. Thermal cracking and oxidation corrosion that occurred at substrate surface can be surrounded and intercepted by a gridded laser strengthened structure. Therefore, the naturally developed cracks could be effectively prevented. Theses results and analysis show that laser surface technique can be positively used to improve surface mechanical properties of H13 dies.

  7. Employing Ti nano-powder dielectric to enhance surface characteristics in electrical discharge machining of AISI D2 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marashi, Houriyeh; Sarhan, Ahmed A. D.; Hamdi, Mohd

    2015-12-01

    Manufacturing components with superior surface characteristics is challenging when electrical discharge machining (EDM) is employed for mass production. The aim of this research is to enhance the characteristics of AISI D2 steel surface machined with EDM through adding Ti nano-powder to dielectric under various machining parameters, including discharge duration (Ton) and peak current (I). Surface roughness profilometer, FESEM and AFM analysis were utilized to reveal the machined surface characteristics in terms of surface roughness, surface morphology and surface micro-defects. Moreover, EDX analysis was performed in order to evaluate the atomic deposition of Ti nano-powder on the surface. The concentration of Ti nano-powder in dielectric was also examined using ESEM and EDX. According to the results, the addition of Ti nano-powder to dielectric notably enhanced the surface morphology and surface roughness at all machining parameters except Ton = 340 μs. Of these parameters, maximum enhancement was observed at Ton = 210 μs, where the material removal rate and average surface roughness improved by ∼69 and ∼35% for peak current of 6 and 12 A, respectively. Elemental analysis signified negligible Ti deposition on the machined surface while the atomic concentration of Ti was increased around the crack areas.

  8. Laser surface alloying of 316L stainless steel coated with a bioactive hydroxyapatite-titanium oxide composite.

    PubMed

    Ghaith, El-Sayed; Hodgson, Simon; Sharp, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Laser surface alloying is a powerful technique for improving the mechanical and chemical properties of engineering components. In this study, laser surface irradiation process employed in the surface modification off 316L stainless steel substrate using hydroxyapatite-titanium oxide to provide a composite ceramic layer for the suitability of applying this technology to improve the biocompatibility of medical alloys and implants. Fusion of the metal surface incorporating hydroxyapatite-titania ceramic particles using a 30 W Nd:YAG laser at different laser powers, 40, 50 and 70% power and a scan speed of 40 mm s(-1) was observed to adopt the optimum condition of ceramic deposition. Coatings were evaluated in terms of microstructure, surface morphology, composition biocompatibility using XRD, ATR-FTIR, SEM and EDS. Evaluation of the in vitro bioactivity by soaking the treated metal in SBF for 10 days showed the deposition of biomimetic apatite.

  9. Comparison of Roller Burnishing Method with Other Hole Surface Finishing Processes Applied on AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkurt, Adnan

    2011-08-01

    Component surface quality and selection of the optimum material are the main factors determining the performance of components used in machine manufacturing. The level of hole surface quality can be evaluated by the measurements regarding surface roughness, micro-hardness, and cylindricity. In this study, data had been obtained for different hole drilling methods. The characteristics of materials obtained after applications were compared for different hole-finishing processes to identify best hole drilling method. AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel material was used. Surface finishing of holes were performed using drilling, turning, reaming, grinding, honing, and roller burnishing methods. The results of the study show that the roller burnishing method gives the best results for mechanical, metallurgical properties, and hole surface quality of the material. On the other hand, the worst characteristics were obtained in the drilling method.

  10. Effect of Carbon Distribution During the Microstructure Evolution of Dual-Phase Steels Studied Using Cellular Automata, Genetic Algorithms, and Experimental Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Chandan; Karmakar, Anish; Hasan, Sk. Md.; Chakrabarti, Debalay; Pietrzyk, Maciej; Chakraborti, Nirupam

    2016-09-01

    The development of ferrite-martensite dual-phase microstructures by cold-rolling and intercritical annealing of 0.06 wt pct carbon steel was systematically studied using a dilatometer for two different heating rates (1 and 10 K/s). A step quenching treatment has been designed to develop dual-phase structures having a similar martensite fraction for two different heating rates. An increase in heating rate seemed to refine the ferrite grain size, but it increased the size and spacing of the martensitic regions. As a result, the strength of the steel increased with heating rate; however, the formability was affected. It has been concluded that the distribution of C during the annealing treatment of cold-rolled steel determines the size, distribution, and morphology of martensite, which ultimately influences the mechanical properties. Experimental detection of carbon distribution in austenite is difficult during annealing of the cold-rolled steel as the phase transformation occurs at a high temperature and C is an interstitial solute, which diffuses fast at that temperature. Therefore, a cellular automata (CA)-based phase transformation model is proposed in the present study for the prediction of C distribution in austenite during annealing of steel as the function of C content and heating rate. The CA model predicts that the carbon distribution in austenite becomes more inhomogeneous when the heating rate increases. In the CA model, the extent of carbon inhomogeneity is measured using a kernel averaging method for different orders of neighbors, which accounts for the different physical space during calculation. The obtained results reveal that the 10th order (covering 10-µm physical spaces around the cell of interest) is showing the maximum inhomogeneity of carbon and the same effect has been investigated and confirmed using auger electron spectroscopy (AES) for 0.06 wt pct carbon steel. Furthermore, the optimization of carbon homogeneity with respect to heating rate

  11. Stainless Steel Foil with Improved Creep-Resistance for Use in Primary Surface Recuperators for Gas Turbine Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, P.F.; Fitzpatrick, M.; Grubb, J.F.; Klug, R.C.; Maziasz, P.J.; Montague, J.P.; Painter, R.A.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1998-10-12

    Primary surface recuperators (PSRs) are compact heat-exchangers made from thin-foil type 347 austenitic stainless steel, which boost the efficiency of land-based gas turbine engines. Solar Turbines uses foil folded into a unique corrugated pattern to maximize the primary surface area for efficient heat transfer between hot exhaust gas on one side, and the compressor discharge air on the other side of the foil. Allegheny-Ludlum produces 0.003 - 0.0035 in. thick foil for a range of current turbine engines using PSRs that operate at up to 660 degrees C. Laboratory-scale processing modification experiments recently have demonstrated that dramatic improvements can be achieved in the creep resistance of such typical 347 stainless steel foils. The modified processing enables fine NbC carbide precipitates to develop during creep at 650-700 degrees C, which provides strength even with a fine grain size. Such improved creep-resistance is necessary for advanced turbine systems that will demand greater materials performance and reliability at higher operating conditions. The next challenges are to better understand the nature of the improved creep resistance in these 347 stainless steel foil, and to achieve similar improvements with scale-up to commercial foil production.

  12. Research on the structure-surface adsorptive activity relationships of triazolyl glycolipid derivatives for mild steel in HCl.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Lin; He, Xiao-Peng; Deng, Qiong; Long, Yi-Tao; Chen, Guo-Rong; Chen, Kaixian

    2012-06-01

    Triazolyl glycolipid derivatives constructed via Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction (Cue-AAC) represent a new range of carbohydrate-based scaffolds for use in many fields of the chemical research. Here the surface adsorptive ability of series of our previously prepared C1- or C6-triazole linked gluco- and galactolipid derivatives for mild steel in 1 M HCl was studied via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results indicated that these monosaccharide-fatty acid conjugates are weak inhibitors against HCl corrosion for mild steel. Moreover, some newly synthesized triazolyl disaccharide (maltose)-fatty alcohol conjugates failed to display enhanced activity, meaning that the structural enlargement of the sugar moiety does not favor the iron surface adsorption. However, a bis-triazolyl glycolipid derivative, which was realized by introducing a benzenesulfonamide group via Cue-AAC to the C6-position of a C1-triazolyl glucolipid analog, eventually showed significantly improved adsorptive potency compared to that of its former counterparts. The corrosion inhibitive modality of this compound for mild steel in HCl was subsequently studied via potentiodynamic polarization and thermodynamic calculations.

  13. Effect of repeated structural recrystallization of grade 20 steel on corrosion resistance of pipes of heating surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomazova, A. V.; Panova, T. V.; Gering, G. I.

    2015-04-01

    The necessity to enhance the operating characteristics of boiler steels is related to a continuous increase in corrosion damages of pipes of heating surfaces. Therefore, the actual task remains the development of ways to enhance the corrosion resistance of pipes made of grade 20, which are used as heat-absorbing elements in heat power engineering. The effect of cyclic modes of normalization (repeated structural recrystallization) on microstructural characteristics and the mechanical and corrosion properties of grade 20 steel in accordance with the regulatory requirements for products of this kind is studied. It is established that twofold normalization for grade 20 carbon steel is the optimum heat treatment mode for equalizing the ferrite grain sizes and decreasing the corrosion rate. It is revealed that this heat treatment mode increases the inequigranularity factor by three times in comparison with the original magnitude. Subsequent normalization cycles result in the formation of rejected microstructures and a decrease in mechanical properties of metal. The increased homogeneity of the microstructure at the double normalization decreases the corrosion rate by 38-51% of the original magnitude. The obtained results can be used for prolongation of the operation life by a decrease in the corrosion rate in pipes normalized twice as well as for the calculation of the remaining life of heating surfaces of boilers of heat power plants.

  14. Joint Test Report for Validation of Alternative Low-Emission Surface Preparation/Depainting Technologies for Structural Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie

    2007-01-01

    Headquarters National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) chartered the NASA Acquisition Pollution Prevention (AP2) Office to coordinate agency activities affecting pollution prevention issues identified during system and component acquisition and sustainment processes. The primary objectives of the AP2 Office are to: (1) Reduce or eliminate the use of hazardous materials or hazardous processes at manufacturing, remanufacturing, and sustainment locations. (2) Avoid duplication of effort in actions required to reduce or eliminate hazardous materials through joint center cooperation and technology sharing. The objective of this project was to qualify candidate alternative Low-Emission Surface Preparation/Depainting Technologies for Structural Steel applications at NASA facilities. This project compares the surface preparation/depainting performance of the proposed alternatives to existing surface preparation/depainting systems or standards. This Joint Test Report (JTR) contains the results of testing as per the outlines of the Joint Test Protocol (JTP), Joint Test Protocol for Validation of Alternative Low-Emission Surface Preparation/Depainting Technologies for Structural Steel, and the Field Test Plan (FTP), Field Evaluations Test Plan for Validation of Alternative Low-Emission Surface Preparation/Depainting Technologies for Structural Steel, for critical requirements and tests necessary to qualify alternatives for coating removal systems. These tests were derived from engineering, performance, and operational impact (supportability) requirements defined by a consensus of government and industry participants. This JTR documents the results of the testing as well as any test modifications made during the execution of the project. This JTR is made available as a reference for future pollution prevention endeavors by other NASA Centers, the Department of Defense and commercial users to minimize duplication of effort. The current coating removal processes

  15. In vitro biocompatibility of plasma-aided surface-modified 316L stainless steel for intracoronary stents.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Cem; Mizrak, Alpay Koray; Aktürk, Selçuk; Kurşaklioğlu, Hurkan; Iyisoy, Atila; Ifran, Ahmet; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2010-10-01

    316L-type stainless steel is a raw material mostly used for manufacturing metallic coronary stents. The purpose of this study was to examine the chemical, wettability, cytotoxic and haemocompatibility properties of 316L stainless steel stents which were modified by plasma polymerization. Six different polymeric compounds, polyethylene glycol, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, ethylenediamine, acrylic acid, hexamethyldisilane and hexamethyldisiloxane, were used in a radio frequency glow discharge plasma polymerization system. As a model antiproliferative drug, mitomycin-C was chosen for covalent coupling onto the stent surface. Modified SS 316L stents were characterized by water contact angle measurements (goniometer) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. C1s binding energies showed a good correlation with the literature. Haemocompatibility tests of coated SS 316L stents showed significant latency (t-test, p < 0.05) with respect to SS 316L and control groups in each test. PMID:20844318

  16. [Dynamics of successive changes in sulphidogenic microbial association under the conditions of formation of the biofilm on steel surface].

    PubMed

    Purish, L M; Asaulenko, L H

    2007-01-01

    Dynamics of successive changes in the artificial associative culture of sulphate-reducing bacteria was investigated under biofilm formation on steel 3 specimens. It was shown that the ammonificating, denitrificating and iron-reducing bacteria were associative satellites of sulphate-reducing bacteria in the biofilm. Heterotrophic satellites ofsulphate-reductors with domination ofammonificating bacteria developed in the first hours of exposition in the microbial association. The appearance of sulphate-reducing bacteria in the biofilm was fixed on the 24th hour of exposition, their domination was noticed after 72 and 240 hours. It was shown that the successive changes with a consequent change of domination of different bacterial physiologic groups took place in the microbial association under the biofilm formation on the steel surface, that favoured mutually beneficial functioning of corrosion-dangerous bacteria.

  17. Interactions at the mild steel acid solution interface in the presence of O-fumaryl-chitosan: Electrochemical and surface studies.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, Y; Meenakshi, S; Sundaram, C Sairam

    2016-01-20

    The performance of synthesised O-fumaryl-chitosan (OFC) as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in 1M HCl has been evaluated through various studies. The initial screening by weight loss method revealed the good inhibition efficiency by the inhibitor. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters have been calculated and discussed. The mode of adsorption is physical in nature and it follows Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Electrochemical measurements supported the inhibition of mild steel by the fumaryl derivative of chitosan. Polarisation studies provided the information that the inhibition is of mixed type. The formation of inhibitor film is assured by surface morphological studies with Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Atomic force microscopy (AFM). The mechanism of inhibition is derived from the Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and zero charge potential measurement. The adsorbed film is characterised using FTIR and X-ray diffraction studies (XRD).

  18. Modeling the Effects of Strand Surface Bulging and Mechanical Softreduction on the Macrosegregation Formation in Steel Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domitner, Josef; Wu, Menghuai; Kharicha, Abdellah; Ludwig, Andreas; Kaufmann, Bernhard; Reiter, Jürgen; Schaden, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Positive centerline macrosegregation is an undesired casting defect that frequently occurs in the continuous casting process of steel strands. Mechanical softreduction (MSR) is a generally applied technology to avoid this casting defect in steel production. In the current paper, the mechanism of MSR is numerically examined. Therefore, two 25-m long horizontal continuous casting strand geometries of industrial scale are modeled. Both of these strand geometries have periodically bulged surfaces, but only one of them considers the cross-section reduction due to a certain MSR configuration. The macrosegregation formation inside of these strands with and without MSR is studied for a binary Fe-C-alloy based on an Eulerian multiphase model. Comparing the macrosegregation patterns obtained for different casting speed definitions allows investigating the fundamental influence of feeding, bulging and MSR mechanisms on the formation of centerline macrosegregation.

  19. Influence of alloy content and a cerium surface treatment on the oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    The cost of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) can be significantly reduced by using interconnects made from ferritic stainless steels. In fact, several alloys have been developed specifically for this application (Crofer 22APU and Hitachi ZMG323). However, these steels lack environmental stability in SOFC environments, and as a result, degrade the performance of the SOFC. A steel interconnect can contribute to performance degradation through: (i) Cr poisoning of electrochemically active sites within the cathode; (ii) formation of non-conductive oxides, such as SiO2 or Al2O3 from residual or minor alloying elements, at the base metal-oxide scale interface; and/or (iii) excessive oxide scale growth, which may also retard electrical conductivity. Consequently, there has been considerable attention on developing coatings to protect steel interconnects in SOFC environments and controlling trace elements during alloy production. Recently, we have reported on the development of a Cerium surface treatment that improves the oxidation behavior of a variety alloys, including Crofer 22APU [1-5]. Initial results indicated that the treatment may improve the performance of Crofer 22APU for SOFC application by: (i) retarding scale growth resulting in a thinner oxide scale; and (ii) suppressing the formation of a deleterious continuous SiO2 layer that can form at the metal-oxide scale interface in materials with high residual Si content [5]. Crofer 22 APU contains Fe-22Cr-0.5Mn-0.1Ti (weight percent). Depending on current market prices and the purity of raw materials utilized for ingot production, Cr can contribute upwards of 90 percent of the raw materials cost. The present research was undertaken to determine the influence of Cr content and minor element additions, especially Ti, on the effectiveness of the Ce surface treatment. Particular emphasis is placed on the behavior of low Cr alloys.

  20. Tritium migration to the surfaces of Type 316 stainless steel; aluminum 6061; and oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper

    DOE PAGES

    Sharpe, M.; Shmayda, W. T.; Schroder, W. U.

    2016-05-25

    The migration of tritium to the surfaces of aluminum 6061, oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper (OFHC), and stainless-steel 316 from the bulk metal was studied using low-pressure Tonks–Langmuir argon plasma. The plasma is shown to be effective at removing tritium from metal surfaces in a controlled manner. Tritium is removed in decreasing quantities with successive plasma exposures, which suggests a depletion of the surface and near-surface tritium inventories. A diffusion model was developed to predict tritium migration from the bulk and its accumulation in the water layers present on the metal surface. The model reproduces the rate of tritium re-growth on themore » surface for all three metals and can be used to calculate the triton solubility in the water layers present on metal surfaces. The ratio of surface-to-bulk solubilities at the water-layer/bulk-metal interface uniquely determines the concentration ratio between these two media. Removing the tritium-rich water layers induces tritium to migrate from the bulk to the surface. Furthermore, this process is driven by a concentration gradient that develops in the bulk because of the perturbation on the surface.« less