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Sample records for festuca arundinacea mirnas

  1. Endophyte status of tall fescue (festuca arundinacea) affects seed predation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a preliminary study seed of a tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) variety ‘Jesup’ without endophyte were consumed at a slightly higher rate by common cricket (Acheta domesticus L.) in a standard feeding trial than the same fescue variety with the endophyte. Although, the preference for the...

  2. Host suitability of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) cultivars to Meloidogyne ethiopica and M. graminicola.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Considering the importance of the perennial grass tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) having as forage potential and its resistance to many pests, including some phytoparasitic nematodes, the host reaction of three tall fescue cultivars (cvs. Bulldogs 51, Georgia 5 and Jesup AR542 ) were evaluated for...

  3. [Cu and Pb absorption and tolerance of Agrostis stolonifera and Festuca arundinacea].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Xin, Shi-Gang; Ma, Lian-Ju; Dai, Bao-Qing; Yu, Long; Wang, Lan-Lan

    2007-03-01

    This paper studied the seed germination rate, chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, SOD activity, and Cu and Pb absorption of Agrostis stolonifera and Festuca arundinacea under Cu and Pb pollution. The results showed that Cu and Pb pollution had a significant effect on the seed germination rate of F. arundinacea. The chlorophyll content of F. arundinacea decreased dramatically under Pb and Cu-Pb pollution, while decreased slightly under Cu pollution. No significant effect of Cu and Pb was observed on the chlorophyll content of A. stolonifera. The SOD activity of A. stolonifera increased under 350 mg Cu x kg(-1) and all test concentrations of Pb, while that of F. arundinacea only increased under 700 mg Pb x kg(-1) and 350 mg Cu x kg(-1) + 1100 mg Pb x kg(-1). The net photosynthetic rate of F. arundinacea decreased more under Pb pollution than under Cu pollution, but that of A. stolonifera all decreased under Cu or Pb pollution. It was suggested that A. stolonifera was more tolerant in physiological characteristics to Cu and Pb pollution than F. arundinacea, while F. arundinacea was more tolerant to Cu than to Pb. The Cu absorption amount of F. arundinacea was relatively large, but did not increase with increasing Cu pollution. A. stolonifera had a high absorption ability of Pb, and the absorbed Pb amount was increased with increasing Pb pollution. A. stolonifera and F. arundinace could be the potential phytoremediation plants for Pb and Cu-polluted soil, respectively.

  4. Phytoparasitic Nematode Populations in Festuca arundinacea Field Plots in Southwestern Missouri

    PubMed Central

    O'Day, M. H.; Niblack, T. L.; Bailey, W. C.

    1993-01-01

    Field plots of tall rescue (Festuca arundinacea) at two locations on the same experimental farm in southwestern Missouri were sampled (one in 1987-88, the other in 1988-89) to inventory root-parasitic nematodes and to determine whether cultivars or endophyte (Acremonium coenophialum) infection frequencies (EIF) affected nematode population densities within single growing seasons. Plots were planted with seven tall rescue cultivars: Kentucky-31, Kenhy, Johnstone, Martin, Mozark, Missouri-96, and Forager. Kentucky-31 seed with high and low EIF were planted in separate plots. Plant-parasitic nematodes were extracted from soil samples, identified to genus, and enumerated four and three times per year for the 1987-1988 and 1988-1989 studies, respectively. Several plant-parasitic genera were identified from both fields, including Helicotylenchus, Heterodera, Hoplolaimus, Paratylenchus, Pratylenchus, Tylenchorhynchus, and members of genera grouped in the family Tylenchidae. Densities of five of these seven groups of nematodes differed among tall fescue cultivars in the 1987-88 study, but only two out of eight groups did so in the 1988-89 study. Irrespective of tall rescue cultivar, EIF had no consistent impact on nematode densities. The putative suppressive effect of endophyte infection on infection by plant-parasitic nematodes is not detectable within single growing seasons and deserves long-term study in field situations. PMID:19279861

  5. An SSR- and AFLP-based genetic linkage map of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.).

    PubMed

    Saha, Malay C; Mian, Rouf; Zwonitzer, John C; Chekhovskiy, Konstantin; Hopkins, Andrew A

    2005-01-01

    Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) is commonly grown as forage and turf grass in the temperate regions of the world. Here, we report the first genetic map of tall fescue constructed with PCR-based markers. A combination of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeats (EST-SSRs) of both tall fescue and those conserved in grass species was used for map construction. Genomic SSRs developed from Festuca x Lolium hybrids were also mapped. Two parental maps were initially constructed using a two-way pseudo-testcross mapping strategy. The female (HD28-56) map included 558 loci placed in 22 linkage groups (LGs) and covered 2,013 cM of the genome. In the male (R43-64) map, 579 loci were grouped in 22 LGs with a total map length of 1,722 cM. The marker density in the two maps varied from 3.61 cM (female parent) to 2.97 (male parent) cM per marker. These differences in map length indicated a reduced level of recombination in the male parent. Markers that revealed polymorphism within both parents and showed 3:1 segregation ratios were used as bridging loci to integrate the two parental maps as a bi-parental consensus. The integrated map covers 1,841 cM on 17 LGs, with an average of 54 loci per LG, and has an average marker density of 2.0 cM per marker. Homoeologous relationships among linkage groups of six of the seven predicted homeologous groups were identified. Three small groups from the HD28-56 map and four from the R43-64 map are yet to be integrated. Homoeologues of four of those groups were detected. Except for a few gaps, markers are well distributed throughout the genome. Clustering of those markers showing significant segregation distortion (23% of total) was observed in four of the LGs of the integrated map.

  6. Festuca arundinacea, glutathione S-transferase and herbicide safeners: a preliminary case study to reduce herbicidal pollution.

    PubMed

    Scarponi, Luciano; Del Buono, Daniele

    2009-11-01

    The expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in Festuca arundinacea was investigated in response to the following herbicide safeners: benoxacor, cloquintocet-mexyl, fenchlorazol-ethyl, fenclorim, fluxofenim and oxabetrinil. All the above compounds enhanced the GST activity tested towards the "model" substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Assays of GST activity towards the herbicides terbuthylazine (N(2)-tert-butyl-6-chloro-N(4)-ethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) and butachlor (N-butoxymethyl-2-chloro-2',6'-diethylacetanilide) as substrates also showed the ability of the safeners to enhance the enzyme activity towards both these herbicides, with the exception of cloquintocet-mexyl for the enzyme activity towards butachlor. As a consequence of the above effects at a macro-scale level, decreased herbicide accumulation and persistence were ascertained in response to the addition of the safener benoxacor to both terbuthylazine and butachlor treatments. These results are discussed in terms of capacity of benoxacor to induce herbicide detoxification in Festuca arundinacea with a view to utilizing them in reducing herbicide pollution.

  7. The use of a biodegradable chelator for enhanced phytoextraction of heavy metals by Festuca arundinacea from municipal solid waste compost and associated heavy metal leaching.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shulan; Jia, Lina; Duo, Lian

    2013-02-01

    In a column experiment with horizontal permeable barriers, the effects of a biodegradable chelator-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) on the uptake of heavy metals from municipal solid waste (MSW) compost by Festuca arundinacea and metal leaching were investigated. The use of NTA was effective in increasing Cu, Pb, and Zn uptakes in shoots of two crops of F. arundinacea. In columns with barriers and treated with 20 mmol NTA per kg MSW compost, metal uptakes by the first and second crop of F. arundinacea were, respectively, 3.8 and 4.0 times for Pb, and 1.8 and 1.7 times for Zn greater with the added NTA than without it. Though NTA application mobilized metals, it caused only slight leaching of metals from MSW compost. Permeable barriers positioned between compost and soil effectively reduced metal leaching. NTA-assisted phytoextraction by turfgrass with permeable barriers to cleanup heavy metal contaminated MSW compost should be environmentally safe.

  8. Ascorbic Acid Enhances the Accumulation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Roots of Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.)

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanzheng; Li, Hui; Gong, Shuaishuai

    2012-01-01

    Plant contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is crucial to food safety and human health. Enzyme inhibitors are commonly utilized in agriculture to control plant metabolism of organic components. This study revealed that the enzyme inhibitor ascorbic acid (AA) significantly reduced the activities of peroxidase (POD) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO), thus enhancing the potential risks of PAH contamination in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.). POD and PPO enzymes in vitro effectively decomposed naphthalene (NAP), phenanthrene (PHE) and anthracene (ANT). The presence of AA reduced POD and PPO activities in plants, and thus was likely responsible for enhanced PAH accumulation in tall fescue. This conclusion is supported by the significantly enhanced uptake of PHE in plants in the presence of AA, and the positive correlation between enzyme inhibition efficiencies and the rates of metabolism of PHE in tall fescue roots. This study provides a new perspective, that the common application of enzyme inhibitors in agricultural production could increase the accumulation of organic contaminants in plants, hence enhancing risks to food safety and quality. PMID:23185628

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhiza affects nickel translocation and expression of ABC transporter and metallothionein genes in Festuca arundinacea.

    PubMed

    Shabani, Leila; Sabzalian, Mohammad R; Mostafavi pour, Sodabeh

    2016-01-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are key microorganisms for enhancing phytoremediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals. In this study, the effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Funneliformis mosseae (=Glomus mosseae) on physiological and molecular mechanisms involved in the nickel (Ni) tolerance of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea = Schedonorus arundinaceus) were investigated. Nickel addition had a pronounced negative effect on tall fescue growth and photosynthetic pigment contents, as well as on AMF colonization. Phosphorus content increased markedly in mycorrhizal plants (M) compared to non-inoculated (NM) ones. However, no significant difference was observed in root carbohydrate content between AMF-inoculated and non-inoculated plants. For both M and NM plants, Ni concentrations in shoots and roots increased according to the addition of the metal into soil, but inoculation with F. mosseae led to significantly lower Ni translocation from roots to the aboveground parts compared to non-inoculated plants. ABC transporter and metallothionein transcripts accumulated to considerably higher levels in tall fescue plants colonized by F. mosseae than in the corresponding non-mycorrhizal plants. These results highlight the importance of mycorrhizal colonization in alleviating Ni-induced stress by reducing Ni transport from roots to shoots of tall fescue plants.

  10. Response to elevated CO2 in the temperate C3 grass Festuca arundinaceae across a wide range of soils

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Eric A.; Jaramillo, Raúl E.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Soils vary widely in mineral nutrient availability and physical characteristics, but the influence of this variability on plant responses to elevated CO2 remains poorly understood. As a first approximation of the effect of global soil variability on plant growth response to CO2, we evaluated the effect of CO2 on tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) grown in soils representing 10 of the 12 global soil orders plus a high-fertility control. Plants were grown in small pots in continuously stirred reactor tanks in a greenhouse. Elevated CO2 (800 ppm) increased plant biomass in the high-fertility control and in two of the more fertile soils. Elevated CO2 had variable effects on foliar mineral concentration—nitrogen was not altered by elevated CO2, and phosphorus and potassium were only affected by CO2 in a small number of soils. While leaf photosynthesis was stimulated by elevated CO2 in six soils, canopy photosynthesis was not stimulated. Four principle components were identified; the first was associated with foliar minerals and soil clay, and the second with soil acidity and foliar manganese concentration. The third principle component was associated with gas exchange, and the fourth with plant biomass and soil minerals. Soils in which tall fescue did not respond to elevated CO2 account for 83% of global land area. These results show that variation in soil physical and chemical properties have important implications for plant responses to global change, and highlight the need to consider soil variability in models of vegetation response to global change. PMID:25774160

  11. Response to elevated CO2 in the temperate C3 grass Festuca arundinaceae across a wide range of soils.

    PubMed

    Nord, Eric A; Jaramillo, Raúl E; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    Soils vary widely in mineral nutrient availability and physical characteristics, but the influence of this variability on plant responses to elevated CO2 remains poorly understood. As a first approximation of the effect of global soil variability on plant growth response to CO2, we evaluated the effect of CO2 on tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) grown in soils representing 10 of the 12 global soil orders plus a high-fertility control. Plants were grown in small pots in continuously stirred reactor tanks in a greenhouse. Elevated CO2 (800 ppm) increased plant biomass in the high-fertility control and in two of the more fertile soils. Elevated CO2 had variable effects on foliar mineral concentration-nitrogen was not altered by elevated CO2, and phosphorus and potassium were only affected by CO2 in a small number of soils. While leaf photosynthesis was stimulated by elevated CO2 in six soils, canopy photosynthesis was not stimulated. Four principle components were identified; the first was associated with foliar minerals and soil clay, and the second with soil acidity and foliar manganese concentration. The third principle component was associated with gas exchange, and the fourth with plant biomass and soil minerals. Soils in which tall fescue did not respond to elevated CO2 account for 83% of global land area. These results show that variation in soil physical and chemical properties have important implications for plant responses to global change, and highlight the need to consider soil variability in models of vegetation response to global change.

  12. Screening the wetland plant species Alisma plantago-aquatica, Carex rostrata and Phalaris arundinacea for innate tolerance to zinc and comparison with Eriophorum angustifolium and Festuca rubra Merlin.

    PubMed

    Matthews, David J; Moran, Bridget M; Otte, Marinus L

    2005-03-01

    Several wetland plant species appear to have constitutive metal tolerance. In previous studies, populations from contaminated and non-contaminated sites of the wetland plants Typha latifolia, Phragmites australis, Glyceria fluitans and Eriophorum angustifolium were found to be tolerant to high concentrations of metals. This study screened three other species of wetland plants: Alisma plantago-aquatica, Carex rostrata and Phalaris arundinacea for innate tolerance to zinc. The degree of tolerance was compared to known zinc-tolerant E. angustifolium and Festuca rubra Merlin. It was found that A. plantago-aquatica and P. arundinacea did not posses innate tolerance to zinc, but that C. rostrata was able to tolerate elevated levels of zinc, at levels comparable to those tolerated by E. angustifolium and F. rubra Merlin. The findings support the theory that some wetland angiosperm species tend to be tolerant to exposure to high levels of metals, regardless of their origin.

  13. Germination, Physiological Responses and Gene Expression of Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) Growing under Pb and Cd.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yanhong; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Deling; Amombo, Erick; Sun, Xin; Wang, Hui; Zhuge, Yuping

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are recognized as the most toxic metal ions due to their detrimental effects not only to plants, but also to humans. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Cd and Pb treatments on seed germination, plant growth, and physiological response in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.). We employed six treatments: CK (nutrient solution as control), T1 (1000 mg L-1 Pb), T2 (50 mg L-1 Cd), T3 (150 mg L-1 Cd), T4 (1000 mg L-1 Pb+50 mg L-1 Cd), T5 (1000 mg L-1 Pb+150 mg L-1 Cd). Antagonistic and synergistic actions were observed in tall fescue under Pb and Cd combined treatments. Under low Cd, plants exhibited higher relative germination rate, germ length, VSGR, catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) activities. Additionally, in the shoots, the gene expression level of Cu/Zn SOD, FeSOD, POD, GPX, translocation factors, MDA, EL, and soluble protein contents were reduced under Pb stress. Conversely, under high Cd level, there was a decline in NRT, Pb content in shoots, Pb translocation factors, CAT activity; and an increase in VSGR, Pb content in roots, gene expression level of Cu/ZnSOD and POD in tall fescue exposed to Pb2+ regimes. On the other hand, tall fescue plants treated with low Cd exhibited lower relative germination rate, germination index, germ length, NRT, Cd content in roots. On the other hand there was higher Cd content, Cd translocation factor, CAT and POD activities, and gene expression level of Cu/Zn SOD, FeSOD, POD, GPX under Pb treatment compared with single Cd2+ treatment in the shoots. However, after high Cd exposure, plants displayed lower NRT, Cd content, CAT activity, and exhibited higher Cd contents, Cd translocation factor, MDA content, gene expression level of Cu/ZnSOD and GPX with the presence of Pb2+ relative to single Cd2+ treatment. These findings lead to a conclusion that the presence of low Cd level impacted positively towards tall fescue growth under Pb stress, while high level of Cd impacted

  14. Germination, Physiological Responses and Gene Expression of Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) Growing under Pb and Cd

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yanhong; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Deling; Amombo, Erick; Sun, Xin; Wang, Hui; Zhuge, Yuping

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are recognized as the most toxic metal ions due to their detrimental effects not only to plants, but also to humans. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Cd and Pb treatments on seed germination, plant growth, and physiological response in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.). We employed six treatments: CK (nutrient solution as control), T1 (1000 mg L-1 Pb), T2 (50 mg L-1 Cd), T3 (150 mg L-1 Cd), T4 (1000 mg L-1 Pb+50 mg L-1 Cd), T5 (1000 mg L-1 Pb+150 mg L-1 Cd). Antagonistic and synergistic actions were observed in tall fescue under Pb and Cd combined treatments. Under low Cd, plants exhibited higher relative germination rate, germ length, VSGR, catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) activities. Additionally, in the shoots, the gene expression level of Cu/Zn SOD, FeSOD, POD, GPX, translocation factors, MDA, EL, and soluble protein contents were reduced under Pb stress. Conversely, under high Cd level, there was a decline in NRT, Pb content in shoots, Pb translocation factors, CAT activity; and an increase in VSGR, Pb content in roots, gene expression level of Cu/ZnSOD and POD in tall fescue exposed to Pb2+ regimes. On the other hand, tall fescue plants treated with low Cd exhibited lower relative germination rate, germination index, germ length, NRT, Cd content in roots. On the other hand there was higher Cd content, Cd translocation factor, CAT and POD activities, and gene expression level of Cu/Zn SOD, FeSOD, POD, GPX under Pb treatment compared with single Cd2+ treatment in the shoots. However, after high Cd exposure, plants displayed lower NRT, Cd content, CAT activity, and exhibited higher Cd contents, Cd translocation factor, MDA content, gene expression level of Cu/ZnSOD and GPX with the presence of Pb2+ relative to single Cd2+ treatment. These findings lead to a conclusion that the presence of low Cd level impacted positively towards tall fescue growth under Pb stress, while high level of Cd impacted

  15. Selenium accumulation and selenium-salt co-tolerance in five grass species. [Festuca arundinaceae; Agropyron deserorum; Buchloe dactyloides; Agrostis stolonifera; Cynodon dactylon

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L.; Huang, Z.; Burau, R.G.

    1987-04-01

    Five grass species including Tall fescue (Festuca arundinaceae Schred), Crested wheatgrass (Agropyron deserorum Fisch), Buffalo grass (Buchlor dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.), Seaside bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) and Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers., Syn.) were examined for selenium and salt tolerance and selenium accumulation under solution culture conditions. Distinct differences in both selenium and salt tolerance were detected among the five species, but no direct association between selenium and salt resistance was found. Tall fescue displayed considerable tolerance under 1 ppm selenium and 100 mM salt treatment. Combined selenium and salt treatment revealed that selenium uptake was increased by the incorporation of salt in the culture solution. However, salt uptake was not significantly affected by the presence of selenium in the culture solution. At moderate toxic levels of selenium, the species with greater tolerance accumulated less selenium than did the less tolerant species.

  16. Effects of elevated ultraviolet radiation and endophytic fungi on plant growth and insect feeding in Lolium perenne, Festuca rubra, F. arundinacea and F. pratensis.

    PubMed

    McLeod, A R; Rey, A; Newsham, K K; Lewis, G C; Wolferstam, P

    2001-09-01

    Plants of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), red fescue (Festuca rubra L.), tall fescue (F. arundinacea Schreb.) and meadow fescue (F. pratensis Huds) were exposed at an outdoor facility located in Edinburgh, UK to modulated levels of UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) using banks of cellulose diacetate filtered UV-B fluorescent lamps that also produce UV-A radiation (315-400 nm). The plants were derived from a single clone of each species and were grown both with and without colonization by naturally-occurring fungal endophytes. The UV-B treatment was a 30% elevation above the ambient erythemally-weighted level of UV-B during July to October. Growth of treated plants was compared with plants grown under elevated UV-A radiation alone produced by banks of polyester filtered lamps and with plants grown at ambient levels of solar radiation under banks of unenergized lamps. At the end of the treatment period, sample leaves were collected for feeding trials with the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria (Forsk). The UV-B treatment produced no effects on the aboveground biomass of any of the four grasses. The UV-B treatment and the UV-A control exposure both increased plant height and the number of daughter plants formed by rhizome growth in F. rubra. There were significant effects of endophyte presence on the total fresh and dry weights of F. arundinacea and F. rubra, on fresh weight only in F. pratensis, and on the fresh and dry weights of inflorescence in F. arundinacea and L. perenne. There were no effects of UV treatments on the absolute amounts of leaf consumed or on the feeding preferences of locusts for leaves with or without endophyte in three species: F. rubra, F. arundinacea and L. perenne. In F. pratensis there was no effect of UV treatment on the weight of leaves consumed but a significant UV x endophyte interaction caused by a marked change in feeding preference between leaves with and without endophyte that differed between the UV-B treatment and UV-A control

  17. Water use efficiency and shoot biomass production under water limitation is negatively correlated to the discrimination against (13)C in the C3 grasses Dactylis glomerata, Festuca arundinacea and Phalaris arundinacea.

    PubMed

    Mårtensson, Linda-Maria; Carlsson, Georg; Prade, Thomas; Kørup, Kirsten; Lærke, Poul Erik; Jensen, Erik Steen

    2017-04-01

    Climate change impacts rainfall patterns which may lead to drought stress in rain-fed agricultural systems. Crops with higher drought tolerance are required on marginal land with low precipitation or on soils with low water retention used for biomass production. It is essential to obtain plant breeding tools, which can identify genotypes with improved drought tolerance and water use efficiency (WUE). In C3 plant species, the variation in discrimination against (13)C (Δ(13)C) during photosynthesis has been shown to be a potential indicator for WUE, where discrimination against (13)C and WUE were negatively correlated. The aim of this study was to determine the variation in the discrimination against (13)C between species and cultivars of three perennial C3 grasses (Dactylis glomerata (cocksfoot), Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue) and Phalaris arundinacea (reed canary grass)) and test the relationships between discrimination against (13)C, season-long water use WUEB, shoot and root biomass production in plants grown under well-watered and water-limited conditions. The grasses were grown in the greenhouse and exposed to two irrigation regimes, which corresponded to 25% and 60% water holding capacity, respectively. We found negative relationships between discrimination against (13)C and WUEB and between discrimination against (13)C and shoot biomass production, under both the well-watered and water-limited growth conditions (p < 0.001). Discrimination against (13)C decreased in response to water limitation (p < 0.001). We found interspecific differences in the discrimination against (13)C, WUEB, and shoot biomass production, where the cocksfoot cultivars showed lowest and the reed canary grass cultivars highest values of discrimination against (13)C. Cocksfoot cultivars also showed highest WUEB, shoot biomass production and potential tolerance to water limitation. We conclude that discrimination against (13)C appears to be a useful indicator, when selecting C3

  18. Enhanced salt tolerance of transgenic progeny of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) expressing a vacuolar Na+/H+ antiporter gene from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junsheng; Zhi, Daying; Xue, Zheyong; Liu, Heng; Xia, Guangmin

    2007-10-01

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress factor limiting crop production. To generate salt-tolerant turf and forage, we had transformed tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) with AtNHX1, a vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene from Arabidopsis thaliana. In this paper, we report that overexpression of the AtNHX1 gene confers enhanced salt tolerance to the transformed tall fescue progenies. DNA gel blot analysis and reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were carried out to confirm the inheritance and expression of the AtNHX1 gene in transgenic T(1) and T(2) lines. These transgenic lines showed no phenotypic changes or yield reduction. Plants carrying the AtNHX1 gene were more resistant to a 20 mM NaCl solution than control plants. The roots of the transgenic lines had a higher sodium content than controls, due to an increased Na(+)/H(+) antiporter activity in tonoplast vesicles. Our results suggest that this accumulation of sodium in vacuoles of root cells, mediated by vacuolar Na(+)/H(+) antiporters, reduced the toxic effects of salinity to tall fescue and thus enhanced its salt tolerance.

  19. Water Deficit Affects Primary Metabolism Differently in Two Lolium multiflorum/Festuca arundinacea Introgression Forms with a Distinct Capacity for Photosynthesis and Membrane Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Perlikowski, Dawid; Czyżniejewski, Mariusz; Marczak, Łukasz; Augustyniak, Adam; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how plants respond to drought at different levels of cell metabolism is an important aspect of research on the mechanisms involved in stress tolerance. Furthermore, a dissection of drought tolerance into its crucial components by the use of plant introgression forms facilitates to analyze this trait more deeply. The important components of plant drought tolerance are the capacity for photosynthesis under drought conditions, and the ability of cellular membrane regeneration after stress cessation. Two closely related introgression forms of Lolium multiflorum/Festuca arundinacea, differing in the level of photosynthetic capacity during stress, and in the ability to regenerate their cellular membranes after stress cessation, were used as forage grass models in a primary metabolome profiling and in an evaluation of chloroplast 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase accumulation level and activity, during 11 days of water deficit, followed by 10 days of rehydration. It was revealed here that the introgression form, characterized by the ability to regenerate membranes after rehydration, contained higher amounts of proline, melibiose, galactaric acid, myo-inositol and myo-inositol-1-phosphate involved in osmoprotection and stress signaling under drought. Moreover, during the rehydration period, this form also maintained elevated accumulation levels of most the primary metabolites, analyzed here. The other introgression form, characterized by the higher capacity for photosynthesis, revealed a higher accumulation level and activity of chloroplast aldolase under drought conditions, and higher accumulation levels of most photosynthetic products during control and drought periods. The potential impact of the observed metabolic alterations on cellular membrane recovery after stress cessation, and on a photosynthetic capacity under drought conditions in grasses, are discussed. PMID:27504113

  20. Water Deficit Affects Primary Metabolism Differently in Two Lolium multiflorum/Festuca arundinacea Introgression Forms with a Distinct Capacity for Photosynthesis and Membrane Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Perlikowski, Dawid; Czyżniejewski, Mariusz; Marczak, Łukasz; Augustyniak, Adam; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how plants respond to drought at different levels of cell metabolism is an important aspect of research on the mechanisms involved in stress tolerance. Furthermore, a dissection of drought tolerance into its crucial components by the use of plant introgression forms facilitates to analyze this trait more deeply. The important components of plant drought tolerance are the capacity for photosynthesis under drought conditions, and the ability of cellular membrane regeneration after stress cessation. Two closely related introgression forms of Lolium multiflorum/Festuca arundinacea, differing in the level of photosynthetic capacity during stress, and in the ability to regenerate their cellular membranes after stress cessation, were used as forage grass models in a primary metabolome profiling and in an evaluation of chloroplast 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase accumulation level and activity, during 11 days of water deficit, followed by 10 days of rehydration. It was revealed here that the introgression form, characterized by the ability to regenerate membranes after rehydration, contained higher amounts of proline, melibiose, galactaric acid, myo-inositol and myo-inositol-1-phosphate involved in osmoprotection and stress signaling under drought. Moreover, during the rehydration period, this form also maintained elevated accumulation levels of most the primary metabolites, analyzed here. The other introgression form, characterized by the higher capacity for photosynthesis, revealed a higher accumulation level and activity of chloroplast aldolase under drought conditions, and higher accumulation levels of most photosynthetic products during control and drought periods. The potential impact of the observed metabolic alterations on cellular membrane recovery after stress cessation, and on a photosynthetic capacity under drought conditions in grasses, are discussed.

  1. Influence of short-term drought conditions and subsequent re-watering on the physiology and proteome of Lolium multiflorum/Festuca arundinacea introgression forms, with contrasting levels of tolerance to long-term drought.

    PubMed

    Perlikowski, D; Kosmala, A; Rapacz, M; Kościelniak, J; Pawłowicz, I; Zwierzykowski, Z

    2014-03-01

    Festuca arundinacea is a drought tolerant species. Lolium multiflorum has better forage quality but lower tolerance to abiotic stresses. Their hybrids offer an opportunity to perform research on the molecular basis of tolerance to drought. The aim of this work was to recognise the mechanisms of response to short-term drought (11 days) in a glasshouse in two L. multiflorum/F. arundinacea introgression forms with distinct levels of tolerance to long-term drought (14 weeks) in the field. Measurements of physiological parameters, analyses of protein accumulation profiles using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry identification of proteins, which were accumulated differentially between the selected genotypes during short-term drought, were performed. Genotype 7/6, with lower yield potential during 14 weeks of drought, and lower ability to re-grow after watering, had a higher capacity for photosynthesis during 11 days of drought. Genotype 4/10, more tolerant to long-term drought, was able to repair damaged cell membranes after watering and was also characterised by lower transpiration during short-term drought. A total of 455 proteins were analysed, and the 17 that were differentially accumulated between the two genotypes were identified. The results of physiological and proteomic research led to a hypothesis that the higher photosynthetic capacity of genotype 7/6 could be due to a more efficient Calvin cycle, supported by higher accumulation of crucial proteins involving chloroplast aldolase.

  2. Detection of kestoses and kestose-related oligosaccharides in extracts of Festuca arundinacea, Dactylis glomerate L. , and Asparagus officinalis L. root cultures and invertase by sup 13 C and sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, K.L.; Feather, M.S.; Gracz, H.; Wong, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Previous studies show that {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to detect and identify mixtures of 1-kestose and neokestose after conversion to the acetate derivatives. In this study, unequivocal assignments are made for the anomeric carbon and proton signals for the above two trisaccharide acetates as well as for 6-kestose hendecaacetate and for nystose tetradecaacetate (a 1-kestose-derived tetrasaccharide). A number of oligosaccharide fractions were isolated from several plant species, converted to the acetates, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra obtained. Using the above reference data, the following information was obtained. The trisaccharide fraction from Dactylis gomerata L. stem tissue and Asparagus officinalis L. roots contain both 1-kestose and neokestose, and the tetrasaccharide fractions contain three components, one of which is nystose. Penta- and hexasaccharide acetates were also isolated from A. officinalis L. roots and were found to contain, respectively, four and at least five components. All components of both of the above species appear to contain a kestose residue and to be produced by the sequential addition of fructofuranosyl units to these. The trisaccharide fraction from Festuca arundinacea is complex, and contains at least five different components, two of which appear to be 1-kestose and neokestose.

  3. Effects of untreated and treated wastewater at the morphological, physiological and biochemical levels on seed germination and development of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench), alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.).

    PubMed

    Rekik, Imen; Chaabane, Zayneb; Missaoui, Amara; Bouket, Ali Chenari; Luptakova, Lenka; Elleuch, Amine; Belbahri, Lassaad

    2017-03-15

    Wastewater reuse in agriculture may help mitigate water scarcity. This may be reached if high quality treatments removing harmful pollutants are applied. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of untreated (UTW) and treated wastewater (TW) on germination and seedlings development of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench). UTW presented high turbidity (130 NTU), chemical and biological oxygen demand (COD, 719mgL(-1), BOD5, 291mgL(-1)) and metal concentrations. These levels caused mortality (18% for fescue), decreased germination speed in seeds (37.5% for alfalfa) and reductions of root and stem length in seedlings (80% and 22% respectively for alfalfa). Adverse effects on seeds germination were reflected at the biochemical level by increased H2O2 levels (6 times for sorghum after 5days) and by increased Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels (more than 600 times for sorghum roots) during seedlings development. When TW was used, these parameters were close to control seeds ones. They were also dependent on plant species and developmental stage. Therefore, for efficient reclaimed wastewater reuse in irrigation, suitable crops, displaying wide tolerance to toxic contents during germination and later seedling development stages have to be selected.

  4. Tiller production in cocksfoot (Dactylis glomerata) and tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) growing along a light gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pasture managers seek to balance leaf appearance with leaf utilization to meet livestock nutritional needs and sustain sward productivity. Achieving this balance when managing forages in silvopasture, requires techniques that account for the influence of light and defoliation on tiller appearance a...

  5. Interaction of heavy metals and pyrene on their fates in soil and tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea).

    PubMed

    Lu, Mang; Zhang, Zhong-Zhi; Wang, Jing-Xiu; Zhang, Min; Xu, Yu-Xin; Wu, Xue-Jiao

    2014-01-21

    90-Day growth chamber experiments were performed to investigate the interactive effect of pyrene and heavy metals (Cu, Cd, and Pb) on the growth of tall fescue and its uptake, accumulation, and dissipation of heavy metals and pyrene. Results show that plant growth and phytomass production were impacted by the interaction of heavy metals and pyrene. They were significantly decreased with heavy metal additions (100-2000 mg/kg), but they were only slightly declined with pyrene spiked up to 100 mg/kg. The addition of a moderate dosage of pyrene (100 mg/kg) lessened heavy metal toxicity to plants, resulting in enhanced plant growth and increased metal accumulation in plant tissues, thus improving heavy metal removal by plants. In contrast, heavy metals always reduced both plant growth and pyrene dissipation in soils. The chemical forms of Cu, Cd, and Pb in plant organs varied with metal species and pyrene addition. The dissipation and mineralization of pyrene tended to decline in both planted soil and unplanted soils with the presence of heavy metals, whereas they were enhanced with planting. The results demonstrate the complex interactive effects of organic pollutants and heavy metals on phytoremediation in soils. It can be concluded that, to a certain extent, tall fescue may be useful for phytoremediation of pyrene-heavy metal-contaminated sites. Further work is needed to enhance methods for phytoremediation of heavy metal-organics co-contaminated soil.

  6. Transcriptomes of Lolium/Schedonorus/Festuca species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ESTs from normalized cDNA libraries of tall fescue with Neotyphodium coenophialum and meadow fescue with Epichloë festucae have been sequenced. The meadow fescue libraries were from RNA isolated from immature tillers of meadow fescue symbiotic with E. festucae, displaying normal inflorescences and ...

  7. Transcriptomes of Lolium/Schedonorus/Festuca Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ESTs from normalized cDNA libraries of tall fescue with Neotyphodium coenophialum and meadow fescue with Epichloë festucae have been sequenced. The meadow fescue libraries were from RNA isolated from immature tillers of meadow fescue symbiotic with E. festucae, displaying normal inflorescences and ...

  8. Transcriptomes of Lolium/Schedonorus/Festuca species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular tools for forage grasses are presently sparse. In order to make available these tools for the community, a large scale sequencing effort has been conducted. Roughly 140,000 cDNA clones from normalized libraries obtained from meadow fescue/Epichloe festucae inflorescences and stromata and t...

  9. He-Ne laser preillumination improves the resistance of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) seedlings to high saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li-Mei; Li, Yong-Feng; Han, Rong

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we explored the protective effect and physiochemical mechanism of He-Ne laser preillumination in enhancement of tall fescue seedlings tolerance to high salt stress. The results showed that salt stress greatly reduced plant growth, plant height, biomass, leaf development, ascorbate acid (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) concentration, the enzymatic activities, and gene expression levels of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) and enhanced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content, superoxide radical (O2 (·-)) generation rates, membrane lipid peroxidation, relative electrolyte leakage, the enzymatic activities, and gene expression levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and peroxidase (POD), compared with controls. However, He-Ne laser preillumination significantly reversed plant growth retardation, biomass loss, and leaves development decay induced by salt stress. And the values of the physiochemical parameters observed in salt-stressed plants were partially reverted or further increased by He-Ne laser. Salt stress had no obvious effect on the transcriptional activity of phytochromeB, whereas He-Ne laser markedly enhanced its transcriptional level. Preillumination with white fluorescent lamps (W), red light (RL) of the same wavelength, or RL, then far-red light (FRL) had not alleviated the inhibitory effect of salt stress on plant growth and antioxidant enzymes activities, suggesting that the effect of He-Ne laser on improved salt tolerance was most likely attributed to the induction of phytochromeB transcription activities by the laser preillumination, but not RL, FRL or other light sources. In addition, we also utilized sodium nitroprusside (SNP) as NO donor to pre-treat tall fescue seedlings at the same conditions, and further evaluated the differences of physiological effects between He-Ne laser and NO in increasing salt resistance of tall fescue. Taken together, our data illustrated that He-Ne laser preillumination contributed to conferring an increased tolerance to salt stress in tall fescue seedlings due to alleviating oxidative damage through scavenging free radicals and inducing transcriptional activities of some genes involved in plant antioxidant system, and the induction of phytochromeB transcriptional level by He-Ne laser was probably correlated with these processes. Moreover, this positive physiochemical effect seemed more effective with He-Ne laser than NO molecule.

  10. The Effects of Temperature on Germination of Eleven Festuca Cultivars.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    Schreb.) had the greatest germination percentage, and "Arctared" red fescue ( Festuca rubra L.) had the least when averaged across the five temperatures...Many studies have shown that water potential at planting affects the germination rate and final germination of Festuca cultivars. Limited information...is available about the extent of variability in temperature-dependence of germination among different Festuca cultivars. Our objective was to study

  11. Evolutionary history of tall fescue morphotypes inferred from molecular phylogenetics of the Lolium-Festuca species complex

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The agriculturally important pasture grass tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb. syn. Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh.) is an outbreeding allohexaploid, that may be more accurately described as a species complex consisting of three major (Continental, Mediterranean and rhizomatous) morphotypes. Observation of hybrid infertility in some crossing combinations between morphotypes suggests the possibility of independent origins from different diploid progenitors. This study aims to clarify the evolutionary relationships between each tall fescue morphotype through phylogenetic analysis using two low-copy nuclear genes (encoding plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase [Acc1] and centroradialis [CEN]), the nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (rDNA ITS) and the chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) genome-located matK gene. Other taxa within the closely related Lolium-Festuca species complex were also included in the study, to increase understanding of evolutionary processes in a taxonomic group characterised by multiple inter-specific hybridisation events. Results Putative homoeologous sequences from both nuclear genes were obtained from each polyploid species and compared to counterparts from 15 diploid taxa. Phylogenetic reconstruction confirmed F. pratensis and F. arundinacea var. glaucescens as probable progenitors to Continental tall fescue, and these species are also likely to be ancestral to the rhizomatous morphotype. However, these two morphotypes are sufficiently distinct to be located in separate clades based on the ITS-derived data set. All four of the generated data sets suggest independent evolution of the Mediterranean and Continental morphotypes, with minimal affinity between cognate sequence haplotypes. No obvious candidate progenitor species for Mediterranean tall fescues were identified, and only two putative sub-genome-specific haplotypes were identified for this morphotype. Conclusions This study describes the first phylogenetic analysis of

  12. Intrapopulation Genome Size Dynamics in Festuca pallens

    PubMed Central

    Šmarda, Petr; Bureš, Petr; Horová, Lucie; Rotreklová, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims It is well known that genome size differs among species. However, information on the variation and dynamics of genome size in wild populations and on the early phase of genome size divergence between taxa is currently lacking. Genome size dynamics, heritability and phenotype effects are analysed here in a wild population of Festuca pallens (Poaceae). Methods Genome size was measured using flow cytometry with DAPI dye in 562 seedlings from 17 maternal plants varying in genome size. The repeatability of genome size measurements was verified at different seasons through the use of different standards and with propidium iodide dye; the range of variation observed was tested via analysis of double-peaks. Additionally, chromosome counts were made in selected seedlings. Key Results and Conclusions Analysis of double-peaks showed that genome size varied up to 1·188-fold within all 562 seedlings, 1·119-fold within the progeny of a single maternal plant and 1·117-fold in seedlings from grains of a single inflorescence. Generally, genome sizes of seedlings and their mothers were highly correlated. However, in maternal plants with both larger and smaller genomes, genome sizes of seedlings were shifted towards the population median. This was probably due to the frequency of available paternal genomes (pollen grains) in the population. There was a stabilizing selection on genome size during the development of seedlings into adults, which may be important for stabilizing genome size within species. Furthermore, a positive correlation was found between genome size and the development rate of seedlings. A larger genome may therefore provide a competitive advantage, perhaps explaining the higher proportion of plants with larger genomes in the population studied. The reason for the observed variation may be the recent induction of genome size variation, e.g. by activity of retrotransposons, which may be preserved in the long term by the segregation of

  13. Models Analyses for Allelopathic Effects of Chicory at Equivalent Coupling of Nitrogen Supply and pH Level on F. arundinacea, T. repens and M. sativa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quanzhen; Xie, Bao; Wu, Chunhui; Chen, Guo; Wang, Zhengwei; Cui, Jian; Hu, Tianming; Wiatrak, Pawel

    2012-01-01

    Alllelopathic potential of chicory was investigated by evaluating its effect on seed germination, soluble sugar, malondialdehyde (MDA) and the chlorophyll content of three target plants species (Festuca arundinacea, Trifolium repens and Medicago sativa). The secretion of allelochemicals was regulated by keeping the donor plant (chicory) separate from the three target plant species and using different pH and nitrogen levels. Leachates from donor pots with different pH levels and nitrogen concentrations continuously irrigated the target pots containing the seedlings. The allelopathic effects of the chicory at equivalent coupling of nitrogen supply and pH level on the three target plants species were explored via models analyses. The results suggested a positive effect of nitrogen supply and pH level on allelochemical secretion from chicory plants. The nitrogen supply and pH level were located at a rectangular area defined by 149 to 168 mg/l nitrogen supply combining 4.95 to 7.0 pH value and point located at nitrogen supply 177 mg/l, pH 6.33 when they were in equivalent coupling effects; whereas the inhibitory effects of equivalent coupling nitrogen supply and pH level were located at rectangular area defined by 125 to 131 mg/l nitrogen supply combining 6.71 to 6.88 pH value and two points respectively located at nitrogen supply 180 mg/l with pH 6.38 and nitrogen supply 166 mg/l with pH 7.59. Aqueous extracts of chicory fleshy roots and leaves accompanied by treatment at different sand pH values and nitrogen concentrations influenced germination, seedling growth, soluble sugar, MDA and chlorophyll of F. arundinacea, T. repens and M. sativa. Additionally, we determined the phenolics contents of root and leaf aqueous extracts, which were 0.104% and 0.044% on average, respectively. PMID:22384054

  14. Models analyses for allelopathic effects of chicory at equivalent coupling of nitrogen supply and pH level on F. arundinacea, T. repens and M. sativa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanzhen; Xie, Bao; Wu, Chunhui; Chen, Guo; Wang, Zhengwei; Cui, Jian; Hu, Tianming; Wiatrak, Pawel

    2012-01-01

    Alllelopathic potential of chicory was investigated by evaluating its effect on seed germination, soluble sugar, malondialdehyde (MDA) and the chlorophyll content of three target plants species (Festuca arundinacea, Trifolium repens and Medicago sativa). The secretion of allelochemicals was regulated by keeping the donor plant (chicory) separate from the three target plant species and using different pH and nitrogen levels. Leachates from donor pots with different pH levels and nitrogen concentrations continuously irrigated the target pots containing the seedlings. The allelopathic effects of the chicory at equivalent coupling of nitrogen supply and pH level on the three target plants species were explored via models analyses. The results suggested a positive effect of nitrogen supply and pH level on allelochemical secretion from chicory plants. The nitrogen supply and pH level were located at a rectangular area defined by 149 to 168 mg/l nitrogen supply combining 4.95 to 7.0 pH value and point located at nitrogen supply 177 mg/l, pH 6.33 when they were in equivalent coupling effects; whereas the inhibitory effects of equivalent coupling nitrogen supply and pH level were located at rectangular area defined by 125 to 131 mg/l nitrogen supply combining 6.71 to 6.88 pH value and two points respectively located at nitrogen supply 180 mg/l with pH 6.38 and nitrogen supply 166 mg/l with pH 7.59. Aqueous extracts of chicory fleshy roots and leaves accompanied by treatment at different sand pH values and nitrogen concentrations influenced germination, seedling growth, soluble sugar, MDA and chlorophyll of F. arundinacea, T. repens and M. sativa. Additionally, we determined the phenolics contents of root and leaf aqueous extracts, which were 0.104% and 0.044% on average, respectively.

  15. Metal cotolerance to copper, lead, and zinc in Festuca rubra

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, M.H.

    1982-10-01

    Tillers of red fescue (Festuca rubra) were collected from three copper-contaminated sites: Prescot (Lancashire, near the copper refinery factory), Great Orme (Clwyd, copper mine), and Ecton (Staffordshire, copper mine), as well as from an uncontaminated area (Festuca rubra S59). By comparing their indexes of tolerance, it was discovered that tillers from Ecton which contained a rather high level of copper, lead, and zinc were tolerant to all three metals. This variety of F. rubra would be useful for reclaiming nonferrous mine spoils which contain a high level of the three commonly occurring heavy metals, i.e., copper, lead and zinc.

  16. Marker-trait association of rangeland and turf traits in hybrids of Festuca idahoensis and Festuca ovina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fine fescue species Festuca idahoensis Elmer is native to the Intermountain West and has potential for low-input turf and rangeland applications. The poor seed production and weak seedling vigor of this species may be overcome by identification and improvement of interspecific hybrids between F...

  17. Comparative interpretation of the development of species Phalaris arundinacea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionel, Samfira; Andreea, Ghica; Marius, Boldea; Monica, Butnariu; Marius, Sendroni; Andrei, M.-Kiss

    2013-10-01

    The development of the morpho-productive features of species Phalaris arundinacea was studied from 2011 to 2012. The study dwelt on a collection of 1000 of the Romanian Premier cultivar and a Polycross field, set in Banat Plain. We assessed the dynamics of the following morpho-productive features: plant height, number of shoots, number of leaves, leaf width, leaf length, and foliar area of a shoot, in accordance with the BBCH code. The growth dynamics of the previously mentioned mean morpho-productive features were measured every 7 days in 20 clones of the Premier. Our findings revealed that the growth dynamics under the conditions provided on the plain area involve the height growth of 0.96 cm/day. In addition, height growth presents significantly positive correlation with the increase of the foliar area of a shoot, as well as of the entire plant.

  18. Stress memory induced rearrangements of HSP transcription, photosystem II photochemistry and metabolism of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) in response to high-temperature stress

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Liu, Shu-Qian; Amombo, Erick; Fu, Jin-Min

    2015-01-01

    When plants are pre-exposed to stress, they can produce some stable signals and physiological reactions that may be carried forward as “stress memory”. However, there is insufficient information about plants' stress memory responses mechanisms. Here, two tall fescue genotypes, heat-tolerant PI 574522 and heat-sensitive PI 512315, were subjected to recurring high-temperature pre-acclimation treatment. Two heat shock protein (HSP) genes, LMW-HSP and HMW-HSP, exhibited transcriptional memory for their higher transcript abundance during one or more subsequent stresses (S2, S3, S4) relative to the first stress (S1), and basal transcript levels during the recovery states (R1, R2, and R3). Activated transcriptional memory from two trainable genes could persist up to 4 days, and induce higher thermotolerance in tall fescue. This was confirmed by greater turf quality and lower electrolyte leakage. Pre-acclimation treatment inhibited the decline at steps of O-J-I-P and energy transport fluxes in active Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) for both tall fescue genotypes. The heat stress memory was associated with major shifts in leaf metabolite profiles. Furthermore, there was an exclusive increase in leaf organic acids (citric acid, malic acid, tris phosphoric acid, threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, glucose, idose, allose, talose, glucoheptose, tagatose, psicose), amino acids (serine, proline, pyroglutamic acid, glycine, alanine), and one fatty acid (butanoic acid) in pre-acclimated plants. These observations involved in transcriptional memory, PSII RC energy transport and metabolite profiles could provide new insights into the plant high–temperature response process. PMID:26136755

  19. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in Epichloë festucae using a split marker system.

    PubMed

    Rahnama, M; Forester, N; Ariyawansa, K G S U; Voisey, C R; Johnson, L J; Johnson, R D; Fleetwood, D J

    2017-03-01

    A split-marker system for targeted gene deletion was developed for the model grass endophytic fungus Epichloë festucae. Compared to the conventional system that yields up to 25% homologous recombinants, the method resulted in 33-74% targeted deletions in E. festucae using as little as 1.5kb of targeting sequence.

  20. Interactions between Metopolophium festucae cerealium (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV-PAV)

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, S. E.; Bjur, J.; Ingwell, L.; Unger, L.; Bosque-Pérez, N. A.; Eigenbrode, S. D.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between an invasive aphid, Metopolophium festucae (Theobald) subsp. cerealium, and Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV-PAV) were studied under laboratory conditions. M. festucae cerealium is an economic pest of wheat and barley that has recently been found in high population densities in wheat in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. BYDV-PAV is the most prevalent and injurious species of BYDV worldwide and in the Pacific Northwest. Although M. festucae sensu stricto (Theobald 1917) has been reported previously as a vector of some BYDV isolates, there is no confirmed transmission of BYDV by M. festucae cerealium. Two experiments examined the ability of M. festucae cerealium to transmit BYDV-PAV. The first used single aphids caged to indicator plants of a BYDV-susceptible winter wheat cultivar and the second used multiple aphids on each test plant. M. festucae cerealium did not transmit BYDV-PAV in either experiment, whereas transmission by a known BYDV vector, Rhopalosiphum padi L., was consistently high (≥93%). A third experiment compared the intrinsic growth rate, days until first reproduction and daily reproduction by M. festucae cerealium on sham-inoculated and BYDV-PAV-infected wheat, but detected no differences. The findings are reviewed in light published data on M. festucae species, BYDV transmission, and the potential pest status of this new invading aphid. PMID:26896673

  1. Development of fine-leaved Festuca grass for forage and wildfire control in the Great Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought and heat tolerant fine-leaved fescue (Festuca ssp.) grasses have potential as components in rangeland greenstrips for wildfire control in semi-arid climates, although such grasses have not been evaluated under rangeland conditions. Therefore, 64 geographically diverse Festuca accessions of ...

  2. Landscape composition and configuration predict the abundance of Phalaris arundinacea L. in Wisconsin wetlands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea L.) is one of the most dominant wetland invaders in North America over the past century. The expansion of urbanization and intensification of agriculture have caused increased sedimentation and eutrophication of wetlands, which have been shown to encourage re...

  3. Fungal Endophyte (Epichloë festucae) Alters the Nutrient Content of Festuca rubra Regardless of Water Availability

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-de-Aldana, Beatriz R.; García-Ciudad, Antonia; García-Criado, Balbino; Vicente-Tavera, Santiago; Zabalgogeazcoa, Iñigo

    2013-01-01

    Festuca rubra plants maintain associations with the vertically transmitted fungal endophyte Epichloë festucae. A high prevalence of infected host plants in semiarid grasslands suggests that this association could be mutualistic. We investigated if the Epichloë-endophyte affects the growth and nutrient content of F. rubra plants subjected to drought. Endophyte-infected (E+) and non-infected (E−) plants of two half-sib lines (PEN and RAB) were subjected to three water availability treatments. Shoot and root biomass, nutrient content, proline, phenolic compounds and fungal alkaloids were measured after the treatments. The effect of the endophyte on shoot and root biomass and dead leaves depended on the plant line. In the PEN line, E+ plants had a greater S:R ratio than E-, but the opposite occurred in RAB. In both plant lines and all water treatments, endophyte-infected plants had greater concentrations of N, P and Zn in shoots and Ca, Mg and Zn in roots than E- plants. On average, E+ plants contained in their shoots more P (62%), Zn (58%) and N (19%) than E- plants. While the proline in shoots increased in response to water stress, the endophyte did not affect this response. A multivariate analysis showed that endophyte status and plant line impose stronger differences in the performance of the plants than the water stress treatments. Furthermore, differences between PEN and RAB lines seemed to be greater in E- than in E+ plants, suggesting that E+ plants of both lines are more similar than those of their non-infected version. This is probably due to the endophyte producing a similar effect in both plant lines, such as the increase in N, P and Zn in shoots. The remarkable effect of the endophyte in the nutrient balance of the plants could help to explain the high prevalence of infected plants in natural grasslands. PMID:24367672

  4. Fungal endophyte (Epichloë festucae) alters the nutrient content of Festuca rubra regardless of water availability.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-de-Aldana, Beatriz R; García-Ciudad, Antonia; García-Criado, Balbino; Vicente-Tavera, Santiago; Zabalgogeazcoa, Iñigo

    2013-01-01

    Festuca rubra plants maintain associations with the vertically transmitted fungal endophyte Epichloë festucae. A high prevalence of infected host plants in semiarid grasslands suggests that this association could be mutualistic. We investigated if the Epichloë-endophyte affects the growth and nutrient content of F. rubra plants subjected to drought. Endophyte-infected (E+) and non-infected (E-) plants of two half-sib lines (PEN and RAB) were subjected to three water availability treatments. Shoot and root biomass, nutrient content, proline, phenolic compounds and fungal alkaloids were measured after the treatments. The effect of the endophyte on shoot and root biomass and dead leaves depended on the plant line. In the PEN line, E+ plants had a greater S:R ratio than E-, but the opposite occurred in RAB. In both plant lines and all water treatments, endophyte-infected plants had greater concentrations of N, P and Zn in shoots and Ca, Mg and Zn in roots than E- plants. On average, E+ plants contained in their shoots more P (62%), Zn (58%) and N (19%) than E- plants. While the proline in shoots increased in response to water stress, the endophyte did not affect this response. A multivariate analysis showed that endophyte status and plant line impose stronger differences in the performance of the plants than the water stress treatments. Furthermore, differences between PEN and RAB lines seemed to be greater in E- than in E+ plants, suggesting that E+ plants of both lines are more similar than those of their non-infected version. This is probably due to the endophyte producing a similar effect in both plant lines, such as the increase in N, P and Zn in shoots. The remarkable effect of the endophyte in the nutrient balance of the plants could help to explain the high prevalence of infected plants in natural grasslands.

  5. Variation in sequences containing microsatellite motifs in the perennial biomass and forage grass, Phalaris arundinacea (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Barth, Susanne; Jankowska, Marta Jolanta; Hodkinson, Trevor Roland; Vellani, Tia; Klaas, Manfred

    2016-03-22

    Forty three microsatellite markers were developed for further genetic characterisation of a forage and biomass grass crop, for which genomic resources are currently scarce. The microsatellite markers were developed from a normalized EST-SSR library. All of the 43 markers gave a clear banding pattern on 3% Metaphor agarose gels. Eight selected SSR markers were tested in detail for polymorphism across eleven DNA samples of large geographic distribution across Europe. The new set of 43 SSR markers will help future research to characterise the genetic structure and diversity of Phalaris arundinacea, with a potential to further understand its invasive character in North American wetlands, as well as aid in breeding work for desired biomass and forage traits. P. arundinacea is particularly valued in the northern latitude as a crop with high biomass potential, even more so on marginal lands.

  6. Remodeling of Leaf Cellular Glycerolipid Composition under Drought and Re-hydration Conditions in Grasses from the Lolium-Festuca Complex.

    PubMed

    Perlikowski, Dawid; Kierszniowska, Sylwia; Sawikowska, Aneta; Krajewski, Paweł; Rapacz, Marcin; Eckhardt, Änne; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Drought tolerant plant genotypes are able to maintain stability and integrity of cellular membranes in unfavorable conditions, and to regenerate damaged membranes after stress cessation. The profiling of cellular glycerolipids during drought stress performed on model species such as Arabidopsis thaliana does not fully cover the picture of lipidome in monocots, including grasses. Herein, two closely related introgression genotypes of Lolium multiflorum (Italian ryegrass) × Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue) were used as a model for other grass species to describe lipid rearrangements during drought and re-hydration. The genotypes differed in their level of photosynthetic capacity during drought, and in their capacity for membrane regeneration after stress cessation. A total of 120 lipids, comprising the classes of monogalactosyldiacyloglycerol, digalactosyldiacyloglycerol, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, diacylglicerol, and triacylglicerol, were analyzed. The results clearly showed that water deficit had a significant impact on lipid metabolism in studied forage grasses. It was revealed that structural and metabolic lipid species changed their abundance during drought and re-watering periods and some crucial genotype-dependent differences were also observed. The introgression genotype characterized by an ability to regenerate membranes after re-hydration demonstrated a higher accumulation level of most chloroplast and numerous extra-chloroplast membrane lipid species at the beginning of drought. Furthermore, this genotype also revealed a significant reduction in the accumulation of most chloroplast lipids after re-hydration, compared with the other introgression genotype without the capacity for membrane regeneration. The potential influence of observed lipidomic alterations on a cellular membrane stability and photosynthetic capacity, are discussed

  7. Remodeling of Leaf Cellular Glycerolipid Composition under Drought and Re-hydration Conditions in Grasses from the Lolium-Festuca Complex

    PubMed Central

    Perlikowski, Dawid; Kierszniowska, Sylwia; Sawikowska, Aneta; Krajewski, Paweł; Rapacz, Marcin; Eckhardt, Änne; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Drought tolerant plant genotypes are able to maintain stability and integrity of cellular membranes in unfavorable conditions, and to regenerate damaged membranes after stress cessation. The profiling of cellular glycerolipids during drought stress performed on model species such as Arabidopsis thaliana does not fully cover the picture of lipidome in monocots, including grasses. Herein, two closely related introgression genotypes of Lolium multiflorum (Italian ryegrass) × Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue) were used as a model for other grass species to describe lipid rearrangements during drought and re-hydration. The genotypes differed in their level of photosynthetic capacity during drought, and in their capacity for membrane regeneration after stress cessation. A total of 120 lipids, comprising the classes of monogalactosyldiacyloglycerol, digalactosyldiacyloglycerol, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, diacylglicerol, and triacylglicerol, were analyzed. The results clearly showed that water deficit had a significant impact on lipid metabolism in studied forage grasses. It was revealed that structural and metabolic lipid species changed their abundance during drought and re-watering periods and some crucial genotype-dependent differences were also observed. The introgression genotype characterized by an ability to regenerate membranes after re-hydration demonstrated a higher accumulation level of most chloroplast and numerous extra-chloroplast membrane lipid species at the beginning of drought. Furthermore, this genotype also revealed a significant reduction in the accumulation of most chloroplast lipids after re-hydration, compared with the other introgression genotype without the capacity for membrane regeneration. The potential influence of observed lipidomic alterations on a cellular membrane stability and photosynthetic capacity, are discussed

  8. A totivirus infecting the mutualistic fungal endophyte Epichloë festucae.

    PubMed

    Romo, María; Leuchtmann, Adrian; García, Balbino; Zabalgogeazcoa, Iñigo

    2007-03-01

    Epichloë festucae (Ascomycota) infects the grass Festuca rubra. Infected plants may be more resistant to herbivores and obtain other benefits. The 5109bp dsRNA genome of a virus which infects E. festucae was sequenced, and its incidence in natural populations and transmission were studied. The viral genome has characteristics of the family Totiviridae. Its two ORFs are overlapped by four nucleotides; ORF1 codes a 765 amino acid putative coat protein (CP); ORF2 is in a -1 frameshift with respect to ORF1, and codes a 826 amino acid RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). This virus, denominated Epichloë festucae virus 1 (EfV1), is closely related to members of the genus Totivirus which infect filamentous fungi, as deduced from phylogenetic analyses of CPs and RdRps. In two natural populations of Epichloë festucae, 36.4% of the isolates were infected by EfV1. The virus was efficiently transmitted to asexual fungal spores. However, when ascospore progeny of matings between virus-free and infected strains was analyzed, it was found that the virus was not transmitted to progeny of sexual spores.

  9. Reduced atmospheric CO2 inhibits nitrogen mobilization in Festuca rubra.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Barry; Paterson, Eric; Kingston-Smith, Alison H; Bollard, Andrea L; Pratt, Shona M; Sim, Allan

    2002-09-01

    In defoliated grasses, where photosynthesis is reduced due to removal of leaf material, it is well established that remobilization of nitrogen occurs from both older remaining leaves and roots towards the younger growing leaves. In contrast, little is known about the movement of nitrogen within intact grass plants experiencing prolonged inhibition of photosynthesis. We tested the following hypotheses in Festuca rubra L. ssp. rubra cv. Boreal: that both reduction of the atmospheric CO2 concentration and defoliation (1) induce mobilization of nitrogen from roots and older leaves towards growing leaves and (2) elicit similar directional change in the abundance of proteins in roots and older leaves relevant to the process of nitrogen mobilization including, glutamine synthetase (GS), EC 6.3.1.2; papain, EC 3.4.22.2; chymopapain, EC 3.4.22.6; ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), EC 4.1.1.39; and the light harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHCPII). After growth at ambient atmospheric CO2 concentration, plants of F. rubra were subject to atmospheres containing either ambient (350 micro l l-1) or deplete (< 20 micro l l-1) CO2. Concurrently, plants were either left intact or defoliated on one occasion. Steady state 15N labelling coupled with a series of destructive harvests over a 7-day period enabled changes in the nitrogen dynamics of the plants to be established. Proteins pertinent to the process of nitrogen mobilization were quantified by immunoblotting. Irrespective of defoliation, plants in ambient CO2 mobilized nitrogen from older to growing leaves. This mobilization was inhibited by deplete CO2. Greater concentration of Rubisco and reduced chymopapain abundance in older remaining leaves of intact plants, in deplete compared with ambient CO2, suggested the inhibition of mobilization was due to inhibition of protein degradation, rather than to the export of degradation products. Both deplete CO2 and defoliation induced nitrogen mobilization from

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis of Codon Usage Bias in Epichloë festucae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuzhang; Song, Hui; Kuang, Yu; Chen, Shuihong; Tian, Pei; Li, Chunjie; Nan, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of codon usage data has both practical and theoretical applications in understanding the basics of molecular biology. Differences in codon usage patterns among genes reflect variations in local base compositional biases and the intensity of natural selection. Recently, there have been several reports related to codon usage in fungi, but little is known about codon usage bias in Epichloë endophytes. The present study aimed to assess codon usage patterns and biases in 4870 sequences from Epichloë festucae, which may be helpful in revealing the constraint factors such as mutation or selection pressure and improving the bioreactor on the cloning, expression, and characterization of some special genes. The GC content with 56.41% is higher than the AT content (43.59%) in E. festucae. The results of neutrality and effective number of codons plot analyses showed that both mutational bias and natural selection play roles in shaping codon usage in this species. We found that gene length is strongly correlated with codon usage and may contribute to the codon usage patterns observed in genes. Nucleotide composition and gene expression levels also shape codon usage bias in E. festucae. E. festucae exhibits codon usage bias based on the relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) values of 61 sense codons, with 25 codons showing an RSCU larger than 1. In addition, we identified 27 optimal codons that end in a G or C. PMID:27428961

  11. Plastome Sequence Determination and Comparative Analysis for Members of the Lolium-Festuca Grass Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hand, Melanie L.; Spangenberg, German C.; Forster, John W.; Cogan, Noel O. I.

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplast genome sequences are of broad significance in plant biology, due to frequent use in molecular phylogenetics, comparative genomics, population genetics, and genetic modification studies. The present study used a second-generation sequencing approach to determine and assemble the plastid genomes (plastomes) of four representatives from the agriculturally important Lolium-Festuca species complex of pasture grasses (Lolium multiflorum, Festuca pratensis, Festuca altissima, and Festuca ovina). Total cellular DNA was extracted from either roots or leaves, was sequenced, and the output was filtered for plastome-related reads. A comparison between sources revealed fewer plastome-related reads from root-derived template but an increase in incidental bacterium-derived sequences. Plastome assembly and annotation indicated high levels of sequence identity and a conserved organization and gene content between species. However, frequent deletions within the F. ovina plastome appeared to contribute to a smaller plastid genome size. Comparative analysis with complete plastome sequences from other members of the Poaceae confirmed conservation of most grass-specific features. Detailed analysis of the rbcL–psaI intergenic region, however, revealed a “hot-spot” of variation characterized by independent deletion events. The evolutionary implications of this observation are discussed. The complete plastome sequences are anticipated to provide the basis for potential organelle-specific genetic modification of pasture grasses. PMID:23550121

  12. The potential value of Festuca valesiaca for use on Great Basin Rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fine-leaved Festuca valesiaca possesses varied abiotic tolerances and is widely distributed on Asian rangelands. However, its performance in the western United States has not been investigated. Therefore, F. valesiaca accessions were evaluated for performance and their relatedness to species in th...

  13. The combined effects of sediment accretion (burial) and nutrient enrichment on the growth and propagation of Phalaris arundinacea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinsheng; Liao, Yulin; Xie, Yonghong; Wu, Chao; Li, Feng; Deng, Zhengmiao; Li, Xu

    2017-01-05

    Sediment accretion (burial) and nutrient enrichment occur concurrently in lacustrine wetlands, but the role of these two aspects of sedimentation on macrophyte performance has rarely been examined. Here, we investigated the concurrent effects of sediment accretion and nutrient enrichment on the growth and propagation of Phalaris arundinacea L. using a factorial sediment burial by nutrient addition experimental design. Regardless of burial depth, nutrient addition increased biomass accumulation, shoot mass ratio, the number of rhizomes, and the length of ramets and rhizomes. While burial had little effect on plant growth and propagation, it had an interactive effect with nutrient addition on belowground growth and ramet production. These results indicate that P. arundinacea is tolerant to burial, which allows it to grow in habitats with high sedimentation rates. However, the enhanced growth and propagation of P. arundinacea following sedimentation were primarily related to nutrient enrichment. This suggests that nutrient enrichment of sediments, which occurs in many lacustrine wetlands, increases the risk of invasion by P. arundinacea.

  14. The combined effects of sediment accretion (burial) and nutrient enrichment on the growth and propagation of Phalaris arundinacea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinsheng; Liao, Yulin; Xie, Yonghong; Wu, Chao; Li, Feng; Deng, Zhengmiao; Li, Xu

    2017-01-01

    Sediment accretion (burial) and nutrient enrichment occur concurrently in lacustrine wetlands, but the role of these two aspects of sedimentation on macrophyte performance has rarely been examined. Here, we investigated the concurrent effects of sediment accretion and nutrient enrichment on the growth and propagation of Phalaris arundinacea L. using a factorial sediment burial by nutrient addition experimental design. Regardless of burial depth, nutrient addition increased biomass accumulation, shoot mass ratio, the number of rhizomes, and the length of ramets and rhizomes. While burial had little effect on plant growth and propagation, it had an interactive effect with nutrient addition on belowground growth and ramet production. These results indicate that P. arundinacea is tolerant to burial, which allows it to grow in habitats with high sedimentation rates. However, the enhanced growth and propagation of P. arundinacea following sedimentation were primarily related to nutrient enrichment. This suggests that nutrient enrichment of sediments, which occurs in many lacustrine wetlands, increases the risk of invasion by P. arundinacea. PMID:28054590

  15. Comparative physico-chemical profiles of Tugaksheeree (Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. and Maranta arundinacea Linn.).

    PubMed

    Rajashekhara, N; Shukla, Vinay J; Ravishankar, B; Sharma, Parameshwar P

    2013-10-01

    Tugaksheeree is as an ingredient in many Ayurvedic formulations. The starch obtained from the rhizomes of two plants, is used as Tugaksheeree, Curcuma angustifolia (CA) Roxb. (Family: Zingiberaceae) and Maranta arundinacea (MA) Linn. (Family Marantaceae). In the present study, a comparative physico-analysis of both the drugs has been carried out. The results suggest that the starch from CA and MA has similar organoleptic characters. The percentage of starch content is higher in the rhizome of CA when compared with that of MA and the starch of MA is packed more densely than the starch in CA. The chemical constituents of both the starch and rhizomes are partially similar to each other. Hence, the therapeutic activities may be similar.

  16. Evaluation of Antidiarrheal Activity of Methanolic Extract of Maranta arundinacea Linn. Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Khalilur; Chowdhury, Md. Ashraf Uddin; Islam, Mohammed Taufiqual; Chowdhury, Md. Anisuzzaman; Uddin, Muhammad Erfan; Sumi, Chandra Datta

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most common causes for thousands of deaths every year. Therefore, identification of new source of antidiarrheal drugs becomes one of the most prominent focuses in modern research. Our aim was to investigate the antidiarrheal and cytotoxic activities of methanolic extract of Maranta arundinacea linn. (MEMA) leaves in rats and brine shrimp, respectively. Antidiarrheal effect was evaluated by using castor oil-induced diarrhea, enteropooling, and gastrointestinal motility tests at 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg body weight in rats where the cytotoxic activity was justified using brine shrimp lethality bioassay at different concentrations of MEMA. The extract showed considerable antidiarrheal effect by inhibiting 42.67% and 57.75% of diarrheal episode at the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively. MEMA also significantly (p < 0.01) reduced the castor oil-induced intestinal volume (2.14 ± 0.16 to 1.61 ± 0.12 mL) in enteropooling test as well as intestinal transit (33.00 to 43.36%) in GI motility test, compared to their respective control. These observed effects are comparable to that of standard drug loperamide (5 mg/kg). On the other hand, in brine shrimp lethality test after 24 h, surviving brine shrimp larvae were counted and LD50 was assessed. Result showed that MEMA was potent against brine shrimp with LD50 value of 420 µg/mL. So the highest dose of 400 µg/mL of MEMA was not toxic to mice. So these results indicate that bioactive compounds are present in methanolic extract of Maranta arundinacea leaves including significant antidiarrheal activity and could be accounted for pharmacological effects. PMID:26346095

  17. Functional characterization of salicylate hydroxylase from the fungal endophyte Epichloë festucae

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Karen V.; Tian, Zipeng; Wang, Yifei; Smith, Jordan; Zylstra, Gerben; Huang, Bingru; Belanger, Faith C.

    2015-01-01

    Epichloë spp. are symbiotic fungal endophytes of many cool season grasses. The presence of the fungal endophytes often confers insect, drought, and disease tolerance to the host grasses. The presence of the fungal endophytes within the host plants does not elicit host defense responses. The molecular basis for this phenomenon is not known. Epichloë festucae, the endophyte of Festuca rubra, expresses a salicylate hydroxylase similar to NahG from the bacterium Pseudomonas putida. Few fungal salicylate hydroxylase enzymes have been reported. The in planta expression of an endophyte salicylate hydroxylase raised the possibility that degradation of plant-produced salicylic acid is a factor in the mechanism of how the endophyte avoids eliciting host plant defenses. Here we report the characterization of the E. festucae salicylate hydroxylase, designated Efe-shyA. Although the fungal enzyme has the expected activity, based on salicylic acid levels in endophyte-free and endophyte-infected plants it is unlikely that expression of the endophyte salicylate hydroxylase is a factor in the lack of a host defense response to the presence of the fungal endophyte. PMID:26055188

  18. Functional characterization of salicylate hydroxylase from the fungal endophyte Epichloë festucae.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Karen V; Tian, Zipeng; Wang, Yifei; Smith, Jordan; Zylstra, Gerben; Huang, Bingru; Belanger, Faith C

    2015-06-09

    Epichloë spp. are symbiotic fungal endophytes of many cool season grasses. The presence of the fungal endophytes often confers insect, drought, and disease tolerance to the host grasses. The presence of the fungal endophytes within the host plants does not elicit host defense responses. The molecular basis for this phenomenon is not known. Epichloë festucae, the endophyte of Festuca rubra, expresses a salicylate hydroxylase similar to NahG from the bacterium Pseudomonas putida. Few fungal salicylate hydroxylase enzymes have been reported. The in planta expression of an endophyte salicylate hydroxylase raised the possibility that degradation of plant-produced salicylic acid is a factor in the mechanism of how the endophyte avoids eliciting host plant defenses. Here we report the characterization of the E. festucae salicylate hydroxylase, designated Efe-shyA. Although the fungal enzyme has the expected activity, based on salicylic acid levels in endophyte-free and endophyte-infected plants it is unlikely that expression of the endophyte salicylate hydroxylase is a factor in the lack of a host defense response to the presence of the fungal endophyte.

  19. Platelet miRNAs and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván; Alarcón, Marcelo

    2015-07-15

    Activated platelets play a critical role in the acute complications of atherosclerosis that cause life-threatening ischemic events at late stages of the disease. The miRNAs are a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that play a significant role in both inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases. The miRNAs are known to be present in platelets and exert important regulatory functions. Here we systematically examine the genes that are regulated by platelet miRNAs (miRNA-223,miRNA-126,miRNA-21, miRNA-24 and miRNA-197) and the association with cardiovascular disease risks. Platelet-secreted miRNAs could be novel biomarkers associated with cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Plasticity of nitrogen allocation in the leaves of the invasive wetland grass, Phalaris arundinacea and co-occurring Carex species determines the photosynthetic sensitivity to nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Holaday, A Scott; Schwilk, Dylan W; Waring, Elizabeth F; Guvvala, Hasitha; Griffin, Chelsea M; Lewis, O Milo

    2015-04-01

    Phalaris arundinacea displaces the slower-growing, native sedge, Carex stricta, where nitrogen availability is high. Our aim was to address whether morphological and physiological traits associated with carbon gain for P. arundinacea and C. stricta responded to nitrogen supply differently and if the species exhibited different degrees of plasticity in these traits. The plants were grown in gravel and provided modified Hoagland's solution containing four nitrogen concentrations from 0.15 to 15 mM for 6 to 7 weeks. Supplied nitrogen affected the leaf nitrogen content to the same degree for both species. Increasing supplied nitrogen strongly increased CO2 assimilation (A), photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE), and respiration for P. arundinacea but had only a small effect on these parameters for C. stricta. Relative to growth at 15 mM nitrogen, growth at 0.15 mM for young leaves decreased carboxylation capacity and efficiency and the capacity for electron transport for P. arundinacea and a larger, stouter Carex species, Carex lacustris, by 53 to 70% but only 20 to 24% for C. stricta. Leaf nitrogen decreased approximately 50% for all species, but vacuolar nitrate did not decrease for P. arundinacea and C. stricta, suggesting that it does not serve as a nitrogen reserve for use during nitrogen deprivation in these species. After 4 months of nitrogen deprivation, P. arundinacea doubled A in 12 days after being supplied 15 mM nitrogen, whereas A for C. stricta increased only 22%. We propose that one factor linking P. arundinacea abundance to nitrogen availability involves this species' plastic response of carbon gain to nitrogen supply. C. stricta appears to be adapted to tolerate low nitrogen availability but cannot respond as rapidly and extensively as P. arundinacea when nitrogen supply is high.

  1. Prevalence of an intraspecific Neotyphodium hybrid in natural populations of stout wood reed (Cinna arundinacea L.) from eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Sita R; Rudgers, Jennifer A; Charlton, Nikki D; Young, Carolyn; Craven, Kelly D

    2011-01-01

    Members of genus Neotyphodium are asexual derivatives of sexual Epichloë species and maintain endophytic relationships with many cool-season grasses. Most Neotyphodium species analyzed so far are interspecific hybrids with combined or partial genomes of two or three ancestral species. In this study we characterized Neotyphodium isolates from Cinna arundinacea, a perennial cool-season grass from eastern North America. A total of 23 isolates grouping into two distinct morphotypes were obtained from five local populations of C. arundinacea. PCR amplification and cloning of translation-elongation factor 1-α (tefA) and β-tubulin (tubB) genes of 10 isolates comprising both morphotypes (two isolates per location) revealed that all 10 contain two copies of tefA and tubB genes. Surprisingly phylogenetic analysis of mainly non-coding sequence from these genes revealed that both copies in each isolate were inherited from Epichloë typhina ancestors, indicating that the C. arundinacea endophytes arose through intraspecific hybridization between two E. typhina progenitors with extant relatives infecting hosts Poa nemoralis and Poa pratensis. Furthermore the tefA sequences were identical between isolates, as were tubB sequences, despite obvious morphological differences. Profiling of alkaloid biosynthetic genes from these isolates indicated the presence of the peramine biosynthetic gene (perA) and the absence of genes required for biosynthesis of lolines, indole-diterpenes and ergot alkaloids. Thus this endophyte is potentially capable of producing peramine in planta and providing protection to its host from insect pests. The absence of genes for indole-diterpenes and ergot alkaloid biosynthesis makes this endophyte a candidate for agricultural applications. Based on our phylogenetic analysis, alkaloid profiling and description of morphological characteristics, we propose the name Neotyphodium schardlii for these isolates from C. arundinacea, a new member of genus

  2. A comparative study of efficacy of Tugaksheeree [Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. and Maranta arundinacea Linn.] in management of Amlapitta.

    PubMed

    Rajashekhara, N; Sharma, P P

    2010-10-01

    Amlapitta is a disease caused by increase of Amla Guna of Pitta. Starch obtained from the rhizomes of two plants viz., Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. (Fam. Zingiberaceae) and Maranta arundinacea Linn. (Fam. Marantaceae) are used as Tugaksheeree. In the present clinical study, the efficacy of Tugaksheeree was studied on 67 patients of Amlapitta. A 0 total of 84 patients suffering from Amlapitta were selected from the O.P.D. and I.P.D. sections in the department of Dravyaguna, I.P.G.T. and R.A., Hospital, Jamnagar, and were randomly divided into two groups. Thirty four patients completed the treatment course in Group I, and 33 patients completed the treatment course in Group II. The efficacy of drug Tugaksheeree was studied through internal administration of the starches of C. angustifolia Roxb. (Fam. Zingiberaceae) in Group I and M. arundinacea Linn. (Fam. Marantaceae) in Group II with the dose of 4 g TID with water for 30 days. Both the drugs were found highly effective in treating Amlapitta. They significantly relieved the cardinal symptoms viz., Avipaka, Tikta-amlodgara, Daha, Shoola, Chhardi and the associated symptoms viz., Aruchi, Gaurava, Udaradhmana, Antrakujana, Vit bheda, Shiroruja, Angasada, and Trit. Statistically significant increase in body weight was noticed in both the groups. This may be because the drugs corrected the Agni and acted as Brihmana and Dhatupushtikara. Both the drugs did not produce any side effects. Therefore, both these drugs (C. angustifolia Roxb. and M. arundinacea Linn.) can be used as substitutes for each other.

  3. Rathayibacter caricis sp. nov. and Rathayibacter festucae sp. nov., isolated from the phyllosphere of Carex sp. and the leaf gall induced by the nematode Anguina graminis on Festuca rubra L., respectively.

    PubMed

    Dorofeeva, Lubov V; Evtushenko, Lyudmila I; Krausova, Valentina I; Karpov, Alexander V; Subbotin, Sergey A; Tiedje, James M

    2002-11-01

    Two novel species, Rathayibacter caricis sp. nov. (type strain VKM Ac-1799T = UCM Ac-618T) and Rathayibacter festucae sp. nov. (type strain VKM Ac-1390T UCM Ac-619T), are proposed for two coryneform actinomycetes found in the phyllosphere of Carex sp. and in the leaf gall induced by the plant-parasitic nematode Anguina graminis on Festuca rubra L., respectively. The strains of the novel species are typical of the genus Rathayibacter in their chemotaxonomic characteristics and fall into the Rathayibacter 16S rDNA phylogenetic cluster. They belong to two separate genomic species and differ markedly from current validly described species of Rathayibacter at the phenotypic level. The most striking feature differentiating Rathayibacter caricis sp. nov. from other species of the genus is the presence of fucose in its cell wall and Rathayibacter festucae sp. nov. can be easily recognized among other yellow-pigmented rathayibacters because of its rose-orange-coloured colonies.

  4. Evaluation of immunostimulatory effect of the arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea. L) in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kumalasari, Ika Dyah; Harmayani, Eni; Lestari, Lily Arsanti; Raharjo, Sri; Asmara, Widya; Nishi, Kosuke; Sugahara, Takuya

    2012-03-01

    Arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea. L) is an underutilized local crop potentially to be developed as carbohydrate source and functional food in Indonesia. The objectives of this research are to evaluate the immunostimulatory effects of arrowroot extracts in vitro by using animal cell culture techniques, and in vivo by using BALB/c mice. The arrowroot tuber extracts were prepared by heat-treatment at 121 °C for 20 min in distilled water. The IgM production stimulatory activity of arrowroot tuber extracts against human hybridoma HB4C5 cells and mouse splenocytes was assessed. The result indicated that the arrowroot tuber extract stimulated IgM production by HB4C5 cells and immunoglobulin (IgG, IgA and IgM) production by splenocytes in vitro. In addition, the arrowroot tuber extracts strongly enhanced interferon γ production by splenocytes. In vivo study indicated that the diet containing arrowroot extracts increased the serum IgG, IgA and IgM levels in mice. These results revealed that the arrowroot tuber extracts have immunostimulatory effects in vivo as well as in vitro.

  5. Genetic characterization of Kyrgyzstan fine-leaved Festuca valesiaca germplasm for use in semi-arid low-maintenance turf applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fine-leaved Festuca valesiaca Shleidcher ex. Gaudin (2n = 2x-4x) is native to heavily grazed, cold, semi-arid, Asian rangelands. However, its potential for low-maintenance turf applications in the semi-arid western United States and its relatedness to other agriculturally important Festuca species ...

  6. Gangrenous ergotism in cattle grazing fescue (Festuca elatior L.) in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Botha, C J; Naudé, T W; Moroe, M L; Rottinghaus, G E

    2004-03-01

    The 1st outbreak of fescue toxicosis in South Africa was recently confirmed in a Brahman herd at Perdekop, near Standerton, in Mpumalanga province, South Africa. Within 3 weeks of being placed on a fescue pasture in mid-winter, 50 of 385 cattle developed lameness and/or necrosis of the tail. The farmer had established Festuca elatior L. (tall fescue, Iewag variety) on c. 140 ha for winter grazing. Fescue may be infected by an endophyte, Neotyphodium coenophialum, which produces ergot alkaloids, in particular ergovaline. Ergovaline concentrations in basal leaf sheaths and grass stems collected during the outbreak ranged from 1720-8170 ppb on a dry-matter basis.

  7. miRNAs in brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  8. miRNA Digger: a comprehensive pipeline for genome-wide novel miRNA mining.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lan; Shao, Chaogang; Ye, Xinghuo; Meng, Yijun; Zhou, Yincong; Chen, Ming

    2016-01-06

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression. The recent advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technique have greatly facilitated large-scale detection of the miRNAs. However, thoroughly discovery of novel miRNAs from the available HTS data sets remains a major challenge. In this study, we observed that Dicer-mediated cleavage sites for the processing of the miRNA precursors could be mapped by using degradome sequencing data in both animals and plants. In this regard, a novel tool, miRNA Digger, was developed for systematical discovery of miRNA candidates through genome-wide screening of cleavage signals based on degradome sequencing data. To test its sensitivity and reliability, miRNA Digger was applied to discover miRNAs from four organs of Arabidopsis. The results revealed that a majority of already known mature miRNAs along with their miRNA*s expressed in these four organs were successfully recovered. Notably, a total of 30 novel miRNA-miRNA* pairs that have not been registered in miRBase were discovered by miRNA Digger. After target prediction and degradome sequencing data-based validation, eleven miRNA-target interactions involving six of the novel miRNAs were identified. Taken together, miRNA Digger could be applied for sensitive detection of novel miRNAs and it could be freely downloaded from http://www.bioinfolab.cn/miRNA_Digger/index.html.

  9. Bioinformatics of cardiovascular miRNA biology.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Meik; Xiao, Ke; Liang, Chunguang; Viereck, Janika; Pachel, Christina; Frantz, Stefan; Thum, Thomas; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small ~22 nucleotide non-coding RNAs and are highly conserved among species. Moreover, miRNAs regulate gene expression of a large number of genes associated with important biological functions and signaling pathways. Recently, several miRNAs have been found to be associated with cardiovascular diseases. Thus, investigating the complex regulatory effect of miRNAs may lead to a better understanding of their functional role in the heart. To achieve this, bioinformatics approaches have to be coupled with validation and screening experiments to understand the complex interactions of miRNAs with the genome. This will boost the subsequent development of diagnostic markers and our understanding of the physiological and therapeutic role of miRNAs in cardiac remodeling. In this review, we focus on and explain different bioinformatics strategies and algorithms for the identification and analysis of miRNAs and their regulatory elements to better understand cardiac miRNA biology. Starting with the biogenesis of miRNAs, we present approaches such as LocARNA and miRBase for combining sequence and structure analysis including phylogenetic comparisons as well as detailed analysis of RNA folding patterns, functional target prediction, signaling pathway as well as functional analysis. We also show how far bioinformatics helps to tackle the unprecedented level of complexity and systemic effects by miRNA, underlining the strong therapeutic potential of miRNA and miRNA target structures in cardiovascular disease. In addition, we discuss drawbacks and limitations of bioinformatics algorithms and the necessity of experimental approaches for miRNA target identification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Non-coding RNAs'.

  10. The evaluation of anti-ulcerogenic effect of rhizome starch of two source plants of Tugaksheeree (Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. and Maranta arundinacea Linn.) on pyloric ligated rats

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekhara, N.; Ashok, B. K.; Sharma, Parmeshwar P.; Ravishankar, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the present era, because of the life-style, the disorders such as hyperacidity and gastric ulcers are found very frequently. Satwa (starch) obtained from the rhizomes of two plants namely Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. and Maranta arundinacea Linn. are used in folklore practice for the treatment of above complaints under the name Tugaksheeree. Aim: To compare the anti-ulcerogenic activity of the above two drugs in pyloric ligation induced gastric ulcer in albino rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 Wistar strain albino rats of both sexes grouped into three groups. Group C served as pyloric ligated control group, Group I received starch of C. angustifolia suspension and Group II received starch of M. arundinacea for seven days. On 8th day pylorus was ligated. After ligation the animals were deprived of food and water and sacrificed at the end of 14 h. The collected gastric contents were used for biochemical estimation and ulcer index was calculated from excised stomach. Results: Both the test drugs showed statistically significant decrease in the volume, increase in the pH, reduced the free acidity of gastric juice and decreased the peptic activity. The starch of C. angustifolia reduced a total acidity non-significantly while M. arundinacea reduced it significantly. Among the two drugs the M. arundinacea has effectively reduced the peptic activity, which is statistically significant. M. arundinacea shown statistically significant increase of total carbohydrates. Conclusion: Both the test drugs proved anti-ulcer activity and prevents the chance of gastric ulcer. Among these two M. arundinacea is more effective. PMID:25558167

  11. A spectroscopy approach to the study of virus infection in the endophytic fungus Epichloë festucae

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In this work we propose a rapid method based on visible and near-infrared (Vis-NIR) spectroscopy to determine the occurrence of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses in Epichloë festucae strains isolated from Festuca rubra plants. In addition, we examined the incidence of infections by E. festucae in populations of F. rubra collected in natural grasslands of Western Spain. Methods Vis-NIR spectra (400-2498 nm) from 124 virus-infected and virus-free E. festucae isolates were recorded directly from ground and freeze-dried mycelium. To estimate how well the spectra for uninfected and infected fungal samples could be differentiated, we used partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS1-DA) and several data pre-treatments to develop calibration models. Results Applying the best regression model, obtained with two sampling years and using standard normal variate (SNV) combined with first derivative transformation to a new validating data set (42 samples), we obtained a correct classification for 75% of the uninfected isolates and up to 86% of the infected isolates. Conclusions The results obtained suggest that Vis-NIR spectroscopy is a promising technology for detection of viral infections in fungal samples when an alternative faster approach is desirable. It provides a tool adequately exact and more time- and cost-saving than the conventional reference analysis. PMID:21651818

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida Strain GM4FR, an Endophytic Bacterium Isolated from Festuca rubra L.

    PubMed Central

    Hollensteiner, Jacqueline; Granzow, Sandra; Daniel, Rolf; Vidal, Stefan; Wemheuer, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas putida GM4FR is an endophytic bacterium isolated from aerial plant tissues of Festuca rubra L. Functional annotation of the draft genome (7.1 Mb) revealed 6,272 predicted protein-encoding genes. The genome provides insights into the biocontrol and plant growth-promoting potential of P. putida GM4FR. PMID:28360162

  13. miRNAs in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farazi, Thalia A.; Spitzer, Jessica I.; Morozov, Pavel; Tuschl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Mature microRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded RNA molecules of 20- to 23-nucleotide (nt) length that control gene expression in many cellular processes. These molecules typically reduce the stability of mRNAs, including those of genes that mediate processes in tumorigenesis, such as inflammation, cell cycle regulation, stress response, differentiation, apoptosis, and invasion. miRNA targeting is mostly achieved through specific base-pairing interactions between the 5′ end (“seed” region) of the miRNA and sites within coding and untranslated regions (UTRs) of mRNAs; target sites in the 3′ UTR lead to more effective mRNA destabilization. Since miRNAs frequently target hundreds of mRNAs, miRNA regulatory pathways are complex. To provide a critical overview of miRNA dysregulation in cancer we first discuss the methods currently available for studying the role of miRNAs in cancer and then review miRNA genomic organization, biogenesis, and mechanism of target recognition examining how these processes are altered in tumorigenesis. Given the critical role miRNAs play in tumorigenesis processes and their disease specific expression, they hold potential as therapeutic targets and novel biomarkers. PMID:21125669

  14. meta-Tyrosine in Festuca rubra ssp. commutata (Chewings fescue) is synthesized by hydroxylation of phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tengfang; Rehak, Ludmila; Jander, Georg

    2012-03-01

    m-Tyrosine is a non-protein amino acid that is structurally similar to the common protein amino acids p-tyrosine and phenylalanine. Copious amounts of m-tyrosine can be found in root exudates of the fine fescue cultivar, Festuca rubra L. ssp. commutata (Chewings fescue). The phytotoxicity of m-tyrosine may contribute to the allelopathic potential of F. rubra. m-Tyrosine in Euphorbia myrsinites (donkey-tail spurge), was previously shown to be synthesized via transamination of m-hydroxyphenylpyruvate. Here we show that m-tyrosine biosynthesis in F. rubra occurs through direct hydroxylation of phenylalanine in the root tips, perhaps through the activity of a cytochrome P450 enzyme. Hence, E. myrsinites and F. rubra, the only two plant species known to produce m-tyrosine, use distinct biosynthetic pathways that likely arose independently in evolutionary history.

  15. Regulation of miRNA Processing and miRNA Mediated Gene Repression in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bajan, Sarah; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2014-01-01

    The majority of human protein-coding genes are predicted to be targets of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. The widespread influence of miRNAs is illustrated by their essential roles in all biological processes. Regulated miRNA expression is essential for maintaining cellular differentiation; therefore alterations in miRNA expression patterns are associated with several diseases, including various cancers. High-throughput sequencing technologies revealed low level expressing miRNA isoforms, termed isomiRs. IsomiRs may differ in sequence, length, target preference and expression patterns from their parental miRNA and can arise from differences in miRNA biosynthesis, RNA editing, or SNPs inherent to the miRNA gene. The association between isomiR expression and disease progression is largely unknown. Misregulated miRNA expression is thought to contribute to the formation and/or progression of cancer. However, due to the diversity of targeted transcripts, miRNAs can function as both tumor-suppressor genes and oncogenes as defined by cellular context. Despite this, miRNA profiling studies concluded that the differential expression of particular miRNAs in diseased tissue could aid the diagnosis and treatment of some cancers. PMID:25069508

  16. MiRNAs in bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Moore, Benjamin T; Xiao, Peng

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which mainly inhibit protein expression by targeting the 3'UTR (untranslated region) of mRNAs, are known to play various roles in the pathogenesis of many different types of diseases. Specifically, in bone diseases, recent emphasis has been placed on the involvement of miRNAs in the differentiation and proliferation of bone and cartilage cells, particularly with regards to how these mechanisms contribute to bone homeostasis. In this review, we summarize miRNAs that are important in the differentiation and proliferation of bone cells, and specific miRNAs associated with bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This review also provides the perspective that miRNA studies will identify not only new mechanisms in basic bone research, but also potential novel diagnostic biomarkers and drug targets for bone diseases.

  17. Evaluation of acute toxicity and anti-ulcerogenic study of rhizome starch of two source plants of Tugaksheeree (Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. and Maranta arundinacea Linn.)

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekhara, N.; Ashok, B.K.; Sharma, Parmeshwar P.; Ravishankar, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disorders like hyperacidity and gastric ulcers are found very frequently now days because of a faulty lifestyle. Starches (Satwa) obtained from the rhizomes of two plants namely, Curcuma angustifolia Roxb. (Fam. Zingiberaceae) and Maranta arundinacea Linn. (Fam. Marantaceae) are used in folklore practice, as Tugaksheeree, for the treatment of the above-mentioned complaints. Aim: To assess the acute toxicity potential of the C. angustifolia and M. arundinacea along with their assessment for adaptogenic activity, by noting their effect on forced swimming-induced hypothermia and gastric ulceration in rats. Materials and Methods: For acute toxicity study, the effect of test drugs C. angustifolia and M. arundinacea rhizome starch were studied after a single administration of up to three dose levels, with 4400 mg/kg as the maximum dose. The animals were observed for 72 hours periodically and mortality was recorded up to seven days. The adaptogenic and anti-ulcer activities were assessed by determining and comparing the changes in rectal temperature, ponderal changes, ulcer index and histopathological parameters in the test drug group with that of stress control group. Results: Both the drugs did not produce any toxic symptoms or mortality even up to the maximum dose level of 4400 mg/kg. Both the test drugs significantly reversed the stress-induced gastric ulceration in comparison to stress-control rats. Starch from rhizome of C. angustifolia reversed forced swimming-induced hypothermia apparently, but not to a significant extent. However, the reversal of hypothermia found statistically significant in the rhizome starch of the M. arundinacea treated group. Conclusion: M. arundinacea had better anti-stress activity in comparision to C. angustifolia. PMID:26195908

  18. Interface design and reinforced features of arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea) starch/polyester-based membranes: Preparation, antioxidant activity, and cytocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin-San; Liao, Hsin-Tzu

    2017-01-01

    The structural, mechanical, antioxidant, and cytocompatibility properties of membranes prepared from the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) and arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea) starch powder (ASP) blend (PHA/ASP) were studied. The acrylic acid-grafted PHA (PHA-g-AA) and the coupling agent treated ASP (TASP) were used to enhance the desired characteristics of these membranes. The PHA-g-AA/TASP membranes had better mechanical properties than the PHA/ASP membrane. This effect was attributed to greater compatibility between the grafted PHA and TASP. The water resistance of the PHA-g-AA/TASP membranes was greater than that of the PHA/ASP membranes, and a cytocompatibility evaluation with human foreskin fibroblasts (FBs) indicated that both materials were nontoxic. Moreover, both ASP and TASP enhanced the polyphenol content and antioxidant properties of the membranes. PHA-g-AA/TASP and PHA/ASP membranes had better antioxidant activity than the control group.

  19. MiRNAs and miRNA Polymorphisms Modify Drug Response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mu-Peng; Hu, Yao-Dong; Hu, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Yan-Jiao; Yang, Yong-Long; Jiang, Chun; Tang, Jie; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Differences in expression of drug response-related genes contribute to inter-individual variation in drugs’ biological effects. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs emerging as new players in epigenetic regulation of gene expression at post-transcriptional level. MiRNAs regulate the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism, drug transportation, drug targets and downstream signal molecules directly or indirectly. MiRNA polymorphisms, the genetic variations affecting miRNA expression and/or miRNA-mRNA interaction, provide a new insight into the understanding of inter-individual difference in drug response. Here, we provide an overview of the recent progress in miRNAs mediated regulation of biotransformation enzymes, drug transporters, and nuclear receptors. We also describe the implications of miRNA polymorphisms in cancer chemotherapy response. PMID:27834829

  20. Redox regulation of an AP-1-like transcription factor, YapA, in the fungal symbiont Epichloe festucae.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Gemma M; Scott, Barry

    2013-10-01

    One of the central regulators of oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is Yap1, a bZIP transcription factor of the AP-1 family. In unstressed cells, Yap1 is reduced and cytoplasmic, but in response to oxidative stress, it becomes oxidized and accumulates in the nucleus. To date, there have been no reports on the role of AP-1-like transcription factors in symbiotic fungi. An ortholog of Yap1, named YapA, was identified in the genome of the grass symbiont Epichloë festucae and shown to complement an S. cerevisiae Δyap1 mutant. Hyphae of the E. festucae ΔyapA strain were sensitive to menadione and diamide but resistant to H2O2, KO2, and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH). In contrast, conidia of the ΔyapA strain were very sensitive to H2O2 and failed to germinate. Using a PcatA-eGFP degron-tagged reporter, YapA was shown to be required for expression of a spore-specific catalase gene, catA. Although YapA-EGFP localized to the nucleus in response to host reactive oxygen species during seedling infection, there was no difference in whole-plant and cellular phenotypes of plants infected with the ΔyapA strain compared to the wild-type strain. Homologs of the S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe redox-sensing proteins (Gpx3 and Tpx1, respectively) did not act as redox sensors for YapA in E. festucae. In response to oxidative stress, YapA-EGFP localized to the nuclei of E. festucae ΔgpxC, ΔtpxA, and ΔgpxC ΔtpxA cells to the same degree as that in wild-type cells. These results show that E. festucae has a robust system for countering oxidative stress in culture and in planta but that Gpx3- or Tpx1-like thiol peroxidases are dispensable for activation of YapA.

  1. Isolation and culture of protoplasts from embryogenic suspension cultures of red fescue (Festuca rubva L.).

    PubMed

    Zaghmout, O M; Torello, W A

    1990-10-01

    Protoplasts were isolated from fast-growing embryogenic suspension cultures of red fescue cv. Dawson (Festuca rubra L.) without agitation. The enzyme isolation solution was highly efficient at releasing protoplasts of greater than 95% viability (5×10(6)-10(7) protoplasts per ml of packed cell volume). A three step procedure was followed for washing and transferring protoplasts from a solution high in inorganic salts to a medium containing glucose and sucrose. The addition of 30 mM sodium thiosulfate to the wash and culture media was found to be helpful in reducing the number of lysed protoplasts. Isolated protoplasts began to divide within 48-72 h when protoplasts were plated in agarose squares and surrounded by nurse cells (mixed nurse plating technique). Maximum colony formation (plating efficiency) was approximately 1%. Many of the colonies continued to grow and produced embryos when transferred to a medium consisting of half-strength MS salts, 4 mg/l 2,4-D, 3 g/l casein hydrolysate and 30 g/l sucrose. Upon transfer to hormone-free medium and exposure to light 16 h/day, many of the embryos germinated to produce green leaves and roots.

  2. Past climate changes facilitated homoploid speciation in three mountain spiny fescues (Festuca, Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Marques, I; Draper, D; López-Herranz, M L; Garnatje, T; Segarra-Moragues, J G; Catalán, P

    2016-11-03

    Apart from the overwhelming cases of allopolyploidization, the impact of speciation through homoploid hybridization is becoming more relevant than previously thought. Much less is known, however, about the impact of climate changes as a driven factor of speciation. To investigate these issues, we selected Festuca picoeuropeana, an hypothetical natural hybrid between the diploid species F. eskia and F. gautieri that occurs in two different mountain ranges (Cantabrian Mountains and Pyrenees) separated by more than 400 km. To unravel the outcomes of this mode of speciation and the impact of climate during speciation we used a multidisciplinary approach combining genome size and chromosome counts, data from an extensive nuclear genotypic analysis, plastid sequences and ecological niche models (ENM). Our results show that the same homoploid hybrid was originated independently in the two mountain ranges, being currently isolated from both parents and producing viable seeds. Parental species had the opportunity to contact as early as 21000 years ago although niche divergence occurs nowadays as result of a climate-driven shift. A high degree of niche divergence was observed between the hybrid and its parents and no recent introgression or backcrossed hybrids were detected, supporting the current presence of reproductive isolation barriers between these species.

  3. Past climate changes facilitated homoploid speciation in three mountain spiny fescues (Festuca, Poaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Marques, I.; Draper, D.; López-Herranz, M. L.; Garnatje, T.; Segarra-Moragues, J. G.; Catalán, P.

    2016-01-01

    Apart from the overwhelming cases of allopolyploidization, the impact of speciation through homoploid hybridization is becoming more relevant than previously thought. Much less is known, however, about the impact of climate changes as a driven factor of speciation. To investigate these issues, we selected Festuca picoeuropeana, an hypothetical natural hybrid between the diploid species F. eskia and F. gautieri that occurs in two different mountain ranges (Cantabrian Mountains and Pyrenees) separated by more than 400 km. To unravel the outcomes of this mode of speciation and the impact of climate during speciation we used a multidisciplinary approach combining genome size and chromosome counts, data from an extensive nuclear genotypic analysis, plastid sequences and ecological niche models (ENM). Our results show that the same homoploid hybrid was originated independently in the two mountain ranges, being currently isolated from both parents and producing viable seeds. Parental species had the opportunity to contact as early as 21000 years ago although niche divergence occurs nowadays as result of a climate-driven shift. A high degree of niche divergence was observed between the hybrid and its parents and no recent introgression or backcrossed hybrids were detected, supporting the current presence of reproductive isolation barriers between these species. PMID:27808118

  4. miRNAs associated with immune response in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Rune; Høyheim, Bjørn

    2017-02-28

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as important post transcriptional regulators of gene expression. In higher vertebrates, a subset of miRNAs has been identified as important regulators of a number of key genes in immune system gene networks, and this paper review recent studies on miRNAs associated with immune response in teleost fish. Challenge studies conducted in several species have identified differently expressed miRNAs associated with viral or bacterial infection. The results from these studies point out several miRNAs that are likely to have evolutionary conserved functions that are related to immune response in teleost fish. Changed expression levels of mature miRNAs from the five miRNA genes miRNA-462, miRNA-731, miRNA-146, miRNA-181 and miRNA-223 are observed following viral as well as bacterial infection in several teleost fish. Furthermore, significant changes in expression of mature miRNAs from the five genes miRNA-21, miRNA-155, miRNA-1388, miRNA-99 and miRNA-100 are observed in multiple studies of virus infected fish while changes in expression of mature miRNA from the three genes miRNA-122, miRNA-192 and miRNA-451 are observed in several studies of fish with bacterial infections. Interestingly, some of these genes are not present in higher vertebrates. The function of the evolutionary conserved miRNAs responding to infection depends on the target gene(s) they regulate. A few target genes have been identified while a large number of target genes have been predicted by in silico analysis. The results suggest that many of the targets are genes from the host's immune response gene networks. We propose a model with expected temporal changes in miRNA expression if they target immune response activators/effector genes or immune response inhibitors, respectively. The best way to understand the function of a miRNA is to identify its target gene(s), but as the amount of genome resources for teleost fish is limited, with less well characterized genomes

  5. Telomere Length, TERT, and miRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Pellatt, Andrew J.; Wolff, Roger K.; Mullany, Lila E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that miRNAs are involved in the control of telomeres. We test that hypothesis by examining the association between miRNAs and telomere length (TL). Additionally, we evaluate if genetic variation in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is associated with miRNA expression levels. We use data from a population-based study of colorectal cancer (CRC), where we have previously shown associations between TL and TERT and CRC, to test associations between TL and miRNA expression and TERT and miRNA expression. To gain insight into functions of miRNAs associated with TERT we tested linear associations between miRNAs and their targeted gene mRNAs. An Agilent platform that contained information on over 2000 miRNAs was used. TL was measured using a multiplexed quantitative PCR (qPCR). RNAseq was used to assess gene expression. Our sample consisted of 1152 individuals with SNP data and miRNA expression data; 363 individuals with both TL and miRNA; and 148 individuals with miRNA and mRNA data. Thirty-three miRNAs were directly associated with TL after adjusting for age and sex (false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.05). TERT rs2736118 was associated with differences in miRNA expression between carcinoma and normal colonic mucosa for 75 miRNAs (FDR <0.05). Genes regulated by these miRNAs, as indicated by mRNA/miRNA associations, were associated with major signaling pathways beyond their TL-related functions, including PTEN, and PI3K/AKT signaling. Our data support a direct association between miRNAs and TL; differences in miRNA expression levels by TERT genotype were observed. Based on miRNA and targeted mRNA associations our data suggest that TERT is involved in non-TL-related functions by acting through altered miRNA expression. PMID:27627813

  6. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian miRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Schanen, Brian C.; Li, Xiaoman

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are members of a growing family of non-coding transcripts, 21-23 nucleotides long, which regulate a diverse collection of biological processes and various diseases by RNA-mediated gene-silencing mechanisms. While currently many studies focus on defining the regulatory functions of miRNAs, few are directed towards how miRNA genes are themselves transcriptionally regulated. Recent studies of miRNA transcription have elucidated RNA polymerase II as the major polymerase of miRNAs, however, little is known of the structural features of miRNA promoters, especially those of mammalian miRNAs. Here, we review the current literature regarding features conserved among miRNA promoters useful for their detection and the current novel methodologies available to enable researchers to advance our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. PMID:20977933

  7. Endophyte-mediated resistance to herbivores depends on herbivore identity in the wild grass Festuca subverticillata.

    PubMed

    Afkhami, Michelle E; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2009-08-01

    Understanding factors that affect the context dependency of species interactions has been identified as a critical research area in ecology. The presence of symbionts in host plants can be an important factor influencing the outcome of plant-insect interactions. Similarly, herbivore identity can alter the outcome of plant-symbiont interactions. Symbiotic foliar fungal endophytes confer resistance to herbivores in economically important agronomic grasses, in part through the production of alkaloids. Although endophytes are common in nature, relatively little is known about their effects on herbivores of native, wild grass species, and a recent meta-analysis suggested that endophytes are only beneficial in agronomic settings. In this study, we performed choice trials for five insect species and a greenhouse experiment with one species to assess effects of the fungal endophyte Neotyphodium sp. on herbivores of the wild grass Festuca subverticillata. In feeding trials, endophyte presence altered the preference of all five insect species tested. However, the magnitude and direction of preference varied among species, with Pterophylla camellifolia (F.), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), and Rhopalosiphum padi L. preferring endophyte-disinfected plants and Encoptolophus costalis (Scudder) and Romalea guttata (Houttuyn) preferring endophyte-symbiotic plants. Despite reducing insect preference, the endophyte had no significant effect on S. frugiperda performance in a no-choice greenhouse experiment and did not increase plant growth in response to this herbivore. Our results show that endophyte-mediated resistance to herbivory depends strongly on herbivore identity and suggest that the fitness consequences of endophyte symbiosis for host plants will be context dependent on the local composition of insect herbivores.

  8. Geographic Variation in Festuca rubra L. Ploidy Levels and Systemic Fungal Endophyte Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Dirihan, Serdar; Helander, Marjo; Väre, Henry; Gundel, Pedro E; Garibaldi, Lucas A; Irisarri, J Gonzalo N; Saloniemi, Irma; Saikkonen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidy and symbiotic Epichloë fungal endophytes are common and heritable characteristics that can facilitate environmental range expansion in grasses. Here we examined geographic patterns of polyploidy and the frequency of fungal endophyte colonized plants in 29 Festuca rubra L. populations from eight geographic sites across latitudes from Spain to northernmost Finland and Greenland. Ploidy seemed to be positively and negatively correlated with latitude and productivity, respectively. However, the correlations were nonlinear; 84% of the plants were hexaploids (2n = 6x = 42), and the positive correlation between ploidy level and latitude is the result of only four populations skewing the data. In the southernmost end of the gradient 86% of the plants were tetraploids (2n = 4x = 28), whereas in the northernmost end of the gradient one population had only octoploid plants (2n = 8x = 56). Endophytes were detected in 22 out of the 29 populations. Endophyte frequencies varied among geographic sites, and populations and habitats within geographic sites irrespective of ploidy, latitude or productivity. The highest overall endophyte frequencies were found in the southernmost end of the gradient, Spain, where 69% of plants harbored endophytes. In northern Finland, endophytes were detected in 30% of grasses but endophyte frequencies varied among populations from 0% to 75%, being higher in meadows compared to riverbanks. The endophytes were detected in 36%, 30% and 27% of the plants in Faroe Islands, Iceland and Switzerland, respectively. Practically all examined plants collected from southern Finland and Greenland were endophyte-free, whereas in other geographic sites endophyte frequencies were highly variable among populations. Common to all populations with high endophyte frequencies is heavy vertebrate grazing. We propose that the detected endophyte frequencies and ploidy levels mirror past distribution history of F. rubra after the last glaciation period, and local

  9. Effect of nitrogen supply and defoliation on loss of organic compounds from roots of Festuca rubra.

    PubMed

    Paterson, E; Sim, A

    2000-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of N-supply and defoliation on rhizodeposition from Festuca rubra, in the context of whole-plant C- partitioning and root morphology. Plants were grown for 36 d in axenic sand microcosms continuously percolated with nutrient solutions of either high or low N concentration (2 mM or 0.01 mM NH(4)NO(3), respectively). The effects of partial defoliation at weekly intervals were determined at high and low N. At low N, dry matter accumulation in roots and shoots was reduced significantly (P<0.001), with proportionately increased partitioning to roots, in comparison with the high N treatment. Root morphology was also affected by N-treatment; at low N, lower biomass production was offset by increased specific root length (P<0.001), reducing the magnitude of the significant (P=0.002) increase in total root length at high N. Cumulative release of organic C from roots of F: rubra over the experimental period was not altered significantly by N-treatment. However, as a proportion of net C-assimilation, rhizodeposition was significantly (P<0.001) greater at low N than at high N. Defoliation transiently (3-5 d) increased the release of soluble organic compounds from roots at each N-supply rate, and increased significantly (P<0.001) cumulative rhizodeposition over the experimental period. These effects of N-supply and defoliation on rhizodeposition are of importance in understanding interactions between plant and microbial productivity in grazed grasslands, and in interpretation of concurrent effects on microbially driven nutrient cycling processes in these systems.

  10. The potential of Festuca rubra and Calamagrostis epigejos for the revegetation of fly ash deposits.

    PubMed

    Mitrović, Miroslava; Pavlović, Pavle; Lakusić, Dmitar; Djurdjević, Lola; Stevanović, Branka; Kostić, Olga; Gajić, Gordana

    2008-12-15

    Two grass species, Festuca rubra (sown) and Calamagrostis epigejos (naturally recolonised), were studied at two fly ash deposit lagoons, weathered 5 (L1) and 13 years (L2). Both species were assessed in terms of their invasive ability, photosynthetic efficiency, trace elements accumulation, and damage symptoms, while the characteristics of the habitat were assessed in terms of trace element content, and the pH and EC of the ash. In the ash weathered for 5 and 13 years, B and Mn concentrations fell within the normal range for soils, while there was an As, Mo and Cu excess, and Se and Zn deficit. There was no difference in the photosynthetic efficiency (ns) of the C. epigejos populations at the different-aged ash lagoons, but differences were found between the populations of F. rubra (P<0.001). F. rubra displayed damage symptoms, in the form of leaf tip chlorosis and necrosis, and wilting seedlings--a result of B accumulation in toxic concentrations and a Cu and Mn deficit. After 13 years the sown F. rubra remained over 9.5% of the ash lagoon's area (L2), while over the same period the naturally recolonised C. epigejos had overgrown 87.5% of the area. The greater colonisation and survival potential of C. epigejos is a result of multiple tolerance to the conditions at ash deposits and of the competitive ability of this species to dominate the colonised habitat. Therefore, characteristics of naturally colonised species can be used for modelling future actions of biological restoration of fly ash deposits aimed at binding the ash with minimal investment (the short-term aim), and for providing conditions for revegetation, and shortening the successive phases in the revegetation of ash deposits after the closure of thermal plants (the long-term aim).

  11. Effect of fertiliser application and abandonment on plant species composition of Festuca rubra grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlů, Vilém; Gaisler, Jan; Pavlů, Lenka; Hejcman, Michal; Ludvíková, Vendula

    2012-11-01

    Little is known about the effects of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) application on soil chemical properties and plant species composition of mountain Festuca rubra grasslands. In this study, we aimed to determine whether fertiliser application affects plant species composition and soil properties during periods of management, and whether residual after-effects of fertiliser application can be detected eight years after its use is abandoned. The experiment with unfertilised control, PK treatment and treatments with low and higher level of NPK application under three (intensive management from 1993 to 1997) and two cut management (moderate management from 1997 to 1999) was established in the Jizera Mts. (Czech Republic) on F. rubra meadow and then the experiment was eight years abandoned. Immediately after the introduction of intensive management, a decrease in species richness and diversification of plant species composition occurred. Plant communities which had diversified in different fertiliser treatments persisted under moderately intensive management. The cover of Alopecurus pratensis increased to >50% while the cover of Agrostis capillaris decreased to <5% in NPK treatments during the period of intensive management. Trifolium repens became the dominant species in the PK treatment. Within eight years, under no management, the differences in plant species composition disappeared, species richness decreased and F. rubra, followed by Hypericum maculatum, became dominant in all treatments. The differences in biomass P concentration and plant available P and K concentrations in the soil were still detectable eight years after the last fertiliser application. As shown in this study, moderate application of NPK and consequent abandonment need not generate irreversible changes in species composition of mountain grassland.

  12. Geographic Variation in Festuca rubra L. Ploidy Levels and Systemic Fungal Endophyte Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Dirihan, Serdar; Helander, Marjo; Väre, Henry; Gundel, Pedro E.; Garibaldi, Lucas A.; Irisarri, J. Gonzalo N.; Saloniemi, Irma; Saikkonen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidy and symbiotic Epichloë fungal endophytes are common and heritable characteristics that can facilitate environmental range expansion in grasses. Here we examined geographic patterns of polyploidy and the frequency of fungal endophyte colonized plants in 29 Festuca rubra L. populations from eight geographic sites across latitudes from Spain to northernmost Finland and Greenland. Ploidy seemed to be positively and negatively correlated with latitude and productivity, respectively. However, the correlations were nonlinear; 84% of the plants were hexaploids (2n = 6x = 42), and the positive correlation between ploidy level and latitude is the result of only four populations skewing the data. In the southernmost end of the gradient 86% of the plants were tetraploids (2n = 4x = 28), whereas in the northernmost end of the gradient one population had only octoploid plants (2n = 8x = 56). Endophytes were detected in 22 out of the 29 populations. Endophyte frequencies varied among geographic sites, and populations and habitats within geographic sites irrespective of ploidy, latitude or productivity. The highest overall endophyte frequencies were found in the southernmost end of the gradient, Spain, where 69% of plants harbored endophytes. In northern Finland, endophytes were detected in 30% of grasses but endophyte frequencies varied among populations from 0% to 75%, being higher in meadows compared to riverbanks. The endophytes were detected in 36%, 30% and 27% of the plants in Faroe Islands, Iceland and Switzerland, respectively. Practically all examined plants collected from southern Finland and Greenland were endophyte-free, whereas in other geographic sites endophyte frequencies were highly variable among populations. Common to all populations with high endophyte frequencies is heavy vertebrate grazing. We propose that the detected endophyte frequencies and ploidy levels mirror past distribution history of F. rubra after the last glaciation period, and local

  13. Occurrence and genetic structure of the systemic grass endophyte Epichloë festucae in fine fescue populations.

    PubMed

    Wäli, Piippa R; Ahlholm, Jouni U; Helander, Marjo; Saikkonen, Kari

    2007-01-01

    Epichloë species are systemic fungal endophytes that usually specialize in a certain group of related grass species. We examined the infection frequency of Epichloë festucae in populations of two fine fescue species (Festuca rubra and F. ovina) in natural and seminatural habitats at 86 study sites (total=2514 plants) across Finland and northern Norway. Infection incidence varied significantly among grass species and populations. A substantial number of the F. rubra and F. ovina populations (53 out of 77 and 25 out of 30, respectively) were either endophyte-free or had very low (<20%) infection frequencies. The highest infection frequencies were found in subarctic areas. Moreover, infection incidence differed between habitats. In the area with the highest infection frequencies, we used microsatellite markers to study genetic diversity and the rates of gene flow of E. festucae among 12 F. rubra populations. Twenty out of the 25 fungal genotypes detected with four microsatellite markers were carrying multiple alleles in at least one locus, indicating multiple infections or vegetative hybridization of the fungus. One dominant genotype occurred in all 12 populations, representing 63.5% of all isolates. We found a moderate level of average genotypic variation and a low level of genetic differentiation (Fst=0.0814). There was no correlation between infection frequency and genotypic diversity. Although the existence of a dominant genotype and the detected linkage disequilibrium suggest that the fungus is mainly asexual and vertically transmitted, the multiallelic loci and variation of genetic diversity among populations indicate occasional contagious spread and sexual or parasexual recombination of the fungus in some populations. Furthermore, the genotypes carrying multiallelic loci suggest the possibility of multiple infections or hybridization of the endophyte.

  14. Use of Mature miRNA Strand Selection in miRNAs Families in Cervical Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    Granados-López, Angelica Judith; Ruiz-Carrillo, José Luis; Servín-González, Luis Steven; Martínez-Rodríguez, José Luis; Reyes-Estrada, Claudia Araceli; Gutiérrez-Hernández, Rosalinda; López, Jesús Adrián

    2017-02-14

    Aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as a cancer hallmark, nevertheless miRNA function and expression does not always correlate in patients tissues and cell lines studies. In addition to this issue, miRNA strand usage conduces to increased cell signaling pathways modulation diversifying cellular processes regulation. In cervical cancer, 20 miRNA families are involved in carcinogenesis induction and development to this moment. These families have 5p and 3p strands with different nucleotide (nt) chain sizes. In general, mature 5p strands are larger: two miRNAs of 24 nt, 24 miRNAs of 23 nt, 35 miRNAs of 22 nt and three miRNAs of 21 nt. On the other hand, the 3p strands lengths observed are: seven miRNAs of 23 nt, 50 miRNAs of 22 nt, six miRNAs of 21 nt and four miRNAs of 20 nt. Based on the analysis of the 20 miRNA families associated with cervical cancer, 67 3p strands and 65 5p strands are selected suggesting selectivity and specificity mechanisms regulating cell processes like proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, metabolism and Warburg effect. The insight reviewed here could be used in the miRNA based therapy, diagnosis and prognosis approaches.

  15. Use of Mature miRNA Strand Selection in miRNAs Families in Cervical Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Granados-López, Angelica Judith; Ruiz-Carrillo, José Luis; Servín-González, Luis Steven; Martínez-Rodríguez, José Luis; Reyes-Estrada, Claudia Araceli; Gutiérrez-Hernández, Rosalinda; López, Jesús Adrián

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as a cancer hallmark, nevertheless miRNA function and expression does not always correlate in patients tissues and cell lines studies. In addition to this issue, miRNA strand usage conduces to increased cell signaling pathways modulation diversifying cellular processes regulation. In cervical cancer, 20 miRNA families are involved in carcinogenesis induction and development to this moment. These families have 5p and 3p strands with different nucleotide (nt) chain sizes. In general, mature 5p strands are larger: two miRNAs of 24 nt, 24 miRNAs of 23 nt, 35 miRNAs of 22 nt and three miRNAs of 21 nt. On the other hand, the 3p strands lengths observed are: seven miRNAs of 23 nt, 50 miRNAs of 22 nt, six miRNAs of 21 nt and four miRNAs of 20 nt. Based on the analysis of the 20 miRNA families associated with cervical cancer, 67 3p strands and 65 5p strands are selected suggesting selectivity and specificity mechanisms regulating cell processes like proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, metabolism and Warburg effect. The insight reviewed here could be used in the miRNA based therapy, diagnosis and prognosis approaches. PMID:28216603

  16. RNA Binding Proteins in the miRNA Pathway.

    PubMed

    Connerty, Patrick; Ahadi, Alireza; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2015-12-26

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short ~22 nucleotides (nt) ribonucleic acids which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. miRNAs are key regulators of all cellular processes, and the correct expression of miRNAs in an organism is crucial for proper development and cellular function. As a result, the miRNA biogenesis pathway is highly regulated. In this review, we outline the basic steps of miRNA biogenesis and miRNA mediated gene regulation focusing on the role of RNA binding proteins (RBPs). We also describe multiple mechanisms that regulate the canonical miRNA pathway, which depends on a wide range of RBPs. Moreover, we hypothesise that the interaction between miRNA regulation and RBPs is potentially more widespread based on the analysis of available high-throughput datasets.

  17. Virus-Mediated Alterations in miRNA Factors and Degradation of Viral miRNAs by MCPIP1

    PubMed Central

    Happel, Christine; Ramalingam, Dhivya; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the causative agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma, encodes 25 mature viral miRNAs. MCP-1-induced protein-1 (MCPIP1), a critical regulator of immune homeostasis, has been shown to suppress miRNA biosynthesis via cleavage of precursor miRNAs through its RNase domain. We demonstrate that MCPIP1 can directly cleave KSHV and EBV precursor miRNAs and that MCPIP1 expression is repressed following de novo KSHV infection. In addition, repression with siRNAs to MCPIP1 in KSHV-infected cells increased IL-6 and KSHV miRNA expression, supporting a role for MCPIP1 in IL-6 and KSHV miRNA regulation. We also provide evidence that KSHV miRNAs repress MCPIP1 expression by targeting the 3’UTR of MCPIP1. Conversely, expression of essential miRNA biogenesis components Dicer and TRBP is increased following latent KSHV infection. We propose that KSHV infection inhibits a negative regulator of miRNA biogenesis (MCPIP1) and up-regulates critical miRNA processing components to evade host mechanisms that inhibit expression of viral miRNAs. KSHV-mediated alterations in miRNA biogenesis represent a novel mechanism by which KSHV interacts with its host and a new mechanism for the regulation of viral miRNA expression. PMID:27893764

  18. Discovery of miRNAs and Their Corresponding miRNA Genes in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua): Use of Stable miRNAs as Reference Genes Reveals Subgroups of miRNAs That Are Highly Expressed in Particular Organs

    PubMed Central

    Andreassen, Rune; Rangnes, Fredrik; Sivertsen, Maria; Chiang, Michelle; Tran, Michelle; Worren, Merete Molton

    2016-01-01

    Background Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is among the economically most important species in the northern Atlantic Ocean and a model species for studying development of the immune system in vertebrates. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of small RNA molecules that regulate fundamental biological processes at the post-transcriptional level. Detailed knowledge about a species miRNA repertoire is necessary to study how the miRNA transcriptome modulate gene expression. We have therefore discovered and characterized mature miRNAs and their corresponding miRNA genes in Atlantic cod. We have also performed a validation study to identify suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of miRNA expression in Atlantic cod. Finally, we utilized the newly characterized miRNA repertoire and the dedicated RT-qPCR method to reveal miRNAs that are highly expressed in certain organs. Results The discovery analysis revealed 490 mature miRNAs (401 unique sequences) along with precursor sequences and genomic location of the miRNA genes. Twenty six of these were novel miRNA genes. Validation studies ranked gmo-miR-17-1—5p or the two-gene combination gmo-miR25-3p and gmo-miR210-5p as most suitable qPCR reference genes. Analysis by RT-qPCR revealed 45 miRNAs with significantly higher expression in tissues from one or a few organs. Comparisons to other vertebrates indicate that some of these miRNAs may regulate processes like growth, lipid metabolism, immune response to microbial infections and scar damage repair. Three teleost-specific and three novel Atlantic cod miRNAs were among the differentially expressed miRNAs. Conclusions The number of known mature miRNAs was considerably increased by our identification of miRNAs and miRNA genes in Atlantic cod. This will benefit further functional studies of miRNA expression using deep sequencing methods. The validation study showed that stable miRNAs are suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of miRNA expression. Applying RT-qPCR we

  19. Intensity and importance of competition for a grass (Festuca rubra) and a legume (Trifolium pratense) vary with environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyan; Cheng, Genwei; Yu, Feihai; Kräuchi, Norbert; Li, Mai-He

    2008-12-01

    How plant competition varies across environmental gradients has been a long debate among ecologists. We conducted a growth chamber experiment to determine the intensity and importance of competition for plants grown in changed environmental conditions. Festuca rubra and Trifolium pratense were grown in monoculture and in two- and/or three-species mixtures under three environmental treatments. The measured competitive variations in terms of growth (height and biomass) were species-dependent. Competition intensity for Festuca increased with decreased productivity, whilst competition importance displayed a humpback response. However, significant response was detected in neither competition intensity nor importance for Trifolium. Intensity and importance of competition followed different response patterns, suggesting that they may not be correlated along an environmental gradient. The biological and physiological variables of plants play an important role to determine the interspecific competition associated with competition intensity and importance. However, the competitive feature can be modified by multiple environmental changes which may increase or hinder how competitive a plant is.

  20. Exosomes as miRNA Carriers: Formation-Function-Future.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojie; Odenthal, Margarete; Fries, Jochen W U

    2016-12-02

    Exosomes, which are one of the smallest extracellular vesicles released from cells, have been shown to carry different nucleic acids, including microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs significantly regulate cell growth and metabolism by posttranscriptional inhibition of gene expression. The rapidly changing understanding of exosomes' formation and function in delivering miRNAs from cell to cell has prompted us to review current knowledge in exosomal miRNA secretion mechanisms as well as possible therapeutic applications for personalized medicine.

  1. Intraspecific DNA Content Variability in Festuca pallens on Different Geographical Scales and Ploidy Levels

    PubMed Central

    ŠMARDA, PETR; BUREŠ, PETR

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Intraspecific genome size variability of Festuca pallens occurring on relict rocky steppes in Central Europe was studied on two ploidy levels and three geographical scales: (1) local scale of 24 populations, (2) landscape scale of three transects in river canyons or hill systems, and (3) global scale of 160 samples covering the whole distribution area. • Methods DAPI flow cytometry of homogeneously cultivated samples (≥1 year), measured randomly with two internal standards, Lycopersicon esculentum and Pisum sativum. Differences in DNA content were confirmed (1) by the double peaks of simultaneously measured samples, (2) based on measurements carried out in different seasons, and (3) by additional measurements with propidium iodide. • Key Results On a global scale, the relative DNA content ranged between 1·170-fold in diploids and 1·164-fold in tetraploids. A maximum difference of 1·088-fold between the mean relative DNA content of nearby populations was found. In 16 of 24 populations significant variability was shown (P < 0·001, 1·121-fold as maximum). For both ploidy levels, the relative genome size had the same range and geographical pattern, correlated with geographical coordinates (P < 0·01). Diploids with larger genomes occur on relict habitats (P < 0·01), and in areas of periglacial steppes (20 000 years ago; P < 0·02). In tetraploids, the relative DNA content differs among the three previously recognized geographical types (Alpine, Pannonian and Scabrifolia, P < 0·001). Tetraploids have a relative DNA content smaller than twice that of the diploids (P < 0·001). An influence of microhabitat on DNA content variation was not confirmed. • Conclusions Genome size variability occurs over all spatial scales: intrapopulation, landscape and global. Correlation between geographical coordinates and palaeovegetation type, concomitant with diploids and tetraploids, and no influence of microhabitat were found. Genome size

  2. The expression of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in gliomas patients and their prognosis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Liang; Wang, Yi; Yue, Shuyuan; Zhang, Jianning

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the expression of microRNA (miRNA)-221 and miRNA-222 in human glioma cells and tissues. The expression of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in human glioma cell line U87, U251, A172, LN229 and surgery resected glioma tissues were measured. The survival rate of X-ray (2 Gy) irradiated glioma cells were calculated. 165 cases of glioma patients were recruited successfully; the expression of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in their resected tissues were measured. The expression of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in cancer tissues were obviously higher than control tissues (normal brain tissue) and control cell (gastric mucosal epithelial cell, GES) (p < 0.05). The highly malignant glioma tissues expressed significantly higher miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 than low malignant glioma tissues. Patients with highly expressed miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 have shorter survival time. Survival rate of glioma cells was significantly higher than GES cell after irradiation (p < 0.05); miRNA-221 in glioma cells. The expressions of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in irritated glioma cells were positively correlated with the survival rate of glioma cells (r = 0.629, 0.712, both p < 0.01). For the 165 glioma patients, the expressions of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 increased with the increasing of pathological grades (χ (2) = 42.85, p < 0.01); and their survival time decreased when miRNA-221 expression elevated (χ (2) = 57.12, p < 0.01). MiRNA-221 and miRNA-222 express highly in human glioma cells and tissues. Expression of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 are closely related to pathological grading and prognosis of glioma; they could be used as independent prognostic factor for glioma.

  3. Breeding bird territory placement in riparian wet meadows in relation to invasive reed canary grass, Phalaris arundinacea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirsch, E.M.; Gray, B.R.; Fox, T.J.; Thogmartin, W.E.

    2007-01-01

    Invasive plants are a growing concern worldwide for conservation of native habitats. In endangered wet meadow habitat in the Upper Midwestern United States, reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) is a recognized problem and its prevalence is more widespread than the better-known invasive wetland plant purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria). Although resource managers are concerned about the effect of reed canary grass on birds, this is the first study to report how common wet meadow birds use habitat in relation to reed canary grass cover and dominance. We examined three response variables: territory placement, size of territories, and numbers of territories per plot in relation to cover of reed canary grass. Territory locations for Sedge Wren (Cistothorus platensis) and Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) were positively associated with reed canary grass cover, while those for Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) were not. Only Swamp Sparrow (M. georgiana) territory locations were negatively associated with reed canary grass cover and dominance (which indicated a tendency to place territories where there was no reed canary grass or where many plant species occurred with reed canary grass). Swamp Sparrow territories were positively associated with vegetation height density and litter depth. Common Yellowthroat territories were positively associated with vegetation height density and shrub cover. Song Sparrow territories were negatively associated with litter depth. Reed canary grass cover within territories was not associated with territory size for any of these four bird species. Territory density per plot was not associated with average reed canary grass cover of plots for all four species. Sedge Wrens and Song Sparrows may not respond negatively to reed canary grass because this grass is native to wet meadows of North America, and in the study area it merely replaces other tall lush plants. Avoidance of reed canary grass by Swamp Sparrows may be mediated

  4. Development of fine-leaved Festuca grass populations identified genetic resources having potential for improved forage production and wildfire control in the western United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought and heat tolerant fine-leaved fescue (Festuca ssp.) grasses have potential as components in rangeland greenstrips for wildfire control in semi-arid climates. However, such fine-leaved grasses have been difficult to identify because of specific adaptations, lack of late maturity, and often p...

  5. An Epichloë festucae homologue of MOB3, a component of the STRIPAK complex, is required for the establishment of a mutualistic symbiotic interaction with Lolium perenne

    PubMed Central

    Green, Kimberly A.; Becker, Yvonne; Fitzsimons, Helen L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary In both Sordaria macrospora and Neurospora crassa, components of the conserved STRIPAK (striatin‐interacting phosphatase and kinase) complex regulate cell–cell fusion, hyphal network development and fruiting body formation. Interestingly, a number of Epichloë festucae genes that are required for hyphal cell–cell fusion, such as noxA, noxR, proA, mpkA and mkkA, are also required for the establishment of a mutualistic symbiotic interaction with Lolium perenne. To determine whether MobC, a homologue of the STRIPAK complex component MOB3 in S. macrospora and N. crassa, is required for E. festucae hyphal fusion and symbiosis, a mobC deletion strain was generated. The ΔmobC mutant showed reduced rates of hyphal cell–cell fusion, formed intrahyphal hyphae and exhibited enhanced conidiation. Plants infected with ΔmobC were severely stunted. Hyphae of ΔmobC showed a proliferative pattern of growth within the leaves of Lolium perenne with increased colonization of the intercellular spaces and vascular bundles. Although hyphae were still able to form expressoria, structures allowing the colonization of the leaf surface, the frequency of formation was significantly reduced. Collectively, these results show that the STRIPAK component MobC is required for the establishment of a mutualistic symbiotic association between E. festucae and L. perenne, and plays an accessory role in the regulation of hyphal cell–cell fusion and expressorium development in E. festucae. PMID:27277141

  6. Assessment of Grazing Effect on Sheep Fescue (Festuca valesiaca)Dominated Steppe Rangelands in the semi-arid Central Anatolian Region of Turkey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of increased grazing pressure over the last fifty years, vegetation of the steppe rangelands in the semi-arid Central Anatolian Region of Turkey has been severely degraded. In these pastures, Festuca valesiaca (a sod forming short-grass) and Thymus sipyleus ssp rosulans (a prostrate shrub) a...

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus pumilus Strain GM3FR, an Endophyte Isolated from Aerial Plant Tissues of Festuca rubra L.

    PubMed Central

    Hollensteiner, Jacqueline; Daniel, Rolf; Liesegang, Heiko; Vidal, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Bacillus pumilus GM3FR, an endophytic bacterium isolated from aerial plant tissues of Festuca rubra L. The draft genome consists of 3.5 Mb and harbors 3,551 predicted protein-encoding genes. The genome provides insights into the biocontrol potential of B. pumilus GM3FR. PMID:28360161

  8. Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of a U.S. native fine-leaved Festuca population portends its potential use for low-input urban landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continued reduction in limited natural resources worldwide increasingly necessitates the incorporation of low maintenance and input plant materials into urban landscapes. Although some fine-leaved Festuca grass species have been utilized in formal gardens and native urban landscapes because of thei...

  9. MicroRNAs, macrocontrol: regulation of miRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Slezak-Prochazka, Izabella; Durmus, Selvi; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; van den Berg, Anke

    2010-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a set of small, non-protein-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Maturation of miRNAs comprises several regulated steps resulting in approximately 22-nucleotide single-stranded mature miRNAs. Regulation of miRNA expression can occur both at the transcriptional level and at the post-transcriptional level during miRNA processing. Recent studies have elucidated specific aspects of the well-regulated nature of miRNA processing involving various regulatory proteins, editing of miRNA transcripts, and cellular location. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms in miRNA genes can also affect the processing efficiency of primary miRNA transcripts. In this review we present an overview of the currently known regulatory pathways of miRNA processing and provide a basis to understand how aberrant miRNA processing may arise and may be involved in pathophysiological conditions such as cancer.

  10. Mitochondria: one of the destinations of miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Sripada, Lakshmi; Tomar, Dhanendra; Singh, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    The cellular processes are controlled by a narrow range of mRNA and proteins levels, where small RNAs (sRNAs) known as miRNAs play a critical role. The spatial and temporal regulation of miRNA processing components and mature miRNA is emerging. The recent studies suggest that mitochondria are one of the destinations of pre as well as mature miRNAs. The role of mitochondria extends beyond energy metabolism to many other cellular processes like metabolism, cell death and inflammation. The new found destination of miRNAs suggest the role of mitochondria in monitoring site specific regulations of proteins as well as the function of mitochondria. The studies in this direction will decipher the novel role of mitochondria-associated miRNAs in different cellular processes. This review is focussed on the recent studies demonstrating the presence of miRNAs in mitochondria and its possible significance in different cellular and physiological conditions.

  11. Stabilization of metals in acidic mine spoil with amendments and red fescue (Festuca rubra L.) growth.

    PubMed

    Simon, László

    2005-12-01

    Stabilization of metals with amendments and red fescue (Festuca rubra, cv. Keszthelyi 2) growth was studied on an acidic and phytotoxic mine spoil (pH(KCl) 3.20-3.26; Cd 7.1 mg kg(-1), Cu 120 mg kg(-1), Pb 2154 mg kg(-1) and Zn 605 mg kg(-1)) from Gyöngyösoroszi, Hungary in a pot experiment. Raising the pH above 5.0 by lime (CaCO(3)), and supplementing with 40 mg kg(-1)nitrogen (NH(4)NO(3)) made this material suitable for plant growth. All cultures were limed with 0.5% (m/m) CaCO(3) (treatment 1), which was combined with 5% (m/m) municipal sewage sludge compost (treatment 2), 5% (m/m) peat (treatment 3), 7.5% (m/m) natural zeolite (clinoptilolite) (treatment 4), and 0.5 (m/m) KH(2)PO(4) (treatment 5). Treatments 1-5 were combined with each other (treatment 6). After 60 days of red fescue growth, pH of the limed mine spoil decreased in all cultures units. Application of peat caused the highest pH decrease (1.15), while decrease of pH was less than 0.23 in treatments 2, 5 or 6. Application of lime significantly reduced concentrations of metals in the 'plant available' fraction of mine spoil compared to non-limed mine spoil. Amendments added to limed mine spoil changed variously the ratio of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in exchangeable or 'plant available' fractions, differently influencing the phytoavailability of these metals. Most of the metals were captured in the roots of test plants. Treatment 2 caused the appearance of less Cd in shoots (<0.1 microg g(-1)) or roots (3.11 microg g(-1)), while treatment 5 resulted in the highest Cd concentration (2.13 microg g(-1)) in shoots. Treatments did not influence significantly the Cu accumulation in shoots. The Pb accumulation of roots (44.7 microg g(-1)) was most effectively inhibited by combined treatment, while the highest value (136 microg g(-1)) was found in the culture treated with potassium phosphate. Pb concentration in shoots was below the detection limit, except for treatments 5 and 6. Peat application resulted in higher

  12. MiRNA-155 and miRNA-132 as potential diagnostic biomarkers for pulmonary tuberculosis: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meng-Li; Zhou, Nai-Kang; Luo, Cheng-Hua

    2016-11-01

    In our study, we aimed to profile a panel microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and to illuminate the molecular mechanisms in the development of PTB. Firstly, gene expression profile of E-GEOD-49951 was downloaded from ArrayExpress database, and quantile-adjusted conditional maximum likelihood method was utilized to identify statistical difference between miRNAs of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-infected individuals and healthy subjects. Furthermore, in order to assess the performance of our methodology, random forest (RF) classification model was utilized to identify the top 10 miRNAs with better Area Under The Curve (AUC) using 10-fold cross-validation method. Additionally, Monte Carlo Cross-Validation was repeated 50 times to explore the best miRNAs. In order to learn more about the differentially-expressed miRNAs, the target genes of differentially-expressed miRNAs were retrieved from TargetScan database and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) was used to screen out biological pathways where target genes were involved. After normalization, a total of 478 miRNAs with higher than 0.25-fold quantile average across all samples were required. Based on the differential expression analysis, 38 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified when the significance was set as false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.01. Among the top 10 differentially expressed miRNAs, miRNA-155 obtained a highest AUC value 0.976, showing a good performance between PTB and control groups. Similarly, miRNA-449a, miRNA-212 and miRNA-132 revealed also a good performance with AUC values 0.947, 0.931 and 0.930, respectively. Moreover, miRNA-155, miRNA-449a, miRNA-29b-1* and miRNA-132 appeared in 50, 49, 49 and 48 bootstraps. Thus, miRNA-155 and miRNA-132 might be important in the progression of PTB and thereby, might present potential signatures for diagnosis of PTB.

  13. miRNA Isolation from FFPET Specimen: A Technical Comparison of miRNA and Total RNA Isolation Methods.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsófia Brigitta; Wichmann, Barnabás; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-07-01

    MiRNA remain stable for detection and PCR-based amplification in FFPE tissue samples. Several miRNA extraction kits are available, however miRNA fraction, as part of total RNA can be isolated using total RNA purification methods, as well. Our primary aim was to compare four different miRNA and total RNA isolation methods from FFPE tissues. Further purposes were to evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively the yield of the isolated miRNA. MiRNAs were isolated from normal colorectal cancer FFPE specimens from the same patients. Two miRNA isolation kits (High Pure miRNA Isolation Kit, miRCURY™ RNA Isolation Kit) and two total RNA isolation kits were compared (High Pure RNA Paraffin Kit, MagNA Pure 96 Cellular RNA LV Kit). Quantity and quality were determined, expression analysis was performed by real-time PCR using qPCR Human Panel I + II (Exiqon) method detecting 742 human miRNAs in parallel. The yield of total RNA was found to be higher than miRNA purification protocols (in CRC: Ex: 0203 ± 0021 μg; HPm: 1,45 ± 0,8 μg; HPp: 21,36 ± 4,98 μg; MP: 8,6 ± 5,1 μg). MiRNAs were detected in lower relative quantity of total RNA compared to the miRNA kits. Higher number of miRNAs could be detected by the miRNA isolation kits in comparison to the total RNA isolation methods. (Ex: 497 ± 16; HPm: 542 ± 11; HPp: 332 ± 36; MP: 295 ± 74). Colon specific miRNAs (miR-21-5p;-34-5p) give satisfying results by miRNA isolation kits. Although miRNA can be detected also after total RNA isolation methods, for reliable and reproducible miRNA expression profiling the use of miRNA isolation kits are more suitable.

  14. Variability of ribosomal DNA sites in Festuca pratensis, Lolium perenne, and their intergeneric hybrids, revealed by FISH and GISH.

    PubMed

    Ksiazczyk, T; Taciak, M; Zwierzykowski, Z

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the variability of chromosomal location and number of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sites in some diploid and autotetraploid Festuca pratensis and Lolium perenne cultivars, as well as on identification of rDNA-bearing chromosomes in their triploid and tetraploid F. pratensis × L. perenne hybrids. The rDNA loci were mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with 5S and 25S rDNA probes, and the origin of parental genomes was verified by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) with L. perenne genomic DNA as a probe, and F. pratensis genomic DNA as a block. FISH detected variation in the number and chromosomal location of both 5S and 45S rDNA sites. In F. pratensis mostly additional signals of 5S rDNA loci occurred, as compared with standard F. pratensis karyotypes. Losses of 45S rDNA loci were more frequent in L. perenne cultivars and intergeneric hybrids. Comparison of the F. pratensis and L. perenne genomes approved a higher number of rDNA sites as well as variation in chromosomal rDNA location in L. perenne. A greater instability of F. pratensis-genome-like and L. perenne-genome-like chromosomes in tetraploid hybrids was revealed, indicating gains and losses of rDNA loci, respectively. Our data indicate that the rDNA loci physically mapped on chromosomes 2 and 3 in F. pratensis and on chromosome 3 in L. perenne are useful markers for these chromosomes in intergeneric Festuca × Lolium hybrids.

  15. Semirna: searching for plant miRNAs using target sequences.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Perkins, James R; Viguera, Enrique; Thode, Guillermo; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J

    2012-04-01

    Many plant genomes are already known, and new ones are being sequenced every year. The next step for researchers is to identify all of the functional elements in these genomes, including the important class of functional elements known as microRNAs (miRNAs), which are involved in posttranscriptional regulatory pathways. However, computational tools for predicting new plant miRNAs are limited, and there is a particular need for tools that can be used easily by laboratory researchers. We present semirna, a new tool for predicting miRNAs in plant genomes, available as a Web server. This tool takes a putative target sequence such as a messenger RNA (mRNA) as input, and allows users to search for miRNAs that target this sequence. It can also be used to determine whether small RNA sequences from massive sequencing analysis represent true miRNAs and to search for miRNAs in new genomes using homology. Semirna has shown a high level of accuracy using various test sets, and gives users the ability to search for miRNAs with several different adjustable parameters. Semirna, a user-friendly and intuitive Web server for predicting miRNA sequences, can be reached at http://www.bioinfocabd.upo.es/semirna/ . It is useful for researchers searching for miRNAs involved in particular pathways, as well as those searching for miRNAs in newly sequenced genomes.

  16. Neuronal Activity Regulates Hippocampal miRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Eacker, Stephen M.; Keuss, Matthew J.; Berezikov, Eugene; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal activity regulates a broad range of processes in the hippocampus, including the precise regulation of translation. Disruptions in proper translational control in the nervous system are associated with a variety of disorders that fall in the autistic spectrum. MicroRNA (miRNA) represent a relatively recently discovered player in the regulation of translation in the nervous system. We have conducted an in depth analysis of how neuronal activity regulates miRNA expression in the hippocampus. Using deep sequencing we exhaustively identify all miRNAs, including 15 novel miRNAs, expressed in hippocampus of the adult mouse. We identified 119 miRNAs documented in miRBase but less than half of these miRNA were expressed at a level greater than 0.1% of total miRNA. Expression profiling following induction of neuronal activity by electroconvulsive shock demonstrates that most miRNA show a biphasic pattern of expression: rapid induction of specific mature miRNA expression followed by a decline in expression. These results have important implications into how miRNAs influence activity-dependent translational control. PMID:21984899

  17. Effects of citric acid and the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFO-B) on the mobility of germanium and rare earth elements in soil and uptake in Phalaris arundinacea.

    PubMed

    Wiche, Oliver; Tischler, Dirk; Fauser, Carla; Lodemann, Jana; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2017-02-03

    Effects of citric acid and desferrioxamine B (DFO-B) on the availability of Ge and selected REEs (La, Nd, Gd, Er) to P. arundinacea were investigated. A soil dissolution experiment was conducted to elucidate the effect of citric acid and DFO-B at different concentrations (1 and 10 mmol l(-1) citric acid) on the release of Ge and REEs from soil. In a greenhouse plants of P. arundinacea were cultivated on soil and on sand cultures to investigate the effects of citric acid and DFO-B on the uptake of Ge and REEs by the plants. Addition of 10 mmol l(-1) citric acid significantly enhanced desorption of Ge and REEs from soil and uptake into soil-grown plants. Applying DFO-B enhanced the dissolution and the uptake of REEs, while no effect on Ge was observed. In sand cultures, presence of citric acid and DFO-B significantly decreased the uptake of Ge and REEs, indicating a discrimination of the formed complexes during uptake. This study clearly indicates that citric acid and the microbial siderophore DFO-B may enhance phytoextraction of Ge and REEs due to the formation of soluble complexes that increase the migration of elements in the rhizosphere.

  18. Genome-wide miRNA seeds prediction in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengqin; Xu, Yuming; Lu, Zuhong

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that miRNA genes exist in the archaeal genome, though the functional role of such noncoding RNA remains unclear. Here, we integrated the phylogenetic information of available archaeal genomes to predict miRNA seeds (typically defined as the 2-8 nucleotides of mature miRNAs) on the genomic scale. Finally, we found 2649 candidate seeds with significant conservation signal. Eleven of 29 unique seeds from previous study support our result (P value <0.01), which demonstrates that the pipeline is suitable to predict experimentally detectable miRNA seeds. The statistical significance of the overlap between the detected archaeal seeds and known eukaryotic seeds shows that the miRNA may evolve before the divergence of these two domains of cellular life. In addition, miRNA targets are enriched for genes involved in transcriptional regulation, which is consistent with the situation in eukaryote. Our research will enhance the regulatory network analysis in Archaea.

  19. miRNA Inhibition in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Beavers, Kelsey R.; Nelson, Christopher E.; Duvall, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) are noncoding RNA that provide an endogenous negative feedback mechanism for translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) into protein. Single miRNAs can regulate hundreds of mRNAs, enabling miRNAs to orchestrate robust biological responses by simultaneously impacting multiple gene networks. MiRNAs can act as master regulators of normal and pathological tissue development, homeostasis, and repair, which has recently motivated expanding efforts toward development of technologies for therapeutically modulating miRNA activity for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. This review highlights the tools currently available for miRNA inhibition and their recent therapeutic applications for improving tissue repair. PMID:25553957

  20. MiRNA inhibition in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Beavers, Kelsey R; Nelson, Christopher E; Duvall, Craig L

    2015-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs that provide an endogenous negative feedback mechanism for translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) into protein. Single miRNAs can regulate hundreds of mRNAs, enabling miRNAs to orchestrate robust biological responses by simultaneously impacting multiple gene networks. MiRNAs can act as master regulators of normal and pathological tissue development, homeostasis, and repair, which has motivated expanding efforts toward the development of technologies for therapeutically modulating miRNA activity for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. This review highlights the tools currently available for miRNA inhibition and their recent therapeutic applications for improving tissue repair.

  1. Epigenetic regulation of miRNAs in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Muller; Calore, Federica; Paone, Alessio; Galli, Roberta; Calin, George A

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs with gene regulatory functions. It has been demonstrated that the genes encoding for miRNAs undergo the same regulatory epigenetic processes of protein coding genes. In turn, a specific subgroup of miRNAs, called epi-miRNAs, is able to directly target key enzymatic effectors of the epigenetic machinery (such as DNA methyltransferases, histone deacetylases, and polycomb genes), therefore indirectly affecting the expression of epigenetically regulated oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Also, several of the epigenetic drugs currently approved as anticancer agents affect the expression of miRNAs and this might explain part of their mechanism of action. This chapter focuses on the tight relationship between epigenetics and miRNAs and provides some insights on the translational implications of these findings, leading to the upcoming introduction of epigenetically related miRNAs in the treatment of cancer.

  2. miRNAs in the pathogenesis of oncogenic human viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor viruses are a class of pathogens with well established roles in the development of malignant diseases. Numerous bodies of work have highlighted miRNAs (microRNAs) as critical regulators of tumor pathways and it is clear that the dysregulation of cellular miRNA expression can promote tumor formation. Tumor viruses encode their own miRNAs and/or manipulate the expression of cellular miRNAs to modulate their host cell environment, thereby facilitating their respective infection cycles. The modulation of these miRNA responsive pathways, however, often influences certain signal transduction cascades in ways that favor tumorigenesis. In this review, we discuss the roles of virally-encoded and virally-regulated cellular miRNAs in the respective viral life-cycles and in virus associated pathogenesis. PMID:20943311

  3. Reprogramming of miRNA networks in cancer and leukemia.

    PubMed

    Volinia, Stefano; Galasso, Marco; Costinean, Stefan; Tagliavini, Luca; Gamberoni, Giacomo; Drusco, Alessandra; Marchesini, Jlenia; Mascellani, Nicoletta; Sana, Maria Elena; Abu Jarour, Ramzey; Desponts, Caroline; Teitell, Michael; Baffa, Raffaele; Aqeilan, Rami; Iorio, Marilena V; Taccioli, Cristian; Garzon, Ramiro; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Fabbri, Muller; Catozzi, Marco; Previati, Maurizio; Ambs, Stefan; Palumbo, Tiziana; Garofalo, Michela; Veronese, Angelo; Bottoni, Arianna; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Harris, Curtis C; Visone, Rosa; Pekarsky, Yuri; de la Chapelle, Albert; Bloomston, Mark; Dillhoff, Mary; Rassenti, Laura Z; Kipps, Thomas J; Huebner, Kay; Pichiorri, Flavia; Lenze, Dido; Cairo, Stefano; Buendia, Marie-Annick; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Zanesi, Nicola; Rossi, Simona; Calin, George A; Liu, Chang-Gong; Palatini, Jeff; Negrini, Massimo; Vecchione, Andrea; Rosenberg, Anne; Croce, Carlo M

    2010-05-01

    We studied miRNA profiles in 4419 human samples (3312 neoplastic, 1107 nonmalignant), corresponding to 50 normal tissues and 51 cancer types. The complexity of our database enabled us to perform a detailed analysis of microRNA (miRNA) activities. We inferred genetic networks from miRNA expression in normal tissues and cancer. We also built, for the first time, specialized miRNA networks for solid tumors and leukemias. Nonmalignant tissues and cancer networks displayed a change in hubs, the most connected miRNAs. hsa-miR-103/106 were downgraded in cancer, whereas hsa-miR-30 became most prominent. Cancer networks appeared as built from disjointed subnetworks, as opposed to normal tissues. A comparison of these nets allowed us to identify key miRNA cliques in cancer. We also investigated miRNA copy number alterations in 744 cancer samples, at a resolution of 150 kb. Members of miRNA families should be similarly deleted or amplified, since they repress the same cellular targets and are thus expected to have similar impacts on oncogenesis. We correctly identified hsa-miR-17/92 family as amplified and the hsa-miR-143/145 cluster as deleted. Other miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-30 and hsa-miR-204, were found to be physically altered at the DNA copy number level as well. By combining differential expression, genetic networks, and DNA copy number alterations, we confirmed, or discovered, miRNAs with comprehensive roles in cancer. Finally, we experimentally validated the miRNA network with acute lymphocytic leukemia originated in Mir155 transgenic mice. Most of miRNAs deregulated in these transgenic mice were located close to hsa-miR-155 in the cancer network.

  4. Reprogramming of miRNA networks in cancer and leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Volinia, Stefano; Galasso, Marco; Costinean, Stefan; Tagliavini, Luca; Gamberoni, Giacomo; Drusco, Alessandra; Marchesini, Jlenia; Mascellani, Nicoletta; Sana, Maria Elena; Abu Jarour, Ramzey; Desponts, Caroline; Teitell, Michael; Baffa, Raffaele; Aqeilan, Rami; Iorio, Marilena V.; Taccioli, Cristian; Garzon, Ramiro; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Fabbri, Muller; Catozzi, Marco; Previati, Maurizio; Ambs, Stefan; Palumbo, Tiziana; Garofalo, Michela; Veronese, Angelo; Bottoni, Arianna; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Harris, Curtis C.; Visone, Rosa; Pekarsky, Yuri; de la Chapelle, Albert; Bloomston, Mark; Dillhoff, Mary; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Huebner, Kay; Pichiorri, Flavia; Lenze, Dido; Cairo, Stefano; Buendia, Marie-Annick; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Zanesi, Nicola; Rossi, Simona; Calin, George A.; Liu, Chang-Gong; Palatini, Jeff; Negrini, Massimo; Vecchione, Andrea; Rosenberg, Anne; Croce, Carlo M.

    2010-01-01

    We studied miRNA profiles in 4419 human samples (3312 neoplastic, 1107 nonmalignant), corresponding to 50 normal tissues and 51 cancer types. The complexity of our database enabled us to perform a detailed analysis of microRNA (miRNA) activities. We inferred genetic networks from miRNA expression in normal tissues and cancer. We also built, for the first time, specialized miRNA networks for solid tumors and leukemias. Nonmalignant tissues and cancer networks displayed a change in hubs, the most connected miRNAs. hsa-miR-103/106 were downgraded in cancer, whereas hsa-miR-30 became most prominent. Cancer networks appeared as built from disjointed subnetworks, as opposed to normal tissues. A comparison of these nets allowed us to identify key miRNA cliques in cancer. We also investigated miRNA copy number alterations in 744 cancer samples, at a resolution of 150 kb. Members of miRNA families should be similarly deleted or amplified, since they repress the same cellular targets and are thus expected to have similar impacts on oncogenesis. We correctly identified hsa-miR-17/92 family as amplified and the hsa-miR-143/145 cluster as deleted. Other miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-30 and hsa-miR-204, were found to be physically altered at the DNA copy number level as well. By combining differential expression, genetic networks, and DNA copy number alterations, we confirmed, or discovered, miRNAs with comprehensive roles in cancer. Finally, we experimentally validated the miRNA network with acute lymphocytic leukemia originated in Mir155 transgenic mice. Most of miRNAs deregulated in these transgenic mice were located close to hsa-miR-155 in the cancer network. PMID:20439436

  5. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-05-05

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10(-8)) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas).

  6. Exosomes as miRNA Carriers: Formation–Function–Future

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaojie; Odenthal, Margarete; Fries, Jochen W. U.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes, which are one of the smallest extracellular vesicles released from cells, have been shown to carry different nucleic acids, including microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs significantly regulate cell growth and metabolism by posttranscriptional inhibition of gene expression. The rapidly changing understanding of exosomes’ formation and function in delivering miRNAs from cell to cell has prompted us to review current knowledge in exosomal miRNA secretion mechanisms as well as possible therapeutic applications for personalized medicine. PMID:27918449

  7. Exploration of miRNA families for hypotheses generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanu, Timothy K. K.; Radovanovic, Aleksandar; Archer, John A. C.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2013-10-01

    Technological improvements have resulted in increased discovery of new microRNAs (miRNAs) and refinement and enrichment of existing miRNA families. miRNA families are important because they suggest a common sequence or structure configuration in sets of genes that hint to a shared function. Exploratory tools to enhance investigation of characteristics of miRNA families and the functions of family-specific miRNA genes are lacking. We have developed, miRNAVISA, a user-friendly web-based tool that allows customized interrogation and comparisons of miRNA families for hypotheses generation, and comparison of per-species chromosomal distribution of miRNA genes in different families. This study illustrates hypothesis generation using miRNAVISA in seven species. Our results unveil a subclass of miRNAs that may be regulated by genomic imprinting, and also suggest that some miRNA families may be species-specific, as well as chromosome- and/or strand-specific.

  8. miRNA expression during prickly pear cactus fruit development.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Cárdenas, Flor de Fátima; Caballero-Pérez, Juan; Gutiérrez-Ramos, Ximena; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; Cruz-Hernández, Andrés; de Folter, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. They are involved in the control of many developmental processes, including fruit development. The increasing amount of information on miRNAs, on their expression, abundance, and conservation between various species, provides a new opportunity to study the role of miRNAs in non-model plant species. In this work, we used a combination of Northern blot and tissue print hybridization analysis to identify conserved miRNAs expressed during prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica) fruit development. Comparative profiling detected the expression of 34 miRNAs, which were clustered in three different groups that were associated with the different phases of fruit development. Variation in the level of miRNA expression was observed. Gradual expression increase of several miRNAs was observed during fruit development, including miR164. miR164 was selected for stem-loop RT-PCR and for a detailed spatial-temporal expression analysis. At early floral stages, miR164 was mainly localized in meristematic tissues, boundaries and fusion zones, while it was more homogenously expressed in fruit tissues. Our results provide the first evidence of miRNA expression in the prickly pear cactus and provide the basis for future research on miRNAs in Opuntia. Moreover, our analyses suggest that miR164 plays different roles during prickly pear cactus fruit development.

  9. miRNAs: roles and clinical applications in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jamaluddin, Md Saha; Weakley, Sarah M; Zhang, Lidong; Kougias, Panagiotis; Lin, Peter H; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2011-01-01

    miRNAs are small, endogenously expressed noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression, mainly at the post-transcriptional level, via degradation or translational inhibition of their target mRNAs. Functionally, an individual miRNA can regulate the expression of multiple target genes. The study of miRNAs is rapidly growing and recent studies have revealed a significant role of miRNAs in vascular biology and disease. Many miRNAs are highly expressed in the vasculature, and their expression is dysregulated in diseased vessels. Several miRNAs have been found to be critical modulators of vascular pathologies, such as atherosclerosis, lipoprotein metabolism, inflammation, arterial remodeling, angiogenesis, smooth muscle cell regeneration, hypertension, apoptosis, neointimal hyperplasia and signal transduction pathways. Thus, miRNAs may serve as novel biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for vascular disease. This article summarizes the current studies related to the disease correlations and functional roles of miRNAs in the vascular system and discusses the potential applications of miRNAs in vascular disease.

  10. Comparative analysis of known miRNAs across platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoliang; Lu, Lixia; Su, Hailong; Lou, Zhongzi; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yadong; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2013-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a subtype of small regulatory RNAs that are involved in numerous biological processes through small RNA-induced silencing networks. In an attempt to explore the phylogeny of miRNAs across five platyhelminths, we integrated annotated miRNAs and their full genomes. We identified conserved miRNA clusters and, in particular, miR-71/2 was conserved from planarian to parasitic flatworms and was expanded in free-living Schmidtea mediterranea. Analysis of 22 miRNA loci provided compelling evidence that most known miRNAs are conserved across platyhelminths. Meanwhile, we also observed alterations of known protein-coding genes flanking miRNA(s), such as transcriptional direction conversion and locus relocation, in around ~ 41% of 22 known miRNA loci. Compared with Echinococcus multilocularis, the majority of these events occurred in evolution-distant Hymenolepis microstoma, Schistosoma japonicum or/and S. mediterranea. These results imply rearrangement events occurred near the known miRNA loci.

  11. miRNAs as biomarkers of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Gomes da Silva, Ananília Medeiros; Silbiger, Vivian Nogueira

    2014-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a highly prevalent arrhythmia with pronounced morbidity and mortality. Genetics analysis has established electrophysiological substrates, which determine individual vulnerability to AF occurrence and maintenance. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) found in virtually all organisms function as negative regulators of protein-coding genes. Several studies have suggested a role for miRNAs in the regulation of cardiac excitability and arrhythmogenesis. This review is based on 18 studies conducted between 2009 and 2013 to investigate the association of miRNAs with AF. miRNAs are discussed here as candidate biomarkers for AF in blood and cardiac tissues and as potential targets for AF therapy.

  12. Methylation of miRNA genes and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Loginov, V I; Rykov, S V; Fridman, M V; Braga, E A

    2015-02-01

    Interaction between microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA of target genes at the posttranscriptional level provides fine-tuned dynamic regulation of cell signaling pathways. Each miRNA can be involved in regulating hundreds of protein-coding genes, and, conversely, a number of different miRNAs usually target a structural gene. Epigenetic gene inactivation associated with methylation of promoter CpG-islands is common to both protein-coding genes and miRNA genes. Here, data on functions of miRNAs in development of tumor-cell phenotype are reviewed. Genomic organization of promoter CpG-islands of the miRNA genes located in inter- and intragenic areas is discussed. The literature and our own results on frequency of CpG-island methylation in miRNA genes from tumors are summarized, and data regarding a link between such modification and changed activity of miRNA genes and, consequently, protein-coding target genes are presented. Moreover, the impact of miRNA gene methylation on key oncogenetic processes as well as affected signaling pathways is discussed.

  13. Rapid divergence and high diversity of miRNAs and miRNA targets in the Camelineae.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lisa M; Burbano, Hernán A; Wang, Xi; Fitz, Joffrey; Wang, George; Ural-Blimke, Yonca; Weigel, Detlef

    2015-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNAs involved in gene regulation through translational inhibition and transcript cleavage. After processing from imperfect fold-back structures, miRNAs are incorporated into RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) before targeting transcripts with varying degrees of complementarity. Some miRNAs are evolutionarily deep-rooted, and sequence complementarity with their targets is maintained through purifying selection. Both Arabidopsis and Capsella belong to the tribe Camelineae in the Brassicaceae, with Capsella rubella serving as an outgroup to the genus Arabidopsis. The genome sequence of C. rubella has recently been released, which allows characterization of its miRNA complement in comparison with Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. Through next-generation sequencing, we identify high-confidence miRNA candidates specific to the C. rubella lineage. Only a few lineage-specific miRNAs have been studied for evolutionary constraints, and there have been no systematic studies of miRNA target diversity within or divergence between closely related plant species. Therefore we contrast sequence variation in miRNAs and their targets within A. thaliana, and between A. thaliana, A. lyrata and C. rubella. We document a surprising amount of small-scale variation in miRNA-target pairs, where many miRNAs are predicted to have species-specific targets in addition to ones that are shared between species. Our results emphasize that the transitive nature of many miRNA-target pairs can be observed even on a relatively short evolutionary time-scale, with non-random occurrences of differences in miRNAs and their complements in the miRNA precursors, the miRNA* sequences.

  14. Influence of papermill sludge on growth of Medicago sativa, Festuca rubra and Agropyron trachycaulum in gold mine tailings: a greenhouse study.

    PubMed

    Green, Scott; Renault, Sylvie

    2008-02-01

    A greenhouse study was undertaken to determine the suitability of adding papermill sludge to neutral/alkaline gold mine tailings to improve the establishment of Festuca rubra, Agropyron trachycaulum and Medicago sativa. Festuca rubra root and shoot biomass and A. Trachycaulum shoot biomass were increased with papermill sludge amendment. The addition of papermill sludge and fertilizer drastically increased the shoot and root biomass of M. sativa (20-30 times) while A. trachycaulum and F. rubra showed a more moderate increase in growth. Photosynthetic pigment content of the leaves was higher in papermill sludge treatments than in the treatments without papermill sludge. The organic carbon content, macro-aggregate content and field capacity of the gold mine tailings were increased while the bulk density was decreased by the addition of papermill sludge. This study suggests that addition of papermill sludge and adequate fertilization can alleviate some of the adverse conditions of neutral/alkaline gold mine tailings.

  15. Comprehensive expression analysis of miRNA in breast cancer at the miRNA and isomiR levels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianjin; Zeng, Rong; Wu, Shaoke; Zhong, Jixin; Yang, Lawei; Xu, Junfa

    2015-02-25

    Breast cancer (BC) is the main factor that leads cause of cancer death in women worldwide. A class of small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), has been widely studied in human cancers as crucial regulatory molecule. Recent studies indicate that a series of isomiRs can be yielded from a miRNA locus, and these physiological miRNA isoforms have versatile roles in miRNA biogenesis. Herein, we performed a comprehensive analysis of miRNAs at the miRNA and isomiR levels in BC using next-generation sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Abnormally expressed miRNA (miR-21, miR-221, miR-155, miR-30e and miR-25) and isomiR profiles could be obtained at the miRNA and isomiR levels, and similar biological roles could be detected. IsomiR expression profiles should be further concerned, and especially isomiRs are actual regulatory molecules in the miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks. The study provides a comprehensive expression analysis at the miRNA and isomiR levels in BC, which indicates biological roles of isomiRs.

  16. Identification of candidate miRNA biomarkers from miRNA regulatory network with application to prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding regulatory RNAs approximately 22 nucleotides in length that play a role in a wide range of biological processes. Abnormal miRNA function has been implicated in various human cancers including prostate cancer (PCa). Altered miRNA expression may serve as a biomarker for cancer diagnosis and treatment. However, limited data are available on the role of cancer-specific miRNAs. Integrative computational bioinformatics approaches are effective for the detection of potential outlier miRNAs in cancer. Methods The human miRNA-mRNA target network was reconstructed by integrating multiple miRNA-mRNA interaction datasets. Paired miRNA and mRNA expression profiling data in PCa versus benign prostate tissue samples were used as another source of information. These datasets were analyzed with an integrated bioinformatics framework to identify potential PCa miRNA signatures. In vitro q-PCR experiments and further systematic analysis were used to validate these prediction results. Results Using this bioinformatics framework, we identified 39 miRNAs as potential PCa miRNA signatures. Among these miRNAs, 20 had previously been identified as PCa aberrant miRNAs by low-throughput methods, and 16 were shown to be deregulated in other cancers. In vitro q-PCR experiments verified the accuracy of these predictions. miR-648 was identified as a novel candidate PCa miRNA biomarker. Further functional and pathway enrichment analysis confirmed the association of the identified miRNAs with PCa progression. Conclusions Our analysis revealed the scale-free features of the human miRNA-mRNA interaction network and showed the distinctive topological features of existing cancer miRNA biomarkers from previously published studies. A novel cancer miRNA biomarker prediction framework was designed based on these observations and applied to prostate cancer study. This method could be applied for miRNA biomarker prediction in other cancers. PMID

  17. A Comprehensive Prescription for Plant miRNA Identification

    PubMed Central

    Alptekin, Burcu; Akpinar, Bala A.; Budak, Hikmet

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are tiny ribo-regulatory molecules involved in various essential pathways for persistence of cellular life, such as development, environmental adaptation, and stress response. In recent years, miRNAs have become a major focus in molecular biology because of their functional and diagnostic importance. This interest in miRNA research has resulted in the development of many specific software and pipelines for the identification of miRNAs and their specific targets, which is the key for the elucidation of miRNA-modulated gene expression. While the well-recognized importance of miRNAs in clinical research pushed the emergence of many useful computational identification approaches in animals, available software and pipelines are fewer for plants. Additionally, existing approaches suffers from mis-identification and annotation of plant miRNAs since the miRNA mining process for plants is highly prone to false-positives, particularly in cereals which have a highly repetitive genome. Our group developed a homology-based in silico miRNA identification approach for plants, which utilizes two Perl scripts “SUmirFind” and “SUmirFold” and since then, this method helped identify many miRNAs particularly from crop species such as Triticum or Aegliops. Herein, we describe a comprehensive updated guideline by the implementation of two new scripts, “SUmirPredictor” and “SUmirLocator,” and refinements to our previous method in order to identify genuine miRNAs with increased sensitivity in consideration of miRNA identification problems in plants. Recent updates enable our method to provide more reliable and precise results in an automated fashion in addition to solutions for elimination of most false-positive predictions, miRNA naming and miRNA mis-annotation. It also provides a comprehensive view to genome/transcriptome-wide location of miRNA precursors as well as their association with transposable elements. The “SUmirPredictor” and

  18. Expression profiles of miRNAs in Gossypium raimondii *

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Guo, Teng-long; Wang, Qing-lian; Wang, Kun-bo; Sun, Run-run; Zhang, Bao-hong

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs are a class of conserved, small, endogenous, and non-protein-coding RNA molecules with 20–24 nucleotides (nt) in length that function as post-transcriptional modulators of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Functional studies have demonstrated that plant miRNAs are involved in the regulation of a wide range of plant developmental processes. To date, however, no research has been carried out to study the expression profiles of miRNAs in Gossypium raimondii, a model cotton species. We selected 16 miRNAs to profile their tissue-specific expression patterns in G. raimondii four different tissues, and these miRNAs are reported to play important roles in plant growth and development. Our results showed that the expression levels of these miRNAs varied significantly from one to another in a tissue-dependent manner. Eight miRNAs, including miR-159, miR-162, miR-164, miR-172, miR-390, miR-395, miR-397, and miR-398, exhibited exclusively high expression levels in flower buds, suggesting that these miRNAs may play significant roles in floral development. The expression level of miR-164 was relatively high in shoots beside flower buds, implying that the function of miR-164 is not only limited to floral development but it may also play an important role in shoot development. Certain miRNAs such as miR-166 and miR-160 were extremely highly expressed in all of the four tissues tested compared with other miRNAs investigated, suggesting that they may play regulatory roles at multiple development stages. This study will contribute to future studies on the functional characterization of miRNAs in cotton. PMID:25845363

  19. Co-expressed miRNAs in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Sally; López, Rocío; Andrade, Rafael E; Rodriguez-Urrego, Paula A; López-Kleine, Liliana; Torres, Maria Mercedes

    2016-08-01

    Co-expression networks may provide insights into the patterns of molecular interactions that underlie cellular processes. To obtain a better understanding of miRNA expression patterns in gastric adenocarcinoma and to provide markers that can be associated with histopathological findings, we performed weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA) and compare it with a supervised analysis. Integrative analysis of target predictions and miRNA expression profiles in gastric cancer samples was also performed. WGCNA identified a module of co-expressed miRNAs that were associated with histological traits and tumor condition. Hub genes were identified based on statistical analysis and network centrality. The miRNAs 100, let-7c, 125b and 99a stood out for their association with the diffuse histological subtype. The 181 miRNA family and miRNA 21 highlighted for their association with the tumoral phenotype. The integrated analysis of miRNA and gene expression profiles showed the let-7 miRNA family playing a central role in the regulatory relationships.

  20. miRNA Control of Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.; Ghatak, Subhadip

    2016-01-01

    Tissue repair and regeneration rely on the function of miRNA, molecular silencers that enact post-transcriptional gene silencing of coding genes. Disruption of miRNA homeostasis is developmentally lethal, indicating that fetal tissue development is tightly controlled by miRNAs. Multiple critical facets of adult tissue repair are subject to control by miRNAs, as well. Sources of cell pool for tissue repair and regeneration are diverse and provided by processes including cellular dedifferentiation, transdifferentiation, and reprogramming. Each of these processes is regulated by miRNAs. Furthermore, induced pluripotency may be achieved by miRNA-based strategies independent of transcription factor manipulation. The observation that miRNA does not integrate into the genome makes miRNA-based therapeutic strategies translationally valuable. Tools to manipulate cellular and tissue miRNA levels include mimics and inhibitors that may be specifically targeted to cells of interest at the injury site. Here, we discuss the extraordinary importance of miRNAs in tissue repair and regeneration based on emergent reports and rapid advances in miRNA-based therapeutics. PMID:26056933

  1. miRNA Regulation of Immune Tolerance in Early Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schjenken, John E; Zhang, Bihong; Chan, Hon Y; Sharkey, David J; Fullston, Tod; Robertson, Sarah A

    2016-03-01

    To support embryo implantation, the female reproductive tract must provide a tolerogenic immune environment. Seminal fluid contact at conception contributes to activating the endometrial gene expression and immune cell changes required for robust implantation, influencing not only the quality of the ensuing pregnancy but also the health of offspring. miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play important regulatory roles in biological processes, including regulation of the immune environment. miRNAs are known to contribute to gene regulation in pregnancy and are altered in pregnancy pathologies. Recent studies indicate that miRNAs participate in establishing immune tolerance at conception, and may contribute to the regulatory effects of seminal fluid in generating tolerogenic dendritic cells and T regulatory cells. This review highlights those miRNAs implicated in programming immune cells that are critical during the peri-conception period and explores how seminal fluid may regulate female tract miRNA expression following coitus.

  2. Modulation of Host miRNAs by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kishore; Garnica, Omar; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of protein coding genes of viruses and eukaryotes at the post-transcriptional level. The eukaryotic genes regulated by miRNAs include those whose products are critical for biological processes such as cell proliferation, metabolic pathways, immune response, and development. It is now increasingly recognized that modulation of miRNAs associated with biological processes is one of the strategies adopted by bacterial pathogens to survive inside host cells. In this review, we present an overview of the recent findings on alterations of miRNAs in the host cells by facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. In addition, we discuss how the altered miRNAs help in the survival of these pathogens in the intracellular environment. PMID:27536558

  3. Small RNA zippers lock miRNA molecules and block miRNA function in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingyu; Liu, Cuicui; Lü, Jinhui; Zhao, Qian; Deng, Shengqiong; Wang, Guangxue; Qiao, Jing; Zhang, Chuyi; Zhen, Lixiao; Lu, Ying; Li, Wenshu; Zhang, Yuzhen; Pestell, Richard G.; Fan, Huiming; Chen, Yi-Han; Liu, Zhongmin; Yu, Zuoren

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) loss-of-function phenotypes are mainly induced by chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides. Here we develop an alternative inhibitor for miRNAs, termed ‘small RNA zipper'. It is designed to connect miRNA molecules end to end, forming a DNA–RNA duplex through a complementary interaction with high affinity, high specificity and high stability. Two miRNAs, miR-221 and miR-17, are tested in human breast cancer cell lines, demonstrating the 70∼90% knockdown of miRNA levels by 30–50 nM small RNA zippers. The miR-221 zipper shows capability in rescuing the expression of target genes of miR-221 and reversing the oncogenic function of miR-221 in breast cancer cells. In addition, we demonstrate that the miR-221 zipper attenuates doxorubicin resistance with higher efficiency than anti-miR-221 in human breast cancer cells. Taken together, small RNA zippers are a miRNA inhibitor, which can be used to induce miRNA loss-of-function phenotypes and validate miRNA target genes. PMID:28045030

  4. A Toolbox for Herpesvirus miRNA Research: Construction of a Complete Set of KSHV miRNA Deletion Mutants.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vaibhav; Plaisance-Bonstaff, Karlie; Sangani, Rajnikumar; Lanier, Curtis; Dolce, Alexander; Hu, Jianhong; Brulois, Kevin; Haecker, Irina; Turner, Peter; Renne, Rolf; Krueger, Brian

    2016-02-19

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes 12 viral microRNAs (miRNAs) that are expressed during latency. Research into KSHV miRNA function has suffered from a lack of genetic systems to study viral miRNA mutations in the context of the viral genome. We used the Escherichia coli Red recombination system together with a new bacmid background, BAC16, to create mutants for all known KSHV miRNAs. The specific miRNA deletions or mutations and the integrity of the bacmids have been strictly quality controlled using PCR, restriction digestion, and sequencing. In addition, stable viral producer cell lines based on iSLK cells have been created for wildtype KSHV, for 12 individual miRNA knock-out mutants (ΔmiR-K12-1 through -12), and for mutants deleted for 10 of 12 (ΔmiR-cluster) or all 12 miRNAs (ΔmiR-all). NGS, in combination with SureSelect technology, was employed to sequence the entire latent genome within all producer cell lines. qPCR assays were used to verify the expression of the remaining viral miRNAs in a subset of mutants. Induction of the lytic cycle leads to efficient production of progeny viruses that have been used to infect endothelial cells. Wt BAC16 and miR mutant iSLK producer cell lines are now available to the research community.

  5. Integrating miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiling Uncovers miRNAs Underlying Fat Deposition in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangxian; Wang, Xiaolong; Yuan, Chao; Kang, Danju; Xu, Xiaochun; Zhou, Jiping; Geng, Rongqing; Yang, Yuxin; Yang, Zhaoxia

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, noncoding RNAs that regulate various biological processes including adipogenesis and fat metabolism. Here, we adopted a deep sequencing approach to determine the identity and abundance of miRNAs involved in fat deposition in adipose tissues from fat-tailed (Kazakhstan sheep, KS) and thin-tailed (Tibetan sheep, TS) sheep breeds. By comparing HiSeq data of these two breeds, 539 miRNAs were shared in both breeds, whereas 179 and 97 miRNAs were uniquely expressed in KS and TS, respectively. We also identified 35 miRNAs that are considered to be putative novel miRNAs. The integration of miRNA-mRNA analysis revealed that miRNA-associated targets were mainly involved in the gene ontology (GO) biological processes concerning cellular process and metabolic process, and miRNAs play critical roles in fat deposition through their ability to regulate fundamental pathways. These pathways included the MAPK signaling pathway, FoxO and Wnt signaling pathway, and focal adhesion. Taken together, our results define miRNA expression signatures that may contribute to fat deposition and lipid metabolism in sheep. PMID:28293627

  6. Phytoalexins, miRNAs and breast cancer: a review of phytochemical mediated miRNA regulation in breast cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A specific class of endogenous, non-coding RNAs, classified as microRNAs (miRNAs), has been identified. It has been found that miRNAs are associated with many biological processes and disease states, including all stages of cancer from initiation to tumor promotion and progression. These studies d...

  7. Integrating miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiling Uncovers miRNAs Underlying Fat Deposition in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangxian; Wang, Xiaolong; Yuan, Chao; Kang, Danju; Xu, Xiaochun; Zhou, Jiping; Geng, Rongqing; Yang, Yuxin; Yang, Zhaoxia; Chen, Yulin

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, noncoding RNAs that regulate various biological processes including adipogenesis and fat metabolism. Here, we adopted a deep sequencing approach to determine the identity and abundance of miRNAs involved in fat deposition in adipose tissues from fat-tailed (Kazakhstan sheep, KS) and thin-tailed (Tibetan sheep, TS) sheep breeds. By comparing HiSeq data of these two breeds, 539 miRNAs were shared in both breeds, whereas 179 and 97 miRNAs were uniquely expressed in KS and TS, respectively. We also identified 35 miRNAs that are considered to be putative novel miRNAs. The integration of miRNA-mRNA analysis revealed that miRNA-associated targets were mainly involved in the gene ontology (GO) biological processes concerning cellular process and metabolic process, and miRNAs play critical roles in fat deposition through their ability to regulate fundamental pathways. These pathways included the MAPK signaling pathway, FoxO and Wnt signaling pathway, and focal adhesion. Taken together, our results define miRNA expression signatures that may contribute to fat deposition and lipid metabolism in sheep.

  8. miRNA and mRNA expression analysis reveals potential sex-biased miRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Zhang, Qiang; Ma, Xiao; Wang, Jun; Liang, Tingming

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that mRNAs may be differentially expressed between males and females. This study aimed to perform expression analysis of mRNA and its main regulatory molecule, microRNA (miRNA), to discuss the potential sex-specific expression patterns using abnormal expression profiles from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Generally, deregulated miRNAs and mRNAs had consistent expression between males and females, but some miRNAs may be oppositely expressed in specific diseases: up-regulated in one group and down-regulated in another. Studies of miRNA gene families and clusters further confirmed that these sequence or location related miRNAs might have opposing expression between sexes. The specific miRNA might have greater expression divergence across different groups, suggesting flexible expression across different individuals, especially in tumor samples. The typical analysis regardless of the sex will ignore or balance these sex-specific deregulated miRNAs. Compared with flexible miRNAs, their targets of mRNAs showed relative stable expression between males and females. These relevant results provide new insights into miRNA-mRNA interaction and sex difference. PMID:28045090

  9. Identifying, cloning and structural analysis of differentially expressed genes upon Puccinia infection of Festuca rubra var. rubra.

    PubMed

    Ergen, Neslihan Z; Dinler, Gizem; Shearman, Robert C; Budak, Hikmet

    2007-05-15

    Differentially expressed genes in response to rust infection (Puccinia sp.) in creeping red fescue (Festuca rubra var. rubra) were identified and quantified using the mRNA differential display technique. The differentially induced genes were identified as homologs of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 3 of Arabidopsis thaliana, stem rust resistance protein Rpg1 of barley and Hsp70 of Spinacia oleracea. The change in the steady state expression levels of these genes in response to rust infection was tested by Northern blot analysis and further quantified by real-time PCR. A steady accumulation of transcripts in the course of rust infection was observed. Full-length transcript of a fescue MPK-3 was obtained by RACE PCR. Its corresponding cDNA encodes a protein with a predicted MW of 42.5 kDa which was mapped onto the structural model of homologs MAPK to illustrate the corresponding MAPK signature motifs. This study, for the first time, presents evidence on the rust infection dependent metabolic pathways in creeping red fescue.

  10. Expression and function analysis of the metallothionein-like (MT-like) gene from Festuca rubra in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Han, SiHai; Hu, ZhangLi; Lei, AnPing

    2008-12-01

    The cDNA of the metallothionein-like (MT-like) gene from Festuca rubra cv. Merlin was optimized with bias codon of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast genome. The optimized MT-like gene was delivered into C. reinhardtii chloroplast and the transgenic strains expressing MT-like gene was obtained. PCR-Southern blot and RT-PCR-Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the MT-like gene was integrated into chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii and expressed at the transcriptional level. The cadmium binding capacity of the transgenic C. reinhardtii was determined by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) and the binding properties were analyzed. Results showed that the transgenic C. reinhardtii expressing the MT-like gene exhibited remarkably higher Cd(2+) binding capacity and grew to higher densities at toxic Cd(2+) concentrations (40-100 micromol/L) than the wild type strain, and that the IC(50) of Cd(2+) (3-d treating) to algal cell growth of transgenic strain was 55.43% higher than that of the wild type strain, indicating that the Cd(2+) binding capacity and Cd(2+) tolerance of C. reinhardtii was enhanced through the expression of the foreign MT-like gene in chloroplast.

  11. Potential for phytoextraction of copper by Sinapis alba and Festuca rubra cv. Merlin grown hydroponically and in vineyard soils.

    PubMed

    Malagoli, Mario; Rossignolo, Virginia; Salvalaggio, Nico; Schiavon, Michela

    2014-03-01

    The extensive use of copper-bearing fungicides in vineyards is responsible for the accumulation of copper (Cu) in soils. Grass species able to accumulate Cu could be cultivated in the vineyard inter-rows for copper phytoextraction. In this study, the capacity of Festuca rubra cv Merlin and Sinapis alba to tolerate and accumulate copper (Cu) was first investigated in a hydroponic system without the interference of soil chemical-physical properties. After the amendment of Cu (5 or 10 mg Cu l-(1)) to nutrient solution, shoot Cu concentration in F. rubra increased up to 108.63 mg Cu kg(-1) DW, more than three times higher than in S. alba (31.56 mg Cu kg(-1) DW). The relationship between Cu concentration in plants and external Cu was dose-dependent and species specific. Results obtained from the hydroponic experiment were confirmed by growing plants in pots containing soil collected from six Italian vineyards. The content of soil organic matter was crucial to enhance Cu tolerance and accumulation in the shoot tissues of both plant species. Although S. alba produced more biomass than F. rubra in most soils, F. rubra accumulated significantly more Cu (up to threefold to fourfold) in the shoots. Given these results, we recommended that F. rubra cv Merlin could be cultivated in the vineyard rows to reduce excess Cu in vineyard soils.

  12. Restoration of regeneration potential of long-term cultures of red fescue (Festuca rubra L.) by elevated sucrose levels.

    PubMed

    Zaghmout, O M; Torello, W A

    1992-04-01

    A tissue culture protocol for restoring embryogenic ability and increasing green plant regeneration from long-term callus (5-year old) and suspension cultures of "Dawson" red fescue (Festuca rubra var trichyoplylla Gaud) was developed. Pretreatment with elevated levels of sucrose over the standard level (60 mM) enhanced regeneration capacity and decreased the number of albino plants. The highest degree of embryogenesis and green shoot number occurred when calli were pre-treated on MS basal medium supplemented with 120 mM sucrose. Mannitol caused callus discoloration and death if added to pre-treatment media at 60, 90, 120, 150 or 180 mM. Cell suspension growth was greatest when 135 mM sucrose was added to the pre-treatment growth media. High concentrations of sucrose (135 and 180 mM) were necessary for plant regeneration from suspension aggregates pretreated with 135 or 180 mM sucrose and then plated on a growth regulator-free regeneration medium composed of half-strength MS salts and B5 vitamins.

  13. [The role of miRNA in endometrial cancer in the context of miRNA 205].

    PubMed

    Wilczyński, Miłosz; Danielska, Justyna; Dzieniecka, Monika; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2015-11-01

    MiRNAs are small, non-coding molecules of ribonucleic acids of approximately 22 bp length, which serve as regulators of gene expression and protein translation due to interference with messenger RNA (mRNA). MiRNAs, which take part in the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis, may be associated with carcinogenesis. Aberrant expression of miRNAs in endometrial cancer might contribute to the endometrial cancer initiation or progression, as well as metastasis formation, and may influence cancer invasiveness. Specific-miRNAs expressed in endometrial cancer tissues may serve as diagnostic markers of the disease, prognostic biomarkers, or play an important part in oncological therapy We aimed to describe the role of miRNAs in endometrial cancer with special consideration of miRNA 205.

  14. GeneSet2miRNA: finding the signature of cooperative miRNA activities in the gene lists

    PubMed Central

    Antonov, Alexey V.; Dietmann, Sabine; Wong, Philip; Lutter, Dominik; Mewes, Hans W.

    2009-01-01

    GeneSet2miRNA is the first web-based tool which is able to identify whether or not a gene list has a signature of miRNA-regulatory activity. As input, GeneSet2miRNA accepts a list of genes. As output, a list of miRNA-regulatory models is provided. A miRNA-regulatory model is a group of miRNAs (single, pair, triplet or quadruplet) that is predicted to regulate a significant subset of genes from the submitted list. GeneSet2miRNA provides a user friendly dialog-driven web page submission available for several model organisms. GeneSet2miRNA is freely available at http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/proj/gene2mir/. PMID:19420064

  15. Protocol for miRNA isolation from biofluids.

    PubMed

    Lekchnov, Evgeny A; Zaporozhchenko, Ivan A; Morozkin, Evgeny S; Bryzgunova, Olga E; Vlassov, Valentin V; Laktionov, Pavel P

    2016-04-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as promising biomarkers in cancer and other diseases. Packaging of miRNAs into vesicles and complexes with proteins ensures their stability in biological fluids but also complicates their isolation. Conventional protocols used to isolate cell-free RNA are generally successful in overcoming these difficulties; however, they are costly, labor-intensive, or heavily reliant on the use of hazardous chemicals. Here we describe a protocol that is suitable for isolating miRNAs from biofluids, including blood plasma and urine. The protocol is based on precipitation of proteins, denaturation of miRNA-containing complexes with octanoic acid and guanidine isothiocyanate, and subsequent purification of miRNA on spin columns. The efficacy of miRNA extraction by phenol-chloroform extraction, miRCURY RNA isolation kit--biofluids (Exiqon), and the proposed protocol was compared by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR of miR-16 and miR-126. The proposed protocol was slightly more effective for isolating miRNA from plasma and significantly superior to the other two methods for miRNA isolation from urine. Spectrophotometry and SDS-PAGE data suggest that the disparity in performance between miRCURY Biofluids and the proposed protocol can be attributed to differences in precipitation mechanisms, as confirmed by the retention of different proteins in the supernatant.

  16. Crosstalk between kinases, phosphatases and miRNAs in cancer.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Júlia L F; Tornatore, Thaís F; Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin J; de Jesus, Marcelo B; Cartaxo, Rodrigo T; Milani, Renato; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen V

    2014-12-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of proteins, performed by kinases and phosphatases, is the major post translational protein modification in eukaryotic cells. This intracellular event represents a critical regulatory mechanism of several signaling pathways and can be related to a vast array of diseases, including cancer. Cancer research has produced increasing evidence that kinase and phosphatase activity can be compromised by mutations and also by miRNA silencing, performed by small non-coding and endogenously produced RNA molecules that lead to translational repression. miRNAs are believed to target about one-third of human mRNAs while a single miRNA may target about 200 transcripts simultaneously. Regulation of the phosphorylation balance by miRNAs has been a topic of intense research over the last years, spanning topics going as far as cancer aggressiveness and chemotherapy resistance. By addressing recent studies that have shown miRNA expression patterns as phenotypic signatures of cancers and how miRNA influence cellular processes such as apoptosis, cell cycle control, angiogenesis, inflammation and DNA repair, we discuss how kinases, phosphatases and miRNAs cooperatively act in cancer biology.

  17. Investigation of key miRNAs and target genes in bladder cancer using miRNA profiling and bioinformatic tools.

    PubMed

    Canturk, Kemal Murat; Ozdemir, Muhsin; Can, Cavit; Öner, Setenay; Emre, Ramazan; Aslan, Huseyin; Cilingir, Oguz; Ciftci, Evrim; Celayir, Fatih Mehmet; Aldemir, Ozgur; Özen, Mustafa; Artan, Sevilhan

    2014-12-01

    Despite the association of several miRNAs with bladder cancer, little is known about the miRNAs' regulatory networks. In this study, we aimed to construct potential networks of bladder-cancer-related miRNAs and their known target genes using miRNA expression profiling and bioinformatics tools and to investigate potential key molecules that might play roles in bladder cancer regulatory networks. Global miRNA expression profiles were obtained using microarray followed by RT-qPCR validation using two randomly selected miRNAs. Known targets of deregulated miRNAs were utilized using DIANA-TarBase database v6.0. The incorporation of deregulated miRNAs and target genes into KEGG pathways were utilized using DIANA-mirPath software. To construct potential miRNA regulatory networks, the overlapping parts of three selected KEGG pathways were visualized by Cytoscape software. We finally gained 19 deregulated miRNAs, including 5 ups- and 14 down regulated in 27 bladder-cancer tissue samples and 8 normal urothelial tissue samples. The enrichment results of deregulated miRNAs and known target genes showed that most pathways were related to cancer or cell signaling pathways. We determined the hub CDK6, BCL2, E2F3, PTEN, MYC, RB, and ERBB3 target genes and hub hsa-let-7c, hsa-miR-195-5p, hsa-miR-141-3p, hsa-miR-26a-5p, hsa-miR-23b-3p, and hsa-miR-125b-5p miRNAs of the constructed networks. These findings provide new insights into the bladder cancer regulatory networks and give us a hypothesis that hsa-let-7c, hsa-miR-195-5p, and hsa-miR-125b-5p, along with CDK4 and CDK6 genes might exist in the same bladder cancer pathway. Particularly, hub miRNAs and genes might be potential biomarkers for bladder cancer clinics.

  18. Assay Reproducibility in Clinical Studies of Plasma miRNA

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Jonathan; Roberts, Henry; Burton, James; Pan, Jianmin; States, Vanessa; Rai, Shesh N.; Galandiuk, Susan

    2015-01-01

    There are increasing reports of plasma miRNAs as biomarkers of human disease but few standards in methodologic reporting, leading to inconsistent data. We systematically reviewed plasma miRNA studies published between July 2013-June 2014 to assess methodology. Six parameters were investigated: time to plasma extraction, methods of RNA extraction, type of miRNA, quantification, cycle threshold (Ct) setting, and methods of statistical analysis. We compared these data with a proposed standard methodologic technique. Beginning with initial screening for 380 miRNAs using microfluidic array technology and validation in an additional cohort of patients, we compared 11 miRNAs that exhibited differential expression between 16 patients with benign colorectal neoplasms (advanced adenomas) and 16 patients without any neoplasm (controls). Plasma was isolated immediately, 12, 24, 48, or 72 h following phlebotomy. miRNA was extracted using two different techniques (Trizol LS with pre-amplification or modified miRNeasy). We performed Taqman-based RT-PCR assays for the 11 miRNAs with subsequent analyses using a variable Ct setting or a fixed Ct set at 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, or 0.5. Assays were performed in duplicate by two different operators. RNU6 was the internal reference. Systematic review yielded 74 manuscripts meeting inclusion criteria. One manuscript (1.4%) documented all 6 methodological parameters, while < 5% of studies listed Ct setting. In our proposed standard technique, plasma extraction ≤12 h provided consistent ΔCt. miRNeasy extraction yielded higher miRNA concentrations and fewer non-expressed miRNAs compared to Trizol LS (1/704 miRNAs [0.14%] vs 109/704 miRNAs [15%], not expressed, respectively). A fixed Ct bar setting of 0.03 yielded the most reproducible data, provided that <10% miRNA were non-expressed. There was no significant intra-operator variability. There was significant inter-operator variation using Trizol LS extraction, while this was negligible using

  19. miRNA Involved in Six1-Induced Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Summay 3. DATES COVERED 15 April 2010 – 14 April 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER miRNA Involved in Six1-Induced Breast Cancer ...the cell cycle inhibitor, p21, and pro-apoptotic factor , Bim. These data suggest that Six1-induced upregulation of these miRNA may mediate the switch...promoting the pro-metastatic functions. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Six1, miRNAs , miR106b-25, TGFβ , epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), cancer stem cells

  20. Differential expression of microRNA (miRNA) in chordoma reveals a role for miRNA-1 in Met expression.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhenfeng; Choy, Edwin; Nielsen, G Petur; Rosenberg, Andrew; Iafrate, John; Yang, Cao; Schwab, Joe; Mankin, Henry; Xavier, Ramnik; Hornicek, Francis J

    2010-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that microRNA (miRNA) expression signatures in cancer may have important diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic value, but there is no data on miRNA expression in chordoma. The purpose of this study was to identify the role of miRNAs in human chordoma. We analyzed miRNA expression in chordoma-derived cell lines and chordoma tissue by using miRNA microarray technology with unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis. The relative expression levels of these miRNAs were confirmed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis. To characterize the potential role of miRNA-1, miRNA-1 was stably transfected into a chordoma cell line, UCH1. The expression of miRNA-1 targeted gene Met in chordoma tissues was also studied. We observe that human chordoma tissues and cell lines can be distinguished from normal muscle tissue by comparing miRNA expression profiles. Several miRNAs were differentially expressed in chordoma cell lines compared to controls, and similar expression patterns were found in primary chordoma tissues. Importantly, we were able to show for the first time, to our knowledge, that expression of miRNA-1 and miRNA-206, two miRNAs implicated in a number of other cancer types, were markedly decreased in both chordoma tissues and cell lines. When chordoma cell lines were transfected with miRNA-1, downregulation of known miRNA-1 targets was observed. These targets included Met and HDAC4-two genes that were observed to be overexpressed in chordoma. Our results demonstrate that some miRNAs are differentially expressed in chordoma and, in particular, miRNA-1 may have a functional effect on chordoma tumor pathogenesis.

  1. Targeting oncomiRNAs and mimicking tumor suppressor miRNAs: New trends in the development of miRNA therapeutic strategies in oncology (Review)

    PubMed Central

    GAMBARI, ROBERTO; BROGNARA, ELEONORA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; FABBRI, ENRICA

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA or miR) therapeutics in cancer are based on targeting or mimicking miRNAs involved in cancer onset, progression, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis. Several studies conclusively have demonstrated that miRNAs are deeply involved in tumor onset and progression, either behaving as tumor-promoting miRNAs (oncomiRNAs and metastamiRNAs) or as tumor suppressor miRNAs. This review focuses on the most promising examples potentially leading to the development of anticancer, miRNA-based therapeutic protocols. The inhibition of miRNA activity can be readily achieved by the use of miRNA inhibitors and oligomers, including RNA, DNA and DNA analogues (miRNA antisense therapy), small molecule inhibitors, miRNA sponges or through miRNA masking. On the contrary, the enhancement of miRNA function (miRNA replacement therapy) can be achieved by the use of modified miRNA mimetics, such as plasmid or lentiviral vectors carrying miRNA sequences. Combination strategies have been recently developed based on the observation that i) the combined administration of different antagomiR molecules induces greater antitumor effects and ii) some anti-miR molecules can sensitize drug-resistant tumor cell lines to therapeutic drugs. In this review, we discuss two additional issues: i) the combination of miRNA replacement therapy with drug administration and ii) the combination of antagomiR and miRNA replacement therapy. One of the solid results emerging from different independent studies is that miRNA replacement therapy can enhance the antitumor effects of the antitumor drugs. The second important conclusion of the reviewed studies is that the combination of anti-miRNA and miRNA replacement strategies may lead to excellent results, in terms of antitumor effects. PMID:27175518

  2. Identification of targets of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in fulvestrant-resistant breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Sun, Manna; Jiang, Wenhua; Zhao, Jinkun; Liang, Chunyong; Zhang, Huilai

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) regulated by microRNA (miRNA)-221 and miRNA-222 that are associated with the resistance of breast cancer to fulvestrant. The GSE19777 transcription profile was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and includes data from three samples of antisense miRNA-221-transfected fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR breast cancer cells, three samples of antisense miRNA-222-transfected fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR cells and three samples of control inhibitor (green fluorescent protein)-treated fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR cells. The linear models for microarray data package in R/Bioconductor was employed to screen for DEGs in the miRNA-transfected cells, and the pheatmap package in R was used to perform two-way clustering. Pathway enrichment was conducted using the Gene Set Enrichment Analysis tool. Furthermore, a miRNA-messenger (m) RNA regulatory network depicting interactions between miRNA-targeted upregulated DEGs was constructed and visualized using Cytoscape. In total, 492 and 404 DEGs were identified for the antisense miRNA-221-transfected MCF7-FR cells and the antisense miRNA-222-transfected MCF7-FR cells, respectively. Genes of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) were significantly enriched in the antisense miRNA-221-transfected MCF7-FR cells. In addition, components of the Wnt signaling pathway and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) were significantly enriched in the antisense miRNA-222-transfected MCF7-FR cells. In the miRNA-mRNA regulatory network, miRNA-222 was demonstrated to target protocadherin 10 (PCDH10). The results of the present study suggested that the PPP and Wnt signaling pathways, as well as CAMs and PCDH10, may be associated with the resistance of breast cancer to fulvestrant. PMID:27895744

  3. Identification of targets of miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 in fulvestrant-resistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Sun, Manna; Jiang, Wenhua; Zhao, Jinkun; Liang, Chunyong; Zhang, Huilai

    2016-11-01

    The present study aimed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) regulated by microRNA (miRNA)-221 and miRNA-222 that are associated with the resistance of breast cancer to fulvestrant. The GSE19777 transcription profile was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, and includes data from three samples of antisense miRNA-221-transfected fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR breast cancer cells, three samples of antisense miRNA-222-transfected fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR cells and three samples of control inhibitor (green fluorescent protein)-treated fulvestrant-resistant MCF7-FR cells. The linear models for microarray data package in R/Bioconductor was employed to screen for DEGs in the miRNA-transfected cells, and the pheatmap package in R was used to perform two-way clustering. Pathway enrichment was conducted using the Gene Set Enrichment Analysis tool. Furthermore, a miRNA-messenger (m) RNA regulatory network depicting interactions between miRNA-targeted upregulated DEGs was constructed and visualized using Cytoscape. In total, 492 and 404 DEGs were identified for the antisense miRNA-221-transfected MCF7-FR cells and the antisense miRNA-222-transfected MCF7-FR cells, respectively. Genes of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) were significantly enriched in the antisense miRNA-221-transfected MCF7-FR cells. In addition, components of the Wnt signaling pathway and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) were significantly enriched in the antisense miRNA-222-transfected MCF7-FR cells. In the miRNA-mRNA regulatory network, miRNA-222 was demonstrated to target protocadherin 10 (PCDH10). The results of the present study suggested that the PPP and Wnt signaling pathways, as well as CAMs and PCDH10, may be associated with the resistance of breast cancer to fulvestrant.

  4. Transcript profiling of the salt-tolerant Festuca rubra ssp. litoralis reveals a regulatory network controlling salt acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Diédhiou, Calliste J; Popova, Olga V; Golldack, Dortje

    2009-05-01

    We report an analysis of salt-stress responses in the monocotyledonous halophyte Festuca rubra ssp. litoralis. Salt-dependent expression of transcripts encoding a PIP2;1 aquaporin, V-ATPase subunit B, and the Na+/H+ antiporter NHX was characterized. Transcription of FrPIP2;1, FrVHA-B, and FrNHX1 was induced in root tissue of F. rubra ssp. litoralis by salt treatment, and during salt-stress F. rubra ssp. litoralis accumulated sodium in leaves and roots. Cell specificity of FrPIP2;1, FrVHA-B, and FrNHX1 transcription was analyzed by in situ PCR in roots of F. rubra ssp. litoralis. Expression of the genes was localized to the root epidermis, cortex cells, endodermis, and the vascular tissue. In plants treated with 500 mM NaCl, transcripts were repressed in the epidermis and the outer cortex cells, whereas endodermis and vasculature showed strong signals. These data demonstrate that transcriptional regulation of the aquaporin PIP2;1, V-ATPase, and the Na+/H+ antiporter NHX is correlated with salt tolerance in F. rubra ssp. litoralis and suggests coordinated control of ion homeostasis and water status at high salinity in plants. Salt-induced transcript accumulation in F. rubra ssp. litoralis was further monitored by cDNA-arrays with expressed sequence tags derived from a cDNA subtraction library. The salt-regulated transcripts included those involved in the control of gene expression and signal transduction elements such as a serine/threonine protein kinase, an SNF1-related protein kinase, and a WRKY-type transcription factor. Other ESTs with salt-dependent regulation included transcripts encoding proteins that function in metabolism, general stress responses, and defense and transport proteins.

  5. Identifying miRNA synergistic regulatory networks in heterogeneous human data via network motifs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junpeng; Duy Le, Thuc; Liu, Lin; He, Jianfeng; Li, Jiuyong

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the synergism of multiple microRNAs (miRNAs) in gene regulation can provide important insights into the mechanisms of complex human diseases caused by miRNA regulation. Therefore, it is important to identify miRNA synergism and study miRNA characteristics in miRNA synergistic regulatory networks. A number of methods have been proposed to identify miRNA synergism. However, most of the methods only use downstream target genes of miRNAs to infer miRNA synergism when miRNAs can also be regulated by upstream transcription factors (TFs) at the transcriptional level. Additionally, most methods are based on statistical associations identified from data without considering the causal nature of gene regulation. In this paper, we present a causality based framework, called mirSRN (miRNA synergistic regulatory network), to infer miRNA synergism in human molecular systems by considering both downstream miRNA targets and upstream TF regulation. We apply the proposed framework to two real world datasets and discover that almost all the top 10 miRNAs with the largest node degree in the mirSRNs are associated with different human diseases, including cancer, and that the mirSRNs are approximately scale-free and small-world networks. We also find that most miRNAs in the networks are frequently synergistic with other miRNAs, and miRNAs related to the same disease are likely to be synergistic and in a cluster linked to a biological function. Synergistic miRNA pairs show higher co-expression level, and may have potential functional relationships indicating collaboration between the miRNAs. Functional validation of the identified synergistic miRNAs demonstrates that these miRNAs cause different kinds of diseases. These results deepen our understanding of the biological meaning of miRNA synergism.

  6. Implications of miRNAs in Colorectal Cancer Chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jingfang

    2011-01-01

    With the exponential growth of research efforts on non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) in the past decade, miRNAs have been demonstrated to be important in many major human diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Due to the broad regulatory function of miRNAs, alterations of their expression can have profound consequences on multiple critical genes and pathways. One of the major issues related to the success of treating advanced colorectal cancer is chemoresistance. In this review, we will present some of the recent advancements in miRNA research related to chemoresistance mechanisms to 5-FU based chemotherapy in colorectal cancer and cancer stem cells. We believe that this miRNA-mediated resistance mechanism will offer novel strategies to develop future anti-cancer therapies.

  7. Molecular and cellular analysis of the pH response transcription factor PacC in the fungal symbiont Epichloë festucae.

    PubMed

    Lukito, Yonathan; Chujo, Tetsuya; Scott, Barry

    2015-12-01

    In order to survive and adapt to the environment, it is imperative for fungi to be able to sense and respond to changes in extracellular pH conditions. In ascomycetes, sensing of extracellular pH is mediated by the Pal pathway resulting in activation of the PacC transcription factor at alkaline pH. The role of PacC in regulating fungal virulence and pathogenicity has been described in several pathogenic fungi but to date not in a symbiotic fungus. Epichloë festucae is a biotrophic fungal endophyte that forms a stable mutualistic interaction with Lolium perenne. In this study, pacC deletion (ΔpacC) and dominant active (pacC(C)) mutants were generated in order to study the cellular roles of PacC in E. festucae. Deletion of pacC resulted in increased sensitivity of the mutant to salt-stress but surprisingly did not affect the ability of the mutant to grow under alkaline pH conditions. Alkaline pH was observed to induce conidiation in wild-type E. festucae but not in the ΔpacC mutant. On the other hand the pacC(C) mutant had increased conidiation at neutral pH alone. Null pacC mutants had no effect on the symbiotic interaction with ryegrass plants whereas the pacC(C) mutant increased the tiller number. Examination of the growth of the pacC(C) mutant in the plant revealed the formation of aberrant convoluted hyphal structures and an increase in hyphal breakage, which are possible reasons for the altered host interaction phenotype.

  8. Regulation of Bone Formation During Disuse by miRNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Nicholas; Choi, Catherine Y.; Alwood, Joshua S.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts lose bone structure during long-duration spaceflight. These changes are due, in part, to insufficient bone formation by the osteoblast cells. Little is known about the role that small (approximately 22 nucleotide), non-coding micro-RNAs (miRNAs) play in the osteoblast response to microgravity. We hypothesize that osteoblast-lineage cells alter their miRNA status during microgravity exposure, contributing to impaired bone formation during weightlessness. To simulate weightlessness, female mice (C57BL/6, Charles River, 10 weeks of age, n = 6) were hindlimb unloaded for 12 days. Age-matched and normally ambulating mice served as controls (n=6). To assess the expression of miRNAs in skeletal tissue, the right and left tibia of the mice were collected ex vivo and cleaned of soft-tissue and marrow. Total RNA was collected from tibial bone and relative abundance was measured for miRNAs of interest using quantitative real time PCR array looking at 372 unique and well-characterized mature miRNAs using the delta-delta Ct method. Transcripts of interest were normalized to an average of 6 reference RNAs. Preliminary results show that hindlimb unloading decreased the expression of 14 miRNAs to less than 1.4-2.9X control levels and increased the expression of 5 miRNAs relative to the control mice greater than 1-2-1.5X (p less than 0.05, respectively). Using the miRSystem we assessed overlapping target genes predicted to be regulated by multiple members of the 19 differentially expressed miRNAs as well as in silico predicted targets of our individual miRNAs. Our miRSystem results indicated that a number of our differentially expressed miRNAs were regulators of genes related to the Wnt-Beta Catenin pathway-a known regulator of bone health-and, interestingly, the estrogen-mediated cell-cycle regulation pathway, which may indicate that simulated weightlessness induced systemic hormonal changes that contributed to bone loss. We plan to follow up these findings by measuring

  9. Airway Epithelial miRNA Expression Is Altered in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Owen D.; Ostrin, Edwin J.; Love, Michael I.; Peng, Jeffrey C.; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Nguyen, Christine; Solon, Margaret; Nguyen, Cindy; Barczak, Andrea J.; Zlock, Lorna T.; Blagev, Denitza P.; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Ansel, K. Mark; Arron, Joseph R.; Erle, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Changes in airway epithelial cell differentiation, driven in part by IL-13, are important in asthma. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation in many systems and could contribute to epithelial abnormalities in asthma. Objectives: To determine whether airway epithelial miRNA expression is altered in asthma and identify IL-13–regulated miRNAs. Methods: We used miRNA microarrays to analyze bronchial epithelial brushings from 16 steroid-naive subjects with asthma before and after inhaled corticosteroids, 19 steroid-using subjects with asthma, and 12 healthy control subjects, and the effects of IL-13 and corticosteroids on cultured bronchial epithelial cells. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction to confirm selected microarray results. Measurements and Main Results: Most (12 of 16) steroid-naive subjects with asthma had a markedly abnormal pattern of bronchial epithelial miRNA expression by microarray analysis. Compared with control subjects, 217 miRNAs were differentially expressed in steroid-naive subjects with asthma and 200 in steroid-using subjects with asthma (false discovery rate < 0.05). Treatment with inhaled corticosteroids had modest effects on miRNA expression in steroid-naive asthma, inducing a statistically significant (false discovery rate < 0.05) change for only nine miRNAs. qPCR analysis confirmed differential expression of 22 miRNAs that were highly differentially expressed by microarrays. IL-13 stimulation recapitulated changes in many differentially expressed miRNAs, including four members of the miR-34/449 family, and these changes in miR-34/449 family members were resistant to corticosteroids. Conclusions: Dramatic alterations of airway epithelial cell miRNA levels are a common feature of asthma. These alterations are only modestly corrected by inhaled corticosteroids. IL-13 effects may account for some of these alterations, including repression of miR-34/449 family members that have established roles in airway

  10. Aberrant miRNA profiles associated with chronic benzene poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wenlin; Chen, Yujiao; Yang, Jing; Niu, Piye; Tian, Lin; Gao, Ai

    2014-06-01

    Chronic occupational benzene exposure is associated with an increased risk of hematological malignancies. To gain an insight into the new biomarkers and molecular mechanisms of chronic benzene poisoning, miRNA profiles and mRNA expression pattern from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chronic benzene poisoning patients and health controls matched age and gender without benzene exposure were performed using the Exiqon miRNA PCR ARRAY and Gene Chip Human Gene 2.0ST Arrays, respectively. Totally, 6 up-regulated miRNAs (miR-34a, miR-205, miR-10b, let-7d, miR-185 and miR-423-5p-2) and 7 down-regulated miRNAs (miR-133a, miR-543, hsa-miR-130a, miR-27b,miR-223, miR-142-5p and miR-320b) were found in chronic benzene poisoning group compared to health controls (P ≤ 0.05). By integrating miRNA and mRNA expression data, these differential miRNAs were mainly involved in regulation of transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter, axon guidance, regulation of transcription, DNA-dependent, nervous system development, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton organization. Further, pathway analysis indicated that SMAD4, PLCB1, NFAT5, GNAI2, PTEN, VEGFA, BCL2, CTNNB1 and CCND1 were key target genes of differential miRNAs which were implicated in Adherens junction, TGF-beta signaling pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, tight junction and Pathways in cancer. In conclusion, the aberrant miRNAs might be a potential biomarker of chronic benzene poisoning.

  11. miRNA in Macrophage Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control cellular gene expression via primarily binding to 3′ or 5′ untranslated region of the target transcript leading to translational repression or mRNA degradation. In most cases, miRNAs have been observed to fine-tune the cellular responses and, therefore, act as a rheostat rather than an on/off switch. Transcription factor PU.1 is a master switch that controls monocyte/macrophage development from hematopoietic stem cells. Recent Advances: PU.1 induces a specific set of miRNAs while suppressing the miR17-92 cluster to regulate monocyte/macrophage development. In addition to development, miRNAs tightly control the macrophage polarization continuum from proinflammatory M1 or proreparative M2 by regulating expression of key transcription factors involved in the process of polarization. Critical Issues: miRNAs are intricately involved with fine-tuning fundamental macrophage functions such as phagocytosis, efferocytosis, inflammation, tissue repair, and tumor promotion. Macrophages are secretory cells that participate in intercellular communication by releasing regulatory molecules and microvesicles (MVs). MVs are bilayered lipid membranes packaging a hydrophilic cargo, including proteins and nucleic acids. Macrophage-derived MVs carry functionally active miRNAs that suppress gene expression in target cells via post-transcriptional gene silencing, thus regulating cell function. In summary, miRNAs fine-tune several major facets of macrophage development and function. Such fine-tuning is critical in preventing exaggerated macrophage response to endogenous or exogenous stimuli. Future Directions: A critical role of miRNAs in the regulation of innate immune response and macrophage biology, including development, differentiation, and activation, has emerged. A clear understanding of such regulation on macrophage function remains to be elucidated. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 795–804. PMID:27353423

  12. MicroRNA (miRNA) cloning analysis reveals sex differences in miRNA expression profiles between adult mouse testis and ovary.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Takuya; Takizawa, Takami; Luo, Shan-Shun; Ishibashi, Osamu; Kawahigashi, Yutaka; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Ishikawa, Tomoko; Mori, Miki; Kanda, Tomohiro; Goto, Tadashi; Takizawa, Toshihiro

    2008-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous non-coding small RNAs that can regulate the expression of complementary mRNA targets. Identifying tissue-specific miRNAs is the first step toward understanding the biological functions of miRNAs, which include the regulation of tissue differentiation and the maintenance of tissue identity. In this study, we performed small RNA library sequencing in adult mouse testis and ovary to reveal their characteristic organ- and gender-specific profiles and to elucidate the characteristics of the miRNAs expressed in the reproductive system. We obtained 10,852 and 11 744 small RNA clones from mouse testis and ovary respectively (greater than 10,000 clones per organ), which included 6630 (159 genes) and 10,192 (154 genes) known miRNAs. A high level of efficiency of miRNA library sequencing was achieved: 61% (6630 miRNA clones/10,852 small RNA clones) and 87% (10,192/11,744) for adult mouse testis and ovary respectively. We obtained characteristic miRNA signatures in testis and ovary; 55 miRNAs were detected highly, exclusively, or predominantly in adult mouse testis and ovary, and discovered two novel miRNAs. Male-biased expression of miRNAs occurred on the X-chromosome. Our data provide important information on sex differences in miRNA expression that should facilitate studies of the reproductive organ-specific roles of miRNAs.

  13. Comparison of sensitivity of grasses (Lolium perenne L. and Festuca rubra L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) exposed to water contaminated with microcystins.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Silvia; Saker, Martin L; Vale, Micaela; Vasconcelos, Vitor M

    2009-07-01

    The effects of aqueous extracts from Microcysts aeruginosa strains (both microcystin-producers and non-microcystin producers) on germination and root growth were investigated for three economically important plant species: Festuca rubra L., Lolium perenne L., and Lactuca sativa L. There was a clear inhibition of root growth for L. sativa exposed to strains containing microcystins (5.9-56.4 microg L(-1)). The strain that produced the most pronounced effects contained the lowest concentration of microcystin suggesting that other cellular compounds may also affect growth.

  14. miRNA Expression in Pediatric Failing Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Brian L.; Russell, Gloria; Nunley, Karin; Miyamoto, Shelley D.; Sucharov, Carmen C.

    2013-01-01

    miRNAs are short regulatory RNAs that can regulate gene expression through interacting with the 3'UTR of target mRNAs. Although the role of miRNAs has been extensively studied in adult human and animal models of heart disease, nothing is known about their expression in pediatric heart failure patients. Different than adults with heart failure, pediatric patients respond well to phosphodiesterase inhibitor (PDEi) treatment, which is safe in the outpatient setting, results in fewer heart failure emergency department visits, fewer cardiac hospital admissions and improved NYHA classification. We have recently shown that the pediatric heart failure patients display a unique molecular profile that is different from adults with heart failure. In this study we show for the first time that pediatric heart failure patients display a unique miRNA profile, and that expression of some miRNAs correlate with response to PDEi treatment. Moreover, we show that expression of Smad4, a potential target for PDEi-regulated miRNAs, is normalized in PDEi-treated patients. Since miRNAs may be used as therapy for human heart failure, our results underscore the importance of defining the molecular characteristics of pediatric heart failure patients, so age-appropriate therapy can be designed for this population. PMID:23333438

  15. Cell-free Circulating miRNA Biomarkers in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Meng-Hsuan; Chen, Liang; Fu, Yebo; Wang, Wendy; Fu, Sidney W.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable attention and an enormous amount of resources have been dedicated to cancer biomarker discovery and validation. However, there are still a limited number of useful biomarkers available for clinical use. An ideal biomarker should be easily assayed with minimally invasive medical procedures but possess high sensitivity and specificity. Commonly used circulating biomarkers are proteins in serum, most of which require labor-intensive analysis hindered by low sensitivity in early tumor detection. Since the deregulation of microRNA (miRNA) is associated with cancer development and progression, profiling of circulating miRNAs has been used in a number of studies to identify novel minimally invasive miRNA biomarkers. In this review, we discuss the origin of the circulating cell-free miRNAs and their carriers in blood. We summarize the clinical use and function of potentially promising miRNA biomarkers in a variety of different cancers, along with their downstream target genes in tumor initiation and development. Additionally, we analyze some technical challenges in applying miRNA biomarkers to clinical practice. PMID:23074383

  16. Lipid Nanoparticles to Deliver miRNA in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Campani, Virginia; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Misso, Gabriella; Zarone, Mayra R; Grimaldi, Anna

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of post-transcriptional gene expression modulators. In the past two decades, over 1500 human miRNAs were discovered. These small non-coding RNAs regulate various biological processes, including cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and cell death. Thus, miRNAs have been proposed as new therapeutical agents in different multifactorial diseases such as cancer. Since miRNAs therapies represent a great promise, many research studies have been focused on the development of delivery strategies to overcome miRNAs biopharmaceutical issues. Lipid delivery systems are undoubtedly the non-viral carriers most largely investigated due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, easy production, low toxicity and immunogenicity, possibility to easily modify the carriers for targeting strategies. In this mini-review we provide a rapid and updated overview on the lipid delivery system currently used to deliver miRNAs, pointing out the progresses achieved in the optimization of these nanovectors, which led up to the first clinical trial.

  17. miRNA regulation of nutrient homeostasis in plants

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Soumitra; Datta, Swapan K.; Datta, Karabi

    2015-01-01

    Small RNAs including micro RNAs (miRNA) play an indispensable role in cell signaling mechanisms. Generally, miRNAs that are 20–24 nucleotides long bind to specific complementary transcripts, attenuating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level or via translational inhibition. In plants, miRNAs have emerged as the principal regulator of various stress responses, including low nutrient availability. It has been reported that miRNAs are vital for maintaining nutrient homeostasis in plants by regulating the expression of transporters that are involved in nutrient uptake and mobilization. The present review highlights the role of various miRNAs in several macro- or micronutrient deficiencies in plants. Understanding the regulation of different transporters by miRNAs will aid in elucidating the underlying molecular signal transduction mechanisms during nutritional stress. Recent findings regarding nutrient related-miRNAs and their gene regulation machinery may delineate a novel platform for improving the nutritional status of cereal grains or crop biofortification programs in the future. PMID:25914709

  18. Computational identification of miRNAs and their targets in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Xie, H; Kong, M L; Sun, Q P; Li, R Z; Pan, J B

    2014-01-21

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of non-coding small RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Although thousands of miRNAs have been identified in plants, limited information is available about miRNAs in Phaseolus vulgaris, despite it being an important food legume worldwide. The high conservation of plant miRNAs enables the identification of new miRNAs in P. vulgaris by homology analysis. Here, 1804 known and unique plant miRNAs from 37 plant species were blast-searched against expressed sequence tag and genomic survey sequence databases to identify novel miRNAs in P. vulgaris. All candidate sequences were screened by a series of miRNA filtering criteria. Finally, we identified 27 conserved miRNAs, belonging to 24 miRNA families. When compared against known miRNAs in P. vulgaris, we found that 24 of the 27 miRNAs were newly discovered. Further, we identified 92 potential target genes with known functions for these novel miRNAs. Most of these target genes were predicted to be involved in plant development, signal transduction, metabolic pathways, disease resistance, and environmental stress response. The identification of the novel miRNAs in P. vulgaris is anticipated to provide baseline information for further research about the biological functions and evolution of miRNAs in P. vulgaris.

  19. Novel miRNA-31 and miRNA-200a-Mediated Regulation of Retinoblastoma Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Vanessa; Fan, Hanli; Bryar, Paul J.; Weinstein, Joanna L.; Mets, Marilyn B.; Feng, Gang; Martin, Joshua; Martin, Alissa; Jiang, Hongmei; Laurie, Nikia A.

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor in children. Current management includes broad-based treatments such as chemotherapy, enucleation, laser therapy, or cryotherapy. However, therapies that target specific pathways important for retinoblastoma progression could provide valuable alternatives for treatment. MicroRNAs are short, noncoding RNA transcripts that can regulate the expression of target genes, and their aberrant expression often facilitates disease. The identification of post-transcriptional events that occur after the initiating genetic lesions could further define the rapidly aggressive growth displayed by retinoblastoma tumors. In this study, we used two phenotypically different retinoblastoma cell lines to elucidate the roles of miRNA-31 and miRNA-200a in tumor proliferation. Our approach confirmed that miRNAs-31 and -200a expression is significantly reduced in human retinoblastomas. Moreover, overexpression of these two miRNAs restricts the expansion of a highly proliferative cell line (Y79), but does not restrict the growth rate of a less aggressive cell line (Weri1). Gene expression profiling of miRNA-31 and/or miRNA-200a-overexpressing cells identified differentially expressed mRNAs associated with the divergent response of the two cell lines. This work has the potential to enhance the development of targeted therapeutic approaches for retinoblastoma and improve the efficacy of treatment. PMID:26379276

  20. Entangling Relation of Micro RNA-let7, miRNA-200 and miRNA-125 with Various Cancers.

    PubMed

    Masood, Nosheen; Yasmin, Azra

    2017-01-09

    Involvement of micro RNAs (miRNA) is currently the focus for cancer studies as they effect the post transcriptional expression of different genes. Let-7 family is among the firstly discovered miRNAs that play important role in cell proliferation and dysregulation leading to cell based diseases including cancer. Another family, miRNA-200 prevents transformation of cell to malignant form and tumor formation by interacting with epidermal mesenchymal transition (EMT). Similarly miRNA-125 controls apoptosis and proliferation by affecting multiple genes involved in transcription, immunological defense, resistance against viral and bacterial infections that ultimately leads to cell proliferation, metastasis and finally cancer. All of these micro RNAs are known to be either upregulated or downregulated in various cancers. Current review is focused to elaborate the role of these three families of micro RNAs on different genes that ultimately cause cancer. In conclusion we can say that the miRNAs discussed here are mostly downregulated in various cancers with some exceptions when upregulation of miRNA-125 may be attributed to cancer formation.

  1. The impacts of Phalaris arundinacea (reed canary grass) invasion on wetland plant richness in the Oregon Coast Range, USA, depend on beavers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, T.; Wilson, M.

    2005-01-01

    Invasive plants can threaten diversity and ecosystem function. We examined the relationship between the invasive Phalaris arundinacea (reed canarygrass) and species richness in beaver wetlands in Oregon, USA. Four basins (drainages) were chosen and three sites each of beaver impoundments, unimpounded areas and areas upstream of debris jams were randomly chosen in each basin for further study (n = 36). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that the relationship between Phalaris and species richness differed significantly (p = 0.01) by site type. Dam sites (beaver impoundments) exhibited a strong inverse relationship between Phalaris and species richness (bD = a??0.15), with one species lost for each 7% increase in Phalaris cover. In contrast, there was essentially no relationship between Phalaris cover and species richness in jam sites (debris jam impoundments formed by flooding; bJ = +0.01) and unimpounded sites (bU = a??0.03). The cycle of beaver impoundment and abandonment both disrupts the native community and provides an ideal environment for Phalaris, which once established tends to exclude development of herbaceous communities and limits species richness. Because beaver wetlands are a dominant wetland type in the Coast Range, Phalaris invasion presents a real threat to landscape heterogeneity and ecosystem function in the region.

  2. Forensic miRNA: potential biomarker for body fluids?

    PubMed

    Silva, Sarah S; Lopes, Cátia; Teixeira, A L; Carneiro de Sousa, M J; Medeiros, R

    2015-01-01

    In forensic investigation, body fluids represent an important support to professionals when detected, collected and correctly identified. Through many years, various approaches were used, namely serology-based methodologies however, their lack of sensitivity and specificity became difficult to set aside. In order to sidetrack the problem, miRNA profiling surged with a real potential to be used to identify evidences like urine, blood, menstrual blood, saliva, semen and vaginal secretions. MiRNAs are small RNA structures with 20-25 nt whose proprieties makes them less prone to degradation processes when compared to mRNA which is extremely important once, in a crime scene, biological evidences might be exposed to several unfavorable environmental factors. Recently, published studies were able to identify some specific miRNAs, however their results were not always reproducible by others which can possibly be the reflection of different workflow strategies for their profiling studies. Given the current blast of interest in miRNAs, it is important to acknowledge potential limitations of miRNA profiling, yet, the lack of such studies are evident. This review pretends to gather all the information to date and assessed a multitude of factors that have a potential aptitude to discrediting miRNA profiling, such as: methodological approaches, environmental factors, physiological conditions, gender, pathologies and samples storage. It can be asserted that much has yet to be made, but we pretend to highlight a potential answer for the ultimate question: Can miRNA profiling be used as the forensic biomarker for body fluids identification?

  3. Susceptibilities of Different Test Systems from Maize (Zea mays), Poa annua, and Festuca rubra to Herbicides That Inhibit the Enzyme Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase

    PubMed

    Herbert; Cole; Pallett; Harwood

    1996-06-01

    The susceptibilities of maize (Zea mays cv. Champ) and two graminicide-resistant grass species, Poa annua (annual meadow grass) and Festuca rubra (red fescue), to two aryloxyphenoxypropionates (quizalofop and fluazifop) and a cyclohexanedione (sethoxydim) graminicide were evaluated in leaf blades and isolated chloroplasts, and by assaying acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) in desalted leaf homogenates. The graminicide resistance of P. annua and F. rubra appeared to be at the level of ACCase. Festuca rubra ACCase was highly insensitive and P. annua ACCase was partially insensitive to the graminicides that were tested. Fatty acid synthesis in isolated maize chloroplasts was more susceptible to inhibition than was ACCase activity from whole leaves. There was a smaller difference in graminicide sensitivity between these two test systems in P. annua. The developmental pattern of ACCase specific activity and its inhibition by quizalofop was measured in maize and P. annua leaf blades. There was an age-dependent increase in the sensitivity of maize leaf ACCase activity to inhibition by quizalofop. Together with the greater susceptibility of chloroplasts compared with leaf homogenates this could imply that a graminicide-insensitive (extrachloroplastic) ACCase isoform is less highly expressed in older leaves. Poa annua ACCase did not significantly alter in sensitivity as leaves aged, consistent with the smaller difference in the level of inhibition between chloroplasts and leaf homogenates in this species. A small pyruvate carboxylase activity was detected in maize leaves after 9 days. By 38 days, when leaves were senescing, pyruvate carboxylase activity predominated over ACCase.

  4. The miRNA biogenesis in marine bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Rosani, Umberto; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs include powerful regulators of gene expression, transposon mobility and virus activity. Among the various categories, mature microRNAs (miRNAs) guide the translational repression and decay of several targeted mRNAs. The biogenesis of miRNAs depends on few gene products, essentially conserved from basal to higher metazoans, whose protein domains allow specific interactions with dsRNA. Here, we report the identification of key genes responsible of the miRNA biogenesis in 32 bivalves, with particular attention to the aquaculture species Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. In detail, we have identified and phylogenetically compared eight evolutionary conserved proteins: DROSHA, DGCR8, EXP5, RAN, DICER TARBP2, AGO and PIWI. In mussels, we recognized several other proteins participating in the miRNA biogenesis or in the subsequent RNA silencing. According to digital expression analysis, these genes display low and not inducible expression levels in adult mussels and oysters whereas they are considerably expressed during development. As miRNAs play an important role also in the antiviral responses, knowledge on their production and regulative effects can shed light on essential molecular processes and provide new hints for disease prevention in bivalves. PMID:26989613

  5. miRNA analysis in pancreatic cancer: the Dartmouth experience.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Francine B de; Liu, Xiaoying; Tsongalis, Gregory J

    2017-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is considered one of the most lethal cancers being the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in adults in the United States because of the lack of early signs and symptoms and the lack of early detection. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the most common histological type among pancreatic cancers, representing 80%-90% of all solid tumors of the pancreas. The majority of PDAC develops from three precursor lesions: pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductual papillary mucinous neoplasm and mucinous cystic neoplasm. Although histologic tissue evaluation remains the gold standard for diagnosis, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration has become the preferred modality for obtaining pathologic confirmation. At Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC),we have developed and validated a microRNA (miRNA) panel for patients with pancreatic diseases that can be used in association with the gold standard method for diagnosis. miRNAs have an important role in biological processes, such as apoptosis, metabolism, cell growth and differentiation. In cancer, miRNAs can be classified as either oncogenic or tumor suppressor according to their function in the carcinogenic process. In this study, we describe the expression of many miRNA in benign and malignant pancreatic tissues as well as their clinical significance. For this reason, miRNAs have been considered potential biomarkers of pancreatic diseases that could potentially contribute to an early diagnosis, predict disease progression, accurately monitor disease, contribute to better treatment strategies and reduce mortality by improving disease management.

  6. Microprocessor activity controls differential miRNA biogenesis In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Thomas; Marsico, Annalisa; Gehre, Maja; Orom, Ulf Andersson

    2014-10-23

    In miRNA biogenesis, pri-miRNA transcripts are converted into pre-miRNA hairpins. The in vivo properties of this process remain enigmatic. Here, we determine in vivo transcriptome-wide pri-miRNA processing using next-generation sequencing of chromatin-associated pri-miRNAs. We identify a distinctive Microprocessor signature in the transcriptome profile from which efficiency of the endogenous processing event can be accurately quantified. This analysis reveals differential susceptibility to Microprocessor cleavage as a key regulatory step in miRNA biogenesis. Processing is highly variable among pri-miRNAs and a better predictor of miRNA abundance than primary transcription itself. Processing is also largely stable across three cell lines, suggesting a major contribution of sequence determinants. On the basis of differential processing efficiencies, we define functionality for short sequence features adjacent to the pre-miRNA hairpin. In conclusion, we identify Microprocessor as the main hub for diversified miRNA output and suggest a role for uncoupling miRNA biogenesis from host gene expression.

  7. Use of miRNAs as Biomarkers in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Dumache, Raluca; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Alina Carmen; Papurica, Marius; Dumbuleu, Corina Maria; Nartita, Radu; Sandesc, Dorel

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the most common causes of death in critical patients. Severe generalized inflammation, infections, and severe physiological imbalances significantly decrease the survival rate with more than 50%. Moreover, monitoring, evaluation, and therapy management often become extremely difficult for the clinician in this type of patients. Current methods of diagnosing sepsis vary based especially on the determination of biochemical-humoral markers, such as cytokines, components of the complement, and proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory compounds. Recent studies highlight the use of new biomarkers for sepsis, namely, miRNAs. miRNAs belong to a class of small, noncoding RNAs with an approximate content of 19–23 nucleotides. Following biochemical and physiological imbalances, the expression of miRNAs in blood or other body fluids changes significantly. Moreover, its stability, specificity, and selectivity make miRNAs ideal candidates for sepsis biomarkers. In conclusion, we can affirm that stable species of circulating miRNAs represent potential biomarkers for monitoring the evolution of sepsis. PMID:26221578

  8. Serum profiling identifies novel muscle miRNA and cardiomyopathy-related miRNA biomarkers in Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy dogs and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Jeanson-Leh, Laurence; Lameth, Julie; Krimi, Soraya; Buisset, Julien; Amor, Fatima; Le Guiner, Caroline; Barthélémy, Inès; Servais, Laurent; Blot, Stéphane; Voit, Thomas; Israeli, David

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal, X-linked neuromuscular disease that affects 1 boy in 3500 to 5000 boys. The golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog is the best clinically relevant DMD animal model. Here, we used a high-thoughput miRNA sequencing screening for identification of candidate serum miRNA biomarkers in golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. We confirmed the dysregulation of the previously described muscle miRNAs, miR-1, miR-133, miR-206, and miR-378, and identified a new candidate muscle miRNA, miR-95. We identified two other classes of dysregulated serum miRNAs in muscular dystrophy: miRNAs belonging to the largest known miRNA cluster that resides in the imprinting DLK1-DIO3 genomic region and miRNAs associated with cardiac disease, including miR-208a, miR-208b, and miR-499. No simple correlation was identified between serum levels of cardiac miRNAs and cardiac functional parameters in golden retriever muscular dystrophy dogs. Finally, we confirmed a dysregulation of miR-95, miR-208a, miR-208b, miR-499, and miR-539 in a small cohort of DMD patients. Given the interspecies conservation of miRNAs and preliminary data in DMD patients, these newly identified dysregulated miRNAs are strong candidate biomarkers for DMD patients.

  9. Human milk miRNAs primarily originate from the mammary gland resulting in unique miRNA profiles of fractionated milk

    PubMed Central

    Alsaweed, Mohammed; Lai, Ching Tat; Hartmann, Peter E.; Geddes, Donna T.; Kakulas, Foteini

    2016-01-01

    Human milk (HM) contains regulatory biomolecules including miRNAs, the origin and functional significance of which are still undetermined. We used TaqMan OpenArrays to profile 681 mature miRNAs in HM cells and fat, and compared them with maternal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and plasma, and bovine and soy infant formulae. HM cells and PBMCs (292 and 345 miRNAs, respectively) had higher miRNA content than HM fat and plasma (242 and 219 miRNAs, respectively) (p < 0.05). A strong association in miRNA profiles was found between HM cells and fat, whilst PBMCs and plasma were distinctly different to HM, displaying marked inter-individual variation. Considering the dominance of epithelial cells in mature milk of healthy women, these results suggest that HM miRNAs primarily originate from the mammary epithelium, whilst the maternal circulation may have a smaller contribution. Our findings demonstrate that unlike infant formulae, which contained very few human miRNA, HM is a rich source of lactation-specific miRNA, which could be used as biomarkers of the performance and health status of the lactating mammary gland. Given the recently identified stability, uptake and functionality of food- and milk-derived miRNA in vivo, HM miRNA are likely to contribute to infant protection and development. PMID:26854194

  10. Insights into MiRNA Regulation of the Human Glycome

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Brian T.; Koppolu, Sujeethraj; Mahal, Lara K.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation is an intricate process requiring the coordinated action of multiple proteins, including glycosyltransferases, glycosidases, sugar nucleotide transporters and trafficking proteins. Work by several groups points to a role for microRNA (miRNA) in controlling the levels of specific glycosyltransferases involved in cancer, neural migration and osteoblast formation. Recent work in our laboratory suggests that miRNA are a principal regulator of the glycome, translating genomic information into the glycocode through tuning of enzyme levels. Herein we overlay predicted miRNA regulation of glycosylation related genes (glycogenes) onto maps of the common N-linked and O-linked glycan biosynthetic pathways to identify key regulatory nodes of the glycome. Our analysis provides insights into glycan regulation and suggests that at the regulatory level, glycogenes are non-redundant. PMID:24463102

  11. miRNAs in mtDNA-less cell mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, N; Peng, Y; Tan, Z; Ciraolo, G; Wang, D; Li, R

    2015-01-01

    The novel regulation mechanism in mtDNA-less cells was investigated. Very low mtDNA copy in mtDNA-less 206 ρ° cells was identified. But no 13 mitochondria-specific proteins were translated in 206 ρ° cells. Their mitochondrial respiration complexes V, III and II were 86.5, 29.4 and 49.6% of 143B cells, respectively. Complexes I and IV completely lack in 206 ρ° cells. Non-mitochondrial respiration to generate ATP in 206 ρ° cells was discovered. The expression levels of some mitochondrial RNAs including 12S rRNA, COX1, COX2, COX3, ND4 and ND5 were low. However, ND1, ND3 and Cyto b were not expressed in 206 ρ° cells. Unequal transcription of mitochondrial RNAs indicated the post-transcriptional cleavage and processing mechanisms in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression in 206 ρ° cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) may modulate these mitochondrial RNA expression in these cells. RNA-induced silencing complex indeed within 206 ρ° cell mitochondria indicated miRNAs in 206 ρ° cell mitochondria. miRNA profile in mtDNA-less 206 ρ° cells was studied by next-generation sequencing of small RNAs. Several mitochondria-enriched miRNAs such as miR-181c-5p and miR-146a-5p were identified in 206 ρ° cell mitochondria. miR-181c-5p and miR-146a-5p had 23 and 19 potential targets on mitochondrial RNAs respectively, and these two miRNAs had multiple targets on mitochondria-associated messenger RNAs encoded by nuclear genes. These data provided the first direct evidence that miRNAs were imported into mitochondria and regulated mitochondrial RNA expressions. PMID:27551440

  12. Seminal miRNA Relationship with Apoptotic Markers and Oxidative Stress in Infertile Men with Varicocele

    PubMed Central

    Rashed, Laila A.; Nabil, Nashaat I.; Osman, Ihab; Mostafa, Rashad; Farag, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Aim. This study aimed to assess seminal miRNA relationship with seminal apoptotic markers and oxidative stress (OS) in infertile men associated with varicocele (Vx). Methods. In all, 220 subjects were divided into the following groups: fertile normozoospermic men, fertile normozoospermic men with Vx, infertile oligoasthenoteratozoospermic (OAT) men without Vx, and infertile OAT men with Vx. They were subjected to history taking, clinical examination, and semen analysis. In their semen, the following were estimated: miRNA-122, miRNA-181a, and miRNA-34c5 using quantitative real-time PCR, apoptotic markers (BAX, BCL2) protein expression, and OS markers [malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)]. Results. The mean levels of seminal miRNA-122, miRNA-181a, and miRNA-34c5 were significantly reduced in infertile OAT men with Vx compared with other groups coupled with Vx grade and Vx bilaterality. Seminal miRNA-122, miRNA-181a, and miRNA-34c5 were positively correlated with sperm concentration, total sperm motility, sperm normal morphology, seminal GPx, and seminal BCL2 and negatively correlated with seminal MDA and seminal BAX. Conclusions. Seminal miRNA-122, miRNA-181a, and miRNA-34c5 are decreased in infertile OAT men with Vx associated with increased Vx grade and Vx bilaterality. In addition, they are positively correlated with sperm parameters and negatively correlated with OS, apoptotic markers. PMID:28105423

  13. Impacts of Whole-Genome Triplication on MIRNA Evolution in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Wu, Jian; Liang, Jianli; Schnable, James C; Yang, Wencai; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short non-coding, endogenous RNAs that play essential roles in eukaryotes. Although the influence of whole-genome triplication (WGT) on protein-coding genes has been well documented in Brassica rapa, little is known about its impacts on MIRNAs. In this study, through generating a comprehensive annotation of 680 MIRNAs for B. rapa, we analyzed the evolutionary characteristics of these MIRNAs from different aspects in B. rapa. First, while MIRNAs and genes show similar patterns of biased distribution among subgenomes of B. rapa, we found that MIRNAs are much more overretained than genes following fractionation after WGT. Second, multiple-copy MIRNAs show significant sequence conservation than that of single-copy MIRNAs, which is opposite to that of genes. This indicates that increased purifying selection is acting upon these highly retained multiple-copy MIRNAs and their functional importance over singleton MIRNAs. Furthermore, we found the extensive divergence between pairs of miRNAs and their target genes following the WGT in B. rapa. In summary, our study provides a valuable resource for exploring MIRNA in B. rapa and highlights the impacts of WGT on the evolution of MIRNA.

  14. Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Activities of miRNAs in Small Animal Models Using Molecular Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Baril, Patrick; Ezzine, Safia; Pichon, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy. PMID:25749473

  15. The Role of miRNA in Papillary Thyroid Cancer in the Context of miRNA Let-7 Family

    PubMed Central

    Perdas, Ewelina; Stawski, Robert; Nowak, Dariusz; Zubrzycka, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common endocrine malignancy. RET/PTC rearrangement is the most common genetic modification identified in this category of cancer, increasing proliferation and dedifferentiation by the activation of the RET/PTC-RAS-BRAF-MAPK-ERK signaling pathway. Recently, let-7 miRNA was found to reduce RAS levels, acting as a tumor suppressor gene. Circulating miRNA profiles of the let-7 family may be used as novel noninvasive diagnostic, prognostic, treatment and surveillance markers for PTC. PMID:27314338

  16. miRNA therapeutics: a new class of drugs with potential therapeutic applications in the heart.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Bianca C; Ooi, Jenny Y Y; Lin, Ruby C Y; McMullen, Julie R

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), which regulate gene expression. Here, the authors describe the contribution of miRNAs to cardiac biology and disease. They discuss various strategies for manipulating miRNA activity including antisense oligonucleotides (antimiRs, blockmiRs), mimics, miRNA sponges, Tough Decoys and miRNA mowers. They review developments in chemistries (e.g., locked nucleic acid) and modifications (sugar, 'ZEN', peptide nucleic acids) and miRNA delivery tools (viral vectors, liposomes, nanoparticles, pHLIP). They summarize potential miRNA therapeutic targets for heart disease based on preclinical studies. Finally, the authors review current progress of miRNA therapeutics in clinical development for HCV and cancer, and discuss challenges that will need to be overcome for similar therapies to enter the clinic for patients with cardiac disease.

  17. Tilletia vankyi, a new species of reticulate-spored bunt fungus with non-conjugating basidiospores infecting species of Festuca and Lolium.

    PubMed

    Carris, Lori M; Castlebury, Lisa A; Huang, Guoming; Alderman, Steve C; Luo, Jiafeng; Bao, Xiaodong

    2007-12-01

    A bunt fungus, exhibiting a spore germination pattern unique to known reticulate-spored species of Tilletia was found infecting plants in seed production fields of Festuca rubra ssp. rubra (red fescue) and F. rubra ssp. fallax (Chewing's fescue) in Oregon, and in seed lots of Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass) from Australia and Germany. Teliospores germinated to form 20-40 uninucleate, non-conjugating basidiospores, and colonies derived from single basidiospores produced teliospores in culture. In inoculation studies using single basidiospore colonies, perennial ryegrass and L. perenne ssp. multiflorum (Italian or annual ryegrass) were infected. A phylogenetic analysis, based on ITS region rDNA, eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha, and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II demonstrated that the fescue and ryegrass bunts are conspecific, and distinct from known species of Tilletia.

  18. Revisiting absorption of dietary plant-based miRNAs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are continuing to test the hypothesis that consumption of genetic information in plant-based foods can modulate animal metabolism. Several studies (1,2,3) have failed to replicate the finding (4) that a rice miRNA survives digestion, enters circulation in copy numbers rivaling endogenous RNAs, an...

  19. Challenges in using circulating miRNAs as cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tiberio, Paola; Callari, Maurizio; Angeloni, Valentina; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Appierto, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, circulating miRNAs have emerged as a new class of promising cancer biomarkers. Independent studies have shown the feasibility of using these small RNAs as tools for the diagnosis and prognosis of different types of malignancies as well as for predicting and possibly monitoring treatment response. However, despite an initial enthusiasm for their possible clinical application, widespread inconsistencies have been observed among the studies, and miRNA-based tools still represent the object of research within clinical diagnostic or treatment protocols. The poor overlap of results could be explained, at least in part, by preanalytical and analytical variables and donor-related factors that could generate artefacts, impairing an accurate quantification of circulating miRNAs. In fact, critical issues are represented by nonuniform sample choice, handling, and processing, as well as by blood cell contamination in sample preparation and lack of consensus for data normalization. In this review, we address the potential technical biases and individual-related parameters that can influence circulating miRNA studies' outcome. The exciting potential of circulating miRNAs as cancer biomarkers could confer an important advance in the disease management, but their clinical significance might not be proven without a global consensus of procedures and standardized protocols for their accurate detection.

  20. miRNA modulation of the cellular stress response.

    PubMed

    Babar, Imran A; Slack, Frank J; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2008-04-01

    Cellular stress responses are potent and dynamic, allowing cells to effectively counteract diverse stresses. These pathways are crucial not only for maintaining normal cellular homeostasis, but also for protecting cells from what would otherwise lead to their demise. A novel class of genes, termed miRNAs, has recently been implicated in the cellular stress response. For example, it has been demonstrated that a cardiac-specific miRNA that is not required for normal development is requisite for a normal cardiac stress response in mice. In addition, we have found that a miRNA family is able to modulate the cellular response to cytotoxic cancer treatment both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we will discuss these and other important developments in the field. In particular, we will focus on studies that have linked miRNAs to the genotoxic stress response and will suggest how this connection may be both important for our understanding of biology and pertinent for the development of novel cancer therapies.

  1. Scaffolds for Artificial miRNA Expression in Animal Cells.

    PubMed

    Calloni, Raquel; Bonatto, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Artificial miRNAs (amiRNAs) are molecules that have been developed to promote gene silencing in a similar manner to naturally occurring miRNAs. amiRNAs are generally constructed by replacing the mature miRNA sequence in the pre-miRNA stem-loop with a sequence targeting a gene of interest. These molecules offer an interesting alternative to silencing approaches that are based on shRNAs and siRNAs because they present the same efficiency as these options and are less cytotoxic. amiRNAs have mostly been applied to gene knockdown in plants; they have been examined to a lesser extent in animal cells. Therefore, this article reviews the amiRNAs that have been developed for animal cells and focuses on the miRNA scaffolds that can already be applied to construct the artificial counterparts, as well as on the different approaches that have been described to promote amiRNA expression and silencing efficiency. Furthermore, the availability of amiRNA libraries and other tools that can be used to design and construct these molecules is briefly discussed, along with an overview of the therapeutic applications for which amiRNAs have already been evaluated.

  2. Challenges in Using Circulating miRNAs as Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Tiberio, Paola; Callari, Maurizio; Angeloni, Valentina; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Appierto, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, circulating miRNAs have emerged as a new class of promising cancer biomarkers. Independent studies have shown the feasibility of using these small RNAs as tools for the diagnosis and prognosis of different types of malignancies as well as for predicting and possibly monitoring treatment response. However, despite an initial enthusiasm for their possible clinical application, widespread inconsistencies have been observed among the studies, and miRNA-based tools still represent the object of research within clinical diagnostic or treatment protocols. The poor overlap of results could be explained, at least in part, by preanalytical and analytical variables and donor-related factors that could generate artefacts, impairing an accurate quantification of circulating miRNAs. In fact, critical issues are represented by nonuniform sample choice, handling, and processing, as well as by blood cell contamination in sample preparation and lack of consensus for data normalization. In this review, we address the potential technical biases and individual-related parameters that can influence circulating miRNA studies' outcome. The exciting potential of circulating miRNAs as cancer biomarkers could confer an important advance in the disease management, but their clinical significance might not be proven without a global consensus of procedures and standardized protocols for their accurate detection. PMID:25874226

  3. MYCN-targeting miRNAs are predominantly downregulated during MYCN‑driven neuroblastoma tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Anneleen; Van Peer, Gert; Carter, Daniel R; Mets, Evelien; Althoff, Kristina; Cheung, Belamy B; Schulte, Johannes H; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo; Marshall, Glenn M; De Preter, Katleen; Speleman, Frank

    2015-03-10

    MYCN is a transcription factor that plays key roles in both normal development and cancer. In neuroblastoma, MYCN acts as a major oncogenic driver through pleiotropic effects regulated by multiple protein encoding genes as well as microRNAs (miRNAs). MYCN activity is tightly controlled at the level of transcription and protein stability through various mechanisms. Like most genes, MYCN is further controlled by miRNAs, but the full complement of all miRNAs implicated in this process has not been determined through an unbiased approach. To elucidate the role of miRNAs in regulation of MYCN, we thus explored the MYCN-miRNA interactome to establish miRNAs controlling MYCN expression levels. We combined results from an unbiased and genome-wide high-throughput miRNA target reporter screen with miRNA and mRNA expression data from patients and a murine neuroblastoma progression model. We identified 29 miRNAs targeting MYCN, of which 12 miRNAs are inversely correlated with MYCN expression or activity in neuroblastoma tumor tissue. The majority of MYCN-targeting miRNAs in neuroblastoma showed a decrease in expression during murine MYCN-driven neuroblastoma tumor development. Therefore, we provide evidence that MYCN-targeting miRNAs are preferentially downregulated in MYCN-driven neuroblastoma, suggesting that MYCN negatively controls the expression of these miRNAs, to safeguard its expression.

  4. Clinical potential of miRNA-221 as a novel prognostic biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fan; Li, Xin-Feng; Fu, Dong-Sheng; Huang, Jian-Guo; Yang, Shun-E

    2017-01-01

    miRNA-221 is one of the over 700 kinds of currently known microRNAs (miRNAs) and is up-regulated in multiple tumors, suggesting that it may be a potential carcinogenic miRNA. Few studies have explored the relationship between miRNA-221 and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We performed real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to detect miRNA-221 expression in HCC and para-carcinoma tissues and to explore the relationship between abnormal expression of miRNA-221 and clinicopathological features of HCC patients. miRNA-221 expression was significantly higher in HCC tissues than in adjacent tissues (P < 0.001). We analyzed the relationship between miRNA-221 expression level and clinicopathological characteristics of HCC patients. Our results suggested that miRNA-221 expression level was closely related to tumor stage (P = 0.012), number of tumor nodes (P = 0.018), and microvascular invasion (P = 0.010) in HCC patients. The results of survival analysis suggested that HCC patients with up-regulated miRNA-221 expression had a shorter survival time. The high miRNA-221 expression indicates the poor prognosis of HCC patients; thus, miRNA-221 can be regarded an important molecular marker for HCC prognosis.

  5. Deregulation of the miRNAs Expression in Cervical Cancer: Human Papillomavirus Implications

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Gómez, Yazmín; Organista-Nava, Jorge; Gariglio, Patricio

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non coding RNAs of 18–25 nucleotides in length. The temporal or short-lived expression of the miRNAs modulates gene expression post transcriptionally. Studies have revealed that miRNAs deregulation correlates and is involved with the initiation and progression of human tumors. Cervical cancer (CC) displays notably increased or decreased expression of a large number of cellular oncogenic or tumor suppressive miRNAs, respectively. However, understanding the potential role of miRNAs in CC is still limited. In CC, the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) infection can affect the miRNAs expression through oncoprotein E6 and E7 that contribute to viral pathogenesis, although other viral proteins might also be involved. This deregulation in the miRNAs expression has an important role in the hallmarks of CC. Interestingly, the miRNA expression profile in CC can discriminate between normal and tumor tissue and the extraordinary stability of miRNAs makes it suitable to serve as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of cancer. In this review, we will summarize the role of the HR-HPVs in miRNA expression, the role of miRNAs in the hallmarks of CC, and the use of miRNAs as potential prognostic biomarkers in CC. PMID:24490161

  6. [Web server for prediction of miRNAs and their precursors and binding sites].

    PubMed

    Vorozheykin, P S; Titov, I I

    2015-01-01

    A microRNA (miRNA) is a small noncoding RNA molecule about 22 nucleotides in length. The paper describes a web server for predicting miRNAs and their precursors and binding sites. The predictions are based on either sequence similarity to known miRNAs of 223 organisms or context-structural hidden Markov models. It has been shown that the proposed methods of prediction of human miRNAs and pre-miRNAs outperform the existing ones in accuracy. The average deviation of predicted 5'-ends of human miRNAs from actual positions is 3.13 nt in the case of predicting one pair of complementary miRNAs (miRNA-miRNA* duplex). A useful option for our application is the prediction of an additional miRNA pair. In this mode, the pairs closest to actual miRNA deviate by 1.61 nt on average. The proposed method also shows good performance in predicting mouse miRNAs. Binding sites for miRNAs are predicted by two known approaches based on complementarity and thermodynamic stability of the miRNA-mRNA duplex and on a new approach, which takes into account miRNAs competition for the site. The role of the secondary structure in miRNA processing is considered. The web server is available at http://wwwmgs.bionet.nsc.ru/mgs/programs/rnaanalys/.

  7. Differential expression of miRNA between the monolayer and three dimensional cells after ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Dong; Ren, Zhenxin; Hu, Burong

    2014-04-01

    We detect the expression of miRNA in 2D and 3D human lung epithelial cells (3KT). And our primary experimental results showed that more miRNA in 3D 3KT down regulated than in 2D 3KT cells after not only X-ray but also C-beam irradiation using the miRNA chip assay. Meanwhile, X-ray induced more significantly differential expression of miRNA when the relative expression value of miRNA in 3D cells were compared to 2D cells after irradiation.

  8. Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Bognanni, Claudia; Tuschl, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (miRNA FISH) is an advanced method for visualizing differentially expressed miRNAs, together with other reference RNAs, in archival tissues. Some miRNAs are excellent disease biomarkers due to their abundance and cell-type specificity. However, these short RNA molecules are difficult to visualize due to loss by diffusion, probe mishybridization, and signal detection and signal amplification issues. Here, we describe a reliable and adjustable method for visualizing and normalizing miRNA signals in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections.

  9. Multiplexed miRNA Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Bognanni, Claudia; Tuschl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (miRNA FISH) is an advanced method for visualizing differentially expressed miRNAs, together with other reference RNAs, in archival tissues. Some miRNAs are excellent disease biomarkers due to their abundance and cell-type specificity. However, these short RNA molecules are difficult to visualize due to loss by diffusion, probe mishybridization, and signal detection and signal amplification issues. Here, we describe a reliable and adjustable method for visualizing and normalizing miRNA signals in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. PMID:25218385

  10. A Burst of miRNA Innovation in the Early Evolution of Butterflies and Moths.

    PubMed

    Quah, Shan; Hui, Jerome H L; Holland, Peter W H

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Because several miRNAs are known to affect the stability or translation of developmental regulatory genes, the origin of novel miRNAs may have contributed to the evolution of developmental processes and morphology. Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) is a species-rich clade with a well-established phylogeny and abundant genomic resources, thereby representing an ideal system in which to study miRNA evolution. We sequenced small RNA libraries from developmental stages of two divergent lepidopterans, Cameraria ohridella (Horse chestnut Leafminer) and Pararge aegeria (Speckled Wood butterfly), discovering 90 and 81 conserved miRNAs, respectively, and many species-specific miRNA sequences. Mapping miRNAs onto the lepidopteran phylogeny reveals rapid miRNA turnover and an episode of miRNA fixation early in lepidopteran evolution, implying that miRNA acquisition accompanied the early radiation of the Lepidoptera. One lepidopteran-specific miRNA gene, miR-2768, is located within an intron of the homeobox gene invected, involved in insect segmental and wing patterning. We identified cubitus interruptus (ci) as a likely direct target of miR-2768, and validated this suppression using a luciferase assay system. We propose a model by which miR-2768 modulates expression of ci in the segmentation pathway and in patterning of lepidopteran wing primordia.

  11. Regulation of the alkaloid biosynthesis by miRNA in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Boke, Hatice; Ozhuner, Esma; Turktas, Mine; Parmaksiz, Iskender; Ozcan, Sebahattin; Unver, Turgay

    2015-04-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is an important medicinal plant producing benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIA). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small RNAs (sRNAs) of approximately 21 nucleotides. They are noncoding, but regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. Although many studies have been conducted on the identification and functions of plant miRNA, scarce researches on miRNA regulation of alkaloid biosynthesis have been reported. In this study, a total of 316 conserved and 11 novel miRNAs were identified in opium poppy using second-generation sequencing and direct cloning. Tissue-specific regulation of miRNA expression was comparatively analysed by miRNA microarray assays. A total of 232 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed among four tissues. Likewise, 1469 target transcripts were detected using in silico and experimental approaches. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses indicated that miRNA putatively regulates carbohydrate metabolism and genetic-information processing. Additionally, miRNA target transcripts were mostly involved in response to stress against various factors and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis processes. Target transcript identification analyses revealed that some of the miRNAs might be involved in BIA biosynthesis, such as pso-miR13, pso-miR2161 and pso-miR408. Additionally, three putatively mature miRNA sequences were predicted to be targeting BIA-biosynthesis genes.

  12. Identification of Dirofilaria immitis miRNA using illumina deep sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The heartworm Dirofilaria immitis is the causative agent of cardiopulmonary dirofilariosis in dogs and cats, which also infects a wide range of wild mammals and humans. The complex life cycle of D. immitis with several developmental stages in its invertebrate mosquito vectors and its vertebrate hosts indicates the importance of miRNA in growth and development, and their ability to regulate infection of mammalian hosts. This study identified the miRNA profiles of D. immitis of zoonotic significance by deep sequencing. A total of 1063 conserved miRNA candidates, including 68 anti-sense miRNA (miRNA*) sequences, were predicted by computational methods and could be grouped into 808 miRNA families. A significant bias towards family members, family abundance and sequence nucleotides was observed. Thirteen novel miRNA candidates were predicted by alignment with the Brugia malayi genome. Eleven out of 13 predicted miRNA candidates were verified by using a PCR-based method. Target genes of the novel miRNA candidates were predicted by using the heartworm transcriptome dataset. To our knowledge, this is the first report of miRNA profiles in D. immitis, which will contribute to a better understanding of the complex biology of this zoonotic filarial nematode and the molecular regulation roles of miRNA involved. Our findings may also become a useful resource for small RNA studies in other filarial parasitic nematodes. PMID:23331513

  13. Hydroxytyrosol supplementation modulates the expression of miRNAs in rodents and in humans.

    PubMed

    Tomé-Carneiro, Joao; Crespo, María Carmen; Iglesias-Gutierrez, Eduardo; Martín, Roberto; Gil-Zamorano, Judit; Tomas-Zapico, Cristina; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Correa, Carlos; Gómez-Coronado, Diego; Lasunción, Miguel A; Herrera, Emilio; Visioli, Francesco; Dávalos, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Dietary microRNAs (miRNAs) modulation could be important for health and wellbeing. Part of the healthful activities of polyphenols might be due to a modulation of miRNAs' expression. Among the most biologically active polyphenols, hydroxytyrosol (HT) has never been studied for its actions on miRNAs. We investigated whether HT could modulate the expression of miRNAs in vivo. We performed an unbiased intestinal miRNA screening in mice supplemented (for 8 weeks) with nutritionally relevant amounts of HT. HT modulated the expression of several miRNAs. Analysis of other tissues revealed consistent HT-induced modulation of only few miRNAs. Also, HT administration increased triglycerides levels. Acute treatment with HT and in vitro experiments provided mechanistic insights. The HT-induced expression of one miRNA was confirmed in healthy volunteers supplemented with HT in a randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled trial. HT consumption affects specific miRNAs' expression in rodents and humans. Our findings suggest that the modulation of miRNAs' action through HT consumption might partially explain its healthful activities and might be pharmanutritionally exploited in current therapies targeting endogenous miRNAs. However, the effects of HT on triglycerides warrant further investigations.

  14. A Burst of miRNA Innovation in the Early Evolution of Butterflies and Moths

    PubMed Central

    Quah, Shan; Hui, Jerome H.L.; Holland, Peter W.H.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Because several miRNAs are known to affect the stability or translation of developmental regulatory genes, the origin of novel miRNAs may have contributed to the evolution of developmental processes and morphology. Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) is a species-rich clade with a well-established phylogeny and abundant genomic resources, thereby representing an ideal system in which to study miRNA evolution. We sequenced small RNA libraries from developmental stages of two divergent lepidopterans, Cameraria ohridella (Horse chestnut Leafminer) and Pararge aegeria (Speckled Wood butterfly), discovering 90 and 81 conserved miRNAs, respectively, and many species-specific miRNA sequences. Mapping miRNAs onto the lepidopteran phylogeny reveals rapid miRNA turnover and an episode of miRNA fixation early in lepidopteran evolution, implying that miRNA acquisition accompanied the early radiation of the Lepidoptera. One lepidopteran-specific miRNA gene, miR-2768, is located within an intron of the homeobox gene invected, involved in insect segmental and wing patterning. We identified cubitus interruptus (ci) as a likely direct target of miR-2768, and validated this suppression using a luciferase assay system. We propose a model by which miR-2768 modulates expression of ci in the segmentation pathway and in patterning of lepidopteran wing primordia. PMID:25576364

  15. Identification of miRNAs and miRNA-mediated regulatory pathways in Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gang; Li, Yang; He, Hua; Wang, Fang; Yu, Diqiu

    2013-10-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) post-transcriptionally regulate target gene expression to modulate growth and development and biotic and abiotic stress responses. By analyzing small RNA deep sequencing data in combination with the genome sequence, we identified 75 conserved miRNAs and 11 novel miRNAs. Their target genes were also predicted. For most conserved miRNAs, the miRNA-target pairs were conserved across plant species. In addition to these conserved miRNA-target pairs, we also identified some papaya-specific miRNA-target regulatory pathways. Both miR168 and miR530 target the Argonaute 1 gene, indicating a second autoregulatory mechanism for miRNA regulation. A non-conserved miRNA was mapped within an intron of Dicer-like 1 (DCL1), suggesting a conserved homeostatic autoregulatory mechanism for DCL1 expression. A 21-nt miRNA triggers secondary siRNA production from its target genes, nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat protein genes. Certain phased-miRNAs were processed from their conserved miRNA precursors, indicating a putative miRNA evolution mechanism. In addition, we identified a Carica papaya-specific miRNA that targets an ethylene receptor gene, implying its function in the ethylene signaling pathway. This work will also advance our understanding of miRNA functions and evolution in plants.

  16. miRNA Repertoires of Demosponges Stylissa carteri and Xestospongia testudinaria

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Manuel; Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs that are involved in many biological process in eukaryotes. They play a crucial role in modulating genetic expression of their targets, which makes them integral components of transcriptional regulatory networks. As sponges (phylum Porifera) are commonly considered the most basal metazoan, the in-depth capture of miRNAs from these organisms provides additional clues to the evolution of miRNA families in metazoans. Here, we identified the core proteins involved in the biogenesis of miRNAs, and obtained evidence for bona fide miRNA sequences for two marine sponges Stylissa carteri and Xestospongia testudinaria (11 and 19 respectively). Our analysis identified several miRNAs that are conserved amongst demosponges, and revealed that all of the novel miRNAs identified in these two species are specific to the class Demospongiae. PMID:26871907

  17. The potential of miRNAs for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertoli, Gloria; Cava, Claudia; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) has a fundamental role in the initiation, development and progression of several human cancers, including breast cancer (BC), since strong evidence has shown that miRNAs can regulate the expression of oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. A possible role of miRNAs in the diagnosis in BC has been demonstrated. As miRNAs has been found stable in biofluids, extracellular multiple miRNA profiles have been proposed as diagnostic tools, showing better diagnostic performance than individual miRNAs in BC. In this paper, based on the current literature, we present the role of microRNAs in the diagnosis and therapy monitoring of BC. Furthermore, we report new miRNA-based drugs that could be turned into promising therapy for BC, alone or in combination with conventional therapy. We also discuss how extracellular miRNAs could become new, easily accessible, affordable, non-invasive tools for BC patients.

  18. miRClassify: an advanced web server for miRNA family classification and annotation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Quan; Mao, Yaozong; Hu, Lingling; Wu, Yunfeng; Ji, Zhiliang

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) family is a group of miRNAs that derive from the common ancestor. Normally, members from the same miRNA family have similar physiological functions; however, they are not always conserved in primary sequence or secondary structure. Proper family prediction from primary sequence will be helpful for accurate identification and further functional annotation of novel miRNA. Therefore, we introduced a novel machine learning-based web server, the miRClassify, which can rapidly identify miRNA from the primary sequence and classify it into a miRNA family regardless of similarity in sequence and structure. Additionally, the medical implication of the miRNA family is also provided when it is available in PubMed. The web server is accessible at the link http://datamining.xmu.edu.cn/software/MIR/home.html.

  19. miRNAs Are Involved in Determining the Improved Vigor of Autotetrapoid Chrysanthemum nankingense

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bin; Wang, Haibin; Song, Aiping; Liu, Tao; Chen, Yun; Fang, Weimin; Chen, Sumei; Chen, Fadi; Guan, Zhiyong; Jiang, Jiafu

    2016-01-01

    Many plant species are autopolyploid, a condition frequently associated with improvements in both vegetative and reproductive vigor. The possible contribution of miRNAs to this improvement was investigated by characterizing the miRNA content of a diploid and an autotetraploid form of Chrysanthemum nankingense. 162 and 161 known miRNA sequences were identified in 2x and 4x library. The length of 22 and 25 nt was predominant in diploid. However, 21 and 24 nt showed dominance in autotetraploid. It seems likely that autopolyploidization have had an immediate effect the distribution of miRNAs. In addition, the abundance of the miRNAs differed markedly between the two ploidy levels and contributed to their targets diversity. A number of target genes associated with miRNAs play important roles in growth and development. The conclusion was that some miRNAs likely make a contribution to the vigor displayed by autotetraploid C. nankingense. PMID:27733854

  20. Analysis of miRNA market trends reveals hotspots of research activity.

    PubMed

    Oosta, Gary; Razvi, Enal

    2012-04-01

    We have conducted an analysis of the miRNA research marketplace by evaluating the publication trends in the field. In this article, we present the results of our analysis which reveals that hotspots exist in terms of research activities in the miRNA space--these hotspots illustrate the areas in the miRNA research space where specific miRNAs have been extensively studied, and other areas that represent new territory. We frame these data into the context of areas of opportunity for miRNA content harvest versus segments of opportunity for the development of research tools. Also presented in this article are the primary market data from online surveys we have performed with researchers involved in miRNA research around the world. Taken together, these data frame the current state of the miRNA marketplace and provide niches of opportunity for new entrants into this space.

  1. Combining miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles in Wilms Tumor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Werner, Tamara V.; Backes, Christina; Trampert, Patrick; Gessler, Manfred; Keller, Andreas; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Graf, Norbert; Meese, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood renal cancer. Recent findings of mutations in microRNA (miRNA) processing proteins suggest a pivotal role of miRNAs in WT genesis. We performed miRNA expression profiling of 36 WTs of different subtypes and four normal kidney tissues using microarrays. Additionally, we determined the gene expression profile of 28 of these tumors to identify potentially correlated target genes and affected pathways. We identified 85 miRNAs and 2107 messenger RNAs (mRNA) differentially expressed in blastemal WT, and 266 miRNAs and 1267 mRNAs differentially expressed in regressive subtype. The hierarchical clustering of the samples, using either the miRNA or mRNA profile, showed the clear separation of WT from normal kidney samples, but the miRNA pattern yielded better separation of WT subtypes. A correlation analysis of the deregulated miRNA and mRNAs identified 13,026 miRNA/mRNA pairs with inversely correlated expression, of which 2844 are potential interactions of miRNA and their predicted mRNA targets. We found significant upregulation of miRNAs-183, -301a/b and -335 for the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs-181b, -223 and -630 for the regressive subtype. We found marked deregulation of miRNAs regulating epithelial to mesenchymal transition, especially in the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs influencing chemosensitivity, especially in regressive subtypes. Further research is needed to assess the influence of preoperative chemotherapy and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes on the miRNA and mRNA patterns in WT. PMID:27043538

  2. The Values of Coronary Circulating miRNAs in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guiyu; Cui, Yuxia; Jia, Zhenghua; Yue, Yunan; Yang, Shuixiang

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of miRNA regulation in atrial fibrillation (AF) occurrence and development is still unclear, especially, the regulating values of coronary circulating miRNAs has not been reported. Based on our AF radiofrequency ablation clinical practice and previous miRNA study, we proposed a hypothesis that the coronary circulating miRNA might much better reflect the regulating state and metabolic level of myocardial miRNA in AF patient. To investigate the regulating values of coronary circulation miRNA, 90 AF patients were selected and compared with 90 healthy subjects, the changes of coronary circulating miRNA differential expression profile in the whole genome were observed in this study. We found out that compared with autologous peripheral blood (PB), 6 miRNAs were upregulated and 8 miRNA downregulated in AF patients’ coronary sinus blood (CSB) significantly, especially, the expression of miR-1266, miR-4279 and miR-4666a-3p were obviously increased. Compared with normal donors’ peripheral blood, 16 miRNAs were upregulated and 24 miRNAs downregulated dramatically in patients’ peripheral blood, among them, the miR-3171 decreased, but miR-892a and miR-3149 increased significantly from the early to end stages of AF. Our results indicated that the coronary circulating miRNA can really reflect the regulating values of miRNA in AF patient; the level of miRNA change in 3 types of AF may reflect the severity of AF clinical and pathophysiological advance; The miR-892a, miR-3171 and miR-3149 may be used as biomarkers for earlier diagnosis, while miR-1266, miR-4279 and miR-4666a-3p may serve as potential intervening targets for AF patient in future. PMID:27855199

  3. Plasma miRNA-506 as a Prognostic Biomarker for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Ping; Su, Hong-Xin; Zhao, Da; Guan, Quan-Lin

    2016-06-27

    BACKGROUND MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are responsible for regulating proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, invasion, and metastasis in tumor cells. miRNA-506 is abnormally expressed in multiple tumors, indicating that it might be oncogenic or tumor-suppressive. However, little is known about the association between miRNA-506 expression and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). MATERIAL AND METHODS We examined the expression of miRNA-506 in the plasma of ESCC patients using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to determine the association between miRNA-506 expression and clinicopathological features of ESCC. ROC curves were produced for ESCC diagnosis by plasma miRNA-506 and the area under curve was calculated to explore its diagnostic value. RESULTS Average miRNA-506 expression levels were remarkably higher in the plasma of ESCC patients than in healthy volunteers (P<0.001). The expression of miRNA-506 in the plasma was closely associated with lymph node status (P=0.004), TNM stage (P=0.031), and tumor length (P<0.001). According to ROC curves, the area under the curve for plasma miRNA-506 was 0.835, indicating statistical significance for ESCC diagnosis by plasma miRNA-506 (P<0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with high miRNA-506 expression had significantly shorter survival time than those with low miRNA-506 expression. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that T stage, N stage, tumor length, and miRNA-506 expression levels were significantly correlated with prognosis in ESCC patients. CONCLUSIONS miRNA-506 can serve as an important molecular marker for diagnosis and prognostic prediction of ESCC.

  4. Diet and lifestyle factors associated with miRNA expression in colorectal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Mullany, Lila E; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-protein-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression. Diet and lifestyle factors have been hypothesized to be involved in the regulation of miRNA expression. In this study it was hypothesized that diet and lifestyle factors are associated with miRNA expression. Data from 1,447 cases of colorectal cancer to evaluate 34 diet and lifestyle variables using miRNA expression in normal colorectal mucosa as well as for differential expression between paired carcinoma and normal tissue were used. miRNA data were obtained using an Agilent platform. Multiple comparisons were adjusted for using the false discovery rate q-value. There were 250 miRNAs differentially expressed between carcinoma and normal colonic tissue by level of carbohydrate intake and 198 miRNAs differentially expressed by the level of sucrose intake. Of these miRNAs, 166 miRNAs were differentially expressed for both carbohydrate intake and sucrose intake. Ninety-nine miRNAs were differentially expressed by the level of whole grain intake in normal colonic mucosa. Level of oxidative balance score was associated with 137 differentially expressed miRNAs between carcinoma and paired normal rectal mucosa. Additionally, 135 miRNAs were differentially expressed in colon tissue based on recent NSAID use. Other dietary factors, body mass index, waist and hip circumference, and long-term physical activity levels did not alter miRNA expression after adjustment for multiple comparisons. These results suggest that diet and lifestyle factors regulate miRNA level. They provide additional support for the influence of carbohydrate, sucrose, whole grains, NSAIDs, and oxidative balance score on colorectal cancer risk. PMID:28053552

  5. miRNA genes of an invasive vector mosquito, Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jinbao; Hu, Wanqi; Wu, Jinya; Zheng, Peiming; Chen, Maoshan; James, Anthony A; Chen, Xiaoguang; Tu, Zhijian

    2013-01-01

    Aedes albopictus, a vector of Dengue and Chikungunya viruses, is a robust invasive species in both tropical and temperate environments. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression and biological processes including embryonic development, innate immunity and infection. While a number of miRNAs have been discovered in some mosquitoes, no comprehensive effort has been made to characterize them from different developmental stages from a single species. Systematic analysis of miRNAs in Ae. albopictus will improve our understanding of its basic biology and inform novel strategies to prevent virus transmission. Between 10-14 million Illumina sequencing reads per sample were obtained from embryos, larvae, pupae, adult males, sugar-fed and blood-fed adult females. A total of 119 miRNA genes represented by 215 miRNA or miRNA star (miRNA*) sequences were identified, 15 of which are novel. Eleven, two, and two of the newly-discovered miRNA genes appear specific to Aedes, Culicinae, and Culicidae, respectively. A number of miRNAs accumulate predominantly in one or two developmental stages and the large number that showed differences in abundance following a blood meal likely are important in blood-induced mosquito biology. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of the targets of all Ae. albopictus miRNAs provides a useful starting point for the study of their functions in mosquitoes. This study is the first systematic analysis of miRNAs based on deep-sequencing of small RNA samples of all developmental stages of a mosquito species. A number of miRNAs are related to specific physiological states, most notably, pre- and post-blood feeding. The distribution of lineage-specific miRNAs is consistent with mosquito phylogeny and the presence of a number of Aedes-specific miRNAs likely reflects the divergence between the Aedes and Culex genera.

  6. Regulation of Gene Expression in Plants through miRNA Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanji; Ziegler, Todd E.; Roberts, James K.; Heck, Gregory R.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms possess a complex RNA-directed gene expression regulatory network allowing the production of unique gene expression patterns. A recent addition to the repertoire of RNA-based gene regulation is miRNA target decoys, endogenous RNA that can negatively regulate miRNA activity. miRNA decoys have been shown to be a valuable tool for understanding the function of several miRNA families in plants and invertebrates. Engineering and precise manipulation of an endogenous RNA regulatory network through modification of miRNA activity also affords a significant opportunity to achieve a desired outcome of enhanced plant development or response to environmental stresses. Here we report that expression of miRNA decoys as single or heteromeric non-cleavable microRNA (miRNA) sites embedded in either non-protein-coding or within the 3′ untranslated region of protein-coding transcripts can regulate the expression of one or more miRNA targets. By altering the sequence of the miRNA decoy sites, we were able to attenuate miRNA inactivation, which allowed for fine regulation of native miRNA targets and the production of a desirable range of plant phenotypes. Thus, our results demonstrate miRNA decoys are a flexible and robust tool, not only for studying miRNA function, but also for targeted engineering of gene expression in plants. Computational analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome revealed a number of potential miRNA decoys, suggesting that endogenous decoys may have an important role in natural modulation of expression in plants. PMID:21731706

  7. Extracellular miRNA: A Collision of Two Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Turchinovich, Andrey; Tonevitsky, Alexander G; Burwinkel, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Since their discovery in 2008, extracellular miRNAs (ex-miRNAs) have persisted as one of the major themes of molecular and cellular biology. The main reason for this remarkable interest is the increasing number of research papers reporting that cell-free circulating miRNA mediates both short-range and distant communication between various cells, and could impact on diverse physiological and pathological processes. However, there are also multiple conflicting lines of evidence that challenge the biological significance of circulating ex-miRNA, suggesting that they are merely byproducts of cell activity and cell death without any particular function. This review aims to summarize these contrasting opinions and to foster further experimental validation of both paradigms.

  8. Viral miRNA targeting of bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Huang, Yufei; Jung, Jae U; Lu, Chun; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2014-08-01

    Successful viral infection entails a choreographic regulation of viral gene expression program. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes numerous miRNAs that regulate viral life cycle. However, few viral targets have been identified due to the lack of information on KSHV 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs). Recent genome-wide mapping of KSHV transcripts and 3'UTRs has revealed abundant bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts. The extended 3'UTRs of the 5' proximal genes of bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts offer additional regulatory targets. Indeed, a genome-wide screening of KSHV 3'UTRs has identified several bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts as the novel targets of viral miRNAs. Together, these works have expanded our knowledge of the unique features of KSHV gene regulation program and provided valuable resources for the research community.

  9. Viral miRNA Targeting of Bicistronic and Polycistronic Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ying; Huang, Yufei; Jung, Jae U.; Lu, Chun; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Successful viral infection entails a choreographic regulation of viral gene expression program. Kaposi’s sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes numerous miRNAs that regulate viral life cycle. However, few viral targets have been identified due to the lack of information on KSHV 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTRs). Recent genome-wide mapping of KSHV transcripts and 3′UTRs has revealed abundant bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts. The extended 3′UTRs of the 5′ proximal genes of bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts offer additional regulatory targets. Indeed, a genome-wide screening of KSHV 3′UTRs has identified several bicistronic and polycistronic transcripts as the novel targets of viral miRNAs. Together, these works have expanded our knowledge of the unique features of KSHV gene regulation program and provided valuable resources for the research community. PMID:24821460

  10. Exosomes and Exosomal miRNA in Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alipoor, Shamila D.; Garssen, Johan; Movassaghi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are nanosized vesicles released from every cell in the body including those in the respiratory tract and lungs. They are found in most body fluids and contain a number of different biomolecules including proteins, lipids, and both mRNA and noncoding RNAs. Since they can release their contents, particularly miRNAs, to both neighboring and distal cells, they are considered important in cell-cell communication. Recent evidence has shown their possible importance in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases. The differential expression of exosomes and of exosomal miRNAs in disease has driven their promise as biomarkers of disease enabling noninvasive clinical diagnosis in addition to their use as therapeutic tools. In this review, we summarize recent advances in this area as applicable to pulmonary diseases. PMID:27738390

  11. Altered expression of selected microRNAs in melanoma: antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity of miRNA-155.

    PubMed

    Levati, Lauretta; Alvino, Ester; Pagani, Elena; Arcelli, Diego; Caporaso, Patrizia; Bondanza, Sergio; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Ferracin, Manuela; Volinia, Stefano; Bonmassar, Enzo; Croce, Carlo Maria; D'Atri, Stefania

    2009-08-01

    Altered expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been detected in cancer, suggesting that these small non-coding RNAs can act as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. In the present study, we investigated the expression of miRNA-17-5p, miRNA-18a, miRNA-20a, miRNA-92a, miRNA-146a, miRNA-146b and miRNA-155 by real-time quantitative RT-PCR in a panel of melanocyte cultures and melanoma cell lines and explored the possible role of miRNA-155 in melanoma cell proliferation and survival. The analyzed miRNAs were selected on the basis of previous studies strongly supporting their involvement in cancer development and/or progression. We found that miRNA-17-5p, miRNA-18a, miRNA-20a, and miRNA-92a were overexpressed, whereas miRNA-146a, miRNA-146b and miRNA-155 were down-regulated in the majority of melanoma cell lines with respect to melanocytes. Ectopic expression of miRNA-155 significantly inhibited proliferation in 12 of 13 melanoma cell lines with reduced levels of this miRNA and induced apoptosis in 4 out of 4 cell lines analyzed. In conclusion, our data further support the finding of altered miRNA expression in melanoma cells and establish for the first time that miRNA-155 is a negative regulator of melanoma cell proliferation and survival.

  12. Characterization of miRNAs in response to short-term waterlogging in three inbred lines of Zea mays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To characterize the involvement of miRNAs and their targets in response to short-term hypoxia conditions, a quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) assay was used to quantify the expression of the 24 candidate mature miRNA signatures (22 known and 2 novel mature miRNAs, representing 66 miRNA loci) and ...

  13. Role of miRNA-9 in Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Balachandar; Alwin Prem Anand, A.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small regulatory RNAs involved in gene regulation. The regulation is effected by either translational inhibition or transcriptional silencing. In vertebrates, the importance of miRNA in development was discovered from mice and zebrafish dicer knockouts. The miRNA-9 (miR-9) is one of the most highly expressed miRNAs in the early and adult vertebrate brain. It has diverse functions within the developing vertebrate brain. In this article, the role of miR-9 in the developing forebrain (telencephalon and diencephalon), midbrain, hindbrain, and spinal cord of vertebrate species is highlighted. In the forebrain, miR-9 is necessary for the proper development of dorsoventral telencephalon by targeting marker genes expressed in the telencephalon. It regulates proliferation in telencephalon by regulating Foxg1, Pax6, Gsh2, and Meis2 genes. The feedback loop regulation between miR-9 and Nr2e1/Tlx helps in neuronal migration and differentiation. Targeting Foxp1 and Foxp2, and Map1b by miR-9 regulates the radial migration of neurons and axonal development. In the organizers, miR-9 is inversely regulated by hairy1 and Fgf8 to maintain zona limitans interthalamica and midbrain–hindbrain boundary (MHB). It maintains the MHB by inhibiting Fgf signaling genes and is involved in the neurogenesis of the midbrain–hindbrain by regulating Her genes. In the hindbrain, miR-9 modulates progenitor proliferation and differentiation by regulating Her genes and Elav3. In the spinal cord, miR-9 modulates the regulation of Foxp1 and Onecut1 for motor neuron development. In the forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain, miR-9 is necessary for proper neuronal progenitor maintenance, neurogenesis, and differentiation. In vertebrate brain development, miR-9 is involved in regulating several region-specific genes in a spatiotemporal pattern. PMID:27721656

  14. Multiplexed miRNA northern blots via hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Maayan; Pierce, Niles A

    2016-09-06

    Northern blots enable detection of a target RNA of interest in a biological sample using standard benchtop equipment. miRNAs are the most challenging targets as they must be detected with a single short nucleic acid probe. With existing approaches, it is cumbersome to perform multiplexed blots in which several RNAs are detected simultaneously, impeding the study of interacting regulatory elements. Here, we address this shortcoming by demonstrating multiplexed northern blotting based on the mechanism of hybridization chain reaction (HCR). With this approach, nucleic acid probes complementary to RNA targets trigger chain reactions in which fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The programmability of HCR allows multiple amplifiers to operate simultaneously and independently within a blot, enabling straightforward multiplexing. We demonstrate simultaneous detection of three endogenous miRNAs in total RNA extracted from 293T and HeLa cells. For a given target, HCR signal scales linearly with target abundance, enabling relative and absolute quantitation. Using non-radioactive HCR, sensitive and selective miRNA detection is achieved using 2'OMe-RNA probes. The HCR northern blot protocol takes ∼1.5 days independent of the number of target RNAs.

  15. Fine tuning by miRNAs in development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, Peter; Levine, Erel; Levine, Herbert

    2007-03-01

    The unique role played by microRNA in a developing embryo is a topic of much current research interest. One possibility is that microRNA diffuse within a developing tissue, acting as communicators between different cells. Here we pursue this possibility in two different contexts. The first case occurs when the transcription profiles of the microRNA and its target are spatially anticorrelated, as for example is the case in the iab4-Ubx system in fly. Conversely, in the second context the two transcription profiles are correlated in space, as may be the case for the mir10-Hoxb4 system in mouse. In each context we identify a major function for a mobile miRNA. In the first, miRNA serve to induce an all-or-nothing response of the mRNA profile to its morphogen by generating a sharp boundary between domains of high and (ultimately) low target expression. In the second, miRNA amplify polarity in the target expression pattern by removing residual mRNAs. Importantly, our model predicts that these two functions require very different type of diffusion. While our results are highly quantitative, we propose ways of realizing them in experiments, taking into account limitations of standard experimental techniques.

  16. Genome-wide analysis for discovery of new rice miRNA reveals natural antisense miRNA (nat-miRNAs)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small RNAs (21-24nt) are involved in gene regulation through translation inhibition, mRNA cleavage, or directing chromatin modifications. In rice, currently ~240 miRNAs have been annotated. We sequenced more than four million small RNAs from rice and identified another 24 miRNA genes. Among these, w...

  17. miRNA Profiles in Plasma from Patients with Sleep Disorders Reveal Dysregulation of miRNAs in Narcolepsy and Other Central Hypersomnias

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Anja; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Knudsen, Stine; Kornum, Birgitte R.; Modvig, Signe; Jennum, Poul; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human diseases including neurological disorders. The aim is to address the involvement of miRNAs in the pathophysiology of central hypersomnias including autoimmune narcolepsy with cataplexy and hypocretin deficiency (type 1 narcolepsy), narcolepsy without cataplexy (type 2 narcolepsy), and idiopathic hypersomnia. Design: We conducted high-throughput analysis of miRNA in plasma from three groups of patients—with type 1 narcolepsy, type 2 narcolepsy, and idiopathic hypersomnia, respectively—in comparison with healthy controls using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) panels. Setting: University hospital based sleep clinic and research laboratories. Patients: Twelve patients with type 1 narcolepsy, 12 patients with type 2 narcolepsy, 12 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia, and 12 healthy controls. Measurements and Results: By analyzing miRNA in plasma with qPCR we identified 50, 24, and 6 miRNAs that were different in patients with type 1 narcolepsy, type 2 narcolepsy, and idiopathic hypersomnia, respectively, compared with healthy controls. Twenty miRNA candidates who fulfilled the criteria of at least two-fold difference and p-value < 0.05 were selected to validate the miRNA changes in an independent cohort of patients. Four miRNAs differed significantly between type 1 narcolepsy patients and healthy controls. Levels of miR-30c, let-7f, and miR-26a were higher, whereas the level of miR-130a was lower in type 1 narcolepsy than healthy controls. The miRNA differences were not specific for type 1 narcolepsy, since the levels of the four miRNAs were also altered in patients with type 2 narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia compared with healthy controls. Conclusion: The levels of four miRNAs differed in plasma from patients with type 1 narcolepsy, type 2 narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia suggesting that alterations of miRNAs may be involved in the

  18. miRNAs: small genes with big potential in metazoan phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Tarver, James E; Sperling, Erik A; Nailor, Audrey; Heimberg, Alysha M; Robinson, Jeffrey M; King, Benjamin L; Pisani, Davide; Donoghue, Philip C J; Peterson, Kevin J

    2013-11-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a key component of gene regulatory networks and have been implicated in the regulation of virtually every biological process found in multicellular eukaryotes. What makes them interesting from a phylogenetic perspective is the high conservation of primary sequence between taxa, their accrual in metazoan genomes through evolutionary time, and the rarity of secondary loss in most metazoan taxa. Despite these properties, the use of miRNAs as phylogenetic markers has not yet been discussed within a clear conceptual framework. Here we highlight five properties of miRNAs that underlie their utility in phylogenetics: 1) The processes of miRNA biogenesis enable the identification of novel miRNAs without prior knowledge of sequence; 2) The continuous addition of miRNA families to metazoan genomes through evolutionary time; 3) The low level of secondary gene loss in most metazoan taxa; 4) The low substitution rate in the mature miRNA sequence; and 5) The small probability of convergent evolution of two miRNAs. Phylogenetic analyses using both Bayesian and parsimony methods on a eumetazoan miRNA data set highlight the potential of miRNAs to become an invaluable new tool, especially when used as an additional line of evidence, to resolve previously intractable nodes within the tree of life.

  19. miRNA in situ hybridization in circulating tumor cells - MishCTC

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Francisco G.; Lorente, Jose A.; Garcia Puche, Jose L.; Ruiz, Maria P.; Sanchez-Martin, Rosario M.; de Miguel-Pérez, Diego; Diaz-Mochon, Juan J.; Serrano, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) must be phenotypically and genetically characterized before they can be utilized in clinical applications. Here, we present the first protocol for the detection of miRNAs in CTCs using in situ hybridization (ISH) combined with immunomagnetic selection based on cytokeratin (CK) expression and immunocytochemistry. Locked-Nucleic Acid (LNA) probes associated with an enzyme-labeled fluorescence (ELF) signal amplification approach were used to detect miRNA-21 in CTCs. This protocol was optimized using both epithelial tumor (MDA-MB468) and epithelial non-tumor (MCF-10A) cell lines, and miRNA-21 was selected as the target miRNA because of its known role as an onco-miRNA. Hematopoietic cells do not express miRNA-21; thus, miRNA-21 is an ideal marker for detecting CTCs. Peripheral blood samples were taken from 25 cancer patients and these samples were analyzed using our developed protocol. Of the 25 samples, 11 contained CTCs. For all 11 CTC-positive samples, the isolated CTCs expressed both CK and miRNA-21. Finally, the protocol was applied to monitor miRNA-21 expression in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-induced MCF-7 cells, an epithelial tumor cell line. CK expression was lost in these cells, whereas miRNA-21 was still expressed, suggesting that miRNA-21 might be a good marker for detecting CTCs with an EMT phenotype. PMID:25777797

  20. miRNA in situ hybridization in circulating tumor cells--MishCTC.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Francisco G; Lorente, Jose A; Garcia Puche, Jose L; Ruiz, Maria P; Sanchez-Martin, Rosario M; de Miguel-Pérez, Diego; Diaz-Mochon, Juan J; Serrano, Maria J

    2015-03-17

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) must be phenotypically and genetically characterized before they can be utilized in clinical applications. Here, we present the first protocol for the detection of miRNAs in CTCs using in situ hybridization (ISH) combined with immunomagnetic selection based on cytokeratin (CK) expression and immunocytochemistry. Locked-Nucleic Acid (LNA) probes associated with an enzyme-labeled fluorescence (ELF) signal amplification approach were used to detect miRNA-21 in CTCs. This protocol was optimized using both epithelial tumor (MDA-MB468) and epithelial non-tumor (MCF-10A) cell lines, and miRNA-21 was selected as the target miRNA because of its known role as an onco-miRNA. Hematopoietic cells do not express miRNA-21; thus, miRNA-21 is an ideal marker for detecting CTCs. Peripheral blood samples were taken from 25 cancer patients and these samples were analyzed using our developed protocol. Of the 25 samples, 11 contained CTCs. For all 11 CTC-positive samples, the isolated CTCs expressed both CK and miRNA-21. Finally, the protocol was applied to monitor miRNA-21 expression in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-induced MCF-7 cells, an epithelial tumor cell line. CK expression was lost in these cells, whereas miRNA-21 was still expressed, suggesting that miRNA-21 might be a good marker for detecting CTCs with an EMT phenotype.

  1. PmiRExAt: plant miRNA expression atlas database and web applications.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Anoop Kishor Singh; Panwar, Abhijeet Singh; Gupta, Rajinder; Mantri, Shrikant S

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput small RNA (sRNA) sequencing technology enables an entirely new perspective for plant microRNA (miRNA) research and has immense potential to unravel regulatory networks. Novel insights gained through data mining in publically available rich resource of sRNA data will help in designing biotechnology-based approaches for crop improvement to enhance plant yield and nutritional value. Bioinformatics resources enabling meta-analysis of miRNA expression across multiple plant species are still evolving. Here, we report PmiRExAt, a new online database resource that caters plant miRNA expression atlas. The web-based repository comprises of miRNA expression profile and query tool for 1859 wheat, 2330 rice and 283 maize miRNA. The database interface offers open and easy access to miRNA expression profile and helps in identifying tissue preferential, differential and constitutively expressing miRNAs. A feature enabling expression study of conserved miRNA across multiple species is also implemented. Custom expression analysis feature enables expression analysis of novel miRNA in total 117 datasets. New sRNA dataset can also be uploaded for analysing miRNA expression profiles for 73 plant species. PmiRExAt application program interface, a simple object access protocol web service allows other programmers to remotely invoke the methods written for doing programmatic search operations on PmiRExAt database.Database URL:http://pmirexat.nabi.res.in.

  2. Analysis of miRNAs and Their Targets during Adventitious Shoot Organogenesis of Acacia crassicarpa

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lingyu; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Fei; Wang, Weixuan; Liang, Di; Yang, Hailun; Jin, Yi; Xie, Xiangming

    2014-01-01

    Organogenesis is an important process for plant regeneration by tissue or cell mass differentiation to regenerate a complete plant. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an essential role in regulating plant development by mediating target genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, but the diversity of miRNAs and their potential roles in organogenesis of Acacia crassicarpa have rarely been investigated. In this study, approximately 10 million sequence reads were obtained from a small RNA library, from which 189 conserved miRNAs from 57 miRNA families, and 7 novel miRNAs from 5 families, were identified from A. crassicarpa organogenetic tissues. Target prediction for these miRNAs yielded 237 potentially unique genes, of which 207 received target Gene Ontology annotations. On the basis of a bioinformatic analysis, one novel and 13 conserved miRNAs were selected to investigate their possible roles in A. crassicarpa organogenesis by qRT-PCR. The stage-specific expression patterns of the miRNAs provided information on their possible regulatory functions, including shoot bud formation, modulated function after transfer of the culture to light, and regulatory roles during induction of organogenesis. This study is the first to investigate miRNAs associated with A. crassicarpa organogenesis. The results provide a foundation for further characterization of miRNA expression profiles and roles in the regulation of diverse physiological pathways during adventitious shoot organogenesis of A. crassicarpa. PMID:24718555

  3. Analysis of Chromosome 17 miRNAs and Their Importance in Medulloblastomas

    PubMed Central

    López-Ochoa, Sebastian; Ramírez-García, Marina

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small sequences of nucleotides that regulate posttranscriptionally gene expression. In recent years they have been recognized as very important general regulators of proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, cell death, and others. In some cases, the characteristic presence of miRNAs reflects some of the cellular pathways that may be altered. Particularly medulloblastomas (MB) represent entities that undergo almost characteristic alterations of chromosome 17: from loss of discrete fragments and isochromosomes formation to complete loss of one of them. An analysis of the major loci on this chromosome revealed that it contains at least 19 genes encoding miRNAs which may regulate the development and differentiation of the brain and cerebellum. miRNAs are regulators of real complex networks; they can regulate from 100 to over 300 messengers of various proteins. In this review some miRNAs are considered to be important in MB studies. Some of them are miRNA-5047, miRNA-1253, miRNA-2909, and miRNA-634. Everyone can significantly affect the development, growth, and cell invasion of MB, and they have not been explored in this tumor. In this review, we propose some miRNAs that can affect some genes in MB, and hence the importance of its study. PMID:25866804

  4. PmiRExAt: plant miRNA expression atlas database and web applications

    PubMed Central

    Gurjar, Anoop Kishor Singh; Panwar, Abhijeet Singh; Gupta, Rajinder; Mantri, Shrikant S.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput small RNA (sRNA) sequencing technology enables an entirely new perspective for plant microRNA (miRNA) research and has immense potential to unravel regulatory networks. Novel insights gained through data mining in publically available rich resource of sRNA data will help in designing biotechnology-based approaches for crop improvement to enhance plant yield and nutritional value. Bioinformatics resources enabling meta-analysis of miRNA expression across multiple plant species are still evolving. Here, we report PmiRExAt, a new online database resource that caters plant miRNA expression atlas. The web-based repository comprises of miRNA expression profile and query tool for 1859 wheat, 2330 rice and 283 maize miRNA. The database interface offers open and easy access to miRNA expression profile and helps in identifying tissue preferential, differential and constitutively expressing miRNAs. A feature enabling expression study of conserved miRNA across multiple species is also implemented. Custom expression analysis feature enables expression analysis of novel miRNA in total 117 datasets. New sRNA dataset can also be uploaded for analysing miRNA expression profiles for 73 plant species. PmiRExAt application program interface, a simple object access protocol web service allows other programmers to remotely invoke the methods written for doing programmatic search operations on PmiRExAt database. Database URL: http://pmirexat.nabi.res.in. PMID:27081157

  5. Regulatory networks between neurotrophins and miRNAs in brain diseases and cancers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian

    2015-02-01

    Neurotrophins are involved in many physiological and pathological processes in the nervous system. They regulate and modify signal transduction, transcription and translation in neurons. It is recently demonstrated that the neurotrophin expression is regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs), changing our views on neurotrophins and miRNAs. Generally, miRNAs regulate neurotrophins and their receptors in at least two ways: (1) miRNAs bind directly to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of isoform-specific mRNAs and post-transcriptionally regulate their expression; (2) miRNAs bind to the 3' UTR of the regulatory factors of neurotrophins and regulate their expression. On the other hand, neurotrophins can regulate miRNAs. The results of BNDF research show that neurotrophins regulate miRNAs in at least three ways: (1) ERK stimulation enhances the activation of TRBP (HIV-1 TAR RNA-binding protein) and Dicer, leading to the upregulation of miRNA biogenesis; (2) ERK-dependent upregulation of Lin28a (RNA-binding proteins) blocks select miRNA biogenesis; (3) transcriptional regulation of miRNA expression through activation of transcription factors, including CREB and NF-κB. These regulatory processes integrate positive and negative regulatory loops in neurotrophin and miRNA signaling pathways, and also expand the function of neurotrophins and miRNAs. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the regulatory networks between neurotrophins and miRNAs in brain diseases and cancers, for which novel cutting edge therapeutic, delivery and diagnostic approaches are emerging.

  6. Posttranscriptional deregulation of signaling pathways in meningioma subtypes by differential expression of miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Mueller, Sabine C.; Backes, Christina; Werner, Tamara V.; Galata, Valentina; Sartorius, Elke; Bohle, Rainer M.; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Background Micro (mi)RNAs are key regulators of gene expression and offer themselves as biomarkers for cancer development and progression. Meningioma is one of the most frequent primary intracranial tumors. As of yet, there are limited data on the role of miRNAs in meningioma of different histological subtypes and the affected signaling pathways. Methods In this study, we compared expression of 1205 miRNAs in different meningioma grades and histological subtypes using microarrays and independently validated deregulation of selected miRNAs with quantitative real-time PCR. Clinical utility of a subset of miRNAs as biomarkers for World Health Organization (WHO) grade II meningioma based on quantitative real-time data was tested. Potential targets of deregulated miRNAs were discovered with an in silico analysis. Results We identified 13 miRNAs deregulated between different subtypes of benign meningiomas, and 52 miRNAs deregulated in anaplastic meningioma compared with benign meningiomas. Known and putative target genes of deregulated miRNAs include genes involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition for benign meningiomas, and Wnt, transforming growth factor–β, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling for higher-grade meningiomas. Furthermore, a 4-miRNA signature (miR-222, -34a*, -136, and -497) shows promise as a biomarker differentiating WHO grade II from grade I meningiomas with an area under the curve of 0.75. Conclusions Our data provide novel insights into the contribution of miRNAs to the phenotypic spectrum in benign meningiomas. By deregulating translation of genes belonging to signaling pathways known to be important for meningioma genesis and progression, miRNAs provide a second in line amplification of growth promoting cellular signals. MiRNAs as biomarkers for diagnosis of aggressive meningiomas might prove useful and should be explored further in a prospective manner. PMID:25681310

  7. Mapping circulating serum miRNAs to their immune-related target mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Nosirov, Bakhtiyor; Billaud, Joël; Vandenbon, Alexis; Diez, Diego; Wijaya, Edward; Ishii, Ken J; Teraguchi, Shunsuke; Standley, Daron M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Evidence suggests that circulating serum microRNAs (miRNAs) might preferentially target immune-related mRNAs. If this were the case, we hypothesized that immune-related mRNAs would have more predicted serum miRNA binding sites than other mRNAs and, reciprocally, that serum miRNAs would have more immune-related mRNA targets than non-serum miRNAs. Materials and methods We developed a consensus target predictor using the random forest framework and calculated the number of predicted miRNA–mRNA interactions in various subsets of miRNAs (serum, non-serum) and mRNAs (immune related, nonimmune related). Results Immune-related mRNAs were predicted to be targeted by serum miRNA more than other mRNAs. Moreover, serum miRNAs were predicted to target many more immune-related mRNA targets than non-serum miRNAs; however, these two biases in immune-related mRNAs and serum miRNAs appear to be completely independent. Conclusion Immune-related mRNAs have more miRNA binding sites in general, not just for serum miRNAs; likewise, serum miRNAs target many more mRNAs than non-serum miRNAs overall, regardless of whether they are immune related or not. Nevertheless, these two independent phenomena result in a significantly larger number of predicted serum miRNA–immune mRNA interactions than would be expected by chance. PMID:28203094

  8. miRNA regulation in the early development of barley seed

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During the early stages of seed development many genes are under dynamic regulation to ensure the proper differentiation and establishment of the tissue that will constitute the mature grain. To investigate how miRNA regulation contributes to this process in barley, a combination of small RNA and mRNA degradome analyses were used to identify miRNAs and their targets. Results Our analysis identified 84 known miRNAs and 7 new miRNAs together with 96 putative miRNA target genes regulated through a slicing mechanism in grain tissues during the first 15 days post anthesis. We also identified many potential miRNAs including several belonging to known miRNA families. Our data gave us evidence for an increase in miRNA-mediated regulation during the transition between pre-storage and storage phases. Potential miRNA targets were found in various signalling pathways including components of four phytohormone pathways (ABA, GA, auxin, ethylene) and the defence response to powdery mildew infection. Among the putative miRNA targets we identified were two essential genes controlling the GA response, a GA3oxidase1 and a homolog of the receptor GID1, and a homolog of the ACC oxidase which catalyses the last step of ethylene biosynthesis. We found that two MLA genes are potentially miRNA regulated, establishing a direct link between miRNAs and the R gene response. Conclusion Our dataset provides a useful source of information on miRNA regulation during the early development of cereal grains and our analysis suggests that miRNAs contribute to the control of development of the cereal grain, notably through the regulation of phytohormone response pathways. PMID:22838835

  9. Unique expression, processing regulation, and regulatory network of peach (Prunus persica) miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as important gene regulators in plants. MiRNAs and their targets have been extensively studied in Arabidopsis and rice. However, relatively little is known about the characterization of miRNAs and their target genes in peach (Prunus persica), which is a complex crop with unique developmental programs. Results We performed small RNA deep sequencing and identified 47 peach-specific and 47 known miRNAs or families with distinct expression patterns. Together, the identified miRNAs targeted 80 genes, many of which have not been reported previously. Like the model plant systems, peach has two of the three conserved trans-acting siRNA biogenesis pathways with similar mechanistic features and target specificity. Unique to peach, three of the miRNAs collectively target 49 MYBs, 19 of which are known to regulate phenylpropanoid metabolism, a key pathway associated with stone hardening and fruit color development, highlighting a critical role of miRNAs in the regulation of peach fruit development and ripening. We also found that the majority of the miRNAs were differentially regulated in different tissues, in part due to differential processing of miRNA precursors. Up to 16% of the peach-specific miRNAs were differentially processed from their precursors in a tissue specific fashion, which has been rarely observed in plant cells. The miRNA precursor processing activity appeared not to be coupled with its transcriptional activity but rather acted independently in peach. Conclusions Collectively, the data characterizes the unique expression pattern and processing regulation of peach miRNAs and demonstrates the presence of a complex, multi-level miRNA regulatory network capable of targeting a wide variety of biological functions, including phenylpropanoid pathways which play a multifaceted spatial-temporal role in peach fruit development. PMID:22909020

  10. Regulatory networks between neurotrophins and miRNAs in brain diseases and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophins are involved in many physiological and pathological processes in the nervous system. They regulate and modify signal transduction, transcription and translation in neurons. It is recently demonstrated that the neurotrophin expression is regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs), changing our views on neurotrophins and miRNAs. Generally, miRNAs regulate neurotrophins and their receptors in at least two ways: (1) miRNAs bind directly to the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of isoform-specific mRNAs and post-transcriptionally regulate their expression; (2) miRNAs bind to the 3′ UTR of the regulatory factors of neurotrophins and regulate their expression. On the other hand, neurotrophins can regulate miRNAs. The results of BNDF research show that neurotrophins regulate miRNAs in at least three ways: (1) ERK stimulation enhances the activation of TRBP (HIV-1 TAR RNA-binding protein) and Dicer, leading to the upregulation of miRNA biogenesis; (2) ERK-dependent upregulation of Lin28a (RNA-binding proteins) blocks select miRNA biogenesis; (3) transcriptional regulation of miRNA expression through activation of transcription factors, including CREB and NF-κB. These regulatory processes integrate positive and negative regulatory loops in neurotrophin and miRNA signaling pathways, and also expand the function of neurotrophins and miRNAs. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the regulatory networks between neurotrophins and miRNAs in brain diseases and cancers, for which novel cutting edge therapeutic, delivery and diagnostic approaches are emerging. PMID:25544363

  11. URINE miRNAs: POTENTIAL BIOMARKERS FOR MONITORING PROGRESION OF EARLY STAGES OF DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yeyi; Xiao, Li; Li, Jun; Kanwar, Yashpal S.; Liu, Fuyou; Sun, Lin

    2013-01-01

    With a steep increase in the incidence of type 1 and 2 diabetes globally, diabetic nephropathy (DN) has now become the leading cause of renal failure in the world. There are no suitable biomarkers for the diagnosis of early stages of DN. In recent years, tremendous efforts are being made worldwide to delineate the role of micro RNAs in the pathogenesis of DN. Circulating miRNAs in serum, plasma, urine and other body fluids, which reflect a response to various pathophysiological stresses, are being investigated in the context of diabetic nephropathy. Delineation of the changes in miRNA levels in patients with DN may lead to a better understanding of the progression of the disease. We present here an exhaustive survey of the miRNA literature, highlighting various studies performed over the last decade. The aim is to assess if changes in various miRNAs could correlate with the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Based on the survey, we found that miRNA-377, miRNA-192, miRNA-216/217 and miRNA-144 are increased in body fluids of patients with DN, while miRNA-21 and miRNA-375 are decreased. Overall, there are a very few miRNAs that are kidney specific, and although significant differences were observed in the urinary excretion of certain miRNAs, they were not correlative to their levels in the blood or plasma. Thus, it is completely plausible that urine-specific miRNAs could serve as novel biomarkers for the diagnosis of early stages of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23683774

  12. Effects of Wastewater and Sewage Sludge on the Growth and Chemical Composition of Turfgrass.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L. var. ’Merion’), red fescue ( Festuca rubra L. var. ’Pennlawn’) and annual ryegrass. The mixtures were grown in...turfgrass mixtures. A mixture of tall fescue ( Festuca arundinacea Scheb var. ’K-31’) and annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) was compared to a mixture

  13. Three new species of eriophyoid mites from grass hosts in Croatia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three new species of grass-feeding eriophyid mites are described from Croatia: Acaralox croatiae n. sp., inhabiting purple moorgrass, Molinia coerulea (L.) Moench; Aculodes festucae n. sp., inhabiting tall fescue, Festuca arundinacea Schreb.; and Aculodes sylvatici n. sp., inhabiting false brome, Br...

  14. Identification and Expression Analyses of miRNAs from Two Contrasting Flower Color Cultivars of Canna by Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sribash; Tripathi, Abhinandan Mani; Yadav, Amrita; Mishra, Parneeta; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs are endogenous small RNA (sRNA) that play critical roles in plant development processes. Canna is an ornamental plant belonging to family Cannaceae. Here, we report for the first time the identification and differential expression of miRNAs in two contrasting flower color cultivars of Canna, Tropical sunrise and Red president. A total of 313 known miRNAs belonging to 78 miRNA families were identified from both the cultivars. Thirty one miRNAs (17 miRNA families) were specific to Tropical sunrise and 43 miRNAs (10 miRNA families) were specific to Red president. Thirty two and 18 putative new miRNAs were identified from Tropical sunrise and Red president, respectively. One hundred and nine miRNAs were differentially expressed in the two cultivars targeting 1343 genes. Among these, 16 miRNAs families targeting 60 genes were involved in flower development related traits and five miRNA families targeting five genes were involved in phenyl propanoid and pigment metabolic processes. We further validated the expression analysis of a few miRNA and their target genes by qRT-PCR. Transcription factors were the major miRNA targets identified. Target validation of a few randomly selected miRNAs by RLM-RACE was performed but was successful with only miR162. These findings will help in understanding flower development processes, particularly the color development in Canna.

  15. Identification and Expression Analyses of miRNAs from Two Contrasting Flower Color Cultivars of Canna by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Amrita; Mishra, Parneeta; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs are endogenous small RNA (sRNA) that play critical roles in plant development processes. Canna is an ornamental plant belonging to family Cannaceae. Here, we report for the first time the identification and differential expression of miRNAs in two contrasting flower color cultivars of Canna, Tropical sunrise and Red president. A total of 313 known miRNAs belonging to 78 miRNA families were identified from both the cultivars. Thirty one miRNAs (17 miRNA families) were specific to Tropical sunrise and 43 miRNAs (10 miRNA families) were specific to Red president. Thirty two and 18 putative new miRNAs were identified from Tropical sunrise and Red president, respectively. One hundred and nine miRNAs were differentially expressed in the two cultivars targeting 1343 genes. Among these, 16 miRNAs families targeting60 genes were involved in flower development related traits and five miRNA families targeting five genes were involved in phenyl propanoid and pigment metabolic processes. We further validated the expression analysis of a few miRNA and their target genes by qRT-PCR. Transcription factors were the major miRNA targets identified. Target validation of a few randomly selected miRNAs by RLM-RACE was performed but was successful with only miR162. These findings will help in understanding flower development processes, particularly the color development in Canna. PMID:26799570

  16. Neuropilin-1 is a receptor for extracellular miRNA and AGO2/miRNA complexes and mediates the internalization of miRNAs that modulate cell function

    PubMed Central

    Prud'homme, Gerald J.; Glinka, Yelena; Lichner, Zsuzsanna; Yousef, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular miRNAs are increasingly studied as markers for specific diseases. They are released in biological fluids in a remarkably stable form, and may play a role in intercellular communication. They are thought to be protected against degradation by either encapsulation within microparticles, or by binding to proteins (mostly AGO2). The particulate forms may be internalized by endocytosis or membrane fusion, but the protein-bound forms require a receptor mechanism for their uptake. A major question is whether there are natural cell-membrane receptors that capture and internalize protein-bound functional miRNAs. We examined neuropilin-1 (NRP1), in view of its properties as a receptor for many ligands, including growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and efficiency at mediating ligand internalization. It is expressed by endothelial cells, many other normal cell types, and cancer cells. Here, we report that NRP1 binds miRNAs with high affinity, and promotes their entry into the cell. Furthermore, the internalized miRNAs remain functional, as they specifically regulate proliferation and migration of cancer cells, as well as tube formation by human endothelial cells. Anti-NRP1 antibodies or NRP1 siRNA knockdown block miRNA effects, further confirming NRP1-mediated uptake. VEGF does not compete with miRNAs for binding to NRP1. In addition, NRP1 binds extracellular AGO2 (carrying miRNA or not), and internalizes AGO2/miRNA complexes. Because miRNA bound to AGO2 appears to the most abundant form in body fluids, this may have important physiological and pathological effects. PMID:27486976

  17. miRNA Profiling of Naïve, Effector and Memory CD8 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haoquan; Neilson, Joel R.; Kumar, Priti; Manocha, Monika; Shankar, Premlata; Sharp, Phillip A.; Manjunath, N.

    2007-01-01

    microRNAs have recently emerged as master regulators of gene expression during development and cell differentiation. Although profound changes in gene expression also occur during antigen-induced T cell differentiation, the role of miRNAs in the process is not known. We compared the miRNA expression profiles between antigen-specific naïve, effector and memory CD8+ T cells using 3 different methods-small RNA cloning, miRNA microarray analysis and real-time PCR. Although many miRNAs were expressed in all the T cell subsets, the frequency of 7 miRNAs (miR-16, miR-21, miR-142-3p, miR-142-5p, miR-150, miR-15b and let-7f) alone accounted for ∼60% of all miRNAs, and their expression was several fold higher than the other expressed miRNAs. Global downregulation of miRNAs (including 6/7 dominantly expressed miRNAs) was observed in effector T cells compared to naïve cells and the miRNA expression levels tended to come back up in memory T cells. However, a few miRNAs, notably miR-21 were higher in effector and memory T cells compared to naïve T cells. These results suggest that concomitant with profound changes in gene expression, miRNA profile also changes dynamically during T cell differentiation. Sequence analysis of the cloned mature miRNAs revealed an extensive degree of end polymorphism. While 3′end polymorphisms dominated, heterogeneity at both ends, resembling drosha/dicer processing shift was also seen in miR-142, suggesting a possible novel mechanism to generate new miRNA and/or to diversify miRNA target selection. Overall, our results suggest that dynamic changes in the expression of miRNAs may be important for the regulation of gene expression during antigen-induced T cell differentiation. Our study also suggests possible novel mechanisms for miRNA biogenesis and function. PMID:17925868

  18. Effects of form of nitrogen fertilization on the accumulation of Pb, As, Sc Ge and U in shoots of reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiche, Oliver; Székely, Balázs; Moschner, Christin; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization is necessary for growth and development of plants but it may also causes an increased metal uptake by plants due to changes of physiochemical properties of the elements in soil. The research in phytoremediation and phytomining conducted so far has revealed that the effect of nitrogen fertilizers initially depends on the form of application, as N is the only element that can be readily utilized by plants in its cationic (ammonia) or anionic form (nitrate) causing several effects in soil-plant system. However, to our knowledge most of the recent studies only documented an improvement of yield parameters and the uptake of heavy metals by plants as a result of different forms of N-fertilization. Here we report the result of a field experiment were we tried to obtain more information about the effects of form of N-fertilization on uptake of As, Pb, Sc Ge and U in reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea L.). In this study, reed canary grass was grown on 15 plots (4 m² each) under field conditions on a semi-field lysimer at the off-site soil recycling and remediation center in Hirschfeld (Saxony, Germany). To test the effects of a fertilization with different N-forms on the accumulation, the plots plants received 5 g N / m² in three doses as NH4SO4, Mg(NO3)2 or NH4NO3. The geometrical arrangement of plots was randomized and every treatment was fivefold replicated. After a 50 day period of plant growth, the plants were harvested and concentrations of trace metals in the shoots were measured with ICP-MS. As a result of the different N-treatments we found that in plants treated with NH4SO4 concentrations of Pb and As as well as of Sc, Ge and U were significantly increased in plant tissues compared to plants treated with NH4NO3. Furthermore, no significant changes in mineral composition of plants between the Mg(NO3)2 and NH4NO3 treatments could be observed. Our interpretation of these results is that it might be an effect of the acidification of

  19. Targeted delivery of miRNA therapeutics for cardiovascular diseases: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kwekkeboom, Rick F J; Lei, Zhiyong; Doevendans, Pieter A; Musters, René J P; Sluijter, Joost P G

    2014-09-01

    Dysregulation of miRNA expression has been associated with many cardiovascular diseases in animal models, as well as in patients. In the present review, we summarize recent findings on the role of miRNAs in cardiovascular diseases and discuss the opportunities, possibilities and challenges of using miRNAs as future therapeutic targets. Furthermore, we focus on the different approaches that can be used to deliver these newly developed miRNA therapeutics to their sites of action. Since siRNAs are structurally homologous with the miRNA therapeutics, important lessons learned from siRNA delivery strategies are discussed that might be applicable to targeted delivery of miRNA therapeutics, thereby reducing costs and potential side effects, and improving efficacy.

  20. Intraindividual Temporal miRNA Variability in Serum, Plasma, and White Blood Cell Subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Ammerlaan, Wim; Betsou, Fay

    2016-10-01

    Blood microRNAs (miRNAs) are ideal biomarkers, and blood derivatives are often collected in the scope of miRNA research projects. However, knowledge of temporal variations of miRNAs in healthy individuals is lacking. In this study, miRNA variability was measured over a 1-year period in different blood derivatives, collected every 2-3 months from two healthy donors. There is a continuum of intraindividual temporal variability, with particularly stable (coefficient of variation [CV] <20%-30%) and particularly unstable (CV >100%-130%) miRNAs in serum, plasma, and specific white blood cell subpopulations. The temporal intraindividual variability of miRNAs should be taken into consideration in experimental design of biospecimen collections and validation of diagnostic biomarkers.

  1. Exploring miRNA based approaches in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shivangi; Yadav, Tanuja; Rani, Vibha

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a highly conserved class of tissue specific, small non-protein coding RNAs maintain cell homeostasis by negative gene regulation. Proper controlling of miRNA expression is required for a balanced physiological environment, as these small molecules influence almost every genetic pathway from cell cycle checkpoint, cell proliferation to apoptosis, with a wide range of target genes. Deregulation in miRNAs expression correlates with various cancers by acting as tumor suppressors and oncogenes. Although promising therapies exist to control tumor development and progression, there is a lack of efficient diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for delineating various types of cancer. The molecularly different tumors can be differentiated by specific miRNA profiling as their phenotypic signatures, which can hence be exploited to surmount the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Present review discusses the involvement of miRNAs in oncogenesis with the analysis of patented research available on miRNAs.

  2. Comparison of metal tolerant and non-tolerant varieties of Festuca rubra for use in the direct hydraulic seeding of metalliferous fluorspar mine tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Morrey, D.R.; Johnson, M.S.; Cooke, J.A.

    1984-09-01

    The germination and growth of metal tolerant and non-tolerant cultivars of Festuca rubra were compared on metalliferous fluorspar tailings in laboratory and field conditions. The effects of wood pulp mulch and alginate stabilizer on germination and establishment were also assessed in the field experiments. Both cultivars germinated satisfactorily, although the laboratory experiment suggested restricted root development in the non-tolerant cultivar. Both experiments, however, showed that the overall shoot growth and cover of the non-tolerant cultivar were not affected. In fact, in the field experiment, contrary to expectation, the non-tolerant cultivar performed better than the metal tolerant cultivar and showed no pathological symptoms of metal toxicity after 12 months. The advantages of using wood pulp as a mulch were clearly demonstrated. However, the application of an alginate stabilizer had no benefit under these particular experimental conditions. The results suggest that the use of carefully selected non-tolerant cultivars in the revegetation of such calcareous metalliferous wastes is possible, even where the zinc content is as high as 1%.

  3. The effects of zinc on cell viability and on mitochondrial structure in contrasting cultivars of Festuca rubra L. - a rapid test for zinc tolerance.

    PubMed

    Davies, K L; Davies, M S; Francis, D

    1995-01-01

    A 20-min exposure to 5.0 microg Zn cm(-3) reduced the percentage of viable root meristematic cells in three cultivars of Festuca rubra L.: Merlin (Zn-tolerant), Hawk (salt-tolerant but with a degree of Zn tolerance) and S59 (Zn-sensitive). The Zn-induced cell mortality in S59 was approximately twice that of the tolerant cultivars. The mean area of mitochondrial profiles in root meristematic cells of Zn-untreated roots was similar in S59 and Merlin but that of Hawk was smaller. A 4-day exposure to 0.2 microg Zn cm(-3) resulted in mitochondrial swelling in the Zn-sensitive cultivar; there was a 25% increase in the mean area of mitochondrial profiles in this cultivar, but no significant increase occurred in Hawk or Merlin. Zn treatment caused a collapse of the cristae and a localized condensation of the mitochondrial matrix in S59, but not in Hawk or Merlin. The marked increase in cell mortality after only a 20-min Zn exposure and the relative simplicity of the technique, indicates that this procedure could be used as a rapid and independent measure of Zn tolerance.

  4. Identification of circulating miRNAs profiles that distinguish malignant pleural mesothelioma from lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gayosso-Gómez, LV; Zárraga-Granados, G; Paredes-Garcia, P; Falfán-Valencia, R; Vazquez-Manríquez, ME; Martinez-Barrera, LM; Castillo-Gonzalez, P; Rumbo-Nava, U; Guevara-Gutierrez, R; Rivera-Bravo, B; Ramirez-Venegas, A; Sansores, R; Negrete-Garcia, MC; Ortiz-Quintero, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of malignant pleura mesothelioma (MPM) is challenging. Differential diagnosis of MPM versus lung adenocarcinoma (AD) is particularly difficult, yet clinically important since the two neoplasias call for different treatment approaches. Circulating miRNA-profiling to identify miRNAs that can be used to distinguish MPM from AD has not been reported. We conducted a wide screening study of miRNA profiles in serum pools of MPM patients (N = 11), AD patients (N = 36), and healthy subjects (N = 45) to identify non-invasive biomarkers for differential diagnosis of MPM and AD, using deep sequencing. Sequencing detected up to 300 known miRNAs and up to 25 novel miRNAs species in the serum samples. Among known miRNAs, 7 were upregulated in MPM and 12 were upregulated in AD compared to healthy controls. Of these, eight were distinctive for AD and three were unique for MPM. Direct comparison of the miRNA profiles for MPM and AD revealed differences in miRNA levels that could be useful for differential diagnosis. No differentially expressed novel miRNAs were found. Further bioinformatics analysis indicated that three upregulated miRNAs in MPM are associated with the p38 pathway. There are unique alterations in serum miRNAs in MPM and AD compared to healthy controls, as well as differences between MPM and AD profiles. Differing miRNA levels between MPM and AD may be useful for differential diagnosis. A potential association to p38 pathway of three upregulated miRNAs in MPM was revealed. PMID:26417297

  5. Diverse miRNA spatial expression patterns suggest important roles in homeostasis and regeneration in planarians.

    PubMed

    González-Estévez, Cristina; Arseni, Varvara; Thambyrajah, Roshana S; Felix, Daniel A; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2009-01-01

    miRNAs are an important class of non-protein coding small RNAs whose specific functions in animals are rapidly being elucidated. It is clear that miRNAs can play crucial roles in stem cell maintenance, cell fate determination and differentiation. We use planarians, which possess a large population of pluripotent somatic stem cells, as a powerful model system to study many aspects of stem cell biology and regeneration. In particular we wish to investigate the regulatory role miRNAs may have in planarian stem cell self renewal, proliferation and differentiation. Here, we characterized the differential spatial patterns of expression of miRNAs in whole and regenerating planarians by in situ hybridization to nascent miRNA transcripts. These miRNA expression patterns are the first which have been determined for a Lophotrocozoan animal. We have characterized the expression patterns of 42 miRNAs in adult planarians, constituting a complete range of tissue specific expression patterns. We also followed miRNA expression during planarian regeneration. The majority of planarian miRNAs were expressed either in areas where stem cells (neoblasts) are located and/or in the nervous system. Some miRNAs were definitively expressed in stem cells and dividing cells as confirmed by in situ hybridisation after irradiation. We also found miRNAs to be expressed in germ stem cells of the sexual strain. Together, these data suggest an important role for miRNAs in stem cell regulation and in neural cell differentiation in planarians.

  6. Formaldehyde exposure alters miRNA expression profiles in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Li, Guifa; Yang, Jing; Ling, Shucai

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that inhaling formaldehyde (FA) causes damage to the central nervous system. However, it is unclear whether FA can disturb the function of the olfactory bulb. Using a microarray, we found that FA inhalation altered the miRNA expression profile. Functional enrichment analysis of the predicted targets of the changed miRNA showed that the enrichment canonical pathways and networks associated with cancer and transcriptional regulation. FA exposure disrupts miRNA expression profiles within the olfactory bulb.

  7. miRNA Transcriptome of Hypertrophic Skeletal Muscle with Overexpressed Myostatin Propeptide

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Lu; Li, Xinyun; Cao, Jianhua; Zhao, Shuhong

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an imperative role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and cell metabolism through regulation of gene expression. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy that results from myostatin depression by its propeptide provides an interesting model to understand how miRNA transcriptome is involved in myostatin-based fiber hypertrophy. This study employed Solexa deep sequencing followed by Q-PCR methods to analyze miRNA transcriptome of skeletal muscle of myostatin propeptide transgenic mice in comparison with their littermate controls. A total of 461 mature known and 69 novel miRNAs were reported from this study. Fifty-seven miRNAs were expressed differentially between transgenic and littermate controls, of which most abundant miRNAs, miR-133a and 378a, were significantly differentially expressed. Expression profiling was validated on 8 known and 2 novel miRNAs. The miRNA targets prediction and pathway analysis showed that FST, SMAD3, TGFBR1, and AcvR1a genes play a vital role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy in the myostatin propeptide transgenic mice. It is predicted that miR-101 targeted to TGFBR1 and SMAD3, miR-425 to TGFBR2 and FST, and miR-199a to AcvR2a and TGF-β genes. In conclusion, the study offers initial miRNA profiling and methodology of miRNA targets prediction for myostatin-based hypertrophy. These differentially expressed miRNAs are proposed as candidate miRNAs for skeletal muscle hypertrophy. PMID:25147795

  8. Discovery of porcine miRNA-196a/b may influence porcine adipogenesis in longissimus dorsi muscle by miRNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linqing; Qian, Kun; Wang, Chonglong

    2017-04-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) is one of the fat traits that has economic importance in the pork industry. Longissimus dorsi muscle contains IMF and is suitable for studying adipogenesis. To discover further potential regulatory miRNAs that may influence adipogenesis, we analyzed miRNA in the longissimus dorsi muscle of Yorkshire (YY, lean-type) and Chinese Wannanhua (WH, fatty) pigs using miRNA sequencing (miRNA-seq). From this dataset, we identified 598 unique miRNAs comprising 325 pre-miRNAs and 273 novel pre-miRNAs through comparison with known miRNAs in miRBase version 21. We found 42 miRNAs including nine up- and 33 down-regulated between the YY and WH pigs. Moreover, we found two miRNAs, miR-196a/b (miR-196a, miR-196b-5p), that had the highest level of expression in WH pigs, and miR-196a/b may influence porcine adipogenesis in longissimus dorsi muscle through an adipocytokine signaling pathway.

  9. Platelets confound the measurement of extracellular miRNA in archived plasma

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Adam J.; Gray, Warren D.; Hayek, Salim S.; Ko, Yi-An; Thomas, Sheena; Rooney, Kim; Awad, Mosaab; Roback, John D.; Quyyumi, Arshed; Searles, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular miRNAs are detectable in biofluids and represent a novel class of disease biomarker. Although many studies have utilized archived plasma for miRNA biomarker discovery, the effects of processing and storage have not been rigorously studied. Previous reports have suggested plasma samples are commonly contaminated by platelets, significantly confounding the measurement of extracellular miRNA, which was thought to be easily addressed by additional post-thaw plasma processing. In a case-control study of archived plasma, we noted a significant correlation between miRNA levels and platelet counts despite post-thaw processing. We thus examined the effects of a single freeze/thaw cycle on microparticles (MPs) and miRNA levels, and show that a single freeze/thaw cycle of plasma dramatically increases the number of platelet-derived MPs, contaminates the extracellular miRNA pool, and profoundly affects the levels of miRNAs detected. The measurement of extracellular miRNAs in archived samples is critically dependent on the removal of residual platelets prior to freezing plasma samples. Many previous clinical studies of extracellular miRNA in archived plasma should be interpreted with caution and future studies should avoid the effects of platelet contamination. PMID:27623086

  10. Prognostic and Clinical Significance of miRNA-205 in Endometrioid Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilczynski, Milosz; Danielska, Justyna; Dzieniecka, Monika; Szymanska, Bozena; Wojciechowski, Michal; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the reproductive female tract, with endometrioid endometrial cancer being the most frequent type. Despite the relatively favourable prognosis in cases of endometrial cancer, there is a necessity to evaluate clinical and prognostic utility of new molecular markers. MiRNAs are small, non-coding RNA molecules that take part in RNA silencing and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Altered expression of miRNAs may be associated with cancer initiation, progression and metastatic capabilities. MiRNA-205 seems to be one of the key regulators of gene expression in endometrial cancer. In this study, we investigated clinical and prognostic role of miRNA-205 in endometrioid endometrial cancer. After total RNA extraction from 100 archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, real-time quantitative RT-PCR was used to define miRNA-205 expression levels. The aim of the study was to evaluate miRNA-205 expression levels in regard to patients' clinical and histopathological features, such as: survival rate, recurrence rate, staging, myometrial invasion, grading and lymph nodes involvement. Higher levels of miRNA-205 expression were observed in tumours with less than half of myometrial invasion and non-advanced cancers. Kaplan-Maier analysis revealed that higher levels of miRNA-205 were associated with better overall survival (p = 0,034). These results indicate potential clinical utility of miRNA-205 as a prognostic marker.

  11. Prognostic and Clinical Significance of miRNA-205 in Endometrioid Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilczynski, Milosz; Wojciechowski, Michal; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the reproductive female tract, with endometrioid endometrial cancer being the most frequent type. Despite the relatively favourable prognosis in cases of endometrial cancer, there is a necessity to evaluate clinical and prognostic utility of new molecular markers. MiRNAs are small, non-coding RNA molecules that take part in RNA silencing and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Altered expression of miRNAs may be associated with cancer initiation, progression and metastatic capabilities. MiRNA-205 seems to be one of the key regulators of gene expression in endometrial cancer. In this study, we investigated clinical and prognostic role of miRNA-205 in endometrioid endometrial cancer. After total RNA extraction from 100 archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, real-time quantitative RT-PCR was used to define miRNA-205 expression levels. The aim of the study was to evaluate miRNA-205 expression levels in regard to patients’ clinical and histopathological features, such as: survival rate, recurrence rate, staging, myometrial invasion, grading and lymph nodes involvement. Higher levels of miRNA-205 expression were observed in tumours with less than half of myometrial invasion and non-advanced cancers. Kaplan-Maier analysis revealed that higher levels of miRNA-205 were associated with better overall survival (p = 0,034). These results indicate potential clinical utility of miRNA-205 as a prognostic marker. PMID:27737015

  12. Identification of associations between small molecule drugs and miRNAs based on functional similarity

    PubMed Central

    Dai, EnYu; Yang, Feng; Wang, Shuyuan; Chen, Xiaowen; Yang, Lei; Wang, Yuwen; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. Increasing evidences show aberrant expression of miRNAs in varieties of diseases. Targeting the dysregulated miRNAs with small molecule drugs has become a novel therapy for many human diseases, especially cancer. Here, we proposed a novel computational approach to identify associations between small molecules and miRNAs based on functional similarity of differentially expressed genes. At the significance level of p < 0.01, we constructed the small molecule and miRNA functional similarity network involving 111 small molecules and 20 miRNAs. Moreover, we also predicted associations between drugs and diseases through integrating our identified small molecule-miRNA associations with experimentally validated disease related miRNAs. As a result, we identified 2265 associations between FDA approved drugs and diseases, in which ~35% associations have been validated by comprehensive literature reviews. For breast cancer, we identified 19 potential drugs, in which 12 drugs were supported by previous studies. In addition, we performed survival analysis for the patients from TCGA and GEO database, which indicated that the associated miRNAs of 4 drugs might be good prognosis markers in breast cancer. Collectively, this study proposed a novel approach to predict small molecule and miRNA associations based on functional similarity, which may pave a new way for miRNA-targeted therapy and drug repositioning. PMID:27232942

  13. Platelets confound the measurement of extracellular miRNA in archived plasma.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Adam J; Gray, Warren D; Hayek, Salim S; Ko, Yi-An; Thomas, Sheena; Rooney, Kim; Awad, Mosaab; Roback, John D; Quyyumi, Arshed; Searles, Charles D

    2016-09-13

    Extracellular miRNAs are detectable in biofluids and represent a novel class of disease biomarker. Although many studies have utilized archived plasma for miRNA biomarker discovery, the effects of processing and storage have not been rigorously studied. Previous reports have suggested plasma samples are commonly contaminated by platelets, significantly confounding the measurement of extracellular miRNA, which was thought to be easily addressed by additional post-thaw plasma processing. In a case-control study of archived plasma, we noted a significant correlation between miRNA levels and platelet counts despite post-thaw processing. We thus examined the effects of a single freeze/thaw cycle on microparticles (MPs) and miRNA levels, and show that a single freeze/thaw cycle of plasma dramatically increases the number of platelet-derived MPs, contaminates the extracellular miRNA pool, and profoundly affects the levels of miRNAs detected. The measurement of extracellular miRNAs in archived samples is critically dependent on the removal of residual platelets prior to freezing plasma samples. Many previous clinical studies of extracellular miRNA in archived plasma should be interpreted with caution and future studies should avoid the effects of platelet contamination.

  14. Chronic ethanol feeding alters miRNA expression dynamics during liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dippold, Rachael P.; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Gonye, Gregory E.; Patra, Biswanath; Hoek, Jan B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Adaptation to chronic ethanol treatment of rats results in a changed functional state of the liver and greatly inhibits its regenerative ability, which may contribute to the progression of alcoholic liver disease. Methods In this study we investigated the effect of chronic ethanol intake on hepatic miRNA expression in male Sprague-Dawley rats during the initial 24 hrs of liver regeneration following 70% partial hepatectomy (PHx) using microRNA (miRNA) microarrays. miRNA expression during adaptation to ethanol was investigated using RT-qPCR. Nuclear Factor kappa B (NFκB) binding at target miRNA promoters was investigated with chromatin immunoprecipitation. Results Unsupervised clustering of miRNA expression profiles suggested that miRNA expression was more affected by chronic ethanol feeding than by the acute challenge of liver regeneration after PHx. Several miRNAs that were significantly altered by chronic ethanol feeding, including miRs-34a, -103, -107, and -122 have been reported to play a role in regulating hepatic metabolism and the onset of these miRNA changes occurred gradually during the time course of ethanol feeding. Chronic ethanol feeding also altered the dynamic miRNA profile during liver regeneration. Promoter analysis predicted a role for Nuclear Factor kappa B (NFκB) in the immediate early miRNA response to PHx. NFκB binding at target miRNA promoters in the chronic ethanol-fed group was significantly altered and these changes directly correlated with the observed expression dynamics of the target miRNA. Conclusions Chronic ethanol consumption alters the hepatic miRNA expression profile such that the response of the metabolism-associated miRNAs occurs during long-term adaptation to ethanol rather than as an acute transient response to ethanol metabolism. Additionally, the dynamic miRNA program during liver regeneration in response to PHx is altered in the chronically ethanol-fed liver and these differences reflect, in part, differences

  15. Elsevier Trophoblast Research Award Lecture: origin, evolution and future of placenta miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Morales-Prieto, D M; Ospina-Prieto, S; Schmidt, A; Chaiwangyen, W; Markert, U R

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the expression of a large number of genes in plants and animals. Placental miRNAs appeared late in evolution and can be found only in mammals. Nevertheless, these miRNAs are constantly under evolutionary pressure. As a consequence, miRNA sequences and their mRNA targets may differ between species, and some miRNAs can only be found in humans. Their expression can be tissue- or cell-specific and can vary time-dependently. Human placenta tissue exhibits a specific miRNA expression pattern that dynamically changes during pregnancy and is reflected in the maternal plasma. Some placental miRNAs are involved in or associated with major pregnancy disorders, such as preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction or preterm delivery and, therefore, have a strong potential for usage as sensitive and specific biomarkers. In this review we summarize current knowledge on the origin of placental miRNAs, their expression in humans with special regard to trophoblast cells, interspecies differences, and their future as biomarkers. It can be concluded that animal models for human reproduction have a different panel of miRNAs and targets, and can only partly reflect or predict the situation in humans.

  16. In-silico identification of miRNAs and their regulating target functions in Ocimum basilicum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Noopur; Sharma, Ashok

    2014-12-01

    microRNA is known to play an important role in growth and development of the plants and also in environmental stress. Ocimum basilicum (Basil) is a well known herb for its medicinal properties. In this study, we used in-silico approaches to identify miRNAs and their targets regulating different functions in O. basilicum using EST approach. Additionally, functional annotation, gene ontology and pathway analysis of identified target transcripts were also done. Seven miRNA families were identified. Meaningful regulations of target transcript by identified miRNAs were computationally evaluated. Four miRNA families have been reported by us for the first time from the Lamiaceae. Our results further confirmed that uracil was the predominant base in the first positions of identified mature miRNA sequence, while adenine and uracil were predominant in pre-miRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out to determine the relation between O. basilicum and other plant pre-miRNAs. Thirteen potential targets were evaluated for 4 miRNA families. Majority of the identified target transcripts regulated by miRNAs showed response to stress. miRNA 5021 was also indicated for playing an important role in the amino acid metabolism and co-factor metabolism in this plant. To the best of our knowledge this is the first in silico study describing miRNAs and their regulation in different metabolic pathways of O. basilicum.

  17. Computational identification of putative miRNAs and their target genes in pathogenic amoeba Naegleria fowleri

    PubMed Central

    Padmashree, Dyavegowda; Swamy, Narayanaswamy Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a parasitic unicellular free living eukaryotic amoeba. The parasite spreads through contaminated water and causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Therefore, it is of interest to understand its molecular pathogenesis. Hence, we analyzed the parasite genome for miRNAs (microRNAs) that are non-coding, single stranded RNA molecules. We identified 245 miRNAs using computational methods in N. fowleri, of which five miRNAs are conserved. The predicted miRNA targets were analyzed by using miRanda (software) and further studied the functions by subsequently annotating using AmiGo (a gene ontology web tool). PMID:26770029

  18. A compilation of Web-based research tools for miRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Vaibhav; Varghese, Vinay Koshy; Kabekkodu, Shama Prasada; Mallya, Sandeep; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2017-02-25

    Since the discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of noncoding RNAs that regulate the gene expression posttranscriptionally in sequence-specific manner, there has been a release of number of tools useful for both basic and advanced applications. This is because of the significance of miRNAs in many pathophysiological conditions including cancer. Numerous bioinformatics tools that have been developed for miRNA analysis have their utility for detection, expression, function, target prediction and many other related features. This review provides a comprehensive assessment of web-based tools for the miRNA analysis that does not require prior knowledge of any computing languages.

  19. miRiadne: a web tool for consistent integration of miRNA nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Bonnal, Raoul J P; Rossi, Riccardo L; Carpi, Donatella; Ranzani, Valeria; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2015-07-01

    The miRBase is the official miRNA repository which keeps the annotation updated on newly discovered miRNAs: it is also used as a reference for the design of miRNA profiling platforms. Nomenclature ambiguities generated by loosely updated platforms and design errors lead to incompatibilities among platforms, even from the same vendor. Published miRNA lists are thus generated with different profiling platforms that refer to diverse and not updated annotations. This greatly compromises searches, comparisons and analyses that rely on miRNA names only without taking into account the mature sequences, which is particularly critic when such analyses are carried over automatically. In this paper we introduce miRiadne, a web tool to harmonize miRNA nomenclature, which takes into account the original miRBase versions from 10 up to 21, and annotations of 40 common profiling platforms from nine brands that we manually curated. miRiadne uses the miRNA mature sequence to link miRBase versions and/or platforms to prevent nomenclature ambiguities. miRiadne was designed to simplify and support biologists and bioinformaticians in re-annotating their own miRNA lists and/or data sets. As Ariadne helped Theseus in escaping the mythological maze, miRiadne will help the miRNA researcher in escaping the nomenclature maze. miRiadne is freely accessible from the URL http://www.miriadne.org.

  20. miRNAs as biomarkers in colorectal cancer diagnosis and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jingfang

    2010-05-01

    Since the discovery of noncoding small miRNAs and their function in controlling mRNA translational rate, the small non-coding miRNA world has become a research wonderland for cancer and other human diseases. Due to the critical regulatory function, miRNA can act as an oncogene or a tumor-suppressor gene. This review will cover some of the recent discoveries of the potential of miRNAs as cancer biomarkers in colorectal cancer, future challenges and solutions.

  1. Mutant p53 inhibits miRNA biogenesis by interfering with the microprocessor complex.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, F; Falcone, E; Trisciuoglio, D; Colombo, T; Lisek, K; Walerych, D; Del Sal, G; Paci, P; Bossi, G; Piaggio, G; Gurtner, A

    2016-07-21

    Downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is commonly observed in cancers and promotes tumorigenesis suggesting that miRNAs may function as tumor suppressors. However, the mechanism through which miRNAs are regulated in cancer, and the connection between oncogenes and miRNA biogenesis remain poorly understood. The TP53 tumor-suppressor gene is mutated in half of human cancers resulting in an oncogene with gain-of-function activities. Here we demonstrate that mutant p53 (mutp53) oncoproteins modulate the biogenesis of a subset of miRNAs in cancer cells inhibiting their post-transcriptional maturation. Interestingly, among these miRNAs several are also downregulated in human tumors. By confocal, co-immunoprecipitation and RNA-chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that endogenous mutp53 binds and sequesters RNA helicases p72/82 from the microprocessor complex, interfering with Drosha-pri-miRNAs association. In agreement with this, the overexpression of p72 leads to an increase of mature miRNAs levels. Moreover, functional experiments demonstrate the oncosuppressive role of mutp53-dependent miRNAs (miR-517a, -519a, -218, -105). Our study highlights a previously undescribed mechanism by which mutp53 interferes with Drosha-p72/82 association leading, at least in part, to miRNA deregulation observed in cancer.

  2. Differential expression of miRNAs and their relation to active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihong; Zhou, Aiping; Ni, Jinjing; Zhang, Qiufen; Wang, Ying; Lu, Jie; Wu, Wenjuan; Karakousis, Petros C; Lu, Shuihua; Yao, Yufeng

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to screen miRNA signatures dysregulated in tuberculosis to improve our understanding of the biological role of miRNAs involved in the disease. Datasets deposited in publically available databases from microarray studies on infectious diseases and malignancies were retrieved, screened, and subjected to further analysis. Effect sizes were combined using the inverse-variance model and between-study heterogeneity was evaluated by the random effects model. 35 miRNAs were differentially expressed (12 up-regulated, 23 down-regulated; p < 0.05) by combining 15 datasets of tuberculosis and other infectious diseases. 15 miRNAs were found to be significantly differentially regulated (7 up-regulated, 8 down-regulated; p < 0.05) by combining 53 datasets of tuberculosis and malignancies. Most of the miRNA signatures identified in this study were found to be involved in immune responses and metabolism. Expression of these miRNA signatures in serum samples from TB subjects (n = 11) as well as healthy controls (n = 10) was examined by TaqMan miRNA array. Taken together, the results revealed differential expression of miRNAs in TB, but available datasets are limited and these miRNA signatures should be validated in future studies.

  3. Uptake of dietary milk miRNAs by adult humans: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Amanda; Vyas, Gopi; Li, Anne; Halushka, Marc; Witwer, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Breast milk is replete with nutritional content as well as nucleic acids including microRNAs (miRNAs). In a recent report, adult humans who drank bovine milk appeared to have increased circulating levels of miRNAs miR-29b-3p and miR-200c-3p. Since these miRNAs are homologous between human and cow, these results could be explained by xeno-miRNA influx, endogenous miRNA regulation, or both. More data were needed to validate the results and explore for additional milk-related alterations in circulating miRNAs. Samples from the published study were obtained, and 223 small RNA features were profiled with a custom OpenArray, followed by individual quantitative PCR assays for selected miRNAs. Additionally, small RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data obtained from plasma samples of the same project were analyzed to find human and uniquely bovine miRNAs. OpenArray revealed no significantly altered miRNA signals after milk ingestion, and this was confirmed by qPCR. Plasma sequencing data contained no miR-29b or miR-200c reads and no intake-consistent mapping of uniquely bovine miRNAs. In conclusion, the results do not support transfer of dietary xenomiRs into the circulation of adult humans. PMID:27158459

  4. MiRNAs: potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets for cerebral ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ruixia; Liu, Xu; Zhu, Ying; He, Zhiyi

    2016-01-01

    MiRNAs are short single-stranded non-coding RNAs that cause degradation or repression of target mRNAs by base pairing with their 3'-untranslated regions. Recent studies have shown that miRNAs play an important role in the occurrence and development of cerebral ischaemia, as well as exerting regulatory effects. Additionally, circulating miRNAs in peripheral blood, which are dysregulated following cerebral ischaemia, have recently been identified as useful biomarkers in diagnosis and prognosis of cerebral ischaemia. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in miRNA genes or target sites are likely to cause complex functional consequences by affecting miRNA biogenesis or target selection. Research on miRNA-SNPs is rapidly growing, and recent studies have identified a significant relationship between miRNAs and ischemic disease. We also address the latest advances in miRNA-based therapeutic approaches for ischemic disease. In conclusion, our review summarizes current research regarding miRNAs and cerebral ischaemia, focusing on the regulatory role of miRNAs in cerebral ischaemia, as well as the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in cerebral ischaemia.

  5. Methods and matrices: approaches to identifying miRNAs for Nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a solid tumor of the head and neck. Multimodal therapy is highly effective when NPC is detected early. However, due to the location of the tumor and the absence of clinical signs, early detection is difficult, making a biomarker for the early detection of NPC a priority. The dysregulation of small non-coding RNAs (miRNAs) during carcinogenesis is the focus of much current biomarker research. Herein, we examine several miRNA discovery methods using two sample matrices to identify circulating miRNAs (c-miRNAs) associated with NPC. Methods We tested two miRNA discovery workflows on two sample sources for miRNAs associated with NPC. In the first workflow, we assumed that NPC tumor tissue would be enriched for miRNAs, so we compared miRNA expression in FFPE from NPC cases and controls using microarray and RNA-Seq technologies. Candidate miRNAs from both technologies were verified by qPCR in FFPE and sera from an independent NPC sample set. In a second workflow, we directly interrogated NPC case and control sera by RNA-Seq for c-miRNAs associated with NPC, with candidate c-miRNAs verified by qPCR in the sera from the same independent NPC sample set. Results Both microarray and RNA-Seq narrowed the miRNA signature to 1-5% of the known mature human miRNAs. Moreover, these two methods produced similar results when applied to the same sample type (FFPE), with RNA-Seq additionally indicating “unknown” miRNAs associated with NPC. However, we found different miRNA profiles in NPC sera compared to FFPE using RNA-Seq, with the few overlapping miRNAs found to be significantly up-regulated in FFPE significantly down-regulated in sera (and vice versa). Despite the different miRNA profiles found in FFPE and sera, both profiles strongly associated with NPC, providing two potential sources for biomarker signatures for NPC. Conclusions We determined that the direct interrogation of sera by RNA-Seq was the most informative method for

  6. Computational identification of putative miRNAs and their target genes in pathogenic amoeba Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Padmashree, Dyavegowda; Swamy, Narayanaswamy Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a parasitic unicellular free living eukaryotic amoeba. The parasite spreads through contaminated water and causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Therefore, it is of interest to understand its molecular pathogenesis. Hence, we analyzed the parasite genome for miRNAs (microRNAs) that are non-coding, single stranded RNA molecules. We identified 245 miRNAs using computational methods in N. fowleri, of which five miRNAs are conserved. The predicted miRNA targets were analyzed by using miRanda (software) and further studied the functions by subsequently annotating using AmiGo (a gene ontology web tool).

  7. How HTLV-1 may subvert miRNAs for persistence and transformation

    PubMed Central

    Bouzar, Amel B; Willems, Luc

    2008-01-01

    Distinct mechanisms are used by viruses to interact with cellular miRNAs. The role of microRNAs in viral replication and persistence ranges from viral-encoded microRNAs to suppressors of RNA interference. Viruses can also exploit cellular miRNAs for influencing cellular metabolism to ensure efficient replication or latency. In particular, two recent studies provide examples of how HTLV-1 may co-opt or subvert cellular miRNAs for persistent replication and oncogenic purposes. The pathways modulated by these described miRNAs are critically involved in apoptosis, proliferation and innate immune response. PMID:19014483

  8. Methylation of miRNA genes in the response to temperature stress in Populus simonii

    PubMed Central

    Ci, Dong; Song, Yuepeng; Tian, Min; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation and miRNAs provide crucial regulation of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional responses to abiotic stress. In this study, we used methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphisms to identify 1066 sites that were differentially methylated in response to temperature stress in Populus simonii. Among these loci, BLAST searches of miRBase identified seven miRNA genes. Expression analysis by quantitative real-time PCR suggested that the methylation pattern of these miRNA genes probably influences their expression. Annotation of these miRNA genes in the sequenced genome of Populus trichocarpa found three target genes (Potri.007G090400, Potri.014G042200, and Potri.010G176000) for the miRNAs produced from five genes (Ptc-MIR396e and g, Ptc-MIR156i and j, and Ptc-MIR390c) respectively. The products of these target genes function in lipid metabolism to deplete lipid peroxide. We also constructed a network based on the interactions between DNA methylation and miRNAs, miRNAs and target genes, and the products of target genes and the metabolic factors that they affect, including H2O2, malondialdehyde, catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase. Our results suggested that DNA methylation probably regulates the expression of miRNA genes, thus affecting expression of their target genes, likely through the gene-silencing function of miRNAs, to maintain cell survival under abiotic stress conditions. PMID:26579167

  9. miRNA in multiple sclerosis: search for novel biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Roopali

    2015-08-01

    A major challenge in multiple sclerosis (MS) is to develop biomarkers that could help in understanding individual MS patients, i.e. whether they are a responder or non-responder to therapy, which medicine is more effective, and the degree to which they may be entering the progressive phase of disease. In the last few years, a lot of attention has been drawn toward identification of diagnostic, prognostic, process-specific, and treatment-related biomarkers for MS. In this review, we will focus on the micro RNAs (miRNAs) as potential candidates for MS biomarkers.

  10. Simultaneous inhibition of multiple oncogenic miRNAs by a multi-potent microRNA sponge.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaeyun; Yeom, Chanjoo; Choi, Yeon-Sook; Kim, Sinae; Lee, EunJi; Park, Min Ji; Kang, Sang Wook; Kim, Sung Bae; Chang, Suhwan

    2015-08-21

    The roles of oncogenic miRNAs are widely recognized in many cancers. Inhibition of single miRNA using antagomiR can efficiently knock-down a specific miRNA. However, the effect is transient and often results in subtle phenotype, as there are other miRNAs contribute to tumorigenesis. Here we report a multi-potent miRNA sponge inhibiting multiple miRNAs simultaneously. As a model system, we targeted miR-21, miR-155 and miR-221/222, known as oncogenic miRNAs in multiple tumors including breast and pancreatic cancers. To achieve efficient knockdown, we generated perfect and bulged-matched miRNA binding sites (MBS) and introduced multiple copies of MBS, ranging from one to five, in the multi-potent miRNA sponge. Luciferase reporter assay showed the multi-potent miRNA sponge efficiently inhibited 4 miRNAs in breast and pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, a stable and inducible version of the multi-potent miRNA sponge cell line showed the miRNA sponge efficiently reduces the level of 4 target miRNAs and increase target protein level of these oncogenic miRNAs. Finally, we showed the miRNA sponge sensitize cells to cancer drug and attenuate cell migratory activity. Altogether, our study demonstrates the multi-potent miRNA sponge is a useful tool to examine the functional impact of simultaneous inhibition of multiple miRNAs and proposes a therapeutic potential.

  11. miRNA-197 and miRNA-223 Predict Cardiovascular Death in a Cohort of Patients with Symptomatic Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Appelbaum, Sebastian; Karakas, Mahir; Ojeda, Francisco; Lau, Denise M.; Hartmann, Tim; Lackner, Karl J.; Westermann, Dirk; Schnabel, Renate B.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Background Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been described as potential diagnostic biomarkers in cardiovascular disease and in particular, coronary artery disease (CAD). Few studies were undertaken to perform analyses with regard to risk stratification of future cardiovascular events. miR-126, miR-197 and miR-223 are involved in endovascular inflammation and platelet activation and have been described as biomarkers in the diagnosis of CAD. They were identified in a prospective study in relation to future myocardial infarction. Objectives The aim of our study was to further evaluate the prognostic value of these miRNAs in a large prospective cohort of patients with documented CAD. Methods Levels of miR-126, miR-197 and miR-223 were evaluated in serum samples of 873 CAD patients with respect to the endpoint cardiovascular death. miRNA quantification was performed using real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Results The median follow-up period was 4 years (IQR 2.78–5.04). The median age of all patients was 64 years (IQR 57–69) with 80.2% males. 38.9% of the patients presented with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), 61.1% were diagnosed with stable angina pectoris (SAP). Elevated levels of miRNA-197 and miRNA-223 reliably predicted future cardiovascular death in the overall group (miRNA-197: hazard ratio (HR) 1.77 per one standard deviation (SD) increase (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20; 2.60), p = 0.004, C-index 0.78; miRNA-223: HR 2.23 per one SD increase (1.20; 4.14), p = 0.011, C-index 0.80). In ACS patients the prognostic power of both miRNAs was even higher (miRNA-197: HR 2.24 per one SD increase (1.25; 4.01), p = 0.006, C-index 0.89); miRA-223: HR 4.94 per one SD increase (1.42; 17.20), p = 0.012, C-index 0.89). Conclusion Serum-derived circulating miRNA-197 and miRNA-223 were identified as predictors for cardiovascular death in a large patient cohort with CAD. These results reinforce the assumption that circulating miRNAs are promising biomarkers

  12. Search for signatures in miRNAs associated with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kothandan, Ram; Biswas, Sumit

    2013-01-01

    Since the first discovery in the early 1990's, the predicted and validated population of microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) has grown significantly. These small (~22 nucleotides long) regulators of gene expression have been implicated and associated with several genes in the cancer pathway as well. Globally, the identification and verification of microRNAs as biomarkers for cancer cell types has been the area of thrust for most miRNA biologists. However, there has been a noticeable vacuum when it comes to identifying a common signature or trademark that could be used to demarcate a miR to be associated with the development or suppression of cancer. To answer these queries, we report an in silico study involving the identification of global signatures in experimentally validated microRNAs which have been associated with cancer. This study has thrown light on the presence of significant common signatures, viz., - sequential and hybridization, which may distinguish a miR to be associated with cancer. Based on our analysis, we suggest the utility of such signatures in the design and development of algorithms for prediction of miRs involved in the cancer pathway. PMID:23861569

  13. Role of Alix in miRNA packaging during extracellular vesicle biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    IAVELLO, ALESSANDRA; FRECH, VALESKA S.L.; GAI, CHIARA; DEREGIBUS, MARIA CHIARA; QUESENBERRY, PETER J.; CAMUSSI, GIOVANNI

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates that Alix, an accessory protein of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT), is involved in the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs contain selected patterns of microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs); however, little is known about the mechanisms of miRNA enrichment in EVs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether Alix is involved in the packaging of miRNAs within EVs released by human liver stem-like cells (HLSCs). EVs released from HLSCs were enriched with miRNAs and expressed Alix and several RNA-binding proteins, including Argonaute 2 (Ago2), a member of the Argonaute family known to be involved in the transport and the processing of miRNAs. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed an association between Alix and Ago2. The results from RT-qPCR indicated that in the Alix/Ago2 immunoprecipitates, miRNAs were detectable. EVs were instrumental in transferring selected miRNAs from HLSCs to human endothelial cells absent in the latter cells. Alix knockdown did not influence the number of EVs released by HLSCs, but it significantly decreased miRNA expression levels in the EVs and consequently their transfer to the endothelium. Our findings indicate that Alix binds to Ago2 and miRNAs, suggesting that it plays a key role in miRNA enrichment during EV biogenesis. These results may represent a novel function of Alix, demonstrating its involvement in the EV-mediated transfer of miRNAs. PMID:26935291

  14. Comparative studies of two methods for miRNA isolation from milk whey*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiao-lu; Wei, Zi-hai; Liu, Lan; Liu, Hong-yun; Liu, Jian-xin

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) from milk whey have been considered for their potential as noninvasive biomarkers for milk quality control and disease diagnosis. However, standard protocols for miRNA isolation and quantification from milk whey are not well established. The objective of this study was to compare two methods for the isolation of miRNAs from milk whey. These two methods were modified phenol-based technique (Trizol LS® followed by phenol precipitation, the TP method) and combined phenol and column-based approach (Trizol LS® followed by cleanup using the miRNeasy kit, the TM method). Yield and quality of RNA were rigorously measured using a NanoDrop ND-1000 spectrophotometer and then the distribution of RNA was precisely detected in a Bioanalyzer 2100 instrument by microchip gel electrophoresis. Several endogenous miRNAs (bta-miR-141, bta-miR-146a, bta-miR-148a, bta-miR-200c, bta-miR-362, and bta-miR-375) and an exogenous spike-in synthetic control miRNA (cel-miR-39) were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to examine the apparent recovery efficiency of milk whey miRNAs. Both methods could successfully isolate sufficient small RNA (<200 nt) from milk whey, and their yields were quite similar. However, the quantification results show that the total miRNA recovery efficiency by the TM method is superior to that by the TP method. The TM method performed better than the TP for recovery of milk whey miRNA due to its consistency and good repeatability in endogenous and spike-in miRNA recovery. Additionally, quantitative recovery analysis of a spike-in miRNA may be more accurate to reflect the milk whey miRNA recovery efficiency than using traditional RNA quality analysis instruments (NanoDrop or Bioanalyzer 2100). PMID:26055915

  15. Comparative studies of two methods for miRNA isolation from milk whey.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiao-lu; Wei, Zi-hai; Liu, Lan; Liu, Hong-yun; Liu, Jian-xin

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) from milk whey have been considered for their potential as noninvasive biomarkers for milk quality control and disease diagnosis. However, standard protocols for miRNA isolation and quantification from milk whey are not well established. The objective of this study was to compare two methods for the isolation of miRNAs from milk whey. These two methods were modified phenol-based technique (Trizol LS(®) followed by phenol precipitation, the TP method) and combined phenol and column-based approach (Trizol LS(®) followed by cleanup using the miRNeasy kit, the TM method). Yield and quality of RNA were rigorously measured using a NanoDrop ND-1000 spectrophotometer and then the distribution of RNA was precisely detected in a Bioanalyzer 2100 instrument by microchip gel electrophoresis. Several endogenous miRNAs (bta-miR-141, bta-miR-146a, bta-miR-148a, bta-miR-200c, bta-miR-362, and bta-miR-375) and an exogenous spike-in synthetic control miRNA (cel-miR-39) were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to examine the apparent recovery efficiency of milk whey miRNAs. Both methods could successfully isolate sufficient small RNA (<200 nt) from milk whey, and their yields were quite similar. However, the quantification results show that the total miRNA recovery efficiency by the TM method is superior to that by the TP method. The TM method performed better than the TP for recovery of milk whey miRNA due to its consistency and good repeatability in endogenous and spike-in miRNA recovery. Additionally, quantitative recovery analysis of a spike-in miRNA may be more accurate to reflect the milk whey miRNA recovery efficiency than using traditional RNA quality analysis instruments (NanoDrop or Bioanalyzer 2100).

  16. The roles of oncogenic miRNAs and their therapeutic importance in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Bryan, Samia; Dong, Shengli; Mathis, J Michael; Alahari, Suresh K

    2017-02-01

    Since the discovery of tumour suppressive miRNA in 2002, the dysregulation of miRNAs was implicated in many cancers, exhibiting both tumour suppressive and oncogenic roles. Dysregulation of miRNAs was found to be involved in the initiation of oncogenesis, as well as the progression, invasion and metastasis of cancers. While normal miRNA inhibitory functions help regulate gene expression in the cell, oncogenic miRNA, when dysregulated can lead to suppression of critical pathways that control apoptosis, cell cycle progression, growth and proliferation. This suppression allows for the upregulation of pro-oncogenic factors that drive cell survival, growth and proliferation. Due to emerging discoveries, oncogenic miRNAs are proving to be a critical component in cancers, such as breast cancer, and may provide novel avenues for cancer treatment. In this article, we discuss the roles of the most studied oncogenic miRNAs in breast cancer including clusters and families involved as well as the less studied and recently discovered oncogenic miRNAs. These miRNAs provide valuable information into the complexity of regulatory elements affected by their overexpression and the overall impact in the progression of breast cancer. Also, identifying miRNAs causing or leading to resistance or sensitivity to current anti-cancer drugs prior to treatment may lead to an improvement in treatment selection and overall patient response. This review summarizes known and recently discovered miRNAs in literature found to have oncogenic roles in breast cancer initiation and the progression, invasion and metastasis of the disease.

  17. Identification of novel and candidate miRNAs in rice by high throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Sunkar, Ramanjulu; Zhou, Xuefeng; Zheng, Yun; Zhang, Weixiong; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2008-01-01

    Background Small RNA-guided gene silencing at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels has emerged as an important mode of gene regulation in plants and animals. Thus far, conventional sequencing of small RNA libraries from rice led to the identification of most of the conserved miRNAs. Deep sequencing of small RNA libraries is an effective approach to uncover rare and lineage- and/or species-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) in any organism. Results In order to identify new miRNAs and possibly abiotic-stress regulated small RNAs in rice, three small RNA libraries were constructed from control rice seedlings and seedlings exposed to drought or salt stress, and then subjected to pyrosequencing. A total of 58,781, 43,003 and 80,990 unique genome-matching small RNAs were obtained from the control, drought and salt stress libraries, respectively. Sequence analysis confirmed the expression of most of the conserved miRNAs in rice. Importantly, 23 new miRNAs mostly each derived from a unique locus in rice genome were identified. Six of the new miRNAs are conserved in other monocots. Additionally, we identified 40 candidate miRNAs. Allowing not more than 3 mis-matches between a miRNA and its target mRNA, we predicted 20 targets for 9 of the new miRNAs. Conclusion Deep sequencing proved to be an effective strategy that allowed the discovery of 23 low-abundance new miRNAs and 40 candidate miRNAs in rice. PMID:18312648

  18. Epigenetic regulation of normal human mammary cell type-specific miRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Vrba, Lukas; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2011-08-26

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important regulators of cell type–specific genes, including miRNAs. In order to identify cell type-specific miRNAs regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, we undertook a global analysis of miRNA expression and epigenetic states in three isogenic pairs of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human mammary fibroblasts (HMF), which represent two differentiated cell types typically present within a given organ, each with a distinct phenotype and a distinct epigenotype. While miRNA expression and epigenetic states showed strong interindividual concordance within a given cell type, almost 10% of the expressed miRNA showed a cell type–specific pattern of expression that was linked to the epigenetic state of their promoter. The tissue-specific miRNA genes were epigenetically repressed in nonexpressing cells by DNA methylation (38%) and H3K27me3 (58%), with only a small set of miRNAs (21%) showing a dual epigenetic repression where both DNA methylation and H3K27me3 were present at their promoters, such as MIR10A and MIR10B. Individual miRNA clusters of closely related miRNA gene families can each display cell type–specific repression by the same or complementary epigenetic mechanisms, such as the MIR200 family, and MIR205, where fibroblasts repress MIR200C/141 by DNA methylation, MIR200A/200B/429 by H3K27me3, and MIR205 by both DNA methylation and H3K27me3. Since deregulation of many of the epigenetically regulated miRNAs that we identified have been linked to disease processes such as cancer, it is predicted that compromise of the epigenetic control mechanisms is important for this process. Overall, these results highlight the importance of epigenetic regulation in the control of normal cell type–specific miRNA expression.

  19. A common set of developmental miRNAs are upregulated in Nicotiana benthamiana by diverse begomoviruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Begomoviruses are single-stranded DNA viruses that cause economically important diseases of many crops throughout the world and induce symptoms in plants, including enations, leaf curling and stunting, that resemble developmental abnormalities. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous RNAs that are involved in a variety of activities, including plant development, signal transduction and protein degradation, as well as response to environmental stress, and pathogen invasion. Results The present study was aimed at understanding the deregulation of miRNAs upon begomovirus infection. Four distinct begomoviruses African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV), Cabbage leaf curl virus (CbLCuV), Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and Cotton leaf curl Multan virus/Cotton leaf curl betasatellite (CLCuV/CLCuMB), were used in this study. Ten developmental miRNA were studied. N. benthamiana plants were inoculated with begomoviruses and their miRNA profiles were analysed by northern blotting using specific miRNA probes. The levels of most developmental miRNA were increased in N. benthamiana by TYLCV, CLCuMV/CLCuMB and CbLCuV infection with a common pattern despite their diverse genomic components. However, the increased levels of individual miRNAs differed for distinct begomoviruses, reflecting differences in severity of symptom phenotypes. Some of these miRNA were also common to ACMV infection. Conclusions Our results have shown a common pattern of miRNAs accumulation upon begomovirus infection. It was found that begomoviruses generally increase the accumulation of miRNA and thus result in the decreased translation of genes involved in the development of plants. Identification of common miRNAs that are deregulated upon begomovirus infection may provide novel targets for control strategies aimed at developing broad-spectrum resistance. PMID:21447165

  20. Distinct AGO1 and AGO2 associated miRNA profiles in human cells and blood plasma

    PubMed Central

    Turchinovich, Andrey; Burwinkel, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Studies of miRNA association with Argonaute (AGO) proteins in mammalian cells have indicated lack of bias toward particular AGO. However, to our knowledge, the use of quantitative methods for studying miRNA association with different AGOs has not been reported so far. In this work we compared the total miRNA content in AGO1 and AGO2 immunoprecipitates obtained from MCF7 adenocarcinoma cells using TaqMan Low Density miRNA Arrays and successfully verified selected miRNAs with qPCR. For most of the miRNA species AGO1 and AGO2 profiles were well correlated, however, some miRNAs demonstrated consistent biases toward one of the Argonautes. Furthermore, miRNAs which were predominantly AGO2-associated derived mostly from sense strands of the corresponding pre-miRNAs while the majority of AGO1 biased miRNAs originated from antisense strands of the pre-miRNAs. Additionally, we show that circulating miRNA in human blood plasma can be immunoprecipitated with both AGO1 and AGO2 antibody. However, unlike in cell lysates, AGO1 and AGO2 associated miRNA profiles in plasma did not correlate, indicating that many cell types contribute to circulating miRNA (given that expression of AGO proteins is tissue specific). Furthermore, AGO-specific miRNA profiles in blood cells differed significantly from miRNAs profiles in plasma indicating that most circulating miRNAs are likely to derive from non-blood cells. Since circulating miRNAs hold great promise as biomarkers for numerous cancers and other diseases, we hypothesize that AGO-specific miRNA profiles might add an additional dimension to circulating miRNA-based diagnostics. PMID:22858679

  1. Identification of precursor transcripts for 6 novel miRNAs expands the diversity on the genomic organisation and expression of miRNA genes in rice

    PubMed Central

    Lacombe, Séverine; Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Santi, Carole; Duval, David; Piégu, Benoît; Bangratz, Martine; Breitler, Jean-Christophe; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Brugidou, Christophe; Hirsch, Judith; Cao, Xiaofeng; Brice, Claire; Panaud, Olivier; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Sato, Yutaka; Echeverria, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Background The plant miRNAs represent an important class of endogenous small RNAs that guide cleavage of an mRNA target or repress its translation to control development and adaptation to stresses. MiRNAs are nuclear-encoded genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II, producing a primary precursor that is subsequently processed by DCL1 an RNase III Dicer-like protein. In rice hundreds of miRNAs have been described or predicted, but little is known on their genes and precursors which are important criteria to distinguish them from siRNAs. Here we develop a combination of experimental approaches to detect novel miRNAs in rice, identify their precursor transcripts and genes and predict or validate their mRNA targets. Results We produced four cDNA libraries from small RNA fractions extracted from distinct rice tissues. By in silico analysis we selected 6 potential novel miRNAs, and confirmed that their expression requires OsDCL1. We predicted their targets and used 5'RACE to validate cleavage for three of them, targeting a PPR, an SPX domain protein and a GT-like transcription factor respectively. In addition, we identified precursor transcripts for the 6 miRNAs expressed in rice, showing that these precursors can be efficiently processed using a transient expression assay in transfected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Most interestingly, we describe two precursors producing tandem miRNAs, but in distinct arrays. We focus on one of them encoding osa-miR159a.2, a novel miRNA produced from the same stem-loop structure encoding the conserved osa-miR159a.1. We show that this dual osa-miR159a.2-osa-miR159a.1 structure is conserved in distant rice species and maize. Finally we show that the predicted mRNA target of osa-miR159a.2 encoding a GT-like transcription factor is cleaved in vivo at the expected site. Conclusion The combination of approaches developed here identified six novel miRNAs expressed in rice which can be clearly distinguished from siRNAs. Importantly, we show that

  2. Targeting of Runx2 by miRNA-135 and miRNA-203 Impairs Progression of Breast Cancer and Metastatic Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taipaleenmäki, Hanna; Browne, Gillian; Akech, Jacqueline; Zustin, Jozef; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Hesse, Eric; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2015-01-01

    Progression of breast cancer to metastatic bone disease is linked to deregulated expression of the transcription factor Runx2. Therefore, our goal was to evaluate the potential for clinical use of Runx2-targeting microRNAs (miRNAs) to reduce tumor growth and bone metastatic burden. Expression analysis of a panel of miRNAs regulating Runx2 revealed a reciprocal relationship between the abundance of Runx2 protein and two miRNAs, miR-135 and miR-203. These miRNAs are highly expressed in normal breast epithelial cells where Runx2 is not detected, and absent in metastatic breast cancer cells and tissue biopsies that express Runx2. Reconstituting metastatic MDA-MB-231-Luc cells with miR-135 and miR-203 reduced the abundance of Runx2 and expression of the metastasis-promoting Runx2 target genes IL-11, MMP-13, and PTHrP. Additionally, tumor cell viability was decreased and migration suppressed in vitro. Orthotopic implantation of MDA-MB-231-luc cells delivered with miR-135 or miR-203, followed by an intratumoral administration of the synthetic miRNAs reduced the tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis to bone. Furthermore, intratibial injection of these miRNA-delivered cells impaired tumor growth in the bone environment and inhibited bone resorption. Importantly, reconstitution of Runx2 in MDA-MB-231-luc cells delivered with miR-135 and miR-203 reversed the inhibitory effect of the miRNAs on tumor growth and metastasis. Thus, we have identified that aberrant expression of Runx2 in aggressive tumor cells is related to the loss of specific Runx2-targeting miRNAs and that a clinically relevant replacement strategy by delivery of synthetic miRNAs is a candidate therapeutic approach to prevent metastatic bone disease by this route. PMID:25634212

  3. Identification of miRNA Signatures Associated with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Chemoresistance with Further Biological and Functional Validation of Identified Key miRNAs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    physiological conditions, including pregnancy [2], diabetes [3], radiation sickness [4], and numerous forms of cancer [5]. In cancer , circulating miRNAs will...undetectable by RT-PCR (Ct > 40, data not shown). Figure 6. ARIA tests on ovarian cancer cell lines. (A) Relative fold change comparing...Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Chemoresistance with Further Biological and Functional Validation of Identified Key miRNAs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Analisa

  4. MiRNA need a TRIM regulation of miRNA activity by Trim-NHL proteins.

    PubMed

    Wulczyn, F Gregory; Cuevas, Elisa; Franzoni, Eleonora; Rybak, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Trim-NHL proteins are defined by RING, B-Box and Coiled-coil protein motifs (referred to collectively as the Trim domain) coupled to an NHL domain. The C. elegans, D. melanogaster, mouse and human Trim-NHL proteins are potential and in several cases confirmed, E3 ubiquitin ligases. Current research is focused on identifying targets and pathways for Trim-NHL-mediated ubiquitination and in assessing the contribution of the NHL protein-protein interactiondomain for function and specificity. Several Trim-NHL proteins were discovered in screens for developmental genes in model organisms; mutations in one of the family members, Trim32, cause developmental disturbances in humans. In most instances, mutations that alter protein function map to the NHL domain. The NHL domain is a scaffold for the assembly of a translational repressor complex by the Brat proto-oncogene, a well-studied family member in Drosophila. The link to translational control is common to at least four Trim-NHLs that associate with miRNA pathway proteins. So far, two have been shown to repress (Mei-P26 and Lin41) and two to promote (NHL-2, Trim32) miRNA-mediated gene silencing. In this chapter we will describe structure-function relations for each of the proteins and then focus on the lessons being learned from these proteins about miRNA functions in development and in stem cell biology.

  5. miRNAs Need a Trim : Regulation of miRNA Activity by Trim-NHL Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wulczyn, F Gregory; Cuevas, Elisa; Franzoni, Eleonora; Rybak, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    Trim-NHL proteins are defined by RING, B-Box and Coiled-coil protein motifs (referred to collectively as the Trim domain) coupled to an NHL domain. The C. elegans, D. melanogaster, mouse and human Trim-NHL proteins are potential and in several cases confirmed, E3 ubiquitin ligases. Current research is focused on identifying targets and pathways for Trim-NHL-mediated ubiquitination and in assessing the contribution of the NHL protein-protein interaction domain for function and specificity. Several Trim-NHL proteins were discovered in screens for developmental genes in model organisms; mutations in one of the family members, Trim32, cause developmental disturbances in humans. In most instances, mutations that alter protein function map to the NHL domain. The NHL domain is a scaffold for the assembly of a translational repressor complex by the Brat proto-oncogene, a well-studied family member in Drosophila. The link to translational control is common to at least four Trim-NHLs that associate with miRNA pathway proteins. So far, two have been shown to repress (Mei-P26 and Lin41) and two to promote (NHL-2, Trim32) miRNA-mediated gene silencing. In this chapter we will describe structure-function relations for each of the proteins and then focus on the lessons being learned from these proteins about miRNA functions in development and in stem cell biology.

  6. Regulation of serum response factor by miRNA-200 and miRNA-9 modulates oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Buller, Benjamin; Chopp, Michael; Ueno, Yuji; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Rui Lan; Morris, Daniel; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2012-01-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) is a transcription factor that transactivates actin associated genes, and has been implicated in oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation. To date, it has not been investigated in cerebral ischemia. We investigated the dynamics of SRF expression after stroke in vivo and the role of SRF in oligodendrocyte differentiation in vitro. Using immunohistochemistry, we found that SRF was upregulated in OLs and OL precursor cells (OPCs) after stroke. Moreover, upregulation of SRF was concurrent with downregulation of the microRNAs (miRNAs) miR-9 and the miR-200 family in the ischemic white matter region, the corpus callosum. Inhibition of SRF activation by CCG-1423, a specific inhibitor of SRF function, blocked OPCs from differentiating into OLs. Over-expression of miR-9 and miR-200 in cultured OPCs suppressed SRF expression and inhibited OPC differentiation. Moreover, co-expression of miR-9 and miR-200 attenuated activity of a luciferase reporter assay containing the Srf 3′ untranslated region (UTR). Collectively, this study is the first to show that stroke upregulates SRF expression in OPCs and OLs, and that SRF levels are mediated by miRNAs and regulate OPC differentiation. PMID:22907787

  7. MiRNA profiling of gastrointestinal stromal tumors by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Gyvyte, Ugne; Juzenas, Simonas; Salteniene, Violeta; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Poskiene, Lina; Kucinskas, Laimutis; Jarmalaite, Sonata; Stuopelyte, Kristina; Steponaitiene, Ruta; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Hübenthal, Matthias; Link, Alexander; Franke, Sabine; Franke, Andre; Pangonyte, Dalia; Lesauskaite, Vaiva; Kupcinskas, Limas; Skieceviciene, Jurgita

    2017-03-29

    Deregulation of miRNAs has been observed virtually in all major types of cancer, whereas the miRNA signature in GIST is not well characterized yet. In this study the first high-throughput miRNA profiling of 15 paired GIST and adjacent normal tissue samples was performed using small RNA-seq approach and differentially expressed miRNAs as well as isomiRNAs were defined. Highly significantly deregulated miRNAs were selected for validation by Taq-Man low-density array in replication group of 40 paired samples. Validated miRNAs were further subjected to enrichment analysis, which revealed significantly enriched KEGG pathways in the main GIST associated pathways. Further, we used an integrated analysis of miRNA-mRNA correlations for KIT and PDGFRA target genes and found a significant correlation between all of the enriched miRNAs and their target gene KIT. Results of the phenotype analysis showed miR-509-3p to be up-regulated in epithelioid and mixed cell types compared to spindle type, whereas miR-215-5p showed negative correlation with risk grade of GIST. These data reveal a detailed miRNA profile of GIST and highlight new candidates that may be important in the development of malignant disease.

  8. Deep Sequencing Identification of Novel Glucocorticoid-Responsive miRNAs in Apoptotic Primary Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mav, Deepak; Scoltock, Alyson B.; Cidlowski, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis of lymphocytes governs the response of the immune system to environmental stress and toxic insult. Signaling through the ubiquitously expressed glucocorticoid receptor, stress-induced glucocorticoid hormones induce apoptosis via mechanisms requiring altered gene expression. Several reports have detailed the changes in gene expression mediating glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of lymphocytes. However, few studies have examined the role of non-coding miRNAs in this essential physiological process. Previously, using hybridization-based gene expression analysis and deep sequencing of small RNAs, we described the prevalent post-transcriptional repression of annotated miRNAs during glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of lymphocytes. Here, we describe the development of a customized bioinformatics pipeline that facilitates the deep sequencing-mediated discovery of novel glucocorticoid-responsive miRNAs in apoptotic primary lymphocytes. This analysis identifies the potential presence of over 200 novel glucocorticoid-responsive miRNAs. We have validated the expression of two novel glucocorticoid-responsive miRNAs using small RNA-specific qPCR. Furthermore, through the use of Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) we determined that the putative targets of these novel validated miRNAs are predicted to regulate cell death processes. These findings identify two and predict the presence of additional novel glucocorticoid-responsive miRNAs in the rat transcriptome, suggesting a potential role for both annotated and novel miRNAs in glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of lymphocytes. PMID:24250753

  9. Two novel aspects of the kinetics of gene expression including miRNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    In eukaryotic cells, many genes are transcribed into non-coding RNAs. Small RNAs or, more specifically, microRNAs (miRNAs) form an abundant sub-class of such RNAs. miRNAs are transcribed as long noncoding RNA and then generated via a processing pathway down to the 20-24-nucleotide length. The key ability of miRNAs is to associate with target mRNAs and to suppress their translation and/or facilitate degradation. Using the mean-field kinetic equations and Monte Carlo simulations, we analyze two aspects of this interplay. First, we describe the situation when the formation of mRNA or miRNA is periodically modulated by a transcription factor which itself is not perturbed by these species. Depending on the ratio between the mRNA and miRNA formation rates, the corresponding induced periodic kinetics are shown to be either nearly harmonic or shaped as anti-phase pulses. The second part of the work is related to recent experimental studies indicating that differentiation of stem cells often involves changes in gene transcription into miRNAs and/or the interference between miRNAs, mRNAs and proteins. In particular, the regulatory protein obtained via mRNA translation may suppress the miRNA formation, and the latter may suppress in turn the miRNA-mRNA association and degradation. The corresponding bistable kinetics are described in detail.

  10. Delivery and detection of dietary plant-based miRNAs in animal tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been proposed that genetic material, namely microRNAs (miRNAs), consumed in plant-based diets can affect animal gene expression. Though deep sequencing reveals the low-level presence of plant miRNAs in animal tissues, many groups have been thus far unable to replicate the finding that a rice ...

  11. Differential expression profiling of miRNAs between Marek’s disease resistant and susceptible chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mounting evidence indicates microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in various biological processes including all aspects of cancer biology. The aim of this study was to profile and to assess the differences of miRNAs between the treatment groups of two lines of White Leghorns with or without viral ...

  12. Future directions of extracellular vesicle-associated miRNAs in metastasis

    PubMed Central

    López, Jesús Adrián

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the dynamic cell-to-cell communication mediated by extracellular vesicles (EV) in cancer cell survival and metastasis development. EV content includes proteins, lipids, DNA, and RNA like microRNAs. Non-protein coding microRNAs play a very active role in almost all cellular processes targeting mRNAs for silencing. Different miRNA profiles have been found in different cancer types, and clarification of miRNAs packed in EV from different types of cancers will allow the understanding of metastasis and the application of miRNAs as biomolecules in diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches to fight cancer. The profound review of Dhondt et al., 2016, provides a wide view of EV miRNAs involved in various steps of the metastasis process to illustrate how the cancer cell interaction with the near and long distance microenvironment allows metastasis. These studies will surely conduce to additional patient studies to prove the relevance of EV miRNAs in metastasis in vivo. It remains to be elucidated how the tumoral cell sorts the miRNAs for secretion to send a message, and to well recognize the type of EV performing this message delivering. It will be very useful to identify whether miRNAs are delivered with post-transcriptional modifications since this is an important feature for miRNAs activity and stability. PMID:28361080

  13. Identification of putative miRNAs from the deep-branching unicellular flagellates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lin, Wei-Chen; Chen, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Yong-Han; Sun, Chin-Hung; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Tang, Petrus

    2012-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of extensively studied RNAi-associated small RNAs that play a critical role in eukaryotic gene regulation. However, knowledge on the miRNA and its regulation in unicellular eukaryotes is very limited. In order to obtain a better understanding on the origin of miRNA regulation system, we used deep-sequencing technology to investigate the miRNA expression pattern in four deep-branching unicellular flagellates: Giardia lamblia, Trichomonas vaginalis, Tritrichomonas foetus, and Pentatrichomonas hominis. In addition to the known miRNAs that have been described in G. lamblia and T. vaginalis, we identified 14 ancient animal miRNA families and 13 plant-specific families. Bioinformatics analysis also identified four novel miRNA candidates with reliable precursor structures derived from mature tRNAs. Our results indicated that miRNAs are likely to be a general feature for gene regulation throughout unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes and some of them may derive from unconventional ncRNAs such as snoRNA and tRNA.

  14. Exosome-mediated delivery of functionally active miRNA-155 inhibitor to macrophages.

    PubMed

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Bala, Shashi; Bukong, Terence; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2014-10-01

    Exosomes, membranous nanovesicles, naturally carry bio-macromolecules and play pivotal roles in both physiological intercellular crosstalk and disease pathogenesis. Here, we showed that B cell-derived exosomes can function as vehicles to deliver exogenous miRNA-155 mimic or inhibitor into hepatocytes or macrophages, respectively. Stimulation of B cells significantly increased exosome production. Unlike in parental cells, baseline level of miRNA-155 was very low in exosomes derived from stimulated B cells. Exosomes loaded with a miRNA-155 mimic significantly increased miRNA-155 levels in primary mouse hepatocytes and the liver of miRNA-155 knockout mice. Treatment of RAW macrophages with miRNA-155 inhibitor loaded exosomes resulted in statistically significant reduction in LPS-induced TNFα production and partially prevented LPS-induced decrease in SOCS1 mRNA levels. Furthermore, exosome-mediated miRNA-155 inhibitor delivery resulted in functionally more efficient inhibition and less cellular toxicity compared to conventional transfection methods. Similar approaches could be useful in modification of target biomolecules in vitro and in vivo. From the clinical editor: In this study, exosome-based delivery of miRNA-155 mimicker or inhibitor was found to have significant biological response in hepatocytes and macrophages. Exosome-based approaches may be useful in the modification of other target biomolecules.

  15. miRNAs: Major modulators for crop growth and development under abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Noman, Ali; Fahad, Shah; Aqeel, Muhammad; Ali, Usman; Amanullah; Anwar, Sumera; Baloch, Shahbaz Khan; Zainab, Madiha

    2017-02-25

    Cumulatively, biotic and abiotic stresses of various magnitudes can decrease the production of crops by 70%. miRNAs have emerged as a genetic tool with enormous potential that can be exploited to understand stress tolerance at the molecular level and eventually regulate stress in crops. Plant miRNA targets frequently fit into diverse families of TFs that control the expression of genes related to a certain trait. As key machinery in gene regulatory networks, it is agreed that a broad understanding of miRNAs will greatly increase our understanding of plant responses to environmental stresses. miRNA-led stress regulatory networks are being considered as novel tools for the development of abiotic stress tolerance in crops. At this time, we need to expand our knowledge about the modulatory role of miRNAs during environmental fluctuations. It has become exceedingly clear that with increased understanding of the role of miRNAs during stress, the techniques for using miRNA-mediated gene regulation to enhance plant stress tolerance will become more effective and reliable. In this review we present: (1) miRNAs as a potential avenue for the modulation of abiotic stresses, and (2) summarize the research progress regarding plant responses to stress. Current progress is explained through discussion of the identification and validation of several miRNAs that enhance crop tolerance of salinity, drought, etc., while missing links on different aspects of miRNAs related to abiotic stress tolerance are noted.

  16. Identification, evolution, and expression partitioning of miRNAs in allopolyploid Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Shen, Enhui; Zou, Jun; Hubertus Behrens, Falk; Chen, Li; Ye, Chuyu; Dai, Shutao; Li, Ruiyan; Ni, Meng; Jiang, Xiaoxue; Qiu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Wang, Weidi; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Chalhoub, Boulos; Bancroft, Ian; Meng, Jinling; Cai, Daguang; Fan, Longjiang

    2015-12-01

    The recently published genome of Brassica napus offers for the first time the opportunity to gain insights into the genomic organization and the evolution of miRNAs in oilseed rape. In this study, 12 small RNA libraries from two B. napus cultivars (Tapidor and Ningyou7) and their four double-haploid lines were sequenced, employing the newly sequenced B. napus genome, together with genomes of its progenitors Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea. A total of 645 miRNAs including 280 conserved and 365 novel miRNAs were identified. Comparative analysis revealed a high level of genomic conservation of MIRNAs (75.9%) between the subgenomes of B. napus and its two progenitors' genomes, and MIRNA lost/gain events (133) occurred in B. napus after its speciation. Furthermore, significant partitioning of miRNA expressions between the two subgenomes in B. napus was detected. The data of degradome sequencing, miRNA-mediated cleavage, and expression analyses support specific interactions between miRNAs and their targets in the modulation of diverse physiological processes in roots and leaves, as well as in biosynthesis of, for example, glucosinolates and lipids in oilseed rape. These data provide a first genome-wide view on the origin, evolution, and genomic organization of B. napus MIRNAs.

  17. Expressional analysis of immune-related miRNAs in breast milk.

    PubMed

    Na, R S; E, G X; Sun, W; Sun, X W; Qiu, X Y; Chen, L P; Huang, Y F

    2015-09-25

    Immune-related miRNAs in breast milk are extracellular miRNAs that are related to immune organ development and regulation of the immune function in infants and young animals. The goal of this study was to compare the expression levels of five immune-related miRNAs in breast milk in black goats, humans, and dairy cattle. The miRNAs from milk were extracted and the expression levels were assessed using quantitive RT-PCR methods. MiR-146, miR-155, miR-181a, miR-223, and miR-150 were all detected in Dazu black goat milk, and these miRNAs were significantly more highly expressed in colostrum than in mature milk of goats (P < 0.01), except for miR-150. Further, all five miRNAs were expressed in human colostrum, but patterns differed from those in goats: miR-146 and miR-155 were highly expressed (P < 0.01) in human colostrum, whereas miR-223 was abundant in goat colostrum (P < 0.01). In addition, five miRNAs were significantly higher in bovine mature milk than in goat milk (P < 0.01). Taken together, these results confirm that immune-related miRNAs are rich in breast milk with different expression levels depending on the lactation phase and species.

  18. Apple miRNAs and tasiRNAs with novel regulatory networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MiRNAs, negatively affecting gene expression at the post-transcriptional levels, have been shown to control numerous genes involved in various biological and metabolic processes. To date, the identification of miRNAs in plants focused on certain model plants, such as Arabidopsis and rice. Investig...

  19. Identification and Characterization of Salvia miltiorrhizain miRNAs in Response to Replanting Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaole; Liu, Lin; He, Zhigui; Yang, Shushen; Liang, Zongsuo; Yan, Xijun; He, Yanfeng; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Replanting disease is a major factor limiting the artificial cultivation of the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza. At present, little information is available regarding the role of miRNAs in response to replanting disease. In this study, two small RNA libraries obtained from first-year (FPR) and second-year plant (SPR) roots were subjected to a high-throughput sequencing method. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 110 known and 7 novel miRNAs were annotated in the roots of S. miltiorrhiza. Moreover, 39 known and 2 novel miRNAs were identified and validated for differential expression in FPR compared with SPR. Thirty-one of these miRNAs were further analyzed by qRT-PCR, which revealed that 5 miRNAs negatively regulated the expression levels of 7 target genes involved in root development or stress responses. This study not only provides novel insights into the miRNA content of S. miltiorrhiza in response to replanting disease but also demonstrates that 5 miRNAs may be involved in these responses. Interactions among the differentially expressed miRNAs with their targets may form an important component of the molecular basis of replanting disease in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:27483013

  20. Bicistronic gene transfer tools for delivery of miRNAs and protein coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Stoller, Michelle L; Chang, Henry C; Fekete, Donna M

    2013-09-05

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a category of small RNAs that modulate levels of proteins via post-transcriptional inhibition. Currently, a standard strategy to overexpress miRNAs is as mature miRNA duplexes, although this method is cumbersome if multiple miRNAs need to be delivered. Many of these miRNAs are found within introns and processed through the RNA polymerase II pathway. We have designed a vector to exploit this naturally-occurring intronic pathway to deliver the three members of the sensory-specific miR-183 family from an artificial intron. In one version of the vector, the downstream exon encodes the reporter (GFP) while another version encodes a fusion protein created between the transcription factor Atoh1 and the hemaglutinin epitope, to distinguish it from endogenous Atoh1. In vitro analysis shows that the miRNAs contained within the artificial intron are processed and bind to their targets with specificity. The genes downstream are successfully translated into protein and identifiable through immunofluorescence. More importantly, Atoh1 is proven functional through in vitro assays. These results suggest that this cassette allows expression of miRNAs and proteins simultaneously, which provides the opportunity for joint delivery of specific translational repressors (miRNA) and possibly transcriptional activators (transcription factors). This ability is attractive for future gene therapy use.

  1. miRNAs regulated by estrogens, tamoxifen, and endocrine disruptors and their downstream gene targets

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (22 nucleotides), single-stranded, non-coding RNAs that form complimentary base-pairs with the 3’ untranslated region of target mRNAs within the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) and block translation and/or stimulate mRNA transcript degradation. The non-coding miRBase (release 21, June 2014) reports that human genome contains ~2,588 mature miRNAs which regulate ~ 60% of human protein-coding mRNAs. Dysregulation of miRNA expression has been implicated in estrogen-related diseases including breast and endometrial cancers. The mechanism for estrogen regulation of miRNA expression and the role of estrogen-regulated miRNAs in normal homeostasis, reproduction, lactation, and in cancer is an area of great research and clinical interest. Estrogens regulate miRNAs transcription through estrogen receptors α and β in a tissue-specific and cell-dependent manner. This review focuses primary on the regulation of miRNA expression by ligand-activated ERs and their bona fide gene targets and includes miRNAs regulation by tamoxifen and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in breast cancer and cell lines. PMID:25659536

  2. Identification of Nutritional Stress-Responsive miRNAs in Phaseolus vulgaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators for Arabidopsis development and stress responses. A hybridization approach using miRNAs-macroarrays was used to identify miRNAs that respond to nutritional stress in Phaseolus vulgaris. miRNAs-macroarrays were prepared by printing nylon filters with DNA syntheti...

  3. Application of miRNAs as Biomarkers of Exposure and Effects in Risk Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Of the known epigenetic mechanisms, non-coding RNA and more specifically, microRNA (miRNA), offer the most immediate promise for risk assessment applications because these molecules can serve as excellent biomarkers of toxicity. The advantages of miRNA versus more classical prot...

  4. Dissecting the regulation rules of cancer-related miRNAs based on network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyu; Guo, Yanzhi; Pu, Xuemei; Li, Menglong

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs (microRNAs) are a set of endogenous and small non-coding RNAs which specifically induce degradation of target mRNAs or inhibit protein translation to control gene expression. Obviously, aberrant miRNA expression in human cells will lead to a serious of changes in protein-protein interaction network (PPIN), thus to activate or inactivate some pathways related to various diseases, especially carcinogenesis. In this study, we systematically constructed the miRNA-regulated co-expressed protein-protein interaction network (CePPIN) for 17 cancers firstly. We investigated the topological parameters and functional annotation for the proteins in CePPIN, especially for those miRNA targets. We found that targets regulated by more miRNAs tend to play a more important role in the forming process of cancers. We further elucidated the miRNA regulation rules in PPIN from a more systematical perspective. By GO and KEGG pathway analysis, miRNA targets are involved in various cellular processes mostly related to cell cycle, such as cell proliferation, growth, differentiation, etc. Through the Pfam classification, we found that miRNAs belonging to the same family tend to have targets from the same family which displays the synergistic function of these miRNAs. Finally, the case study on miR-519d and miR-21-regulated sub-network was performed to support our findings. PMID:27694936

  5. Use of radiometric indices to evaluate Zn and Pb stress in two grass species (Festuca rubra L. and Vulpia myuros L.).

    PubMed

    Gómez, J; Yunta, F; Esteban, E; Carpena, R O; Zornoza, P

    2016-11-01

    Vegetation indices obtained from radiometric measurements have been used to estimate the stress response of plants grown in contaminated sites. The phytotoxicity of Pb and Zn in Festuca rubra L. and Vulpia myuros L. plants grown under hydroponic conditions was evaluated using vegetation indices obtained from radiometric measurements. The plants were supplied with 3 mM Zn (+Zn), 500 μM Pb (+Pb) and 500 μM Pb with EDTA (+PbEDTA) for 3 months. Significantly higher Zn concentrations in F. rubra shoots compared with V. myuros shoots were detected for Zn and Pb treatments. EDTA increased Pb transport to the shoots for both grasses, while Pb-treated plants retained Pb primarily in the roots. All vegetation indices tested showed the highest differences in F. rubra under +PbEDTA treatment and minor effects under +Zn, whereas the major variations for V. myuros corresponded to +Zn treatment, followed by +PbEDTA. Red edge normalized difference vegetation index, yellowness index and anthocyanin concentration index were the most sensitive indices to report Zn and Pb phytotoxicity in these grasses. According to the results obtained, both metal concentrations and radiometric indices suggested that Pb is more phytotoxic to F. rubra, which tolerates high Zn levels, whereas V. myuros was strongly affected by high Zn levels and markedly tolerant to Pb, even when applied in a mobile form (PbEDTA). Both species could be used in the phytostabilization of Zn- and Pb-contaminated soils. The abilities of F. rubra to accumulate Zn and V. myuros to accumulate Pb in the roots would facilitate a more efficient phytoremediation strategy when used in combination.

  6. Inference of miRNA targets using evolutionary conservation and pathway analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gaidatzis, Dimos; van Nimwegen, Erik; Hausser, Jean; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2007-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs have emerged as important regulatory genes in a variety of cellular processes and, in recent years, hundreds of such genes have been discovered in animals. In contrast, functional annotations are available only for a very small fraction of these miRNAs, and even in these cases only partially. Results We developed a general Bayesian method for the inference of miRNA target sites, in which, for each miRNA, we explicitly model the evolution of orthologous target sites in a set of related species. Using this method we predict target sites for all known miRNAs in flies, worms, fish, and mammals. By comparing our predictions in fly with a reference set of experimentally tested miRNA-mRNA interactions we show that our general method performs at least as well as the most accurate methods available to date, including ones specifically tailored for target prediction in fly. An important novel feature of our model is that it explicitly infers the phylogenetic distribution of functional target sites, independently for each miRNA. This allows us to infer species-specific and clade-specific miRNA targeting. We also show that, in long human 3' UTRs, miRNA target sites occur preferentially near the start and near the end of the 3' UTR. To characterize miRNA function beyond the predicted lists of targets we further present a method to infer significant associations between the sets of targets predicted for individual miRNAs and specific biochemical pathways, in particular those of the KEGG pathway database. We show that this approach retrieves several known functional miRNA-mRNA associations, and predicts novel functions for known miRNAs in cell growth and in development. Conclusion We have presented a Bayesian target prediction algorithm without any tunable parameters, that can be applied to sequences from any clade of species. The algorithm automatically infers the phylogenetic distribution of functional sites for each miRNA, and assigns a posterior

  7. Involvement of miRNAs in equine follicle development.

    PubMed

    Schauer, S N; Sontakke, S D; Watson, E D; Esteves, C L; Donadeu, F X

    2013-09-01

    Previous evidence from in vitro studies suggests specific roles for a subset of miRNAs, including miR-21, miR-23a, miR-145, miR-503, miR-224, miR-383, miR-378, miR-132, and miR-212, in regulating ovarian follicle development. The objective of this study was to determine changes in the levels of these miRNAs in relation to follicle selection, maturation, and ovulation in the monovular equine ovary. In Experiment 1, follicular fluid was aspirated during ovulatory cycles from the dominant (DO) and largest subordinate (S) follicles of an ovulatory wave and the dominant (DA) follicle of a mid-cycle anovulatory wave (n=6 mares). Follicular fluid levels of progesterone and estradiol were lower (P<0.01) in S follicles than in DO follicles, whereas mean levels of IGF1 were lower (P<0.01) in S and DA follicles than in DO follicles. Relative to DO and DA follicles, S follicles had higher (P≤0.01) follicular fluid levels of miR-145 and miR-378. In Experiment 2, follicular fluid and granulosa cells were aspirated from dominant follicles before (DO) and 24 h after (L) administration of an ovulatory dose of hCG (n=5 mares/group). Relative to DO follicles, L follicles had higher follicular fluid levels of progesterone (P=0.05) and lower granulosa cell levels of CYP19A1 and LHCGR (P<0.005). Levels of miR-21, miR-132, miR-212, and miR-224 were increased (P<0.05) in L follicles; this was associated with reduced expression of the putative miRNA targets, PTEN, RASA1, and SMAD4. These novel results may indicate a physiological involvement of miR-21, miR-145, miR-224, miR-378, miR-132, and miR-212 in the regulation of cell survival, steroidogenesis, and differentiation during follicle selection and ovulation in the monovular ovary.

  8. siRNA and miRNA processing: new functions for Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Olga; Pikaard, Craig S

    2008-04-01

    In diverse eukaryotes, micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) regulate important processes that include mRNA inactivation, viral defense, chromatin modification, and transposon silencing. Recently, nucleolus-associated Cajal bodies in plants have been implicated as sites of siRNA and miRNA biogenesis, whereas in animals siRNA and miRNA dicing occurs in the cytoplasm. The plant nucleolus also contains proteins of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway that in animals are found associated with cytoplasmic processing bodies (P-bodies). P-bodies also function in the degradation of mRNAs subjected to miRNA and siRNA targeting. Collectively, these observations suggest interesting variations in the way siRNAs and miRNAs can accomplish their similar functions in plants and animals.

  9. Shen 4-marker miRNA panel for lung cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    We initially validated expressions of a set of miRNAs in paired lung tumor tissues and plasma specimens from 28 stage I NSCLC patients by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR, and then evaluated diagnostic value of the plasma miRNAs in a cohort of 58 NSCLC patients and 29 healthy individuals. The altered miRNA expressions were reproducibly confirmed in the tumor tissues. The miRNAs were stably present and reliably measurable in plasma. A logistic regression model with the best prediction was defined on the basis of the four genes (miRNA-21, -126, -210, and 486-5p), yielding 86.22% sensitivity and 96.55% specificity in distinguishing NSCLC patients from the healthy controls. (Lab Invest. 2011 Apr;91(4):579-87, PMID: 21116241)

  10. Capture and Identification of miRNA Targets by Biotin Pulldown and RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shen Mynn; Lieberman, Judy

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate the stability and expression of target RNAs in a sequence-dependent manner. Identifying miRNA-regulated genes is key to understanding miRNA function. Here, we describe an unbiased biochemical pulldown method to identify with high-specificity miRNA targets. Regulated transcripts are enriched in streptavidin-captured mRNAs that bind to a transfected biotinylated miRNA mimic. The method is relatively simple, does not involve cross-linking and can be performed with only a million cells. Addition of an on-bead RNase digestion step also identifies miRNA recognition elements (MRE).

  11. Altered miRNA expression in the cervix during pregnancy associated with lead and mercury exposure

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Alison P; Burris, Heather H; Just, Allan C; Motta, Valeria; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Svensson, Katherine; Oken, Emily; Solano-Gonzalez, Maritsa; Mercado-Garcia, Adriana; Pantic, Ivan; Schwartz, Joel; Tellez-Rojo, Martha M; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Wright, Robert O

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Toxic metals including lead and mercury are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. This study aimed to assess the association between miRNA expression in the cervix during pregnancy with lead and mercury levels. Materials & methods: We obtained cervical swabs from pregnant women (n = 60) and quantified cervical miRNA expression. Women's blood lead, bone lead and toenail mercury levels were analyzed. We performed linear regression to examine the association between metal levels and expression of 74 miRNAs adjusting for covariates. Results: Seventeen miRNAs were negatively associated with toenail mercury levels, and tibial bone lead levels were associated with decreased expression of miR-575 and miR-4286. Conclusion: The findings highlight miRNAs in the human cervix as novel responders to maternal chemical exposure during pregnancy. PMID:26418635

  12. Identification of potential miRNAs and their targets in Vriesea carinata (Poales, Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Guzman, Frank; Almerão, Mauricio Pereira; Korbes, Ana Paula; Christoff, Ana Paula; Zanella, Camila Martini; Bered, Fernanda; Margis, Rogério

    2013-09-01

    The miRNAs play important roles in regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. A small RNA and RNA-seq of libraries were constructed to identify miRNAs in Vriesea carinata, a native bromeliad species from Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest. Illumina technology was used to perform high throughput sequencing and data was analyzed using bioinformatics tools. We obtained 2,191,509 mature miRNAs sequences representing 54 conserved families in plant species. Further analysis allowed the prediction of secondary structures for 19 conserved and 16 novel miRNAs. Potential targets were predicted from pre-miRNAs by sequence homology and validated using RTqPCR approach. This study provides the first identification of miRNAs and their potential targets of a bromeliad species.

  13. Age-Associated Changes in miRNA Expression Profiles in Thymopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Virts, Elizabeth L.; Thoman, Marilyn L.

    2010-01-01

    During adult life, the thymus involutes and thymic output of mature T cells drastically declines. The molecular events underlying this process are not well understood. Here, we present evidence of the importance of miRNAs in regulating T cell differentiation in the aged. miRNAs are a wide-ranging regulatory element influencing gene expression throughout the lifetime of the organism. To establish whether they play a role in the age-specific thymic decline, the miRNA expression pattern was examined in TN subsets of young and aged mice. Fifty-two percent of the miRNAs exhibited elevated expression levels in the aged TN1 cells. This expression profile leads us to hypothesize that the large number of highly expressed miRNAs, indicative of rigidly controlled protein expression, limits the developmental potential of this population and results in the age-induced decline in thymopoiesis. PMID:20934450

  14. Caenorhabditis elegans period homolog lin-42 regulates the timing of heterochronic miRNA expression.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Katherine A; Rougvie, Ann E

    2014-10-28

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally via the 3' UTR of target mRNAs and were first identified in the Caenorhabditis elegans heterochronic pathway. miRNAs have since been found in many organisms and have broad functions, including control of differentiation and pluripotency in humans. lin-4 and let-7-family miRNAs regulate developmental timing in C. elegans, and their proper temporal expression ensures cell lineage patterns are correctly timed and sequentially executed. Although much is known about miRNA biogenesis, less is understood about how miRNA expression is timed and regulated. lin-42, the worm homolog of the circadian rhythm gene period of flies and mammals, is another core component of the heterochronic gene pathway. lin-42 mutants have a precocious phenotype, in which later-stage programs are executed too early, but the placement of lin-42 in the timing pathway is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that lin-42 negatively regulates heterochronic miRNA transcription. let-7 and the related miRNA miR-48 accumulate precociously in lin-42 mutants. This defect reflects transcriptional misregulation because enhanced expression of both primary miRNA transcripts (pri-miRNAs) and a let-7 promoter::gfp fusion are observed. The pri-miRNA levels oscillate during larval development, in a pattern reminiscent of lin-42 expression. Importantly, we show that lin-42 is not required for this cycling; instead, peak amplitude is increased. Genetic analyses further confirm that lin-42 acts through let-7 family miRNAs. Taken together, these data show that a key function of lin-42 in developmental timing is to dampen pri-miRNAs levels, preventing their premature expression as mature miRNAs.

  15. Site-specific associations between miRNA expression and survival in colorectal cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Martha L.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Pellatt, Daniel F.; Mullany, Lila E.; Stevens, John R.; Wolff, Erica; Hoffman, Michael D.; Wolff, Roger K.; Samowitz, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small non-coding RNA involved in cellular processes, including cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Thus, miRNA expression may alter survival after diagnosis with colorectal cancer (CRC). Results Individuals diagnosed with stage 1 or stage 2 rectal cancer had worse survival than colon cancer cases diagnosed at stage 1 or stage 2. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, no miRNAs were significantly associated with disease stage. Two miRNAs infrequently expressed in the population and not previously reported were associated with survival after diagnosis with colon cancer (miR-1 HR 2.17 95% CI 1.41, 3.36; and miR-101-3p HR 3.51 95% CI 1.72, 7.15). Among those diagnosed with rectal cancer, 201 miRNAs were associated with survival when the FDR q value was < 0.05. Assessment of 105 previously reported miRNAs associated with prognosis showed that four miRNAs influenced colon cancer survival and 17 influenced survival after a diagnosis with rectal cancer when raw p values were considered. Patients and Methods This study includes data from population-based studies of CRC conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. A total of 1893 carcinoma and normal paired colorectal mucosa tissue samples were run using the Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V19.0. We assessed miRNA differential expression between paired carcinoma and normal colonic mucosa tissue with CRC- specific survival evaluating stage and site-specific associations after adjusting for age, sex, microsatellite instability tumor status, and AJCC stage. Conclusions MiRNAs dysregulated for both colon and rectal cancer had a greater impact on survival after a diagnosis with rectal cancer. PMID:27517623

  16. miRNAs Signature in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastasis: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Soussan

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Head and neck cancers include epithelial tumors arising in the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, paranasal sinuses, and nasal cavity. Metastasis is a hallmark of cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small non-coding RNAs involved in cell proliferation, development, differentiation and metastasis. It is believed that miRNA alterations correlate with initiation and progression of cancer cell proliferation or inhibition of tumorigenesis. Moreover, miRNAs have different roles in development, progression, and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Altered expression of miRNAs could be novel molecular biomarkers for the definite diagnosis of cancer, metastatic site, cancer stage, and its progression. Purpose The purpose of this review was to provide a comprehensive literature review of the role of miRNAs in head and neck cancer metastasis. Search strategy A relevant English literature search in PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar was performed. The keywords ‘miRNA’, ‘head and neck’, and ‘cancer’ were searched in title and abstract of publications; limited from 1990 to 2015. The inclusion criterion was the role of miRNAs in cancer metastasis. The exclusion criterion was the other functions of miRNAs in cancers. Out of 15221 articles, the full texts of 442 articles were retrieved and only 133 articles met the inclusion criteria. Conclusion Despite the advances in cancer treatment, the mortality rate of HNSCC is still high. The potential application of miRNAs for cancer therapy has been demonstrated in many studies; miRNAs function as either tumor suppressor or oncogene. The recognition of metastamir and their targets may lead to better understanding of HNSCC oncogenesis, and consequently, development of new therapeutic strategies which is a necessity in cancer treatment. Development of therapeutic agents based on miRNAs is a promising target. PMID:27284551

  17. Assessing sample and miRNA profile quality in serum and plasma or other biofluids.

    PubMed

    Blondal, Thorarinn; Jensby Nielsen, Søren; Baker, Adam; Andreasen, Ditte; Mouritzen, Peter; Wrang Teilum, Maria; Dahlsveen, Ina K

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a class of small cellular RNAs (typically 21-23nt) that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Current estimates indicate that more than one third of the cellular transcriptome is regulated by miRNAs, although they are relatively few in number (less than 2000 human miRNAs). The high relative stability of miRNA in common clinical tissues and biofluids (e.g. plasma, serum, urine, saliva, etc.) and the ability of miRNA expression profiles to accurately classify discrete tissue types and disease states have positioned miRNA quantification as a promising new tool for a wide range of diagnostic applications. Furthermore miRNAs have been shown to be rapidly released from tissues into the circulation with the development of pathology. To facilitate discovery and clinical development of miRNA-based biomarkers, we developed a genome-wide Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA™)-based miRNA qPCR platform with unparalleled sensitivity and robustness. The platform allows high-throughput profiling of miRNAs from important clinical sources without the need for pre-amplification. Using this system, we have profiled thousands of biofluid samples including blood derived plasma and serum. An extensive quality control (QC) system has been implemented in order to secure technical excellence and reveal any unwanted bias coming from pre-analytical or analytical variables. We present our approaches to sample and RNA QC as well as data QC and normalization. Specifically we have developed normal reference ranges for circulating miRNAs in serum and plasma as well as a hemolysis indicator based on microRNA expression.

  18. Escape of X-linked miRNA genes from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Enrique; Flores, Luis; Yan, Wei; McCarrey, John R

    2015-11-01

    Past studies have indicated that transcription of all X-linked genes is repressed by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during the meiotic phase of spermatogenesis in mammals. However, more recent studies have shown an increase in steady-state levels of certain X-linked miRNAs in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that either synthesis of these miRNAs increases or that degradation of these miRNAs decreases dramatically in these cells. To distinguish between these possibilities, we performed RNA-FISH to detect nascent transcripts from multiple miRNA genes in various spermatogenic cell types. Our results show definitively that Type I X-linked miRNA genes are subject to MSCI, as are all or most X-linked mRNA genes, whereas Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI by continuing ongoing, active transcription in primary spermatocytes. We corroborated these results by co-localization of RNA-FISH signals with both a corresponding DNA-FISH signal and an immunofluorescence signal for RNA polymerase II. We also found that X-linked miRNA genes that escape MSCI locate non-randomly to the periphery of the XY body, whereas genes that are subject to MSCI remain located within the XY body in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that the mechanism of escape of X-linked miRNA genes from MSCI involves their relocation to a position outside of the repressive chromatin domain associated with the XY body. The fact that Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI suggests an immediacy of function of the encoded miRNAs specifically required during the meiotic stages of spermatogenesis.

  19. Escape of X-linked miRNA genes from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Enrique; Flores, Luis; Yan, Wei; McCarrey, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have indicated that transcription of all X-linked genes is repressed by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during the meiotic phase of spermatogenesis in mammals. However, more recent studies have shown an increase in steady-state levels of certain X-linked miRNAs in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that either synthesis of these miRNAs increases or that degradation of these miRNAs decreases dramatically in these cells. To distinguish between these possibilities, we performed RNA-FISH to detect nascent transcripts from multiple miRNA genes in various spermatogenic cell types. Our results show definitively that Type I X-linked miRNA genes are subject to MSCI, as are all or most X-linked mRNA genes, whereas Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI by continuing ongoing, active transcription in primary spermatocytes. We corroborated these results by co-localization of RNA-FISH signals with both a corresponding DNA-FISH signal and an immunofluorescence signal for RNA polymerase II. We also found that X-linked miRNA genes that escape MSCI locate non-randomly to the periphery of the XY body, whereas genes that are subject to MSCI remain located within the XY body in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that the mechanism of escape of X-linked miRNA genes from MSCI involves their relocation to a position outside of the repressive chromatin domain associated with the XY body. The fact that Type II and III X-linked miRNA genes escape MSCI suggests an immediacy of function of the encoded miRNAs specifically required during the meiotic stages of spermatogenesis. PMID:26395485

  20. Genomic analysis of miRNAs in an extreme mammalian hibernator, the Arctic ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuting; Hu, Wenchao; Wang, Haifang; Lu, Minghua; Shao, Chunxuan; Menzel, Corinna; Yan, Zheng; Li, Ying; Zhao, Sen; Khaitovich, Philipp; Liu, Mofang; Chen, Wei; Barnes, Brian M; Yan, Jun

    2010-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 19- to 25-nucleotide-long small and noncoding RNAs now well-known for their regulatory roles in gene expression through posttranscriptional and translational controls. Mammalian hibernation is a physiological process involving profound changes in set-points for food consumption, body mass and growth, body temperature, and metabolic rate in which miRNAs may play important regulatory roles. In an initial study, we analyzed miRNAs in the liver of an extreme hibernating species, the Arctic ground squirrel (Spermophilus parryii), using massively parallel Illumina sequencing technology. We identified >200 ground squirrel miRNAs, including 18 novel miRNAs specific to ground squirrel and mir-506 that is fast evolving in the ground squirrel lineage. Comparing animals sampled after at least 8 days of continuous torpor (late torpid), within 5 h of a spontaneous arousal episode (early aroused), and 1-2 mo after hibernation had ended (nonhibernating), we identified differentially expressed miRNAs during hibernation, which are also compared with the results from two other miRNA profiling methods: Agilent miRNA microarray and real-time PCR. Among the most significant miRNAs, miR-320 and miR-378 were significantly underexpressed during both stages of hibernation compared with nonhibernating animals, whereas miR-486 and miR-451 were overexpressed in late torpor but returned in early arousal to the levels similar to those in nonhibernating animals. Analyses of their putative target genes suggest that these miRNAs could play an important role in suppressing tumor progression and cell growth during hibernation. High-throughput sequencing data and microarray data have been submitted to GEO database with accession: GSE19808.

  1. Getting miRNA Therapeutics into the Target Cells for Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Mini-Review

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ming Ming

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs play important roles in modulating gene expression in varying cellular processes and disease pathogenesis, including neurodegenerative diseases. Several miRNAs are expressed in the brain, control brain development and are identified as important biomarkers in the pathogenesis of motor—and neuro-cognitive diseases such as Alzheimer’s (AD), Huntington’s and Parkinson’s diseases (PD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These remarkable miRNAs could be used as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targeting potential for many stressful and untreatable progressive neurodegenerative diseases. To modulate these miRNA activities, there are currently two strategies involved; first one is to therapeutically restore the suppressed miRNA level by miRNA mimics (agonist), and the other one is to inhibit miRNA function by using anti-miR (antagonist) to repress overactive miRNA function. However, RNAi-based therapeutics often faces in vivo instability because naked nucleic acids are subject to enzyme degradation before reaching the target sites. Therefore, an effective, safe and stable bio-responsive delivery system is necessary to protect the nucleic acids from serum degradation and assist their entrance to the cells. Since neuronal cells are non-regenerating, to design engineered miRNAs to be delivered to the central nervous system (CNS) for long term gene expression and knockdown is representing an enormous challenge for scientists. This article provides an insight summary on some of the innovative strategies employed to deliver miRNA into target cells. These viral and non-viral carrier systems hold promise in RNA therapy delivery for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27920668

  2. miRNA Expression in Control and FSHD Fetal Human Muscle Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Portilho, Débora Morueco; Alves, Marcelo Ribeiro; Kratassiouk, Gueorgui; Roche, Stéphane; Magdinier, Frédérique; de Santana, Eliane Corrêa; Polesskaya, Anna; Harel-Bellan, Annick; Mouly, Vincent; Savino, Wilson; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Dumonceaux, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal-dominant disorder and is one of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy. We have recently shown that some hallmarks of FSHD are already expressed in fetal FSHD biopsies, thus opening a new field of investigation for mechanisms leading to FSHD. As microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in myogenesis and muscle disorders, in this study we compared miRNAs expression levels during normal and FSHD muscle development. Methods Muscle biopsies were obtained from quadriceps of both healthy control and FSHD1 fetuses with ages ranging from 14 to 33 weeks of development. miRNA expression profiles were analyzed using TaqMan Human MicroRNA Arrays. Results During human skeletal muscle development, in control muscle biopsies we observed changes for 4 miRNAs potentially involved in secondary muscle fiber formation and 5 miRNAs potentially involved in fiber maturation. When we compared the miRNA profiles obtained from control and FSHD biopsies, we did not observe any differences in the muscle specific miRNAs. However, we identified 8 miRNAs exclusively expressed in FSHD1 samples (miR-330, miR-331-5p, miR-34a, miR-380-3p, miR-516b, miR-582-5p, miR-517* and miR-625) which could represent new biomarkers for this disease. Their putative targets are mainly involved in muscle development and morphogenesis. Interestingly, these FSHD1 specific miRNAs do not target the genes previously described to be involved in FSHD. Conclusions This work provides new candidate mechanisms potentially involved in the onset of FSHD pathology. Whether these FSHD specific miRNAs cause deregulations during fetal development, or protect against the appearance of the FSHD phenotype until the second decade of life still needs to be investigated. PMID:25692472

  3. Distinctive serum miRNA profile in mouse models of striated muscular pathologies.

    PubMed

    Vignier, Nicolas; Amor, Fatima; Fogel, Paul; Duvallet, Angélique; Poupiot, Jérôme; Charrier, Sabine; Arock, Michel; Montus, Marie; Nelson, Isabelle; Richard, Isabelle; Carrier, Lucie; Servais, Laurent; Voit, Thomas; Bonne, Gisèle; Israeli, David

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers are critically important for disease diagnosis and monitoring. In particular, close monitoring of disease evolution is eminently required for the evaluation of therapeutic treatments. Classical monitoring methods in muscular dystrophies are largely based on histological and molecular analyses of muscle biopsies. Such biopsies are invasive and therefore difficult to obtain. The serum protein creatine kinase is a useful biomarker, which is however not specific for a given pathology and correlates poorly with the severity or course of the muscular pathology. The aim of the present study was the systematic evaluation of serum microRNAs (miRNAs) as biomarkers in striated muscle pathologies. Mouse models for five striated muscle pathologies were investigated: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D (LGMD2D), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD2C), Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Two-step RT-qPCR methodology was elaborated, using two different RT-qPCR miRNA quantification technologies. We identified miRNA modulation in the serum of all the five mouse models. The most highly dysregulated serum miRNAs were found to be commonly upregulated in DMD, LGMD2D and LGMD2C mouse models, which all exhibit massive destruction of striated muscle tissues. Some of these miRNAs were down rather than upregulated in the EDMD mice, a model without massive myofiber destruction. The dysregulated miRNAs identified in the HCM model were different, with the exception of one dysregulated miRNA common to all pathologies. Importantly, a specific and distinctive circulating miRNA profile was identified for each studied pathological mouse model. The differential expression of a few dysregulated miRNAs in the DMD mice was further evaluated in DMD patients, providing new candidates of circulating miRNA biomarkers for DMD.

  4. Biological basis of miRNA action when their targets are located in human protein coding region.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wanjun; Wang, Xiaofei; Zhai, Chuanying; Zhou, Tong; Xie, Xueying

    2013-01-01

    Recent analyses have revealed many functional microRNA (miRNA) targets in mammalian protein coding regions. But, the mechanisms that ensure miRNA function when their target sites are located in protein coding regions of mammalian mRNA transcripts are largely unknown. In this paper, we investigate some potential biological factors, such as target site accessibility and local translation efficiency. We computationally analyze these two factors using experimentally identified miRNA targets in human protein coding region. We find site accessibility is significantly increased in miRNA target region to facilitate miRNA binding. At the mean time, local translation efficiency is also selectively decreased near miRNA target region. GC-poor codons are preferred in the flank region of miRNA target sites to ease the access of miRNA targets. Within-genome analysis shows substantial variations of site accessibility and local translation efficiency among different miRNA targets in the genome. Further analyses suggest target gene's GC content and conservation level could explain some of the differences in site accessibility. On the other hand, target gene's functional importance and conservation level can affect local translation efficiency near miRNA target region. We hence propose both site accessibility and local translation efficiency are important in miRNA action when miRNA target sites are located in mammalian protein coding regions.

  5. CpG preconditioning regulates miRNA expression that modulates genomic reprogramming associated with neuroprotection against ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Vartanian, Keri B; Mitchell, Hugh D; Stevens, Susan L; Conrad, Valerie K; McDermott, Jason E; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P

    2015-01-01

    Cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) preconditioning reprograms the genomic response to stroke to protect the brain against ischemic injury. The mechanisms underlying genomic reprogramming are incompletely understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression; however, their role in modulating gene responses produced by CpG preconditioning is unknown. We evaluated brain miRNA expression in response to CpG preconditioning before and after stroke using microarray. Importantly, we have data from previous gene microarrays under the same conditions, which allowed integration of miRNA and gene expression data to specifically identify regulated miRNA gene targets. CpG preconditioning did not significantly alter miRNA expression before stroke, indicating that miRNA regulation is not critical for the initiation of preconditioning-induced neuroprotection. However, after stroke, differentially regulated miRNAs between CpG- and saline-treated animals associated with the upregulation of several neuroprotective genes, implicating these miRNAs in genomic reprogramming that increases neuroprotection. Statistical analysis revealed that the miRNA targets were enriched in the gene population regulated in the setting of stroke, implying that miRNAs likely orchestrate this gene expression. These data suggest that miRNAs regulate endogenous responses to stroke and that manipulation of these miRNAs may have the potential to acutely activate novel neuroprotective processes that reduce damage. PMID:25388675

  6. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Differential Expression of miRNAs in Male and Female Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Houshuang; Zhou, Yongzhi; Cao, Jie; Zhou, Jinlin

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates the innate immune response in arthropods. In tick vectors, LPS activates expression of immune genes, including those for antibacterial peptides. miRNAs are 21–24 nt non-coding small RNAs that regulate target mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. However, our understanding of tick innate immunity is limited to a few cellular immune reactions and some characterized immune molecules. Moreover, there is little information on the regulation of the immune system in ticks by miRNA. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the differential expression of miRNAs in male and female ticks after LPS injection. LPS was injected into male and female Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides ticks to stimulate immune response, with phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-injected ticks as negative controls. miRNAs from each group were sequenced and analyzed. In the PBS- and LPS-injected female ticks, 11.46 and 12.82 million reads of 18–30 nt were obtained respectively. There were 13.92 and 15.29 million reads of 18–30 nt obtained in the PBS- and LPS-injected male ticks, respectively. Expression of miRNAs in male ticks was greater than that in female ticks. There were 955 and 984 conserved miRNA families in the PBS- and LPS-injected female ticks, respectively, and correspondingly 1684 and 1552 conserved miRNA families in male ticks. Nine novel miRNAs were detected as common miRNAs in two or more tested samples. There were 37 known miRNAs up-regulated >10-fold and 33 down-regulated >10-fold in LPS-injected female ticks; and correspondingly 52 and 59 miRNAs in male ticks. Differential expression of miRNAs in PBS- and LPS-injected samples supports their involvement in the regulation of innate immunity. These data provide an important resource for more detailed functional analysis of miRNAs in this species. PMID:26430879

  7. miRNA-10b sponge: An anti-breast cancer study in vitro

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, AI-LING; ZHANG, TING-TING; ZHOU, NING; WU, CUI YUN; LIN, MAN-HUA; LIU, YONG-JUN

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a malignant tumor with the highest incidence among women. Breast cancer metastasis is the major cause of treatment failure and mortality among such patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small molecular non-coding regulatory RNAs, which act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in breast cancer. miRNA-10b has been found to exhibit a high expression level in advanced and metastatic breast cancer, and is closely related to breast cancer metastasis. An miRNA sponge is an mRNA with several repeated sequences of complete or incomplete complementarity to the natural miRNA in its 3′ non-translating region. It acts as a sponge adsorbing miRNAs and ensures their separation from their targets and inhibits their function. The present study designed a sponge plasmid against miRNA-10b and transiently transfected it into high and low metastatic human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, and analyzed the effects of the miRNA-10b sponge on the growth and proliferation, migration and invasion in these cell lines. qRT-PCR results found that the sponge plasmid effectively inhibited the expression of miRNA-10b, and upregulated the expression of the miRNA-10b target protein HOXD-10. The results from the CCK-8 assay found that the miRNA-10b sponge inhibited the growth of breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. Results of the plate cloning experiments indicated that the miRNA-10b sponge suppressed the colony formation of the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. The results of wound healing and Transwell assays showed that the miRNA-10b sponge inhibited the migration and invasion of the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. Our results demonstrated that the miRNA-10b sponge effectively inhibited the growth and proliferation of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. In addition, it also restrained the migration and invasion of human highly metastatic breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. PMID:26820121

  8. Urinary Exosomal miRNA Signature in Type II Diabetic Nephropathy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Delić, Denis; Eisele, Claudia; Schmid, Ramona; Baum, Patrick; Wiech, Franziska; Gerl, Martin; Zimdahl, Heike; Pullen, Steven S.; Urquhart, Richard

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA species which are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. miRNAs are present in urine in a remarkably stable form packaged in extracellular vesicles, predominantly exosomes. In the present study, urinary exosomal miRNA profiling was conducted in urinary exosomes obtained from 8 healthy controls (C), 8 patients with type II diabetes (T2D) and 8 patients with type II diabetic nephropathy (DN) using Agilent´s miRNA microarrays. In total, the expression of 16 miRNA species was deregulated (>2-fold) in DN patients compared to healthy donors and T2D patients: the expression of 14 miRNAs (miR-320c, miR-6068, miR-1234-5p, miR-6133, miR-4270, miR-4739, miR-371b-5p, miR-638, miR-572, miR-1227-5p, miR-6126, miR-1915-5p, miR-4778-5p and miR-2861) was up-regulated whereas the expression of 2 miRNAs (miR-30d-5p and miR-30e-5p) was down-regulated. Most of the deregulated miRNAs are involved in progression of renal diseases. Deregulation of urinary exosomal miRNAs occurred in micro-albuminuric DN patients but not in normo-albuminuric DN patients. We used qRT-PCR based analysis of the most strongly up-regulated miRNAs in urinary exosomes from DN patients, miRNAs miR-320c and miR-6068. The correlation of miRNA expression and micro-albuminuria levels could be replicated in a confirmation cohort. In conclusion, urinary exosomal miRNA content is altered in type II diabetic patients with DN. Deregulated miR-320c, which might have an impact on the TGF-β-signaling pathway via targeting thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) shows promise as a novel candidate marker for disease progression in type II DN that should be evaluated in future studies. PMID:26930277

  9. miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 induce apoptosis via the KIT/AKT signalling pathway in gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Ihle, Michaela Angelika; Trautmann, Marcel; Kuenstlinger, Helen; Huss, Sebastian; Heydt, Carina; Fassunke, Jana; Wardelmann, Eva; Bauer, Sebastian; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Buettner, Reinhard; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine

    2015-08-01

    Aberrantly expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in many diseases including cancer. In gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) expression of miR-221 and miR-222 is reduced compared to control tissue and other sarcomas but the functional effects of this downregulation are not fully understood. This study aimed at evaluating the miR-221 and miR-222 expression profiles in different GIST subtypes and the functional role of these miRNAs. Expression of miR-221 and miR-222 was analysed in six KIT exon 9 and three KIT exon 11 mutated and nine wildtype GISTs by qPCR. Viability and apoptosis were examined in three different, KIT positive GIST cell lines (GIST882, GIST-T1 and GIST48) after overexpression of these miRNAs. The modulation of KIT and the PI3K/AKT pathways was determined by Western blot. Wildtype and KIT mutated GISTs revealed reduced miRNA expression compared to adequate control tissue. miRNA expression was lower for wildtype compared to mutated GISTs. Transient transfection of miR-221 and miR-222 reduced viability and induced apoptosis by inhibition of KIT expression and its phosphorylation and activation of caspases 3 and 7 in all three GIST cell lines. p-AKT, AKT and BCL2 expression was reduced after miRNA transfection whereas only slight influence on p-MTOR, MTOR and BCL2L11 (BIM) was detected. Our results demonstrate that miR-221 and miR-222 which are downregulated in wildtype and mutated GISTs, induce apoptosis in vitro by a signalling cascade involving KIT, AKT and BCL2. Therefore, overexpression of these miRNAs seems to functionally counteract oncogenic signalling pathways in GIST.

  10. Identification of novel miRNAs from drought tolerant rice variety Nagina 22.

    PubMed

    Mutum, Roseeta Devi; Kumar, Santosh; Balyan, Sonia; Kansal, Shivani; Mathur, Saloni; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh

    2016-08-08

    MicroRNAs regulate a spectrum of developmental and biochemical processes in plants and animals. Thus, knowledge of the entire miRNome is essential to understand the complete regulatory schema of any organism. The current study attempts to unravel yet undiscovered miRNA genes in rice. Analysis of small RNA libraries from various tissues of drought-tolerant 'aus' rice variety Nagina 22 (N22) identified 71 novel miRNAs. These were validated based on precursor hairpin structure, small RNA mapping pattern, 'star' sequence, conservation and identification of targets based on degradome data. While some novel miRNAs were conserved in other monocots and dicots, most appear to be lineage-specific. They were segregated into two different classes based on the closeness to the classical miRNA definition. Interestingly, evidence of a miRNA-like cleavage was found even for miRNAs that lie beyond the classical definition. Several novel miRNAs displayed tissue-enriched and/or drought responsive expression. Generation and analysis of the degradome data from N22 along with publicly available degradome identified several high confidence targets implicated in regulation of fundamental processes such as flowering and stress response. Thus, discovery of these novel miRNAs considerably expands the dimension of the miRNA-mediated regulation in rice.

  11. Multistep Model of Cervical Cancer: Participation of miRNAs and Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    López, Angelica Judith Granados; López, Jesús Adrián

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as an important step in the development of cancer. Close to 70 microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in cervical cancer up to now, nevertheless it is unknown if aberrant miRNA expression causes the onset of cervical cancer. One of the best ways to address this issue is through a multistep model of carcinogenesis. In the progression of cervical cancer there are three well-established steps to reach cancer that we used in the model proposed here. The first step of the model comprises the gene changes that occur in normal cells to be transformed into immortal cells (CIN 1), the second comprises immortal cell changes to tumorigenic cells (CIN 2), the third step includes cell changes to increase tumorigenic capacity (CIN 3), and the final step covers tumorigenic changes to carcinogenic cells. Altered miRNAs and their target genes are located in each one of the four steps of the multistep model of carcinogenesis. miRNA expression has shown discrepancies in different works; therefore, in this model we include miRNAs recording similar results in at least two studies. The present model is a useful insight into studying potential prognostic, diagnostic, and therapeutic miRNAs. PMID:25192291

  12. Multistep model of cervical cancer: participation of miRNAs and coding genes.

    PubMed

    Granados López, Angelica Judith; López, Jesús Adrián

    2014-09-04

    Aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as an important step in the development of cancer. Close to 70 microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in cervical cancer up to now, nevertheless it is unknown if aberrant miRNA expression causes the onset of cervical cancer. One of the best ways to address this issue is through a multistep model of carcinogenesis. In the progression of cervical cancer there are three well-established steps to reach cancer that we used in the model proposed here. The first step of the model comprises the gene changes that occur in normal cells to be transformed into immortal cells (CIN 1), the second comprises immortal cell changes to tumorigenic cells (CIN 2), the third step includes cell changes to increase tumorigenic capacity (CIN 3), and the final step covers tumorigenic changes to carcinogenic cells. Altered miRNAs and their target genes are located in each one of the four steps of the multistep model of carcinogenesis. miRNA expression has shown discrepancies in different works; therefore, in this model we include miRNAs recording similar results in at least two studies. The present model is a useful insight into studying potential prognostic, diagnostic, and therapeutic miRNAs.

  13. A Simple Alternative to Stereotactic Injection for Brain Specific Knockdown of miRNA.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Hemant; Sarangdhar, Mayuresh Anant; Vij, Manika; Roshan, Reema; Singh, Vijay Pal; Ganguli, Munia; Pillai, Beena

    2015-12-26

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression. In the brain, vital processes like neurodevelopment and neuronal functions depend on the correct expression of microRNAs. Perturbation of microRNAs in the brain can be used to model neurodegenerative diseases by modulating neuronal cell death. Currently, stereotactic injection is used to deliver miRNA knockdown agents to specific location in the brain. Here, we discuss strategies to design antagomirs against miRNA with locked nucleotide modifications (LNA). Subsequently describe a method for brain specific delivery of antagomirs, uniformly across different regions of the brain. This method is simple and widely applicable since it overcomes the surgery, associated injury and limitation of local delivery in stereotactic injections. We prepared a complex of neurotropic, cell-penetrating peptide Rabies Virus Glycoprotein (RVG) with antagomir against miRNA-29 and injected through tail vein, to specifically deliver in the brain. The antagomir design incorporated features that allow specific targeting of the miRNA and formation of non-covalent complexes with the peptide. The knock-down of the miRNA in neuronal cells, resulted in apoptotic cell death and associated behavioural defects. Thus, the method can be used for acute models of neuro-degeneration through the perturbation of miRNAs.

  14. RACK1 scaffold proteins influence miRNA abundance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Speth, Corinna; Willing, Eva-Maria; Rausch, Stephanie; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Laubinger, Sascha

    2013-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate plant development by post-transcriptional regulation of target genes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, DCL1 processes precursors (pri-miRNAs) to miRNA duplexes, which associate with AGO1. Additional proteins act in concert with DCL1 (e.g. HYL1 and SERRATE) or AGO1 to facilitate efficient and precise pri-miRNA processing and miRNA loading, respectively. In this study, we show that the accumulation of plant microRNAs depends on RECEPTOR FOR ACTIVATED C KINASE 1 (RACK1), a scaffold protein that is found in all higher eukaryotes. miRNA levels are reduced in rack1 mutants, and our data suggest that RACK1 affects the microRNA pathway via several distinct mechanisms involving direct interactions with known microRNA factors: RACK1 ensures the accumulation and processing of some pri-miRNAs, directly interacts with SERRATE and is part of an AGO1 complex. As a result, mutations in RACK1 lead to over-accumulation of miRNA target mRNAs, which are important for ABA responses and phyllotaxy, for example. In conclusion, our study identified complex functioning of RACK1 proteins in the Arabidopsis miRNA pathway; these proteins are important for miRNA production and therefore plant development.

  15. Amplification-free detection of miRNA via an ECL chips system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weipeng; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2012-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play pivotal roles in many fundamental aspects of life, such as tissue differentiation, metabolic modulation and cell proliferation control. As miRNA has the characteristics of small size, easy degradation and low abundance, a simple, rapid and specificity method to measure the concentration of miRNA is required. Herein, we present an Electrochemiluminescent Chips system for rapid miRNA detection based on the base stacking hybridization and magnetic beads (MB) enrichment technology. In this design, integrating the microfluidic system with Electrochemiluminescent detection makes it easy to assemble the multiple assay steps (e.g., sample preparation, incubation, washing and detection) and let the device convenient to carry. This method is very fast, we can detect miRNA in 19 min with a 10 uL sample volume. Moreover, in this experiment the detection limit was 1 fmol of the pure synthetic miRNA, and the linear range was from 5 fmol to 1 pmol. It also exhibited excellent selectivity over a series of interference miRNA, which display a high level of expression in cancer cell. These results suggest that this method might have potential for cancer diagnosis at the point of care.

  16. Circulating miRNAs: roles in cancer diagnosis, prognosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guofeng

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) belong to a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate numerous biological processes by targeting a broad set of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNAs have been detected in remarkably stable forms in many types of body fluids. A comparison between cancer patients and healthy individuals has clearly shown that certain types of circulating miRNAs are associated with cancer initiation and progression. Research on miRNA-based biomarkers has witnessed phenomenal growth, owing to the non-invasive nature of miRNA-based screening assays and their sensitivity and specificity in detecting cancers. Consequently, a considerable effort has been devoted to identify suitable miRNAs for cancer diagnosis and also decode the information carried by circulating miRNAs. This review highlights the current studies that focus on the identification of circulating miRNA-based diagnostic and prognostic markers, for the most prevalent types of cancer. Additionally, the review also provides an insight into the putative functions of miRNAs, and attempts to delineate the mechanisms through which they are released into the bloodstream. Moreover, methodologies and strategies for identification of circulating miRNAs in cancers are summarized. Finally, potential strategies for circulating miRNA-based cancer therapies are proposed.

  17. Loss of miRNAs during processing and storage of cow's (Bos taurus) milk.

    PubMed

    Howard, Katherine M; Jati Kusuma, Rio; Baier, Scott R; Friemel, Taylor; Markham, Laura; Vanamala, Jairam; Zempleni, Janos

    2015-01-21

    MicroRNAs (miRs, miRNAs) play central roles in gene regulation. Previously, we reported that miRNAs from pasteurized, store-bought bovine milk have biological activity in humans. Here, we assessed the effects of milk processing, storage, somatic cell content, and handling by consumers on the degradation of miRNAs in milk; we also quantified miRNAs in dairy products. Pasteurization and homogenization caused a 63% loss of miR-200c, whereas a 67% loss observed for miR-29b was statistically significant only in skim milk. Effects of cold storage and somatic cell content were quantitatively minor (<2% loss). Heating in the microwave caused a 40% loss of miR-29b but no loss of miR-200c. The milk fat content had no effect on miRNA stability during storage and microwave heating. The concentrations of miRNAs in dairy products were considerably lower than in store-bought milk. We conclude that processing of milk by dairies and handling by consumers causes a significant loss of miRNAs.

  18. Integrated analysis of the miRNA, gene and pathway regulatory network in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Qu, Yanjun; Duan, Jingjing; Deng, Ting; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Le; Bai, Ming; Li, Jialu; Zhou, Likun; Ning, Tao; Li, Hongli; Ge, Shaohua; Li, Hua; Ying, Guoguang; Huang, Dingzhi; Ba, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide; however, the efficacy of clinical treatment is limited. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that have been reported to play a key role in the development of cancer. They also provide novel candidates for targeted therapy. To date, in-depth studies on the molecular mechanisms of gastric cancer involving miRNAs are still absent. We previously reported that 5 miRNAs were identified as being significantly increased in gastric cancer, and the role of these miRNAs was investigated in the present study. By using bioinformatics tools, we found that more than 4,000 unique genes are potential downstream targets of gastric cancer miRNAs, and these targets belong to the protein class of nucleic acid binding, transcription factor, enzyme modulator, transferase and receptor. Pathway mapping showed that the targets of gastric cancer miRNAs are involved in the MAPK signaling pathway, pathways in cancer, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, the HTLV-1 signaling pathway and Ras signaling pathway, thus regulating cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and metastasis. Analysis of the pathways related to miRNAs may provides potential drug targets for future therapy of gastric cancer.

  19. In silico MCMV Silencing Concludes Potential Host-Derived miRNAs in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Muhammad Shahzad; Jabbar, Basit; Sharif, Muhammad Nauman; Ali, Qurban; Husnain, Tayyab; Nasir, Idrees A.

    2017-01-01

    Maize Chlorotic Mottle Virus (MCMV) is a deleterious pathogen which causes Maize Lethal Necrosis Disease (MLND) that results in substantial yield loss of Maize crop worldwide. The positive-sense RNA genome of MCMV (4.4 kb) encodes six proteins: P32 (32 kDa protein), RNA dependent RNA polymerases (P50 and P111), P31 (31 kDa protein), P7 (7 kDa protein), coat protein (25 kDa). P31, P7 and coat protein are encoded from sgRNA1, located at the 3′end of the genome and sgRNA2 is located at the extremity of the 3′genome end. The objective of this study is to locate the possible attachment sites of Zea mays derived miRNAs in the genome of MCMV using four diverse miRNA target prediction algorithms. In total, 321 mature miRNAs were retrieved from miRBase (miRNA database) and were tested for hybridization of MCMV genome. These algorithms considered the parameters of seed pairing, minimum free energy, target site accessibility, multiple target sites, pattern recognition and folding energy for attachment. Out of 321 miRNAs only 10 maize miRNAs are predicted for silencing of MCMV genome. The results of this study can hence act as the first step towards the development of MCMV resistant transgenic Maize plants through expression of the selected miRNAs.

  20. Identification of novel miRNAs from drought tolerant rice variety Nagina 22

    PubMed Central

    Mutum, Roseeta Devi; Kumar, Santosh; Balyan, Sonia; Kansal, Shivani; Mathur, Saloni; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate a spectrum of developmental and biochemical processes in plants and animals. Thus, knowledge of the entire miRNome is essential to understand the complete regulatory schema of any organism. The current study attempts to unravel yet undiscovered miRNA genes in rice. Analysis of small RNA libraries from various tissues of drought-tolerant ‘aus’ rice variety Nagina 22 (N22) identified 71 novel miRNAs. These were validated based on precursor hairpin structure, small RNA mapping pattern, ‘star’ sequence, conservation and identification of targets based on degradome data. While some novel miRNAs were conserved in other monocots and dicots, most appear to be lineage-specific. They were segregated into two different classes based on the closeness to the classical miRNA definition. Interestingly, evidence of a miRNA-like cleavage was found even for miRNAs that lie beyond the classical definition. Several novel miRNAs displayed tissue-enriched and/or drought responsive expression. Generation and analysis of the degradome data from N22 along with publicly available degradome identified several high confidence targets implicated in regulation of fundamental processes such as flowering and stress response. Thus, discovery of these novel miRNAs considerably expands the dimension of the miRNA-mediated regulation in rice. PMID:27499088

  1. Small RNA Sequencing Based Identification of MiRNAs in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Ünlü, Ercan Selçuk; Gordon, Donna M; Telli, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA molecules are short, non-coding RNAs identified for their crucial role in post-transcriptional regulation. A well-studied example includes miRNAs (microRNAs) which have been identified in several model organisms including the freshwater flea and planktonic crustacean Daphnia. A model for epigenetic-based studies with an available genome database, the identification of miRNAs and their potential role in regulating Daphnia gene expression has only recently garnered interest. Computational-based work using Daphnia pulex, has indicated the existence of 45 miRNAs, 14 of which have been experimentally verified. To extend this study, we took a sequencing approach towards identifying miRNAs present in a small RNA library isolated from Daphnia magna. Using Perl codes designed for comparative genomic analysis, 815,699 reads were obtained from 4 million raw reads and run against a database file of known miRNA sequences. Using this approach, we have identified 205 putative mature miRNA sequences belonging to 188 distinct miRNA families. Data from this study provides critical information necessary to begin an investigation into a role for these transcripts in the epigenetic regulation of Daphnia magna.

  2. miRNAs Regulation and Its Role as Biomarkers in Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Marí-Alexandre, Josep; Sánchez-Izquierdo, Dolors; Gilabert-Estellés, Juan; Barceló-Molina, Moisés; Braza-Boïls, Aitana; Sandoval, Juan

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs (18–22 nt) that function as modulators of gene expression. Since their discovery in 1993 in C. elegans, our knowledge about their biogenesis, function, and mechanism of action has increased enormously, especially in recent years, with the development of deep-sequencing technologies. New biogenesis pathways and sources of miRNAs are changing our concept about these molecules. The study of the miRNA contribution to pathological states is a field of great interest in research. Different groups have reported the implication of miRNAs in pathologies such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, and gynecological diseases. It is also well-known that miRNAs are present in biofluids (plasma, serum, urine, semen, and menstrual blood) and have been proposed as ideal candidates as disease biomarkers. The goal of this review is to highlight the current knowledge in the field of miRNAs with a special emphasis to their role in endometriosis and the newest investigations addressing the use of miRNAs as biomarkers for this gynecological disease. PMID:26771608

  3. Differentially expressed miRNAs in oxygen-induced retinopathy newborn mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunpeng; Wu, Suying; Yang, Yang; Peng, Fen; Li, Qintao; Tian, Peng; Xiang, Erying; Liang, Honglu; Wang, Beibei; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Huang, Hua; Zhou, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in regulating retinal neovascularization and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). A total of 80 healthy C57BL/6 neonatal mice were randomly divided into the oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) group (n=40), in which 7-day-old mice were maintained in 75% oxygen conditions for 5 days, or the control group (n=40). Following collection of retinal tissue, retinal angiography and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining were performed. Total RNA was also extracted from retinal tissue, and miRNA microarrays and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) were performed to identify differentially expressed miRNAs in the two groups. Retinal angiography and H&E staining revealed damage to retinas in the OIR group. Compared with the control group, 67 miRNAs were differentially expressed in the OIR group, of which 34 were upregulated and 33 were downregulated. Of these differentially expressed miRNAs, 32 exhibited a fold change ≥2, of which 21 were upregulated and 11 were downregulated. The results of RT-qPCR for miR-130a-3p and miR-5107-5p were in accordance with those of the miRNA microarray. The newly identified miRNAs may be important in the development of ROP, and may provide a basis for future research into the mechanisms of ROP. PMID:27922698

  4. Application of miRNAs as Biomarkers of Exposure and Effects ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Of the known epigenetic mechanisms, non-coding RNA and more specifically, microRNA (miRNA), offer the most immediate promise for risk assessment applications because these molecules can serve as excellent biomarkers of toxicity. The advantages of miRNA versus more classical protein toxicity biomarkers include: greater stability and earlier appearance in biofluids that can be obtained by relatively non-invasive approaches; tissue- and/or cell-specific expression patterns; evolutionary conservation in both sequence and function across species; and novel technologies for sensitive and accurate quantification. Further, information on individual miRNA is readily available through databases such as miRBase and others. Thus miRNA biomarkers offer substantial benefits in terms of cost, time, convenience, sensitivity, and specificity when assessing environmental-induced toxicity in model systems or human cohorts. Although this field is rapidly expanding, documented examples include associations of miR-155 with lymphocytic leukemia, miR-122 with liver toxicity; miR-206 with skeletal muscle disease; and miR-208a-3p with cardiac toxicity. Despite their promise, some challenges in using miRNAs as toxicity biomarkers remain, including the need for improved methods for normalizing miRNA measurements, translating findings of biofluid-based miRNA biomarker alterations in experimental models to human health and specific cell/tissue injury, and finally, the need to better defi

  5. Expression of miRNAs in ovine fetal gonads: potential role in gonadal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gonadal differentiation in the mammalian fetus involves a complex dose-dependent genetic network. Initiation and progression of fetal ovarian and testicular pathways are accompanied by dynamic expression patterns of thousands of genes. We postulate these expression patterns are regulated by small non-coding RNAs called microRNAs (miRNAs). The aim of this study was to identify the expression of miRNAs in mammalian fetal gonads using sheep as a model. Methods We determined the expression of 128 miRNAs by real time PCR in early-gestational (gestational day (GD) 42) and mid-gestational (GD75) sheep ovaries and testes. Expression data were further examined and validated by bioinformatic analysis. Results Expression analysis revealed significant differences between ovaries and testes among 24 miRNAs at GD42, and 43 miRNAs at GD75. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that a number of differentially expressed miRNAs are predicted to target genes known to be important in mammalian gonadal development, including ESR1, CYP19A1, and SOX9. In situ hybridization revealed miR-22 localization within fetal testicular cords. As estrogen signaling is important in human and sheep ovarian development, these data indicate that miR-22 is involved in repressing estrogen signaling within fetal testes. Conclusions Based on our results we postulate that gene expression networks underlying fetal gonadal development are regulated by miRNAs. PMID:21223560

  6. Biogenesis and regulation of the let-7 miRNAs and their functional implications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hosuk; Han, Sungwook; Kwon, Chang Seob; Lee, Daeyoup

    2016-02-01

    The let-7 miRNA was one of the first miRNAs discovered in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and its biological functions show a high level of evolutionary conservation from the nematode to the human. Unlike in C. elegans, higher animals have multiple isoforms of let-7 miRNAs; these isoforms share a consensus sequence called the 'seed sequence' and these isoforms are categorized into let-7 miRNA family. The expression of let-7 family is required for developmental timing and tumor suppressor function, but must be suppressed for the self-renewal of stem cells. Therefore, let-7 miRNA biogenesis must be carefully controlled. To generate a let-7 miRNA, a primary transcript is produced by RNA polymerase II and then subsequently processed by Drosha/DGCR8, TUTase, and Dicer. Because dysregulation of let-7 processing is deleterious, biogenesis of let-7 is tightly regulated by cellular factors, such as the RNA binding proteins, LIN28A/B and DIS3L2. In this review, we discuss the biological functions and biogenesis of let-7 miRNAs, focusing on the molecular mechanisms of regulation of let-7 biogenesis in vertebrates, such as the mouse and the human.

  7. Uncovering miRNAs involved in crosstalk between nutrient deficiencies in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gang; Ai, Qin; Yu, Diqiu

    2015-07-02

    Integrating carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and sulfur (S) metabolism is essential for the growth and development of living organisms. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in regulating nutrient metabolism in plants. However, how plant miRNAs mediate crosstalk between different nutrient metabolic pathways is unclear. In this study, deep sequencing of Arabidopsis thaliana small RNAs was used to reveal miRNAs that were differentially expressed in response to C, N, or S deficiency. Comparative analysis revealed that the targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs are involved in different cellular responses and metabolic processes, including transcriptional regulation, auxin signal transduction, nutrient homeostasis, and regulation of development. C, N, and S deficiency specifically induced miR169b/c, miR826 and miR395, respectively. In contrast, miR167, miR172, miR397, miR398, miR399, miR408, miR775, miR827, miR841, miR857, and miR2111 are commonly suppressed by C, N, and S deficiency. In particular, the miRNAs that are induced specifically by a certain nutrient deficiency are often suppressed by other nutrient deficiencies. Further investigation indicated that the modulation of nutrient-responsive miRNA abundance affects the adaptation of plants to nutrient starvation conditions. This study revealed that miRNAs function as important regulatory nodes of different nutrient metabolic pathways.

  8. miRNAs Regulation and Its Role as Biomarkers in Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Marí-Alexandre, Josep; Sánchez-Izquierdo, Dolors; Gilabert-Estellés, Juan; Barceló-Molina, Moisés; Braza-Boïls, Aitana; Sandoval, Juan

    2016-01-13

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs (18-22 nt) that function as modulators of gene expression. Since their discovery in 1993 in C. elegans, our knowledge about their biogenesis, function, and mechanism of action has increased enormously, especially in recent years, with the development of deep-sequencing technologies. New biogenesis pathways and sources of miRNAs are changing our concept about these molecules. The study of the miRNA contribution to pathological states is a field of great interest in research. Different groups have reported the implication of miRNAs in pathologies such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, and gynecological diseases. It is also well-known that miRNAs are present in biofluids (plasma, serum, urine, semen, and menstrual blood) and have been proposed as ideal candidates as disease biomarkers. The goal of this review is to highlight the current knowledge in the field of miRNAs with a special emphasis to their role in endometriosis and the newest investigations addressing the use of miRNAs as biomarkers for this gynecological disease.

  9. Conservation and evolution of miRNA regulatory programs in plant development

    PubMed Central

    Willmann, Matthew R.; Poethig, R. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Summary of recent advances Over the past two years, microarray technologies, large-scale small RNA and whole genome sequencing projects, and data mining have provided a wealth of information about the spectrum of miRNAs and miRNA targets present in different plant species and the alga Chlamydomonas. Such studies have shown that a number of key miRNA regulatory modules for plant development are conserved throughout the plant kingdom, suggesting that these programs were critical to the colonization of land. New genetic and biochemical studies of miRNA pathways in Arabidopsis, the spatiotemporal expression patterns of several conserved miRNAs and their targets, and the characterization of mutations in Arabidopsis and maize have begun to reveal the functions of these ancient miRNA-regulated developmental programs. In addition to these conserved miRNAs, there are many clade and species-specific miRNAs, which have evolved more recently and whose functions are currently unknown. PMID:17709279

  10. Psmir: a database of potential associations between small molecules and miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanlin; Wang, Jing; Dai, Enyu; Yang, Feng; Chen, Xiaowen; Wang, Shuyuan; Yu, Xuexin; Liu, Dianming; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs are key post-transcriptional regulators of many essential biological processes, and their dysregulation has been validated in almost all human cancers. Restoring aberrantly expressed miRNAs might be a novel therapeutics. Recently, many studies have demonstrated that small molecular compounds can affect miRNA expression. Thus, prediction of associations between small molecules and miRNAs is important for investigation of miRNA-targeted drugs. Here, we analyzed 39 miRNA-perturbed gene expression profiles, and then calculated the similarity of transcription responses between miRNA perturbation and drug treatment to predict drug-miRNA associations. At the significance level of 0.05, we obtained 6501 candidate associations between 1295 small molecules and 25 miRNAs, which included 624 FDA approved drugs. Finally, we constructed the Psmir database to store all potential associations and the related materials. In a word, Psmir served as a valuable resource for dissecting the biological significance in small molecules’ effects on miRNA expression, which will facilitate developing novel potential therapeutic targets or treatments for human cancers. Psmir is supported by all major browsers, and is freely available at http://www.bio-bigdata.com/Psmir/. PMID:26759061

  11. Psmir: a database of potential associations between small molecules and miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanlin; Wang, Jing; Dai, Enyu; Yang, Feng; Chen, Xiaowen; Wang, Shuyuan; Yu, Xuexin; Liu, Dianming; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-13

    miRNAs are key post-transcriptional regulators of many essential biological processes, and their dysregulation has been validated in almost all human cancers. Restoring aberrantly expressed miRNAs might be a novel therapeutics. Recently, many studies have demonstrated that small molecular compounds can affect miRNA expression. Thus, prediction of associations between small molecules and miRNAs is important for investigation of miRNA-targeted drugs. Here, we analyzed 39 miRNA-perturbed gene expression profiles, and then calculated the similarity of transcription responses between miRNA perturbation and drug treatment to predict drug-miRNA associations. At the significance level of 0.05, we obtained 6501 candidate associations between 1295 small molecules and 25 miRNAs, which included 624 FDA approved drugs. Finally, we constructed the Psmir database to store all potential associations and the related materials. In a word, Psmir served as a valuable resource for dissecting the biological significance in small molecules' effects on miRNA expression, which will facilitate developing novel potential therapeutic targets or treatments for human cancers. Psmir is supported by all major browsers, and is freely available at http://www.bio-bigdata.com/Psmir/.

  12. Comprehensive miRNA expression profiles in the ilea of Lawsonia intracellularis-infected pigs

    PubMed Central

    LI, Hongyi; ZHANG, Mao; ZHENG, Enqin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the miRNA expression profiles in Lawsonia intracellularis-infected porcine intestines, infected pigs were first identified using PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction). Then, RNA from infected intestines and control tissues were isolated and subjected to microarray analysis and RT-PCR. Results showed that a total of 83 miRNAs were differentially expressed between the infected samples and controls, out of which 53 were upregulated and 30 were downregulated. Validation using RT-PCR showed a high degree of confidence for the obtained data. Using the current miRBase release 21.0, nine groups of miRNAs were located in the same cluster, and three groups of miRNAs were found to belong to the same family. Interestingly, except for ssc-miR-10a-5p, all clustered miRNAs and the family members exhibited the same expression patterns. Pathway analysis of the putative gene targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs showed that they were involved in the immune response, amino acid metabolism and cell communication/growth/motility. Thus, the results indicate that altered miRNA expression profiles can affect immunity, metabolism and cellular processes. PMID:27916787

  13. Circulating miRNAs: a new generation of anti-doping biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, Nicolas; Robinson, Neil; Saugy, Martial

    2013-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate a variety of biological processes. Cell-free miRNAs detected in blood plasma are used as specific and sensitive markers of physiological processes and some diseases. Circulating miRNAs are highly stable in body fluids, for example plasma. Therefore, profiles of circulating miRNAs have been investigated for potential use as novel, non-invasive anti-doping biomarkers. This review describes the biological mechanisms underlying the variation of circulating miRNAs, revealing that they have great potential as a new class of biomarker for detection of doping substances. The latest developments in extraction and profiling technology, and the technical design of experiments useful for anti-doping, are also discussed. Longitudinal measurements of circulating miRNAs in the context of the athlete biological passport are proposed as an efficient strategy for the use of these new markers. The review also emphasizes potential challenges for the translation of circulating miRNAs from research into practical anti-doping applications.

  14. MiRTDL: a deep learning approach for miRNA target prediction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shuang; Guo, Maozu; Wang, Chunyu; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Xuejian

    2015-12-22

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate genes that are associated with various diseases. To better understand miRNAs, the miRNA regulatory mechanism needs to be investigated and the real targets identified. Here, we present miRTDL, a new miRNA target prediction algorithm based on convolutional neural network (CNN). The CNN automatically extracts essential information from the input data rather than completely relying on the input dataset generated artificially when the precise miRNA target mechanisms are poorly known. In this work, the constraint relaxing method is first used to construct a balanced training dataset to avoid inaccurate predictions caused by the existing unbalanced dataset. The miRTDL is then applied to 1,606 experimentally validated miRNA target pairs. Finally, the results show that our miRTDL outperforms the existing target prediction algorithms and achieves significantly higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 88.43%, 96.44% and 89.98%, respectively. We also investigate the miRNA target mechanism, and the results show that the complementation features are more important than the others.

  15. miReader: Discovering Novel miRNAs in Species without Sequenced Genome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Along with computational approaches, NGS led technologies have caused a major impact upon the discoveries made in the area of miRNA biology, including novel miRNAs identification. However, to this date all microRNA discovery tools compulsorily depend upon the availability of reference or genomic sequences. Here, for the first time a novel approach, miReader, has been introduced which could discover novel miRNAs without any dependence upon genomic/reference sequences. The approach used NGS read data to build highly accurate miRNA models, molded through a Multi-boosting algorithm with Best-First Tree as its base classifier. It was comprehensively tested over large amount of experimental data from wide range of species including human, plants, nematode, zebrafish and fruit fly, performing consistently with >90% accuracy. Using the same tool over Illumina read data for Miscanthus, a plant whose genome is not sequenced; the study reported 21 novel mature miRNA duplex candidates. Considering the fact that miRNA discovery requires handling of high throughput data, the entire approach has been implemented in a standalone parallel architecture. This work is expected to cause a positive impact over the area of miRNA discovery in majority of species, where genomic sequence availability would not be a compulsion any more. PMID:23805282

  16. A path-based measurement for human miRNA functional similarities using miRNA-disease associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Pingjian; Luo, Jiawei; Xiao, Qiu; Chen, Xiangtao

    2016-09-01

    Compared with the sequence and expression similarity, miRNA functional similarity is so important for biology researches and many applications such as miRNA clustering, miRNA function prediction, miRNA synergism identification and disease miRNA prioritization. However, the existing methods always utilized the predicted miRNA target which has high false positive and false negative to calculate the miRNA functional similarity. Meanwhile, it is difficult to achieve high reliability of miRNA functional similarity with miRNA-disease associations. Therefore, it is increasingly needed to improve the measurement of miRNA functional similarity. In this study, we develop a novel path-based calculation method of miRNA functional similarity based on miRNA-disease associations, called MFSP. Compared with other methods, our method obtains higher average functional similarity of intra-family and intra-cluster selected groups. Meanwhile, the lower average functional similarity of inter-family and inter-cluster miRNA pair is obtained. In addition, the smaller p-value is achieved, while applying Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Kruskal-Wallis test to different miRNA groups. The relationship between miRNA functional similarity and other information sources is exhibited. Furthermore, the constructed miRNA functional network based on MFSP is a scale-free and small-world network. Moreover, the higher AUC for miRNA-disease prediction indicates the ability of MFSP uncovering miRNA functional similarity.

  17. Ammonia-induced miRNA expression changes in cultured rat astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oenarto, Jessica; Karababa, Ayse; Castoldi, Mirco; Bidmon, Hans J.; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric syndrome evolving from cerebral osmotic disturbances and oxidative/nitrosative stress. Ammonia, the main toxin of hepatic encephalopathy, triggers astrocyte senescence in an oxidative stress-dependent way. As miRNAs are critically involved in cell cycle regulation and their expression may be regulated by oxidative stress, we analysed, whether astrocyte senescence is a consequence of ammonia-induced miRNA expression changes. Using a combined miRNA and gene microarray approach, 43 miRNA species which were downregulated and 142 genes which were upregulated by NH4Cl (5 mmol/l, 48 h) in cultured rat astrocytes were found. Ammonia-induced miRNA and gene expression changes were validated by qPCR and 43 potential miRNA target genes, including HO-1, were identified by matching upregulated mRNA species with predicted targets of miRNA species downregulated by ammonia. Inhibition of HO-1 targeting miRNAs which were downregulated by NH4Cl strongly upregulated HO-1 mRNA and protein levels and inhibited astrocyte proliferation in a HO-1-dependent way. Preventing ammonia-induced upregulation of HO-1 by taurine (5 mmol/l) as well as blocking HO-1 activity by tin-protoporphyrine IX fully prevented ammonia-induced proliferation inhibition and senescence. The data suggest that ammonia induces astrocyte senescence through NADPH oxidase-dependent downregulation of HO-1 targeting miRNAs and concomitant upregulation of HO-1 at both mRNA and protein level. PMID:26755400

  18. Differential miRNA expressions in peripheral blood mononuclear cells for diagnosis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Lin, Yanli; Zhan, Min; Mann, Dean L; Stass, Sanford A; Jiang, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Tremendous efforts have been made to develop cancer biomarkers by detecting circulating extracellular miRNAs directly released from tumors. Yet, none of the cell-free biomarkers has been accepted to be used for early detection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs) act as the first line of defense against malignancy in immune system, their dysfunction may occur as an early event in cancer immunogenicity or immune evasion. We proposed to investigate whether analysis of miRNA expressions of PBMCs has diagnostic value for NSCLC. We first used a microarray to analyze PBMCs of 16 stage I NSCLC patients and 16 cancer-free smokers, and identified seven PBMC miRNAs with a significantly altered expression level in NSCLC patients. In a training set of 84 NSCLC patients and 69 cancer-free smokers, a panel of two miRNAs (miRs-19b-3p and -29b-3p) were developed from the seven PBMC miRNAs, producing 72.62% sensitivity and 82.61% specificity in identifying NSCLC. Furthermore, the miRNAs could identify squamous cell lung carcinoma (SCC), a major type of NSCLC, with 80.00% sensitivity and 89.86% specificity. The expression levels of the miRNAs were independent of disease stage. In a testing set of 56 NSCLC patients and 46 controls, the performance of the biomarkers was reproducibly confirmed. The study presents the first in-depth analysis of PBMC miRNA profile of NSCLC patients. The assessment of PBMC miRNAs may provide a new diagnostic approach for the early detection of NSCLC.

  19. miRNA Expression Profiling Enables Risk Stratification in Archived and Fresh Neuroblastoma Tumor Samples

    PubMed Central

    De Preter, Katleen; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vermeulen, Joëlle; Zeka, Fjoralba; Naranjo, Arlene; Bray, Isabella; Castel, Victoria; Chen, Caifu; Drozynska, Elzbieta; Eggert, Angelika; Hogarty, Michael D.; Iżycka-Swieszewska, Ewa; London, Wendy B.; Noguera, Rosa; Piqueras, Marta; Bryan, Kenneth; Schowe, Benjamin; van Sluis, Peter; Molenaar, Jan J.; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H.; Stallings, Raymond L.; Versteeg, Rogier; Laureys, Geneviève; Van Roy, Nadine; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose More accurate assessment of prognosis is important to further improve the choice of risk-related therapy in neuroblastoma (NB) patients. In this study, we aimed to establish and validate a prognostic miRNA signature for children with NB and tested it in both fresh frozen and archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. Experimental Design Four hundred-thirty human mature miRNAs were profiled in two patient subgroups with maximally divergent clinical courses. Univariate logistic regression analysis was used to select miRNAs correlating with NB patient survival. A 25-miRNA gene signature was built using 51 training samples, tested on 179 test samples, and validated on an independent set of 304 fresh frozen tumor samples and 75 archived FFPE samples. Results The 25-miRNA signature significantly discriminates the test patients with respect to progression-free and overall survival (P < 0.0001), both in the overall population and in the cohort of high-risk patients. Multivariate analysis indicates that the miRNA signature is an independent predictor of patient survival after controlling for current risk factors. The results were confirmed in an external validation set. In contrast to a previously published mRNA classifier, the 25-miRNA signature was found to be predictive for patient survival in a set of 75 FFPE neuroblastoma samples. Conclusions In this study, we present the largest NB miRNA expression study so far, including more than 500 NB patients. We established and validated a robust miRNA classifier, able to identify a cohort of high-risk NB patients at greater risk for adverse outcome using both fresh frozen and archived material. PMID:22031095

  20. Using miRNA-Analyzer for the Analysis of miRNA Data

    PubMed Central

    Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Tradigo, Giuseppe; Veltri, Pierangelo

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small biological molecules that play an important role during the mechanisms of protein formation. Recent findings have demonstrated that they act as both positive and negative regulators of protein formation. Thus, the investigation of miRNAs, i.e., the determination of their level of expression, has developed a huge interest in the scientific community. One of the leading technologies for extracting miRNA data from biological samples is the miRNA Affymetrix platform. It provides the quantification of the level of expression of the miRNA in a sample, thus enabling the accumulation of data and allowing the determination of relationships among miRNA, genes, and diseases. Unfortunately, there is a lack of a comprehensive platform able to provide all the functions needed for the extraction of information from miRNA data. We here present miRNA-Analyzer, a complete software tool providing primary functionalities for miRNA data analysis. The current version of miRNA-Analyzer wraps the Affymetrix QCTool for the preprocessing of binary data files, and then provides feature selection (the filtering by species and by the associated p-value of preprocessed files). Finally, preprocessed and filtered data are analyzed by the Multiple Experiment Viewer (T-MEV) and Short Time Series Expression Miner (STEM) tools, which are also wrapped into miRNA-Analyzer, thus providing a unique environment for miRNA data analysis. The tool offers a plug-in interface so it is easily extensible by adding other algorithms as plug-ins. Users may download the tool freely for academic use at https://sites.google.com/site/mirnaanalyserproject/d. PMID:27983673

  1. Changes in the miRNA profile under the influence of anabolic steroids in bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christiane; Riedmaier, Irmgard; Reiter, Martina; Tichopad, Ales; Pfaffl, Michael W; Meyer, Heinrich H D

    2011-03-21

    miRNAs are regulatory RNA molecules. The analytical interest rose over the past 10 years especially in clinical diagnostics as miRNAs show specific expression patterns in several human diseases like diabetes or cancer. Therefore, it is expected that miRNA profiles might be used as biomarkers in early diagnosis. The idea of establishing biomarkers is also present in veterinary drug analysis, e.g. in the surveillance of illegal use of anabolics. Transcriptomics is a promising approach in the detection of anabolics misuse. However, miRNA expression patterns have shown their superiority over mRNA patterns in clinical diagnostics. Thus, the influence of anabolic steroids on miRNA expression in bovine liver should be investigated and an expression pattern should be validated, which might be used as a treatment biomarker. An animal experiment was conducted with 18 heifers equally allocated to a control and a treatment group, which was implanted with TBA plus E2. Liver samples were screened for miRNA expression using PCR arrays. Expression of 11 prominent miRNAs was validated via single assay qPCR. Herein, the following expression pattern could be found with an up-regulation of miR-29c and miR-103 and a down-regulation of miR-34a, miR-181c, miR-20a and miR-15a (p<0.05 each). Using principal components analysis (PCA), the control group could clearly be distinguished from the treatment group, when integrating gene expression results from both miRNA and mRNA. So, the combination of different transcribed targets (mRNA plus miRNA) might be a promising approach to find a valid expression pattern to be used for anabolic treatment screening.

  2. Development of a circulating miRNA assay to monitor tumor burden: From mouse to man.

    PubMed

    Greystoke, Alastair; Ayub, Mahmood; Rothwell, Dominic G; Morris, Dan; Burt, Deborah; Hodgkinson, Cassandra L; Morrow, Christopher J; Smith, Nigel; Aung, Kyaw; Valle, Juan; Carter, Louise; Blackhall, Fiona; Dive, Caroline; Brady, Ged

    2016-02-01

    Circulating miRNA stability suggests potential utility of miRNA based biomarkers to monitor tumor burden and/or progression, particularly in cancer types where serial biopsy is impractical. Assessment of miRNA specificity and sensitivity is challenging within the clinical setting. To address this, circulating miRNAs were examined in mice bearing human SCLC tumor xenografts and SCLC patient derived circulating tumor cell explant models (CDX). We identified 49 miRNAs using human TaqMan Low Density Arrays readily detectable in 10 μl tail vein plasma from mice carrying H526 SCLC xenografts that were low or undetectable in non-tumor bearing controls. Circulating miR-95 measured serially in mice bearing CDX was detected with tumor volumes as low as 10 mm(3) and faithfully reported subsequent tumor growth. Having established assay sensitivity in mouse models, we identified 26 miRNAs that were elevated in a stage dependent manner in a pilot study of plasma from SCLC patients (n = 16) compared to healthy controls (n = 11) that were also elevated in the mouse models. We selected a smaller panel of 10 previously reported miRNAs (miRs 95, 141, 200a, 200b, 200c, 210, 335#, 375, 429) that were consistently elevated in SCLC, some of which are reported to be elevated in other cancer types. Using a multiplex qPCR assay, elevated levels of miRNAs across the panel were also observed in a further 66 patients with non-small cell lung, colorectal or pancreatic cancers. The utility of this circulating miRNA panel as an early warning of tumor progression across several tumor types merits further evaluation in larger studies.

  3. miRNAs Do Not Regulate Circadian Protein Synthesis in the Dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum

    PubMed Central

    Dagenais-Bellefeuille, Steve; Beauchemin, Mathieu; Morse, David

    2017-01-01

    Dinoflagellates have been shown to express miRNA by bioinformatics and RNA blot (Northern) analyses. However, it is not yet known if miRNAs are able to alter gene expression in this class of organisms. We have assessed the possibility that miRNA may mediate circadian regulation of gene expression in the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum using the Luciferin Binding Protein (LBP) as a specific example. LBP is a good candidate for regulation by miRNA since mRNA levels are constant over the daily cycle while protein synthesis is restricted by the circadian clock to a period of several hours at the start of the night phase. The transcriptome contains a potential DICER and an ARGONAUTE, suggesting the machinery for generating miRNAs is present. Furthermore, a probe directed against an abundant Symbiodinium miRNA cross reacts on Northern blots. However, L. polyedrum has no small RNAs detectable by ethidium bromide staining, even though higher plant miRNAs run in parallel are readily observed. Illumina sequencing of small RNAs showed that the majority of reads did not have a match in the L. polyedrum transcriptome, and those that did were almost all sense strand mRNA fragments. A direct search for 18–26 nucleotide long RNAs capable of forming duplexes with a 2 base 3’ overhang detected 53 different potential miRNAs, none of which was able to target any of the known circadian regulated genes. Lastly, a microscopy-based test to assess synthesis of the naturally fluorescent LBP in single cells showed that neither double-stranded nor antisense lbp RNA introduced into cells by microparticle bombardment prior to the time of LBP synthesis were able to reduce the amount of LBP produced. Taken together, our results indicate that circadian control of protein synthesis in L. polyedrum is not mediated by miRNAs. PMID:28103286

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of miRNA targets in Brachypodium and Biomass Energy Crops

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Pamela J.

    2015-08-11

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to the control of numerous biological processes through the regulation of specific target mRNAs. Although the identities of these targets are essential to elucidate miRNA function, the targets are much more difficult to identify than the small RNAs themselves. Before this work, we pioneered the genome-wide identification of the targets of Arabidopsis miRNAs using an approach called PARE (German et al., Nature Biotech. 2008; Nature Protocols, 2009). Under this project, we applied PARE to Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), a model plant in the Poaceae family, which includes the major food grain and bioenergy crops. Through in-depth global analysis and examination of specific examples, this research greatly expanded our knowledge of miRNAs and target RNAs of Brachypodium. New regulation in response to environmental stress or tissue type was found, and many new miRNAs were discovered. More than 260 targets of new and known miRNAs with PARE sequences at the precise sites of miRNA-guided cleavage were identified and characterized. Combining PARE data with the small RNA data also identified the miRNAs responsible for initiating approximately 500 phased loci, including one of the novel miRNAs. PARE analysis also revealed that differentially expressed miRNAs in the same family guide specific target RNA cleavage in a correspondingly tissue-preferential manner. The project included generation of small RNA and PARE resources for bioenergy crops, to facilitate ongoing discovery of conserved miRNA-target RNA regulation. By associating specific miRNA-target RNA pairs with known physiological functions, the research provides insights about gene regulation in different tissues and in response to environmental stress. This, and release of new PARE and small RNA data sets should contribute basic knowledge to enhance breeding and may suggest new strategies for improvement of biomass energy crops.

  5. miRNA profiling of B-cell subsets: specific miRNA profile for germinal center B cells with variation between centroblasts and centrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lu Ping; Wang, Miao; Robertus, Jan-Lukas; Schakel, Rikst Nynke; Gibcus, Johan H; Diepstra, Arjan; Harms, Geert; Peh, Suat-Cheng; Reijmers, Rogier M; Pals, Steven T; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Kluin, Philip M; Poppema, Sibrand; van den Berg, Anke

    2009-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an important class of small RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. It has become evident that miRNAs are involved in hematopoiesis, and that deregulation of miRNAs may give rise to hematopoietic malignancies. The aim of our study was to establish miRNA profiles of naïve, germinal center (GC) and memory B cells, and validate their expression patterns in normal lymphoid tissues. Quantitative (q) RT-PCR profiling revealed that several miRNAs were elevated in GC B cells, including miR-17-5p, miR-106a and miR-181b. One of the most abundant miRNAs in all three B-cell subsets analyzed was miR-150, with a more than 10-fold lower level in GC B cell as compared with the other two subsets. miRNA in situ hybridization (ISH) in tonsil tissue sections confirmed the findings from the profiling work. Interestingly, gradual decrease of miR-17-5p, miR-106a and miR-181b staining intensity from the dark to the light zone was observed in GC. A strong cytoplasmic staining of miR-150 was observed in a minority of the centroblasts in the dark zone of the GC. Inverse staining pattern of miR-150 against c-Myb and Survivin was observed in tonsil tissue sections, suggesting possible targeting of these genes by miR-150. In line with this, the experimental induction of miR-150 lead to reduced c-Myb, Survivin and Foxp1 expression levels in the Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, DG75. In conclusion, miRNA profiles of naïve, GC and memory B cells were established and validated by miRNA ISH. Within the GC cells, a marked difference was observed between the light and the dark zone.

  6. Design of a miRNA sponge for the miR-17 miRNA family as a therapeutic strategy against vulvar carcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Melo Maia, Beatriz; Ling, Hui; Monroig, Paloma; Ciccone, Maria; Soares, Fernando A; Calin, George A; Rocha, Rafael M

    2015-12-01

    Dysregulation of microRNAs has been studied thoroughly, and has been observed in a variety of tumors including vulvar carcinomas, a rare type of gynecological tumor with increasing incidence. However, very few therapeutic alternatives have reached the clinical setting, and there is an urgent unmet need to develop novel strategies for patients with this tumor type. Thus, a microRNA (miRNA) sponge for the miR-17 miRNA family was designed, synthesized and validated in vitro in order to explore a new therapeutic strategy based on inhibiting this oncogenic miRNA family in vulvar cancer. Members of the miR-17 family were evaluated for expression in a vulvar tumor cell line (SW954) and 20 HPV negative formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Six in tandem, bulged sequences that were complementary to these miRNAs were designed, synthesized, cloned, and transfected into SW954 cells. A luciferase reporter assay with a psiCheck2 vector was used to test the specificity of the sponge sequences for miR-17 family miRNA binding. Taqman qRT-PCR was used to test how the sponges affected miRNA expression. In FFPE samples, higher expression of miR-20a and miR-106a correlated with deeper tumor invasion (P = 0.0187 and P = 0.0404, respectively). The luciferase reporter assay validated the specificity of the sponge for miR-17 family members. Using qRT-PCR, we confirmed this specificity with decreased expression in 5 (out of six) miRNAs of the miR-17 family in SW954 cells. Although our results are preliminary, these results demonstrate that these miRNA sponges are potent inhibitors of the miR-17 family of miRNAs in SW954. Therefore, this miRNA-specific sponge may be developed into a novel therapeutic treatment for patients with vulvar cancer.

  7. miRNA expression profiling of inflammatory breast cancer identifies a 5-miRNA signature predictive of breast tumor aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Lerebours, Florence; Cizeron-Clairac, Geraldine; Susini, Aurelie; Vacher, Sophie; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Belichard, Catherine; Brain, Etienne; Alberini, Jean-Louis; Spyratos, Frédérique; Lidereau, Rosette; Bieche, Ivan

    2013-10-01

    IBC (inflammatory breast cancer) is a rare but very aggressive form of breast cancer with a particular phenotype. The molecular mechanisms responsible for IBC remain largely unknown. In particular, genetic and epigenetic alterations specific to IBC remain to be identified. MicroRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs able to regulate gene expression, are deregulated in breast cancer and may therefore serve as tools for diagnosis and prediction. This study was designed to determine miRNA expression profiling (microRNAome) in IBC. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine expression levels of 804 miRNAs in a screening series of 12 IBC compared to 31 non-stage-matched non-IBC and 8 normal breast samples. The differentially expressed miRNAs were then validated in a series of 65 IBC and 95 non-IBC. From a set of 18 miRNAs of interest selected from the screening series, 13 were differentially expressed with statistical significance in the validation series of IBC compared to non-IBC. Among these, a 5-miRNA signature comprising miR-421, miR-486, miR-503, miR-720 and miR-1303 was shown to be predictive for IBC phenotype with an overall accuracy of 89%. Moreover, multivariate analysis showed that this signature was an independent predictor of poor Metastasis-Free Survival in non-IBC patients.

  8. Label-Free Isothermal Amplification Assay for Specific and Highly Sensitive Colorimetric miRNA Detection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new method for the detection of miRNA in biological samples. This technology is based on the isothermal nicking enzyme amplification reaction and subsequent hybridization of the amplification product with gold nanoparticles and magnetic microparticles (barcode system) to achieve naked-eye colorimetric detection. This platform was used to detect a specific miRNA (miRNA-10b) associated with breast cancer, and attomolar sensitivity was demonstrated. The assay was validated in cell culture lysates from breast cancer cells and in serum from a mouse model of breast cancer. PMID:27713932

  9. MiRNA-10b sponge: An anti-breast cancer study in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ai-Ling; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Ning; Wu, Cui Yun; Lin, Man-Hua; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is a malignant tumor with the highest incidence among women. Breast cancer metastasis is the major cause of treatment failure and mortality among such patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small molecular non-coding regulatory RNAs, which act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in breast cancer. miRNA-10b has been found to exhibit a high expression level in advanced and metastatic breast cancer, and is closely related to breast cancer metastasis. An miRNA sponge is an mRNA with several repeated sequences of complete or incomplete complementarity to the natural miRNA in its 3' non-translating region. It acts as a sponge adsorbing miRNAs and ensures their separation from their targets and inhibits their function. The present study designed a sponge plasmid against miRNA-10b and transiently transfected it into high and low metastatic human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, and analyzed the effects of the miRNA-10b sponge on the growth and proliferation, migration and invasion in these cell lines. qRT-PCR results found that the sponge plasmid effectively inhibited the expression of miRNA-10b, and upregulated the expression of the miRNA‑10b target protein HOXD-10. The results from the CCK-8 assay found that the miRNA-10b sponge inhibited the growth of breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. Results of the plate cloning experiments indicated that the miRNA-10b sponge suppressed the colony formation of the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. The results of wound healing and Transwell assays showed that the miRNA-10b sponge inhibited the migration and invasion of the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. Our results demonstrated that the miRNA-10b sponge effectively inhibited the growth and proliferation of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. In addition, it also restrained the migration and invasion of human highly metastatic breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

  10. Expression Profiles of miRNA Subsets Distinguish Human Colorectal Carcinoma and Normal Colonic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Pellatt, Daniel F; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K; Mullany, Lila E; Herrick, Jennifer S; Samowitz, Wade; Slattery, Martha L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-protein-coding RNA molecules that are commonly dysregulated in colorectal tumors. The objective of this study was to identify smaller subsets of highly predictive miRNAs. METHODS: Data come from population-based studies of colorectal cancer conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. Tissue samples were available for 1,953 individuals, of which 1,894 had carcinoma tissue and 1,599 had normal mucosa available for statistical analysis. Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V.19.0 was used to generate miRNA expression profiles; validation of expression levels was carried out using quantitative PCR. We used random forest analysis and verified findings with logistic modeling in separate data sets. Important microRNAs are identified and bioinformatics tools are used to identify target genes and related biological pathways. RESULTS: We identified 16 miRNAs for colon and 17 miRNAs for rectal carcinoma that appear to differentiate between carcinoma and normal mucosa; of these, 12 were important for both colon and rectal cancer, hsa-miR-663b, hsa-miR-4539, hsa-miR-17-5p, hsa-miR-20a-5p, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-4506, hsa-miR-92a-3p, hsa-miR-93-5p, hsa-miR-145-5p, hsa-miR-3651, hsa-miR-378a-3p, and hsa-miR-378i. Estimated misclassification rates were low at 4.83% and 2.5% among colon and rectal observations, respectively. Among independent observations, logistic modeling reinforced the importance of these miRNAs, finding the primary principal components of their variation statistically significant (P<0.001 among both colon and rectal observations) and again producing low misclassification rates. Repeating our analysis without those miRNAs initially identified as important identified other important miRNAs; however, misclassification rates increased and distinctions between remaining miRNAs in terms of classification importance were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the hypothesis that while many miRNAs are

  11. Potential MiRNAs recognition site identification in 3' UTR regions by DSP methods.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Norbert; Arrigo, Patrizio; Ruggiero, Carmelina

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate fundamental cellular processes in diverse organisms and that have an important function in gene expression regulation. miRNAs seem capable to concurrently modulate hundreds of target genes. Their abnormal expression is emerging as important element in many pathological conditions. The identification of microRNA binding sites on those proteins that can be disease biomarker is fundamental to design synthetic artificial oligomers. In this paper we suggest a method, based on signal processing, to filter out potential miRNA recognition sites in the 3' UTR region of mRNAs.

  12. Aberration of miRNAs Expression in Leukocytes from Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, YongPing; Wei, QianQian; Chen, XuePing; Li, ChunYu; Cao, Bei; Ou, RuWei; Hadano, Shinji; Shang, Hui-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence indicates that miRNAs play an important role in the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Most of previous studies on miRNA dysregulation in ALS focused on the alterative expression in ALS animal model or in limited samples from European patients with ALS. In the present study, the miRNA expression profiles were investigated in Chinese ALS patients to explore leukocytes miRNAs as a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of ALS. Methods: We analyzed the expression profiles of 1733 human mature miRNAs using microarray technology in leukocytes obtained from 5 patients with sporadic ALS (SALS) and 5 healthy controls. An independent group of 83 SALS patients, 24 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and 61 controls was used for validation by real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy. In addition, target genes and signaling information of validated differential expression miRNAs were predicted using Bioinformatics. Results: Eleven miRNAs, including four over-expressed and seven under-expressed miRNAs detected in SALS patients compared to healthy controls were selected for validation. Four under-expressed microRNAs, including hsa-miR-183, hsa-miR-193b, hsa-miR-451, and hsa-miR-3935, were confirmed in validation stage by comparison of 83 SALS patients and 61 HCs. Moreover, we identified a miRNA panel (hsa-miR-183, hsa-miR-193b, hsa-miR-451, and hsa-miR-3935) having a high diagnostic accuracy of SALS (AUC 0.857 for the validation group). However, only hsa-miR-183 was significantly lower in SALS patients than that in PD patients and in HCs, while no differences were found between PD patients and HCs. By bioinformatics analysis, we obtained a large number of target genes and signaling information that are linked to neurodegeneration. Conclusion: This study provided evidence of abnormal miRNA expression patterns in the peripheral

  13. Deregulated miRNA in Mammary Epithelium by Tumor Promoting Extracellular Matrix

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    examine the ECM-derived signal- ing in cancer progression [7]. microRNAs ( miRNAs ) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression, often via...3-D culture and warrant further utilization of rBM 3-D culture in investigation of miRNAs in breast cancer . Key Words: microRNA ; three...signature from rBM 3-D culture of breast cancer cells holds prognostic values for patients with breast cancer (9). microRNAs ( miRNAs ) are small non

  14. Next-Generation Sequencing Analysis of MiRNA Expression in Control and FSHD Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Soldà, Giulia; Picco, Raffaella; Roma, Francesca; Ginelli, Enrico; Meneveri, Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that miRNA sequences can regulate skeletal myogenesis by controlling the process of myoblast proliferation and differentiation. However, at present a deep analysis of miRNA expression in control and FSHD myoblasts during differentiation has not yet been derived. To close this gap, we used a next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach applied to in vitro myogenesis. Furthermore, to minimize sample genetic heterogeneity and muscle-type specific patterns of gene expression, miRNA profiling from NGS data was filtered with FC≥4 (log2FC≥2) and p-value<0.05, and its validation was derived by qRT-PCR on myoblasts from seven muscle districts. In particular, control myogenesis showed the modulation of 38 miRNAs, the majority of which (34 out 38) were up-regulated, including myomiRs (miR-1, -133a, -133b and -206). Approximately one third of the modulated miRNAs were not previously reported to be involved in muscle differentiation, and interestingly some of these (i.e. miR-874, -1290, -95 and -146a) were previously shown to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation. FSHD myogenesis evidenced a reduced number of modulated miRNAs than healthy muscle cells. The two processes shared nine miRNAs, including myomiRs, although with FC values lower in FSHD than in control cells. In addition, FSHD cells showed the modulation of six miRNAs (miR-1268, -1268b, -1908, 4258, -4508- and -4516) not evidenced in control cells and that therefore could be considered FSHD-specific, likewise three novel miRNAs that seem to be specifically expressed in FSHD myotubes. These data further clarify the impact of miRNA regulation during control myogenesis and strongly suggest that a complex dysregulation of miRNA expression characterizes FSHD, impairing two important features of myogenesis: cell cycle and muscle development. The derived miRNA profiling could represent a novel molecular signature for FSHD that includes diagnostic biomarkers and possibly

  15. Plasma vesicle miRNAs for therapy response monitoring in Hodgkin lymphoma patients

    PubMed Central

    van Eijndhoven, Monique A.J.; Zijlstra, Josée M.; Groenewegen, Nils J.; Drees, Esther E.E.; van Niele, Stuart; Baglio, S. Rubina; Koppers-Lalic, Danijela; van der Voorn, Hans; Libregts, Sten F.W.M.; Wauben, Marca H.M.; de Menezes, Renee X.; van Weering, Jan R.T.; Nieuwland, Rienk; Visser, Lydia; de Jong, Daphne; Pegtel, D. Michiel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Cell-free circulating nucleic acids, including 22-nt microRNAs (miRNAs), represent noninvasive biomarkers for treatment response monitoring of cancer patients. While the majority of plasma miRNA is bound to proteins, a smaller, less well-characterized pool is associated with extracellular vesicles (EVs). Here, we addressed whether EV-associated miRNAs reflect metabolic disease in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) patients. METHODS. With standardized size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), we isolated EV-associated extracellular RNA (exRNA) fractions and protein-bound miRNA from plasma of cHL patients and healthy subjects. We performed a comprehensive small RNA sequencing analysis and validation by TaqMan qRT-PCR for candidate discovery. Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET (FDG-PET) status before treatment, directly after treatment, and during long-term follow-up was compared directly with EV miRNA levels. RESULTS. The plasma EV miRNA repertoire was more extensive compared with protein-bound miRNA that was heavily dominated by a few abundant miRNA species and was less informative of disease status. Purified EV fractions of untreated cHL patients and tumor EVs had enriched levels of miR24-3p, miR127-3p, miR21-5p, miR155-5p, and let7a-5p compared with EV fractions from healthy subjects and disease controls. Serial monitoring of EV miRNA levels in patients before treatment, directly after treatment, and during long-term follow-up revealed robust, stable decreases in miRNA levels matching a complete metabolic response, as observed with FDG-PET. Importantly, EV miRNA levels rose again in relapse patients. CONCLUSION. We conclude that cHL-related miRNA levels in circulating EVs reflect the presence of vital tumor tissue and are suitable for therapy response and relapse monitoring in individual cHL patients. FUNDING. Cancer Center Amsterdam Foundation (CCA-2013), Dutch Cancer Society (KWF-5510), Technology Foundation STW (STW Perspectief CANCER-ID). PMID:27882350

  16. Platelets miRNA as a Prediction Marker of Thrombotic Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Dzieciol, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The blood platelets are crucial for the coagulation physiology to maintain haemostatic balance and are involved in various pathologies such as atherosclerosis and thrombosis. The studies of recent years have shown that anucleated platelets are able to succeed protein synthesis. Additionally, mRNA translation in blood platelets is regulated by miRNA molecules. Recent works postulate the possibility of using miRNAs as biomarkers of atherosclerosis and ischemic episodes. This review article describes clinical studies that presented blood platelets miRNAs expression profile changes in different thrombotic states, which suggest use of these molecules as predictive biomarkers. PMID:28042196

  17. Boeri miRNA signature of risk for lung cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    miRNA expression analyses in plasma samples collected 1-2 years before the onset of disease, at the time of CT detection and in disease-free smokers enrolled in the screening trial, resulted in the generation of miRNA signatures with strong predictive, diagnostic, and prognostic potential (area under the ROC curve > or = 0.85). The signature of diagnosis of lung cancer is comprised of 16 ratios composed from 13 miRNAs: 21, 92a, 140-3p, 17, 106a, 140-5p, 660, 19b, 451, 30c, 15b, 28-3p, 486-5p. (from PMID:21300873)

  18. Boeri miRNA signature of diagnosis of lung cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    miRNA expression analyses in plasma samples collected 1-2 years before the onset of disease, at the time of CT detection and in disease-free smokers enrolled in the screening trial, resulted in the generation of miRNA signatures with strong predictive, diagnostic, and prognostic potential (area under the ROC curve > or = 0.85). The signature of diagnosis of lung cancer is comprised of 16 ratios composed from 13 miRNAs: 21, 92a, 140-3p, 17, 106a, 140-5p, 660, 19b, 451, 30c, 15b, 28-3p, 486-5p. (from PMID:21300873)

  19. Genome-wide identification of novel ovarian-predominant miRNAs: new insights from the medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Bouchareb, Amine; Le Cam, Aurélie; Montfort, Jérôme; Gay, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Thaovi; Bobe, Julien; Thermes, Violette

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, highly conserved non-coding RNAs that play important roles in the regulation of many physiological processes. However, the role of miRNAs in vertebrate oocyte formation (i.e., oogenesis) remains poorly investigated. To gain new insights into the roles of miRNAs in oogenesis, we searched for ovarian-predominant miRNAs. Using a microarray displaying 3,800 distinct miRNAs originating from different vertebrate species, we identified 66 miRNAs that are expressed predominantly in the ovary. Of the miRNAs exhibiting the highest overabundance in the ovary, 20 were selected for further analysis. Using a combination of QPCR and in silico analyses, we identified 8 novel miRNAs that are predominantly expressed in the ovary, including 2 miRNAs (miR-4785 and miR-6352) that exhibit strict ovarian expression. Of these 8 miRNAs, 7 were previously uncharacterized in fish. The strict ovarian expression of miR-4785 and miR-6352 suggests an important role in oogenesis and/or early development, possibly involving a maternal effect. Together, these results indicate that, similar to protein-coding genes, a significant number of ovarian-predominant miRNA genes are found in fish. PMID:28071684

  20. Fractionation of human spermatogenic cells using STA-PUT gravity sedimentation and their miRNA profiling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Niu, Minghui; Yao, Chencheng; Hai, Yanan; Yuan, Qingqing; Liu, Yang; Guo, Ying; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2015-01-30

    Human spermatogenic cells have not yet been isolated, and notably, their global miRNA profiles remain unknown. Here we have effectively isolated human spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids using STA-PUT velocity sedimentation. RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry and meiosis spread assays revealed that the purities of isolated human spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes, and round spermatids were 90%, and the viability of these isolated cells was over 98%. MiRNA microarrays showed distinct global miRNA profiles among human spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes, and round spermatids. Thirty-two miRNAs were significantly up-regulated whereas 78 miRNAs were down-regulated between human spermatogonia and pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that these miRNAs are involved in the meiosis and mitosis, respectively. In total, 144 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated while 29 miRNAs were down-regulated between pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids, reflecting potential roles of these miRNAs in mediating spermiogenesis. A number of novel binding targets of miRNAs were further identified using various softwares and verified by real-time PCR. Our ability of isolating human spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids and unveiling their distinct global miRNA signatures and novel targets could provide novel small RNA regulatory mechanisms mediating three phases of human spermatogenesis and offer new targets for the treatment of male infertility.

  1. Human Milk Cells Contain Numerous miRNAs that May Change with Milk Removal and Regulate Multiple Physiological Processes.

    PubMed

    Alsaweed, Mohammed; Lai, Ching Tat; Hartmann, Peter E; Geddes, Donna T; Kakulas, Foteini

    2016-06-17

    Human milk (HM) is a complex biofluid conferring nutritional, protective and developmental components for optimal infant growth. Amongst these are maternal cells, which change in response to feeding and were recently shown to be a rich source of miRNAs. We used next generation sequencing to characterize the cellular miRNA profile of HM collected before and after feeding. HM cells conserved higher miRNA content than the lipid and skim HM fractions or other body fluids, in accordance with previous studies. In total, 1467 known mature and 1996 novel miRNAs were identified, with 89 high-confidence novel miRNAs. HM cell content was higher post-feeding (p < 0.05), and was positively associated with total miRNA content (p = 0.014) and species number (p < 0.001). This coincided with upregulation of 29 known and 2 novel miRNAs, and downregulation of 4 known and 1 novel miRNAs post-feeding, but no statistically significant change in expression was found for the remaining miRNAs. These findings suggest that feeding may influence the miRNA content of HM cells. The most highly and differentially expressed miRNAs were key regulators of milk components, with potential diagnostic value in lactation performance. They are also involved in the control of body fluid balance, thirst, appetite, immune response, and development, implicating their functional significance for the infant.

  2. Human Milk Cells Contain Numerous miRNAs that May Change with Milk Removal and Regulate Multiple Physiological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Alsaweed, Mohammed; Lai, Ching Tat; Hartmann, Peter E.; Geddes, Donna T.; Kakulas, Foteini

    2016-01-01

    Human milk (HM) is a complex biofluid conferring nutritional, protective and developmental components for optimal infant growth. Amongst these are maternal cells, which change in response to feeding and were recently shown to be a rich source of miRNAs. We used next generation sequencing to characterize the cellular miRNA profile of HM collected before and after feeding. HM cells conserved higher miRNA content than the lipid and skim HM fractions or other body fluids, in accordance with previous studies. In total, 1467 known mature and 1996 novel miRNAs were identified, with 89 high-confidence novel miRNAs. HM cell content was higher post-feeding (p < 0.05), and was positively associated with total miRNA content (p = 0.014) and species number (p < 0.001). This coincided with upregulation of 29 known and 2 novel miRNAs, and downregulation of 4 known and 1 novel miRNAs post-feeding, but no statistically significant change in expression was found for the remaining miRNAs. These findings suggest that feeding may influence the miRNA content of HM cells. The most highly and differentially expressed miRNAs were key regulators of milk components, with potential diagnostic value in lactation performance. They are also involved in the control of body fluid balance, thirst, appetite, immune response, and development, implicating their functional significance for the infant. PMID:27322254

  3. The upregulation of miRNA-146a inhibited biological behaviors of ESCC through inhibition of IRS2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haibo; Ren, Guohua; Zhu, Liangming; Liu, Xiangyan; He, Xiaopeng

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, microRNAs, also called as miRNAs, play an important role in carcinogenesis, and the dysregulation of miRNAs is closely associated with cancer progression. Till now, little has been known about the role of miRNA-146a in the esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC). In the present study, we used in vitro assays to investigate the mechanisms of miRNA-146a in ESCC cell lines and 60 ESCC tissues. Here, we found that miRNA-146a expression is downregulated in both ESCC cell lines and tissues and obviously associated with pathological indicators, such as metastasis and stage of ESCC. In addition, the overexpression of miRNA-146a suppressed EC109 and TE8 cell proliferation and invasion. Meanwhile, miRNA-146a overexpression extremely inhibited the protein expression of insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2). Notably, the enforced expression of IRS2 in EC109 cells with miRNA-146a overexpression attenuated the inhibitory effects of miRNA-146a. In conclusion, our findings suggest that miRNA-146a may function as a useful clinical tool in the treatment and diagnosis of ESCC, and its overexpression suppressed cell growth through inhibition of IRS2. Thus, miRNA-146a pathway may be recommended as potential makers for drug design.

  4. Identify signature regulatory network for glioblastoma prognosis by integrative mRNA and miRNA co-expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Bing, Zhi-Tong; Yang, Guang-Hui; Xiong, Jie; Guo, Ling; Yang, Lei

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive type of primary brain tumor in adults. Patients with this disease have a poor prognosis. The objective of this study is to identify survival-related individual genes (or miRNAs) and miRNA -mRNA pairs in GBM using a multi-step approach. First, the weighted gene co-expression network analysis and survival analysis are applied to identify survival-related modules from mRNA and miRNA expression profiles, respectively. Subsequently, the role of individual genes (or miRNAs) within these modules in GBM prognosis are highlighted using survival analysis. Finally, the integration analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression as well as miRNA target prediction is used to identify survival-related miRNA -mRNA regulatory network. In this study, five genes and two miRNA modules that significantly correlated to patient's survival. In addition, many individual genes (or miRNAs) assigned to these modules were found to be closely linked with survival. For instance, increased expression of neuropilin-1 gene (a member of module turquoise) indicated poor prognosis for patients and a group of miRNA -mRNA regulatory networks that comprised 38 survival-related miRNA -mRNA pairs. These findings provide a new insight into the underlying molecular regulatory mechanisms of GBM.

  5. Microarray profiling of microRNAs reveals frequent coexpression with neighboring miRNAs and host genes.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, Scott; Bartel, David P

    2005-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short endogenous RNAs known to post-transcriptionally repress gene expression in animals and plants. A microarray profiling survey revealed the expression patterns of 175 human miRNAs across 24 different human organs. Our results show that proximal pairs of miRNAs are generally coexpressed. In addition, an abrupt transition in the correlation between pairs of expressed miRNAs occurs at a distance of 50 kb, implying that miRNAs separated by <50 kb typically derive from a common transcript. Some microRNAs are within the introns of host genes. Intronic miRNAs are usually coordinately expressed with their host gene mRNA, implying that they also generally derive from a common transcript, and that in situ analyses of host gene expression can be used to probe the spatial and temporal localization of intronic miRNAs.

  6. Joint Profiling of miRNAs and mRNAs Reveals miRNA Mediated Gene Regulation in the Göttingen Minipig Obesity Model

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Ferhat; Keinicke, Helle; Jacobsen, Mette J.; Gorodkin, Jan; Fredholm, Merete; Cirera, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and its comorbidities are an increasing challenge for both affected individuals and health care systems, worldwide. In obese individuals, perturbation of expression of both protein-coding genes and microRNAs (miRNA) are seen in obesity-relevant tissues (i.e. adipose tissue, liver and skeletal muscle). miRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules which have important regulatory roles in a wide range of biological processes, including obesity. Rodents are widely used animal models for human diseases including obesity. However, not all research is applicable for human health or diseases. In contrast, pigs are emerging as an excellent animal model for obesity studies, due to their similarities in their metabolism, their digestive tract and their genetics, when compared to humans. The Göttingen minipig is a small sized easy-to-handle pig breed which has been extensively used for modeling human obesity, due to its capacity to develop severe obesity when fed ad libitum. The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed of protein-coding genes and miRNAs in a Göttingen minipig obesity model. Liver, skeletal muscle and abdominal adipose tissue were sampled from 7 lean and 7 obese minipigs. Differential gene expression was investigated using high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) on 90 mRNAs and 72 miRNAs. The results revealed de-regulation of several obesity and inflammation-relevant protein-coding genes and miRNAs in all tissues examined. Many genes that are known to be de-regulated in obese humans were confirmed in the obese minipigs and several of these genes have target sites for miRNAs expressed in the opposing direction of the gene, confirming miRNA-mediated regulation in obesity. These results confirm the translational value of the pig for human obesity studies. PMID:27902747

  7. A novel label-free electrochemical miRNA biosensor using methylene blue as redox indicator: application to breast cancer biomarker miRNA-21.

    PubMed

    Rafiee-Pour, Hossain-Ali; Behpour, Mohsen; Keshavarz, Mahin

    2016-03-15

    Small noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as ideal noninvasive biomarkers for early-phase cancer detection. In this report, a label-free and simple electrochemical miRNA biosensor is developed based on employing methylene blue (MB) as a redox indicator. The successfully immobilization of the single strand DNA (ss-DNA) probe and hybridization with the target miRNA sequence were confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) methods. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique was used to record the oxidation peak current of MB under optimal condition and an increase in the peak current was observed after hybridization. By employing this strategy, miRNA can detect in a range from 0.1 to 500.0 pM with a relatively low detection limit of 84.3 fM. The electrochemical response of MB on ss-DNA and duplex of miRNA/DNA was characterized by CV and chronocoulometry method. The linear relation between the redox peak currents (Ip) and scan rate (ν) indicates that the electron transfer (ET) between MB and the electrode surface was mediated by the miRNA/DNA π-stacked duplex. The value of surface coverage (Γ) was calculated that indicated increase amount of MB on the surface of modified electrode after hybridization event and revealed the adsorption of MB at modified electrode is monolayer. Also, the electron transfer rate constants (ks) of MB were estimated. The results of kinetic analysis were confirmed by chronocoulometry method. The discrimination ability of miRNA biosensor even against a noncomplementary target was also studied. Consequently, this strategy will be valuable for sensitive, selective and label-free detection of miRNA.

  8. DARWIN REVIEW: microRNA, seeds and Darwin? – Diverse Function of miRNA in Seed Biology and Plant Responses to Stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single-stranded RNAs that downregulate target genes at the post-transcriptional level. miRNAs regulate target genes by guiding mRNA cleavage or by repressing translation. miRNAs play crucial roles in a broad range of developmental processes in plants. Multiple miRNAs ar...

  9. Introns of plant pri-miRNAs enhance miRNA biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bielewicz, Dawid; Kalak, Malgorzata; Kalyna, Maria; Windels, David; Barta, Andrea; Vazquez, Franck; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Jarmolowski, Artur

    2013-01-01

    Plant MIR genes are independent transcription units that encode long primary miRNA precursors, which usually contain introns. For two miRNA genes, MIR163 and MIR161, we show that introns are crucial for the accumulation of proper levels of mature miRNA. Removal of the intron in both cases led to a drop-off in the level of mature miRNAs. We demonstrate that the stimulating effects of the intron mostly reside in the 5′ss rather than on a genuine splicing event. Our findings are biologically significant as the presence of functional splice sites in the MIR163 gene appears mandatory for pathogen-triggered accumulation of miR163 and proper regulation of at least one of its targets. PMID:23681439

  10. Localization of miRNAs by In Situ Hybridization in Plants Using Conventional Oligonucleotide Probes.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Castellano, Sara; Nic-Can, Geovanny I; De-la-Peña, Clelia

    2017-01-01

    Among the epigenetic mechanisms studied with a greater interest in the last decade are the microRNAs (miRNAs). These small noncoding RNA sequences that are approximately 17-22 nucleotides in length play an essential role in many biological processes of various organisms, including plants. The analysis of spatiotemporal expression of miRNAs provides a better understanding of the role of these small molecules in plant development, cell differentiation, and other processes; but such analysis is also an important method for the validation of biological functions. In this work, we describe the optimization of an efficient protocol for the spatiotemporal analysis of miRNA by in situ hybridization using different plant tissues embedded in paraffin. Instead of LNA-modified probes that are typically used for this work, we use conventional oligonucleotide probes that yield a high specificity and clean distribution of miRNAs.

  11. Measurement of precursor miRNA in exosomes from human ESC-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian Sheng; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been shown to secrete exosomes that are cardioprotective against myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury in a mouse model. To elucidate this cardioprotective mechanism, we have characterized the protein, nucleic acid, and lipid composition of MSC exosomes. Here we describe the isolation and analysis of RNA in MSC exosome. We have previously reported that RNAs in MSC exosome are primarily small RNA molecules of <300 nt and they include many miRNAs. Many of these miRNAs are in the precursor form suggesting that pre-miRNAs, and not mature miRNAs are preferentially loaded into exosomes. The protocols described here include assays to ascertain the presence of pre-miRNAs, profiling of miRNA and pre-miRNA, and quantitative estimation of mature and pre-miRNA.

  12. Epigenetic Regulation of miRNAs and Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Duru, Nadire; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Eades, Gabriel; Eckert, Richard; Zhou, Qun

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as important targets of chemopreventive strategies in breast cancer. We have found that miRNAs are dysregulated at an early stage in breast cancer, in non-malignant Ductal Carcinoma In Situ. Many dietary chemoprevention agents can act by epigenetically activating miRNA-signaling pathways involved in tumor cell proliferation and invasive progression. In addition, many miRNAs activated via chemopreventive strategies target cancer stem cell signaling and prevent tumor progression or relapse. Specifically, we have found that miRNAs regulate DCIS stem cells, which may play important roles in breast cancer progression to invasive disease. We have shown that chemopreventive agents can directly inhibit DCIS stem cells and block tumor formation in vivo, via activation of tumor suppressor miRNAs. PMID:26052481

  13. High-throughput identification of miRNAs of Taenia ovis, a cestode threatening sheep industry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yadong

    2017-03-22

    Taenia ovis is a tapeworm that is mainly transmitted between dogs and sheep or goats and has an adverse effect on sheep industry. miRNAs are short regulatory non-coding RNAs, involved in parasite development and growth as well as parasite infection. The miRNA profile of T. ovis remains to be established. Herein, 33 known miRNAs belonging to 23 different families were identified in T. ovis metacestodes using deep sequencing approach. Of them, expression of some miRNAs such as tov-miR-10 and -let-7 was absolutely predominant. Moreover, comparative analysis revealed the presence of a miR-71/2b/2c cluster in T. ovis, which was also completely conserved in other 6 cestodes. The study provides rich data for further understandings of T. ovis biology.

  14. Emerging roles for miRNAs in the development, diagnosis, and treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Johanna K; Taila, Matthew; Alvarez, M Lucrecia

    2013-08-01

    Although the causes of diabetic nephropathy are not yet fully known, emerging evidence suggests a role for epigenetic factors in the development of the disease. In particular, microRNAs (miRNAs) are becoming recognized as important mediators of biological processes relevant to diabetic nephropathy. Until recently, investigations of miRNAs in the development of diabetic nephropathy have remained relatively limited; however, the number of reports identifying potential new candidates and mechanisms of impact is presently expanding at a rapid pace. This review seeks to summarize these recent findings, focusing on new candidates and/or novel mechanisms, including the intersection between genetic variation and miRNA function in modulating disease expression, emerging in the field. We also review the latest advances in the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of miRNAs in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  15. The Emerging Role of miRNAs in HTLV-1 Infection and ATLL Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Moles, Ramona; Nicot, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)-1 is a human retrovirus and the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), a fatal malignancy of CD4/CD25+ T lymphocytes. In recent years, cellular as well as virus-encoded microRNA (miRNA) have been shown to deregulate signaling pathways to favor virus life cycle. HTLV-1 does not encode miRNA, but several studies have demonstrated that cellular miRNA expression is affected in infected cells. Distinct mechanisms such as transcriptional, epigenetic or interference with miRNA processing machinery have been involved. This article reviews the current knowledge of the role of cellular microRNAs in virus infection, replication, immune escape and pathogenesis of HTLV-1. PMID:26205403

  16. Identification of miRNAs Affecting the Establishment of Brassica Alboglabra Seedling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rongfang; Deng, Yanping; Huang, Zhongkai; Chen, Xiaodong; XuHan, Xu; Lai, Zhongxiong

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important for plant development including seed formation, dormancy, and germination, as well as seedling establishment. The Brassica vegetable seedling establishment stage influences the development of high quality seedlings, but also affects the nutrient content of sprouts. Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra) seedlings at different growth stages were used to construct two small-RNA (sRNA) libraries. We comprehensively analyzed the miRNAs in 2- and 9-day-old seedlings. An average of 11,722,490 clean reads were generated after removing low-quality reads and adapter contaminants. The results revealed that 37.65 and 26.69% of the sRNAs in 2- and 9-day-old seedlings, respectively, were 24 nt long. In total, 254 known mature miRNA sequences from 228 miRNA families and 343 novel miRNAs were identified. Of these miRNAs, 224 were differentially expressed between the two analyzed libraries. The most abundant miRNAs identified by sequence homology were miR156, miR167, and miR157, each with more than 100,000 sequenced reads. Compared with the expression levels in 2-day-old seedlings, MiR8154 and miR390 were the most up- and down-regulated miRNAs respectively in 9-day-old seedlings. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of the differentially expressed-miRNA target genes affecting biological processes revealed that most genes were in the “regulation of transcription” category. Additionally, the expression patterns of some miRNAs and target genes were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We determined that development-associated miRNAs (e.g., bal-miR156/157/159/166/167/172/396), were highly-expressed during seedling-establishment stage, as were stress-related (bal-miR408) and metabolism-related (bal-miR826) miRNAs. Combined with the low level of targets SPL9 and AP2, it was concluded that miR156-SPL9 and miR172-AP modules play key roles during the B. alboglabra seedling establishment stage. PMID:28018366

  17. Regulation of PP2Cm expression by miRNA-204/211 and miRNA-22 in mouse and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Bang-fen; Gao, Chen; Ren, Shu-xun; Wang, Yi-bin; Sun, Hai-peng; Zhou, Mei-yi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The mitochondrial targeted 2C-type serine/threonine protein phosphatase (PP2Cm) is encoded by the gene PPM1K and is highly conserved among vertebrates. PP2Cm plays a critical role in branched-chain amino acid catabolism and regulates cell survival. Its expression is dynamically regulated by the nutrient environment and pathological stresses. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of PPM1K gene expression. In this study, we aimed to reveal how PPM1K expression is affected by miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. Methods: Computational analysis based on conserved miRNA binding motifs was applied to predict the candidate miRNAs that potentially affect PPM1K expression. Dual-luciferase reporter assay was performed to verify the miRNAs' binding sites in the PPM1K gene and their influence on PPM1K 3′UTR activity. We further over-expressed the mimics of these miRNAs in human and mouse cells to examine whether miRNAs affected the mRNA level of PPM1K. Results: Computational analysis identified numerous miRNAs potentially targeting PPM1K. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that the 3′UTR of PPM1K gene contained the recognition sites of miR-204 and miR-211. Overexpression of these miRNAs in human and mouse cells diminished the 3′UTR activity and the endogenous mRNA level of PPM1K. However, the miR-22 binding site was found only in human and not mouse PPM1K 3′UTR. Accordingly, PPM1K 3′UTR activity was suppressed by miR-22 overexpression in human but not mouse cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that different miRNAs contribute to the regulation of PP2Cm expression in a species-specific manner. miR-204 and miR-211 are efficient in both mouse and human cells, while miR-22 regulates PP2Cm expression only in human cells. PMID:26592513

  18. Differentially regulated miRNAs as prognostic biomarkers in the blood of primary CNS lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Roth, Patrick; Keller, Andreas; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Codo, Paula; Bauer, Andrea S; Backes, Christina; Leidinger, Petra; Meese, Eckart; Thiel, Eckhard; Korfel, Agnieszka; Weller, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Despite improved therapeutic regimens, primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) remains a therapeutic challenge. A prognostic classification of PCNSL patients may represent an important step towards optimised patient-adapted therapy. However, only higher age and low Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) have repeatedly been reported to be associated with shorter overall survival (OS). Here we characterised microRNA (miRNA) fingerprints in the blood of PCNSL patients with short-term survival (STS) versus long-term survival (LTS) to assess their potential as novel prognostic biomarkers. Blood was collected from patients enrolled in the G-PCNSL-SG1 trial, a phase III study for patients with newly diagnosed PCNSL. miRNAs were extracted from the blood and analysed by next generation sequencing. The STS group comprised 20 patients with a median OS of 3 months and was compared to 20 LTS patients with a median OS of 55 months. The cohorts were balanced for age and KPS. Twelve annotated miRNAs were significantly deregulated between the two groups. Among them, miR-151a-5p and miR-151b exhibited the most prominent differences. Importantly, the combination of several miRNA allowed for a good separation between short- and long-term survivors with maximal Area Under Curve (AUC) above 0.75. Besides the known miRNAs we identified putative novel miRNA candidates with potential regulatory influence of PCNSL. Finally, the differential regulation of the most promising candidate miRNAs was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a validation cohort consisting of 20 STS and LTS patients. In conclusion, peripheral blood miRNA expression patterns hold promise as a prognostic tool in PCNSL patients.

  19. Predicting miRNA Targets by Integrating Gene Regulatory Knowledge with Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weijia; Le, Thuc Duy; Liu, Lin; Zhou, Zhi-Hua; Li, Jiuyong

    2016-01-01

    Motivation microRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation of both plants and mammals, and dysfunctions of miRNAs are often associated with tumorigenesis and development through the effects on their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Identifying miRNA functions is critical for understanding cancer mechanisms and determining the efficacy of drugs. Computational methods analyzing high-throughput data offer great assistance in understanding the diverse and complex relationships between miRNAs and mRNAs. However, most of the existing methods do not fully utilise the available knowledge in biology to reduce the uncertainty in the modeling process. Therefore it is desirable to develop a method that can seamlessly integrate existing biological knowledge and high-throughput data into the process of discovering miRNA regulation mechanisms. Results In this article we present an integrative framework, CIDER (Causal miRNA target Discovery with Expression profile and Regulatory knowledge), to predict miRNA targets. CIDER is able to utilise a variety of gene regulation knowledge, including transcriptional and post-transcriptional knowledge, and to exploit gene expression data for the discovery of miRNA-mRNA regulatory relationships. The benefits of our framework is demonstrated by both simulation study and the analysis of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the breast cancer (BRCA) datasets. Our results reveal that even a limited amount of either Transcription Factor (TF)-miRNA or miRNA-mRNA regulatory knowledge improves the performance of miRNA target prediction, and the combination of the two types of knowledge enhances the improvement further. Another useful property of the framework is that its performance increases monotonically with the increase of regulatory knowledge. PMID:27064982

  20. MiRNA182 regulates percentage of myeloid and erythroid cells in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arya, Deepak; Sachithanandan, Sasikala P; Ross, Cecil; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Li, Shang; Krishna, Sudhir

    2017-01-12

    The deregulation of lineage control programs is often associated with the progression of haematological malignancies. The molecular regulators of lineage choices in the context of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance remain poorly understood in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). To find a potential molecular regulator contributing to lineage distribution and TKI resistance, we undertook an RNA-sequencing approach for identifying microRNAs (miRNAs). Following an unbiased screen, elevated miRNA182-5p levels were detected in Bcr-Abl-inhibited K562 cells (CML blast crisis cell line) and in a panel of CML patients. Earlier, miRNA182-5p upregulation was reported in several solid tumours and haematological malignancies. We undertook a strategy involving transient modulation and CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats)-mediated knockout of the MIR182 locus in CML cells. The lineage contribution was assessed by methylcellulose colony formation assay. The transient modulation of miRNA182-5p revealed a biased phenotype. Strikingly, Δ182 cells (homozygous deletion of MIR182 locus) produced a marked shift in lineage distribution. The phenotype was rescued by ectopic expression of miRNA182-5p in Δ182 cells. A bioinformatic analysis and Hes1 modulation data suggested that Hes1 could be a putative target of miRNA182-5p. A reciprocal relationship between miRNA182-5p and Hes1 was seen in the context of TK inhibition. In conclusion, we reveal a key role for miRNA182-5p in restricting the myeloid development of leukemic cells. We propose that the Δ182 cell line will be valuable in designing experiments for next-generation pharmacological interventions.

  1. Detection of Exosomal miRNAs in the Plasma of Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Susan R.; Grossmann, Kenneth F.; Cassidy, Pamela B.; Yang, Chuan He; Fan, Meiyun; Kopelovich, Levy; Leachman, Sancy A.; Pfeffer, Lawrence M.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 22–25 nucleotide RNAs that control gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. MiRNAs have potential as cancer biomarkers. Melanoma is a highly aggressive form of skin cancer accounting for almost 4% of cancers among men and women, and ~80% of skin cancer-related deaths in the US. In the present study we analyzed plasma-derived exosomal miRNAs from clinically affected and unaffected familial melanoma patients (CDKN2A/p16 gene carriers) and compared them with affected (nonfamilial melanoma) and unaffected control subjects in order to identify novel risk biomarkers for melanoma. Intact miRNAs can be isolated from the circulation because of their presence in exosomes. A number of differentially regulated miRNAs identified by NanoString human V2 miRNA array were validated by quantitative PCR. Significantly, miR-17, miR-19a, miR-21, miR-126, and miR-149 were expressed at higher levels in patients with metastatic sporadic melanoma as compared with familial melanoma patients or unaffected control subjects. Surprisingly, no substantial differences in miRNA expression were detected between familial melanoma patients (all inclusive) and unaffected control subjects. The miRNAs differentially expressed in the different patient cohorts, especially in patients with metastatic melanoma, may play important roles in tumor progression and metastasis, and may be used as predictive biomarkers to monitor remission as well as relapse following therapeutic intervention. PMID:26694476

  2. Circulating miRNAs revealed as surrogate molecular signatures for the early detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sanjay; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Suman, Shankar; Kumar, Vijay; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2015-12-01

    The miRNAs have well studied roles in cancer. Here, we identified altered miRNA expression by global miRNA profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of breast cancer (n = 15) and healthy subjects (n = 15), and further validated the selected miRNAs in PBMCs (n = 45), blood plasma (n = 45) and breast tissue samples (n = 09). The expression of altered miRNAs was also evaluated in PBMCs among early stage (n = 32), advanced stage (n = 13), triple positive (n = 5) and triple negative (n = 5) breast cancer patients. Results showed differential pattern of expressions of these miRNAs in multiple cohorts, however in early stage breast cancer, miR-106a-5p and miR-454-3p were upregulated (p < 0.05), miR-195-5p and miR-495 were downregulated (p < 0.05) in PBMCs. In addition, these miRNAs were also significantly associated with cancer and ErbB signaling pathways. Multiple regression analysis and receiver-operative curve (ROC) analysis of miR-195-5p and miR-495 with area under curve (AUC) of 0.901 showed best discriminating combination for early stage breast cancer detection. In summary, the present study delineated the importance of miR-195-5p and miR-495 miRNAs as prospective circulating surrogate molecular signatures for early detection of breast cancer.

  3. Signatures of purifying and local positive selection in human miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Quach, Hélène; Barreiro, Luis B; Laval, Guillaume; Zidane, Nora; Patin, Etienne; Kidd, Kenneth K; Kidd, Judith R; Bouchier, Christiane; Veuille, Michel; Antoniewski, Christophe; Quintana-Murci, Lluís

    2009-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs involved in posttranscriptional gene repression, and their role in diverse physiological processes is increasingly recognized. Yet, few efforts have been devoted to evolutionary studies of human miRNAs. Knowledge about the way in which natural selection has targeted miRNAs should provide insight into their functional relevance as well as their mechanisms of action. Here we used miRNAs as a model system for investigating the influence of natural selection on gene regulation by characterizing the full spectrum of naturally occurring sequence variation of 117 human miRNAs from different populations worldwide. We found that purifying selection has globally constrained the diversity of miRNA-containing regions and has strongly targeted the mature miRNA. This observation emphasizes that mutations in these molecules are likely to be deleterious, and therefore they can have severe phenotypic consequences on human health. More importantly, we obtained evidence of population-specific events of positive selection acting on a number of miRNA-containing regions. Notably, our analysis revealed that positive selection has targeted a "small-RNA-rich island" on chromosome 14, harboring both miRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs, in Europeans and East Asians. These observations support the notion that the tuning of gene expression contributes to the processes by which populations adapt to specific environments. These findings will fuel future investigations exploring how genetic and functional variation of miRNAs under selection affects the repression of their mRNA targets, increasing our understanding of the role of gene regulation in population adaptation and human disease.

  4. Shrimp miRNAs regulate innate immune response against white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kaewkascholkul, Napol; Somboonviwat, Kulwadee; Asakawa, Shuichi; Hirono, Ikuo; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs are short noncoding RNAs of RNA interference pathways that regulate gene expression through partial complementary base-pairing to target mRNAs. In this study, miRNAs that are expressed in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-infected Penaeus monodon, were identified using next generation sequencing. Forty-six miRNA homologs were identified from WSSV-infected shrimp hemocyte. Stem-loop real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that 11 out of 16 selected miRNAs were differentially expressed upon WSSV infection. Of those, pmo-miR-315 and pmo-miR-750 were highly responsive miRNAs. miRNA target prediction revealed that the miRNAs were targeted at 5'UTR, ORF, and 3'UTR of several immune-related genes such as genes encoding antimicrobial peptides, signaling transduction proteins, heat shock proteins, oxidative stress proteins, proteinases or proteinase inhibitors, proteins in blood clotting system, apoptosis-related proteins, proteins in prophenoloxidase system, pattern recognition proteins and other immune molecules. The highly conserved miRNA homolog, pmo-bantam, was characterized for its function in shrimp. The pmo-bantam was predicted to target the 3'UTR of Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (KuSPI). Binding of pmo-bantam to the target sequence of KuSPI gene was analyzed by luciferase reporter assay. Correlation of pmo-bantam and KuSPI expression was observed in lymphoid organ of WSSV-infected shrimp. These results implied that miRNAs might play roles as immune gene regulators in shrimp antiviral response.

  5. Analysis of Serum miRNA Profiles of Myasthenia Gravis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Ramos-Fransi, Alba; Suárez-Calvet, Xavier; Navas, Miquel; Rojas-García, Ricard; Mosquera, Jose Luis; Díaz-Manera, Jordi; Querol, Luis; Gallardo, Eduard; Illa, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of autoantibodies, mainly against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The mechanisms triggering and maintaining this chronic disease are unknown. MiRNAs are regulatory molecules that play a key role in the immune system and are altered in many autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate miRNA profiles in serum of 61 AChR MG patients. We studied serum from patients with early onset MG (n = 22), late onset MG (n = 27) and thymoma (n = 12), to identify alterations in the specific subgroups. In a discovery cohort, we analysed 381 miRNA arrays from 5 patients from each subgroup, and 5 healthy controls. The 15 patients had not received any treatment. We found 32 miRNAs in different levels in MG and analysed 8 of these in a validation cohort that included 46 of the MG patients. MiR15b, miR122, miR-140-3p, miR185, miR192, miR20b and miR-885-5p were in lower levels in MG patients than in controls. Our study suggests that different clinical phenotypes in MG share common altered mechanisms in circulating miRNAs, with no additional contribution of the thymoma. MG treatment intervention does not modify the profile of these miRNAs. Novel insights into the pathogenesis of MG can be reached by the analysis of circulating miRNAs since some of these miRNAs have also been found low in MG peripheral mononuclear cells, and have targets with important roles in B cell survival and antibody production. PMID:24637658

  6. miRDeep*: an integrated application tool for miRNA identification from RNA sequencing data.

    PubMed

    An, Jiyuan; Lai, John; Lehman, Melanie L; Nelson, Colleen C

    2013-01-01

    miRDeep and its varieties are widely used to quantify known and novel micro RNA (miRNA) from small RNA sequencing (RNAseq). This article describes miRDeep*, our integrated miRNA identification tool, which is modeled off miRDeep, but the precision of detecting novel miRNAs is improved by introducing new strategies to identify precursor miRNAs. miRDeep* has a user-friendly graphic interface and accepts raw data in FastQ and Sequence Alignment Map (SAM) or the binary equivalent (BAM) format. Known and novel miRNA expression levels, as measured by the number of reads, are displayed in an interface, which shows each RNAseq read relative to the pre-miRNA hairpin. The secondary pre-miRNA structure and read locations for each predicted miRNA are shown and kept in a separate figure file. Moreover, the target genes of known and novel miRNAs are predicted using the TargetScan algorithm, and the targets are ranked according to the confidence score. miRDeep* is an integrated standalone application where sequence alignment, pre-miRNA secondary structure calculation and graphical display are purely Java coded. This application tool can be executed using a normal personal computer with 1.5 GB of memory. Further, we show that miRDeep* outperformed existing miRNA prediction tools using our LNCaP and other small RNAseq datasets. miRDeep* is freely available online at http://www.australianprostatecentre.org/research/software/mirdeep-star.

  7. Pluripotent and Multipotent Stem Cells Display Distinct Hypoxic miRNA Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rahul; Dale, Tina P.; Al-Zubaidi, Mohammed A.; Benny Malgulwar, Prit; Forsyth, Nicholas R.; Kulshreshtha, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are reported to have a crucial role in the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. Hypoxia has been identified as a key biophysical element of the stem cell culture milieu however, the link between hypoxia and miRNA expression in stem cells remains poorly understood. We therefore explored miRNA expression in hypoxic human embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells (hESCs and hMSCs). A total of 50 and 76 miRNAs were differentially regulated by hypoxia (2% O2) in hESCs and hMSCs, respectively, with a negligible overlap of only three miRNAs. We found coordinate regulation of precursor and mature miRNAs under hypoxia suggesting their regulation mainly at transcriptional level. Hypoxia response elements were located upstream of 97% of upregulated hypoxia regulated miRNAs (HRMs) suggesting hypoxia-inducible-factor (HIF) driven transcription. HIF binding to the candidate cis-elements of specific miRNAs under hypoxia was confirmed by Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with qPCR. Role analysis of a subset of upregulated HRMs identified linkage to reported inhibition of differentiation while a downregulated subset of HRMs had a putative role in the promotion of differentiation. MiRNA-target prediction correlation with published hypoxic hESC and hMSC gene expression profiles revealed HRM target genes enriched in the cytokine:cytokine receptor, HIF signalling and pathways in cancer. Overall, our study reveals, novel and distinct hypoxia-driven miRNA signatures in hESCs and hMSCs with the potential for application in optimised culture and differentiation models for both therapeutic application and improved understanding of stem cell biology. PMID:27783707

  8. Growth Hormone-Regulated mRNAs and miRNAs in Chicken Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huijuan; Shao, Fang; Yu, JianFeng; Jiang, Honglin; Han, Yaoping; Gong, Daoqing; Gu, Zhiliang

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a key regulatory factor in animal growth, development and metabolism. Based on the expression level of the GH receptor, the chicken liver is a major target organ of GH, but the biological effects of GH on the chicken liver are not fully understood. In this work we identified mRNAs and miRNAs that are regulated by GH in primary hepatocytes from female chickens through RNA-seq, and analyzed the functional relevance of these mRNAs and miRNAs through GO enrichment analysis and miRNA target prediction. A total of 164 mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed between GH-treated and control chicken hepatocytes, of which 112 were up-regulated and 52 were down-regulated by GH. A total of 225 chicken miRNAs were identified by the RNA-Seq analysis. Among these miRNAs 16 were up-regulated and 1 miRNA was down-regulated by GH. The GH-regulated mRNAs were mainly involved in growth and metabolism. Most of the GH-upregulated or GH-downregulated miRNAs were predicted to target the GH-downregulated or GH-upregulated mRNAs, respectively, involved in lipid metabolism. This study reveals that GH regulates the expression of many mRNAs involved in metabolism in female chicken hepatocytes, which suggests that GH plays an important role in regulating liver metabolism in female chickens. The results of this study also support the hypothesis that GH regulates lipid metabolism in chicken liver in part by regulating the expression of miRNAs that target the mRNAs involved in lipid metabolism. PMID:25386791

  9. An integrated analysis of differential miRNA and mRNA expressions in human gallstones.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Liu, Bin; Bi, Pinduan; Wu, Tao; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Jie

    2015-04-01

    Gallstone disease, including cholesterol precipitation in bile, increased bile salt hydrophobicity and gallbladder inflammation. Here, we investigated miRNA and mRNA involved in the formation of gallstones, and explored the molecular mechanisms in the development of gallstones. Differentially expressed 17 miRNAs and 525 mRNA were identified based on Illumina sequencing from gallbladder mucosa of patients with or without gallstones, and were validated by randomly selected 6 miRNAs and 8 genes using quantitative RT-PCR. 114 miRNA target genes were identified, whose functions and regulating pathways were related to gallstones. The differentially expressed genes were enriched upon lipoprotein binding and some metabolic pathways, and differentially expressed miRNAs enriched upon ABC transportation and cancer related pathways. A molecular regulatory network consisting of 17 differentially expressed miRNAs, inclusive of their target genes, was constructed. miR-210 and its potential target gene ATP11A were found to be differentially expressed in both miRNA and mRNA profiles. ATP11A was a direct target of miR-210, which was predicted to regulate the ABC-transporters pathway. The expression levels of ATP11A in the gallstone showed inverse correlation with miR-210 expression, and up-regulation of miR-210 could reduce ATP11A expression in HGBEC. This is the first report that indicates the existence of differences in miRNA and mRNA expression in patients with or without gallstones. Our data shed light on further investigating the mechanisms of gallstone formation.

  10. miRNA gene counts in chromosomes vary widely in a species and biogenesis of miRNA largely depends on transcription or post-transcriptional processing of coding genes

    PubMed Central

    Ghorai, Atanu; Ghosh, Utpal

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs target specific mRNA(s) to silence its expression and thereby regulate various cellular processes. We have investigated miRNA gene counts in chromosomes for 20 different species and observed wide variation. Certain chromosomes have extremely high number of miRNA gene compared with others in all the species. For example, high number of miRNA gene in X chromosome and the least or absence of miRNA gene in Y chromosome was observed in all species. To search the criteria governing such variation of miRNA gene counts in chromosomes, we have selected three parameters- length, number of non-coding and coding genes in a chromosome. We have calculated Pearson's correlation coefficient of miRNA gene counts with length, number of non-coding and coding genes in a chromosome for all 20 species. Major number of species showed that number of miRNA gene was not correlated with chromosome length. Eighty five percent of species under study showed strong positive correlation coefficient (r ≥ 0.5) between the numbers of miRNA gene vs. non-coding gene in chromosomes as expected because miRNA is a sub-set of non-coding genes. 55% species under study showed strong positive correlation coefficient (r ≥ 0.5) between numbers of miRNA gene vs. coding gene. We hypothesize biogenesis of miRNA largely depends on coding genes, an evolutionary conserved process. Chromosomes having higher number of miRNA genes will be most likely playing regulatory roles in several cellular processes including different disorders. In humans, cancer and cardiovascular disease associated miRNAs are mostly intergenic and located in Chromosome 19, X, 14, and 1. PMID:24808907

  11. Comparative miRNA Analysis of Urine Extracellular Vesicles Isolated through Five Different Methods.

    PubMed

    Royo, Felix; Diwan, Izzuddin; Tackett, Michael R; Zuñiga, Patricia; Sanchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Loizaga-Iriarte, Ana; Ugalde-Olano, Aitziber; Lacasa, Isabel; Perez, Amparo; Unda, Miguel; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Falcon-Perez, Juan M

    2016-12-10

    Urine extracellular vesicles are a valuable low-invasive source of information, especially for the cells of the genitourinary tract. In the search for biomarkers, different techniques have been developed to isolate and characterize the cargo of these vesicles. In the present work, we compare five of these different isolation methods (three commercial isolation kits, ultracentrifugation, and lectin-based purification) and perform miRNA profiling using a multiplex miRNA assay. The results showed high correlation through all isolation techniques, and 48 out of 68 miRNAs were detected above the detection limit at least 10 times. The results obtained by multiplex assay were validated through Taqman qPCR. In addition, using this technique combined with a clinically friendly extracellular vesicle (uEV)-enrichment method, we performed the analysis of selected miRNAs in urine from patients affected with bladder cancer, benign prostate hyperplasia, or prostate cancer. Importantly, we found that those miRNAs could be detected in almost 100% of the samples, and no significant differences were observed between groups. Our results support the feasibility of analyzing exosomes-associated miRNAs using a methodology that requires a small volume of urine and is compatible with a clinical environment and high-throughput analysis.

  12. Germline miRNA DNA variants and the risk of colorectal cancer by subtype

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Melissa C.; DeRycke, Melissa S.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Baheti, Saurabh; Fogarty, Zachary C.; Win, Aung Ko; Potter, John D.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Newcomb, Polly A.; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Goode, Ellen L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate up to one‐third of all protein‐coding genes including genes relevant to cancer. Variants within miRNAs have been reported to be associated with prognosis, survival, response to chemotherapy across cancer types, in vitro parameters of cell growth, and altered risks for development of cancer. Five miRNA variants have been reported to be associated with risk for development of colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we evaluated germline genetic variation in 1,123 miRNAs in 899 individuals with CRCs categorized by clinical subtypes and in 204 controls. The role of common miRNA variation in CRC was investigated using single variant and miRNA‐level association tests. Twenty‐nine miRNAs and 30 variants exhibited some marginal association with CRC in at least one subtype of CRC. Previously reported associations were not confirmed (n = 4) or could not be evaluated (n = 1). The variants noted for the CRCs with deficient mismatch repair showed little overlap with the variants noted for CRCs with proficient mismatch repair, consistent with our evolving understanding of the distinct biology underlying these two groups. © 2016 The Authors Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27636879

  13. Nucleotide sequence of miRNA precursor contributes to cleavage site selection by Dicer.

    PubMed

    Starega-Roslan, Julia; Galka-Marciniak, Paulina; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2015-12-15

    The ribonuclease Dicer excises mature miRNAs from a diverse group of precursors (pre-miRNAs), most of which contain various secondary structure motifs in their hairpin stem. In this study, we analyzed Dicer cleavage in hairpin substrates deprived of such motifs. We searched for the factors other than the secondary structure, which may influence the length diversity and heterogeneity of miRNAs. We found that the nucleotide sequence at the Dicer cleavage site influences both of these miRNA characteristics. With regard to cleavage mechanism, we demonstrate that the Dicer RNase IIIA domain that cleaves within the 3' arm of the pre-miRNA is more sensitive to the nucleotide sequence of its substrate than is the RNase IIIB domain. The RNase IIIA domain avoids releasing miRNAs with G nucleotide and prefers to generate miRNAs with a U nucleotide at the 5' end. We also propose that the sequence restrictions at the Dicer cleavage site might be the factor that contributes to the generation of miRNA duplexes with 3' overhangs of atypical lengths. This finding implies that the two RNase III domains forming the single processing center of Dicer may exhibit some degree of flexibility, which allows for the formation of these non-standard 3' overhangs.

  14. The role of miRNAs in the regulation of inflammatory processes during hepatofibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sanchari; Benz, Fabian; Luedde, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis represents the end stage of most chronic inflammatory liver diseases and is a major global health burden. Despite the enormous relevance of cirrhotic disease, pharmacological strategies for prevention or treatment of hepatic fibrosis are still limited, underlining the need to establish a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of hepatic cirrhosis. Recently, miRNAs have emerged as a new class of RNAs that do not withhold the information to encode for proteins but regulate whole gene expression networks during different physiological and pathological processes. Various authors demonstrated that miRNA species are functionally involved in the regulation of chronic liver damage and development of liver cirrhosis in inflamed livers. Moreover, circulating miRNA patterns were suggested to serve as blood-based biomarkers indicating liver injury and progression to hepatic cirrhosis and cancer. Here we summarize current findings on a potential role of miRNAs in the cascade leading from liver inflammation to liver fibrosis and finally hepatocellular carcinoma. We compare data from animal models with findings on miRNAs dysregulated in human patients and finally highlight a potential use of miRNAs as biomarkers for liver injury, fibrosis and cancer. PMID:25713802

  15. Characterization of miRNAs expression profiles and identification of potential biomarkers in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Karina T O S; Souza, Renan P; Assis, Marieta T A; Araújo, Marcelo G; Locati, Massimo; Jesus, Amélia M R; Baptista, Ida M F D; Lima, Cristiano X; Teixeira, Antônio L; Teixeira, Mauro M; Soriani, Frederico M

    2017-03-08

    Leprosy is an important cause of disability in the developing world. Early diagnosis is essential to allow cure and interrupt transmission of this infection. MiRNAs are important factors for host-pathogen interaction and they have been identified as biomarkers for various infectious diseases. The expression profile of 377 microRNAs were analyzed by TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) in skin lesions of tuberculoid and lepromatous leprosy patients, as well as skin specimens from healthy controls. In a second step, sixteen microRNAs were selected for validation experiments with qRT-PCR in skin samples from new individuals. Principal component analysis followed by logistic regression model and ROC curve analysis were performed to evaluate the diagnostic potential of selected miRNAs. Four patterns of differential expression were identified in TLDA experiment suggesting a diagnostic potential of miRNAs in leprosy. After validation experiments, a combination of four miRNAs (miR-101, miR-196b, miR-27b, miR-29c) was revealed as able to discriminate healthy control and leprosy patients with 80% sensitivity and 91% specificity. This set of miRNAs was also able to discriminate lepromatous and tuberculoid patients with sensitivity of 83% and 80% of specificity. In this work, it was possible to identify a set of miRNAs with good diagnostic potential for leprosy.

  16. RAS-MAPK pathway epigenetic activation in cancer: miRNAs in action

    PubMed Central

    Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Garinet, Simon; Pasmant, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved RAS-mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is involved in a wide range of cellular processes including differentiation, proliferation, and survival. Somatic mutations in genes encoding RAS-MAPK components frequently occur in many tumors, making the RAS-MAPK a critical pathway in human cancer. Since the pioneering study reporting that let-7 miRNA acted as tumor suppressor by repressing the RAS oncogene, growing evidence has suggested the importance of miRNAs targeting the RAS-MAPK in oncogenesis. MiRNAs alterations in human cancers may act as a rheostat of the oncogenic RAS signal that is often amplified as cancers progress. However, specific mechanisms leading to miRNAs deregulation and their functional consequences in cancer are far from being fully elucidated. In this review, we provide an experimental-validated map of RAS-MAPK oncomiRs and tumor suppressor miRNAs from transmembrane receptor to downstream ERK proteins. MiRNAs could be further considered as potential genetic biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, or therapeutic purpose. PMID:26646588

  17. MAGIA, a web-based tool for miRNA and Genes Integrated Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sales, Gabriele; Coppe, Alessandro; Bisognin, Andrea; Biasiolo, Marta; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Romualdi, Chiara

    2010-07-01

    MAGIA (miRNA and genes integrated analysis) is a novel web tool for the integrative analysis of target predictions, miRNA and gene expression data. MAGIA is divided into two parts: the query section allows the user to retrieve and browse updated miRNA target predictions computed with a number of different algorithms (PITA, miRanda and Target Scan) and Boolean combinations thereof. The analysis section comprises a multistep procedure for (i) direct integration through different functional measures (parametric and non-parametric correlation indexes, a variational Bayesian model, mutual information and a meta-analysis approach based on P-value combination) of mRNA and miRNA expression data, (ii) construction of bipartite regulatory network of the best miRNA and mRNA putative interactions and (iii) retrieval of information available in several public databases of genes, miRNAs and diseases and via scientific literature text-mining. MAGIA is freely available for Academic users at http://gencomp.bio.unipd.it/magia.

  18. Dynamics of miRNA transcriptome during gonadal development of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Presslauer, Christopher; Tilahun Bizuayehu, Teshome; Kopp, Martina; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.; Babiak, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Studies in non-teleost vertebrates have found microRNAs (miRNAs) to be essential for proper gonadal development. However, comparatively little is known about their role during gonadal development in teleost fishes. So far in zebrafish, a model teleost, transcript profiling throughout gonadal development has not been established because of a tiny size of an organ in juvenile stages and its poor distinguishability from surrounding tissues. We performed small RNA sequencing on isolated gonads of See-Thru-Gonad line, from the undifferentiated state at 3 weeks post fertilization (wpf) to fully mature adults at 24 wpf. We identified 520 gonadal mature miRNAs; 111 of them had significant changes in abundance over time, while 50 miRNAs were either testis- or ovary-enriched significantly in at least one developmental stage. We characterized patterns of miRNA abundance over time including isomiR variants. We identified putative germline versus gonadal somatic miRNAs through differential small RNA sequencing of isolated gametes versus the whole gonads. This report is the most comprehensive analysis of the miRNA repertoire in zebrafish gonads during the sexual development to date and provides an important database from which functional studies can be performed. PMID:28262836

  19. MIRNA-DISTILLER: A Stand-Alone Application to Compile microRNA Data from Databases

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Jessica K.; Bodan, Denis A.; Zanger, Ulrich M.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small non-coding RNA molecules of ∼22 nucleotides which regulate large numbers of genes by binding to seed sequences at the 3′-untranslated region of target gene transcripts. The target mRNA is then usually degraded or translation is inhibited, although thus resulting in posttranscriptional down regulation of gene expression at the mRNA and/or protein level. Due to the bioinformatic difficulties in predicting functional miRNA binding sites, several publically available databases have been developed that predict miRNA binding sites based on different algorithms. The parallel use of different databases is currently indispensable, but highly uncomfortable and time consuming, especially when working with numerous genes of interest. We have therefore developed a new stand-alone program, termed MIRNA-DISTILLER, which allows to compile miRNA data for given target genes from public databases. Currently implemented are TargetScan, microCosm, and miRDB, which may be queried independently, pairwise, or together to calculate the respective intersections. Data are stored locally for application of further analysis tools including freely definable biological parameter filters, customized output-lists for both miRNAs and target genes, and various graphical facilities. The software, a data example file and a tutorial are freely available at http://www.ikp-stuttgart.de/content/language1/html/10415.asp PMID:22303335

  20. The roles of miRNAs as potential biomarkers in lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Alipoor, Shamila D; Adcock, Ian M; Garssen, Johan; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Varahram, Mohammad; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Velayati, Aliakbar

    2016-11-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs which can act as master regulators of gene expression, modulate almost all biological process and are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis. Dysregulation of miRNA expression has been associated with aberrant gene expression and may lead to pathological conditions. Evidence suggests that miRNA expression profiles are altered between health and disease and as such may be considered as biomarkers of disease. Evidence is increasing that miRNAs are particularly important in lung homeostasis and development and have been demonstrated to be the involved in many pulmonary diseases such as asthma, COPD, sarcoidosis, lung cancer and other smoking related diseases. Better understanding of the function of miRNA and the mechanisms underlying their action in the lung, would help to improve current diagnosis and therapeutics strategies in pulmonary diseases. Recently, some miRNA-based drugs have been introduced as possible therapeutic agents. In this review we aim to summarize the recent findings regarding the role of miRNAs in the airways and lung and emphasise their potential therapeutic roles in pulmonary diseases.

  1. Hippo signaling regulates Microprocessor and links cell density-dependent miRNA biogenesis to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Masaki; Triboulet, Robinson; Mohseni, Morvarid; Schlegelmilch, Karin; Shrestha, Kriti; Camargo, Fernando D.; Gregory, Richard I.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Global downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is commonly observed in human cancers and can have a causative role in tumorigenesis. The mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here we show that YAP, the downstream target of the tumor-suppressive Hippo signaling pathway regulates miRNA biogenesis in a cell density-dependent manner. At low cell density, nuclear YAP binds and sequesters p72 (DDX17), a regulatory component of the miRNA processing machinery. At high cell density, Hippo-mediated cytoplasmic retention of YAP facilitates p72 association with Microprocessor and binding to a specific sequence motif in pri-miRNAs. Inactivation of the Hippo pathway or expression of constitutively active YAP causes widespread miRNA suppression in cells and tumors and a corresponding post-transcriptional induction of MYC expression. Thus, the Hippo pathway links contact-inhibition regulation to miRNA biogenesis and may be responsible for the widespread miRNA repression observed in cancer. PMID:24581491

  2. Germline miRNA DNA variants and the risk of colorectal cancer by subtype.

    PubMed

    Lindor, Noralane M; Larson, Melissa C; DeRycke, Melissa S; McDonnell, Shannon K; Baheti, Saurabh; Fogarty, Zachary C; Win, Aung Ko; Potter, John D; Buchanan, Daniel D; Clendenning, Mark; Newcomb, Polly A; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Goode, Ellen L; Thibodeau, Stephen N

    2017-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate up to one-third of all protein-coding genes including genes relevant to cancer. Variants within miRNAs have been reported to be associated with prognosis, survival, response to chemotherapy across cancer types, in vitro parameters of cell growth, and altered risks for development of cancer. Five miRNA variants have been reported to be associated with risk for development of colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we evaluated germline genetic variation in 1,123 miRNAs in 899 individuals with CRCs categorized by clinical subtypes and in 204 controls. The role of common miRNA variation in CRC was investigated using single variant and miRNA-level association tests. Twenty-nine miRNAs and 30 variants exhibited some marginal association with CRC in at least one subtype of CRC. Previously reported associations were not confirmed (n = 4) or could not be evaluated (n = 1). The variants noted for the CRCs with deficient mismatch repair showed little overlap with the variants noted for CRCs with proficient mismatch repair, consistent with our evolving understanding of the distinct biology underlying these two groups. © 2016 The Authors Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The Role of miRNAs in Common Inflammatory Arthropathies: Osteoarthritis and Gouty Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Papanagnou, Panagiota; Stivarou, Theodora; Tsironi, Maria

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNA species that are highly evolutionarily conserved, from higher invertebrates to man. Up to 1000 miRNAs have been identified in human cells thus far, where they are key regulators of the expression of numerous targets at the post-transcriptional level. They are implicated in various processes, including cell differentiation, metabolism, and inflammation. An expanding list of miRNAs is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of common, non-autoimmune inflammatory diseases. Interestingly, osteoarthritis (OA) is now being conceptualized as a metabolic disease, as there is a correlation among hyperuricemia and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Experimental evidence suggests that metabolic deregulation is a commonality between these different pathological entities, and that miRNAs are key players in the modulation of metabolic routes. In light of these findings, this review discusses the role of miRNAs in OA and gouty arthritis, as well as the possible therapeutic targetability of miRNAs in these diseases. PMID:27845712

  4. Activity-dependent spatially localized miRNA maturation in neuronal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Sambandan, Sivakumar; Akbalik, Güney; Kochen, Lisa; Rinne, Jennifer; Kahlstatt, Josefine; Glock, Caspar; Tushev, Georgi; Alvarez-Castelao, Beatriz; Heckel, Alexander; Schuman, Erin M

    2017-02-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by binding to target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and preventing their translation. In general, the number of potential mRNA targets in a cell is much greater than the miRNA copy number, complicating high-fidelity miRNA-target interactions. We developed an inducible fluorescent probe to explore whether the maturation of a miRNA could be regulated in space and time in neurons. A precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA) probe exhibited an activity-dependent increase in fluorescence, suggesting the stimulation of miRNA maturation. Single-synapse stimulation resulted in a local maturation of miRNA that was associated with a spatially restricted reduction in the protein synthesis of a target mRNA. Thus, the spatially and temporally regulated maturation of pre-miRNAs can be used to increase the precision and robustness of miRNA-mediated translational repression.

  5. The emerging role of miRNAs in inflammatory bowel disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), comprised of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, is believed to develop as a result of a deregulated inflammatory response to environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals. Despite advances in understanding the genetic risks of IBD, associated single nucleotide polymorphisms have low penetrance, monozygotic twin studies suggest a low concordance rate, and increasing worldwide IBD incidence leave gaps in our understanding of IBD heritability and highlight the importance of environmental influences. Operating at the interface between environment and heritable molecular and cellular phenotypes, microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous, small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression. Studies to date have identified unique miRNA expression profile signatures in IBD and preliminary functional analyses associate these deregulated miRNAs to canonical pathways associated with IBD pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize and discuss the miRNA expression signatures associated with IBD in tissue and peripheral blood, highlight miRNAs with potential future clinical applications as diagnostic and therapeutic targets, and provide an outlook on how to develop miRNA based therapies. PMID:25553076

  6. In vivo NCL targeting affects breast cancer aggressiveness through miRNA regulation

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Dario; De Luca, Luciana; Consiglio, Jessica; You, Jia; Rocci, Alberto; Talabere, Tiffany; Piovan, Claudia; Lagana, Alessandro; Cascione, Luciano; Guan, Jingwen; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Balatti, Veronica; Nuovo, Gerard; Coppola, Vincenzo; Hofmeister, Craig C.; Marcucci, Guido; Byrd, John C.; Volinia, Stefano; Shapiro, Charles L.; Freitas, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have described the altered expression and the causal role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in human cancer. However, to date, efforts to modulate miRNA levels for therapeutic purposes have been challenging to implement. Here we find that nucleolin (NCL), a major nucleolar protein, posttranscriptionally regulates the expression of a specific subset of miRNAs, including miR-21, miR-221, miR-222, and miR-103, that are causally involved in breast cancer initiation, progression, and drug resistance. We also show that NCL is commonly overexpressed in human breast tumors and that its expression correlates with that of NCL-dependent miRNAs. Finally, inhibition of NCL using guanosine-rich aptamers reduces the levels of NCL-dependent miRNAs and their target genes, thus reducing breast cancer cell aggressiveness both in vitro and in vivo. These findings illuminate a path to novel therapeutic approaches based on NCL-targeting aptamers for the modulation of miRNA expression in the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:23610125

  7. Sequencing the miRNAs in maternal plasma from women before and after parturition.

    PubMed

    Pan, Min; Ge, Qinyu; Li, Hailing; Yang, Qi; Lu, Jiafeng; Zhang, Dingdong; Lu, Zuhong

    2012-05-01

    The goal of the study was to analyze the microRNAs (miRNA) expression that differentiates in maternal plasma of women before and after parturition. Here, we used high throughput sequencer to analyze the expression change of all microRNAs in plasma from pregnant women. Six families of microRNA were also surveyed using real-time quantitative PCR. Sequencing result showed that the circulating microRNA expression in plasma from pregnant women down regulated remarkably after parturition. The quantitative PCR results showed that the differential expression of most miRNAs in plasma between before and after parturition was consistent with the sequencing result. It is also showed that not only notable differential miRNA expression between the plasma from the same woman collected before and after parturition, but also between normal plasma and preeclamptic plasma, which indicate that miRNAs could be potential biomarker for prenatal diagnosis and prognosis. The study suggested circulating miRNAs in plasma of pregnant women could be detected more comprehensive by the next generation sequencing technology. This research also suggested the differential miRNA expression could be related to the existence and clearance of circulating DNA/RNA, which paved a new way for studying the origin and path of circulating nucleic acid.

  8. Comparative miRNA Analysis of Urine Extracellular Vesicles Isolated through Five Different Methods

    PubMed Central

    Royo, Felix; Diwan, Izzuddin; Tackett, Michael R.; Zuñiga, Patricia; Sanchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Loizaga-Iriarte, Ana; Ugalde-Olano, Aitziber; Lacasa, Isabel; Perez, Amparo; Unda, Miguel; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Urine extracellular vesicles are a valuable low-invasive source of information, especially for the cells of the genitourinary tract. In the search for biomarkers, different techniques have been developed to isolate and characterize the cargo of these vesicles. In the present work, we compare five of these different isolation methods (three commercial isolation kits, ultracentrifugation, and lectin-based purification) and perform miRNA profiling using a multiplex miRNA assay. The results showed high correlation through all isolation techniques, and 48 out of 68 miRNAs were detected above the detection limit at least 10 times. The results obtained by multiplex assay were validated through Taqman qPCR. In addition, using this technique combined with a clinically friendly extracellular vesicle (uEV)-enrichment method, we performed the analysis of selected miRNAs in urine from patients affected with bladder cancer, benign prostate hyperplasia, or prostate cancer. Importantly, we found that those miRNAs could be detected in almost 100% of the samples, and no significant differences were observed between groups. Our results support the feasibility of analyzing exosomes-associated miRNAs using a methodology that requires a small volume of urine and is compatible with a clinical environment and high-throughput analysis. PMID:27973407

  9. Expression Variations of miRNAs and mRNAs in Rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ming; Xie, Munan; He, Lian; Wang, Yushuai; Shi, Suhua; Tang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Differences in expression levels are an important source of phenotypic variation within and between populations. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key players in post-transcriptional gene regulation that are important for plant development and stress responses. We surveyed expression variation of miRNAs and mRNAs of six accessions from two rice subspecies Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica and Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica using deep sequencing. While more than half (53.7%) of the mature miRNAs exhibit differential expression between grains and seedlings of rice, only 11.0% show expression differences between subspecies, with an additional 2.2% differentiated for the development-by-subspecies interaction. Expression variation is greater for lowly conserved miRNAs than highly conserved miRNAs, whereas the latter show stronger negative correlation with their targets in expression changes between subspecies. Using a permutation test, we identified 51 miRNA–mRNA pairs that correlate negatively or positively in expression level among cultivated rice. Genes involved in various metabolic processes and stress responses are enriched in the differentially expressed genes between rice indica and japonica subspecies. Our results indicate that stabilizing selection is the major force governing miRNA expression in cultivated rice, albeit positive selection may be responsible for much of the between-subspecies expression divergence. PMID:27797952

  10. Nucleotide sequence of miRNA precursor contributes to cleavage site selection by Dicer

    PubMed Central

    Starega-Roslan, Julia; Galka-Marciniak, Paulina; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2015-01-01

    The ribonuclease Dicer excises mature miRNAs from a diverse group of precursors (pre-miRNAs), most of which contain various secondary structure motifs in their hairpin stem. In this study, we analyzed Dicer cleavage in hairpin substrates deprived of such motifs. We searched for the factors other than the secondary structure, which may influence the length diversity and heterogeneity of miRNAs. We found that the nucleotide sequence at the Dicer cleavage site influences both of these miRNA characteristics. With regard to cleavage mechanism, we demonstrate that the Dicer RNase IIIA domain that cleaves within the 3′ arm of the pre-miRNA is more sensitive to the nucleotide sequence of its substrate than is the RNase IIIB domain. The RNase IIIA domain avoids releasing miRNAs with G nucleotide and prefers to generate miRNAs with a U nucleotide at the 5′ end. We also propose that the sequence restrictions at the Dicer cleavage site might be the factor that contributes to the generation of miRNA duplexes with 3′ overhangs of atypical lengths. This finding implies that the two RNase III domains forming the single processing center of Dicer may exhibit some degree of flexibility, which allows for the formation of these non-standard 3′ overhangs. PMID:26424848

  11. Effects of space radiation and microgravity on miRNA expression profile in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dan; Sun, Yeqing; Lei, Huang; Gao, Ying

    2012-07-01

    Living organisms experience a shock and subsequent adaption when they are subjected to space radiation and microgravity during spaceflight. Such changes have been already documented for some biological consequences including skeletal muscle alterations, reduced immune function and bone loss. Recent advancement in the field of molecular biology has demonstrated that small non-coding microRNA (miRNA) can have a broad effect on gene expression networks, and play a key role in cellular response to environmental stresses. However, little is known about how radiation exposure and altered gravity affect miRNA expression. In the present study, we explored the changes in expression of miRNA and related genes from Caenorhabditis elegans (C.elegans) flown on spaceflight. We used wild-type (N2) and dys-1 mutant (deletion of dys-1) stains of C.elegans, which were cultured to Dauer stage and transferred to special SIMbox in the experiment container. These worms taken by Shenzhou VIII spacecraft experienced the 16.5-day shuttle spaceflight. During spaceflight, they suffered space radiation and underwent static zero gravity (microgravity) or imitated earth gravity (1g) in the rotating condition. In contrast, these worms live under static earth gravity (1g) in ground-based controls. To evaluate the effects of space radiation and microgravity on miRNA expression profile, we performed miRNA microarray expression analysis and found that a set of miRNAs in N2 groups were significantly upregulated or downregualted in radiation and microgravity conditions. Among these altered miRNAs, there are two up-regulated and four down-regulated miRNAs in space radiation conditions; one down-regulated miRNAs in microgravity condition. Expression of several miRNAs in N2 groups was only changed significantly in the imitated earth gravity (1g) conditions, presenting these altered miRNAs were affected by radiation exposure alone. Notably, dys-1 mutant is not sensitive to altered gravity due to muscle

  12. Identification of four potential predicting miRNA biomarkers for multiple myeloma from published datasets

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Liu, Gao

    2017-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is a cancer which has a high occurrence rate and causes great injury to people worldwide. In recent years, many studies reported the effects of miRNA on the appearance of multiple myeloma. However, due to the differences of samples and sequencing platforms, a large number of inconsistent results have been generated among these studies, which limited the cure of multiple myeloma at the miRNA level. Methods We performed meta-analyses to identify the key miRNA biomarkers which could be applied on the treatment of multiple myeloma. The key miRNAs were determined by overlap comparisons of seven datasets in multiple myeloma. Then, the target genes for key miRNAs were predicted by the software TargetScan. Additionally, functional enrichments and binding TFs were investigated by DAVID database and Tfacts database, respectively. Results Firstly, comparing the normal tissues, 13 miRNAs were differently expressed miRNAs (DEMs) for at least three datasets. They were considered as key miRNAs, with 12 up-regulated (hsa-miR-106b, hsa-miR-125b, hsa-miR-130b, hsa-miR-138, hsa-miR-15b, hsa-miR-181a, hsa-miR-183, hsa-miR-191, hsa-miR-19a, hsa-miR-20a, hsa-miR-221 and hsa-miR-25) and one down-regulated (hsa-miR-223). Secondly, functional enrichment analyses indicated that target genes of the upregulated miRNAs were mainly transcript factors and enriched in transcription regulation. Besides, these genes were enriched in multiple pathways: the cancer signal pathway, insulin signal metabolic pathway, cell binding molecules, melanin generation, long-term regression and P53 signaling pathway. However, no significant enrichment was found for target genes of the down-regulated genes. Due to the distinct regulation function, four miRNAs (hsa-miR-19a has-miR-221 has-miR25 and has-miR223) were ascertained as the potential prognostic and diagnostic markers in MM. Thirdly, transcript factors analysis unveiled that there were 148 TFs and 60 TFs which bind target genes

  13. MicroRNA Profile of Lung Tumor Tissues Is Associated with a High Risk Plasma miRNA Signature

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Orazio; Verri, Carla; Pastorino, Ugo; Sozzi, Gabriella; Boeri, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. Many studies have reported that alterations in miRNA expression are involved in several human tumors. We have previously identified a circulating miRNA signature classifier (MSC) able to discriminate lung cancer with more aggressive features. In the present work, microarray miRNA profiling of tumor tissues collected from 19 lung cancer patients with an available MSC result were perform in order to find a possible association between miRNA expression and the MSC risk level. Eleven tissue mature miRNAs and six miRNA precursors were observed to be associated with the plasma MSC risk level of patients. Not one of these miRNAs was included in the MSC algorithm. A pathway enrichment analysis revealed a role of these miRNA in the main pathways determining lung cancer aggressiveness. Overall, these findings add to the knowledge that tissue and plasma miRNAs behave as excellent diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, which may find rapid application in clinical settings. PMID:27600084

  14. In vivo mutagenesis of miRNA gene families using a scalable multiplexed CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease system

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Anand; Hill-Teran, Guillermina; Moro, Albertomaria; Ristori, Emma; Kasper, Dionna M.; A. Roden, Christine; Lu, Jun; Nicoli, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    A large number of microRNAs (miRNAs) are grouped into families derived from the same phylogenetic ancestors. miRNAs within a family often share the same physiological functions despite differences in their primary sequences, secondary structures, or chromosomal locations. Consequently, the generation of animal models to analyze the activity of miRNA families is extremely challenging. Using zebrafish as a model system, we successfully provide experimental evidence that a large number of miRNAs can be simultaneously mutated to abrogate the activity of an entire miRNA family. We show that injection of the Cas9 nuclease and two, four, ten, and up to twenty-four multiplexed single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) can induce mutations in 90% of the miRNA genomic sequences analyzed. We performed a survey of these 45 mutations in 10 miRNA genes, analyzing the impact of our mutagenesis strategy on the processing of each miRNA both computationally and in vivo. Our results offer an effective approach to mutate and study the activity of miRNA families and pave the way for further analysis on the function of complex miRNA families in higher multicellular organisms. PMID:27572667

  15. In silico screening of alleged miRNAs associated with cell competition: an emerging cellular event in cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manish; Antala, Bhavesh; Shrivastava, Neeta

    2015-12-01

    Cell competition is identified as a crucial phenomenon for cancer and organ development. There is a possibility that microRNAs (miRNAs) may play an important role in the regulation of expression of genes involved in cell competition. In silico screening of miRNAs is an effort to abridge, economize and expedite the experimental approaches to identification of potential miRNAs involved in cell competition, as no study has reported involvement of miRNAs in cell competition to date. In this study, we used multiple screening steps as follows: (i) selection of cell competition related genes of Drosophila through a literature survey; (ii) homology study of selected cell competition related genes; (iii) identification of miRNAs that target conserved cell competition-related genes through prediction tools; (iv) sequence conservation analysis of identified miRNAs with human genome; (v) identification of conserved cell competition miRNAs using their expression profiles and exploration of roles of their homologous human miRNAs. This study led to the identification of nine potential cell competition miRNAs in the Drosophila genome. Importantly, eighteen human homologs of these nine potential Drosophila miRNAs are well reported for their involvement in different types of cancers. This confirms their probable involvement in cell competition as well, because cell competition is well justified for its involvement in cancer initiation and maintenance.

  16. Increased Levels of miRNA-146a in Serum and Histologic Samples of Patients with Uveal Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Russo, Andrea; Caltabiano, Rosario; Longo, Antonio; Avitabile, Teresio; Franco, Livio M; Bonfiglio, Vincenza; Puzzo, Lidia; Reibaldi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze MiRs expression in serum of UM patients, respect to healthy donors, and to compare this data with MiRs expressed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded UM samples. Methods: Expression profile of 754 miRNAs was performed in serum of patients with uveal melanoma who underwent primary enucleation. The level of miRNAs increased in serum was individually analyzed on FFPE UM samples and compared to choroidal melanocytes from unaffected eyes. Results: Fourteen patients with uveal melanoma were included in the study. We found 8 serum miRNAs differentially expressed compared to normal controls: 2 upregulated miRNAs (miRNA-146a, miR-523); 6 downregulated miRNAs (miR-19a, miR-30d, miR-127, miR-451, miR-518f, miR-1274B). When data on upregulated miRNAs were singularly validated only a significant overexpression of miRNA-146a was found. A statistically significant upregulation of miRNA-146a was also found on FFPE UM samples, compared to choroidal melanocytes from unaffected eyes. Conclusions: miRNA-146a is increased in serum of patients with UM and in FFPE tumor samples. Further studies will show if it could be considered a potential marker of UM in the blood.

  17. Increased Levels of miRNA-146a in Serum and Histologic Samples of Patients with Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Andrea; Caltabiano, Rosario; Longo, Antonio; Avitabile, Teresio; Franco, Livio M.; Bonfiglio, Vincenza; Puzzo, Lidia; Reibaldi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze MiRs expression in serum of UM patients, respect to healthy donors, and to compare this data with MiRs expressed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded UM samples. Methods: Expression profile of 754 miRNAs was performed in serum of patients with uveal melanoma who underwent primary enucleation. The level of miRNAs increased in serum was individually analyzed on FFPE UM samples and compared to choroidal melanocytes from unaffected eyes. Results: Fourteen patients with uveal melanoma were included in the study. We found 8 serum miRNAs differentially expressed compared to normal controls: 2 upregulated miRNAs (miRNA-146a, miR-523); 6 downregulated miRNAs (miR-19a, miR-30d, miR-127, miR-451, miR-518f, miR-1274B). When data on upregulated miRNAs were singularly validated only a significant overexpression of miRNA-146a was found. A statistically significant upregulation of miRNA-146a was also found on FFPE UM samples, compared to choroidal melanocytes from unaffected eyes. Conclusions: miRNA-146a is increased in serum of patients with UM and in FFPE tumor samples. Further studies will show if it could be considered a potential marker of UM in the blood. PMID:27895580

  18. A knowledge base for the discovery of function, diagnostic potential and drug effects on cellular and extracellular miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that play an important role in the regulation of various biological processes through their interaction with cellular mRNAs. A significant amount of miRNAs has been found in extracellular human body fluids (e.g. plasma and serum) and some circulating miRNAs in the blood have been successfully revealed as biomarkers for diseases including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Released miRNAs do not necessarily reflect the abundance of miRNAs in the cell of origin. It is claimed that release of miRNAs from cells into blood and ductal fluids is selective and that the selection of released miRNAs may correlate with malignancy. Moreover, miRNAs play a significant role in pharmacogenomics by down-regulating genes that are important for drug function. In particular, the use of drugs should be taken into consideration while analyzing plasma miRNA levels as drug treatment. This may impair their employment as biomarkers. Description We enriched our manually curated extracellular/circulating microRNAs database, miRandola, by providing (i) a systematic comparison of expression profiles of cellular and extracellular miRNAs, (ii) a miRNA targets enrichment analysis procedure, (iii) information on drugs and their effect on miRNA expression, obtained by applying a natural language processing algorithm to abstracts obtained from PubMed. Conclusions This allows users to improve the knowledge about the function, diagnostic potential, and the drug effects on cellular and circulating miRNAs. PMID:25077952

  19. miRNAsong: a web-based tool for generation and testing of miRNA sponge constructs in silico

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Tomas; Peskova, Lucie; Hampl, Ales

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) sponges are RNA transcripts containing multiple high-affinity binding sites that associate with and sequester specific miRNAs to prevent them from interacting with their target messenger (m)RNAs. Due to the high specificity of miRNA sponges and strong inhibition of target miRNAs, these molecules have become increasingly applied in miRNA loss-of-function studies. However, improperly designed sponge constructs may sequester off-target miRNAs; thus, it has become increasingly important to develop a tool for miRNA sponge construct design and testing. In this study, we introduce microRNA sponge generator and tester (miRNAsong), a freely available web-based tool for generation and in silico testing of miRNA sponges. This tool generates miRNA sponge constructs for specific miRNAs and miRNA families/clusters and tests them for potential binding to miRNAs in selected organisms. Currently, miRNAsong allows for testing of sponge constructs in 219 species covering 35,828 miRNA sequences. Furthermore, we also provide an example, supplemented with experimental data, of how to use this tool. Using miRNAsong, we designed and tested a sponge for miR-145 inhibition, and cloned the sequence into an inducible lentiviral vector. We found that established cell lines expressing miR-145 sponge strongly inhibited miR-145, thus demonstrating the usability of miRNAsong tool for sponge generation. URL: http://www.med.muni.cz/histology/miRNAsong/. PMID:27857164

  20. miRNAsong: a web-based tool for generation and testing of miRNA sponge constructs in silico.

    PubMed

    Barta, Tomas; Peskova, Lucie; Hampl, Ales

    2016-11-18

    MicroRNA (miRNA) sponges are RNA transcripts containing multiple high-affinity binding sites that associate with and sequester specific miRNAs to prevent them from interacting with their target messenger (m)RNAs. Due to the high specificity of miRNA sponges and strong inhibition of target miRNAs, these molecules have become increasingly applied in miRNA loss-of-function studies. However, improperly designed sponge constructs may sequester off-target miRNAs; thus, it has become increasingly important to develop a tool for miRNA sponge construct design and testing. In this study, we introduce microRNA sponge generator and tester (miRNAsong), a freely available web-based tool for generation and in silico testing of miRNA sponges. This tool generates miRNA sponge constructs for specific miRNAs and miRNA families/clusters and tests them for potential binding to miRNAs in selected organisms. Currently, miRNAsong allows for testing of sponge constructs in 219 species covering 35,828 miRNA sequences. Furthermore, we also provide an example, supplemented with experimental data, of how to use this tool. Using miRNAsong, we designed and tested a sponge for miR-145 inhibition, and cloned the sequence into an inducible lentiviral vector. We found that established cell lines expressing miR-145 sponge strongly inhibited miR-145, thus demonstrating the usability of miRNAsong tool for sponge generation. URL: http://www.med.muni.cz/histology/miRNAsong/.

  1. Value of distinguishing differentiated thyroid carcinoma by miRNA

    PubMed Central

    XU, JIANLIN; ZHANG, DING; NIU, QIAN; NAN, YONGGANG; SHI, CHANGBEI; ZHAO, HUA; LIANG, XIAOYAN

    2016-01-01

    Current methods for diagnosing thyroid carcinoma are time consuming or expensive. Thus, alternative approaches are required. In the present study, microRNAs (miRNAs) with higher sensitivity and specificity were screened while distinguishing between differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) and subtype papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A total of 120 cases suspected of having thyroid carcinoma were selected and examined using clinical color Doppler ultrasound, and computed tomography scan at the same time. The tissue specimens were obtained with fine needle aspiration, multiphase biopsy and surgical resection. The expression of miR146b, miR221 and miR222 was detected uisng the RT-quantitative polymerase chain reaction method. The receiver operating characteristic curve was used to obtain the cut-off value. Pathological examination identified 8 cases of normal thyroid tissue; 9 cases of hyperplastic nodules; 12 cases of thyroid adenoma; and 91 cases of thyroid carcinoma, of which 59 cases were DTC, 15 cases were follicular carcinoma and 17 cases were undifferentiated carcinoma. In the thyroid carcinoma, the expression levels of miR146b, miR221 and miR222 were significantly higher than those of other tissues (P<0.05). The expression levels of these miRNAs in the differentiated type were also significantly higher than those in the undifferentiated type (P<0.05). A comparison of the differentiated subunit identified no statistically significant difference (P>0.05). Following diagnosis of DTC, the area under curve (AUC) of miR146b, miR221 and miR222 was 0.832, 0.806 and 0.745, respectively; the cut-off values were 1.346, 1.213 and 1.425, respectively; susceptibility was 72.8, 71.5 and 68.7%, respectively; and specificity was 62.3, 60.9 and 59.3%, respectively. The AUC of the combined miR-146b and −221 following diagnosis of PTC was 0.695; the cut-off values were 1.506 and 1.462, respectively; susceptibility was 78.9%; and specificity was 68.5%. The AUC of the combined mi

  2. Urinary chromium is associated with changes in leukocyte miRNA expression in obese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dioni, L; Sucato, S; Motta, V; Iodice, S; Angelici, L; Favero, C; Cavalleri, T; Vigna, L; Albetti, B; Fustinoni, S; Bertazzi, P; Pesatori, A; Bollati, V

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Epidemiological studies suggest a link between chromium (Cr) status and cardiovascular disease. Increased urinary excretion of Cr was reported in subjects with diabetes compared with non-diabetic controls and those with non-diabetic insulin resistance. Epigenetic alterations have been linked to the presence of Cr, and microRNA (miRNA) expression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). We investigated the association between Cr excretion and miRNA expression in leukocytes from obese subjects. We also examined the relationship between altered miRNA expression and selected clinical parameters to further investigate mechanisms linking Cr to metabolic diseases and CVDs. Subjects/Methods: We analyzed urinary Cr in 90 Italian subjects using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Peripheral blood miRNA levels were screened with TaqMan Low-Density Array Human MicroRNA A. Cr level-associated expression of miRNAs was detected with multivariate regression analyses, and the top 10 candidate miRNAs were selected for validation. We also used multivariate regression analyses to assess possible associations between validated miRNAs and glycated hemoglobin (A1c) and blood pressure (BP). The validated miRNAs were further investigated by functional analysis with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Results: Urinary Cr levels (mean: 0.35 μg/l; s.d.=0.24) ranged from 0.05 to 1.27 μg/l. In the screening phase, 43 miRNAs were negatively associated with Cr. Of the top 10 miRNAs selected for validation, nine (miR-451, miR-301, miR-15b, miR-21, miR-26a, miR-362-3p, miR-182, miR-183 and miR-486-3p) were downregulated in association with Cr (P-false discovery rate (FDR)<0.10). miR-451 expression was associated with A1c (β=–0.06; P=0.0416), whereas miR-486-3p expression was associated both with diastolic (β=2.1; P=0.004) and systolic BP (β=3.3; P=0.003). Conclusions: These results indicate that mi

  3. Sensitive and specific miRNA detection method using SplintR Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jingmin; Vaud, Sophie; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M.; Posfai, Janos; McReynolds, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a simple, specific and sensitive microRNA (miRNA) detection method that utilizes Chlorella virus DNA ligase (SplintR® Ligase). This two-step method involves ligation of adjacent DNA oligonucleotides hybridized to a miRNA followed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). SplintR Ligase is 100X faster than either T4 DNA Ligase or T4 RNA Ligase 2 for RNA splinted DNA ligation. Only a 4–6 bp overlap between a DNA probe and miRNA was required for efficient ligation by SplintR Ligase. This property allows more flexibility in designing miRNA-specific ligation probes than methods that use reverse transcriptase for cDNA synthesis of miRNA. The qPCR SplintR ligation assay is sensitive; it can detect a few thousand molecules of miR-122. For miR-122 detection the SplintR qPCR assay, using a FAM labeled double quenched DNA probe, was at least 40× more sensitive than the TaqMan assay. The SplintR method, when coupled with NextGen sequencing, allowed multiplex detection of miRNAs from brain, kidney, testis and liver. The SplintR qPCR assay is specific; individual let-7 miRNAs that differ by one nucleotide are detected. The rapid kinetics and ability to ligate DNA probes hybridized to RNA with short complementary sequences makes SplintR Ligase a useful enzyme for miRNA detection. PMID:27154271

  4. miRNA as molecular target of polyphenols underlying their biological effects.

    PubMed

    Milenkovic, Dragan; Jude, Baptiste; Morand, Christine

    2013-09-01

    Polyphenols are the most abundant antioxidants in the human diet and are widespread constituents of fruits and beverages, such as tea, coffee, and wine. Epidemiological, clinical, and animal studies support a role of polyphenols in the prevention of various chronic diseases. For a long time, their direct antioxidant effect has been reported as the mechanism responsible for the observed health properties. However, recent findings revealed that polyphenols could interact with cellular signaling cascades regulating the activity of transcription factors and consequently affecting the expression of genes. Together with this classical regulatory pathway, polyphenols have been shown to affect the expression of microRNAs (miRNA). miRNAs are small, noncoding RNAs implicated in the regulation of gene expression that control both physiological and pathological processes such as development and cancer. Furthermore, expression of miRNAs can be affected by different external stimuli including nutrients such as vitamins, lipids, and phytochemicals. In this paper, we review studies assessing modulation of miRNAs expression by dietary polyphenols that could constitute a new pathway by which these compounds may exert their health effects. Over 100 miRNAs, involved in the control of different cellular processes such as inflammation or apoptosis, were identified as modulated by polyphenols. Most of the studies were performed in vitro using different cell lines, particularly cancer cell lines, and few studies were performed in animals. From all these data, miRNAs appear as interesting mediators in regulating polyphenols' biological effects; however, further studies are needed to validate miRNA targets and particularly in physiologically relevant conditions taking into account the bioavailability of dietary polyphenols.

  5. miRNA profiling of circulating EpCAM+ extracellular vesicles: promising biomarkers of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Jensen, Steffen Grann; Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Christensen, Lise-Lotte; Thorsen, Stine Buch; Stenvang, Jan; Hvam, Michael Lykke; Thomsen, Anni; Mouritzen, Peter; Rasmussen, Mads Heilskov; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells secrete small membranous extracellular vesicles (EVs) into their microenvironment and circulation. These contain biomolecules, including proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs). Both circulating EVs and miRNAs have received much attention as biomarker candidates for non-invasive diagnostics. Here we describe a sensitive analytical method for isolation and subsequent miRNA profiling of epithelial-derived EVs from blood samples of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The epithelial-derived EVs were isolated by immunoaffinity-capture using the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) as marker. This approach mitigates some of the specificity issues observed in earlier studies of circulating miRNAs, in particular the negative influence of miRNAs released by erythrocytes, platelets and non-epithelial cells. By applying this method to 2 small-scale patient cohorts, we showed that blood plasma isolated from CRC patients prior to surgery contained elevated levels of 13 EpCAM+-EV miRNAs compared with healthy individuals. Upon surgical tumour removal, the plasma levels of 8 of these were reduced (miR-16-5p, miR-23a-3p, miR-23b-3p, miR-27a-3p, miR-27b-3p, miR-30b-5p, miR-30c-5p and miR-222-3p). These findings indicate that the miRNAs are of tumour origin and may have potential as non-invasive biomarkers for detection of CRC. This work describes a non-invasive blood-based method for sensitive detection of cancer with potential for clinical use in relation to diagnosis and screening. We used the method to study CRC; however, it is not restricted to this disease. It may in principle be used to study any cancer that release epithelial-derived EVs into circulation. PMID:27576678

  6. Oxidative Stress Alters miRNA and Gene Expression Profiles in Villous First Trimester Trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Courtney E.; Tolba, Mai F.; Rondelli, Catherine M.; Xu, Meixiang; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between oxidative stress and miRNA changes in placenta as a potential mechanism involved in preeclampsia (PE) is not fully elucidated. We investigated the impact of oxidative stress on miRNAs and mRNA expression profiles of genes associated with PE in villous 3A first trimester trophoblast cells exposed to H2O2 at 12 different concentrations (0-1 mM) for 0.5, 4, 24, and 48 h. Cytotoxicity, determined using the SRB assay, was used to calculate the IC50 of H2O2. RNA was extracted after 4 h exposure to H2O2 for miRNA and gene expression profiling. H2O2 exerted a concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity on 3A trophoblast cells. Short-term exposure of 3A cells to low concentration of H2O2 (5% of IC50) significantly altered miRNA profile as evidenced by significant changes in 195 out of 595 evaluable miRNAs. Tool for annotations of microRNAs (TAM) analysis indicated that these altered miRNAs fall into 43 clusters and 34 families, with 41 functions identified. Exposure to H2O2 altered mRNA expression of 22 out of 84 key genes involved in dysregulation of placental development. In conclusion, short-term exposure of villous first trimester trophoblasts to low concentrations of H2O2 significantly alters miRNA profile and expression of genes implicated in placental development. PMID:26339600

  7. Functional Analysis of miRNAs Using the DIANA Tools Online Suite.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Ioannis S; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are central regulators of gene expression. They are actively studied for their involvement in numerous physiological and pathological conditions but also as diagnostic biomarkers or promising therapeutic targets. The increased complexity of the miRNA interactomes hinders straightforward interpretation of miRNA expression differences between states and conditions. To this end, functional analysis web servers process and combine experimental and in silico data, enabling researchers to uncover targeted pathways and transcriptional mechanisms that are hidden within numerous interactions and vast expression datasets. DIANA-tools ( www.microrna.gr ) is a web server hosting state-of-the-art utilities and databases for miRNA functional investigation. Available utilities cover a wide scope of different needs and research scenarios, rendering DIANA website a one-stop-shop for miRNA analyses. The most commonly utilized databases and algorithms include DIANA-microT-CDS, DIANA-TarBase v7.0, DIANA-lncBase v2.0, DIANA-miRGen v3.0, DIANA-miRPath v3.0, and DIANA-mirExTra v2.0.In the presented protocol, we will utilize different online tools in order to explore miRNA functions and to identify probable targets of interest for downstream analyses and wet lab experiments. The combined use of different applications from the DIANA suite can shed light to numerous different aspects of miRNA regulation and regulatory function, without the necessity for extensive bioinformatics expertise or computational infrastructure.

  8. Excess fertilizer responsive miRNAs revealed in Linum usitatissimum L.

    PubMed

    Melnikova, Nataliya V; Dmitriev, Alexey A; Belenikin, Maxim S; Speranskaya, Anna S; Krinitsina, Anastasia A; Rachinskaia, Olga A; Lakunina, Valentina A; Krasnov, George S; Snezhkina, Anastasiya V; Sadritdinova, Asiya F; Uroshlev, Leonid A; Koroban, Nadezda V; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Amosova, Alexandra V; Zelenin, Alexander V; Muravenko, Olga V; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Kudryavtseva, Anna V

    2015-02-01

    Effective fertilizer application is necessary to increase crop yields and reduce risk of plant overdosing. It is known that expression level of microRNAs (miRNAs) alters in plants under different nutrient concentrations in soil. The aim of our study was to identify and characterize miRNAs with expression alterations under excessive fertilizer in agriculturally important crop - flax (Linum usitatissimum L.). We have sequenced small RNAs in flax grown under normal and excessive fertilizer using Illumina GAIIx. Over 14 million raw reads was obtained for two small RNA libraries. 84 conserved miRNAs from 20 families were identified. Differential expression was revealed for several flax miRNAs under excessive fertilizer according to high-throughput sequencing data. For 6 miRNA families (miR395, miR169, miR408, miR399, miR398 and miR168) expression level alterations were evaluated on the extended sampling using qPCR. Statistically significant up-regulation was revealed for miR395 under excessive fertilizer. It is known that target genes of miR395 are involved in sulfate uptake and assimilation. However, according to our data alterations of the expression level of miR395 could be associated not only with excess sulfur application, but also with redundancy of other macro- and micronutrients. Furthermore expression level was evaluated for miRNAs and their predicted targets. The negative correlation between miR399 expression and expression of its predicted target ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 gene was shown in flax for the first time. So we suggested miR399 involvement in phosphate regulation in L. usitatissimum. Revealed in our study expression alterations contribute to miRNA role in flax response to excessive fertilizer.

  9. Integrative miRNA and Gene Expression Profiling Analysis of Human Quiescent Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Coll, Mar; El Taghdouini, Adil; Perea, Luis; Mannaerts, Inge; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Blaya, Delia; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Affò, Silvia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Graupera, Isabel; Lozano, Juan José; Najimi, Mustapha; Sokal, Etienne; Lambrecht, Joeri; Ginès, Pere; van Grunsven, Leo A; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-06-22

    Unveiling the regulatory pathways maintaining hepatic stellate cells (HSC) in a quiescent (q) phenotype is essential to develop new therapeutic strategies to treat fibrogenic diseases. To uncover the miRNA-mRNA regulatory interactions in qHSCs, HSCs were FACS-sorted from healthy livers and activated HSCs (aHSCs) were generated in vitro. MiRNA Taqman array analysis showed HSCs expressed a low number of miRNAs (n = 259), from which 47 were down-regulated and 212 up-regulated upon activation. Computational integration of miRNA and gene expression profiles revealed that 66% of qHSC-associated miRNAs correlated with more than 6 altered target mRNAs (17,28 ± 10,7 targets/miRNA) whereas aHSC-associated miRNAs had an average of 1,49 targeted genes. Interestingly, interaction networks generated by miRNA-targeted genes in qHSCs were associated with key HSC activation processes. Next, selected miRNAs were validated in healthy and cirrhotic human livers and miR-192 was chosen for functional analysis. Down-regulation of miR-192 in HSCs was found to be an early event during fibrosis progression in mouse models of liver injury. Moreover, mimic assays for miR-192 in HSCs revealed its role in HSC activation, proliferation and migration. Together, these results uncover the importance of miRNAs in the maintenance of the qHSC phenotype and form the basis for understanding the regulatory networks in HSCs.

  10. Integrative miRNA and Gene Expression Profiling Analysis of Human Quiescent Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coll, Mar; Taghdouini, Adil El; Perea, Luis; Mannaerts, Inge; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Blaya, Delia; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Affò, Silvia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Graupera, Isabel; Lozano, Juan José; Najimi, Mustapha; Sokal, Etienne; Lambrecht, Joeri; Ginès, Pere; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Unveiling the regulatory pathways maintaining hepatic stellate cells (HSC) in a quiescent (q) phenotype is essential to develop new therapeutic strategies to treat fibrogenic diseases. To uncover the miRNA-mRNA regulatory interactions in qHSCs, HSCs were FACS-sorted from healthy livers and activated HSCs (aHSCs) were generated in vitro. MiRNA Taqman array analysis showed HSCs expressed a low number of miRNAs (n = 259), from which 47 were down-regulated and 212 up-regulated upon activation. Computational integration of miRNA and gene expression profiles revealed that 66% of qHSC-associated miRNAs correlated with more than 6 altered target mRNAs (17,28 ± 10,7 targets/miRNA) whereas aHSC-associated miRNAs had an average of 1,49 targeted genes. Interestingly, interaction networks generated by miRNA-targeted genes in qHSCs were associated with key HSC activation processes. Next, selected miRNAs were validated in healthy and cirrhotic human livers and miR-192 was chosen for functional analysis. Down-regulation of miR-192 in HSCs was found to be an early event during fibrosis progression in mouse models of liver injury. Moreover, mimic assays for miR-192 in HSCs revealed its role in HSC activation, proliferation and migration. Together, these results uncover the importance of miRNAs in the maintenance of the qHSC phenotype and form the basis for understanding the regulatory networks in HSCs. PMID:26096707

  11. Effect of miRNA-27a and Leptin Polymorphisms on Risk of Recurrent Spontaneous Abortion