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Sample records for fetal por parvovirus

  1. Parvovirus infection: an immunohistochemical study using fetal and placental tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing Jing; Henwood, Tony; Van Hal, Sebastian; Charlton, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection causes 5% to 15% of cases of nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the use of immunohistochemistry in diagnosing parvovirus infection in fetal and placental tissue during routine fetal and perinatal autopsies. Histology slides of 20 cases of confirmed parvovirus infection were reviewed, and immunohistochemistry was applied to selected blocks of fetal and placental tissue. Immunohistochemistry was positive in all 20 cases, and histologic viral inclusions were seen in 19 cases. Immunohistochemical staining was closely correlated with histology and was more sensitive than histology in detecting virally infected cells, especially in autolyzed tissue. All cases also had confirmatory evidence of parvovirus infection by polymerase chain reaction of fetal liver and positive maternal serology, where it was available. We conclude that parvovirus immunohistochemistry is a reliable method for diagnosing parvovirus infection, especially in autolyzed tissue where histologic assessment may be suboptimal.

  2. A Case of Fetal Parvovirus B19 Myocarditis That Caused Terminal Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 is a well-established cause of fetal anemia and nonimmune fetal hydrops in pregnancy. Fetal parvovirus infection can cause severe destruction of erythroid progenitor cells, resulting in fetal anemia, hydrops, and intrauterine death. However, viral myocarditis with subsequent heart failure is another possible mechanism for hydrops formation as viral infection of fetal myocardial cells has been reported in postmortem examinations. We herein report a case of fetal cardiomegaly and massive pericardial effusion secondary to myocarditis as a result of parvovirus B19 infection. The case developed hydrops as consequence of severe anemia and experienced terminal heart failure, which led to the fetus dying an intrauterine death at 22 weeks of gestation. This case demonstrates that there may be an association between myocarditis caused by intrauterine parvovirus B19 infection and a poor outcome. The presence of viral myocarditis may be the determining prognostic factor in that situation. PMID:25328731

  3. Relation between parvovirus B19 infection and fetal mortality and spontaneous abortion

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Zahra; Esghaei, Maryam; Keyvani, Hossein; Shabani, Fateme; Sarmadi, Fateme; Mollaie, Hamidreza; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infection with parvovirus B19 may cause fetal losses including spontaneous abortion, intrauterine fetal death and non-immune hydrops fetalis. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of parvovirus B19 in formalin fixed placental tissues in lost fetuses using real-time PCR method. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 100 formalin fixed placental tissues with unknown cause of fetal death were determined using real-time PCR method after DNA extraction. Results: Six out of 100 cases (6%) were positive for parvovirus B19 using real-time PCR. Gestational age of all positive cases was less than 20 weeks with a mean of 12.3 weeks. Three cases have a history of abortion and all of positive cases were collected in spring. Mean age of positive cases were 28 years. Conclusion: Parvovirus B19 during pregnancy can infect red precursor cells and induces apoptosis or lyses these cells that resulting in anemia and congestive heart failure leading to fetal death. Management of parvovirus B19 infection in pregnant women is important because immediate diagnosis and transfusion in hydropsic fetuses can decrease the risk of fetal death. PMID:26157715

  4. Unusual high rate of asymptomatic maternal parvovirus B19 infection associated with severe fetal outcome.

    PubMed

    Brkic, Snezana; Bogavac, Mirjana A; Simin, Natasa; Hrnjakovic-Cvetkovic, Ivana; Milosevic, Vesna; Maric, Danijela

    2011-04-01

    To study the role of asymptomatic maternal parvo B19 infection in severe fetal outcome in Province of Vojvodina. One hundred seventy-six pregnant women (13-25 weeks of gestation) were divided in two groups - patients with symptoms of imminent spontaneous abortion and poor pregnancy outcome and patients with normal course of pregnancy. Double serum samples were analyzed to quantify IgM and IgG to parvovirus B19. Among pregnant women with symptoms of spontaneous abortion, we found significantly higher percentage of acute parvovirus B19 infection. Asymptomatic parvo B19 infection is associated with poor fetal outcome much more than we presumed previously.

  5. Detection of parvovirus B19 in macerated fetal tissue using in situ hybridisation.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, C; Powe, D G; Padfield, C J; Fagan, D G

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To compare the application of a non-radioactive in situ hybridisation (ISH) technique with an immunocytochemical technique for the detection of human parvovirus B19 in formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded sections of macerated fetal tissue. METHODS: Archived samples of liver, lung or kidney from 19 human fetuses were investigated for parvovirus B19 using a full length digoxigenin labelled DNA probe of 5.5 kb; bound probe was detected using an anti-digoxigenin (alkaline phosphatase) conjugate and visualised using NBT/BCIP. Immunocytochemical detection of parvovirus B19 was performed using a monoclonal mouse antiparvovirus B19 antiserum, with a streptavidin-biotin complex (horse radish peroxidase) method. Cases were selected to provide a range of diagnostic certainty and a range of degrees of macerative degeneration. RESULTS: Parvovirus B19 was found in 15 of 19 cases using the B19 ISH technique compared with 8 of 19 cases using the immunocytochemical technique. The four negative cases were all controls known to be parvovirus B19 free. All ISH positive cases showed excellent staining with low background regardless of extent of maceration and tissue type. In comparison, sections stained by the immunocytochemical method showed considerable non-specific immunoreactivity in many cases, particularly with severe maceration. Kidney and lung tissues gave the cleanest results. CONCLUSIONS: ISH is more effective than the immunocytochemical technique for the detection of human parvovirus B19 in macerated fetal tissue. The lack of detectable background staining with the ISH technique led to easier interpretation suggesting that this technique should be the method of choice for the investigation of parvovirus B19 in macerated postmortem tissues. Images PMID:9389975

  6. Parvovirus B19 Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Viral detection involves finding parvovirus B19 genetic material ( DNA ) in a blood sample or, less commonly, in ... fetal cord blood, or amniotic fluid . Parvovirus B19 DNA testing is performed primarily to detect active parvovirus ...

  7. [DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF COMBINED USE OF COMBINED METHOD OF ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY AND POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION TO DETECT OF INTRAUTERINE FETAL INFECTION BY PARVOVIRUS B19].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, N P; Lakatosh, V P; Lakatosh, P V; Malanchuk, O B; Poladich, I V

    2015-01-01

    The combined method of diagnosis parvovirus infection during pregnancy by maternal serum enzyme immunoassay and deoxyribonucleic acid isolation parvovirus B19 polymerase chain reaction in amnniotic fluid and fetal cord blood newborns, can diagnose vertical transmission and anticipate a negative effect on the fetus parvovirus. Lack of maternal IgM antibodies in serum due to parvovirus seroconversion during pregnancy does not exclude the persistence of the virus in the fetus. To analyze the diagnostic value of the method for determining the LHP parvovirus B19 DNA in the amniotic fluid, umbilical cord blood of newborns to determine vertical transmission of parvovirus infection when infected mothers B19 during pregnancy.

  8. Risk of fetal hydrops and non-hydropic late intrauterine fetal death after gestational parvovirus B19 infection.

    PubMed

    Enders, Martin; Klingel, Karin; Weidner, Andrea; Baisch, Carola; Kandolf, Reinhard; Schalasta, Gunnar; Enders, Gisela

    2010-11-01

    Risk assessment of parvovirus B19 (B19)-associated fetal complications following gestational B19 infection remains controversial. To determine the risk of fetal hydrops or non-hydropic late intrauterine fetal death following acute maternal B19 infection at defined gestational weeks. Observational cohort study of pregnant women with serologic evidence of acute B19 infection. If available, fetal or neonatal tissue samples from cases complicated by fetal loss or hydrops were investigated for the presence of B19 DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or in situ hybridization (ISH). Of 236 women with known pregnancy outcome, 228 had a live birth and 8 a fetal loss. The observed rate of fetal hydrops for all pregnant women was 4.2% (10/236) (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1-7.7) and 10.6% (10/94) (95% CI, 5.2-18.7) for those infected between 9 and 20 weeks gestation. Tissue samples from 8 hydrops cases were investigated by PCR or ISH and all were B19 DNA positive. Fetal death occurring during or after gestational week 22 was only observed in one case which was associated with B19-derived fetal hydrops. Our findings demonstrate that although adverse fetal outcome is a rare complication of gestational B19 infection, a relevant risk of fetal hydrops exists particularly for women infected between 9 and 20 weeks' gestation. Cases of B19-derived non-hydropic late intrauterine fetal death were not observed in the present study. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental in utero infection of fetal pigs with a porcine parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, P A; Sheffy, B E; Vauhan, J T

    1975-01-01

    In utero infection of fetuses of six specific-pathogen-free large white sows at 35, 48, 55, 72, 99, and 105 days was studied. The fetuses were infected by direct inoculation of porcine parvovirus into the amniotic sac. The inoculation consisted of 0.25 ml of tissue culture fluid containing 10(5.5) mean tissue culture infective doses per ml of porcine parvovirus strain G10/1. Fetuses of one uterus horn were infected, whereas fetuses in the opposite horn were given 0.25 ml of noninfected cell culture material. No clinical signs of infection were observed; however, all sows developed antibodies 7 to 9 days postinfection. A total of 24 virus-inoculated fetuses and 20 control fetuses were studied. Fetuses infected at 35, 48, and 55 days of gestation died between about 5 and 22 days after infection. Virus was isolated from their organs and fetal blood. Virus spread to control fetuses but did not cause death and mummification or stimulate antibody production. Fetuses from sows infected at 72, 99, and 105 days of gestation survived. They developed high antibody titer in utero. Control piglets remained antibody free. PMID:1165118

  10. Human Parvoviruses.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jianming; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Young, Neal S

    2017-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) and human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), members of the large Parvoviridae family, are human pathogens responsible for a variety of diseases. For B19V in particular, host features determine disease manifestations. These viruses are prevalent worldwide and are culturable in vitro, and serological and molecular assays are available but require careful interpretation of results. Additional human parvoviruses, including HBoV2 to -4, human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), and human bufavirus (BuV) are also reviewed. The full spectrum of parvovirus disease in humans has yet to be established. Candidate recombinant B19V vaccines have been developed but may not be commercially feasible. We review relevant features of the molecular and cellular biology of these viruses, and the human immune response that they elicit, which have allowed a deep understanding of pathophysiology. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. KBSH parvovirus: comparison with porcine parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, T W; Joo, H S; Collett, M S

    1985-01-01

    We compared the molecular, antigenic, and pathogenic properties of KBSH parvovirus to those of porcine parvovirus (PPV) isolate NADL-8. KBSH, propagated in swine testes cells in culture, possessed two major capsid polypeptides of 83 and 64 kilodaltons that were similar in size to those of PPV. KBSH-infected cells also contained an 86-kilodalton nonstructural polypeptide that was identical in size to the PPV nonstructural polypeptide (NS-1). The KBSH polypeptides were structurally similar but not identical to the corresponding PPV polypeptides, as revealed by partial proteolysis mapping. Viral replicative-form DNA from KBSH-infected cells was similar in size to PPV replicative-form DNA and exhibited similar but not identical restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns to that of PPV replicative-form DNA. Antigenically, the two viruses were also very closely related. By using heterologous and homologous antisera, the two viruses were indistinguishable in hemagglutination inhibition and immunoprecipitation assays. However, pathogenically these viruses were dramatically different. NADL-8 caused fetal death when injected into swine fetuses in utero and viremia and high persisting antibody titers when administered orally to weaning-age swine. KBSH-inoculated fetuses were normal in appearance, and pigs orally exposed to KBSH failed to establish viremia and demonstrated only transient antibody titers. Thus, KBSH appears to be a PPV that is very closely related to a highly pathogenic PPV isolate, yet is itself nonpathogenic in swine. This reduced pathogenic potential of KBSH may be attributable to its poor ability to replicate in swine. Images PMID:2991553

  12. The lack of routine surveillance of Parvovirus B19 infection in pregnancy prevents an accurate understanding of this regular cause of fetal loss and the risks posed by occupational exposure.

    PubMed

    Watt, Alison P; Brown, Martin; Pathiraja, Melanie; Anbazhagan, Akila; Coyle, Peter V

    2013-01-01

    In Europe, fetal loss due to Parvovirus B19 (B19V) is under-reported and a poorly addressed occupational risk to pregnant women. This is exemplified internationally, where it was unmentioned in the last two European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) annual surveillance reports or its 2009 special report on infections in pregnancy. To assess this potential for underestimating B19V fetal loss in pregnancy, we undertook a systematic review of practice in Northern Ireland in the management and reporting of B19V infections over a 12-month period of heightened transmission, one of six observed in a span of 9 years. Pregnant and non-pregnant women presented with symptomatic infection in 24 and 93 % of confirmed B19V infections, respectively, with no difference in viral loads. There was underinvestigation of viral causes of fetal loss, with only 143/2739 (5 %) tested for B19V, and a failure to follow up most non-immune women tested following rash contact. Occupational exposure was recorded in 31/60 (51.6 %) of pregnancies audited following rash exposure, the majority teachers or day care workers. Against a background seroprevalence of 66.5 % immunity in women of child-bearing years, two patterns of infection were identified. Firstly, pregnant women investigated for a rash or exposure to slapped cheek syndrome, where an infection incidence of 18 % was observed, resulted in 42 confirmed infections, all proceeding to healthy term deliveries. Secondly, pregnant women with unsuspected infection had six cases of confirmed B19V fetal loss, including four of 22 (18 %) diagnosed at autopsy, of which three were non-hydropic. While many studies have reported B19V fetal loss in pregnancy, there are no robust public health surveillance figures to draw on. That all six confirmed fetal losses came from the small number of miscarriages/stillbirths investigated, 143 out of 2739, suggests inadequate follow-up of those pregnancies where B19V-related fetal loss may be most

  13. Parvovirus B19 Infection in Human Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Ronald F.; Sobel, Jack; Vaisbuch, Edi; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Kim, Sun Kwon; Uldbjerg, Niels; Romero, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 infection is widespread. Approximately 30-50% of pregnant women are non-immune and vertical transmission is common following maternal infection in pregnancy. Fetal infection may be associated with a normal outcome but fetal death may also occur without ultrasound evidence of infections sequelae. B19 infection should be considered in any case of non-immune hydrops. Diagnosis is mainly through serology and PCR. Surveillance requires sequential ultrasound and Doppler screening for signs of fetal anemia, heart failure, and hydrops. Immunoglobulins antiviral and vaccination are not yet available but intrauterine transfusion in selected cases can be lifesaving. PMID:21040396

  14. Fifth Disease (Parvovirus B19) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... mothertobaby. org/ fact- sheets/ paternal- exposures- pregnancy/ . My dog has a parvovirus infection. Can I catch it ... parvoviruses. Each type is species-specific, meaning that dog (canine) parvoviruses infect only dogs, cat (feline) parvoviruses ...

  15. Fifth Disease (Parvovirus B19)

    MedlinePlus

    ... anemia (low red blood cell count) such as sickle cell anemia. Outbreaks of parvovirus B19 infections occur from ... exercising, bathing , or sunbathing . Parvovirus infections can make sickle cell anemia and other hemolytic anemias, much worse. This ...

  16. Parvovirus infection in early arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mauermann, Maria; Hochauf-Stange, Kristina; Kleymann, Alexander; Conrad, Karsten; Aringer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the subgroup of early arthritis patients with new onset parvovirus infections for details that may help narrow the population tested. From their routine patient charts, patient histories and clinical and serological data were obtained for all 130 patients of the Rheumatology division with parvovirus serology performed. 11 patients had acute parvovirus infections, defined by specific IgM antibodies. 95 patients had a previous infection, 16 were never infected, together forming the n=111 control group, and 8 patients had to be excluded. Most patients with acute parvovirus infection had an acute onset, highly symmetrical polyarthritis of small joints, which was preceded by prodromal symptoms. Positive ANA were frequently found, whereas C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were only mildly elevated. No frank synovitis was found longer than two weeks after disease onset. Most patients were free of symptoms within three months, and no patient in the parvovirus group developed rheumatoid arthritis or a connective tissue disease. Parvovirus serology may be helpful in patients with acute polyarthritis of very recent onset, and if they give a history of prodromal symptoms, in particular. In most instances, parvovirus arthritis is an acute disease, which is rapidly self-limiting.

  17. Parvovirus Glycan Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Halder, Sujata; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Parvoviridae utilize glycan receptors for cellular attachment and subsequent interactions determine transduction efficiency or pathogenic outcome. This review focuses on the identity of the glycan receptors utilized, their capsid binding footprints, and a discussion of the overlap of these sites with tropism, transduction, and pathogenicity determinants. Despite high sequence diversity between the different genera, most parvoviruses bind to negatively charged glycans, such as sialic acid and heparan sulfate, abundant on cell surface membranes. The capsid structure of these viruses exhibit high structural homology enabling common regions to be utilized for glycan binding and at the same time the sequence diversity at the common footprints allows for binding of different glycans or differential binding of the same glycan. PMID:25047752

  18. Parvovirus glycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Halder, Sujata; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2014-08-01

    Members of the Parvoviridae utilize glycan receptors for cellular attachment and subsequent interactions determine transduction efficiency or pathogenic outcome. This review focuses on the identity of the glycan receptors utilized, their capsid binding footprints, and a discussion of the overlap of these sites with tropism, transduction, and pathogenicity determinants. Despite high sequence diversity between the different genera, most parvoviruses bind to negatively charged glycans, such as sialic acid and heparan sulfate, abundant on cell surface membranes. The capsid structure of these viruses exhibit high structural homology enabling common regions to be utilized for glycan binding. At the same time the sequence diversity at the common footprints allows for binding of different glycans or differential binding of the same glycan.

  19. Enteric parvovirus infections of chickens and turkeys

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chicken and turkey parvoviruses are members of the Parvovirus family. Comparative sequence analysis of their genome structure revealed that they should form a new genus within the vertebrate Parvovirinae subfamily. The first chicken and turkey parvoviruses were identified by electron microscopy duri...

  20. Canine parvovirus: current perspective.

    PubMed

    Nandi, S; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-06-01

    Canine parvovirus 2 (CPV-2) has been considered to be an important pathogen of domestic and wild canids and has spread worldwide since its emergence in 1978. It has been reported from Asia, Australia, New Zealand, the Americas and Europe. Two distinct parvoviruses are now known to infect dogs-the pathogenic CPV-2 and CPV-1 or the minute virus of canine (MVC). CPV-2, the causative agent of acute hemorrhagic enteritis and myocarditis in dogs, is one of the most important pathogenic viruses with high morbidity (100%) and frequent mortality up to 10% in adult dogs and 91% in pups. The disease condition has been complicated further due to emergence of a number of variants namely CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c over the years and involvement of domestic and wild canines. There are a number of different serological and molecular tests available for prompt, specific and accurate diagnosis of the disease. Further, both live attenuated and inactivated vaccines are available to control the disease in animals. Besides, new generation vaccines namely recombinant vaccine, peptide vaccine and DNA vaccine are in different stages of development and offer hope for better management of the disease in canines. However, new generation vaccines have not been issued license to be used in the field condition. Again, the presence of maternal antibodies often interferes with the active immunization with live attenuated vaccine and there always exists a window of susceptibility in spite of following proper immunization regimen. Lastly, judicious use of the vaccines in pet dogs, stray dogs and wild canids keeping in mind the new variants of the CPV-2 along with the proper sanitation and disinfection practices must be implemented for the successful control the disease.

  1. Autonomous parvovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Ian H; Terrell, Kristina L; Maxwell, Françoise

    2002-10-01

    Parvoviruses are small, icosahedral viruses (approximately 25 nm) containing a single-strand DNA genome (approximately 5 kb) with hairpin termini. Autonomous parvoviruses (APVs) are found in many species; they do not require a helper virus for replication but they do require proliferating cells (S-phase functions) and, in some cases, tissue-specific factors. APVs can protect animals from spontaneous or experimental tumors, leading to consideration of these viruses, and vectors derived from them, as anticancer agents. Vector development has focused on three rodent APVs that can infect human cells, namely, LuIII, MVM, and H1. LuIII-based vectors with complete replacement of the viral coding sequences can direct transient or persistent expression of transgenes in cell culture. MVM-based and H1-based vectors with substitution of transgenes for the viral capsid sequences retain viral nonstructural (NS) coding sequences and express the NS1 protein. The latter serves to amplify the vector genome in target cells, potentially contributing to antitumor activity. APV vectors have packaging capacity for foreign DNA of approximately 4.8 kb, a limit that probably cannot be exceeded by more than a few percent. LuIII vectors can be pseudotyped with capsid proteins from related APVs, a promising strategy for controlling tissue tropism and circumventing immune responses to repeated administration. Initial success has been achieved in targeting such a pseudotyped vector by genetic modification of the capsid. Subject to advances in production and purification methods, APV vectors have potential as gene transfer agents for experimental and therapeutic use, particularly for cancer therapy. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA)

  2. Long term follow up of serostatus after maternofetal parvovirus B19 infection

    PubMed Central

    Dembinski, J; Eis-Hubinger, A; Maar, J; Schild, R; Bartmann, P

    2003-01-01

    Background: Maternofetal parvovirus B19 infection may result in fetal hydrops or abortion. Chronic infection has been associated with long term complications (polyarthritis, persistent aplastic anaemia, hepatitis). In pregnancy maternal immunosuppression caused by a TH2 dominant response to viral antigens has been observed. There is little information on long term reactivity to intrauterine infection. Aims: To assess the serological status in children and their mothers after maternofetal parvovirus B19 infection and development of fetal hydrops. Methods: A total of 18 children and their mothers, and 54 age matched control infants were studied. Main outcome measures were parvovirus B19 DNA, specific IgM and IgG against the virus proteins VP1/VP2, and NS-1 in venous blood. Results: Parvovirus B19 DNA and antiparvovirus B19 (IgM) were undetectable in all sera. A significant larger proportion of maternal sera compared to study children's sera contained IgG against the non-structural protein NS-1. Mean levels of VP1/VP2 IgG antibodies were significantly lower in the children than in their mothers (48 (36) v 197 (95) IU/ml). There was no history of chronic arthritis in mothers and children. Five women had subsequent acute but transient arthritis postpartum, which was not correlated with antibodies against NS-1. Conclusions: Serological evidence of persistent infection after maternofetal parvovirus B19 disease could not be detected. Increased maternal prevalence of anti NS-1 (IgG) and increased levels of antiparvovirus B19 (IgG) may reflect prolonged viraemia compared to fetal disease. PMID:12598382

  3. Parvovirus B19 Associated Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Bihari, Chhagan; Rastogi, Archana; Saxena, Priyanka; Rangegowda, Devraj; Chowdhury, Ashok; Gupta, Nalini; Sarin, Shiv Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection can present with myriads of clinical diseases and syndromes; liver manifestations and hepatitis are examples of them. Parvovirus B19 hepatitis associated aplastic anemia and its coinfection with other hepatotropic viruses are relatively underrecognized, and there is sufficient evidence in the literature suggesting that B19 infections can cause a spectrum of liver diseases from elevation of transaminases to acute hepatitis to fulminant liver failure and even chronic hepatitis. It can also cause fatal macrophage activation syndrome and fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis. Parvovirus B19 is an erythrovirus that can only be replicate in pronormoblasts and hepatocytes, and other cells which have globosides and glycosphingolipids in their membrane can also be affected by direct virus injury due to nonstructural protein 1 persistence and indirectly by immune mediated injury. The virus infection is suspected in bone marrow aspiration in cases with sudden drop of hemoglobin and onset of transient aplastic anemia in immunosuppressed or immunocompetent patients and is confirmed either by IgM and IgG positive serology, PCR analysis, and in situ hybridization in biopsy specimens or by application of both. There is no specific treatment for parvovirus B19 related liver diseases, but triple therapy regimen may be effective consisting of immunoglobulin, dehydrohydrocortisone, and cyclosporine. PMID:24232179

  4. Experimental parvovirus infection in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Potgieter, L N; Jones, J B; Patton, C S; Webb-Martin, T A

    1981-01-01

    Five eight week old dogs were inoculated orally and intranasally with cell culture origin canine parvovirus. Three dogs became depressed and anorectic and developed a mild (one dog) to severe diarrhea five days postinfection. The remaining dogs had subclinical infections but developed a lymphopenia followed by a transient lymphocytosis. The ill dogs developed mild (one dog) to severe neutropenia and a moderate lymphopenia. One died nine days postinfection. Recovery was associated with cessation of viral excretion and with lymphocytosis and antibody production. Two of three dogs challenged intragastrically developed mild clinical signs and a moderate panleukopenia four to eight days postinfection. The pathological changes of the experimental disease were very similar to that of spontaneous disease. Bone marrow changes included a severe granulocytic and mild erythroid depletion. The pathogenesis of canine parvovirus infection is discussed. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:7340906

  5. Suspected parvovirus infection in porcupines.

    PubMed

    Frelier, P F; Leininger, R W; Armstrong, L D; Nation, P N; Povey, R C

    1984-12-01

    During a 142-day period, 6 porcupines died or were killed after becoming moribund. Three had severe acute necrotizing enteritis; two had acute necrotizing myocarditis, one with concurrent lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis; and one had chronic enteritis. Histologically, the acute necrotizing enteritis was characterized by villous fusion, blunting, and crypt dilatation. Many dilated crypts contained necrotic debris and were lined by flattened enterocytes. Acidophilic intranuclear inclusions were in colonic epithelial cells in one of these animals. The myocardial lesions consisted of degenerating shrunken myofibers, with infiltrating neutrophils and lymphocytes. Myofiber mineralization was evident in one animal. Though the histologic findings were indicative of parvovirus infection, electron microscopic, serologic, and virologic studies failed to demonstrate parvovirus as the etiologic agent.

  6. Fifth Disease (Parvovirus B19) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Fifth Disease (parvovirus B19) In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby with ... infectiosum, is a viral illness caused by human parvovirus B19. It occurs most commonly in children ages ...

  7. Evolutionary Relationships among Parvoviruses: Virus-Host Coevolution among Autonomous Primate Parvoviruses and Links between Adeno-Associated and Avian Parvoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lukashov, Vladimir V.; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2001-01-01

    The current classification of parvoviruses is based on virus host range and helper virus dependence, while little data on evolutionary relationships among viruses are available. We identified and analyzed 472 sequences of parvoviruses, among which there were (virtually) full-length genomes of all 41 viruses currently recognized as individual species within the family Parvoviridae. Our phylogenetic analysis of full-length genomes as well as open reading frames distinguished three evolutionary groups of parvoviruses from vertebrates: (i) the human helper-dependent adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes 1 to 6 and the autonomous avian parvoviruses; (ii) the bovine, chipmunk, and autonomous primate parvoviruses, including human viruses B19 and V9; and (iii) the parvoviruses from rodents (except for chipmunks), carnivores, and pigs. Each of these three evolutionary groups could be further subdivided, reflecting both virus-host coevolution and multiple cross-species transmissions in the evolutionary history of parvoviruses. No parvoviruses from invertebrates clustered with vertebrate parvoviruses. Our analysis provided evidence for negative selection among parvoviruses, the independent evolution of their genes, and recombination among parvoviruses from rodents. The topology of the phylogenetic tree of autonomous human and simian parvoviruses matched exactly the topology of the primate family tree, as based on the analysis of primate mitochondrial DNA. Viruses belonging to the AAV group were not evolutionarily linked to other primate parvoviruses but were linked to the parvoviruses of birds. The two lineages of human parvoviruses may have resulted from independent ancient zoonotic infections. Our results provide an argument for reclassification of Parvovirinae based on evolutionary relationships among viruses. PMID:11222696

  8. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  9. Porcine parvovirus: DNA sequence and genome organization.

    PubMed

    Ranz, A I; Manclús, J J; Díaz-Aroca, E; Casal, J I

    1989-10-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of an almost full-length clone of porcine parvovirus (PPV). The sequence is 4973 nucleotides (nt) long. The 3' end of virion DNA shows a Y-shaped configuration homologous to rodent parvoviruses. The 5' end of virion DNA shows a repetition of 127 nt at the carboxy terminus of the capsid proteins. The overall organization of the PPV genome is similar to those of other autonomous parvoviruses. There are two large open reading frames (ORFs) that almost entirely cover the genome, both located in the same frame of the complementary strand. The left ORF encodes the non-structural protein NS1 and the right ORF encodes the capsid proteins (VP1, VP2 and VP3). Promoter analysis, location of splicing sites and putative amino acid sequences for the viral proteins show a high homology of PPV with feline panleukopenia virus and canine parvoviruses (FPV and CPV) and rodent parvovirus. Therefore we conclude that PPV is related to the Kilham rat virus (KRV) group of autonomous parvoviruses formed by KRV, minute virus of mice, Lu III, H-1, FPV and CPV.

  10. Biomarkers in canine parvovirus enteritis.

    PubMed

    Schoeman, J P; Goddard, A; Leisewitz, A L

    2013-07-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) enteritis has, since its emergence in 1978, remained a common and important cause of morbidity and mortality in young dogs. The continued incidence of parvoviral enteritis is partly due to the virus' capability to evolve into more virulent and resistant variants with significant local gastrointestinal and systemic inflammatory sequelae. This paper reviews current knowledge on historical-, signalment-, and clinical factors as well as several haematological-, biochemical- and endocrine parameters that can be used as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in CPV enteritis. These factors include season of presentation, purebred nature, bodyweight, vomiting, leukopaenia, lymphopaenia, thrombocytopaenia, hypercoagulability, hypercortisolaemia, hypothyroxinaemia, hypoalbuminaemia, elevated C-reactive protein and tumour necrosis factor, hypocholesterolaemia and hypocitrullinaemia. Factors contributing to the manifestations of CPV infection are multiple with elements of host, pathogen, secondary infections, underlying stressors and environment affecting severity and outcome. The availability of several prognosticators has made identification of patients at high risk of death and their subsequent targeted management more rewarding.

  11. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.214 Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine...

  12. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.214 Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine...

  13. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.214 Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine...

  14. Neonatal outcome after fetal anemia managed by intrauterine transfusion.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, C; Rakza, T; Thomas, D; Wibaut, B; Vaast, P; Subtil, D; Houfflin-Debarge, V

    2015-11-01

    In-utero transfusion is now well under control and improves the survival of foetuses monitored for fetal anemia with a survival rate of more than 80 %. The aim was to evaluate short-term neonatal outcome after fetal severe anemia managed by intrauterine transfusions. We did a retrospective study of all neonates born after management of severe fetal anemia (n = 93) between January 1999 and January 2013 in our regional center. The two main causes of anemia were maternal red blood cell alloimmunization (N = 81, 87 %) and Parvovirus B19 infection (N = 10, 10.8 %). In the alloimmunization group, phototherapy was implemented in 85.2 % of cases with a maximum level of bilirubin of 114.4 ± 60.7 (mg/dl). Transfusion and exchange transfusion were, respectively, required in 51.9 % and in 34.6 % of cases. One neonate presented a convulsive episode, and we observed three neonatal deaths. In the parvovirus group, none of the child had anemia at birth and no management was necessary. Contemporary management of Rhesus disease is associated with encouraging neonatal outcomes. In case of Parvovirus infection, no specific management is necessary at. But, in all cases of fetal anemia, children should be followed up with particular attention to neurologic development. • In-utero transfusion is now well under control and improves the survival of fetuses monitored for fetal anemia. • Limited studies are available on the effect of IUT on postnatal outcome in infants with a history of fetal anemia. What is New: • Contemporary management of severe Rhesus disease is associated with encouraging neonatal outcomes. • The majority of infants can be managed with phototherapy and a limited number of top-up transfusions and exchange transfusions. In case of Parvovirus infection, the short-term neonatal outcome is excellent.

  15. Severe pneumonia after heart transplantation as a result of human parvovirus B19.

    PubMed

    Janner, D; Bork, J; Baum, M; Chinnock, R

    1994-01-01

    The diverse manifestations of human parvovirus B19 infection have been well established. Erythema infectiosum, fetal hydrops, adult arthropathy, and aplastic anemia in patients with hemoglobinopathies or underlying immunocompromise have been described. Recently we successfully treated a patient who, after heart transplantation, had fever, rash, and pneumonia with respiratory failure caused by human parovirus B19. Human parovirus B19 has not been reported previously as a pathogen causing pulmonary disease after pediatric heart transplantation, and we wish to report it at this time.

  16. Parvovirus Family Conundrum: What Makes a Killer?

    PubMed

    Kailasan, Shweta; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Parrish, Colin R

    2015-11-01

    Parvoviruses infect a wide variety of hosts, and their ancestors appear to have emerged tens to hundreds of millions of years ago and to have spread widely ever since. The diversity of parvoviruses is therefore extensive, and although they all appear to descend from a common ancestor and share common structures in their capsid and nonstructural proteins, there is often low homology at the DNA or protein level. The diversity of these viruses is also seen in the widely differing impacts they have on their hosts, which range from severe and even lethal disease to subclinical or nonpathogenic infections. In the past few years, deep sequencing of DNA samples from animals has shown just how widespread the parvoviruses are in nature, but most of the newly discovered viruses have not yet been associated with any disease. However, variants of some parvoviruses have altered their host ranges to create new epidemic or pandemic viruses. Here, we examine the properties of parvoviruses and their interactions with their hosts that are associated with these disparate pathogenic outcomes.

  17. Epidemiological and immunopathological studies on Porcine parvovirus infection in Punjab

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Amninder; Mahajan, V.; Leishangthem, G. D.; Singh, N. D.; Bhat, Payal; Banga, H. S.; Filia, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to get the first-hand knowledge about the seroprevalence of Porcine parvovirus (PPV) in Punjab and a diagnosis of PPV from abortion cases of swine using gross, histopathological, and immunohistopathological techniques to observe the tissue tropism of the virus strain. Materials and Methods: Tissue samples from the reproductive tract of pig (n=32), placental tissue (n=10), and aborted fetuses (n=18) were collected from Postmortem Hall of the Department of Veterinary Pathology, GADVASU, field outbreaks and from butcher houses in and around Ludhiana. These samples were processed for histopathological and immunohistochemical (IHC) studies. For seroprevalence study, 90 serum samples of different sex and age were collected from 15 swine farms of Punjab and were subjected to indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay using commercial kit. Results: Overall, seroprevalence of PPV was found to be 41.1%. Sex and age related difference in the prevalence was noted. In abortion cases grossly congested and emphysematous lungs, congested internal organs with fluid in abdominal cavity and congestion in brain, changes were noted in fetuses, while diffuse hemorrhages and edema was observed in placental tissue. Histopathologically, the most frequent fetal lesions in aborted fetuses were noted in lungs, liver, and brain. IHC staining revealed PPV antigens in sections of heart, liver, lung, spleen, brain, lymph node of fetuses, placenta, and uterus of sow. Gross, histopathological, and IHC examination of the samples confirmed 5 fetus, 2 placenta and 3 female reproductive samples positive for parvovirus infection. Conclusions: Seroprevalence results may serve as a support either in prevention or control of the disease. IHC is the sensitive technique for diagnosis of PPV associated with the reproductive tract of swine and was found to supplement the gross and histopathological alterations, respectively, associated with the disease. PMID:27651669

  18. Fetal Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, John T.; Sladek, John R.

    1989-11-01

    This article reviews some of the significant contributions of fetal research and fetal tissue research over the past 20 years. The benefits of fetal research include the development of vaccines, advances in prenatal diagnosis, detection of malformations, assessment of safe and effective medications, and the development of in utero surgical therapies. Fetal tissue research benefits vaccine development, assessment of risk factors and toxicity levels in drug production, development of cell lines, and provides a source of fetal cells for ongoing transplantation trials. Together, fetal research and fetal tissue research offer tremendous potential for the treatment of the fetus, neonate, and adult.

  19. Role of mitochondria in parvovirus pathology.

    PubMed

    Nykky, Jonna; Vuento, Matti; Gilbert, Leona

    2014-01-01

    Proper functioning of the mitochondria is crucial for the survival of the cell. Viruses are able to interfere with mitochondrial functions as they infect the host cell. Parvoviruses are known to induce apoptosis in infected cells, but the role of the mitochondria in parvovirus induced cytopathy is only partially known. Here we demonstrate with confocal and electron microscopy that canine parvovirus (CPV) associated with the mitochondrial outer membrane from the onset of infection. During viral entry a transient depolarization of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and increase in ROS level was detected. Subsequently, mitochondrial homeostasis was normalized shortly, as detected by repolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and decrease of ROS. Indeed, activation of cell survival signalling through ERK1/2 cascade was observed early in CPV infected cells. At 12 hours post infection, concurrent with the expression of viral non-structural protein 1, damage to the mitochondrial structure and depolarization of its membrane were apparent. Results of this study provide additional insight of parvovirus pathology and also more general information of virus-mitochondria association.

  20. Role of Mitochondria in Parvovirus Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Nykky, Jonna; Vuento, Matti; Gilbert, Leona

    2014-01-01

    Proper functioning of the mitochondria is crucial for the survival of the cell. Viruses are able to interfere with mitochondrial functions as they infect the host cell. Parvoviruses are known to induce apoptosis in infected cells, but the role of the mitochondria in parvovirus induced cytopathy is only partially known. Here we demonstrate with confocal and electron microscopy that canine parvovirus (CPV) associated with the mitochondrial outer membrane from the onset of infection. During viral entry a transient depolarization of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and increase in ROS level was detected. Subsequently, mitochondrial homeostasis was normalized shortly, as detected by repolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and decrease of ROS. Indeed, activation of cell survival signalling through ERK1/2 cascade was observed early in CPV infected cells. At 12 hours post infection, concurrent with the expression of viral non-structural protein 1, damage to the mitochondrial structure and depolarization of its membrane were apparent. Results of this study provide additional insight of parvovirus pathology and also more general information of virus-mitochondria association. PMID:24465910

  1. Seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 infection in daycare educators.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, N. L.; Gyorkos, T. W.; Béliveau, C.; Rahme, E.; Muecke, C.; Soto, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to provide first-time estimates for the seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 infection among daycare educators in Montréal, Canada, and to identify factors associated with seropositivity. A cross-sectional design was used. Directors and educators from 81 daycare centres (DCCs) were surveyed about DCC and personal characteristics respectively, and serum samples from 477 female educators were tested for parvovirus B19 IgG antibodies. The seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 was 70%. Parvovirus B19 seropositivity was significantly associated with age and with working experience in DCCs, but the latter association was restricted to educators aged less than 40 years. In conclusion, working as a daycare educator appears to be associated with increased risk of acquiring parvovirus B19 infection, but this finding will require further investigation. Because of the large proportion of educators susceptible to acquiring parvovirus B19 infection, our findings also highlight the need for preventive measures. PMID:15816155

  2. Complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of bovine parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, K C; Shull, B C; Moses, E A; Lederman, M; Stout, E R; Bates, R C

    1986-01-01

    We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of bovine parvovirus (BPV), an autonomous parvovirus. The sequence is 5,491 nucleotides long. The terminal regions contain nonidentical imperfect palindromic sequences of 150 and 121 nucleotides. In the plus strand, there are three large open reading frames (left ORF, mid ORF, and right ORF) with coding capacities of 729, 255, and 685 amino acids, respectively. As with all parvoviruses studied to date, the left ORF of BPV codes for the nonstructural protein NS-1 and the right ORF codes for the major parts of the three capsid proteins. The mid ORF probably encodes the major part of the nonstructural protein NP-1. There are promoterlike sequences at map units 4.5, 12.8, and 38.7 and polyadenylation signals at map units 61.6, 64.6, and 98.5. BPV has little DNA homology with the defective parvovirus AAV, with the human autonomous parvovirus B19, or with the other autonomous parvoviruses sequenced (canine parvovirus, feline panleukopenia virus, H-1, and minute virus of mice). Even though the overall DNA homology of BPV with other parvoviruses is low, several small regions of high homology are observed when the amino acid sequences encoded by the left and right ORFs are compared. From these comparisons, it can be shown that the evolutionary relationship among the parvoviruses is B19 in equilibrium with AAV in equilibrium with BPV in equilibrium with MVM. The highly conserved amino acid sequences observed among all parvoviruses may be useful in the identification and detection of parvoviruses and in the design of a general parvovirus vaccine. PMID:3783814

  3. Fetal akinesia.

    PubMed

    Hammond, E; Donnenfeld, A E

    1995-03-01

    Normal fetal growth and development during pregnancy is highly dependent upon adequate fetal movement. Limitation of movement, regardless of the underlying cause, can result in a particular pattern of abnormal fetal morphogenesis. This phenotype is termed the fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS). The etiology of fetal akinesia may be generally classified into one of five categories: neuropathy, myopathy, restrictive dermopathy, teratogen exposure, or restricted movement due to intrauterine constraint. In this article, the differential diagnosis of fetal akinesia is systematically reviewed and information regarding prenatal diagnosis, prognosis, perinatal management, and recurrence risks are discussed.

  4. Coping with parvovirus infections in mice: health surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Janus, Lydia M; Bleich, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Parvoviruses of mice, minute virus of mice (MVM) and mouse parvovirus (MPV), are challenging pathogens to eradicate from laboratory animal facilities. Due to the impediment on rodent-based research, recent studies have focused on the assessment of re-derivation techniques and parvoviral potential to induce persistent infections. Summarizing recent data, this review gives an overview on studies associated with parvoviral impact on research, diagnostic methods, parvoviral persistence and re-derivation techniques, demonstrating the complex nature of parvovirus infection in mice and unfolding the challenge of controlling parvovirus infections in laboratory animal facilities.

  5. The emergence of parvoviruses of carnivores

    PubMed Central

    Hoelzer, Karin; Parrish, Colin R.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of canine parvovirus (CPV) represents a well-documented example highlighting the emergence of a new virus through cross-species transmission. CPV emerged in the mid-1970s as a new pathogen of dogs and has since become endemic in the global dog population. Despite widespread vaccination, CPV has remained a widespread disease of dogs, and new genetic and antigenic variants have arisen and sometimes reached high frequency in certain geographic regions or throughout the world. Here we review our understanding of this emergence event and contrast it to what is known about the emergence of a disease in mink caused by mink enteritis virus (MEV). In addition, we summarize the evolution of CPV over the past 30 years in the global dog population, and describe the epidemiology of contemporary parvovirus infections of dogs and cats. CPV represents a valuable model for understanding disease emergence through cross-species transmission, while MEV provides an interesting comparison. PMID:20152105

  6. Parvovirus capsid disorders cholesterol-rich membranes.

    PubMed

    Pakkanen, Kirsi; Kirjavainen, Sanna; Mäkelä, Anna R; Rintanen, Nina; Oker-Blom, Christian; Jalonen, Tuula O; Vuento, Matti

    2009-02-06

    In this study canine parvovirus, CPV, was found to induce disorder in DPPC:cholesterol membranes in acidic conditions. This acidicity-induced fluidizing effect is suggested to originate from the N-terminus of the viral capsid protein VP1. In accordance with the model membrane studies, a fluidizing effect was seen also in the endosomal membranes during CPV infection implying an important functional role of the fluidization in the endocytic entry of the virus.

  7. Fetal endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Gayatri, Kotni; Jammula, Sruti; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Kota, Siva Krishna; Krishna, S. V. S.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Successful outcome of pregnancy depends upon genetic, cellular, and hormonal interactions, which lead to implantation, placentation, embryonic, and fetal development, parturition and fetal adaptation to extrauterine life. The fetal endocrine system commences development early in gestation and plays a modulating role on the various physiological organ systems and prepares the fetus for life after birth. Our current article provides an overview of the current knowledge of several aspects of this vast field of fetal endocrinology and the role of endocrine system on transition to extrauterine life. We also provide an insight into fetal endocrine adaptations pertinent to various clinically important situations like placental insufficiency and maternal malnutrition. PMID:23961471

  8. Fetal endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Gayatri, Kotni; Jammula, Sruti; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Kota, Siva Krishna; Krishna, S V S; Modi, Kirtikumar D

    2013-07-01

    Successful outcome of pregnancy depends upon genetic, cellular, and hormonal interactions, which lead to implantation, placentation, embryonic, and fetal development, parturition and fetal adaptation to extrauterine life. The fetal endocrine system commences development early in gestation and plays a modulating role on the various physiological organ systems and prepares the fetus for life after birth. Our current article provides an overview of the current knowledge of several aspects of this vast field of fetal endocrinology and the role of endocrine system on transition to extrauterine life. We also provide an insight into fetal endocrine adaptations pertinent to various clinically important situations like placental insufficiency and maternal malnutrition.

  9. Detection of parvoviruses in wolf feces by electron microscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muneer, M.A.; Farah, I.O.; Pomeroy, K.A.; Goyal, S.M.; Mech, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    One hundred fifteen wolf (Canis lupus) feces were collected between 1980 and 1984 from northeastern Minnesota and were examined for canine parvovirus by negative contrast electron microscopy. Of these, seven (6%) samples revealed the presence of parvovirus. Some of these viruses were able to grow in cell cultures forming intranuclear inclusion bodies and giant cells.

  10. Acute cerebellar ataxia with human parvovirus B19 infection

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Y.; Ueno, T.; Komatsu, H.; Takada, H.; Nunoue, T.

    1999-01-01

    A 2 year old boy developed acute cerebellar ataxia in association with erythema infectiosum. During the disease, genomic DNA and antibodies against human parvovirus B19 were detected in serum but not in cerebrospinal fluid. Parvovirus B19 associated acute cerebellar ataxia might occur due to transient vascular reaction in the cerebellum during infection.

 PMID:10325764

  11. New parvovirus in child with unexplained diarrhea, Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Phan, Tung G; Sdiri-Loulizi, Khira; Aouni, Mahjoub; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Pothier, Pierre; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric

    2014-11-01

    A divergent parvovirus genome was the only eukaryotic viral sequence detected in feces of a Tunisian child with unexplained diarrhea. Tusavirus 1 shared 44% and 39% identity with the nonstructural protein 1 and viral protein 1, respectively, of the closest genome, Kilham rat parvovirus, indicating presence of a new human viral species in the Protoparvovirus genus.

  12. 9 CFR 113.317 - Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.317 Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine recommended for use in dogs shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which has been established as...

  13. 9 CFR 113.317 - Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.317 Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine recommended for use in dogs shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which has been established as...

  14. 9 CFR 113.317 - Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.317 Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine recommended for use in dogs shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which has been established as...

  15. Host specificity and phylogenetic relationships of chicken and turkey parvoviruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous reports indicate that the newly discovered chicken parvoviruses (ChPV) and turkey parvoviruses (TuPV) are very similar to each other, yet they represent different species within a new genus of Parvoviridae. Currently, strain classification is based on the phylogenetic analysis of a 561 bas...

  16. New Parvovirus in Child with Unexplained Diarrhea, Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Tung G.; Sdiri-Loulizi, Khira; Aouni, Mahjoub; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Pothier, Pierre; Deng, Xutao

    2014-01-01

    A divergent parvovirus genome was the only eukaryotic viral sequence detected in feces of a Tunisian child with unexplained diarrhea. Tusavirus 1 shared 44% and 39% identity with the nonstructural protein 1 and viral protein 1, respectively, of the closest genome, Kilham rat parvovirus, indicating presence of a new human viral species in the Protoparvovirus genus. PMID:25340816

  17. Nucleotide sequence of the coat protein gene of canine parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Rhode, S L

    1985-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the canine parvovirus (CPV2) from map units 33 to 95 has been determined. This includes the entire coat protein gene and noncoding sequences at the 3' end of the gene, exclusive of the terminal inverted repeat. The predicted capsid protein structures are discussed and compared with those of the rodent parvoviruses H-1 and MVM. PMID:3989914

  18. Do canine parvoviruses affect canine neurons? An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Url, A; Schmidt, P

    2005-08-01

    In cats (most of which died from panleukopenia), cerebral neurons have recently been shown to be susceptible to canine parvovirus infection. In addition to positive immunostaining and distinct in situ hybridization signals, signs of neurodegeneration were identified by histopathology, mainly in the diencephalic area. Similar histological lesions of the diencephalic regions in dogs have also attracted attention; therefore, an immunohistochemical study was initiated to determine the possible infection of canine neurons with canine parvoviruses. The study was carried out on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded brain tissue, with and without signs of neurodegeneration, from 40 dogs, most of them dying from parvovirus enteritis. Immunohistochemistry, using polyclonal antiserum against canine parvoviruses, was negative in all 40 cases, suggesting that, unlike cats, canine parvoviruses do not seem capable of infecting canine neurons.

  19. Parvovirus enteritis in vaccinated juvenile bush dogs.

    PubMed

    Janssen, D L; Bartz, C R; Bush, M; Marchwicki, R H; Grate, S J; Montali, R J

    1982-12-01

    Parvovirus enteritis developed in 10 of 17 vaccinated juvenile bush dogs (Speothos venaticus) from 4 litters in a 5-month period. Nine dogs died. The first outbreak involved 6 of 9 bush dogs from 2 litters. Each had been vaccinated with a killed feline-origin parvovirus vaccine at 11 and 14 weeks of age. The 6 affected dogs became ill at 29 weeks of age and died. The second outbreak involved a litter of 6 bush dogs. Each had been vaccinated every 2 weeks starting at 5 weeks of age. Two were isolated from the colony at 16 weeks of age for treatment of foot sores. Three of the 4 nonisolated dogs developed parvovirus enteritis at 20 weeks of age; 2 died at 6 and 8 days, respectively, after onset of signs. The 3rd outbreak involved a litter of 2 bush dogs. Both had been vaccinated every 2 to 3 weeks, starting at 6 weeks of age. One of these dogs became ill at 17 weeks and died 13 days later. A litter of 6 maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) and a litter of 3 bush dogs were isolated from their parent colonies at 13 and 15 weeks of age, respectively. Each animal had been vaccinated weekly, beginning at 8 weeks of age, using an inactivated canine-origin parvovirus vaccine. None of the isolated animals developed the disease. Serologic testing during isolation did not reveal protective titers (greater than or equal to 1:80) against canine parvovirus in the bush dogs until they were 23 weeks old, whereas protective titers developed in the maned wolves when they were 14 to 18 weeks old. One hand-raised bush dog was vaccinated weekly, beginning at 8 weeks of age, and a protective titer developed by 21 weeks of age. It was concluded that the juvenile bush dogs went through a period during which maternal antibodies interfered with immunization, yet did not protect against the disease. When the pups were isolated from the colony during this period, then vaccinated repeatedly until protective titers developed, the disease was prevented.

  20. The RNA profile of porcine parvovirus 4, a Boca-like virus, is unique among the Parvoviruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phylogenetically, porcine parvovirus 4 (PPV4) is most related to bovine parvovirus 2 that has two open reading frames (ORFs), but its genome organization resembles that of members of the Bocavirus genus that has three ORFs. Although PPV4 transcribes its genome from a single promoter and the transcri...

  1. The prevalence of parvovirus B19 infection among pregnant women of Ardabil in 2013.

    PubMed

    Habibzadeh, Shahram; Peeri-Doghaheh, Hadi; Mohammad-Shahi, Jafar; Mobini, Elham; Shahbazzadegan, Samira

    2016-06-01

    Trans-placental transmission of parvovirus B19 during pregnancy can causes adverse outcomes. Regarding its importance in prenatal care, we decided to study prevalence of parvovirus B19 infection among pregnant woman in Ardabil, Iran. In a community based study with a cluster sampling, 350 pregnant women that attended in health care centers in Ardabil were selected. Serum samples were collected and Anti-B19 specific IgG was detected using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (Euroimmune Elisa kit, Germany). Furthermore, a questionnaire filled for all participants during samples collection. 64.6% (226/350) of participants were Ardabil citizen and the rest were from rural area (124/350). Anti-B19-specific IgG antibody was detected in 69.1% of pregnant women (242/350). Participants' ages ranged from 15 to 34 years with average of 23 years. According to our study, seroprevalence of IgG antibodies had positive significant correlation with the participants' age (r=0.268) but there were no significant relations between B19 seropositivity and living area, family member, number of commensals, number of living children, and the amount of hemoglobin (p>0.05). Approximately, one-third of the participants were at risk of primary B19 infection. Therefore, health education of pregnant women and screening of infected pregnant women is recommended to prevent fetal complications.

  2. The prevalence of parvovirus B19 infection among pregnant women of Ardabil in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Habibzadeh, Shahram; Peeri-Doghaheh, Hadi; Mohammad-Shahi, Jafar; Mobini, Elham; Shahbazzadegan, Samira

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Trans-placental transmission of parvovirus B19 during pregnancy can causes adverse outcomes. Regarding its importance in prenatal care, we decided to study prevalence of parvovirus B19 infection among pregnant woman in Ardabil, Iran. Materials and Methods: In a community based study with a cluster sampling, 350 pregnant women that attended in health care centers in Ardabil were selected. Serum samples were collected and Anti-B19 specific IgG was detected using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (Euroimmune Elisa kit, Germany). Furthermore, a questionnaire filled for all participants during samples collection. Results: 64.6% (226/350) of participants were Ardabil citizen and the rest were from rural area (124/350). Anti-B19-specific IgG antibody was detected in 69.1% of pregnant women (242/350). Participants’ ages ranged from 15 to 34 years with average of 23 years. According to our study, seroprevalence of IgG antibodies had positive significant correlation with the participants’ age (r=0.268) but there were no significant relations between B19 seropositivity and living area, family member, number of commensals, number of living children, and the amount of hemoglobin (p>0.05). Conclusion: Approximately, one-third of the participants were at risk of primary B19 infection. Therefore, health education of pregnant women and screening of infected pregnant women is recommended to prevent fetal complications. PMID:27928490

  3. [Fetal magnetocardiography].

    PubMed

    Hosono, Takayoshi

    2006-05-01

    The electrical activities of the heart causes weak changes of the magnetic field, which can be recorded as magnetocardiogram (MCG). Fetal cardiac magnetic activity is measured in the order of less than 10 pT. An advance of the novel technology of a superconducting quantum interference device enabled the first recording of fetal MCG (FMCG) in 1974. In Japan, FMCG instrument (MC6400, Hitachi High-Technologies Ltd) was approved as a diagnostic tool by Japanese Government in 2003 owing to the cooperative studies of Tsukuba University, National Cardiovascular Center and Hitachi Ltd. FMCG offers similar information to a fetal electrocardiogram, which is difficult to be recorded because the fetal skin is covered with fatty caseous vernix of weak electrical conductivity in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. Magnetic flux can pass through the fat layer, and thus FMCG can measure the electrical activity of the fetal heart. Besides FMCG has far higher resolutions in time domain than echocardiography does. The amplitude of FMCG signals depends on the size of fetal heart and the distance between the sensors and the fetal heart. The amplitudes of the QRS, P and T waves increases with gestational age. Since the amplitudes of P and T waves are often weak, averaging of FMCG signals is needed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Current-arrow map is a useful mapping technique even in FMCG. FMCG has been applied in the prenatal diagnosis of fetal arrhythmias such as bradyarrhythmia (atrioventricular block, long QT syndrome, etc), tachyarrhythmia (supraventricular tachycardia, atrial flutter, atrial fibrillation and WPW syndrome, etc) and extrasystoles. Fetal cardiomegaly with myocardial abnormalities can be also diagnosed by FMCG. Applications of FMCG for fetal heart rate monitoring using beat-to-beat variability have been also studied to obtain better information on fetal well-beings.

  4. Chronic hepatitis caused by persistent parvovirus B19 infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Human infection with parvovirus B19 may lead to a diverse spectrum of clinical manifestations, including benign erythema infectiosum in children, transient aplastic crisis in patients with haemolytic anaemia, and congenital hydrops foetalis. These different diseases represent direct consequences of the ability of parvovirus B19 to target the erythroid cell lineage. However, accumulating evidence suggests that this virus can also infect other cell types resulting in diverse clinical manifestations, of which the pathogenesis remains to be fully elucidated. This has prompted important questions regarding the tropism of the virus and its possible involvement in a broad range of infectious and autoimmune medical conditions. Case Presentation Here, we present an unusual case of persistent parvovirus B19 infection as a cause of chronic hepatitis. This patient had persistent parvovirus B19 viraemia over a period of more than four years and displayed signs of chronic hepatitis evidenced by fluctuating elevated levels of ALAT and a liver biopsy demonstrating chronic hepatitis. Other known causes of hepatitis and liver damage were excluded. In addition, the patient was evaluated for immunodeficiency, since she had lymphopenia both prior to and following clearance of parvovirus B19 infection. Conclusions In this case report, we describe the current knowledge on the natural history and pathogenesis of parvovirus B19 infection, and discuss the existing evidence of parvovirus B19 as a cause of acute and chronic hepatitis. We suggest that parvovirus B19 was the direct cause of this patient's chronic hepatitis, and that she had an idiopathic lymphopenia, which may have predisposed her to persistent infection, rather than bone marrow depression secondary to infection. In addition, we propose that her liver involvement may have represented a viral reservoir. Finally, we suggest that clinicians should be aware of parvovirus B19 as an unusual aetiology of chronic hepatitis

  5. Parvovirus B19 infection in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Crane, Joan; Mundle, William; Boucoiran, Isabelle; Gagnon, Robert; Bujold, Emmanuel; Basso, Melanie; Bos, Hayley; Brown, Richard; Cooper, Stephanie; Gouin, Katy; McLeod, N Lynne; Menticoglou, Savas; Mundle, William; Pylypjuk, Christy; Roggensack, Anne; Sanderson, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Objectifs : La présente directive clinique passe en revue les données probantes en ce qui concerne les effets qu’exerce le parvovirus B19 sur la femme enceinte et le fœtus, et traite de la prise en charge (pendant la grossesse) des femmes qui sont exposées au parvovirus B19, qui sont exposées à des risques de contracter une infection au parvovirus B19 ou qui contractent une telle infection. Issues : Les issues évaluées ont été les issues maternelles (dont le mégalérythème épidémique, l’arthropathie, l’anémie et la myocardite) et fœtales (dont l’avortement spontané, les anomalies congénitales, l’anasarque fœtoplacentaire, la mortinaissance et les effets à long terme de l’infection). Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed et The Cochrane Library le 8 juillet 2013 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (« parvovirus » et « pregnancy ») et de mots clés (« parvovirus », « infection », « pregnancy », « hydrops ») appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs et aux études observationnelles. Aucune restriction n’a été imposée en matière de date; toutefois, les résultats ont été limités aux documents rédigés en anglais ou en français. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats est évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans le rapport du Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs (Tableau

  6. Parvovirus B19 Myocarditis of Fulminant Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Spartalis, Michael; Tzatzaki, Eleni; Spartalis, Eleftherios; Damaskos, Christos; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Voudris, Vassilis

    2017-01-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammation of the myocardium. Clinical presentation ranges from non-specific systematic symptoms to fulminant collapse and sudden death. Sudden death occurs at rates of 8.6-12% and cardiomyopathy at 9%. In active myocarditis, there is inflammatory cellular infiltrate with myocardial necrosis. The disease is distinguished by clinical presentation in fulminant and non-fulminant myocarditis. We present a rare case of a parvovirus B19-induced fulminant viral myocarditis in a young female. The patient presented with acute onset heart failure mimicking a myocardial infarction, followed by non-specific symptoms that had been misdiagnosed as urinary tract infection. PMID:28868104

  7. Survey of porcine parvovirus infection in swine fetuses and their dams at a Minnesota abattoir

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, B.J.; Leman, A.D.; Hurtgen, J.P.; Sauber, T.E.; Joo, H.S.

    1981-05-01

    Reproductive tracts were recovered from 209 sow and 32 gilt carcasses at slaughter; animals had been pregnant not less than 27 days. Of 241 litters examined, 28 (11.6%) contained one or more porcine parvovirus (PPV)-infected fetuses, as determined by immunofluorescent microscopy. The frequencies in sow and gilt litters were 12.0% and 9.4%, respectively. The PPV antigen was detected in 219 of 334 (65.6%) dead or mummified fetuses and in 12 of 2,172 (0.5%) live fetuses examined. The 18 litters which contained only dead or mummified fetuses were infected with PPV. As the percentage of litter mummification increased, the likelihood of finding PPV increased. The PPV antibody was detected in ovarian follicular fluids of 94.3% of the sows and 78.1% of the gilts. These findings indicate that PPV is highly associated with fetal mummification and that some pregnant gilts and sows are susceptible to infection.

  8. Fetal Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Lindsey; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Five cases of fetal abuse by mothers suffering from depression are discussed. Four of the women had unplanned pregnancies and had considered termination of the pregnancy. Other factors associated with fetal abuse include pregnancy denial, pregnancy ambivalence, previous postpartum depression, and difficulties in relationships. Vigilance for…

  9. Fetal Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Lindsey; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Five cases of fetal abuse by mothers suffering from depression are discussed. Four of the women had unplanned pregnancies and had considered termination of the pregnancy. Other factors associated with fetal abuse include pregnancy denial, pregnancy ambivalence, previous postpartum depression, and difficulties in relationships. Vigilance for…

  10. [Familial transient red cell aplasia from parvovirus B-19 infection].

    PubMed

    Salvini, F; Tonella, M; Carpani, G; Scaglioni, S; Zuccotti, G V

    2002-01-01

    In our Paediatric Clinic we observed a case of transient aplastic crisis caused by Parvovirus B19 in a child and his mother, both affected by spherocytic haemolytic anemia. Anti-Parvovirus IgM antibody titre and viral search by PCR were positive. Anemia was treated with transfusion of concentrated red blood cells. In case of a family onset of hyperacute anemia it is necessary to consider a bone marrow aplastic crisis of the red series, induced by Parvovirus B19, especially if there is notice of an ongoing outbreak of erythema infectiosum.

  11. Influence of infection during pregnancy on fetal development.

    PubMed

    Adams Waldorf, Kristina M; McAdams, Ryan M

    2013-01-01

    Infection by bacteria, viruses, and parasites may lead to fetal death, organ injury, or limited sequelae depending on the pathogen. Here, we consider the role of infection during pregnancy in fetal development including placental development and function, which can lead to fetal growth restriction. The classical group of teratogenic pathogens is referred to as 'TORCH' (Toxoplasma gondii, others like Treponema pallidum, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus) but should include a much broader group of pathogens including Parvovirus B19, Varicella zoster virus, and Plasmodium falciparum to name a few. In this review, we describe the influence of different infections in utero on fetal development and the short- and long-term outcomes for the neonate. In some cases, the mechanisms used by these pathogens to disrupt fetal development are well known. Bacterial infection of the developing fetal lungs and brain begins with an inflammatory cascade resulting in cytokine injury and oxidative stress. For some pathogens like P. falciparum, the mechanisms involve oxidative stress and apoptosis to disrupt placental and fetal growth. An in utero infection may also affect the long-term health of the infant; in many cases, a viral infection in utero increases the risk of developing type 1 diabetes in childhood. Understanding the varied mechanisms employed by these pathogens may enable therapies to attenuate changes in fetal development, decrease preterm birth, and improve survival.

  12. Feline parvovirus infection and associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Stuetzer, Bianca; Hartmann, Katrin

    2014-08-01

    Feline panleukopenia, caused by the single-stranded DNA virus feline parvovirus (FPV), is a highly contagious and often lethal disease of cats and other Felidae. FPV, but also canine parvovirus (CPV) can be isolated from both healthy and diseased cats. In Germany, CPV was detected in only approximately 10% of feline samples, but in Southeast Asia, reports estimated that up to approximately 80% of diseased cats were infected with CPV. Infection spreads rapidly, especially in cells with high mitotic activity, such as bone marrow, lymphoid tissue and intestinal crypt cells. Anorexia, vomiting, diarrhoea, neutropenia and lymphopenia are common in clinically affected cases. In utero or neonatal infection can result in cerebellar hypoplasia. Depending on the severity of clinical signs, mortality ranges from 25 to 100%. Effective vaccination and thorough disinfection are of the utmost importance in the prevention of disease transmission in multi-cat households and animal shelters. If clinical signs develop, supportive treatment should be commenced. The efficacy of feline recombinant interferon and FPV antibodies has not been clearly demonstrated. Commercially available vaccines should induce protective immunity when administered according to current guidelines. Recent studies suggest that in some kittens, maternally derived antibodies (MDA) can persist for much longer than has been previously recognised. FPV serum antibody tests are available, but protection status needs to be interpreted with caution in kittens with MDA and a negative titre in adult cats does not necessarily denote lack of protection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Parvovirus-like particles as vaccine vectors.

    PubMed

    Casal, J I; Rueda, P; Hurtado, A

    1999-09-01

    A wide array of systems have been developed to improve "classic" vaccines. The use of small polypeptides able to elicit potent antibody and cytotoxic responses seems to have enormous potential in the design of safer vaccines. While peptide coupling to large soluble proteins such as keyhole limpet hemocyanin is the current method of choice for eliciting antibody responses and insertion in live viruses for cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses, alternative cheaper and/or safer methods will clearly be required in the future. Virus-like particles constitute very immunogenic molecules that allow for covalent coupling of the epitopes of interest in a simple way. In this article, we detail the methodology employed for the preparation of efficient virus vectors as delivery systems. We used parvovirus as the model for the design of new vaccine vectors. Recently parvovirus-like particles have been engineered to express foreign polypeptides in certain positions, resulting in the production of large quantities of highly immunogenic peptides, and to induce strong antibody, helper-T-cell, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. We discuss the different alternatives and the necessary steps to carry out this process, placing special emphasis on the flow of decisions that need to be made during the project. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  14. Death of a wild wolf from canine parvovirus enteritis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Kurtz, H.J.; Goyal, S.

    1997-01-01

    A 9-mo-old female wolf (Canis lupus) in the Superior National Forest of Minnesota (USA) died from a canine parvovirus (CPV) infection. This is the first direct evidence that this infection effects free-ranging wild wolves.

  15. Parvovirus-like particles associated with diarrhea in unweaned piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Dea, S; Elazhary, M A; Martineau, G P; Vaillancourt, J

    1985-01-01

    Numerous parvovirus-like particles, 18 to 26 nm in diameter, were detected by electron microscopy in the intestinal contents of two to three week old piglets with mild to severe diarrhea, in six Quebec pig herds. Hemagglutination of guinea pig and African green monkey red blood cells was obtained with clarified intestinal contents. Two isolates were found to be antigenically related to porcine and canine parvoviruses, while another differed from the porcine parvovirus using the hemagglutination-inhibition test. Three isolates could be cultivated in cell cultures as demonstrated by the development of a cytopathic effect, hemagglutination activity, immunofluorescence and identification of the virions in the cell culture fluids by electron microscopy. The possibility of a primary etiological role for these parvoviruses in diarrhea of unweaned piglets is discussed. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2412678

  16. Latex agglutination test for detecting feline panleukopenia virus, canine parvovirus, and parvoviruses of fur animals.

    PubMed Central

    Veijalainen, P M; Neuvonen, E; Niskanen, A; Juokslahti, T

    1986-01-01

    A latex agglutination (LA) test for the detection of parvoviruses of fur animals, cats, and dogs was developed, and its sensitivity and specificity were compared with those of hemagglutination (HA) and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Tissue culture isolation was used to confirm the specificity results. Fecal samples from various sources were tested, including specimens from raccoon dogs and mink which were experimentally infected with parvoviruses by oral exposure. LA compared favorably with the other tests. The ELISA was the most sensitive. When it was considered as a reference test, the corresponding sensitivities for HA and LA were 96 and 91%, respectively. The specificities were 93% for the ELISA, 95% for the HA test, and 92% for the LA test. LA seems to be a suitable technique for screening animals in the field and in laboratories in which sophisticated techniques are not available. PMID:3007568

  17. The role of nuclear localization signal in parvovirus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun

    2017-04-14

    Parvoviruses are small, non-enveloped viruses with an approximately 5.0 kb, single-stranded DNA genome. Usually, the parvovirus capsid gene contains one or more nuclear localization signals (NLSs), which are required for guiding the virus particle into the nucleus through the nuclear pore. However, several classical NLSs (cNLSs) and non-classical NLSs (ncNLSs) have been identified in non-structural genes, and the ncNLSs can also target non-structural proteins into the nucleus. In this review, we have summarized recent research findings on parvovirus NLSs. The capsid protein of the adeno-associated virus has four potential nuclear localization sequences, named basic region 1 (BR), BR2, BR3 and BR4. BR3 was identified as an NLS by fusing it with green fluorescent protein. Moreover, BR3 and BR4 are required for infectivity and virion assembly. In Protoparvovirus, the canine parvovirus has a common cNLS located in the VP1 unique region, similar to parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) and porcine parvovirus. Moreover, an ncNLS is found in the C-terminal region of MVM VP1/2. Parvovirus B19 also contains an ncNLS in the C-terminal region of VP1/2, which is essential for the nuclear transport of VP1/VP2. Approximately 1 or 2 cNLSs and 1 ncNLS have been reported in the non-structural protein of bocaviruses. Understanding the role of the NLS in the process of parvovirus infection and its mechanism of nuclear transport will contribute to the development of therapeutic vaccines and novel antiviral medicines.

  18. Analysis of Evolutionary Processes of Species Jump in Waterfowl Parvovirus

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wentao; Sun, Zhaoyu; Shen, Tongtong; Xu, Danning; Huang, Kehe; Zhou, Jiyong; Song, Suquan; Yan, Liping

    2017-01-01

    Waterfowl parvoviruses are classified into goose parvovirus (GPV) and Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) according to their antigenic features and host preferences. A novel duck parvovirus (NDPV), identified as a new variant of GPV, is currently infecting ducks, thus causing considerable economic loss. This study analyzed the molecular evolution and population dynamics of the emerging parvovirus capsid gene to investigate the evolutionary processes concerning the host shift of NDPV. Two important amino acids changes (Asn-489 and Asn-650) were identified in NDPV, which may be responsible for host shift of NDPV. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the currently circulating NDPV originated from the GPV lineage. The Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo tree indicated that the NDPV diverged from GPV approximately 20 years ago. Evolutionary rate analyses demonstrated that GPV evolved with 7.674 × 10-4 substitutions/site/year, and the data for MDPV was 5.237 × 10-4 substitutions/site/year, whereas the substitution rate in NDPV branch was 2.25 × 10-3 substitutions/site/year. Meanwhile, viral population dynamics analysis revealed that the GPV major clade, including NDPV, grew exponentially at a rate of 1.717 year-1. Selection pressure analysis showed that most sites are subject to strong purifying selection and no positively selected sites were found in NDPV. The unique immune-epitopes in waterfowl parvovirus were also estimated, which may be helpful for the prediction of antibody binding sites against NDPV in ducks. PMID:28352261

  19. Oncolytic parvoviruses: from basic virology to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Marchini, Antonio; Bonifati, Serena; Scott, Eleanor M; Angelova, Assia L; Rommelaere, Jean

    2015-01-29

    Accumulated evidence gathered over recent decades demonstrated that some members of the Parvoviridae family, in particular the rodent protoparvoviruses H-1PV, the minute virus of mice and LuIII have natural anticancer activity while being nonpathogenic to humans. These studies have laid the foundations for the launch of a first phase I/IIa clinical trial, in which the rat H-1 parvovirus is presently undergoing evaluation for its safety and first signs of efficacy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. After a brief overview of the biology of parvoviruses, this review focuses on the studies which unraveled the antineoplastic properties of these agents and supported their clinical use as anticancer therapeutics. Furthermore, the development of novel parvovirus-based anticancer strategies with enhanced specificity and efficacy is discussed, in particular the development of second and third generation vectors and the combination of parvoviruses with other anticancer agents. Lastly, we address the key challenges that remain towards a more rational and efficient use of oncolytic parvoviruses in clinical settings, and discuss how a better understanding of the virus life-cycle and of the cellular factors involved in virus infection, replication and cytotoxicity may promote the further development of parvovirus-based anticancer therapies, open new prospects for treatment and hopefully improve clinical outcome.

  20. Parvovirus transmission by blood products - a cause for concern?

    PubMed

    Norja, Päivi; Lassila, Riitta; Makris, Mike

    2012-11-01

    The introduction of dual viral inactivation of clotting factor concentrates has practically eliminated infections by viruses associated with significant pathogenicity over the last 20 years. Despite this, theoretical concerns about transmission of infection have remained, as it is known that currently available viral inactivation methods are unable to eliminate parvovirus B19 or prions from these products. Recently, concern has been raised following the identification of the new parvoviruses, human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) and new genotypes of parvovirus B19, in blood products. Parvoviruses do not cause chronic pathogenicity similar to human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis C virus, but nevertheless may cause clinical manifestations, especially in immunosuppressed patients. Manufacturers should institute measures, such as minipool polymerase chain reaction testing, to ensure that their products contain no known viruses. So far, human bocavirus, another new genus of parvovirus, has not been detected in fractionated blood products, and unless their presence can be demonstrated, routine testing during manufacture is not essential. Continued surveillance of the patients and of the safety of blood products remains an important ongoing issue.

  1. Genetic characterization of feline parvovirus sequences from various carnivores.

    PubMed

    Steinel, A; Munson, L; van Vuuren, M; Truyen, U

    2000-02-01

    Infections with viruses of the feline parvovirus subgroup such as feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), mink enteritis virus (MEV) and canine parvovirus (CPV-2) [together with its new antigenic types (CPV-2a, CPV-2b)] have been reported from several wild carnivore species. To examine the susceptibility of different species to the various parvoviruses and their antigenic types, samples from wild carnivores with acute parvovirus infections were collected. Viral DNA was amplified, and subsequently analysed, from faeces or formalin-fixed small intestines from an orphaned bat-eared fox (Otocyon megalotis), a free-ranging honey badger (Mellivora capensis), six captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), a captive Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) and a free-ranging African wild cat (Felis lybica). Parvovirus infection in bat-eared fox and honey badger was demonstrated for the first time. FPV-sequences were detected in tissues of the African wild cat and in faeces of one cheetah and the honey badger, whereas CPV-2b sequences were found in five cheetahs and the bat-eared fox. The Siberian tiger (from a German zoo) was infected with a CPV-type 2a virus. This distribution of feline parvovirus antigenic types in captive large cats suggests an interspecies transmission from domestic dogs. CPV-2 sequences were not detected in any of the specimens and no sequences with features intermediate between FPV and CPV were found in any of the animals examined.

  2. Does parvovirus infection have a role in systemic lupus erythematosus?

    PubMed

    Hod, Tami; Zandman-Goddard, Giselle; Langevitz, Pnina; Rudnic, Hagit; Grossman, Zehava; Rotman-Pikielny, Pnina; Levy, Yair

    2017-01-23

    We sought to evaluate a possible link between parvovirus B19 infection and the clinical and laboratory expression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE patients were examined to evaluate their clinical status and disease activity. A complete Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score was obtained for each patient. In addition, we determined the level of systemic involvement throughout the course of the disease. Blood levels of IgM and IgG antibodies to parvovirus B19, levels of anti-dsDNA, C3, and C4 were measured. A PCR real-time assay was used to determine the presence of parvovirus B19 genetic material. The viral genome was found in sera of 2 of 51(3.9%) patients with SLE. There was no correlation between viral serology and the clinical and serological parameters of the disease. More SLE patients with secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) had IgG and IgM antibodies to the virus (p < 0.029 and p < 0.018, respectively). These patients also had a higher titer of IgG antibodies to parvovirus B19 compared to SLE patients without APS. In this group of SLE patients, no association was found between parvovirus infection and the presence or activity of SLE. The results of the study suggest an association between parvovirus infection and antibody production directed against phospholipids.

  3. Fetal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... needle placement during certain prenatal tests, such as amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Determine fetal position before ... home. Accessed Aug. 11, 2015. Ghidini A. Diagnostic amniocentesis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 11, ...

  4. Fetal echocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Fetal echocardiography is a test that uses sound waves ( ultrasound ) to evaluate the baby's heart for ... moved over the area. The probe sends out sound waves, which bounce off the baby's heart and ...

  5. Fetal stroke.

    PubMed

    Ozduman, Koray; Pober, Barbara R; Barnes, Patrick; Copel, Joshua A; Ogle, Eileen A; Duncan, Charles C; Ment, Laura R

    2004-03-01

    Fetal stroke, or that which occurs between 14 weeks of gestation and the onset of labor resulting in delivery, has been associated with postnatal epilepsy, mental retardation, and cerebral palsy. The entity is caused by antenatal ischemic, thrombotic, or hemorrhagic injury. We present seven new cases of fetal stroke diagnosed in utero and review the 47 cases reported in the literature. Although risk factors could not be assigned to 50% of the fetuses with stroke, the most common maternal conditions associated with fetal stroke were alloimmune thrombocytopenia and trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging was optimal for identifying fetal stroke, and prenatal imaging revealed hemorrhagic lesions in over 90% of studies; porencephalies were identified in just 13%. Seventy-eight percent of cases with reported outcome resulted in either death or adverse neurodevelopmental outcome at ages 3 months to 6 years. Fetal stroke appears to have different risk factors, clinical characteristics, and outcomes than other perinatal or childhood stroke syndromes. A better understanding of those risk factors predisposing a fetus to cerebral infarction may provide a basis for future therapeutic intervention trials. Ozduman K, Pober BR, Barnes P, Copel JA, Ogle EA, Duncan CC, Ment LR. Fetal stroke.

  6. [Fetal magnetocardiography].

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, P

    1997-09-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography is a new, alternative method for prenatal surveillance. The fetal magnetocardiogram (FMCG) registers the magnetic field produced by conduction currents in the fetal heart. Compared to the fetal electrocardiogram, the propagation of magnetic fields is relatively undisturbed by surrounding tissue. The FMCG thus has the advantage of a higher signal-to-noise ratio and can be acquired earlier pregnancy. Also, the high temporal resolution of the signal permits a significantly more precise determination of fetal heart rate parameters than fetal ultrasound. FMCG registration using a biomagnetometer is noninvasive and can be performed as of the second trimeter. It can be used to examine signal morphology, cardiac time intervals, heart rate variability as well as cardiac magnetic fields. To date, arrhythmic activity has been observed in the form of supraventricular and ventricular ectopies as well as atrial flutter, atrio-ventricular block, atrial tachycardia and Torsades de Pointes tachycardia. We also report here on the presence of short episodes of bradycardia in the second trimester of normal pregnancy. Measurement of the magnetic field strength at various locations above the abdomen has allowed the reconstruction of the fetal cardiac magnetic field and the determination of its relation to the position of the fetus. Signal averaging has permitted the precise examination of signal amplitude and cardiac time intervals and has shown that they increase in the course of pregnancy. Heart rate variability could be quantified in the time and frequency domain as well as using parameters of nonlinear dynamics. The results demonstrated an increase of variability and complexity over gestational age. Furthermore spectral analysis of fetal heart arte data could be associated with sympathetic and parasympathetic activity as well as, with respiration. Although the studies presenting these results have involved only limited numbers of observations, they

  7. Parvovirus PARV4 visualization and detection.

    PubMed

    Tuke, Philip W; Parry, Ruth P; Appleton, Hazel

    2010-02-01

    The parvovirus PARV4 is the most recently described member of the family Parvoviridae that has a human host. To investigate the prevalence of PARV4 in blood, a quantitative TaqMan PCR was developed and plasma, sera or whole blood from a variety of population groups were examined. Eight samples were positive for PARV4, one at high copy number. The high-titre-positive plasma had an approximate viral load of 5 x 10(8) genome equivalents ml(-1). Two human sera, identified as PARV4 antibody-positive by indirect immunofluorescence, were used in immune electron microscopy to try to visualize native PARV4 within the high-titre human plasma. PARV4 particles were observed using one of these two sera. To our knowledge, this is the first time that native PARV4 has been visualized.

  8. Parvovirus diversity and DNA damage responses.

    PubMed

    Cotmore, Susan F; Tattersall, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Parvoviruses have a linear single-stranded DNA genome, around 5 kb in length, with short imperfect terminal palindromes that fold back on themselves to form duplex hairpin telomeres. These contain most of the cis-acting information required for viral "rolling hairpin" DNA replication, an evolutionary adaptation of rolling-circle synthesis in which the hairpins create duplex replication origins, prime complementary strand synthesis, and act as hinges to reverse the direction of the unidirectional cellular fork. Genomes are packaged vectorially into small, rugged protein capsids ~260 Å in diameter, which mediate their delivery directly into the cell nucleus, where they await their host cell's entry into S phase under its own cell cycle control. Here we focus on genus-specific variations in genome structure and replication, and review host cell responses that modulate the nuclear environment.

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in a child with human parvovirus B19 infection.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Cláudia; Cunha, Francisco; Mota, Teresa C; Carvalho, José M; Simões, Joana S; Aparicio, José M

    2005-11-01

    A 6-year-old girl developed shock and multiple organ dysfunction including acute respiratory distress syndrome in association with parvovirus B19 infection. The diagnosis was based on positive antibodies and the detection of parvovirus 19 DNA in serum, bronchial secretions and skin biopsy. It seems likely, but it was not proved, that the parvovirus infection caused acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Seal Parvovirus, 1988–2014

    PubMed Central

    Bodewes, Rogier; Hapsari, Rebriarina; Rubio García, Ana; Sánchez Contreras, Guillermo J.; van de Bildt, Marco W. G.; de Graaf, Miranda; Kuiken, Thijs; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2014-01-01

    A novel parvovirus was discovered recently in the brain of a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) with chronic meningo-encephalitis. Phylogenetic analysis of this virus indicated that it belongs to the genus Erythroparvovirus, to which also human parvovirus B19 belongs. In the present study, the prevalence, genetic diversity and clinical relevance of seal parvovirus (SePV) infections was evaluated in both harbor and grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) that lived in Northwestern European coastal waters from 1988 to 2014. To this end, serum and tissue samples collected from seals were tested for the presence of seal parvovirus DNA by real-time PCR and the sequences of the partial NS gene and the complete VP2 gene of positive samples were determined. Seal parvovirus DNA was detected in nine (8%) of the spleen tissues tested and in one (0.5%) of the serum samples tested, including samples collected from seals that died in 1988. Sequence analysis of the partial NS and complete VP2 genes of nine SePV revealed multiple sites with nucleotide substitutions but only one amino acid change in the VP2 gene. Estimated nucleotide substitution rates per year were 2.00×10−4 for the partial NS gene and 1.15×10−4 for the complete VP2 gene. Most samples containing SePV DNA were co-infected with phocine herpesvirus 1 or PDV, so no conclusions could be drawn about the clinical impact of SePV infection alone. The present study is one of the few in which the mutation rates of parvoviruses were evaluated over a period of more than 20 years, especially in a wildlife population, providing additional insights into the genetic diversity of parvoviruses. PMID:25390639

  11. Molecular epidemiology of seal parvovirus, 1988-2014.

    PubMed

    Bodewes, Rogier; Hapsari, Rebriarina; Rubio García, Ana; Sánchez Contreras, Guillermo J; van de Bildt, Marco W G; de Graaf, Miranda; Kuiken, Thijs; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2014-01-01

    A novel parvovirus was discovered recently in the brain of a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) with chronic meningo-encephalitis. Phylogenetic analysis of this virus indicated that it belongs to the genus Erythroparvovirus, to which also human parvovirus B19 belongs. In the present study, the prevalence, genetic diversity and clinical relevance of seal parvovirus (SePV) infections was evaluated in both harbor and grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) that lived in Northwestern European coastal waters from 1988 to 2014. To this end, serum and tissue samples collected from seals were tested for the presence of seal parvovirus DNA by real-time PCR and the sequences of the partial NS gene and the complete VP2 gene of positive samples were determined. Seal parvovirus DNA was detected in nine (8%) of the spleen tissues tested and in one (0.5%) of the serum samples tested, including samples collected from seals that died in 1988. Sequence analysis of the partial NS and complete VP2 genes of nine SePV revealed multiple sites with nucleotide substitutions but only one amino acid change in the VP2 gene. Estimated nucleotide substitution rates per year were 2.00 × 10(-4) for the partial NS gene and 1.15 × 10(-4) for the complete VP2 gene. Most samples containing SePV DNA were co-infected with phocine herpesvirus 1 or PDV, so no conclusions could be drawn about the clinical impact of SePV infection alone. The present study is one of the few in which the mutation rates of parvoviruses were evaluated over a period of more than 20 years, especially in a wildlife population, providing additional insights into the genetic diversity of parvoviruses.

  12. Experimental infection of mice with hamster parvovirus: evidence for interspecies transmission of mouse parvovirus 3.

    PubMed

    Christie, Rachel D; Marcus, Emily C; Wagner, April M; Besselsen, David G

    2010-04-01

    Hamster parvovirus (HaPV) was isolated 2 decades ago from hamsters with clinical signs similar to those induced in hamsters experimentally infected with other rodent parvoviruses. Genetically, HaPV is most closely related to mouse parvovirus (MPV), which induces subclinical infection in mice. A novel MPV strain, MPV3, was detected recently in naturally infected mice, and genomic sequence analysis indicates that MPV3 is almost identical to HaPV. The goal of the present studies was to examine the infectivity of HaPV in mice. Neonatal and weanling mice of several mouse strains were inoculated with HaPV. Tissues, excretions, and sera were harvested at 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk after inoculation and evaluated by quantitative PCR and serologic assays specific for HaPV. Quantitative PCR detected viral DNA quantities that greatly exceeded the quantity of virus in inocula in multiple tissues of infected mice. Seroconversion to both nonstructural and structural viral proteins was detected in most immunocompetent mice 2 or more weeks after inoculation with HaPV. In neonatal SCID mice, viral transcripts were detected in lymphoid tissues by RT-PCR and viral DNA was detected in feces by quantitative PCR at 8 wk after inoculation. No clinical signs, gross, or histologic lesions were observed. These findings are similar to those observed in mice infected with MPV. These data support the hypothesis that HaPV and MPV3 are likely variants of the same viral species, for which the mouse is the natural rodent host with rare interspecies transmission to the hamster.

  13. Experimental Infection of Mice with Hamster Parvovirus: Evidence for Interspecies Transmission of Mouse Parvovirus 3

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Rachel D; Marcus, Emily C; Wagner, April M; Besselsen, David G

    2010-01-01

    Hamster parvovirus (HaPV) was isolated 2 decades ago from hamsters with clinical signs similar to those induced in hamsters experimentally infected with other rodent parvoviruses. Genetically, HaPV is most closely related to mouse parvovirus (MPV), which induces subclinical infection in mice. A novel MPV strain, MPV3, was detected recently in naturally infected mice, and genomic sequence analysis indicates that MPV3 is almost identical to HaPV. The goal of the present studies was to examine the infectivity of HaPV in mice. Neonatal and weanling mice of several mouse strains were inoculated with HaPV. Tissues, excretions, and sera were harvested at 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk after inoculation and evaluated by quantitative PCR and serologic assays specific for HaPV. Quantitative PCR detected viral DNA quantities that greatly exceeded the quantity of virus in inocula in multiple tissues of infected mice. Seroconversion to both nonstructural and structural viral proteins was detected in most immunocompetent mice 2 or more weeks after inoculation with HaPV. In neonatal SCID mice, viral transcripts were detected in lymphoid tissues by RT-PCR and viral DNA was detected in feces by quantitative PCR at 8 wk after inoculation. No clinical signs, gross, or histologic lesions were observed. These findings are similar to those observed in mice infected with MPV. These data support the hypothesis that HaPV and MPV3 are likely variants of the same viral species, for which the mouse is the natural rodent host with rare interspecies transmission to the hamster. PMID:20412687

  14. Virotherapy of digestive tumors with rodent parvovirus: overview and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Akladios, Cherif; Aprahamian, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Toolan's H-1 parvovirus (H-1PV) exerts a cytotoxic/oncolytic effect, predominantly mediated by its non-structural protein (NS1). This rat parvovirus is harmless, unlike other parvoviruses, and its antitumor potential may be useful to clinicians as its oncolytic action appears to be true in numerous non-digestive and digestive cancers. After a brief review of parvovirus genus and biology, we summarize the proposed mechanisms to explain the cytotoxicity of H-1PV to tumors which results in dysregulation of cell transcription, cell-cycle arrest, termination of cell replication, activation of cellular stress response and induction of cell death. Viral oncolysis induces a strong tumor-specific immune response leading to the recognition and elimination of minimal residual disease. As the action of H-1PV is not limited to the digestive tract, we initially analyse studies performed in non-digestive cancers such as glioma (as the virus is able to cross the blood brain barrier), and then focused more particularly on the results in digestive cancers. Based on the results of studies showing little H-1PV toxicity to living bodies, we advocate for the use of the parvovirus in cancers such as melanoma, glioma and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in addition to conventional chemotherapy.

  15. Seroprevalence of cytomegalovirus, toxoplasma and parvovirus in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wong, A; Tan, K H; Tee, C S; Yeo, G S

    2000-04-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the seroprevalence of cytomegalovirus (CMV), toxoplasma and parvovirus infection in our local antenatal population, and to see the effects, if any, of age, race, parity and nationality on its seroprevalence. The sera of 120 consecutive antenatal women seen in KK Women's and Children's Hospital between the period of October 1997 and March 1998 were screened for cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgG, toxoplasma IgG and parvovirus B19 IgG and IgM. An antibody titer greater than 1:32 was regarded as positive. A total of 87.0% of patients were tested seropositive for CMV IgG, 17.2% seropositive for toxoplasma IgG and 30.0% seropositive for parvovirus IgG. There seemed to be a trend of increasing seropositivity with age in all three groups, however only parovirus B19 reached statistical significance. The incidence of all three infections were higher among the Malays, Indians and other races compared to the Chinese. CMV is endemic in our population and hence the most common infection. Toxoplasmosis and parvovirus is relatively low in our population but this implies that a large proportion of our antenatal women are still susceptible to these infections. Prevention of congenital CMV, toxoplasmosis and parvovirus infection is mainly by educating the antenatal population.

  16. Detection and differentiation of human parvovirus variants by commercial quantitative real-time PCR tests.

    PubMed

    Hokynar, Kati; Norja, Päivi; Laitinen, Harri; Palomäki, Pekka; Garbarg-Chenon, Antoine; Ranki, Annamari; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria

    2004-05-01

    Parvovirus B19 causes a variety of diseases in humans, with outcomes ranging from asymptomatic to severe, such as chronic anemia in immunocompromised patients or fetal hydrops and death after maternal infection during pregnancy. The virus may be transmitted via plasma-derived products. According to the results of solvent-detergent safety studies, an upper limit of B19 DNA in plasma pools was recently defined. To restrict the input of B19 virus into production pools, a quantitative nucleic acid test is a prerequisite. We examined the suitability of the two commercial quantitative B19 PCR tests, LightCycler-Parvovirus B19 quantification kit (Roche Diagnostics) and RealArt Parvo B19 LC PCR (Artus) for detection, quantification, and differentiation of the three known B19 genotypes, including the newly described erythrovirus variants (genotypes 2 and 3). The former kit was highly sensitive for genotype 1 but was not suitable for detection of genotype 2 or one of two genotype 3 strains. The latter kit detected and differentiated all three genotypes, albeit with lower sensitivity for one of the genotype-3 strains. We furthermore assessed the prevalence of the three B19 virus genotypes in blood donors, by screening pooled plasma samples derived from 140,160 Finnish blood-donor units. None of the pools contained detectable levels of B19 virus genotypes 2 or 3. The origin, mode of transmission, and clinical significance of these genotypes are unknown and deserve further study. The RealArt Parvo B19 LC PCR is suitable for detection, quantification, and differentiation of all three B19 virus genotypes in molecular and clinical research.

  17. Fetal Macrosomia

    MedlinePlus

    ... previously been diagnosed with diabetes, after childbirth your health care provider will test you for the condition. During future pregnancies, you'll be closely monitored for signs and symptoms of gestational diabetes — a type ... health care provider suspects fetal macrosomia during your pregnancy, you ...

  18. Novel parvoviruses in reptiles and genome sequence of a lizard parvovirus shed light on Dependoparvovirus genus evolution.

    PubMed

    Pénzes, Judit J; Pham, Hanh T; Benkö, Mária; Tijssen, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Here, we report the detection and partial genome characterization of two novel reptilian parvoviruses derived from a short-tailed pygmy chameleon (Rampholeon brevicaudatus) and a corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus) along with the complete genome analysis of the first lizard parvovirus, obtained from four bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps). Both homology searches and phylogenetic tree reconstructions demonstrated that all are members of the genus Dependoparvovirus. Even though most dependoparvoviruses replicate efficiently only in co-infections with large DNA viruses, no such agents could be detected in one of the bearded dragon samples, hence the possibility of autonomous replication was explored. The alternative ORF encoding the full assembly activating protein (AAP), typical for the genus, could be obtained from reptilian parvoviruses for the first time, with a structure that appears to be more ancient than that of avian and mammalian parvoviruses. All three viruses were found to harbour short introns as previously observed for snake adeno-associated virus, shorter than that of any non-reptilian dependoparvovirus. According to the phylogenetic calculations based on full non-structural protein (Rep) and AAP sequences, the monophyletic cluster of reptilian parvoviruses seems to be the most basal out of all lineages of genus Dependoparvovirus. The suspected ability for autonomous replication, results of phylogenetic tree reconstruction, intron lengths and the structure of the AAP suggested that a single Squamata origin instead of the earlier assumed diapsid (common avian-reptilian) origin is more likely for the genus Dependoparvovirus of the family Parvoviridae.

  19. The structure and host entry of an invertebrate parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Meng, Geng; Zhang, Xinzheng; Plevka, Pavel; Yu, Qian; Tijssen, Peter; Rossmann, Michael G

    2013-12-01

    The 3.5-Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of mature cricket parvovirus (Acheta domesticus densovirus [AdDNV]) has been determined. Structural comparisons show that vertebrate and invertebrate parvoviruses have evolved independently, although there are common structural features among all parvovirus capsid proteins. It was shown that raising the temperature of the AdDNV particles caused a loss of their genomes. The structure of these emptied particles was determined by cryo-electron microscopy to 5.5-Å resolution, and the capsid structure was found to be the same as that for the full, mature virus except for the absence of the three ordered nucleotides observed in the crystal structure. The viral protein 1 (VP1) amino termini could be externalized without significant damage to the capsid. In vitro, this externalization of the VP1 amino termini is accompanied by the release of the viral genome.

  20. The Structure and Host Entry of an Invertebrate Parvovirus

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Geng; Zhang, Xinzheng; Plevka, Pavel; Yu, Qian; Tijssen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The 3.5-Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of mature cricket parvovirus (Acheta domesticus densovirus [AdDNV]) has been determined. Structural comparisons show that vertebrate and invertebrate parvoviruses have evolved independently, although there are common structural features among all parvovirus capsid proteins. It was shown that raising the temperature of the AdDNV particles caused a loss of their genomes. The structure of these emptied particles was determined by cryo-electron microscopy to 5.5-Å resolution, and the capsid structure was found to be the same as that for the full, mature virus except for the absence of the three ordered nucleotides observed in the crystal structure. The viral protein 1 (VP1) amino termini could be externalized without significant damage to the capsid. In vitro, this externalization of the VP1 amino termini is accompanied by the release of the viral genome. PMID:24027306

  1. Biology, genome organization, and evolution of parvoviruses in marine shrimp.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Arun K; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Saksmerprome, Vanvimon; Lakshman, Dilip K

    2014-01-01

    As shrimp aquaculture has evolved from a subsistent farming activity to an economically important global industry, viral diseases have also become a serious threat to the sustainable growth and productivity of this industry. Parvoviruses represent an economically important group of viruses that has greatly affected shrimp aquaculture. In the early 1980s, an outbreak of a shrimp parvovirus, infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV), led to the collapse of penaeid shrimp farming in the Americas. Since then, considerable progress has been made in characterizing the parvoviruses of shrimp and developing diagnostic methods aimed to preventing the spread of diseases caused by these viruses. To date, four parvoviruses are known that infect shrimp; these include IHHNV, hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV), spawner-isolated mortality virus (SMV), and lymphoid organ parvo-like virus. Due to the economic repercussions that IHHNV and HPV outbreaks have caused to shrimp farming over the years, studies have been focused mostly on these two pathogens, while information on SMV and LPV remains limited. IHHNV was the first shrimp virus to be sequenced and the first for which highly sensitive diagnostic methods were developed. IHHNV-resistant lines of shrimp were also developed to mitigate the losses caused by this virus. While the losses due to IHHNV have been largely contained in recent years, reports of HPV-induced mortalities in larval stages in hatchery and losses due to reduced growth have increased. This review presents a comprehensive account of the history and current knowledge on the biology, diagnostics methods, genomic features, mechanisms of evolution, and management strategies of shrimp parvoviruses. We also highlighted areas where research efforts should be focused in order to gain further insight on the mechanisms of parvoviral pathogenicity in shrimp that will help to prevent future losses caused by these viruses. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  2. Evidence for Vertical Transmission of Novel Duck-Origin Goose Parvovirus-Related Parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Tang, Y; Dou, Y; Zheng, X; Diao, Y

    2016-06-01

    In 2015, novel duck-origin goose parvovirus-related parvovirus (N-GPV) infection progressively appeared in commercial Cherry Valley duck flocks in North China. Diseased ducks were observed to have beak atrophy and dwarfism syndrome (BADS). A previous study showed that a high seropositive rate for N-GPV indicated a latent infection in most breeder duck flocks. To investigate this possibility in hatching eggs collected from N-GPV-infected breeder ducks, 120 eggs were collected at various stages of embryonic development for viral DNA detection and an N-GPV-specific antibody test. N-GPV DNA was present in nine hatching eggs, eleven duck embryo and eight newly hatched ducklings. Of the newly hatched ducklings, 58.33% (21/36) were seropositive. Further, two isolates were obtained from a 12-day-old duck embryo and a newly hatched duckling. N-GPV infection did not reduce the fertilization rate and hatchability. These results indicate possible vertical transmission of N-GPV and suggest that it may be transmitted from breeder ducks to ducklings in ovo.

  3. Recombinant vaccine for canine parvovirus in dogs.

    PubMed

    López de Turiso, J A; Cortés, E; Martínez, C; Ruiz de Ybáñez, R; Simarro, I; Vela, C; Casal, I

    1992-05-01

    VP2 is the major component of canine parvovirus (CPV) capsids. The VP2-coding gene was engineered to be expressed by a recombinant baculovirus under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. A transfer vector that contains the lacZ gene under the control of the p10 promoter was used in order to facilitate the selection of recombinants. The expressed VP2 was found to be structurally and immunologically indistinguishable from authentic VP2. The recombinant VP2 shows also the capability to self-assemble, forming viruslike particles similar in size and appearance to CPV virions. These viruslike particles have been used to immunize dogs in different doses and combinations of adjuvants, and the anti-CPV responses have been measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, monolayer protection assays, and an assay for the inhibition of hemagglutination. A dose of ca. 10 micrograms of VP2 was able to elicit a good protective response, higher than that obtained with a commercially available, inactivated vaccine. The results indicate that these viruslike particles can be used to protect dogs from CPV infection.

  4. Recombinant vaccine for canine parvovirus in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    López de Turiso, J A; Cortés, E; Martínez, C; Ruiz de Ybáñez, R; Simarro, I; Vela, C; Casal, I

    1992-01-01

    VP2 is the major component of canine parvovirus (CPV) capsids. The VP2-coding gene was engineered to be expressed by a recombinant baculovirus under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. A transfer vector that contains the lacZ gene under the control of the p10 promoter was used in order to facilitate the selection of recombinants. The expressed VP2 was found to be structurally and immunologically indistinguishable from authentic VP2. The recombinant VP2 shows also the capability to self-assemble, forming viruslike particles similar in size and appearance to CPV virions. These viruslike particles have been used to immunize dogs in different doses and combinations of adjuvants, and the anti-CPV responses have been measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, monolayer protection assays, and an assay for the inhibition of hemagglutination. A dose of ca. 10 micrograms of VP2 was able to elicit a good protective response, higher than that obtained with a commercially available, inactivated vaccine. The results indicate that these viruslike particles can be used to protect dogs from CPV infection. Images PMID:1313899

  5. Transmission of mouse parvovirus to neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Compton, Susan R; Paturzo, Frank X; Macy, James D

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the infection of newborn mice with mouse parvovirus (MPV), a single MPV-infected mouse was added to each of 15 cages, each of which housed an uninfected breeding pair of Swiss Webster mice just before parturition. Seven litters were left with their parents, and the remaining 8 litters were fostered at postpartum day 1. All dams were shedding MPV at 1 and 2 wk after exposure. Soiled-bedding transmission did not differ between cages with and without litters. Half the foster dams but none of the fostered pups seroconverted to MPV. None of the pups left with their birth mothers had MPV DNA in their feces at 3 or 6 wk after exposure, but pups in 6 of 7 litters were MPV seropositive at 6 wk. To investigate MPV infection of older neonatal mice, 9 dams with 7-d-old litters and 9 dams with 14-d-old litters each were exposed to an MPV-infected mouse. At weaning, pups exposed to MPV at 7 or 14 d of age were shedding MPV and were seronegative but became seropositive by 6 wk of age and transmitted the infection to sentinels. In conclusion, fostering of pups had no benefit and may spread infection because the pups may act as fomites, infecting the foster dam. Infection of 7- or 14-d-old mice likely occurred because maternal antibodies had not been transferred to the progeny before they began to ingest MPV-laden feces.

  6. Genotyping of Canine parvovirus in western Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Roldán, César; Páez-Magallan, Varinia; Charles-Niño, Claudia; Elizondo-Quiroga, Darwin; De Cervantes-Mireles, Raúl Leonel; López-Amezcua, Mario Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is one of the most common infectious agents related to high morbidity rates in dogs. In addition, the virus is associated with severe gastroenteritis, diarrhea, and vomiting, resulting in high death rates, especially in puppies and nonvaccinated dogs. To date, there are 3 variants of the virus (CPV-2a, CPV-2b, and CPV-2c) circulating worldwide. In Mexico, reports describing the viral variants circulating in dog populations are lacking. In response to this deficiency, a total of 41 fecal samples of suspected dogs were collected from October 2013 through April 2014 in the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Guadalajara in western Mexico. From these, 24 samples resulted positive by polymerase chain reaction, and the viral variant was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Five positive diagnosed samples were selected for partial sequencing of the vp2 gene and codon analysis. The results demonstrated that the current dominant viral variant in Mexico is CPV-2c. The current study describes the genotyping of CPV strains, providing valuable evidence of the dominant frequency of this virus in a dog population from western Mexico. © 2014 The Author(s).

  7. Parvovirus-B19 and hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Yetgin, Sevgi; Aytaç Elmas, Selin

    2010-12-05

    Parvovirus-B19 (PV-B19) is a member of Parvoviridae, which is one of the smallest DNA viruses. PV-B19-associated diseases usually serve as a good representation of the balance of virus, host response and the immune system. The diseases manifested with PV-B19 are erythema infectiosum, which is common in children, hydrops fetalis, transient pure red cell aplasia in patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, arthralgia - mostly observed in women, and chronic pure red cell aplasia in immunocompromised individuals. Cytopenia (bicytopenia, monocytopenia or pancytopenia) may also accompany the diseases mentioned above. On the other hand, there are many diseases, including neurologic, vasculitic, hepatic, rheumatoid, nephritic, autoimmune, myocardial, and others in which the mechanisms of the diseases are not clear, which may be associated with PV-B19. The virus may manifest with unexpected and unexplained clinical pictures and lead to misdiagnosis. Therefore, hematologic disorders in any unestablished clinical diagnosis should be investigated for PV-B19 infection. However, serologic examination for PV-B19 diagnosis is not sufficient in immunocompromised status. The virus can be determined with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the serum or tissue samples. Supportive therapy, blood transfusion and immunoglobulin are the conventional therapeutic interventions for PV-B19 today. Vaccination studies are under examination.

  8. [Diagnostic tools for canine parvovirus infection].

    PubMed

    Proksch, A L; Hartmann, K

    2015-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) infection is one of the most important and common infectious diseases in dogs, in particular affecting young puppies when maternal antibodies have waned and vaccine-induced antibodies have not yet developed. The mortality rate remains high. Therefore, a rapid and safe diagnostic tool is essential to diagnose the disease to 1) provide intensive care treatment and 2) to identify virus-shedding animals and thus prevent virus spread. Whilst the detection of antibodies against CPV is considered unsuitable to diagnose the disease, there are several different methods to directly detect complete virus, virus antigen or DNA. Additionally, to test in commercial laboratories, rapid in-house tests based on ELISA are available worldwide. The specificity of the ELISA rapid in-house tests is reported to be excellent. However, results on sensitivity vary and high numbers of false-negative results are commonly reported, which potentially leads to misdiagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a very sensitive and specific diagnostic tool. It also provides the opportunity to differentiate vaccine strains from natural infection when sequencing is performed after PCR.

  9. Intracellular route of canine parvovirus entry.

    PubMed

    Vihinen-Ranta, M; Kalela, A; Mäkinen, P; Kakkola, L; Marjomäki, V; Vuento, M

    1998-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the endocytic pathway involved in canine parvovirus (CPV) infection. Reduced temperature (18 degrees C) or the microtubule-depolymerizing drug nocodazole was found to inhibit productive infection of canine A72 cells by CPV and caused CPV to be retained in cytoplasmic vesicles as indicated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Consistent with previously published results, these data indicate that CPV enters a host cell via an endocytic route and further suggest that microtubule-dependent delivery of CPV to late endosomes is required for productive infection. Cytoplasmic microinjection of CPV particles was used to circumvent the endocytosis and membrane fusion steps in the entry process. Microinjection experiments showed that CPV particles which were injected directly into the cytoplasm, thus avoiding the endocytic pathway, were unable to initiate progeny virus production. CPV treated at pH 5.0 prior to microinjection was unable to initiate virus production, showing that factors of the endocytic route other than low pH are necessary for the initiation of infection by CPV.

  10. Intracellular Route of Canine Parvovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Kalela, Anne; Mäkinen, Päivi; Kakkola, Laura; Marjomäki, Varpu; Vuento, Matti

    1998-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the endocytic pathway involved in canine parvovirus (CPV) infection. Reduced temperature (18°C) or the microtubule-depolymerizing drug nocodazole was found to inhibit productive infection of canine A72 cells by CPV and caused CPV to be retained in cytoplasmic vesicles as indicated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Consistent with previously published results, these data indicate that CPV enters a host cell via an endocytic route and further suggest that microtubule-dependent delivery of CPV to late endosomes is required for productive infection. Cytoplasmic microinjection of CPV particles was used to circumvent the endocytosis and membrane fusion steps in the entry process. Microinjection experiments showed that CPV particles which were injected directly into the cytoplasm, thus avoiding the endocytic pathway, were unable to initiate progeny virus production. CPV treated at pH 5.0 prior to microinjection was unable to initiate virus production, showing that factors of the endocytic route other than low pH are necessary for the initiation of infection by CPV. PMID:9420290

  11. Parvovirus B19-Induced Apoptosis of Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Brian D.; Karetnyi, Yuory V.; Naides, Stanley J.

    2004-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19 virus) can persist in multiple tissues and has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including acute fulminant liver failure. The mechanism by which B19 virus induces liver failure remains unknown. Hepatocytes are nonpermissive for B19 virus replication. We previously reported that acute fulminant liver failure associated with B19 virus infection was characterized by hepatocellular dropout. We inoculated both primary hepatocytes and the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Hep G2 with B19 virus and assayed for apoptosis by using annexin V staining. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis and immunofluorescence demonstrated that B19 virus was able to infect the cells and produce its nonstructural protein but little or no structural capsid protein. Infection with B19 virus induced means of 28% of Hep G2 cells and 10% of primary hepatocytes to undergo apoptosis, which were four- and threefold increases, respectively, over background levels. Analysis of caspase involvement showed that B19 virus-inoculated cultures had a significant increase in the number of cells with active caspase 3. Inhibition studies demonstrated that caspases 3 and 9, but not caspase 8, are required for B19 virus-induced apoptosis. PMID:15220451

  12. Molecular epidemiology of canine parvovirus in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Amrani, Nadia; Desario, Costantina; Kadiri, Ahlam; Cavalli, Alessandra; Berrada, Jaouad; Zro, Khalil; Sebbar, Ghizlane; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Parisi, Antonio; Elia, Gabriella; Buonavoglia, Canio; Malik, Jamal; Decaro, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Since it first emergence in the mid-1970's, canine parvovirus 2 (CPV-2) has evolved giving rise to new antigenic variants termed CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c, which have completely replaced the original strain and had been variously distributed worldwide. In Africa limited data are available on epidemiological prevalence of these new types. Hence, the aim of the present study was to determine circulating variants in Morocco. Through TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay, 91 samples, collected from symptomatic dogs originating from various cities between 2011 and 2015, were diagnosed. Positive specimens were characterised by means of minor groove binder (MGB) probe PCR. The results showed that all samples but one (98.9%) were CPV positive, of which 1 (1.1%) was characterised as CPV-2a, 43 (47.7%) as CPV-2b and 39 (43.3%) as CPV-2c. Interestingly, a co-infection with CPV-2b and CPV-2c was detected in 4 (4.4%) samples and 3 (3.3%) samples were not characterised. Sequencing of the full VP2 gene revealed these 3 uncharacterised strains as CPV-2c, displaying a change G4068A responsible for the replacement of aspartic acid with asparagine at residue 427, impacting the MGB probe binding. In this work we provide a better understanding of the current status of prevailing CPV strains in northern Africa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Parvovirus particles as platforms for protein presentation.

    PubMed Central

    Miyamura, K; Kajigaya, S; Momoeda, M; Smith-Gill, S J; Young, N S

    1994-01-01

    Empty capsids of the human pathogenic parvovirus B19 can be produced in a baculovirus system. B19 capsids are composed mainly of major capsid protein (VP2) and a small amount of minor capsid protein (VP1); VP1 is identical to VP2 but contains an additional 227-aa N-terminal region ("unique" region). A portion of that region of VP1 is external to the capsid, and VP1 is not required for capsid formation. We substituted the unique region with a sequence encoding the 147 aa of hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) and constructed recombinant baculoviruses with variable amounts of retained VP1 sequence joined to the VP2 backbone. After cotransfection with VP2 baculovirus and expression in insect cells, capsids were purified by density sedimentation. Purified recombinant capsids contained HEL. External presentation of HEL was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation, ELISA, and immune electron microscopy using anti-lysozyme monoclonal antibodies or specific rabbit antisera. Empty particles showed enzymatic activity in a micrococcal cell wall digestion assay. Rabbits inoculated with capsids made antibodies to HEL. Intact heterologous protein can be incorporated in B19 particles and presented on the capsid surface, properties that may be useful in vaccine development, cell targeting, and gene therapy. Images PMID:8078912

  14. Fetal electrocardiograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Heriberto; Andrade, Armando; Puente, Ernestina; Lizana, Pablo R.; Mendoza, Diego

    2002-11-01

    The high intra-uterine death rate is due to failure in appropriately diagnosing some problems in the cardiobreathing system of the fetus during pregnancy. The electrocardiograph is one apparatus which might detect problems at an early stage. With electrodes located near the womb and uterus, in a way similar to the normal technique, the detection of so-called biopotential differences, caused by concentrations of ions, can be achieved. The fetal electrocardiograph is based on an ultrasound technique aimed at detecting intrauterine problems in pregnant women, because it is a noninvasive technique due to the very low level of ultrasound power used. With this system, the following tests can be done: Heart movements from the ninth week onwards; Rapid and safe diagnosis of intrauterine fetal death; Location and size of the placenta. The construction of the fetal electrocardiograph requires instrument level components directly mounted on the printed circuit board, in order to avoid stray capacitance in the cabling which prevents the detection of the E.C.G. activity. The low cost of the system makes it affordable to low budget institutions; in contrast, available commercial systems are priced in U.S. Dollars. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  15. CpG Dinucleotide Frequencies Reveal the Role of Host Methylation Capabilities in Parvovirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Mohita; Samal, Jasmine; Kandpal, Manish; Vasaikar, Suhas; Biswas, Banhi; Gomes, James

    2013-01-01

    Parvoviruses are rapidly evolving viruses that infect a wide range of hosts, including vertebrates and invertebrates. Extensive methylation of the parvovirus genome has been recently demonstrated. A global pattern of methylation of CpG dinucleotides is seen in vertebrate genomes, compared to “fractional” methylation patterns in invertebrate genomes. It remains unknown if the loss of CpG dinucleotides occurs in all viruses of a given DNA virus family that infect host species spanning across vertebrates and invertebrates. We investigated the link between the extent of CpG dinucleotide depletion among autonomous parvoviruses and the evolutionary lineage of the infected host. We demonstrate major differences in the relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides among autonomous parvoviruses which share similar genome organization and common ancestry, depending on the infected host species. Parvoviruses infecting vertebrate hosts had significantly lower relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides than parvoviruses infecting invertebrate hosts. The strong correlation of CpG dinucleotide depletion with the gain in TpG/CpA dinucleotides and the loss of TpA dinucleotides among parvoviruses suggests a major role for CpG methylation in the evolution of parvoviruses. Our data present evidence that links the relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides in parvoviruses to the methylation capabilities of the infected host. In sum, our findings support a novel perspective of host-driven evolution among autonomous parvoviruses. PMID:24109231

  16. CpG dinucleotide frequencies reveal the role of host methylation capabilities in parvovirus evolution.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Mohita; Samal, Jasmine; Kandpal, Manish; Vasaikar, Suhas; Biswas, Banhi; Gomes, James; Vivekanandan, Perumal

    2013-12-01

    Parvoviruses are rapidly evolving viruses that infect a wide range of hosts, including vertebrates and invertebrates. Extensive methylation of the parvovirus genome has been recently demonstrated. A global pattern of methylation of CpG dinucleotides is seen in vertebrate genomes, compared to "fractional" methylation patterns in invertebrate genomes. It remains unknown if the loss of CpG dinucleotides occurs in all viruses of a given DNA virus family that infect host species spanning across vertebrates and invertebrates. We investigated the link between the extent of CpG dinucleotide depletion among autonomous parvoviruses and the evolutionary lineage of the infected host. We demonstrate major differences in the relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides among autonomous parvoviruses which share similar genome organization and common ancestry, depending on the infected host species. Parvoviruses infecting vertebrate hosts had significantly lower relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides than parvoviruses infecting invertebrate hosts. The strong correlation of CpG dinucleotide depletion with the gain in TpG/CpA dinucleotides and the loss of TpA dinucleotides among parvoviruses suggests a major role for CpG methylation in the evolution of parvoviruses. Our data present evidence that links the relative abundance of CpG dinucleotides in parvoviruses to the methylation capabilities of the infected host. In sum, our findings support a novel perspective of host-driven evolution among autonomous parvoviruses.

  17. Inactivation of Avian Influenza Virus, Newcastle Disease Virus and Goose Parvovirus Using Solution of Nano-Sized Scallop Shell Powder

    PubMed Central

    THAMMAKARN, Chanathip; SATOH, Keisuke; SUGURO, Atsushi; HAKIM, Hakimullah; RUENPHET, Sakchai; TAKEHARA, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scallop shell powder produced by calcination process − the average diameter of the powder particles being 20 µm (SSP) − was further ground into nano-sized particles, with average diameter of 500 nm, here designated CaO-Nano. Solution of CaO-Nano could inactivate avian influenza virus within 5 sec, whereas the solution of SSP could not even after 1 hr incubation. CaO-Nano solution could also inactivate Newcastle disease virus and goose parvovirus within 5 sec and 30 sec, respectively. The virus-inactivating capacity (neutralizing index: NI>3) of the solution was not reduced by the presence of 20% fetal bovine serum. CaO-Nano solution seems to be a good candidate of materials for enhancement of biosecurity in farms. PMID:24871643

  18. Inactivation of avian influenza virus, newcastle disease virus and goose parvovirus using solution of nano-sized scallop shell powder.

    PubMed

    Thammakarn, Chanathip; Satoh, Keisuke; Suguro, Atsushi; Hakim, Hakimullah; Ruenphet, Sakchai; Takehara, Kazuaki

    2014-09-01

    Scallop shell powder produced by calcination process - the average diameter of the powder particles being 20 µm (SSP) - was further ground into nano-sized particles, with average diameter of 500 nm, here designated CaO-Nano. Solution of CaO-Nano could inactivate avian influenza virus within 5 sec, whereas the solution of SSP could not even after 1 hr incubation. CaO-Nano solution could also inactivate Newcastle disease virus and goose parvovirus within 5 sec and 30 sec, respectively. The virus-inactivating capacity (neutralizing index: NI>3) of the solution was not reduced by the presence of 20% fetal bovine serum. CaO-Nano solution seems to be a good candidate of materials for enhancement of biosecurity in farms.

  19. Successful experimental challenge of dogs with canine parvovirus-2.

    PubMed Central

    Carman, S; Povey, C

    1982-01-01

    Withholding food from dogs for 24 hours prior to, and for 48 hours following oral challenge with a gut mucosal homogenate of canine parvovirus-2, was a successful means of reproducing gastroenteric signs of canine parvovirus-2 infection. Twenty-one of 24 dogs, which had previously received various vaccine preparations of mink enteritis virus or were unvaccinated, and which were starved at challenge, developed soft or liquid feces with large or without large clots of mucus. Altered feces were most frequent on postexposure day 11. Seven dogs passed frank blood in their stools on one or more occasions and seven dogs vomited sporadically. Pyrexia was noted in 71.6% of the dogs on postexposure day 6 and lymphopenia was detected on postexposure day 5 or 6 in 50% of the dogs monitored. In contrast, four dogs not starved at the time of challenge remained free of gastrointestinal signs apart from one dog which passed a soft stool with scant mucus on one day, postexposure day 6. Also four dogs vaccinated with a killed canine parvovirus-2 vaccine preparation and subsequently starved at the time of challenge, remained clinically healthy. Apart from these last mentioned four dogs, all others shed canine parvovirus-2 in their feces following challenge. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6280819

  20. First detection of canine parvovirus type 2c in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Streck, André Felipe; de Souza, Carine Kunzler; Gonçalves, Karla Rathje; Zang, Luciana; Pinto, Luciane Dubina; Canal, Cláudio Wageck

    2009-01-01

    The presence of canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), 2a and 2b has been described in Brazil, however, the type 2c had not been reported until now. In the current study, seven out of nine samples from dogs with diarrhea were characterized as CPV-2c, indicating that this virus is already circulating in the Brazilian canine population. PMID:24031389

  1. Antibody to porcine parvovirus in warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus).

    PubMed

    Thomson, G R; Peenze, I

    1980-03-01

    Haemagglutination inhibiting antibody to porcine parvovirus was shown to be widespread in all but one of the warthog populations sampled from South Africa and Zimbabwe Rhodesia. In some instances titres as high as greater than or equal to 1/20 000 were detected.

  2. Parvovirus Induced Alterations in Nuclear Architecture and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Niskanen, Einari A.; Jylhävä, Juulia; Paloheimo, Outi; Dross, Nicolas; Smolander, Hanna; Langowski, Jörg; Timonen, Jussi; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija

    2009-01-01

    The nucleus of interphase eukaryotic cell is a highly compartmentalized structure containing the three-dimensional network of chromatin and numerous proteinaceous subcompartments. DNA viruses induce profound changes in the intranuclear structures of their host cells. We are applying a combination of confocal imaging including photobleaching microscopy and computational methods to analyze the modifications of nuclear architecture and dynamics in parvovirus infected cells. Upon canine parvovirus infection, expansion of the viral replication compartment is accompanied by chromatin marginalization to the vicinity of the nuclear membrane. Dextran microinjection and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) studies revealed the homogeneity of this compartment. Markedly, in spite of increase in viral DNA content of the nucleus, a significant increase in the protein mobility was observed in infected compared to non-infected cells. Moreover, analyzis of the dynamics of photoactivable capsid protein demonstrated rapid intranuclear dynamics of viral capsids. Finally, quantitative FRAP and cellular modelling were used to determine the duration of viral genome replication. Altogether, our findings indicate that parvoviruses modify the nuclear structure and dynamics extensively. Intranuclear crowding of viral components leads to enlargement of the interchromosomal domain and to chromatin marginalization via depletion attraction. In conclusion, parvoviruses provide a useful model system for understanding the mechanisms of virus-induced intranuclear modifications. PMID:19536327

  3. Evidence of parvovirus replication in cerebral neurons of cats.

    PubMed

    Url, Angelika; Truyen, Uwe; Rebel-Bauder, Barbara; Weissenböck, Herbert; Schmidt, Peter

    2003-08-01

    The correlation between parvovirus infections and lesions in the central nervous system other than cerebellar hypoplasia was studied in 100 cats. The animals were necropsied with a history of various diseases, one third showing typical clinical and pathomorphological signs of panleukopenia. In 18 cats polyclonal antiserum against canine parvovirus consistently labeled neurons mainly in diencephalic regions, whereas the cerebellar cortex remained negative in all cases. In situ hybridization with digoxigenin-labeled minus-sense RNA probes, hybridizing with monomer-replicative form DNA or mRNA, revealed positive signals in nuclei of several neurons of the brain, again excluding the cerebellum. PCR applied to formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded brain tissue and intestinal tissues of the diseased cats and subsequent DNA sequence analysis yielded canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2)-like sequences in the central nervous system. Two aspects of these findings are intriguing: (i). parvoviruses appear to be capable of replicating in neurons, cells that are considered to be terminally differentiated and (ii). CPV-like viruses of the old antigenic type CPV-2 appear to be able to infect cats.

  4. Biology, genome organization and evolution of parvoviruses in marine shrimp

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A number of parvoviruses are now know to infect marine shrimp, and these viruses alone or in combination with other viruses have the potential to cause major losses in shrimp aquaculture globally. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the biology, genome organization, gene expression, and...

  5. Parvovirus 4–like Virus in Blood Products

    PubMed Central

    Szelei, Jozsef; Liu, Kaiyu; Li, Yi; Fernandes, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Porcine plasma and factor VIII preparations were screened for parvovirus 4 (PARV)–like viruses. Although the prevalence of PARV4-like viruses in plasma samples was relatively low, viruses appeared to be concentrated during manufacture of factor VIII. PARV4-like viruses from human and porcine origins coevolved likewise with their hosts. PMID:20202447

  6. Parvovirus induced alterations in nuclear architecture and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ihalainen, Teemu O; Niskanen, Einari A; Jylhävä, Juulia; Paloheimo, Outi; Dross, Nicolas; Smolander, Hanna; Langowski, Jörg; Timonen, Jussi; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija

    2009-06-17

    The nucleus of interphase eukaryotic cell is a highly compartmentalized structure containing the three-dimensional network of chromatin and numerous proteinaceous subcompartments. DNA viruses induce profound changes in the intranuclear structures of their host cells. We are applying a combination of confocal imaging including photobleaching microscopy and computational methods to analyze the modifications of nuclear architecture and dynamics in parvovirus infected cells. Upon canine parvovirus infection, expansion of the viral replication compartment is accompanied by chromatin marginalization to the vicinity of the nuclear membrane. Dextran microinjection and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) studies revealed the homogeneity of this compartment. Markedly, in spite of increase in viral DNA content of the nucleus, a significant increase in the protein mobility was observed in infected compared to non-infected cells. Moreover, analysis of the dynamics of photoactivable capsid protein demonstrated rapid intranuclear dynamics of viral capsids. Finally, quantitative FRAP and cellular modelling were used to determine the duration of viral genome replication. Altogether, our findings indicate that parvoviruses modify the nuclear structure and dynamics extensively. Intranuclear crowding of viral components leads to enlargement of the interchromosomal domain and to chromatin marginalization via depletion attraction. In conclusion, parvoviruses provide a useful model system for understanding the mechanisms of virus-induced intranuclear modifications.

  7. Parvovirus infection in a family with wheeze in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Postlethwaite, R.

    1986-01-01

    In a family outbreak of human parvovirus infection, a 59-year-old doctor had a prodromal illness with wheeze. This was followed by a distinct acute episode with itch and arthropathy and a two-month phase characterized by intermittent cough and wheeze. PMID:3018240

  8. Detection of a Novel Porcine Parvovirus in Chinese Swine Herds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To determine whether the recently reported novel porcine parvovirus type 4 (PPV4) is prevalent in China, a set of PPV4 specific primers were designed and used for the molecular survey of PPV4 among clinical samples. The results indicated a positive detection for PPV4 in Chinese swine herds of 1.84% ...

  9. Leukoencephalopathy Associated with Parvovirus Infection in Cretan Hound Puppies▿

    PubMed Central

    Schaudien, D.; Polizopoulou, Z.; Koutinas, A.; Schwab, S.; Porombka, D.; Baumgärtner, W.; Herden, C.

    2010-01-01

    Leukoencephalopathies in dogs encompass presumably inherited conditions such as leukodystrophies, hypomyelination or spongiform degeneration, but other causes, such as virus infections and toxic or nutritional factors, might also play a contributory role. In this report, we provide evidence of parvovirus infection and replication in the brains of five 6-week-old Cretan hound puppies suffering from a puppy shaker syndrome and leukoencephalopathy. Although these puppies belonged to two different litters, they were closely related, tracing back two generations to the same sire. Histologically, a mild to moderate lymphohistiocytic meningitis, with focal lymphohistiocytic leukoencephalitis in two animals, and a mild to moderate vacuolation with myelin loss, mainly in the white matter of the cerebellum was detected. Vacuolation was also found in the corpus callosum, fimbria hippocampi, mesencephalon, capsula interna, basal ganglia, and hypothalamus. By immunohistology and in situ hybridization, either parvoviral antigen, DNA, mRNA, or replicative intermediate DNA were detected in the cerebellum, hippocampus, periventricular areas, corpus callosum, cerebral cortex, medulla oblongata, and spinal cord. Parvovirus antigen, DNA, and mRNA were present in cells of the outer granular layer of the cerebellum and in periventricular cells, most likely representing spongioblasts, glial cells, neurons, endothelial cells, occasional macrophages, and ependymal cells. Sequencing revealed canine parvovirus type 2 stretches. Thus, an association of parvovirus infection with the leukoencephalopathy seems likely, possibly facilitated by a genetic predisposition due to the mode of inbreeding in this particular dog breed. PMID:20592142

  10. First identification of porcine parvovirus 6 in Poland.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jin; Fan, Jinghui; Gerber, Priscilla F; Biernacka, Kinga; Stadejek, Tomasz; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Opriessnig, Tanja

    2017-02-01

    Porcine parvovirus type 1 is a major causative agent of swine reproductive failure. During the past decade, several new parvoviruses have been discovered in pigs. Porcine parvovirus type 6 (PPV6), recently identified, has been reported in pigs in China and in the USA while the PPV6 status in the European pig population remains undetermined. In the present study, PPV6 DNA was identified in serum samples collected from domestic pigs in Poland. In investigated herds, the prevalence of PPV6 was 14.9 % (15/101 samples). Sequencing was conducted, and 11 nearly complete PPV6 genomes were obtained. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that PPV6 sequences cluster into four distinct groups, and the Polish PPV6 strains from three individual farms were present in three of these four groups. In addition, the Polish PPV6 strain P15-1 was identified as a putative recombination of an ORF1 from US stains and an ORF2 from Chinese strains. This is the first identification of PPV6 in Europe, and this finding will encourage future epidemiological studies on parvoviruses in European pigs.

  11. 9 CFR 113.317 - Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine). 113.317 Section 113.317 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which has been established as...

  12. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). 113.214 Section 113.214 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE..., Killed Virus, recommended for use in dogs, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only...

  13. 9 CFR 113.214 - Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine, Killed Virus (Canine). 113.214 Section 113.214 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE..., Killed Virus, recommended for use in dogs, shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only...

  14. 9 CFR 113.317 - Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine). 113.317 Section 113.317 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell culture fluids. Only Master Seed which has been established as...

  15. Antibody response to chicken parvovirus following inoculation with inactivated virus and recombinant viruses expressing chicken parvovirus viral protein 2(VP2).

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We reported earlier that day-old broiler chickens showed typical runting-stunting syndrome (RSS) post infection with chicken parvovirus (ChPV). There was also evidence that ChPV-specific maternal antibodies could provide significant protection against parvovirus induced enteric disease. Here, we st...

  16. Childhood myocarditis and parvovirus B19 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Dina, Julia; Villedieu, Florence; Labombarda, Fabien; Freymuth, François; de la Gastine, Geoffroy; Jokic, Mikael; Vabret, Astrid

    2011-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (PVB19) infection is occasionally associated with acute myocarditis. Three cases of children with PVB19 virus-associated myocarditis occurred in a very short period and the same geographical region. To elucidate if virological factors could be responsible for determining the course of infection, a molecular epidemiologic investigation was performed. The diagnosis of myocarditis was established by histology or echocardiography. In the three cases, the PVB19 DNA was detected in different samples. Eight different regions were amplified by PCR using a high fidelity Taq polymerase and sequenced on both strands. Phylogenetic analyses were performed. First, the genotypes of the PVB19 strains were determined, then the intra-patient viral variability was analysed by sequencing PVB19 detected in different specimens sampled from the same patient at the same moment. Nearly complete sequences of the PVB19 virus (4265nt) were obtained from different samples in the three patients. The phylogenetic analyses showed that PVB19 strains identified clustered with genotype 1a PVB19 strains referenced in GenBank. When compared to the referenced strain NC_000883, the number of substitutions (transitions and transversions) were as follows: 58 for Caen.FRA/19.09, 74 for Caen.FRA/21.09 and 60 for Caen.FRA/24.09. The strains isolated from the same patient showed 100% of similarity. Viral myocarditis is a frequently unrecognized cause of post-inflammatory cardiomyopathy. The detailed molecular analyses do not give rise to virological markers associated with myocarditis in these children. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Transmission of Mouse Parvovirus by Fomites

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Susan R; Paturzo, Frank X; Smith, Peter C; Macy, James D

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the current studies was to determine the risk of transmission of mouse parvovirus (MPV) by caging and husbandry practices. To determine whether MPV can be transmitted during cage changes in a biologic safety cabinet without the use of disinfectants, 14 cages of Swiss Webster mice were inoculated with MPV. Cages containing infected mice were interspersed among 14 cages housing naïve Swiss Webster mice. At 1, 2, and 4 wk after inoculation of the mice, cages were changed across each row. All naïve mice housed adjacent to infected mice remained seronegative. To determine the risk of environmental contamination, nesting pads that were used to sample the room floor during husbandry procedures at 1, 2, 4, and 6 wk after inoculation of the mice were placed in cages with naïve mice. None of the mice exposed to the pads became MPV seropositive. To determine whether components from cages that had housed MPV-infected mice could transmit MPV, Swiss Webster mice were exposed to soiled bedding or used cages, drinking valves, food, cage bottoms, wire bars and filter tops, nesting material, or shelters. With the exception of drinking valves, all mice exposed to other components became MPV seropositive. Fourteen cages that had housed MPV-infected mice were washed but not autoclaved; mice housed in the washed cages did not become MPV seropositive. In conclusion, all cage components can serve as fomites, with the drinking valve being the least risky. Cage washing alone was sufficient to remove or inactivate MPV. PMID:23294883

  18. Studies on the inactivation of human parvovirus 4.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Sally A; Tuke, Philip W; Miyagawa, Eiji; Blümel, Johannes

    2013-10-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is a novel parvovirus, which like parvovirus B19 (B19V) can be a contaminant of plasma pools used to prepare plasma-derived medicinal products. Inactivation studies of B19V have shown that it is more sensitive to virus inactivation strategies than animal parvoviruses. However, inactivation of PARV4 has not yet been specifically addressed. Treatment of parvoviruses by heat or low-pH conditions causes externalization of the virus genome. Using nuclease treatment combined with real-time polymerase chain reaction, the extent of virus DNA externalization was used as an indirect measure of the inactivation of PARV4, B19V, and minute virus of mice (MVM) by pasteurization of albumin and by low-pH treatment. Infectivity studies were performed in parallel for B19V and MVM. PARV4 showed greater resistance to pasteurization and low-pH treatment than B19V, although PARV4 was not as resistant as MVM. There was a 2- to 3-log reduction of encapsidated PARV4 DNA after pasteurization and low-pH treatment. In contrast, B19V was effectively inactivated while MVM was stable under these conditions. Divalent cations were found to have a stabilizing effect on PARV4 capsids. In the absence of divalent cations, even at neutral pH, there was a reduction of PARV4 titer, an effect not observed for B19V or MVM. In the case of heat treatment and incubation at low pH, PARV4 shows intermediate resistance when compared to B19V and MVM. Divalent cations seem important for stabilizing PARV4 virus particles. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  19. Acute diarrhea in West African children: diverse enteric viruses and a novel parvovirus genus.

    PubMed

    Phan, Tung G; Vo, Nguyen P; Bonkoungou, Isidore J O; Kapoor, Amit; Barro, Nicolas; O'Ryan, Miguel; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Wang, Chunling; Delwart, Eric

    2012-10-01

    Parvoviruses cause a variety of mild to severe symptoms or asymptomatic infections in humans and animals. During a viral metagenomic analysis of feces from children with acute diarrhea in Burkina Faso, we identified in decreasing prevalence nucleic acids from anelloviruses, dependoviruses, sapoviruses, enteroviruses, bocaviruses, noroviruses, adenoviruses, parechoviruses, rotaviruses, cosavirus, astroviruses, and hepatitis B virus. Sequences from a highly divergent parvovirus, provisionally called bufavirus, were also detected whose NS1 and VP1 proteins showed <39% and <31% identities to those of previously known parvoviruses. Four percent of the fecal samples were PCR positive for this new parvovirus, including a related bufavirus species showing only 72% identity in VP1. The high degree of genetic divergence of these related genomes from those of other parvoviruses indicates the presence of a proposed new Parvoviridae genus containing at least two species. Studies of the tropism and pathogenicity of these novel parvoviruses will be facilitated by the availability of their genome sequences.

  20. Acute Diarrhea in West African Children: Diverse Enteric Viruses and a Novel Parvovirus Genus

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Tung G.; Vo, Nguyen P.; Bonkoungou, Isidore J. O.; Kapoor, Amit; Barro, Nicolas; O'Ryan, Miguel; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Wang, Chunling

    2012-01-01

    Parvoviruses cause a variety of mild to severe symptoms or asymptomatic infections in humans and animals. During a viral metagenomic analysis of feces from children with acute diarrhea in Burkina Faso, we identified in decreasing prevalence nucleic acids from anelloviruses, dependoviruses, sapoviruses, enteroviruses, bocaviruses, noroviruses, adenoviruses, parechoviruses, rotaviruses, cosavirus, astroviruses, and hepatitis B virus. Sequences from a highly divergent parvovirus, provisionally called bufavirus, were also detected whose NS1 and VP1 proteins showed <39% and <31% identities to those of previously known parvoviruses. Four percent of the fecal samples were PCR positive for this new parvovirus, including a related bufavirus species showing only 72% identity in VP1. The high degree of genetic divergence of these related genomes from those of other parvoviruses indicates the presence of a proposed new Parvoviridae genus containing at least two species. Studies of the tropism and pathogenicity of these novel parvoviruses will be facilitated by the availability of their genome sequences. PMID:22855485

  1. Parvovirus b19 infection associated with acute hepatitis, arthralgias, and rash.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, J M; Wolfe, J T; Frattali, A L; Werth, V P; Naides, S J; Spiers, E M

    1996-04-01

    Human parvovirus B19 is responsible for a wide variety of clinical syndromes, including erythema infectiosum, or fifth disease, polyarthritis, aplastic crisis in patients with hemolytic anemia, and chronic anemia in immunocompromised persons. Liver enzyme abnormalities are an infrequently reported association of parvovirus B19 infection in adults. We present a case of an acute transient hepatitis in the setting of parvovirus B19 infection, associated with arthralgias and an erythematous, edematous rash on the hands and leg.

  2. Comparison of canine parvovirus with mink enteritis virus by restriction site mapping.

    PubMed Central

    McMaster, G K; Tratschin, J D; Siegl, G

    1981-01-01

    The genomes of canine parvovirus and mink enteritis virus were compared by restriction enzyme analysis of their replicative-form DNAs. Of 79 mapped sites, 68, or 86%, were found to be common for both types of DNA, indicating that canine parvovirus and mink enteritis virus are closely related viruses. Whether they evolved from a common precursor or whether canine parvovirus is derived from mink enteritis virus, however, cannot be deduced from our present data. Images PMID:6264109

  3. Fetal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Rosa, F W; Turshen, M

    1970-01-01

    The extensive literature on nutrition in pregnancy is reviewed with special reference to international experience, including observations on nutritional trials in pregnancy, pregnancy during famines caused by war, and studies of birth-weight in relation to pregnancy interval, parity and multiple pregnancies. Recent research on the significance of fetal nutrition suggests that "small-for-dates" infants, i.e., those that are developmentally retarded in utero, suffer long-term developmental sequelae. A high world-wide incidence of small-for-dates births was reported by the World Health Organization in 1960.Although a definite correlation has been found between socio-economic status and birth-weight, it is not known to what extent the smaller birth-weights observed in the lower socio-economic groups can be improved by specific nutritional measures. In addition to the general advice given on maternal nutrition and family-planning, further studies are needed to determine the precise means of achieving improvement in fetal nutrition and a better outcome of pregnancy.

  4. Fetal nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Franz W.; Turshen, Meredeth

    1970-01-01

    The extensive literature on nutrition in pregnancy is reviewed with special reference to international experience, including observations on nutritional trials in pregnancy, pregnancy during famines caused by war, and studies of birth-weight in relation to pregnancy interval, parity and multiple pregnancies. Recent research on the significance of fetal nutrition suggests that ”small-for-dates” infants, i.e., those that are developmentally retarded in utero, suffer long-term developmental sequelae. A high world-wide incidence of small-for-dates births was reported by the World Health Organization in 1960. Although a definite correlation has been found between socio-economic status and birth-weight, it is not known to what extent the smaller birth-weights observed in the lower socio-economic groups can be improved by specific nutritional measures. In addition to the general advice given on maternal nutrition and family-planning, further studies are needed to determine the precise means of achieving improvement in fetal nutrition and a better outcome of pregnancy. PMID:5314013

  5. Fetal yawning.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Fetal neurobehavioral patterns have been considered as indicators of nervous system development. Moreover, the capacity of 4-dimensional sonography to evaluate complex facial expressions allows recognition of common behaviors with which one can appreciate the prenatal functional development of the central nervous system. Using yawning as an example, we review this interpretation on the basis of knowledge derived from phylogeny and ontogeny. As a flip-flop switch, the reciprocal interactions between sleep- and wake-promoting brain regions allow the emergence of distinct states of arousal. By its ontogenic links with REM sleep, yawning appears to be a behavior which causes arousal reinforcement through the powerful stretching and the neuromuscular connections induced. Yawning indicates a harmonious progress in the development of both the brainstem and the peripheral neuromuscular function, testifying to the induction of an ultradian rhythm of vigilance. The lack of fetal yawn, frequently associated with lack of swallowing (associated or not with retrognathia), may be a key to predicting brainstem dysfunction after birth. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. [Advances in Parvovirus Non-structural Protein NS1 Induced Apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Tu, Mengyu; Liu, Fei; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-11-01

    Until now, more than seventeen parvovirus have been reported which can infect mammals and poultries. The infected cells appeared different properties of apoptosis and death, present a typical cytopathic effect. NS1 is a major nonstructural protein of parvovirus, with a conservative structure and function, which plays an important role in the viral life cycle. In addition to the influence on viral replication, the NS1 also participates in apoptosis induced by viruses. Parvovirus induced apoptosis which is mainly mediated by mitochondrial pathway, this review summarized the latest research progresses of parvovirus induced apoptosis.

  7. Novel B19-like parvovirus in the brain of a harbor seal.

    PubMed

    Bodewes, Rogier; Rubio García, Ana; Wiersma, Lidewij C M; Getu, Sarah; Beukers, Martijn; Schapendonk, Claudia M E; van Run, Peter R W A; van de Bildt, Marco W G; Poen, Marjolein J; Osinga, Nynke; Sánchez Contreras, Guillermo J; Kuiken, Thijs; Smits, Saskia L; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2013-01-01

    Using random PCR in combination with next-generation sequencing, a novel parvovirus was detected in the brain of a young harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) with chronic non-suppurative meningo-encephalitis that was rehabilitated at the Seal Rehabilitation and Research Centre (SRRC) in the Netherlands. In addition, two novel viruses belonging to the family Anelloviridae were detected in the lungs of this animal. Phylogenetic analysis of the coding sequence of the novel parvovirus, tentatively called Seal parvovirus, indicated that this virus belonged to the genus Erythrovirus, to which human parvovirus B19 also belongs. Although no other seals with similar signs were rehabilitated in SRRC in recent years, a prevalence study of tissues of seals from the same area collected in the period 2008-2012 indicated that the Seal parvovirus has circulated in the harbor seal population at least since 2008. The presence of the Seal parvovirus in the brain was confirmed by real-time PCR and in vitro replication. Using in situ hybridization, we showed for the first time that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus was present in the Virchow-Robin space and in cerebral parenchyma adjacent to the meninges. These findings showed that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus can be involved in central nervous system infection and inflammation, as has also been suspected but not proven for human parvovirus B19 infection.

  8. Novel B19-Like Parvovirus in the Brain of a Harbor Seal

    PubMed Central

    Bodewes, Rogier; Rubio García, Ana; Wiersma, Lidewij C. M.; Getu, Sarah; Beukers, Martijn; Schapendonk, Claudia M. E.; van Run, Peter R. W. A.; van de Bildt, Marco W. G.; Poen, Marjolein J.; Osinga, Nynke; Sánchez Contreras, Guillermo J.; Kuiken, Thijs; Smits, Saskia L.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Using random PCR in combination with next-generation sequencing, a novel parvovirus was detected in the brain of a young harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) with chronic non-suppurative meningo-encephalitis that was rehabilitated at the Seal Rehabilitation and Research Centre (SRRC) in the Netherlands. In addition, two novel viruses belonging to the family Anelloviridae were detected in the lungs of this animal. Phylogenetic analysis of the coding sequence of the novel parvovirus, tentatively called Seal parvovirus, indicated that this virus belonged to the genus Erythrovirus, to which human parvovirus B19 also belongs. Although no other seals with similar signs were rehabilitated in SRRC in recent years, a prevalence study of tissues of seals from the same area collected in the period 2008-2012 indicated that the Seal parvovirus has circulated in the harbor seal population at least since 2008. The presence of the Seal parvovirus in the brain was confirmed by real-time PCR and in vitro replication. Using in situ hybridization, we showed for the first time that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus was present in the Virchow-Robin space and in cerebral parenchyma adjacent to the meninges. These findings showed that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus can be involved in central nervous system infection and inflammation, as has also been suspected but not proven for human parvovirus B19 infection. PMID:24223918

  9. Release of canine parvovirus from endocytic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Suikkanen, Sanna; Antila, Mia; Jaatinen, Anne; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Vuento, Matti

    2003-11-25

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a small nonenveloped virus with a single-stranded DNA genome. CPV enters cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and requires an acidic endosomal step for productive infection. Virion contains a potential nuclear localization signal as well as a phospholipase A(2) like domain in N-terminus of VP1. In this study we characterized the role of PLA(2) activity on CPV entry process. PLA(2) activity of CPV capsids was triggered in vitro by heat or acidic pH. PLA(2) inhibitors inhibited the viral proliferation suggesting that PLA(2) activity is needed for productive infection. The N-terminus of VP1 was exposed during the entry, suggesting that PLA(2) activity might have a role during endocytic entry. The presence of drugs modifying endocytosis (amiloride, bafilomycin A(1), brefeldin A, and monensin) caused viral proteins to remain in endosomal/lysosomal vesicles, even though the drugs were not able to inhibit the exposure of VP1 N-terminal end. These results indicate that the exposure of N-terminus of VP1 alone is not sufficient to allow CPV to proliferate. Some other pH-dependent changes are needed for productive infection. In addition to blocking endocytic entry, amiloride was able to block some postendocytic steps. The ability of CPV to permeabilize endosomal membranes was demonstrated by feeding cells with differently sized rhodamine-conjugated dextrans together with the CPV in the presence or in the absence of amiloride, bafilomycin A(1), brefeldin A, or monensin. Dextran with a molecular weight of 3000 was released from vesicles after 8 h of infection, while dextran with a molecular weight of 10,000 was mainly retained in vesicles. The results suggest that CPV infection does not cause disruption of endosomal vesicles. However, the permeability of endosomal membranes apparently changes during CPV infection, probably due to the PLA(2) activity of the virus. These results suggest that parvoviral PLA(2) activity is essential for productive

  10. Fetal pain.

    PubMed

    Rokyta, Richard

    2008-12-01

    The fetus reacts to nociceptive stimulations through different motor, autonomic, vegetative, hormonal, and metabolic changes relatively early in the gestation period. With respect to the fact that the modulatory system does not yet exist, the first reactions are purely reflexive and without connection to the type of stimulus. While the fetal nervous system is able to react through protective reflexes to potentially harmful stimuli, there is no accurate evidence concerning pain sensations in this early period. Cortical processes occur only after thalamocortical connections and pathways have been completed at the 26th gestational week. Harmful (painful) stimuli, especially in fetuses have an adverse effect on the development of humans regardless of the processes in brain. Moreover, pain activates a number of subcortical mechanisms and a wide spectrum of stress responses influence the maturation of thalamocortical pathways and other cortical activation which are very important in pain processing.

  11. Aquaporins in Fetal Development.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Nora; Damiano, Alicia E

    2017-01-01

    Water homeostasis during fetal development is of crucial physiologic importance. The successful formation and development of the placenta is critical to maintain normal fetal growth and homeostasis. The expression of several aquaporins (AQPs ) was found from blastocyst stages to term placenta and fetal membranes. Therefore, AQPs are proposed to play important roles in normal pregnancy, fetal growth, and homeostasis of amniotic fluid volume, and water handling in other organs. However, the functional importance of AQPs in fetal development remains to be elucidated.

  12. A model for tumor suppression using H-1 parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Telerman, A; Tuynder, M; Dupressoir, T; Robaye, B; Sigaux, F; Shaulian, E; Oren, M; Rommelaere, J; Amson, R

    1993-01-01

    A model system is proposed to investigate, at the molecular level, the pathways of tumor suppression. As a tool for the selection of cells with a suppressed phenotype, we used the H-1 parvovirus that preferentially kills various neoplastic cells. From the human K562 leukemia cells, we isolated a clone, KS, that is resistant to the cytopathic effect of the H-1 virus and displays a suppressed malignant phenotype. The suppressed malignancy and the cellular resistance to H-1 killing appear to depend on the activity of wild-type p53. Whereas the KS cells express wild-type p53, the protein is undetectable in the parental K562 cells. Experiments with p53 mutants suggest that wild-type p53, in its functionally intact state, contributes to the resistance against the cytopathic effect of H-1 parvovirus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8378352

  13. Canine parvovirus effect on wolf population change and pup survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Goyal, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Canine parvovirus infected wild canids more than a decade ago, but no population effect has been documented. In wild Minnesota wolves (Canis lupus) over a 12-yr period, the annual percent population increase and proportion of pups each were inversely related to the percentage of wolves serologically positive to the disease. Although these effects did not seem to retard this large extant population, similar relationships in more isolated wolf populations might hinder recovery of this endangered and threatened species.

  14. Drug Hypersensitivity Syndrome with Prolonged Course Complicated by Parvovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Carrie C; Jen, Melinda V; Boos, Markus D

    2016-11-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is a severe medication reaction involving multiple organ systems that is characterized by rash, lymphadenopathy, and laboratory aberrations, including hepatic enzyme changes. Viral reactivation in the setting of DHS can significantly affect the course of disease. We report two children in whom parvovirus infection prolonged and complicated their course of DHS. Most other DHS-complicating viruses are herpesviruses; this report broadens the scope of DHS-modifying infections to include activation of Parvoviridae. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Nucleotide sequence and genome organization of canine parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, A P; Jones, E V; Miller, T J

    1988-01-01

    The genome of a canine parvovirus isolate strain (CPV-N) was cloned, and the DNA sequence was determined. The entire genome, including ends, was 5,323 nucleotides in length. The terminal repeat at the 3' end of the genome shared similar structural characteristics but limited homology with the rodent parvoviruses. The 5' terminal repeat was not detected in any of the clones. Instead, a region of DNA starting near the capsid gene stop codon and extending 248 base pairs into the coding region had been duplicated and inserted 75 base pairs downstream from the poly(A) addition site. Consensus sequences for the 5' donor and 3' acceptor sites as well as promotors and poly(A) addition sites were identified and compared with the available information on related parvoviruses. The genomic organization of CPV-N is similar to that of feline parvovirus (FPV) in that there are two major open reading frames (668 and 722 amino acids) in the plus strand (mRNA polarity). Both coding domains are in the same frame, and no significant open reading frames were apparent in any of the other frames of both minus and plus DNA strands. The nucleotide and amino acid homologies of the capsid genes between CPV-N and FPV were 98 and 99%, respectively. In contrast, the nucleotide and amino acid homologies of the capsid genes for CPV-N and CPV-b (S. Rhode III, J. Virol. 54:630-633, 1985) were 95 and 98%, respectively. These results indicate that very few nucleotide or amino acid changes differentiate the antigenic and host range specificity of FPV and CPV. PMID:2824850

  16. Generation of a parvovirus B19 vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Chandramouli, Sumana; Medina-Selby, Angelica; Coit, Doris; Schaefer, Mary; Spencer, Terika; Brito, Luis A; Zhang, Pu; Otten, Gillis; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Settembre, Ethan C

    2013-08-20

    Parvovirus B19 is the causative agent of fifth disease in children, aplastic crisis in those with blood dyscrasias, and hydrops fetalis. Previous parvovirus B19 virus-like-particle (VLP) vaccine candidates were produced by co-infection of insect cells with two baculoviruses, one expressing wild-type VP1 and the other expressing VP2. In humans, the VLPs were immunogenic but reactogenic. We have developed new VLP-based parvovirus B19 vaccine candidates, produced by co-expressing VP2 and either wild-type VP1 or phospholipase-negative VP1 in a regulated ratio from a single plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These VLPs are expressed efficiently, are very homogeneous, and can be highly purified. Although VP2 alone can form VLPs, in mouse immunizations, VP1 and the adjuvant MF59 are required to elicit a neutralizing response. Wild-type VLPs and those with phospholipase-negative VP1 are equivalently potent. The purity, homogeneity, yeast origin, and lack of phospholipase activity of these VLPs address potential causes of previously observed reactogenicity.

  17. Development of an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay to Detect Chicken Parvovirus Specific Antibodies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here we report the development and application of an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay to detect parvovirus-specific antibodies in chicken sera. We used an approach previously described for other parvoviruses to clone and express viral structural proteins in insect cells from recombinant baculovirus...

  18. Enteric disease in broiler chickens following experimental infection with chicken parvovirus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Day-old broiler chickens were inoculated orally with the chicken parvovirus strain, chicken parvovirus-P1. In four independent experiments, characteristic clinical signs of enteric disease including watery, mustard color diarrhea and growth retardation were observed following infection. The virus wa...

  19. Chicken parvovirus-induced runting-stunting syndrome in young broilers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previously we identified a novel parvovirus from enteric contents of chickens that were affected by enteric diseases. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the chicken parvovirus (ChPV) represented a new member in the Parvoviridae family. Here, we describe some of the pathogenic characteristics ...

  20. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Isolates of Human Parvovirus 4 from Patients with Acute Encephalitis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Shantanu; Seth, Akanksha; Singh, Arvind K.; Jain, Bhawana

    2015-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (Parv4) is a relatively new virus. Association of this virus with any human disease is yet to be established. We detected human parvovirus 4 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of two patients presenting with acute encephalitis syndrome in northern India. This is the first report of the Parv4 genome sequence from northern India. PMID:25635010

  1. Association of a parvovirus with an outbreak of foetal death and mummification in pigs.

    PubMed

    Forman, A J; Lenghaus, C; Hogg, G G; Hale, C J

    1977-07-01

    A parvovirus was isolated during an outbreak of mummifications and abortions in a commercial piggery. Stillborn piglets from which virus was isolated or in which parvovirus antibody was detected had widespread inflammatory lesions. Lesions were also seen in apparently healthy piglets from affected litters.

  2. Fetal pain?

    PubMed

    Vanhatalo, S; van Nieuwenhuizen, O

    2000-05-01

    During the last few years a vivid debate, both scientifically and emotionally, has risen in the medical literature as to whether a fetus is able to feel pain during abortion or intrauterine surgery. This debate has mainly been inspired by the demonstration of various hormonal or motor reactions to noxious stimuli at very early stages of fetal development. The aims of this paper are to review the literature on development of the pain system in the fetus, and to speculate about the relationship between "sensing" as opposed to "feeling" pain and the number of reactions associated with painful stimuli. While a cortical processing of pain theoretically becomes possible after development of the thalamo-cortical connections in the 26th week of gestation, noxious stimuli may trigger complex reflex reactions much earlier. However, more important than possible painfulness is the fact that the noxious stimuli, by triggering stress responses, most likely affect the development of an individual at very early stages. Hence, it is not reasonable to speculate on the possible emotional experiences of pain in fetuses or premature babies. A clinically relevant aim is rather to avoid and/or treat any possibly noxious stimuli, and thereby prevent their potential adverse effects on the subsequent development.

  3. Antiviral effect of lithium chloride on infection of cells by canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pei; Fu, Xinliang; Yan, Zhongshan; Fang, Bo; Huang, San; Fu, Cheng; Hong, Malin; Li, Shoujun

    2015-11-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 causes significant viral disease in dogs, with high morbidity, high infectivity, and high mortality. Lithium chloride is a potential antiviral drug for viruses. We determined the antiviral effect of Lithium Chloride on canine parvovirus type 2 in feline kidney cells. The viral DNA and proteins of canine parvovirus were suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by lithium chloride. Further investigation verified that viral entry into cells was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by lithium chloride. These results indicated that lithium chloride could be a potential antiviral drug for curing dogs with canine parvovirus infection. The specific steps of canine parvovirus entry into cells that are affected by lithium chloride and its antiviral effect in vivo should be explored in future studies.

  4. [Detection of human parvovirus B19, human bocavirus and human parvovirus 4 infections in blood samples among 95 patients with liver disease in Nanjing by nested PCR].

    PubMed

    Tong, Rui; Zhou, Wei-Min; Liu, Xi-Jun; Wang, Yue; Lou, Yong-Liang; Tan, Wen-Jie

    2013-04-01

    To analyze the infection of human parvovirus B19, human bocavirus (HBoV) and human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) in blood samples among patients with liver disease in Nanjing by molecular detection. Nested PCR assays were designed and validated to detect B19, HBoV and PARV4, respectively. The assays were used to screen three parvoviruses in blood samples from 95 patients with different liver disease in Nanjing. The parvovirus infection was analyzed statistically. The detection limits were 10 copies of genomic DNA equivalents per reaction for each assays and the good specificity were observed. The frequency of B19 and HBoV were 2/95 (2.1%) and 9/95 (9.5%) in blood samples respectively. No PARV4 was detected. HBoV was detected in 3/5 patients with drug-induced hepatitis. Both B19 and HBoV infection were detected in blood from patients with liver disease.

  5. Assessment of fetal neurodevelopment via fetal magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Ronald T

    2004-11-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) offers unique capabilities for assessment of fetal heart rate (FHR) and fetal behavior, which are fundamental aspects of neurodevelopment. The most important attribute of fMCG for FHR monitoring is its high precision, which allows accurate assessment of beat-to-beat fetal heart rate variability (FHRV), including respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Using mathematical indices to assess FHRV, we find that short- and long-term FHRV both increase during gestation but not in the same manner. The largest increases in short-term FHRV occur during the last trimester, while the largest increases in long-term FHRV occur early on, with smaller changes occurring during the last trimester. The fMCG also allows assessment of fetal activity. This results from the high sensitivity of the signal to the position and orientation of the fetal heart. FMCG actograms are therefore specific for fetal trunk movement, which are thought to be more important than isolated extremity movements and other small fetal movements. The ability to assess FHR, FHRV, and fetal trunk movement simultaneously makes fMCG a valuable tool for neurodevelopment research.

  6. Original Research: Parvovirus B19 infection in children with sickle cell disease in the hydroxyurea era

    PubMed Central

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Lavoie, Paul; Tang, Li; Sun, Yilun; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection causes transient aplastic crisis in sickle cell disease (SCD) due to a temporary interruption in the red blood cell production. Toxicity from hydroxyurea includes anemia and reticulocytopenia, both of which also occur during a transient aplastic crisis event. Hydroxyurea inhibits proliferation of hematopoietic cells and may be immunosuppressive. We postulated that hydroxyurea could exacerbate parvovirus B19-induced aplastic crisis and inhibit the development of specific immune responses in children with SCD. We conducted a retrospective review of parvovirus B19 infection in 330 children with SCD. Altogether there were 120 known cases of aplastic crisis attributed to parvovirus B19 infection, and 12% of children were on hydroxyurea treatment during the episode. We evaluated hematological and immune responses. Children with HbSS or HbSβ0-thalassemia treated with hydroxyurea, when compared with untreated children, required fewer transfusions and had higher Hb concentration nadir during transient aplastic crisis. Duration of hospital stays was no different between hydroxyurea-treated and untreated groups. Children tested within a week following aplastic crisis were positive for parvovirus-specific IgG. Immune responses lasted for the duration of the observation period, up to 13 years after transient aplastic crisis, and there were no repeat aplastic crisis episodes. The frequencies of parvovirus-specific antibodies in all children with SCD increased with age, as expected due to the increased likelihood of a parvovirus exposure, and were comparable to frequencies reported for healthy children. Approximately one-third of children had a positive parvovirus B19-specific IgG test without a documented history of transient aplastic crisis, and 64% of them were treated with hydroxyurea. Hydroxyurea may reduce requirements for blood transfusions and may attenuate symptoms during transient aplastic crisis episodes caused by parvovirus B19 infections

  7. Survey on viral pathogens in wild red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Germany with emphasis on parvoviruses and analysis of a DNA sequence from a red fox parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Truyen, U.; Müller, T.; Heidrich, R.; Tackmann, K.; Carmichael, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The seroprevalence of canine parvovirus (CPV), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine adenovirus (CAV) and canine herpesvirus (CHV) infections in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) was determined in fox sera collected between 1991 and 1995. A total of 500 sera were selected and the seroprevalences were estimated to be 13% (65 of 500 sera) for CPV, 4.4% (17 of 383 sera) for CDV, 35% (17 of 485 sera) for CAV, and 0.4% (2 of 485 sera) for CHV, respectively. No statistically significant differences were observed between the two (rural and suburban) areas under study. Parvovirus DNA sequences were amplified from tissues of free-ranging foxes and compared to those of prototype viruses from dogs and cats. We report here a parvovirus sequence indicative of a true intermediate between the feline panleukopenia virus-like viruses and the canine parvovirus-like viruses. The red fox parvoviral sequence, therefore, appears to represent a link between those viral groups. The DNA sequence together with a significant seroprevalence of parvovirus infections in foxes supports the hypothesis that the sudden emergence of canine parvovirus in the domestic dog population may have involved the interspecies transmission between wild and domestic carnivores. PMID:9825797

  8. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Daily life skills, such as feeding and bathing Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most serious type of FASD. People with fetal alcohol syndrome have facial abnormalities, including wide-set and narrow ...

  9. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders with similar signs and symptoms. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders The range of consequences from drinking alcohol during pregnancy are collectively called fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, as not all signs and symptoms are ...

  10. Fetal behavioral teratology.

    PubMed

    Visser, Gerard H A; Mulder, Eduard J H; Tessa Ververs, F F

    2010-10-01

    Ultrasound studies of fetal motor behavior provide direct – in vivo – insight in the functioning of the motor component of the fetal central nervous system. In this article, studies are reviewed showing changes in the first timetable of appearance of fetal movements, changes in quality and/or quantity of movements and disturbances in the development of fetal behavioral states in case of endogenous malfunctions, maternal diseases and exogenous behavioral teratogens.

  11. Advances in fetal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pedreira, Denise Araujo Lapa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper discusses the main advances in fetal surgical therapy aiming to inform health care professionals about the state-of-the-art techniques and future challenges in this field. We discuss the necessary steps of technical evolution from the initial open fetal surgery approach until the development of minimally invasive techniques of fetal endoscopic surgery (fetoscopy). PMID:27074241

  12. LuIII parvovirus selectively and efficiently targets, replicates in, and kills human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Paglino, Justin C; Ozduman, Koray; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2012-07-01

    Because productive infection by parvoviruses requires cell division and is enhanced by oncogenic transformation, some parvoviruses may have potential utility in killing cancer cells. To identify the parvovirus(es) with the optimal oncolytic effect against human glioblastomas, we screened 12 parvoviruses at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). MVMi, MVMc, MVM-G17, tumor virus X (TVX), canine parvovirus (CPV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), rat parvovirus 1A (RPV1A), and H-3 were relatively ineffective. The four viruses with the greatest oncolytic activity, LuIII, H-1, MVMp, and MVM-G52, were tested for the ability, at a low MOI, to progressively infect the culture over time, causing cell death at a rate higher than that of cell proliferation. LuIII alone was effective in all five human glioblastomas tested. H-1 progressively infected only two of five; MVMp and MVM-G52 were ineffective in all five. To investigate the underlying mechanism of LuIII's phenotype, we used recombinant parvoviruses with the LuIII capsid replacing the MVMp capsid or with molecular alteration of the P4 promoter. The LuIII capsid enhanced efficient replication and oncolysis in MO59J gliomas cells; other gliomas tested required the entire LuIII genome to exhibit enhanced infection. LuIII selectively infected glioma cells over normal glial cells in vitro. In mouse models, human glioblastoma xenografts were selectively infected by LuIII when administered intratumorally; LuIII reduced tumor growth by 75%. LuIII also had the capacity to selectively infect subcutaneous or intracranial gliomas after intravenous inoculation. Intravenous or intracranial LuIII caused no adverse effects. Intracranial LuIII caused no infection of mature mouse neurons or glia in vivo but showed a modest infection of developing neurons.

  13. LuIII Parvovirus Selectively and Efficiently Targets, Replicates in, and Kills Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paglino, Justin C.; Ozduman, Koray

    2012-01-01

    Because productive infection by parvoviruses requires cell division and is enhanced by oncogenic transformation, some parvoviruses may have potential utility in killing cancer cells. To identify the parvovirus(es) with the optimal oncolytic effect against human glioblastomas, we screened 12 parvoviruses at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). MVMi, MVMc, MVM-G17, tumor virus X (TVX), canine parvovirus (CPV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), rat parvovirus 1A (RPV1A), and H-3 were relatively ineffective. The four viruses with the greatest oncolytic activity, LuIII, H-1, MVMp, and MVM-G52, were tested for the ability, at a low MOI, to progressively infect the culture over time, causing cell death at a rate higher than that of cell proliferation. LuIII alone was effective in all five human glioblastomas tested. H-1 progressively infected only two of five; MVMp and MVM-G52 were ineffective in all five. To investigate the underlying mechanism of LuIII's phenotype, we used recombinant parvoviruses with the LuIII capsid replacing the MVMp capsid or with molecular alteration of the P4 promoter. The LuIII capsid enhanced efficient replication and oncolysis in MO59J gliomas cells; other gliomas tested required the entire LuIII genome to exhibit enhanced infection. LuIII selectively infected glioma cells over normal glial cells in vitro. In mouse models, human glioblastoma xenografts were selectively infected by LuIII when administered intratumorally; LuIII reduced tumor growth by 75%. LuIII also had the capacity to selectively infect subcutaneous or intracranial gliomas after intravenous inoculation. Intravenous or intracranial LuIII caused no adverse effects. Intracranial LuIII caused no infection of mature mouse neurons or glia in vivo but showed a modest infection of developing neurons. PMID:22553327

  14. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  15. Occurrence of human bocaviruses and parvovirus 4 in solid tissues.

    PubMed

    Norja, Päivi; Hedman, Lea; Kantola, Kalle; Kemppainen, Kaisa; Suvilehto, Jari; Pitkäranta, Anne; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Seppänen, Mikko; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria

    2012-08-01

    Human bocaviruses 1-4 (HBoV1-4) and parvovirus 4 (PARV4) are recently discovered human parvoviruses. HBoV1 is associated with respiratory infections of young children, while HBoV2-4 are enteric viruses. The clinical manifestations of PARV4 remain unknown. The objective of this study was to determine whether the DNAs of HBoV1-4 and PARV4 persist in human tissues long after primary infection. Biopsies of tonsillar tissue, skin, and synovia were examined for HBoV1-4 DNA and PARV4 DNA by PCR. Serum samples from the tissue donors were assayed for HBoV1 and PARV4 IgG and IgM antibodies. To obtain species-specific seroprevalences for HBoV1 and for HBoV2/3 combined, the sera were analyzed after virus-like particle (VLP) competition. While HBoV1 DNA was detected exclusively in the tonsillar tissues of 16/438 individuals (3.7%), all of them ≤8 years of age. HBoV2-4 and PARV4 DNAs were absent from all tissue types. HBoV1 IgG seroprevalence was 94.9%. No subject had HBoV1 or PARV4 IgM, nor did they have PARV4 IgG. The results indicate that HBoV1 DNA occurred in a small proportion of tonsils of young children after recent primary HBoV1 infection, but did not persist long in the other tissue types studied, unlike parvovirus B19 DNA. The results obtained by the PARV4 assays are in line with previous results on PARV4 epidemiology.

  16. Fetal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Turner, Christopher G B; Fauza, Dario O

    2009-06-01

    Attempts at harnessing the prospective benefits of the therapeutic use of fetal cells or tissues date many decades before the modern era of transplantation. The first reported transplantation of human fetal tissue took place in 1922. Fetal cells or tissues also have been used as helpful investigational tools since the 1930s. Still, it was only in the last three decades that fetal tissue transplantation in people has started to lead to favorable outcomes, yet by and large anecdotally. This article offers an outlook on a relatively new dimension in fetal cell-based therapies, namely the engineering of tissues in the laboratory, along with its prospective applications.

  17. First molecular characterization of canine parvovirus strains in Sardinia, Italy.

    PubMed

    Dei Giudici, S; Cubeddu, T; Giagu, A; Sanna, G; Rocca, S; Oggiano, A

    2017-07-14

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) is responsible of acute hemorrhagic gastroenteritis in young dogs. CPV-2 emerged in 1978 in the USA, but new antigenic types, CPV-2a, 2b and 2c, have completely replaced the original type. In this study, we analyzed 81 animals collected in Sardinia, Italy. The VP2 sequence analysis of 27 positive samples showed that all antigenic CPV-2 types are circulating. CPV-2b seems to be the most widespread variant, followed by CPV-2a. Furthermore, 12 CPV-2b strains displayed further amino acid substitutions and formed a separate cluster in a phylogenetic tree, indicating regional genetic variation.

  18. Investigation of the pathogenesis of transplacental transmission of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus in experimentally infected mink.

    PubMed Central

    Broll, S; Alexandersen, S

    1996-01-01

    The transplacental transmission of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) was studied in experimental infection of 1-year-old female non-Aleutian mink. The ADV-seronegative female mink were inoculated with ADV prior to mating or after the expected implantation of the embryos during pregnancy. A group of uninfected females served as a control group. Animals from each group were killed prior to or shortly after parturition. The in situ hybridization technique with radiolabeled strand-specific RNA probes was used to determine target cells of virus infection and virus replication. In both infected groups, ADV crossed the endotheliochorial placental barrier, although animals infected before mating already had high antibody titers against ADV at the time of implantation. The percentage of dead and resorbed fetuses was much higher in dams infected before mating. In the placentae of these mink, virus DNA and viral mRNA were detected in cells in the mesenchymal stroma of the placental labyrinth and hematoma but only occasionally in the cytotrophoblast of the placental hematoma. Placentae of animals infected during pregnancy showed in addition very high levels of virus and also viral replication in a large number of cytotrophoblast cells in the placental hematoma, which exhibited distinct inclusion bodies. In both groups, neither virus nor virus replication could be detected in maternal endothelial cells or fetal syncytiotrophoblast of the placental labyrinth. Fetuses were positive for virus and viral replication at high levels in a wide range of tissues. Possible routes of transplacental transmission of ADV and the role of trophoblast cells as targets for viral replication are discussed. PMID:8627663

  19. Detection and genetic characterization of a novel parvovirus distantly related to human bufavirus in domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Hargitai, Renáta; Pankovics, Péter; Kertész, Attila Mihály; Bíró, Hunor; Boros, Ákos; Phan, Tung Gia; Delwart, Eric; Reuter, Gábor

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a novel parvovirus (strain swine/Zsana3/2013/HUN, KT965075) was detected in domestic pigs and genetically characterized by viral metagenomics and PCR methods. The novel parvovirus was distantly related to the human bufaviruses and was detected in 19 (90.5 %) of the 21 and five (33.3 %) of the 15 faecal samples collected from animals with and without cases of posterior paraplegia of unknown etiology from five affected farms and one control farm in Hungary, respectively. Swine/Zsana3/2013/HUN is highly prevalent in domestic pigs and potentially represents a novel parvovirus species in the subfamily Parvovirinae.

  20. Identification and genomic characterization of a novel porcine parvovirus (PPV6) in China.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianqiang; Qiao, Caixia; Han, Xue; Han, Tao; Kang, Wenhua; Zi, Zhanchao; Cao, Zhen; Zhai, Xinyan; Cai, Xuepeng

    2014-12-02

    Parvoviruses are classified into two subfamilies based on their host range: the Parvovirinae, which infect vertebrates, and the Densovirinae, which mainly infect insects and other arthropods. In recent years, a number of novel parvoviruses belonging to the subfamily Parvovirinae have been identified from various animal species and humans, including human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), porcine hokovirus, ovine partetravirus, porcine parvovirus 4 (PPV4), and porcine parvovirus 5 (PPV5). Using sequence-independent single primer amplification (SISPA), a novel parvovirus within the subfamily Parvovirinae that was distinct from any known parvoviruses was identified and five full-length genome sequences were determined and analyzed. A novel porcine parvovirus, provisionally named PPV6, was initially identified from aborted pig fetuses in China. Retrospective studies revealed the prevalence of PPV6 in aborted pig fetuses and piglets(50% and 75%, respectively) was apparently higher than that in finishing pigs and sows (15.6% and 3.8% respectively). Furthermore, the prevalence of PPV6 in finishing pig was similar in affected and unaffected farms (i.e. 16.7% vs. 13.6%-21.7%). This finding indicates that animal age, perhaps due to increased innate immune resistance, strongly influences the level of PPV6 viremia. Complete genome sequencing and multiple alignments have shown that the nearly full-length genome sequences were approximately 6,100 nucleotides in length and shared 20.5%-42.6% DNA sequence identity with other members of the Parvovirinae subfamily. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PPV6 was significantly distinct from other known parvoviruses and was most closely related to PPV4. Our findings and review of published parvovirus sequences suggested that a novel porcine parvovirus is currently circulating in China and might be classified into the novel genus Copiparvovirus within the subfamily Parvovirinae. However, the clinical manifestations of PPV6 are still unknown in that the

  1. Molecular Biology and Epidemiology of Hepatopancreatic parvovirus of Penaeid Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Safeena, Muhammed P; Rai, Praveen; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2012-09-01

    Hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV) is one of the major shrimp parvovirus which is known to cause slow growth in penaeid shrimps. HPV has been found in wild and cultured penaeid shrimps throughout the world and there is high genetic variation among the different geographic isolates/host species. Given its high prevalence, wide distribution and ability to cause considerable economic loss in shrimp aquaculture industry, HPV deserves more attention than it has received. Till date, a total of four complete genome sequences of HPV have been reported in addition to a large number of partial sequences. HPV infection is seldom observed alone in epizootics and has occurred in multiple infections with other more pathogenic viruses and in most cases, heavy infections result in no visible inflammatory response. A great deal of information has accumulated in recent years on the clinical signs, geographical distribution, transmission and genetic diversity of HPV infection in shrimp aquaculture. However, the mechanism by which HPV enters the shrimp tissues and pathogenesis of virus is still unknown. To date, no effective prophylactic measures are available to reduce the infection in shrimps. To control and prevent HPV infection, considerable research efforts are on. This review provides information on current knowledge on HPV infection in penaeid shrimp aquaculture.

  2. Canine parvovirus in vaccinated dogs: a field study.

    PubMed

    Miranda, C; Thompson, G

    2016-04-16

    The authors report a field study that investigated the canine parvovirus (CPV) strains present in dogs that developed the disease after being vaccinated. Faecal samples of 78 dogs that have been vaccinated against CPV and later presented with clinical signs suspected of parvovirus infection were used. Fifty (64.1 per cent) samples tested positive by PCR for CPV. No CPV vaccine type was detected. The disease by CPV-2b occurred in older and female dogs when compared with that by CPV-2c. The clinical signs presented by infected dogs were similar when any of both variants were involved. In most cases of disease, the resulting infection by field variants occurred shortly after CPV vaccination. Two dogs that had been subjected to a complete vaccination schedule and presented with clinical signs after 10 days of vaccination, had the CPV-2c variant associated. The phylogenetic studies showed a close relationship of the isolates in vaccinated dogs to European field strains. Despite the limited sample size in this study, the findings point to the significance of the continuous molecular typing of the virus as a tool to monitor the prevalent circulating CPV strains and access the efficacy of current vaccines. Adjustments on the vaccine types to be used may have to be evaluated again according to each epidemiological situation in order to achieve the dog's optimal immune protection against CPV.

  3. Sphingomyelin induces structural alteration in canine parvovirus capsid.

    PubMed

    Pakkanen, Kirsi; Karttunen, Jenni; Virtanen, Salla; Vuento, Matti

    2008-03-01

    One of the essential steps in canine parvovirus (CPV) infection, the release from endosomal vesicles, is dominated by interactions between the virus capsid and the endosomal membranes. In this study, the effect of sphingomyelin and phosphatidyl serine on canine parvovirus capsid and on the phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) activity of CPV VP1 unique N-terminus was analyzed. Accordingly, a significant (P< or =0.05) shift of tryptophan fluorescence emission peak was detected at pH 5.5 in the presence of sphingomyelin, whereas at pH 7.4 a similar but minor shift was observed. This effect may relate to the exposure of VP1 N-terminus in acidic pH as well as to interactions between sphingomyelin and CPV. When the phenomenon was further characterized using circular dichroism spectroscopy, differences in CPV capsid CD spectra with and without sphingomyelin and phosphatidyl serine were detected, corresponding to data obtained with tryptophan fluorescence. However, when the enzymatic activity of CPV PLA(2) was tested in the presence of sphingomyelin, no significant effect in the function of the enzyme was detected. Thus, the structural changes observed with spectroscopic techniques appear not to manipulate the activity of CPV PLA(2), and may therefore implicate alternative interactions between CPV capsid and sphingomyelin.

  4. Structural Comparison of Different Antibodies Interacting with Parvovirus Capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Hafenstein, Susan; Bowman, Valorie D.; Sun, Tao; Nelson, Christian D.S.; Palermo, Laura M.; Chipman, Paul R.; Battisti, Anthony J.; Parrish, Colin R.; Rossmann, Michael G.; Cornell; Purdue

    2009-05-13

    The structures of canine parvovirus (CPV) and feline parvovirus (FPV) complexed with antibody fragments from eight different neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) reconstruction to resolutions varying from 8.5 to 18 {angstrom}. The crystal structure of one of the Fab molecules and the sequence of the variable domain for each of the Fab molecules have been determined. The structures of Fab fragments not determined crystallographically were predicted by homology modeling according to the amino acid sequence. Fitting of the Fab and virus structures into the cryoEM densities identified the footprints of each antibody on the viral surface. As anticipated from earlier analyses, the Fab binding sites are directed to two epitopes, A and B. The A site is on an exposed part of the surface near an icosahedral threefold axis, whereas the B site is about equidistant from the surrounding five-, three-, and twofold axes. One antibody directed to the A site binds CPV but not FPV. Two of the antibodies directed to the B site neutralize the virus as Fab fragments. The differences in antibody properties have been linked to the amino acids within the antibody footprints, the position of the binding site relative to the icosahedral symmetry elements, and the orientation of the Fab structure relative to the surface of the virus. Most of the exposed surface area was antigenic, although each of the antibodies had a common area of overlap that coincided with the positions of the previously mapped escape mutations.

  5. Seroprevalence of Canine Parvovirus in Dogs in Lusaka District, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) enteritis is a highly contagious enteric disease of young dogs. Limited studies have been done in Zambia to investigate the prevalence of CPV in dogs. Blood was collected from dogs from three veterinary clinics (clinic samples, n = 174) and one township of Lusaka (field samples, n = 56). Each dog's age, sex, breed, and vaccination status were recorded. A haemagglutination assay using pig erythrocytes and modified live parvovirus vaccine as the antigen was used. Antibodies to CPV were detected in 100% of dogs (unvaccinated or vaccinated). The titres ranged from 160 to 10240 with a median of 1280. Vaccinated dogs had significantly higher antibody titres compared to unvaccinated (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference in titres of clinic samples compared to field samples (p < 0.0001) but not within breed (p = 0.098) or sex (p = 0.572). Multiple regression analysis showed that only age and vaccination status were significant predictors of antibody titres. The presence of antibody in all dogs suggests that the CPV infection is ubiquitous and the disease is endemic, hence the need for research to determine the protection conferred by vaccination and natural exposure to the virus under local conditions. PMID:27699205

  6. Novel duck parvovirus identified in Cherry Valley ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus), China.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuanfeng; Li, Qi; Chen, Zongyan; Liu, Guangqing

    2016-10-01

    An unknown infectious disease in Cherry Valley ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus) characterized by short beak and strong growth retardation occurred in China during 2015. The causative agent of this disease, tentatively named duck short beak and dwarfism syndrome (DSBDS), as well as the evolutionary relationships between this causative agent and all currently known avian-origin parvoviruses were clarified by virus isolation, transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation, analysis of nuclear acid type, (RT-)PCR identification, whole genome sequencing, and NS1 protein sequences-based phylogenetic analyses. The results indicated that the causative agent of DSBDS is closely related with the goose parvovirus-like virus, which is divergent from all currently known avian-origin parvoviruses and should be a novel duck parvovirus (NDPV).

  7. Parvovirus infection in a Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) and in a European wildcat (Felis silvestris silvestris).

    PubMed

    Wasieri, J; Schmiedeknecht, G; Förster, C; König, M; Reinacher, M

    2009-01-01

    A Eurasian lynx and a European wildcat from the same wildlife park were submitted for necropsy examination after sudden death and after death following a clinical history of lethargy, respectively. Neither animal had been vaccinated against feline parvovirus (feline panleukopenia virus). Feral domestic cats were widespread in the area of the wildlife park and a number of these animals that had been captured had recently died from parvovirus infection. Gross and microscopical findings in the two non-domestic felids were consistent with feline parvovirus infection and this was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction. The introduction of feline parvovirus into captive non-domestic felid populations could pose a threat to their health and survival. Vaccination of captive non-domestic felids is therefore recommended.

  8. Management strategies for controlling endemic and seasonal mouse parvovirus infection in a barrier facility.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Jon D; Livingston, Robert; Leblanc, Mathias

    2011-05-01

    Despite improved diagnostic and rederivation capabilities, research facilities still struggle to manage parvovirus infections (e.g., mouse parvovirus (MPV) and minute virus of mice) in mouse colonies. Multi-faceted approaches are needed to prevent adventitious organisms such as MPV from breaching a barrier facility. In this article, the authors document recent changes to the Salk Institute's animal care program that were intended to help manage mouse parvovirus in the barrier facility. Specifically, the Institute started to use a new disinfectant and to give mice irradiated feed. The authors found an association between these modifications and a reduction in MPV incidence and prevalence in endemically infected colonies. These data suggest that using irradiated feed and appropriate disinfectants with contemporary management practices can be an effective plan for eradicating or controlling MPV infection in a research facility. The authors recommend further study of the environmental risk factors for parvovirus infection and of potential biological interactions associated with the use of irradiated feed.

  9. Serologic response of maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) to canine and canine parvovirus vaccination distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Maia, O B; Gouveia, A M

    2001-03-01

    This study evaluated the immune response of 47 (22 males, 25 females) captive maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) to modified-live canine parvovirus and canine distemper virus (Onderstepoort and Rockborn strains) vaccines. Sera were collected from 33 adults and 14 pups, including five free-ranging pups captured at 1 yr of age or younger. All the adults and four captive-born pups had been vaccinated prior to this first blood collection. Virus neutralization and hemagglutination-inhibition assays were performed for quantitating antibodies against canine distemper and canine parvovirus, respectively. Distemper antibody titers > or = 100 were present in 57% of adults and 14% of pups. All adults and 29% of pups had parvovirus antibody titers > or = 80. After vaccination, 72% of the wolves developed antibody titers > or = 100 against distemper and 98% developed titers > or = 80 against parvovirus. Both vaccines used were safe and immunogenic to juvenile and adult maned wolves, regardless of prior vaccination history.

  10. Long-term neurodevelopmental and cardiovascular outcome after intrauterine transfusions for fetal anaemia: a review.

    PubMed

    Lindenburg, Irene T M; van Klink, Jeanine M; Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E H J; van Kamp, Inge L; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico

    2013-09-01

    Perinatal survival rates after intrauterine transfusions (IUT) for red cell alloimmunisation now exceed 90%, which demonstrates the safety and efficacy of one of the most successful procedures in fetal therapy. However, improved perinatal survival could lead to an increased number of children with long-term disabilities. The importance of long-term follow-up studies in fetal therapy lies in both the necessity of evaluation of antenatal management as well as in evidence-based preconceptional and prenatal counselling. This review describes the possible long-term cardiovascular and neurodevelopmental sequelae after IUT treatment for different indications including red cell alloimmunisation, parvovirus B19 infection, fetomaternal haemorrhage and twin anaemia-polycythaemia sequence.

  11. Parvovirus-derived endogenous viral elements in two South American rodent genomes.

    PubMed

    Arriagada, Gloria; Gifford, Robert J

    2014-10-01

    We describe endogenous viral elements (EVEs) derived from parvoviruses (family Parvoviridae) in the genomes of the long-tailed chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) and the degu (Octodon degus). The novel EVEs include dependovirus-related elements and representatives of a clearly distinct parvovirus lineage that also has endogenous representatives in marsupial genomes. In the degu, one dependovirus-derived EVE was found to carry an intact reading frame and was differentially expressed in vivo, with increased expression in the liver.

  12. Parvovirus-Derived Endogenous Viral Elements in Two South American Rodent Genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We describe endogenous viral elements (EVEs) derived from parvoviruses (family Parvoviridae) in the genomes of the long-tailed chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) and the degu (Octodon degus). The novel EVEs include dependovirus-related elements and representatives of a clearly distinct parvovirus lineage that also has endogenous representatives in marsupial genomes. In the degu, one dependovirus-derived EVE was found to carry an intact reading frame and was differentially expressed in vivo, with increased expression in the liver. PMID:25078696

  13. Identification and phylogenetic diversity of parvovirus circulating in commercial chicken and turkey flocks in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Bidin, M; Lojkić, I; Bidin, Z; Tiljar, M; Majnarić, D

    2011-12-01

    Phylogenetic diversity of parvovirus detected in commercial chicken and turkey flocks is described. Nine chicken and six turkey flocks from Croatian farms were tested for parvovirus presence. Intestinal samples from one turkey and seven chicken flocks were found positive, and were sequenced. Natural parvovirus infection was more frequently detected in chickens than in turkeys examined in this study. Sequence analysis of 400 nucleotide fragments of the nonstructural gene (NS) showed that our sequences had more similarity with chicken parvovirus (ChPV) (92.3%-99.7%) than turkey parvovirus (TuPV) (89.5%-98.9%) strains. Phylogenetic analysis grouped our sequences in two clades. Also, the higher prevalence of ChPV than TuPV in tested flocks was defined. The necropsy findings suggested a malabsorption syndrome followed by a preascitic condition. Further research of parvovirus infection, pathogenesis, and the possibility of its association with poult enteritis and mortality syndrome (PEMS) and runting and stunting syndrome (RSS) is needed to clarify its significance as an agent of enteric disease.

  14. Hematologic improvement in dogs with parvovirus infection treated with recombinant canine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Duffy, A; Dow, S; Ogilvie, G; Rao, S; Hackett, T

    2010-08-01

    Previously, dogs with canine parvovirus-induced neutropenia have not responded to treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). However, recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) has not been previously evaluated for treatment of parvovirus-induced neutropenia in dogs. We assessed the effectiveness of rcG-CSF in dogs with parvovirus-induced neutropenia with a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized clinical trial. Endpoints of our study were time to recovery of WBC and neutrophil counts, and duration of hospitalization. 28 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia were treated with rcG-CSF and outcomes were compared to those of 34 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia not treated with rcG-CSF. We found that mean WBC and neutrophil counts were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the 28 dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to disease-matched dogs not treated with rcG-CSF. In addition, the mean duration of hospitalization was reduced (P = 0.01) in rcG-CSF treated dogs compared to untreated dogs. However, survival times were decreased in dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to untreated dogs. These results suggest that treatment with rcG-CSF was effective in stimulating neutrophil recovery and shortening the duration of hospitalization in dogs with parvovirus infection, but indicate the need for additional studies to evaluate overall safety of the treatment.

  15. Human parvovirus B19 in patients with beta thalassemia major from Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Arabzadeh, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Alizadeh, Farideh; Tavakoli, Ahmad; Mollaei, Hamidreza; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Karimi, Gharib; Farahmand, Mohammad; Mortazavi, Helya Sadat; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza

    2017-03-01

    Due to the tropism of human parvovirus B19 to erythroid progenitor cells, infection in patients with an underlying hemolytic disorder such as beta-thalassemia major leads to suppression of erythrocyte formation, referred to as transient aplasia crisis (TAC), which may be life-threatening. We investigated the prevalence of parvovirus B19 among patients with beta thalassemia major attending the Zafar Adult Thalassemia Clinic in Tehran, Iran. This cross-sectional study was performed to determine the presence of parvovirus B19 DNA in blood samples and parvovirus B19 genotypes in plasma samples of patients with thalassemia major. The population consisted of 150 patients with beta-thalassemia major who attended the Zafar clinic in Tehran. Specimens were studied using a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. The prevalence of parvovirus B19 in our study population was 4%. Of 150 patients with thalassemia, six (4%) were positive for B19 DNA. There was no significant correlation between blood transfusion frequency and B19 DNA positivity. Finally, phylogenetic analysis of human parvovirus B19 revealed genotype I in these six patients. In this study, acute B19 infections were detected in patients with beta thalassemia major. Screening of such high-risk groups can considerably reduce the incidence and prevalence of B19 infection; thus, screening is required for epidemiologic surveillance and disease-prevention measures.

  16. Human parvovirus B19 in patients with beta thalassemia major from Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Arabzadeh, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Alizadeh, Farideh; Tavakoli, Ahmad; Mollaei, Hamidreza; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Karimi, Gharib; Farahmand, Mohammad; Mortazavi, Helya Sadat

    2017-01-01

    Background Due to the tropism of human parvovirus B19 to erythroid progenitor cells, infection in patients with an underlying hemolytic disorder such as beta-thalassemia major leads to suppression of erythrocyte formation, referred to as transient aplasia crisis (TAC), which may be life-threatening. We investigated the prevalence of parvovirus B19 among patients with beta thalassemia major attending the Zafar Adult Thalassemia Clinic in Tehran, Iran. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed to determine the presence of parvovirus B19 DNA in blood samples and parvovirus B19 genotypes in plasma samples of patients with thalassemia major. The population consisted of 150 patients with beta-thalassemia major who attended the Zafar clinic in Tehran. Specimens were studied using a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Results The prevalence of parvovirus B19 in our study population was 4%. Of 150 patients with thalassemia, six (4%) were positive for B19 DNA. There was no significant correlation between blood transfusion frequency and B19 DNA positivity. Finally, phylogenetic analysis of human parvovirus B19 revealed genotype I in these six patients. Conclusion In this study, acute B19 infections were detected in patients with beta thalassemia major. Screening of such high-risk groups can considerably reduce the incidence and prevalence of B19 infection; thus, screening is required for epidemiologic surveillance and disease-prevention measures. PMID:28401102

  17. Detection of Parvovirus B19 Infection in Thalasemic Patients in Isfahan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nikoozad, Razieh; Mahzounieh, Mohammad Reza; Ghorani, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Parvovirus B19, a member of the Erythrovirus genus of Parvoviridae family, causes various clinical illnesses including infectious erythema, arthropathy, hydrops fetalis or congenital anemia, and transient aplastic crises. The B19 virus can be transmitted through respiratory secretions, blood products, and blood transfusion. Objectives: The aim of this study was to detect the B19 virus in thalassemia patients in Isfahan, Iran. Patients and Methods: The prevalence of parvovirus B19 infection was compared between thalassemia major patients and healthy subjects. Plasma samples were collected from 30 thalassemia patients from Isfahan, Iran. Thirty patients without any blood complications were considered as the control group. After DNA extraction from the plasma samples, polymerase chain reaction was performed for parvovirus B19 detection. Results: The parvovirus B19-specific nucleotide sequence was detected in 6 patients (20%). None of the samples obtained from the 30 control subjects tested positive for B19. Conclusions: In this study B19-Parvovirus infection were detected in patients with hematologic disorders in comparison with control subjects. Screening of patients with a high risk of parvovirus B19 infection can considerably reduce the incidence and prevalence of B19 infection. PMID:26855745

  18. Ethics of fetal tissue transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sanders, L M; Giudice, L; Raffin, T A

    1993-09-01

    Now that the Clinton Administration has overturned the ban on federal funding for fetal tissue transplantation, old ethical issues renew their relevance and new ethical issues arise. Is fetal tissue transplantation necessary and beneficial? Are fetal rights violated by the use of fetal tissue in research? Is there a moral danger that the potential of fetal tissue donation will encourage elective abortions? Should pregnant women be allowed to designate specific fetal transplant recipients? What criteria should be used to select fetal tissue transplants? Whose consent should be required for the use of fetal tissue for transplantation? We review the current state of clinical research with fetal tissue transplantation, the legal history of fetal tissue research, the major arguments against the use of fetal tissue for transplantation, and the new postmoratorium ethical dilemmas. We include recommendations for guidelines to govern the medical treatment of fetal tissue in transplantation.

  19. Risk factors and long-term outcomes of parvovirus B19 infection in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Baek, Chung Hee; Kim, Hyosang; Yang, Won Seok; Han, Duck Jong; Park, Su-Kil

    2017-10-01

    Parvovirus B19 is a small, non-enveloped, single-stranded DNA virus with a special affinity for the erythroid progenitor cells of the bone marrow. The first case of parvovirus B19 infection in a kidney transplant recipient (KTR) was reported in 1986. Data on the risk factors and specific clinical characteristics of parvovirus B19 infection remain insufficient. We screened 602 KTRs for parvovirus B19 infection using parvovirus B19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from January 1990 to April 2016, and the clinical characteristics of patients with positive results were compared to those of age- and gender-matched patients with negative PCR results. A total of 39 KTRs tested positive for parvovirus B19, and they were compared to 78 age- and gender-matched patients among 563 KTRs who had negative PCR results. In all, 89.7% of positive cases were reported within the first year after kidney transplantation. In multivariate analyses, deceased-donor kidney transplantation (odds ratio [OR] 9.067, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.668-49.275, P = .011), use of tacrolimus (OR 3.607, 95% CI 1.024-12.706, P = .046), PCR test within 1 year of kidney transplantation (OR 12.456, 95% CI 2.674-58.036, P = .001), and hemoglobin levels (OR 0.559, 95% CI 0.351-0.889, P = .014) showed significant correlations with parvovirus B19 infection. Graft survival did not differ between the two groups during the follow-up period of 111.68 ± 54.54 months (P = .685 by log-rank test). The identification of factors related to positive parvovirus B19 PCR results may promote the early detection of parvovirus B19 infection. Further studies are needed to elucidate the characteristics of parvovirus B19 infection in kidney transplantation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Production of porcine parvovirus empty capsids with high immunogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Martínez, C; Dalsgaard, K; López de Turiso, J A; Cortés, E; Vela, C; Casal, J I

    1992-01-01

    The VP2 gene of porcine parvovirus was cloned in the baculovirus system and expressed in insect cells. The resulting product was present in high yield. It self-assembled into particles which were structurally and antigenically indistinguishable from regular PPV capsids. A high degree of purity of the recombinant capsids was obtained by ammonium sulphate precipitation of cell lysates. These virus-like particles were used as antigen in the immunization of two pigs. The pigs elicited an immune response which, when assayed by standard serological techniques, was identical to that of a commercial vaccine. The amount of recombinant antigen needed in a vaccine dose was only 3 micrograms in a primary dose and 1.5 micrograms in the booster.

  1. Human parvovirus PARV4 in plasma pools of Chinese origin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y-Y; Guo, Y; Zhao, X; Wang, Z; Lv, M-M; Yan, Q-P; Zhang, J-G

    2012-10-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is present in blood and blood products. As the presence and levels of PARV4 in Chinese source plasma pools have never been determined, we implemented real-time quantitative PCR to investigate the presence of PARV4 in source plasma pools in China. Results showed that 26·15% (51/195) of lots tested positive for PARV4. The amounts of DNA ranged from 2·83 × 10(3) copies/ml to 2·35×10(7) copies/ml plasma. The high level of PARV4 in plasma pools may pose a potential risk to recipients. Further studies on the pathogenesis of PARV4 are urgently required.

  2. Canine parvovirus (CPV-2) variants circulating in Nigerian dogs

    PubMed Central

    Apaa, T. T.; Daly, J. M.; Tarlinton, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) is a highly contagious viral disease with three variants (CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c) currently circulating in dogs worldwide. The main aim of this study was to determine the prevalent CPV-2 variant in faecal samples from 53 dogs presenting with acute gastroenteritis suspected to be and consistent with CPV-2 to Nigerian Veterinary Clinics in 2013–2014. Seventy-five per cent of these dogs tested positive for CPV-2 in a commercial antigen test and/or by PCR. Partial sequencing of the VP2 gene of six of these demonstrated them to be CPV-2a. Most of the dogs (60 per cent) were vaccinated, with 74 per cent of them puppies less than six months old. PMID:27933190

  3. Overview of fetal arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Shardha; Strasburger, Janette

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Though fetal arrhythmias account for a small proportion of referrals to a fetal cardiologist, they may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The present review outlines the current literature with regard to the diagnosis and, in brief, some management strategies in fetal arrhythmias. Recent findings Advances in echocardiography have resulted in significant improvements in our ability to elucidate the mechanism of arrhythmia at the bedside. At the same time, fetal magnetocardiography is broadening our understanding of mechanisms of arrhythmia especially as it pertains to ventricular arrhythmias and congenital heart block. It provides a unique window to study electrical properties of the fetal heart, unlike what has been available to date. Recent reports of bedside use of fetal ECG make it a promising new technology. The underlying mechanisms resulting in immune-mediated complete heart block in a small subset of ‘at-risk’ fetuses is under investigation. Summary There have been great strides in noninvasive diagnosis of fetal arrhythmias. However, we still need to improve our knowledge of the electromechanical properties of the fetal heart as well as the mechanisms of arrhythmia to further improve outcomes. Multiinstitutional collaborative studies are needed to help answer some of the questions regarding patient, drug selection and management algorithms. PMID:18781114

  4. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caley, Linda M.; Kramer, Charlotte; Robinson, Luther K.

    2005-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a serious and widespread problem in this country. Positioned within the community with links to children, families, and healthcare systems, school nurses are a critical element in the prevention and treatment of those affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Although most school nurses are familiar…

  5. Fetal Neurobehavioral Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigated the ontogeny of fetal autonomic, motoric, state, and interactive functioning in 31 healthy fetuses from 20 weeks through term. Found that male fetuses were more active than female fetuses, and that greater maternal stress appraisal was associated with reduced fetal heart rate variability. Found that an apparent period of…

  6. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caley, Linda M.; Kramer, Charlotte; Robinson, Luther K.

    2005-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a serious and widespread problem in this country. Positioned within the community with links to children, families, and healthcare systems, school nurses are a critical element in the prevention and treatment of those affected by fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Although most school nurses are familiar…

  7. Myocardial Parvovirus B19 Persistence: Lack of Association with Clinicopathologic Phenotype in Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Garrick C.; Lopez-Molina, Javier; Gottumukkala, Raju V.; Rosner, Gregg F.; Anello, Mary S.; Hecht, Jonathan L.; Winters, Gayle L.; Padera, Robert F.; Baughman, Kenneth L.; Lipes, Myra A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple viruses have been isolated from the heart, but their significance remains controversial. We sought to determine the prevalence of cardiotropic viruses in endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) samples from adult heart failure (HF) patients and to define the clinicopathologic profile of patients exhibiting viral positivity. Methods and Results EMB from 100 patients (median EF 30%, IQR 20–45%) presenting for cardiomyopathy evaluation (median symptom duration 5 months, IQR 1–13 months) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, cytomegalovirus, enteroviruses, Epstein-Barr virus, and parvovirus B19. Each isolate was sequenced and viral load was determined. Parvovirus B19 was the only virus detected in EMB samples (12% of subjects). No subject had anti-parvovirus IgM antibodies, but all had IgG antibodies, suggesting viral persistence. The clinical presentation of parvovirus-positive patients was markedly heterogeneous, with both acute and chronic HF, variable ventricular function, and ischemic cardiomyopathy. No subject met Dallas histopathological criteria for active or borderline myocarditis. Two patients with a positive cardiac MRI and presumed “parvomyocarditis” had similar viral loads as autopsy controls without heart disease. The oldest parvovirus-positive subjects were positive for genotype 2, suggesting lifelong persistence in heart tissue. Conclusions Parvovirus B19 was the only virus isolated from EMB samples in this series of adult HF patients from the United States. Positivity was associated with a wide array of clinical presentations and heart failure phenotypes. Our studies do not support a causative role for parvovirus B19 persistence in HF and therefore advocate against the use of antiviral therapy for these patients. PMID:21097605

  8. Advances in fetal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, Kathryn M.

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the gold standard for the treatment of congenital malformations has been planned delivery at tertiary care center with attempted post-natal repair or amelioration of the lesion. Over the last few decades however, rapid advances in imaging and instrumentation technology combined with superior knowledge of fetal pathophysiology has led to the development of novel intrauterine interventions for most common fetal anomalies. Great success has already been seen the treatment of previous devastating anomalies such as myelomeningocele (MMC), congenital cystic malformations of the lung, twin-twin transfusion, and sacrococcygeal teratomas. Although still limited, these innovative techniques have unique potential to improve outcomes in the most devastating fetal anomalies. PMID:27867946

  9. Genetic characterization of a potentially novel goose parvovirus circulating in Muscovy duck flocks in Fujian Province, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao; Cheng, Xiao-Xia; Chen, Shao-Ying; Zhu, Xiao-Li; Chen, Shi-Long; Lin, Feng-Qiang; Li, Zhao-Long

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel goose parvovirus (MDGPV/PT) isolated from an affected Muscovy duck in Fujian Province, China. In this study, the NS1 sequence analyses indicated a close genetic relationship between MDGPV/PT and Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) strains, although MDGPV/DY, which was isolated from a Muscovy duck in 2006 in Sichuan Province, could be divided into GPV-related groups. Phylogenetic analysis showed that except for differences in the NS1 gene, MDGPV strains PT and DY are closely related to a parvovirus that infects domestic waterfowls. This is the first demonstration of recombination between goose and Muscovy duck parvoviruses in nature, and MDGPV/PT might have led to the generation of a novel waterfowl parvovirus strain circulating in Muscovy duck flocks in China.

  10. Anaemia and fever in Kidney transplant. The role of human parvovirus B19.

    PubMed

    Parodis López, Yanet; Santana Estupiñán, Raquel; Marrero Robayna, Silvia; Gallego Samper, Roberto; Henríquez Palop, Fernando; Rivero Vera, José Carlos; Camacho Galán, Rafael; Pena López, María José; Sablón González, Nery; González Cabrera, Fayna; Oliva Dámaso, Elena; Vega Díaz, Nicanor; Rodríguez Pérez, José Carlos

    Infections remain an issue of particular relevance in renal transplant patients, particularly viral infections. Human parvovirus B19 infection causes severe refractory anaemia, pancytopenia and thrombotic microangiopathy. Its presence is recognized by analysing blood polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by the discovery of typical giant proerythroblasts in the bone marrow. We report the case of a 65 year-old man with a history of deceased donor renal transplant in September 2014. At 38 days after the transplant, the patient presented progressive anaemia that was resistant to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. At 64 days after transplant, hyperthermia occurred with progressive deterioration of the patient's general condition. The viral serology and the first blood PCR for human parvovirus B19 were both negative. At 4 months and 19 days after, a bone marrow biopsy was conducted, showing giant erythroblasts with nuclear viral inclusions that were compatible with parvovirus; a PCR in the tissue confirmed the diagnosis. A second blood PCR was positive for parvovirus. After treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and the temporary discontinuation of mycophenolate mofetil, a complete remission of the disease occurred, although the blood PCR for parvovirus B19 remained positive, so monitoring is necessary for future likely recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. An updated TaqMan real-time PCR for canine and feline parvoviruses.

    PubMed

    Streck, André Felipe; Rüster, Dana; Truyen, Uwe; Homeier, Timo

    2013-10-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) emerged in late 1970s from the feline panleukopenia virus (FPLV) and developed, since then, into novel genetic and antigenic variants (CPV-2a, -2b and -2c). Canine and feline parvoviruses cause an acute enteric disease in their hosts, with high level of viral shedding. In this study, a quantitative TaqMan PCR for detection and quantitation of canine and feline parvoviruses in serum and fecal samples was developed. The primers were designed based upon the entire GenBank content for CPV and FPLV. A standard curve was generated, and validation tests were performed using 10-fold serial dilutions of CPV-2 virus in CPV/FPLV-negative feces and CPV/FPLV-negative serum samples. As a result, the 100% detection limit of the PCR was 18 copies of the viral genome per μl of serum and fecal sample. All canine parvovirus types as well as FPLV were detected. In conclusion, the real-time PCR represents an upgraded and useful tool to identify and quantify canine and feline parvoviruses in different sample matrices.

  12. A Ten-Year Molecular Survey on Parvoviruses Infecting Carnivores in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Filipov, C; Desario, C; Patouchas, O; Eftimov, P; Gruichev, G; Manov, V; Filipov, G; Buonavoglia, C; Decaro, N

    2016-08-01

    Parvoviruses represent the most important infectious agents that are responsible for severe to fatal disease in carnivores. This study reports the results of a 10-year molecular survey conducted on carnivores in Bulgaria (n = 344), including 262 dogs and 19 cats with gastroenteritis, and 57 hunted wild carnivores. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), followed by virus characterization by minor groove binder (MGB) probe assays, detected 216 parvovirus positive dogs with a predominance of canine parvovirus type 2a (CPV-2a, 79.17%) over CPV-2b (18.52%) and CPV-2c (2.31%). Rottweilers and German shepherds were the most frequent breeds among CPV-positive pedigree dogs (n = 96). Eighteen cats were found to shed parvoviruses in their faeces, with most strains being characterized as FPLV (n = 17), although a single specimen tested positive for CPV-2a. Only two wild carnivores were parvovirus positive, a wolf (Canis lupus) and a red fox (Vulpes vulpes), both being infected by CPV-2a strains.

  13. Comparison of different in-house test systems to detect parvovirus in faeces of cats.

    PubMed

    Neuerer, Felix F; Horlacher, Karin; Truyen, Uwe; Hartmann, Katrin

    2008-07-01

    In-house tests for the identification of faecal parvovirus antigen are now available. The majority of these are licensed for canine parvovirus only; but anecdotal information suggests that they will detect feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) as well. This prospective study was designed to compare five commercially available test systems. In total, 200 faecal samples from randomly selected healthy cats (148) and cats with diarrhoea (52) were tested and compared with the results of examination by electron microscopy. Ten cats were positive for FPV and all of these had diarrhoea. In-house canine parvovirus tests can be used to detect FPV. All tests were suitable to screen cats for faecal parvovirus excretion (positive predictive values for the Witness Parvo, the Snap Parvo, the SAS Parvo, the Fastest Parvo Strip, and the Speed Parvo were 100.0, 100.0, 57.1, 38.9, and 100%, respectively, negative predictive values for the Witness Parvo, the Snap Parvo, the SAS Parvo, the Fastest Parvo Strip, and the Speed Parvo were 97.4, 97.9, 98.9, 98.4, and 97.4%, respectively). In-house parvovirus tests may be positive up to 2 weeks after vaccination, and therefore, in recently vaccinated cats positive results do not necessarily mean infection.

  14. High prevalence of human parvovirus 4 infection in HBV and HCV infected individuals in shanghai.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelian; Zhang, Jing; Hong, Liang; Wang, Jiayu; Yuan, Zhengan; Zhang, Xi; Ghildyal, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) has been detected in blood and diverse tissues samples from HIV/AIDS patients who are injecting drug users. Although B19 virus, the best characterized human parvovirus, has been shown to co-infect patients with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus (HBV, HCV) infection, the association of PARV4 with HBV or HCV infections is still unknown.The aim of this study was to characterise the association of viruses belonging to PARV4 genotype 1 and 2 with chronic HBV and HCV infection in Shanghai.Serum samples of healthy controls, HCV infected subjects and HBV infected subjects were retrieved from Shanghai Center for Disease Control and Prevention (SCDC) Sample Bank. Parvovirus-specific nested-PCR was performed and results confirmed by sequencing. Sequences were compared with reference sequences obtained from Genbank to derive phylogeny trees.The frequency of parvovirus molecular detection was 16-22%, 33% and 41% in healthy controls, HCV infected and HBV infected subjects respectively, with PARV4 being the only parvovirus detected. HCV infected and HBV infected subjects had a significantly higher PARV4 prevalence than the healthy population. No statistical difference was found in PARV4 prevalence between HBV or HCV infected subjects. PARV4 sequence divergence within study groups was similar in healthy subjects, HBV or HCV infected subjects.Our data clearly demonstrate that PARV4 infection is strongly associated with HCV and HBV infection in Shanghai but may not cause increased disease severity.

  15. Increasing parvovirus filter throughput of monoclonal antibodies using ion exchange membrane adsorptive pre-filtration.

    PubMed

    Brown, Arick; Bechtel, Charity; Bill, Jerome; Liu, Hui; Liu, Jun; McDonald, Dan; Pai, Satyan; Radhamohan, Asha; Renslow, Ryan; Thayer, Brooke; Yohe, Stefan; Dowd, Chris

    2010-07-01

    Pre-filtration using ion exchange membrane adsorbers can improve parvovirus filter throughput of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The membranes work by binding trace foulants, and although some antibody product also binds, yields > or =99% are easily achieved by overloading. Results show that foulant adsorption is dependent on pH and conductivity, but independent of scale and adsorber brand. The ability to use ion exchange membranes as pre-filters is significant because it provides a clean, well defined, chemically stable option for enhancing throughput. Additionally, ion exchange membranes facilitate characterization of parvovirus filter foulants. Examination of adsorber elution samples using sedimentation velocity analysis and SEC-MALS/QELS revealed the presence of high molecular weight species ranging from 8 to 13 nm in hydrodynamic radius, which are similar in size to parvoviruses and thus would be expected to plug the pores of a parvovirus filter. A study of two identical membranes in-series supports the hypothesis that the foulants are soluble, trace level aggregates in the feed. This study's significance lies in a previously undiscovered application of membrane chromatography, leading to a more cost effective and robust approach to parvovirus filtration for the production of monoclonal antibodies.

  16. Discovery of parvovirus-related sequences in an unexpected broad range of animals

    PubMed Central

    François, S.; Filloux, D.; Roumagnac, P.; Bigot, D.; Gayral, P.; Martin, D. P.; Froissart, R.; Ogliastro, M.

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of the genetic diversity and host ranges of viruses is fragmentary. This is particularly true for the Parvoviridae family. Genetic diversity studies of single stranded DNA viruses within this family have been largely focused on arthropod- and vertebrate-infecting species that cause diseases of humans and our domesticated animals: a focus that has biased our perception of parvovirus diversity. While metagenomics approaches could help rectify this bias, so too could transcriptomics studies. Large amounts of transcriptomic data are available for a diverse array of animal species and whenever this data has inadvertently been gathered from virus-infected individuals, it could contain detectable viral transcripts. We therefore performed a systematic search for parvovirus-related sequences (PRSs) within publicly available transcript, genome and protein databases and eleven new transcriptome datasets. This revealed 463 PRSs in the transcript databases of 118 animals. At least 41 of these PRSs are likely integrated within animal genomes in that they were also found within genomic sequence databases. Besides illuminating the ubiquity of parvoviruses, the number of parvoviral sequences discovered within public databases revealed numerous previously unknown parvovirus-host combinations; particularly in invertebrates. Our findings suggest that the host-ranges of extant parvoviruses might span the entire animal kingdom. PMID:27600734

  17. Standardization of parvovirus B19 DNA extraction from serum and quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Janak

    2005-10-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a newly emerging virus causing a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. The corner stone of diagnosis of acute B19 infection is demonstration of anti-B19 IgM antibodies and its DNA by PCR. Sera of patients infected with B19 acutely or persistently shows intense viraemia (up to 10(12) virus particles/ ml) but extraction of B19 DNA from serum is a problematic task. There is no single standardized, cost-effective in-house method, which can successfully extract DNA of B19 from serum samples and which has been subsequently tested repeatedly by many investigators over time. We describe here an efficient in-house method of extraction of B19 DNA from serum and quantitate extracted DNA by PCR. Firstly, a quantitative PCR was done using 3 microl of a cloned B19 DNA (33.3 pg/ml) mixed in 47 microl of sterile distilled water which were further diluted from 10(-1) up to 10(-7) to find the lower limit of DNA detection. To mimic human serum samples with known quantity of B19, 3 ml of cloned B19 DNA (33.3 pg/ml) were mixed with 47ml of fetal calf serum (FCS; free of B19) and were similarly log diluted from 10(-1) to 10(-7) in 50 ml volume. In-house method of DNA extraction from serum (FCS+B19 DNA) were then performed followed by quantitative PCR. In both the cases, we were able to detect B19 DNA up to 10(-4) dilution which contained 0.6 fg of B19 DNA corresponding to 12 B19 genome equivalents/PCR reaction or 2.4 x 10(2) genome quivalents/ml of serum. Further, the entire procedure was repeated two more times and identical results were obtained confirming its reproducibility. Using this in-house method we extracted and amplified B19 DNA successfully from sera of clinically suspected cases of B19 infection (data not shown). Compared to other studies, the sensitivity of our in-house method was found to be superior hence recommended for developing countries as commercial kits are too costly.

  18. Short beak and dwarfism syndrome of mule duck is caused by a distinct lineage of goose parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Palya, Vilmos; Zolnai, Anna; Benyeda, Zsófia; Kovács, Edit; Kardi, Veronika; Mató, Tamás

    2009-04-01

    From the early 1970s to the present, numerous cases of short beak and dwarfism syndrome (SBDS) have been reported in mule ducks from France. The animals showed strong growth retardation with smaller beak and tarsus. It was suggested that the syndrome was caused by goose parvovirus on the basis of serological investigation, but the causative agent has not been isolated and the disease has not so far been reproduced by experimental infection. The aim of the present study was to characterize the virus strains isolated from field cases of SBDS, and to reproduce the disease experimentally. Phylogenetic analysis proved that the parvovirus isolates obtained from SBDS of mule duck belonged to a distinct lineage of goose parvovirus-related group of waterfowl parvoviruses. The authors carried out experimental infections of 1-day-old, 2-week-old and 3-week-old mule ducks by the oral route with three different parvovirus strains: strain D17/99 of goose parvovirus from Derzsy's disease, strain FM of Muscovy duck parvovirus from the parvovirus disease of Muscovy ducks, and strain D176/02 isolated from SBDS of mule duck. The symptoms of SBDS of the mule duck could only be reproduced with the mule duck isolate (strain D176/02) following 1-day-old inoculation. Infection with a genetically different strain of goose parvovirus isolated from classical Derzsy's disease (D17/99) or with the Muscovy duck parvovirus strain (FM) did not cause any clinical symptoms or pathological lesions in mule ducks.

  19. Fetal Health and Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... fetus grows and develops. There are specific prenatal tests to monitor both the mother's health and fetal health during each trimester. With modern technology, health professionals can Detect birth defects Identify problems ...

  20. [Paradigms of fetal ethology].

    PubMed

    Jakobovits, Akos

    2006-03-19

    In utero, the fetus is protected against biological and social influences of the outside world. This circumstance offers an opportunity for sonographic investigation of inherited fetal behavior free of extraneous effects. Observation of fetal activities with ultrasound permits the recognition of certain uniform features of fetal behavior. Immediately after birth, the neonate continues repeating those activities that he/she became accustomed to in the womb. Later these become modified by environmental influences. Nonetheless, basic inherited behavioral characteristics continue to be expressed and may remain recognizable even during adulthood. Some aspects of adult behavior may derive from experience acquired during fetal life. These include the hand-face reflex, various types of facial expression, such as smiling, crying, yawning, grimaces of dissatification and desperation as well as sticking out one's tongue.

  1. Evolution of fetal ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Avni, F E; Cos, T; Cassart, M; Massez, A; Donner, C; Ismaili, K; Hall, M

    2007-02-01

    The authors wish to highlight the evolution that has occurred in fetal ultrasound in recent years. A first significant evolution lies in the increasing contribution of first trimester ultrasound for the detection of fetal anomalies. Malformations of several organs and systems have been diagnosed during the first trimester. Furthermore the systematic measurement of the fetal neck translucency has led to increasing rate of detection of aneuploidies and heart malformations. For several years now, three-dimensional (3D) and 4D ultrasound (US) have been used as a complementary tool to 2D US for the evaluation of fetal morphology. This brings an improved morphologic assessment of the fetus. Applications of the techniques are increasing, especially for the fetal face, heart and extremities. The third field where fetal US is continuously providing important information is the knowledge of the natural history of diseases. This has brought significant improvement in the postnatal management of several diseases, especially urinary tract dilatation and broncho-pulmonary malformation.

  2. Human fetal thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Polak, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The early steps of thyroid development that lead to its function in the human fetus and subsequently the further maturation that allows the human fetus to secrete thyroxine (T4) in a significant amount are reviewed here. We underline the importance of the transfer of T4 from the pregnant woman to her fetus, which contributes at all stages of the pregnancy to fetal thyroid function and development. In the first trimester of pregnancy, the temporal and structural correlation of thyroid hormone synthesis with folliculogenesis supported the concept that structural and functional maturations are closely related. Human thyroid terminal differentiation follows a precisely timed gene expression program. The crucial role of the sodium/iodine symporter for the onset of thyroid function in the human fetus is shown. Fetal T4 is detected by the eleventh week of gestation and progressively increases throughout. The pattern of thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels in the course of pregnancy is given from fetal blood sampling data, and the mechanisms governing this maturation in the human fetus are discussed. Finally an example of primary human fetal thyroid dysfunction, such as in Down syndrome, is given. The understanding of the physiology of the human fetal thyroid function is the basis for fetal medicine in the field of thyroidology.

  3. [Parvovirus B19 seroprevalence in a group of schizophrenic patients].

    PubMed

    El Kissi, Y; Hannachi, N; Mtiraoui, A; Samoud, S; Bouhlel, S; Gaabout, S; Boukadida, J; Ben Hadj Ali, B

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly disabling chronic mental illness. It is considerded as a neurodeveloppemental illness resulting from the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Growing evidence supports the major role of prenatal infections and inflammation in the genesis of schizophrenia. The hypothesis including viral infections has been the subject of several studies and the role of parvovirus B19 (PB19) in the onset of the disease has been suggested. However, there is, up till now, no seroepidemiological evidence of his involvement. To determine the prevalence of parvovirus B19 (PB19) in schizophrenic patients and in control subjects and to examine clinical associations between viral prevalence, risk factors of infectious disease and clinical features. We carried out a case-control seroepidemiological study in the Psychiatry department of Farhat-Hached general hospital of Sousse (Tunisia). We recruited108 schizophrenic patients and 108 healthy controls free from any psychotic disorder and matched for age and sex. We collected sociodemographic data, medical history, axis I comorbid disorders and infectious risk factors. We assessed patients for psychopathology and severity of illness using respectively the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS), the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Clinical Global Impressions (CGI). For each study participant, blood sample was collected and levels of IgG and IgM anti-PB19 were measured using the ELISA technique. The prevalence of IgG antibodies to PB19 was significantly higher in schizophrenic patients than in controls (73.1% vs 60.2%; P=0.04). There were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding the prevalence of IgM antibodies to PB19. No association was found between viral prevalence and sociodemographic data, risk factors for infection or clinical characteristics. The

  4. Influenza A and Parvovirus B19 Seropositivity Rates in Gabonese Infants.

    PubMed

    Gabor, Julian J; Schwarz, Norbert G; Esen, Meral; Kremsner, Peter G; Grobusch, Martin P

    2015-08-01

    Clinical and epidemiological data from Central Africa on influenza A and parvovirus B19 infections are limited. We analyzed 162 blood samples of infants 3, 9, 15, and 30 months of age for IgG antibodies against both pathogens. Antibody responses were 0, 3.7%, 12.3%, and 20.4% against influenza A; and 1.2%, 2.5%, 3.1%, and 9.3% against parvovirus B19, respectively. Seropositivity rates were 89.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 59-120.1) and 38.2 (95% CI: 18.9-57.6)/1,000 person-years at risk for influenza A and parvovirus B19, respectively. Our data add to the understanding of the epidemiology of both conditions.

  5. The Seroprevalence of Canine Parvovirus-2 in a Selected Sample of the Canine Population in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Carman, P. S.; Povey, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Canine sera, collected from dogs presented to the Ontario Veterinary College between 1976 and 1980, were assessed for canine parvovirus-2 antibody using a microtitre hemagglutination-inhibition test. Special emphasis was made on the period from September 1979 to October 1980 (2892 samples). No antibody was detected in samples collected in 1976 or 1977. The first positive sera were obtained in January 1978. By the end of 1978 antibodies to canine parvovirus-2 were widespread in Ontario dogs and in 1980, 683 of 2191 dogs (31.2%) had antibody. This was before widespread vaccination was being practised and indicates canine parvovirus-2 infection occurred frequently. Evaluation of clinical records of these dogs suggested that most infections had been subclinical. PMID:17422418

  6. Adeno-associated virus type 2 enhances goose parvovirus replication in embryonated goose eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Malkinson, Mertyn . E-mail: malkins@agri.huji.ac.il; Winocour, Ernest . E-mail: ernest.winocour@weizmann.ac.il

    2005-06-05

    The autonomous goose parvovirus (GPV) and the human helper-dependent adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) share a high degree of homology. To determine if this evolutionary relationship has a biological impact, we studied viral replication in human 293 cells and in embryonated goose eggs coinfected with both viruses. Similar experiments were performed with the minute virus of mice (MVM), an autonomous murine parvovirus with less homology to AAV2. In human 293 cells, both GPV and MVM augmented AAV2 replication. In contrast, AAV2 markedly enhanced GPV replication in embryonated goose eggs under conditions where a similar effect was not observed with MVM. AAV2 did not replicate in embryonated goose eggs and AAV2 inactivated by UV-irradiation also enhanced GPV replication. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a human helper-dependent member of the Parvoviridae can provide helper activity for an autonomous parvovirus in a natural host.

  7. Neutralizing antibodies against feline parvoviruses in nondomestic felids inoculated with commercial inactivated polyvalent vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sassa, Yukiko; Fukui, Daisuke; Takeshi, Kouichi; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2006-11-01

    The virus neutralization (VN) antibody titers of serum samples from 18 individuals representing 8 carnivore species vaccinated with commercial polyvalent vaccines optimized for domestic cats containing inactivated feline panleukopenia virus (FPLV) were evaluated against canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV2). In addition, the titers among 5 individuals from 4 carnivore were evaluated against antigenic variants of feline parvoviruses; FPLV, CPV2, CPV2a, CPV2b, CPV2c, mink enteritis virus type 1 (MEV1) and MEV2. The polyvalent vaccines induced cross-reactive VN titers against antigenic variants of feline parvoviruses in nondomestic felids. However, we observed very low cross-reactive VN antibody in lions and Siberian tigers, therefore we should pay attention to CPV infections in these animals even if they were vaccinated with inactivated FPLV vaccines.

  8. Persistent parvovirus B19 infection and arthralgia in a patient mistakenly treated for Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Dobec, Marinko; Kaeppeli, Franz; Cassinotti, Pascal; Satz, Norbert

    2008-10-01

    We report a case of a 37-year-old woman with persistent parvovirus B19 infection and arthralgia mistakenly treated for Lyme disease. This case indicates that poor standardization of both screening and confirmatory assays for Lyme disease can lead to an incorrect diagnosis of Lyme disease. Before making a final diagnosis of Lyme arthritis in an endemic region, other causative agents of arthritis, such as parvovirus B19, should be excluded to avoid unnecessary treatment or to add appropriate therapy in the case of co-infections. Since parvovirus B19 is often associated with arthralgia and can mimic rheumatoid arthritis and autoimmune diseases, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of arthralgia.

  9. Human parvovirus infection in haemophiliacs first infused with treated clotting factor concentrates.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei Corsi, O; Azzi, A; Morfini, M; Fanci, R; Rossi Ferrini, P

    1988-06-01

    A group of 27 first infused haemophiliacs was studied for association between heat-treated clotting factor concentrates and transmission of human parvovirus B19. The prevalence rate of B19 antibody, detected by the Immunoelectroosmophoresis (IEOP) reaction, was 55.5% in this group of first infused subjects, significantly higher than the 29.3% of the control group of 58 healthy blood donors but lower than the 93.3% of antibody positive subjects in a group of 30 haemophiliacs multitreated with unheated products. Five of 17 B19 antibody negative patients produced human parvovirus IgM, detectable by radioimmunoassay, after the first treatment with heated concentrates; two of them developed viraemia 6 and 10 days, respectively, after the first infusion dose. These results lead to the conclusion that human parvovirus is transmissible by blood derivatives even when they have been exposed to steam- or dry-heat treatment.

  10. Fetal bile salt metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, R. A.; Lester, R.; Piasecki, G. J.; Klein, P. D.; Greco, R.; Jackson, B. T.

    1972-01-01

    Bile salt metabolism was studied in fetal dogs 1 wk before term. The size and distribution of the fetal bile salt pool were measured, and individual bile salts were identified. The hepatic excretion of endogenous bile salts was studied in bile fistula fetuses, and the capacity of this excretory mechanism was investigated by the i.v. infusion of a load of sodium taurocholate-14C up to 20 times the endogenous pool size. The total fetal bile salt pool was 30.9±2.7 μmoles, of which two-thirds was in the fetal gallbladder. Expressed on a body weight basis, this was equal to approximately one-half the estimated pool size in the adult dog (119.2±11.3 vs. 247.5±33.1 μmoles/kg body wt). Measurable quantities of bile salt were found in small bowel (6.0±1.8 μmoles), large bowel (1.1±0.3 μmoles), liver (1.2±0.5 μmoles), and plasma (0.1±0.03 μmoles). Plasma bile salt levels were significantly greater in fetal than in maternal plasma (1.01±0.24 μg/ml vs. 0.36±0.06 μg/ml; P < 0.05). Fetal hepatic bile salt excretion showed a fall over the period of study from 2.04±0.34 to 0.30±0.07 μmoles/hr. The maximal endogenous bile salt concentration in fetal hepatic bile was 18.7±1.5 μmoles/ml. The concentration in fetal gallbladder bile was 73.9±8.6 μmoles/ml; and, in those studies in which hepatic and gallbladder bile could be compared directly, the gallbladder appeared to concentrate bile four- to fivefold. Taurocholate, taurochenodeoxycholate, and taurodeoxycholate were present in fetal bile, but no free bile salts were identified. The presence of deoxycholate was confirmed by thin-layer chromatography and gas liquid chromatography, and the absence of microorganisms in fetal gut suggests that it was probably transferred from the maternal circulation. After infusion of a taurocholate load, fetal hepatic bile salt excretion increased 30-fold, so that 85-95% of the dose was excreted by the fetal liver during the period of observation. Placental transfer accounted

  11. Response of mink, skunk, red fox and raccoon to inoculation with mink virus enteritis, feline panleukopenia and canine parvovirus and prevalence of antibody to parvovirus in wild carnivores in Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, I K; Povey, R C; Voigt, D R

    1983-01-01

    Mink virus enteritis, feline panleukopenia and canine parvovirus-2 were inoculated separately into groups of raccoon, mink, red fox and striped skunk. Raccoons were highly susceptible to mink virus enteritis and feline panleukopenia, with animals developing clinical illness, and several dying within six to ten days of inoculation with lesions typical of parvovirus infection. Both viruses were shed in high titre in the feces of infected raccoons, and high antibody titres were stimulated. Raccoons inoculated with canine parvovirus-2 showed no signs; shedding of virus was sporadic though moderate titres of antibody developed. Mink inoculated with mink virus enteritis and feline panleukopenia developed signs and lesions of early parvovirus infection. No signs or significant lesions followed canine parvovirus-2 inoculation. Shedding of virus was heavy (mink virus enteritis) or sporadic (feline panleukopenia and canine parvovirus-2), though good serological responses were elicited to all three viruses. Red fox showed no signs of infection, shed all three viruses only sporadically, and the serological response was strong only to feline panleukopenia. Skunks developed low antibody titres, but no signs, and did not shed virus. Antibody to parvovirus was found in 79.2% of 144 wild red foxes; 22.3% of 112 wild raccoons; 1.3% of 157 wild skunks and 6/7 coyotes in southern Ontario. The likely significance of these viruses to wild and captive individuals and populations of these carnivores is discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6309349

  12. A Rare Case of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Associated with Parvovirus B19 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Asad-Ur-Rahman, FNU; Abusaada, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare but life-threatening syndrome resulting from excessive immune activation. Secondarily, HLH is often associated with autoimmune disease, infection, and malignancy. The most common infectious trigger is Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. HLH is rarely triggered by parvovirus B19. We discuss a case of a 62-year-old male who presented with multi-organ failure with presumed septic shock who eventually was diagnosed with HLH, with positive parvovirus B19 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Prompt treatment with dexamethasone resulted in significant clinical resolution. PMID:28018767

  13. Frequent Cross-Species Transmission of Parvoviruses among Diverse Carnivore Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Andrew B.; Kohler, Dennis J.; Fox, Karen A.; Brown, Justin D.; Gerhold, Richard W.; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Dubovi, Edward J.; Parrish, Colin R.

    2013-01-01

    Although parvoviruses are commonly described in domestic carnivores, little is known about their biodiversity in nondomestic species. A phylogenetic analysis of VP2 gene sequences from puma, coyote, gray wolf, bobcat, raccoon, and striped skunk revealed two major groups related to either feline panleukopenia virus (“FPV-like”) or canine parvovirus (“CPV-like”). Cross-species transmission was commonplace, with multiple introductions into each host species but, with the exception of raccoons, relatively little evidence for onward transmission in nondomestic species. PMID:23221559

  14. Frequent cross-species transmission of parvoviruses among diverse carnivore hosts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allison, Andrew B.; Kohler, Dennis J.; Fox, Karen A.; Brown, Justin D.; Gerhold, Richard W.; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Dubovi, Edward J.; Parrish, Colin R.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    Although parvoviruses are commonly described in domestic carnivores, little is known about their biodiversity in nondomestic species. A phylogenetic analysis of VP2 gene sequences from puma, coyote, gray wolf, bobcat, raccoon, and striped skunk revealed two major groups related to either feline panleukopenia virus (“FPV-like”) or canine parvovirus (“CPV-like”). Cross-species transmission was commonplace, with multiple introductions into each host species but, with the exception of raccoons, relatively little evidence for onward transmission in nondomestic species.

  15. Measles, mumps, rubella, and human parvovirus B19 infections and neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Bale, James F

    2014-01-01

    While the systemic disorders associated with measles, mumps, and rubella viruses and human parvovirus B19 tend to be mild, each virus can produce potentially life-threatening neurologic disease in human hosts, especially when these viruses infect young children. Two of the viruses, rubella and parvovirus B19, can be vertically transmitted to fetuses during maternal infection and cause congenital infection. Neurologic complications are common after intrauterine infection with the rubella virus, a condition known as the congenital rubella syndrome. Two, measles and rubella viruses, can induce "slow viral" infections, serious, disorders that can occur several years after the initial exposure to the virus and typically have fatal outcomes.

  16. Hepatitis A and parvovirus B19 infections in an infant with fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Ozçay, Figen; Bikmaz, Y Emre; Canan, Oğuz; Ozbek, Namik

    2006-06-01

    Acute viral hepatitis with hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E viruses in the etiology of fulminant hepatic failure either single or in combinations has been described. Parvovirus B19 is also an etiologic agent of acute liver failure and hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia. We present a patient diagnosed with fulminant hepatitis A referred for liver transplantation. Parvovirus B19 superinfection was detected when the patient developed anemia during the course of the disease. We discuss possible roles of both viruses in fulminant hepatitis and pure red cell aplasia.

  17. The Transcription Profile of the Bocavirus Bovine Parvovirus Is Unlike Those of Previously Characterized Parvoviruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jianming; Cheng, Fang; Johnson, F. Brent; Pintel, David

    2007-01-01

    The Bocavirus bovine parvovirus generated a single pre-mRNA from a promoter at its left-hand end; however, the pattern of its alternative polyadenylation and splicing was different from that of other parvoviruses. A large left-hand-end open reading frame (ORF) encoded a nonstructural protein of approximately 95 kDa. An abundant, spliced, internally polyadenylated transcript encoded the viral NP1 protein from an ORF in the center of the genome. Transcripts encoding the capsid proteins were polyadenylated in the right-hand terminal palindrome. This is the first published transcription map of a member of the Bocavirus genus of the Parvovirinae. PMID:17715221

  18. Fine mapping of canine parvovirus B cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    López de Turiso, J A; Cortés, E; Ranz, A; García, J; Sanz, A; Vela, C; Casal, J I

    1991-10-01

    In this report we describe the topological mapping of neutralizing domains of canine parvovirus (CPV). We obtained 11 CPV-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), six of which are neutralizing. The reactivities were as determined by ELISA and Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. VP2, the most abundant protein of the CPV capsid, seemed to contain all the neutralization sites. Also, an almost full-length genomic clone of CPV was constructed in the bacterial plasmid pUC18 to enable expression of CPV proteins. All the neutralizing MAbs recognized recombinant VP2 when it was expressed as a free protein in Escherichia coli but not when expressed as a fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase. When two large fragments containing about 85% and 67% of the C terminus of VP2 were expressed, no neutralization sites were detected. When fusion proteins containing the N terminus were expressed, two linear determinants were mapped, one between residues 1 to 10 of VP2, and the other between amino acids 11 and 23. The peptide 11 GQPAVRNERATGS 23, recognized by MAb 3C9, was synthesized chemically and checked for immunogenicity, not being able to induce neutralizing activity. Although the antibody response in rabbits to all the fusion proteins was uniformly high, the anti-CPV response was very variable. Protein from pCPVEx11, which contains a T cell epitope (peptide PKIFINLAKKKKAG) present in the VP1-specific region as well as the B cell epitopes, seemed to be the most effective in inducing virus neutralization.

  19. Porcine parvovirus removal using trimer and biased hexamer peptides

    PubMed Central

    Heldt, Caryn L.; Gurgel, Patrick V.; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Carbonell, Ruben G.

    2014-01-01

    Assuring the microbiological safety of biological therapeutics remains an important concern. Our group has recently reported small trimeric peptides that have the ability to bind and remove a model non-enveloped virus, porcine parvovirus (PPV), from complex solutions containing human blood plasma. In an effort to improve the removal efficiency of these small peptides, we created a biased library of hexamer peptides that contain two previously reported trimeric peptides designated WRW and KYY. This library was screened and several hexamer peptides were discovered that also removed PPV from solution, but there was no marked improvement in removal efficiency when compared to the trimeric peptides. Based on simulated docking experiments, it appeared that hexamer peptide binding is dictated more by secondary structure, whereas the binding of trimeric peptides is dominated by charge and hydrophobicity. This study demonstrates that trimeric and hexameric peptides may have different, matrix-specific roles to play in virus removal applications. In general, the hexamer ligand may perform better for binding of specific viruses, whereas the trimer ligand may have more broadly reactive virus-binding properties. PMID:21751387

  20. Goose Parvovirus and Circovirus Coinfections in Ornamental Ducks.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Awad A; Gerry, Dorrestein M; Heenemann, Kristin; Halami, Mohammed Y; Tokarzewski, Stanisław; Wencel, Peter; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Clinical observations and diagnostic procedures carried out to elucidate the cause of high mortality in 2-8-wk-old ornamental ducks (mandarin, wood, falcated, and silver teal ducks) are described. At necropsy, ducklings showed general pallor of skeletal and heart muscles, subcutaneous gelatinous transudates, pericarditis, ascites, and severe edema and hyperemia of lungs. Histopathologic examination revealed that the most important changes were located in the crop, bursa of Fabricius, and lungs with presence of amorphic basic intracytoplasmic inclusions. No bacteria or fungi could be detected from affected organs and ascitic fluid. Viral diagnosis included molecular detection for the presence of goose parvovirus (GPV), circovirus, avian influenza, herpesviruses, paramyxovirus, reovirus, and polyomavirus. Both GPV and circovirus could be detected by real-time PCR and nested broad-spectrum PCR, respectively. Phylogenetically, full-length nucleotide sequence of GPV showed a close similarity ranging from 95.6% to 97.9% with European and Asian pathogenic GPV. On the other hand, the detected circovirus showed nucleotide identity of 90% to 98% with goose circoviruses (GoCVs). This is the first report of GoCVs and GPV in ornamental ducks. The concurrence of GPV and GoCV infections is thought to contribute to the high mortality.

  1. Human parvovirus B19-induced acute glomerulonephritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shimohata, Homare; Higuchi, Takashi; Ogawa, Yujiro; Fujita, Shogo; Nagai, Miho; Imaizumi, Masahiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Kouichi; Kobayashi, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19) infection is well known as a cause of erythema infectiosum in children. Acute glomerulonephritis due to HPVB19 infection is rarely observed in adults. Here, we present the case of a 45-year-old female who showed acute glomerulonephritis induced by HPVB19 infection with various autoantibodies. She had proteinuria (175 mg/g creatinine) and hematuria (20-29 erythrocytes per high-power field) in a urinalysis, and various autoantibodies such as antinuclear antibodies, proteinase-3-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (PR3-ANCA), antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies, and anticardiolipin antibodies in a blood examination. A renal biopsy showed that endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis comprised of mononuclear cell infiltration. By using immunofluorescence microscopy, IgG, IgA, IgM, C3, C4, and C1q deposits were detected mainly in glomerular capillaries. Electron-dense deposits were detected in the subendothelial area and mesangial area by using electron microscopy. All symptoms and abnormal laboratory data were self-improved. Our patient's case may provide a clue to the etiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis or lupus nephritis.

  2. Seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 in the German population

    PubMed Central

    RÖHRER, C.; GÄRTNER, B.; SAUERBREI, A.; BÖHM, S.; HOTTENTRÄGER, B.; RAAB, U.; THIERFELDER, W.; WUTZLER, P.; MODROW, S.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute parvovirus B19 infection is a risk for pregnant women. After vertical transmission the infected fetus may develop hydrops fetalis. Since B19 infection occurs mainly during childhood, children represent a main source for virus transmission. In order to determine whether certain groups in the German population show increased risks for B19 infection we analysed the seroprevalence using 6583 sera collected from adults in former Eastern and Western Germany during the German National Health Survey and 649 sera from healthy Thuringian children and adolescents. In adults the overall seroprevalence was 72·1%, rising from 20·4% in children (1–3 years) and 66·9% in adolescents (18–19 years) to 79·1% in the elderly (65–69 years). Significant differences were observed between females (73·3%) and males (70·9%) and between inhabitants of small (74·8%) and big cities (69·0%) but not between people of the former Eastern (72·8%) and Western states (72·0%) of Germany. For women during childbearing age (18–49 years) highest values were observed in those living together with two or more children (81·6%) and in women with occupational contact with children aged <6 years (88·9%). In contrast seroprevalence was significantly lower in age-matched female singles (64·8%) and in women with occupational contact with children aged >6 years and adolescents (63·8%). PMID:18198003

  3. Effects of canine parvovirus on gray wolves in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Goyal, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    Long-term effects of disease on wild animal population demography is not well documented. We studied a gray wolf (Canis lupus) population in a 2,060km2 area of Minnesota for 15 years to determine its response to canine parvovirus (CPV). The CPV had little effect (P gt 0.05) on wolf population size while epizootic during 1979-83. However, after CPV became enzootic, percentage of pups captured during summer-fall 1984-93 and changes in subsequent winter wolf numbers were each inversely related to the serological prevalence of CPV in wolves captured during July-November (r2 = 0.39 and 0.72, P = 0.05 and lt 0.01, respectively). The CPV antibody prevalence in adult wolves increased to 87% in 1993 (r2 = 0.28, P = 0.05). However, because population level remained stable, CPV-induced mortality appeared to compensate for other mortality factors such as starvation. We -predict that the winter wolf population will decline when CPV prevalence in adults consistently exceeds 76%. The CPV may become important in limiting wolf populations.

  4. Phylogenetic Analysis of Canine Parvovirus VP2 Gene in China.

    PubMed

    Yi, L; Tong, M; Cheng, Y; Song, W; Cheng, S

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a total of 37 samples (58.0%) were found through PCR assay to be positive for canine parvovirus (CPV) of 66 suspected faecal samples of dogs collected from various cities throughout China. Eight CPV isolates could be obtained in the CRFK cell line. The sequencing of the VP2 gene of CPV identified the predominant CPV strain as CPV-2a (Ser297Ala), with two CPV-2b (Ser297Ala). Sequence comparison revealed homologies of 99.3-99.9%, 99.9% and 99.3-99.7% within the CPV 2a isolates, within the CPV 2b isolates and between the CPV 2a and 2b isolates, respectively. In addition, several non-synonymous and synonymous mutations were also recorded. The phylogenetic tree revealed that most of the CPV strains from different areas in China were located in the formation of a large branch, which were grouped together along with the KU143-09 strain from Thailand and followed the same evolution. In this study, we provide an updated molecular characterization of CPV 2 circulation in China.

  5. Detection of human parvovirus B19 in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J H; Zhang, W P; Liu, H X; Wang, D; Li, Y F; Wang, W Q; Wang, L; He, F R; Wang, Z; Yan, Q G; Chen, L W; Huang, G S

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate whether parvovirus B19, a common human pathogen, was also involved in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), 112 paraffin-embedded thyroid specimens of benign nodules, papillary, medullary and follicular carcinomas, and normal controls were examined for B19 DNA and capsid protein by nested PCR, in situ hybridisation (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The expression of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was investigated by IHC. The results showed B19 DNA commonly exists in human thyroid tissues; however, there were significant differences between PTC group and normal controls, and between PTC and nonneoplastic adjacent tissues (P<0.001). The presence of viral DNA in PTC neoplastic epithelium was confirmed by laser-capture microdissection and sequencing of nested PCR products. B19 capsid protein in PTC group was significantly higher than that of all the control groups and nonneoplastic adjacent tissues (P⩽0.001). Compared with control groups, the activation of NF-κB in PTC group was significantly increased (P⩽0.02), except for medullary carcinomas, and the activation of NF-κB was correlated with the viral protein presence (P=0.002). Moreover, NF-κB was colocalised with B19 DNA in the neoplastic epithelium of PTC by double staining of IHC and ISH. These results indicate for the first time a possible role of B19 in pathogenesis of PTC. PMID:18212749

  6. Evolution of canine parvovirus--a need for new vaccines?

    PubMed

    Truyen, Uwe

    2006-10-05

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a new virus, which is continuing to evolve, giving rise to new antigenic types and virus mutants that spread through the dog population. The most successful mutants, from an evolutionary perspective, appear to be selected by improved binding to the CPV receptor, the canine transferrin receptor, and by an extended host range, which for the newer antigenic types now includes both the dog and the cat. The new viruses also show antigenic differences that can be defined by binding of certain monoclonal antibodies; they also differ in their reactivity in virus neutralisation tests, using immune sera raised against the various antigenic types. These differences may influence the susceptibility of young animals to infection at the time when the level of maternally derived antibody decreases to the minimum protective titre. This minimum protective titre may vary depending on the infecting virus type. There is, however, a high degree of cross-protection between the virus types and the true relevance of the differences in neutralisation titer is currently not known.

  7. Characterization of Aleutian disease virus as a parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, M E; Race, R E; Wolfinbarger, J B

    1980-01-01

    We characterized a strain of Aleutian disease virus adapted to growth in Crandall feline kidney cells at 31.8 degrees C. When purified from infected cells, Aleutian disease virus had a density in CsCl of 1.42 to 1.44 g/ml and was 24 to 26 nm in diameter. [3H]thymidine could be incorporated into the viral genome, and the viral DNA was then studied. In alkaline sucrose gradients, Aleutian disease virus DNA was a single species that cosedimented at 15.5S with single-stranded DNA from adeno-associated virus. When the DNA was analyzed on neutral sucrose gradients, a single species was again observed, which sedimented at 21S and was clearly distinct from 16S duplex adeno-associated virus DNA. A similar result was obtained even after incubation under annealing conditions, implying that the bulk of Aleutian disease virus virions contained a single non-complementary strand with a molecular weight of about 1.4 X 10(6). In addition, two major virus-associated polypeptides with molecular weights of 89,100 and 77,600 were demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of virus purified from infected cultures labeled with [35S]methionine. These data suggest that Aleutian disease virus is a nondefective parvovirus. Images PMID:6252342

  8. First report of human parvovirus 4 detection in Iran.

    PubMed

    Asiyabi, Sanaz; Nejati, Ahmad; Shoja, Zabihollah; Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Jalilvand, Somayeh; Farahmand, Mohammad; Gorzin, Ali-Akbar; Najafi, Alireza; Haji Mollahoseini, Mostafa; Marashi, Sayed Mahdi

    2016-08-01

    Parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is an emerging and intriguing virus that currently received many attentions. High prevalence of PARV4 infection in high-risk groups such as HIV infected patients highlights the potential clinical outcomes that this virus might have. Molecular techniques were used to determine both the presence and the genotype of circulating PARV4 on previously collected serum samples from 133 HIV infected patients and 120 healthy blood donors. Nested PCR was applied to assess the presence of PARV4 DNA genome in both groups. PARV4 DNA was detected in 35.3% of HIV infected patients compared to 16.6% healthy donors. To genetically characterize the PARV4 genotype in these groups, positive samples were randomly selected and subjected for sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. All PARV4 sequences were found to be genotype 1 and clustered with the reference sequences of PARV4 genotype 1. J. Med. Virol. 88:1314-1318, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Substitution rate and natural selection in parvovirus B19

    PubMed Central

    Stamenković, Gorana G.; Ćirković, Valentina S.; Šiljić, Marina M.; Blagojević, Jelena V.; Knežević, Aleksandra M.; Joksić, Ivana D.; Stanojević, Maja P.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate substitution rate and imprints of natural selection on parvovirus B19 genotype 1. Studied datasets included 137 near complete coding B19 genomes (positions 665 to 4851) for phylogenetic and substitution rate analysis and 146 and 214 partial genomes for selection analyses in open reading frames ORF1 and ORF2, respectively, collected 1973–2012 and including 9 newly sequenced isolates from Serbia. Phylogenetic clustering assigned majority of studied isolates to G1A. Nucleotide substitution rate for total coding DNA was 1.03 (0.6–1.27) x 10−4 substitutions/site/year, with higher values for analyzed genome partitions. In spite of the highest evolutionary rate, VP2 codons were found to be under purifying selection with rare episodic positive selection, whereas codons under diversifying selection were found in the unique part of VP1, known to contain B19 immune epitopes important in persistent infection. Analyses of overlapping gene regions identified nucleotide positions under opposite selective pressure in different ORFs, suggesting complex evolutionary mechanisms of nucleotide changes in B19 viral genomes. PMID:27775080

  10. Micronutrients and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Fall, Caroline H D; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Rao, Shobha; Davies, Anna A; Brown, Nick; Farrant, Hannah J W

    2003-05-01

    Fetal undernutrition affects large numbers of infants in developing countries, with adverse consequences for their immediate survival and lifelong health. It manifests as intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), defined as birth weight <10th percentile, which probably underestimates the number failing to achieve full growth potential. Birth weight is a crude measure of the dynamic process of fetal growth and does not capture effects of fetal undernutrition on body composition and the development of specific tissues. The link between maternal nutrition and fetal nutrition is indirect. The fetus is nourished by a complex supply line that includes the mother's diet and absorption, endocrine status and metabolism, cardiovascular adaptations to pregnancy and placental function. Micronutrients are essential for growth, and maternal micronutrient deficiency, frequently multiple in developing countries, may be an important cause of IUGR. Supplementation of undernourished mothers with micronutrients has several benefits but there is little hard evidence of improved fetal growth. However, this has been inadequately tested. Most trials have only used single micronutrients and many were inconclusive because of methodological problems. Several food-based studies (some uncontrolled) suggest benefits from improving maternal dietary quality with micronutrient-dense foods. One trial of a multivitamin supplement (HIV-positive mothers, Tanzania) showed increased birth weight and fewer fetal deaths. Well-conducted randomized controlled trials of adequate sample size and including measures of effectiveness are needed in populations at high risk of micronutrient deficiency and IUGR and should include food-based interventions and better measurements of fetal growth, maternal metabolism, and long-term outcomes in the offspring.

  11. ALTERATIONS IN MATERNAL-FETAL CELLULAR TRAFFICKING AFTER FETAL SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Saadai, Payam; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Bautista, Geoanna; Gonzales, Kelly D.; Nijagal, Amar; Busch, Michael P.; Kim, CJ; Romero, Roberto; Lee, Hanmin; Hirose, Shinjiro; Rand, Larry; Miniati, Douglas; Farmer, Diana L.; MacKenzie, Tippi C.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Purpose Bi-directional trafficking of cells between the mother and the fetus is routine in pregnancy and a component of maternal-fetal tolerance. Changes in fetal-to-maternal cellular trafficking have been reported in prenatal complications, but maternal-to-fetal trafficking has never been studied in the context of fetal intervention. We hypothesized that patients undergoing open fetal surgery would have altered maternal-fetal cellular trafficking. Methods Cellular trafficking was analyzed in patients with myelomeningocele (MMC) who underwent open fetal surgical repair (n=5), MMC patients who had routine postnatal repair (n=6), and normal term patients (n=9). As a control for the fetal operation, trafficking was also analyzed in patients who were delivered by an ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure (n=6). Microchimerism in maternal and cord blood was determined using quantitative real-time PCR for non-shared alleles. Results Maternal-to-fetal trafficking was significantly increased in patients who underwent open fetal surgery for MMC compared to normal controls, postnatal MMC repair, and EXIT patients. There were no differences in fetal-to-maternal cell trafficking between groups. Conclusion Patients undergoing open fetal surgery for MMC have elevated levels of maternal microchimerism. These results suggest altered trafficking and/or increased proliferation of maternal cells in fetal blood and may have important implications for preterm labor. PMID:22703775

  12. Sulfate in fetal development.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul A

    2011-08-01

    Sulfate (SO(4)(2-)) is an important nutrient for human growth and development, and is obtained from the diet and the intra-cellular metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, including methionine and cysteine. During pregnancy, fetal tissues have a limited capacity to produce sulfate, and rely on sulfate obtained from the maternal circulation. Sulfate enters and exits placental and fetal cells via transporters on the plasma membrane, which maintain a sufficient intracellular supply of sulfate and its universal sulfonate donor 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) for sulfate conjugation (sulfonation) reactions to function effectively. Sulfotransferases mediate sulfonation of numerous endogenous compounds, including proteins and steroids, which biotransforms their biological activities. In addition, sulfonation of proteoglycans is important for maintaining normal structure and development of tissues, as shown for reduced sulfonation of cartilage proteoglycans that leads to developmental dwarfism disorders and four different osteochondrodysplasias (diastrophic dysplasia, atelosteogenesis type II, achondrogenesis type IB and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia). The removal of sulfate via sulfatases is an important step in proteoglycan degradation, and defects in several sulfatases are linked to perturbed fetal bone development, including mesomelia-synostoses syndrome and chondrodysplasia punctata 1. In recent years, interest in sulfate and its role in developmental biology has expanded following the characterisation of sulfate transporters, sulfotransferases and sulfatases and their involvement in fetal growth. This review will focus on the physiological roles of sulfate in fetal development, with links to human and animal pathophysiologies.

  13. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  14. 21 CFR 884.2900 - Fetal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Fetal stethoscope. (a) Identification. A fetal stethoscope is a device used for listening to fetal heart sounds. It is designed to transmit the fetal heart sounds not only through sound channels by...

  15. A putative nucleoside triphosphate-binding domain in the nonstructural protein of B19 parvovirus is required for cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Momoeda, M; Wong, S; Kawase, M; Young, N S; Kajigaya, S

    1994-01-01

    Cytotoxicity secondary to B19 parvovirus infection is due to expression of the viral nonstructural protein. Nonstructural proteins of many parvoviruses contain a well-conserved nucleoside triphosphate (NTP)-binding motif, which has been shown to be essential for a variety of protein functions. We show here that cytotoxicity of the B19 parvovirus nonstructural protein was abolished by single mutations of amino acids within the NTP-binding domain, especially within the A motif, implicating NTP-binding in virus-induced cell death. Images PMID:7966641

  16. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... FASD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are a group of conditions that ...

  17. Evidence for porcine parvovirus type 4 (PPV4) in Brazilian swine herds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction Porcine bocaviruses were recently identified among swine co-infected with PCV2 (2,3) and suffering an acute-onset disease of high mortality in the United States, in pigs with PMWS in Sweden (1), and in pigs with reproductive and neurological disease in China (4). Parvoviruses are smal...

  18. Pathogenic Potential of Canine Parvovirus Types 2a and 2c in Domestic Cats

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Maki; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Sato, Eiji; Kawakami, Kazuo; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Tohya, Yukinobu; Takahashi, Eiji; Mikami, Takeshi; Mochizuki, Masami

    2001-01-01

    The in vivo pathogenicity of canine parvovirus (CPV) type 2c (strain V203) and of CPV type 2a (strain V154) against cats was investigated. Our results indicate that both types of CPV have the potential to induce disease in cats. PMID:11329478

  19. Antiviral effect of diammonium glycyrrhizinate on cell infection by porcine parvovirus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) can cause reproductive failure in swine resulting in economic losses to the industry. Antiviral effects of diammonium glycyrrhizinate (DG) have been reported on several animal viruses; however, to date it has yet to be tested on PPV. In this study, the antiviral activity of ...

  20. Human parvovirus 4 as potential cause of encephalitis in children, India.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Laura A; Lewthwaite, Penny; Vasanthapuram, Ravi; Zhao, Guoyan; Sharp, Colin; Simmonds, Peter; Wang, David; Solomon, Tom

    2011-08-01

    To investigate whether uncharacterized infectious agents were associated with neurologic disease, we analyzed cerebrospinal fluid specimens from 12 children with acute central nervous system infection. A high-throughput pyrosequencing screen detected human parvovirus 4 DNA in cerebrospinal fluid of 2 children with encephalitis of unknown etiology.

  1. Placental transmission of human parvovirus 4 in newborns with hydrops, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mao-Yuan; Yang, Shiu-Ju; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2011-10-01

    In studying the epidemiology of parvovirus 4 (PARV4) in Taiwan, we detected DNA in plasma of 3 mothers and their newborns with hydrops. In 1 additional case, only the mother had PARV4 DNA. Our findings demonstrate that PARV4 can be transmitted through the placenta.

  2. Clinical, hematological, and biochemical findings in puppies with coronavirus and parvovirus enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Tatiana X.; Cubel Garcia, Rita de Cássia N.; Gonçalves, Luciana P. S.; Costa, Erika M.; Marcello, Gracy C.G.; Labarthe, Norma V.; Mendes-de-Almeida, Flavya

    2013-01-01

    The clinical and laboratory findings in puppies naturally infected with canine coronavirus (CCoV) and/or canine parvovirus (CPV) were compared with findings in uninfected puppies. Lymphopenia was the only parameter related to CCoV infection that was statistically significant; vomiting, anorexia, lethargy, hemorrhagic fluid diarrhea, leukopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, hypoglycemia, and hypoproteinemia were correlated with CPV infection. PMID:24155496

  3. Parvovirus B19 in HIV infection: a treatable cause of anemia.

    PubMed

    Fuller, A; Moaven, L; Spelman, D; Spicer, W J; Wraight, H; Curtis, D; Leydon, J; Doultree, J; Locarnini, S

    1996-08-01

    We describe the case of an adult male patient with AIDS who presented with severe anemia and on investigation was found to have red cell aplasia due to parvovirus B19 infection. Bone marrow examination revealed absence of erythroid development and rare giant pronormoblasts. Repeated serological examinations revealed a low level of parvovirus IgM but no IgG. Viremia was demonstrated by electron microscopy and by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The patient's initial hemoglobin was 45 g/l and over a four month period he required twenty units of blood. He was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (Intragam, CSL) at a dose of 400 mg/kg/day for five days. This led to an increase in his hemoglobin to 135 g/l. Parvovirus remained detectable by PCR but not by electron microscopy. Six months later the patient relapsed (Hb 65 g/l). Again he was transfused and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin for five days. His hemoglobin rose to 153 g/l and remained stable. He subsequently received maintenance treatment with 30 g of intagram once a month. We recommend that parvovirus be considered in any HIV infected patient with recurrent anemia.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Porcine Parvovirus 2 Recovered from Swine Sera.

    PubMed

    Campos, F S; Kluge, M; Franco, A C; Giongo, A; Valdez, F P; Saddi, T M; Brito, W M E D; Roehe, P M

    2016-01-28

    A complete genomic sequence of porcine parvovirus 2 (PPV-2) was detected by viral metagenome analysis on swine sera. A phylogenetic analysis of this genome reveals that it is highly similar to previously reported North American PPV-2 genomes. The complete PPV-2 sequence is 5,426 nucleotides long.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Porcine Parvovirus 2 Recovered from Swine Sera

    PubMed Central

    Kluge, M.; Franco, A. C.; Giongo, A.; Valdez, F. P.; Saddi, T. M.; Brito, W. M. E. D.; Roehe, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    A complete genomic sequence of porcine parvovirus 2 (PPV-2) was detected by viral metagenome analysis on swine sera. A phylogenetic analysis of this genome reveals that it is highly similar to previously reported North American PPV-2 genomes. The complete PPV-2 sequence is 5,426 nucleotides long. PMID:26823583

  6. Demonstration of parvovirus in diarrhoeic African cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus jubatus Schreber, 1775).

    PubMed

    Valícek, L; Smíd, B; Váhala, J

    1993-01-01

    Parvovirus was demonstrated in the intestinal content of diarrhoeic African cheetahs by electron microscopy. The virus was isolated in a feline kidney cell line inoculated with a filtrate of the intestinal content. Its growth characteristics, cytopathic effect, agglutination of porcine erythrocytes, structure, and results of immunoelectron microscopic examination were indistinguishable from those of feline panleukopenia virus.

  7. Serological prevalence of human parvovirus B19 in diseases or disordersrelated to different human body systems.

    PubMed

    Aktaş, Osman; Aydin, Hakan; Uslu, Hakan

    2016-02-17

    Human parvovirus B19 is a pathogen that affects different parts of the body. We planned this study because of the lack of data on B19 seroprevalence based on different body-system diseases. The prevalence of parvovirus B19 antibodies was investigated retrospectively in 1239 patients by review of medical records from 2009-2012, according to their diseases classified under general titles in compliance with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Parvovirus B19-specific antibodies were detected by quantitative enzyme immunoassays. The positivity rate was 27.8% for only IgG, 8.5% for only IgM, and 2.6% for both IgG and IgM. The highest positivity for IgG alone was found in musculoskeletal system and connective tissue diseases (55.9%), while the highest positivity for IgM was found in neoplasms (16.4%). The highest positivity for IgG was seen in rheumatoid arthritis (72.2%) and pregnancy (52.6%), and the highest positivity for total IgM was found in upper respiratory tract disease (21.0%) and hepatic failure (17.1%). Parvovirus B19 seroprevalence was relatively low in northeastern Anatolia compared to most serological studies conducted in other regions. We think that this study has provided the first wide-ranging information on the seroprevalence of B19 in diseases and disorders of the major human body systems.

  8. Discovery of a novel Parvovirinae virus, porcine parvovirus 7, by metagenomic sequencing of porcine rectal swabs.

    PubMed

    Palinski, Rachel M; Mitra, Namita; Hause, Ben M

    2016-08-01

    Parvoviruses are a diverse group of viruses containing some of the smallest known species that are capable of infecting a wide range of animals. Metagenomic sequencing of pooled rectal swabs from adult pigs identified a 4103-bp contig consisting of two major open reading frames encoding proteins of 672 and 469 amino acids (aa) in length. BLASTP analysis of the 672-aa protein found 42.4 % identity to fruit bat (Eidolon helvum) parvovirus 2 (EhPV2) and 37.9 % to turkey parvovirus (TuPV) TP1-2012/HUN NS1 proteins. The 469-aa protein had no significant similarity to known proteins. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses suggest that PPV7, EhPV2, and TuPV represent a novel genus in the family Parvoviridae. Quantitative PCR screening of 182 porcine diagnostic samples found a total of 16 positives (8.6 %). Together, these data suggest that PPV7 is a highly divergent novel parvovirus prevalent within the US swine.

  9. Placental Transmission of Human Parvovirus 4 in Newborns with Hydrops, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shiu-Ju; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2011-01-01

    In studying the epidemiology of parvovirus 4 (PARV4) in Taiwan, we detected DNA in plasma of 3 mothers and their newborns with hydrops. In 1 additional case, only the mother had PARV4 DNA. Our findings demonstrate that PARV4 can be transmitted through the placenta. PMID:22000381

  10. Structural Determinants of Tissue Tropism and In Vivo Pathogenicity for the Parvovirus Minute Virus of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kontou, Maria; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Nam, Hyun-Joo; Bryant, Nathan; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Foces-Foces, Concepción; Hernando, Eva; Rubio, Mari-Paz; McKenna, Robert; Almendral, José M.; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2005-01-01

    Two strains of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM), the immunosuppressive (MVMi) and the prototype (MVMp) strains, display disparate in vitro tropism and in vivo pathogenicity. We report the crystal structures of MVMp virus-like particles (MVMpb) and native wild-type (wt) empty capsids (MVMpe), determined and refined to 3.25 and 3.75 Å resolution, respectively, and their comparison to the structure of MVMi, also refined to 3.5 Å resolution in this study. A comparison of the MVMpb and MVMpe capsids showed their structures to be the same, providing structural verification that some heterologously expressed parvovirus capsids are indistinguishable from wt capsids produced in host cells. The structures of MVMi and MVMp capsids were almost identical, but local surface conformational differences clustered from symmetry-related capsid proteins at three specific domains: (i) the icosahedral fivefold axis, (ii) the “shoulder” of the protrusion at the icosahedral threefold axis, and (iii) the area surrounding the depression at the icosahedral twofold axis. The latter two domains contain important determinants of MVM in vitro tropism (residues 317 and 321) and forward mutation residues (residues 399, 460, 553, and 558) conferring fibrotropism on MVMi. Furthermore, these structural differences between the MVM strains colocalize with tropism and pathogenicity determinants mapped for other autonomous parvovirus capsids, highlighting the importance of common parvovirus capsid regions in the control of virus-host interactions. PMID:16103145

  11. Synthesis of parvovirus H-1 replicative form from viral DNA by DNA polymerase gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Kollek, R; Goulian, M

    1981-01-01

    The initial event in the replication cycle of parvovirus H-1 is conversion of the single-stranded linear viral DNA to the double-stranded linear replicative form. We describe here detection of an activity in uninfected cell extracts that carries out this reaction. The activity was purified and identified as DNA polymerase gamma. Images PMID:6947222

  12. A Case Report of Parvovirus B19 Infection in a Renal Allograft.

    PubMed

    Oramas, Diana M; Setty, Suman; Yeldandi, Vijay; Cabrera, Julio; Patel, Tushar

    2017-10-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection is undiagnosed in recipients undergoing solid organ transplantation. It is usually responsible for unexplained acute and chronic red blood cell aplasia that does not respond to erythropoietin therapy. Cases of parvovirus B19 infection associated with pancytopenia, solid organ dysfunction, and allograft rejection have been described in the literature. The deterioration of the immune system as a result of severe immunotherapy favors the reactivation of a previous infection or the acquisition of a new one. We present a case of a 32-year-old woman with a 1-year history of renal allograft transplant and previous cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection who presented with chest pain, polyarthritis, pancytopenia, and renal dysfunction. A serum sample using polymerase chain reaction showed a parvovirus titer of 13.8 trillion IU/mL and a CMV titer of 800 IU/mL. The renal biopsy revealed nucleomegaly with focal viral inclusions, along with changes associated with immunotherapy toxicity. Electron microscopy demonstrated capillary and tubular epithelial cells with "viral factories," thereby confirming the diagnosis. Thus, screening for parvovirus B19 is advised in high-risk patients who present with refractory anemia to avoid the complications of a chronic infection associated with the fatal rejection of the transplanted organ.

  13. Human parvovirus B19 infection among hospital staff members after contact with infected patients.

    PubMed

    Bell, L M; Naides, S J; Stoffman, P; Hodinka, R L; Plotkin, S A

    1989-08-24

    In the spring and summer of 1988, two separate outbreaks of an illness with a rash resembling erythema infectiosum occurred among members of the nursing staff of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The sources were two adolescent patients with sickle cell disease and aplastic crisis who had unsuspected parvovirus infection. Tests for IgM and IgG antibodies to parvovirus B19 were positive in both patients, and electron microscopical examination showed parvovirus-like particles in the early serum samples. Of 40 health care workers exposed to infected patients, 12 (30 percent) were infected, 2 (5 percent) were possibly infected, 8 (20 percent) had evidence of a past infection with B19, and 18 (45 percent) remained seronegative. Attack rates among the susceptible contacts were 36 percent in the first outbreak and at least 38 percent in the second. Clinical symptoms began a mean of 12.6 days after exposure and included malaise, rash, and joint pain. We conclude that hospital workers are at risk of contracting nosocomial erythema infectiosum from patients with parvovirus-associated aplastic crisis. We recommend that all patients with hereditary hemolytic anemias who are admitted with a febrile illness be evaluated for aplasia and promptly placed in respiratory and contact isolation if aplastic crisis is suspected.

  14. High local genetic diversity of canine parvovirus from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Aldaz, Jaime; García-Díaz, Juan; Calleros, Lucía; Sosa, Katia; Iraola, Gregorio; Marandino, Ana; Hernández, Martín; Panzera, Yanina; Pérez, Ruben

    2013-09-27

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) comprises three antigenic variants (2a, 2b, and 2c) that are distributed globally with different frequencies and levels of genetic variability. CPVs from central Ecuador were herein analyzed to characterize the strains and to provide new insights into local viral diversity, evolution, and pathogenicity. Variant prevalence was analyzed by PCR and partial sequencing for 53 CPV-positive samples collected during 2011 and 2012. The full-length VP2 gene was sequenced in 24 selected strains and a maximum-likelihood phylogenetic tree was constructed using both Ecuadorian and worldwide strains. Ecuadorian CPVs have a remarkable genetic diversity that includes the circulation of all three variants and the existence of different evolutionary groups or lineages. CPV-2c was the most prevalent variant (54.7%), confirming the spread of this variant in America. Ecuadorian CPV-2c strains clustered in two lineages, which represent the first evidence of polyphyletic CPV-2c circulating in South America. CPV-2a strains constituted 41.5% of the samples and clustered in a single lineage. The two detected CPV-2b strains (3.8%) were clearly polyphyletic and appeared related to Ecuadorian CPV-2a or foreign CPV-2b strains. Besides the substitution at residue 426 that is used to identify the variants, two amino acid changes occurred in Ecuadorian strains: Val139Iso and Thr440Ser. Ser(440) occurred in a biologically relevant domain of VP2 and is here described for the first time in CPV. The associations of Ecuadorian CPV-2c and CPV-2a with clinical symptoms indicate that dull mentation, hemorrhagic gastroenteritis and hypothermia occurred more frequently in infection with CPV-2c than with CPV-2a.

  15. Chicken parvovirus and its associations with malabsorption syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finkler, F; Lima, D A; Cerva, C; Moraes, L B; Cibulski, S P; Teixeira, T F; Santos, H F; Almeida, L L; Roehe, P M; Franco, A C

    2016-08-01

    Malabsorption syndrome (MAS) is a multifactorial syndrome which is characterized by enteric disorders and reduced growth rates of broilers. Such condition is responsible for significant economic losses to the poultry industry. A possible association between chicken parvovirus (ChPV) infections and the occurrence of MAS has been proposed. However, such association has not to date been elucidated in view that ChPV has been detected in healthy as well as in MAS-affected chickens. This study aimed to detect and quantify ChPV loads in sera and tissues of MAS-affected, as well as in healthy broilers. Fifty nine, 39-day-old broilers (50 diseased, 9 healthy birds), obtained from the same flocks, were examined. The highest ChPV DNA loads were detected in MAS-affected broilers, particularly in fecal samples and intestinal tissues (~5500 genomic copies/300ng of total DNA). The average viral genome load in serum in MAS-affected birds was 1134copies/mL, whereas no viral DNA was found in sera and thymus tissues from healthy animals. These findings reveal that MAS-affected broilers consistently carry ChPV DNA is serum, whereas healthy animals do not. In addition, viral loads in tissues (bursa of Fabricius, spleen, intestine and liver) of MAS-affected birds were significantly higher in comparison to the same tissues from healthy broilers. Although preliminary, the results obtained here indicate an association between the detection of ChPV DNA in serum, in addition to high ChPV viral loads in tissues, and the occurrence of MAS in broilers. Further experiments should be performed to confirm such results.

  16. Factors affecting the occurrence of canine parvovirus in dogs.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Carla; Carvalheira, Júlio; Parrish, Colin R; Thompson, Gertrude

    2015-10-22

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is the most important enteric virus infecting canids worldwide. The purpose of this study was to detect CPV in naturally infected dogs from several veterinary clinics distributed throughout Portugal between 2012 and 2014 and to identify risk factors associated with CPV infection. From 209 dogs suspected of being infected with CPV, historical data and clinical signs were collected. Fecal samples were screened for CPV by PCR assay and those positive were confirmed by sequencing. The data was analyzed using logistic regression to investigate associations between each of the predisposing factors and CPV status. Of the samples collected, 77.5% tested CPV-positive. Statistical analysis showed that animals in the three age categories (p<0.001) were at list 12 times more likely to be CPV-positive than older animals. The anthelminthic treatment [OR=0.45, p=0.04] and the rectal temperature (hypothermia, [OR=0.12, p=0.004]) contributed to decrease the likelihood of the dogs be infected with CPV. On the other hand, clinical signs such as depression [OR=4.4, p=0.02] and dehydration status [OR=2.38, p=0.001] made dogs more likely to be CPV-infected. The results indicate that although having a high morbidity, only 18% of the Portuguese dog population died in the study. Some of the risk factors identified in this study have not been commonly reported, yet they are easy to obtain and can be used as prognostic indicators in the veterinary practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Tissue persistence of parvovirus B19 genotypes in asymptomatic persons.

    PubMed

    Corcioli, Fabiana; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Rinieri, Alessio; Fanci, Rosa; Innocenti, Massimo; Civinini, Roberto; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Azzi, Alberta

    2008-11-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) can persist in immunocompetent symptomatic and non-symptomatic individuals, as demonstrated by the finding of viral DNA in different tissues, in absence of viremia and of anti-B19V IgM. The spread and the nature of this phenomenon have not been clearly determined. In order to investigate the frequency of persistence and the tissue distribution of the three genotypes of B19V, the viral load of the persistent virus and its expression in the affected tissues, 139 tissue samples and 102 sera from 139 asymptomatic individuals have been analyzed by consensus PCRs and genotype specific PCRs for B19V detection and genotyping. Viral load was measured by real time PCR and viral mRNAs were detected by RT-PCR. Altogether, 51% individuals carried B19V DNA, more frequently in solid tissues (65%) than in bone marrow (20%). Genotype 1 was found in 28% tissue samples, genotype 2 in 68% and genotype 3 in 3% only. Viral load ranged from less then 10 copies to 7 x 10(4) copies per 10(6) cells, with the exception of two samples of myocardium with about 10(6) copies per 10(6) cells. mRNA of capsid proteins was present in two bone marrow samples only. In conclusion, in asymptomatic individuals B19V persistence is more common in solid tissues than in bone marrow, and genotype 2 persists more frequently than genotype 1. The results suggest that the virus persists without replicating, at sub-immunogenic levels.

  18. Restriction of porcine parvovirus replication in nonpermissive cells.

    PubMed Central

    Oraveerakul, K; Choi, C S; Molitor, T W

    1992-01-01

    Swine testicle (ST) cells and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells differ in their ability to support replication of porcine parvovirus (PPV). Viral replication events in ST cells, a permissive cell type, and MDCK cells, a nonpermissive cell type, were compared in an attempt to elucidate putative mechanisms of restrictive virus replication. Radiolabeled PPV bound to the cell surface of both cell types equally well and the binding was shown to be PPV specific, indicating that the restriction was not at the cell surface level. In contrast, profound differences in intracellular events in PPV replication were observed between these two cell types. Synthesis of viral DNA was limited in MDCK cells in that the percentage of cells with replicative-form DNA as determined by strand-specific probe in situ hybridization was approximately 100-fold lower in MDCK cells than in ST cells at the same multiplicity of infection. Northern (RNA) blot analysis, using oligonucleotide probes derived from both structural and nonstructural protein-coding regions of the PPV genome, revealed four PPV mRNA transcripts from infected ST cells. Comparatively, RNA species from the structural protein coding region were actively transcribed in MDCK cells, but synthesis of RNA species from the nonstructural protein coding region was negligible. Immunoprecipitation of viral polypeptides revealed the three characteristic structural polypeptides, VP1, VP2, and VP3, along with the nonstructural polypeptide, NS-1 from ST cells. In contrast, neither viral structural or nonstructural polypeptides nor progeny virions were produced from MDCK cells. The data suggest that mechanisms controlling permissiveness of cells to PPV infection are associated with the level of viral DNA replication, RNA transcription, and viral antigen expression but not absorption to the cell surface. Images PMID:1370555

  19. Epidemiological and phylogenetic analysis of institutional mouse parvoviruses.

    PubMed

    Joh, Joongho; Proctor, Mary L; Ditslear, Janice L; King, William W; Sundberg, John P; Jenson, A Bennett; Ghim, Shin-Je

    2013-08-01

    Mouse parvoviruses (MPVs) are small, single-stranded, 5 kb DNA viruses that are subclinical and endemic in many laboratory mouse colonies. MPVs cause more distinctive deleterious effects in immune-compromised or genetically-engineered mice than immuno-competent mice. At the University of Louisville (U of L), there was an unexpected increase of MPV sero-positivity for MPV infections in mouse colonies between January 2006 and February 2007, resulting in strategic husbandry changes aimed at controlling MPV spread throughout the animal facility. To investigate these MPVs, VP2 genes of seven MPVs were cloned and sequenced from eight documented incidences by PCR technology. The mutations in these VP2 genes were compared to those found at the Genbank database (NCBI; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) and an intra-institutional phylogenetic tree for MPV infections at U of L was constructed. We discovered that the seven MPV isolates were different from those in Genbank and were not identical to each other. These MPVs were designated MPV-UL1 to 7; none of them were minute virus of mice (MVMs). Four isolates could be classified as MPV1, one was classified as MPV2, and two were defined as novel types with less than 96% and 94% homology with existing MPV types. Considering that all seven isolates had mutations in their VP2 genes and no mutations were observed in VP2 genes of MPV during a four-month time period of incubation, we concluded that all seven MPVs isolated at U of L between 2006 and 2007 probably originated from different sources. Serological survey for MPV infections verified that each MPV outbreak was controlled without further contamination within the institution. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Use of parvovirus-like particles for vaccination and induction of multiple immune responses.

    PubMed

    Casal, J I

    1999-04-01

    Expression of the VP2 gene of autonomous parvoviruses in insect cells with the use of the baculovirus system has led to the production of virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by the self-assembly of VP2. These VLPs are expressed at high levels and can easily be purified by salt fractionation. They are highly immunogenic in the corresponding host, being fully protective at doses as low as 1-2 microg of purified material per animal. No special adjuvants are required. An interesting property of these particles is their usefulness as a diagnostic reagent for ELISA kits, which have successfully replaced conventional methods for parvovirus diagnostics based on haemagglutination. Another application of the hybrid recombinant parvovirus-like particles of pig parvovirus (PPV) and canine parvovirus (CPV) is its use as an antigen delivery system. PPV:VLPs containing a CD8(+) epitope from the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) nucleoprotein are able to evoke a potent cytolytic T-lymphocyte response and to protect mice against a lethal infection with LCMV. Also, PPV:VLPs containing the C3:T epitope from poliovirus elicited a T helper response in mice. These T-cell epitopes were inserted into the N-terminus of the VP2 protein. Unfortunately, the N-terminus is not adequate for antibody responses because it is inside the particle. Recent findings have shown that fine tailoring of the point of insertion around the tip of loop 2 of the surface of CPV allowed the elicitation of a potent antibody response. Thus mice immunized with chimaeric C3:B CPV:VLPs were able to elicit a strong neutralizing antibody response (>3 log10 units) against poliovirus. We now have the possibility of using these particles to elicit different immune responses against single or multiple pathogens in a simple and economic way.

  1. Persistence of parvovirus B19 DNA in synovium of patients with haemophilic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, K; Azzi, A; De Biasi, E; Radossi, P; De Santis, R; Davoli, P G; Tagariello, G

    2001-10-01

    A progressive arthropathy develops commonly in haemophiliacs and its pathogenesis is not fully understood. Human parvovirus B19 has been associated with several diseases including acute and chronic arthropathy and some studies suggest its implication in chronic inflammatory diseases of the joints such as rheumatoid arthritis. In haemophiliacs parvovirus B19 infection occurs very frequently because of its transmission with plasma derivatives. In order to assess a role of B19 virus in haemophilic arthritis, synovial tissue samples from patients with haemophilia with arthritis and from patients, nonhaemophiliacs, with arthrosis or with joint trauma were examined for B19 DNA by nested PCR. In addition, the prevalence of antibody to parvovirus B19 NS1 protein as a possible serological marker of persistent B19 infection was tested and the association of the outcome of parvovirus infection with genetic diversity of B19 P6 promoter sequences was investigated. B19 DNA was detected in the synovial tissue of 31% of haemophiliacs with progressive arthropathy and of 5% of control patients. Fourteen out of 17 patients (82%) with haemophilic arthritis and with B19 DNA in their synovial membranes had IgG antibodies against the nonstructural protein NS1 of parvovirus B19. On the other hand, 19% of patients with haemophilia with B19 PCR negative synovial tissue and 21% of controls showed anti-NS1 antibodies. The P6 promoter presented specific sites of point mutations shared frequently by isolates from patients with haemophilia and arthritis. These results indicate that B19 DNA can persist in the synovial membranes of patients with haemophilic arthritis significantly more frequently in comparison to control individuals with arthrosis or joint trauma and show a correlation between anti- NS1 antibody presence and B19 DNA persistence in the synovial tissue.

  2. Structural Characterization of H-1 Parvovirus: Comparison of Infectious Virions to Empty Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Sujata; Nam, Hyun-Joo; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Vogel, Michèle; Dinsart, Christiane; Salomé, Nathalie; McKenna, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The structure of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) packaging H-1 parvovirus (H-1PV), which is being developed as an antitumor gene delivery vector, has been determined for wild-type (wt) virions and noninfectious (empty) capsids to 2.7- and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, using X-ray crystallography. The capsid viral protein (VP) structure consists of an α-helix and an eight-stranded anti-parallel β-barrel with large loop regions between the strands. The β-barrel and loops form the capsid core and surface, respectively. In the wt structure, 600 nucleotides are ordered in an interior DNA binding pocket of the capsid. This accounts for ∼12% of the H-1PV genome. The wt structure is identical to the empty capsid structure, except for side chain conformation variations at the nucleotide binding pocket. Comparison of the H-1PV nucleotides to those observed in canine parvovirus and minute virus of mice, two members of the genus Parvovirus, showed both similarity in structure and analogous interactions. This observation suggests a functional role, such as in capsid stability and/or ssDNA genome recognition for encapsulation. The VP structure differs from those of other parvoviruses in surface loop regions that control receptor binding, tissue tropism, pathogenicity, and antibody recognition, including VP sequences reported to determine tumor cell tropism for oncotropic rodent parvoviruses. These structures of H-1PV provide insight into structural features that dictate capsid stabilization following genome packaging and three-dimensional information applicable for rational design of tumor-targeted recombinant gene delivery vectors. PMID:23449783

  3. Seroepidemiology of parvovirus B19 in the Frankfurt am Main area, Germany: evaluation of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Reinheimer, C; Allwinn, R; Doerr, H W; Wittek, M

    2010-10-01

    Parvovirus B 19 is a virus that is distributed by respiratory droplets. It is known to be an initiator of erythema infectiosum (children's fifth disease), with erythroblasts being the target cells of infection. In case of vertically transmission, hydrops fetalis has been documented. Parvovirus B19 seroprevalence was investigated in serum samples routinely collected from patients who had been admitted to the University Hospital in Frankfurt a. M., Germany. Patients were classified in different groups in order to analyze parovirus B19 seroprevalences in terms of risk factors. Between June 2007 and March 2010, a total of 2,197 serum samples were analyzed for parvovirus B19-immunoglobulin G using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The study population included six groups of patients, namely, patients suffering from haemophilia, malignant disease, immunodeficiency diseases, common gynecological ailments, pregnant women and children with malignant diseases. Of the 2,197 serum samples, 1,383 contained antibodies to parvovirus B19 (62.9%). The overall seroprevalence in adults (20 to ≥60 years of age) was 71%. Gradually rising prevalences were recorded in children/adolescents with increasing age. We found a positive serostatus in 54.9% of adult patients with malignant disease, in 64.2% of patients with haemophilia (1 to ≥60 years), in 66.7% of patients under immunosuppression with various drugs (1 to ≥60 years) and in 41.7% of oncological patients aged 1-19 years. Of the pregnant women (aged 15-49 years), 71.1% were seropositive. The seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 in patients admitted to the University Hospital in Frankfurt a.M. was, on average, lower than that among the general population in Germany. Infection among patients in specific risk groups did not spread more than that in age-matched non-selected patients, with the exception of the group of immunocompromised patients.

  4. Aphidicolin inhibition of the production of replicative-form DNA during bovine parvovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, A T; Stout, E R; Bates, R C

    1984-01-01

    Since parvoviruses apparently do not possess a DNA polymerase activity, one or more of the host cell DNA polymerases must be responsible for replicating the single-stranded DNA genome. We have focused on determining which polymerase, alpha, beta, or gamma (pol alpha, pol beta, or pol gamma, respectively), is responsible for the first step in bovine parvoviral DNA replication: conversion of the single-stranded DNA genome to a parental replicative form (RF). In this study, we used aphidicolin, a specific inhibitor of DNA pol alpha, to assay for the requirement of pol alpha activity in parental RF formation in vivo. Synchronized cell cultures were infected with bovine parvovirus with or without aphidicolin, and the products of viral replication were separated on agarose gels and identified by Southern blot analysis. We found that complete inhibition of viral DNA synthesis resulted when 20 microM aphidicolin was present throughout the infection. In addition, viral DNA synthesis was inhibited by as little as 1 microM aphidicolin, whereas lower concentrations (0.1 and 0.01 microM) resulted in partial inhibition of the replication process. Using 32P-labeled bovine parvovirus as the input virus we differentiated parental RF from daughter RF and progeny DNA synthesis. We conclude that DNA pol alpha is required for the production of RF during bovine parvovirus replication in vivo and that this requirement is most likely for the conversion of bovine parvovirus input single-stranded DNA to parental RF. These results do not rule out a possible role for DNA pol gamma in the first step, nor do they rule out a role for pol alpha or pol gamma in later stages of the replication cycle. Images PMID:6422050

  5. Fetal blood testing (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... testing is performed during labor to test the blood pH of the baby which can determine its well-being during delivery. A small puncture is made in the scalp and fetal blood droplets are collected in a thin glass tube. ...

  6. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, John; Ostrow, Lisa S.

    1980-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is a pattern of altered growth and morphogenesis found in about half the offspring of severely and chronically alcoholic women who continue drinking throughout their pregnancy. Of children studied, mild to moderate mental retardation was the most common disorder, occurring in 44 percent of the cases. (PHR)

  7. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerrer, Peggy

    The paper reviews Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a series of effects seen in children whose mothers drink alcohol to excess during pregnancy. The identification of FAS and its recognition as a major health problem in need of prevention are traced. Characteristics of children with FAS are described and resultant growth retardation, abnormal physical…

  8. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerrer, Peggy

    The paper reviews Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a series of effects seen in children whose mothers drink alcohol to excess during pregnancy. The identification of FAS and its recognition as a major health problem in need of prevention are traced. Characteristics of children with FAS are described and resultant growth retardation, abnormal physical…

  9. The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, John; Ostrow, Lisa S.

    1980-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is a pattern of altered growth and morphogenesis found in about half the offspring of severely and chronically alcoholic women who continue drinking throughout their pregnancy. Of children studied, mild to moderate mental retardation was the most common disorder, occurring in 44 percent of the cases. (PHR)

  10. The Duration of Immunity to an Inactivated Adjuvanted Canine Parvovirus Vaccine. A 52 and 64 Week Postvaccination Challenge Study

    PubMed Central

    Povey, R. C.; Carman, P. S.; Ewert, E.

    1983-01-01

    Dogs were successfully isolated for a period of either 52 or 64 weeks following vaccination with an inactivated, adjuvanted canine parvovirus-2 vaccine. Antibody persisted in all ten vaccinated dogs, although in one case by 52 weeks postvaccination only virus neutralizing antibody, and not hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody, could be detected. Sentinel unvaccinated dogs housed alongside the vaccinated dogs throughout the study remained free of canine parvovirus-2 antibody until challenged. Upon oral challenge with canine parvovirus-2 infected material all unvaccinated dogs developed one or more signs of canine parvovirus-2 disease, shed virus and developed antibody. None of the vaccinated dogs became overtly sick. Of the five vaccinated dogs challenged 52 weeks after vaccination, three shed virus and one showed a significant rise in antibody. At 64 weeks after vaccination only one of the five challenged dogs shed virus and showed a boost in antibody titer. PMID:17422291

  11. MRI of the Fetal Brain.

    PubMed

    Weisstanner, C; Kasprian, G; Gruber, G M; Brugger, P C; Prayer, D

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the possibilities for fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of the fetal brain. For brain pathologies, fetal MRI is usually performed when an abnormality is detected by previous prenatal ultrasound, and is, therefore, an important adjunct to ultrasound. The most commonly suspected brain pathologies referred to fetal MRI for further evaluation are ventriculomegaly, missing corpus callosum, and abnormalities of the posterior fossa. We will briefly discuss the most common indications for fetal brain MRI, as well as recent advances.

  12. Two potential recombinant rabies vaccines expressing canine parvovirus virion protein 2 induce immunogenicity to canine parvovirus and rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Shi, Hehe; Tan, Yeping; Niu, Xuefeng; Long, Teng; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Qin; Wang, Yifei; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-17

    Both rabies virus (RABV) and canine parvovirus (CPV) cause lethal diseases in dogs. In this study, both high egg passage Flury (HEP-Flury) strains of RABV and recombinant RABV carrying double RABV glycoprotein (G) gene were used to express the CPV virion protein 2 (VP2) gene, and were designated rHEP-VP2 and, rHEP-dG-VP2 respectively. The two recombinant RABVs maintained optimal virus titration according to their viral growth kinetics assay compared with the parental strain HEP-Flury. Western blotting indicated that G protein and VP2 were expressed in vitro. The expression of VP2 in Crandell feline kidney cells post-infection by rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay with antibody against VP2. Immunogenicity of recombinant rabies viruses was tested in Kunming mice. Both rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 induced high levels of rabies antibody compared with HEP-Flury. Mice immunized with rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 both had a high level of antibodies against VP2, which can protect against CPV infection. A challenge experiment indicated that more than 80% mice immunized with recombinant RABVs survived after infection of challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24). Together, this study showed that recombinant RABVs expressing VP2 induced protective immune responses to RABV and CPV. Therefore, rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 might be potential combined vaccines for RABV and CPV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of Goose-Origin Parvovirus as a Cause of Newly Emerging Beak Atrophy and Dwarfism Syndrome in Ducklings

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kexiang; Ma, Xiuli; Sheng, Zizhang; Qi, Lihong; Liu, Cunxia; Wang, Dan; Huang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    A recent epizootic outbreak, in China, of duck beak atrophy and dwarfism syndrome (BADS) was investigated using electron microscopic, genetic, and virological studies, which identified a parvovirus with a greater similarity to goose parvovirus (GPV) (97% protein homology) than to Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) (90% protein homology). The new virus, provisionally designated GPV-QH15, was found to be antigenically more closely related to GPV than to MDPV in a virus neutralization assay. These findings were further supported by phylogenetic analysis showing that GPV-QH15 evolved from goose lineage parvoviruses, rather than from Muscovy duck- or other duck species-related parvoviruses. In all, two genetic lineages (GPV I and GPV II) were identified from the GPV samples analyzed, and GPV-QH15 was found to be closely clustered with two known goose-origin parvoviruses (GPVa2006 and GPV1995), together forming a distinctive GPV IIa sublineage. Finally, structural modeling revealed that GPV-QH15 and the closely related viruses GPVa2006 and GPV1995 possessed identical clusters of receptor-interacting amino acid residues in the VP2 protein, a major determinant of viral receptor binding and host specificity. Significantly, these three viruses differed from MDPVs and other GPVs at these positions. Taken together, these results suggest that GPV-QH15 represents a new variant of goose-origin parvovirus that currently circulates in ducklings and causes BADS, a syndrome reported previously in Europe. This new finding highlights the need for future surveillance of GPV-QH15 in poultry in order to gain a better understanding of both the evolution and the biology of this emerging parvovirus. PMID:27194692

  14. Identification of Goose-Origin Parvovirus as a Cause of Newly Emerging Beak Atrophy and Dwarfism Syndrome in Ducklings.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kexiang; Ma, Xiuli; Sheng, Zizhang; Qi, Lihong; Liu, Cunxia; Wang, Dan; Huang, Bing; Li, Feng; Song, Minxun

    2016-08-01

    A recent epizootic outbreak, in China, of duck beak atrophy and dwarfism syndrome (BADS) was investigated using electron microscopic, genetic, and virological studies, which identified a parvovirus with a greater similarity to goose parvovirus (GPV) (97% protein homology) than to Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) (90% protein homology). The new virus, provisionally designated GPV-QH15, was found to be antigenically more closely related to GPV than to MDPV in a virus neutralization assay. These findings were further supported by phylogenetic analysis showing that GPV-QH15 evolved from goose lineage parvoviruses, rather than from Muscovy duck- or other duck species-related parvoviruses. In all, two genetic lineages (GPV I and GPV II) were identified from the GPV samples analyzed, and GPV-QH15 was found to be closely clustered with two known goose-origin parvoviruses (GPVa2006 and GPV1995), together forming a distinctive GPV IIa sublineage. Finally, structural modeling revealed that GPV-QH15 and the closely related viruses GPVa2006 and GPV1995 possessed identical clusters of receptor-interacting amino acid residues in the VP2 protein, a major determinant of viral receptor binding and host specificity. Significantly, these three viruses differed from MDPVs and other GPVs at these positions. Taken together, these results suggest that GPV-QH15 represents a new variant of goose-origin parvovirus that currently circulates in ducklings and causes BADS, a syndrome reported previously in Europe. This new finding highlights the need for future surveillance of GPV-QH15 in poultry in order to gain a better understanding of both the evolution and the biology of this emerging parvovirus. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 antibodies and evidence of viremia among Nigerian patients with sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Iwalokun, Bamidele Abiodun; Iwalokun, Senapon Olusola; Hodonu, Semande Olufunmilayo

    2013-01-01

    Clinical, biochemical and molecular evidence for the sickle cell anemia (SCA) crisis in Nigerian patients arising from parvovirus b19 infection remains inadequate. This study determined the prevalence and correlates of anti-parvovirus b19 antibodies in a population of SCA patients and non-SCA healthy controls in Lagos, Nigeria. In this prospective cross-sectional study, we enrolled 73 confirmed SCA patients from 5 district hospitals in Lagos and 81 sex and age-matched non-SCA healthy controls. Serum sample from each study participant was screened for anti-parvovirus b19 by ELISA and PCR techniques. Standard biomedical assays were also done. Anti-parvovirus b19 IgM and IgG antibodies were detected in 22 (14.3%) and 97 (62.9%) of the 154 sera screened, 13 (17.8%) and 45 (61.6%) in SCA patients; 9 (11.1%) and 52 (64.2%) in non-SCA controls. The overall seronegativity rate was 19.5%. Parvovirus B19 DNA was found in 2 (11.1%) of the 18 IgM seropositive SCA serum samples screened. On the whole, parvovirus b19 infection was more commonly asymptomatic in non-SCA controls but caused significant elevation in liver enzymes in infected SCA patients (P < 0.05). The risk of acute parvovirus b19 infection increased 65 times during unsteady state among the SCA patients. Although no deaths of infected patients were recorded during the study, age below 12 years, hospitalization and overcrowded environment were risk factors for infection. We conclude that parvovirus b19 is common in SCA patients, incurring greater susceptibility to infections. PMID:23885266

  16. Canine parvovirus types 2c and 2b circulating in North American dogs in 2006 and 2007.

    PubMed

    Kapil, Sanjay; Cooper, Emily; Lamm, Cathy; Murray, Brandy; Rezabek, Grant; Johnston, Larry; Campbell, Gregory; Johnson, Bill

    2007-12-01

    Parvovirus is the most common viral cause of diarrhea in young puppies. Based on the analysis of a partial VP2 sequence of 54 samples, canine parvovirus type 2c (CPV-2c) (n = 26), CPV-2b (n = 25), and CPV-2 (n = 3) were detected in the United States. The American CPV-2b isolates have unique codons (494 and 572) in VP2.

  17. Restrictive dermopathy and fetal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Mulder, E J; Beemer, F A; Stoutenbeek, P

    2001-07-01

    We report three siblings from consecutive pregnancies affected with restrictive dermopathy (RD). During the second pregnancy, fetal behavioural development and growth were studied extensively using ultrasound at 1-4 week intervals. Dramatic and sudden changes occurred in fetal body movements and growth but not until the end of the second trimester of pregnancy. Prominent at that time were prolonged periods of fetal quiescence and very low heart rate variability, together with abnormally executed body movements of short duration. Retarded femoral development and jerky abrupt fetal body movements (abnormal movement quality) were already present in the early second trimester of pregnancy. Facial anomalies emerged despite the presence of fetal mouth movements. The clinical features of RD were only partly explained by present knowledge of skin development and the fetal akinesia deformation sequence hypothesis. Quantitative assessment of fetal movements proved to be a poor early marker for antenatal diagnosis of this disorder.

  18. Stillbirth and fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Radek

    2010-09-01

    The association between stillbirth and fetal growth restriction is strong and supported by a large body of evidence and clinically employed for the stillbirth prediction. However, although assessment of fetal growth is a basis of clinical practice, it is not trivial. Essentially, fetal growth is a result of the genetic growth potential of the fetus and placental function. The growth potential is the driving force of fetal growth, whereas the placenta as the sole source of nutrients and oxygen might become the rate limiting element of fetal growth if its function is impaired. Thus, placental dysfunction may prevent the fetus from reaching its full genetically determined growth potential. In this sense fetal growth and its aberration provides an insight into placental function. Fetal growth is a proxy for the test of the effectiveness of placenta, whose function is otherwise obscured during pregnancy.

  19. Immune complex-based vaccine for pig protection against parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Roić, B; Cajavec, S; Ergotić, N; Lipej, Z; Madić, J; Lojkić, M; Pokrić, B

    2006-02-01

    The insoluble immune complexes (ICs) were prepared under the conditions of double immunodiffusion in gel, using the suspension of the ultrasound treated PK-15 cell-line infected with porcine parvovirus (PPV) containing both viral particles and viral proteins, as well as pig or rabbit anti-PPV polyclonal immune sera. The immunodiffusion performed in an agarose gel allows only viral subunits with a molecular mass equal to or less than 1000 kDa, rather than the viral particles, to diffuse through the gel and reach the point where the immunoprecipitate is to be formed. The immunoprecipitation under the conditions of the diffusion ensures the optimal, i.e. equimolar ratio of both immunoprecipitating components, antibody/antigen in the IC. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the Western blot analyses showed the ICs were composed of two proteins, a protein in which molecular mass corresponded to the VP2 of the PPV and a protein with a molecular mass of the IgG. This suggests that the ICs are mainly composed of the VP2 antigen and IgG class antibodies. The potency of the IC-vaccines prepared in the form of a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion was compared with that of a commercially available, inactivated oil vaccine. The vaccination of gilts, 6 weeks before mating, with the IC containing allogeneic pig antibodies, resulted in the development of high and long-lasting anti-PPV antibody titres, similar to those generated by the licenced vaccine (P > 0.01). The content of the virus material administered by the IC was twice lower than that in the licenced vaccine. Neither systemic nor local reactions were observed in the gilts during the period of the trial with the IC vaccine. The number of viable piglets per litter varied between 9 and 12 and no signs of the PPV infection were detected. Rabbits were used as one of the alternative laboratory animal models accepted for the testing of the vaccine against the PPV. The rabbit humoral immune response

  20. Fetal congenital lobar emphysema.

    PubMed

    Chia, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Soon-Cen; Liu, Min-Chang; Se, Tung-Yi

    2007-03-01

    To report a rare fetal congenital lung anomaly characterized by over inflation of a pulmonary lobe. A 28-year-old systemic lupus erythematous mother, gravida 1 para 0, who had normal prenatal care in our department, was admitted for labor pain and an abnormal fetal heart location was noted incidentally during labor. The baby showed rib retraction in room air but no obvious cyanotic change after delivery. Both the fetus chest X-ray and ultrasound showed a hyperechogenic tumor in the left thoracic cavity with a right-side-shifted heart and trachea. Computed tomography showed a hypodense and multiseptal tumor in the left thoracic cavity with right-sided shift of the heart and trachea. It was a soft, solid tumor in the parenchyma of the left lung and the histopathology confirmed it to be benign congenital lobar emphysema. The favorable outcome in both asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic children suggests that a nonsurgical approach should be considered for these patients.

  1. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  2. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  3. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Hall, Earl T.; Baker, Donald A.; Bryant, Timothy D.

    1992-08-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  4. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-07-01

    The invention is an ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system. The invention incorporates piezoelectric polymer film combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted from a fetus inside an expectant mother and to provide means for filtering out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  5. Intrapartum fetal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Alison G; Spain, Janine

    2015-06-01

    Intrapartum fetal monitoring to assess fetal well-being during the labor and delivery process has been a central component of intrapartum care for decades. Today, electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) is the most common method used to assess the fetus during labor without substantial evidence to suggest a benefit. A Cochrane review of 13 trials, which included over 37,000 women, found that continuous EFM provided no significant improvement in perinatal death rate [risk ratio (RR) 0.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.59-1.23] or cerebral palsy rate (RR 1.75; 95% CI, 0.84-3.63) as compared with intermittent auscultation; however, there was a significant decrease in neonatal seizures (RR 0.50; 95% CI, 0.31-0.80). In addition, there was a significant increase in cesarean delivery (RR 1.63; 95% CI, 1.29-2.07) and operative vaginal delivery (RR 1.15; 95% CI, 1.01-1.33). Despite the lack of scientific support to suggest that EFM reduces adverse neonatal outcomes, its use is almost universal in the hospital setting and very likely has contributed to the rise in cesarean rate.

  6. The fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Kiserud, Torvid; Acharya, Ganesh

    2004-12-30

    Accumulating data on the human fetal circulation shows the similarity to the experimental animal physiology, but with important differences. The human fetus seems to circulate less blood through the placenta, shunt less through the ductus venosus and foramen ovale, but direct more blood through the lungs than the fetal sheep. However, there are substantial individual variations and the pattern changes with gestational age. The normalised umbilical blood flow decreases with gestational age, and, at 28 to 32 weeks, a new level of development seems to be reached. At this stage, the shunting through the ductus venosus and the foramen ovale reaches a minimum, and the flow through the lungs a maximum. The ductus venosus and foramen ovale are functionally closely related and represent an important distributional unit for the venous return. The left portal branch represents a venous watershed, and, similarly, the isthmus aorta an arterial watershed. Thus, the fetal central circulation is a very flexible and adaptive circulatory system. The responses to increased afterload, hypoxaemia and acidaemia in the human fetus are equivalent to those found in animal studies: increased ductus venosus and foramen ovale shunting, increased impedance in the lungs, reduced impedance in the brain, increasingly reversed flow in the aortic isthmus and a more prominent coronary blood flow.

  7. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janet F; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the developing fetus and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In 1973, fetal alcohol syndrome was first described as a specific cluster of birth defects resulting from alcohol exposure in utero. Subsequently, research unequivocally revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure causes a broad range of adverse developmental effects. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the general term that encompasses the range of adverse effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are specific, and comprehensive efforts are ongoing to establish definitive criteria for diagnosing the other FASDs. A large and growing body of research has led to evidence-based FASD education of professionals and the public, broader prevention initiatives, and recommended treatment approaches based on the following premises:▪ Alcohol-related birth defects and developmental disabilities are completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol use.▪ Neurocognitive and behavioral problems resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure are lifelong.▪ Early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy for any condition along the FASD continuum can result in improved outcomes.▪ During pregnancy:◦no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe;◦there is no safe trimester to drink alcohol;◦all forms of alcohol, such as beer, wine, and liquor, pose similar risk; and◦binge drinking poses dose-related risk to the developing fetus. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Fetal vibroacoustic stimulation for facilitation of tests of fetal wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kelvin H; Smyth, Rebecca M D; Wei, Xing

    2013-12-07

    Acoustic stimulation of the fetus has been suggested to improve the efficiency of antepartum fetal heart rate testing. To assess the advantages and disadvantages of the use of fetal vibroacoustic stimulation in conjunction with tests of fetal wellbeing. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 September 2013). All published and unpublished randomised controlled trials assessing the merits of the use of fetal vibroacoustic stimulation in conjunction with tests of fetal wellbeing. All review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. Authors of published and unpublished trials were contacted for further information. Altogether 12 trials with a total of 6822 participants were included. Fetal vibroacoustic stimulation reduced the incidence of non-reactive antenatal cardiotocography test (nine trials; average risk ratio (RR) 0.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48 to 0.81). Vibroacoustic stimulation compared with mock stimulation evoked significantly more fetal movements when used in conjunction with fetal heart rate testing (one trial, RR 0.23, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.29). Vibroacoustic stimulation offers benefits by decreasing the incidence of non-reactive cardiotocography and reducing the testing time. Further randomised trials should be encouraged to determine not only the optimum intensity, frequency, duration and position of the vibroacoustic stimulation, but also to evaluate the efficacy, predictive reliability, safety and perinatal outcome of these stimuli with cardiotocography and other tests of fetal wellbeing.

  9. Scarless fetal healing. Therapeutic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Adzick, N S; Longaker, M T

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to call attention to the fetal wound healing process as a blueprint for ideal tissue repair. Wound healing in the fetus is fundamentally different from healing in the adult. Fetal tissue repair occurs rapidly and in the absence of scar formation. Because scarring and fibrosis dominate some diseases in every area of medicine, an understanding of fetal wound healing should help develop therapeutic strategies to avert the devastating consequences of excessive scar formation. PMID:1731647

  10. Hormonal regulation of fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Gicquel, C; Le Bouc, Y

    2006-01-01

    Fetal growth is a complex process depending on the genetics of the fetus, the availability of nutrients and oxygen to the fetus, maternal nutrition and various growth factors and hormones of maternal, fetal and placental origin. Hormones play a central role in regulating fetal growth and development. They act as maturational and nutritional signals in utero and control tissue development and differentiation according to the prevailing environmental conditions in the fetus. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system, and IGF-I and IGF-II in particular, plays a critical role in fetal and placental growth throughout gestation. Disruption of the IGF1, IGF2 or IGF1R gene retards fetal growth, whereas disruption of IGF2R or overexpression of IGF2 enhances fetal growth. IGF-I stimulates fetal growth when nutrients are available, thereby ensuring that fetal growth is appropriate for the nutrient supply. The production of IGF-I is particularly sensitive to undernutrition. IGF-II plays a key role in placental growth and nutrient transfer. Several key hormone genes involved in embryonic and fetal growth are imprinted. Disruption of this imprinting causes disorders involving growth defects, such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, which is associated with fetal overgrowth, or Silver-Russell syndrome, which is associated with intrauterine growth retardation. Optimal fetal growth is essential for perinatal survival and has long-term consequences extending into adulthood. Given the high incidence of intrauterine growth retardation and the high risk of metabolic and cardiovascular complications in later life, further clinical and basic research is needed to develop accurate early diagnosis of aberrant fetal growth and novel therapeutic strategies.

  11. Concurrent infection of a cat with cowpox virus and feline parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Schaudien, D; Meyer, H; Grunwald, D; Janssen, H; Wohlsein, P

    2007-01-01

    Concurrent infection with cowpox and feline parvovirus was diagnosed in a 5-month-old male European Short Hair cat. Microscopical examination of the facial skin, ears and foot pads revealed multifocal to coalescing, ulcerative to necrotizing dermatitis and panniculitis with ballooning epidermal degeneration and eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction testing and virus isolation confirmed infection with a strain of cowpox virus similar to that isolated from a cat in Germany 5 years previously. Lymphoid tissues were depleted and there was catarrhal enteritis caused by feline parvovirus as confirmed by immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. This co-infection did not result in a more severe and rapid course of the poxvirus-associated disease.

  12. Sequence analysis of a canine parvovirus isolated from a red panda (Ailurus fulgens) in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qin; Loeffler, I Kati; Li, Ming; Tian, Kegong; Wei, Fuwen

    2007-06-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) was first recognized in the late 1970 s in dogs and has mutated and spread throughout the world in canid and felid species since then. In this study, a novel CPV was isolated from the endangered red panda (Ailurus fulgens) in China. Nucleotide and phylogenetic analysis of the capsid protein VP2 gene classified the red panda parvovirus (RPPV) as a CPV-2a type. Substitution of Val for Gly at the conserved 300 residue in RPPV presents an unusual variation in the CPV-2a amino acid sequence and is further evidence for the continuing evolution of the virus. The 300 residue is important in distinguishing the antigenicity and host range of CPVs. The clinical significance and population impact of RPPV infection in captive red pandas in China is unknown and is an important topic for future research.

  13. Canine parvovirus enteritis, canine distemper, and major histocompatibility complex genetic variation in Mexican wolves.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Philip W; Lee, Rhonda N; Buchanan, Colleen

    2003-10-01

    The endangered Mexican wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) was recently reintroduced into Arizona and New Mexico (USA). In 1999 and 2000, pups from three litters that were part of the reintroduction program died of either canine parvovirus or canine distemper. Overall, half (seven of 14) of the pups died of either canine parvovirus or canine distemper. The parents and their litters were analyzed for variation at the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene DRB1. Similar MHC genes are related to disease resistance in other species. All six of the surviving pups genotyped for the MHC gene were heterozygous while five of the pups that died were heterozygous and one was homozygous. Resistance to pathogens is an important aspect of the management and long-term survival of endangered taxa, such as the Mexican wolf.

  14. Analysis of canine parvovirus sequences from wolves and dogs isolated in Italy.

    PubMed

    Battilani, M; Scagliarini, A; Tisato, E; Turilli, C; Jacoboni, I; Casadio, R; Prosperi, S

    2001-07-01

    The VP2 genes of Italian canine parvovirus (CPV) type 2 strains isolated from dogs and wolves were sequenced and a three-dimensional model of the VP2 capsid protein was constructed. Two mutations were detected in the VP2 sequences of the Italian strains: one at residue 297 and one at residue 265. Variant 297 is the predominant CPV isolate in Europe, whereas variant 265 has never been detected before. The mutation at residue 265 causes a disruption in a G strand of the beta-barrel in the VP2 protein. Data on strains isolated from wolves demonstrated that the same strain of CPV can circulate among domestic and wild canids; therefore, this result leads us to exclude the possibility that a separate parvovirus pool exists in wild populations.

  15. [Fetal pulmonary artery blood flow depending on fetal lung maturity].

    PubMed

    Jastrzebski, Arkadiusz; Lech, Tomasz; Obcowska-Lech, Marta; Sobański, Andrzej; Sipiński, Adam

    2004-01-01

    The ultrasonographic assessment of fetal lung maturity by evaluating the elasticity of lung tissue, Dynamic Lung Score (DLS) has been being performed since 1986 in ObGyn Department in Tychy (Medical University of Silesia). The lung elasticity is evaluated on the cross sections of fetal thorax, on the level of heart ventricles. The result of the evaluation is given as the three degree scale, in which I degree indicates the lack of elasticity and fetal lung immaturity, II degrees indicates partially expressed elasticity, corresponding with incomplete maturity of lung tissue, and III degrees represents full elasticity and indicates complete maturity of fetal lungs. This study was designed to compare fetal pulmonary artery blood flow with the maturity of fetal lung tissue evaluated during the ultrasonographic assessment of fetal lung tissue elasticity. The examination was performed on pregnant women, beginning on 27th week gestation. During the examination the mean Pulsatility Index was decreased, particularly in fetuses with II degrees lung maturity. The Resistance Index (RI) was found to be stable and independent of gestational age. In the group with I degree lung maturity (DLS I), the mean PI = 2.643 (+/- 0.229), mean RI = 0.879 (+/- 0.036), in DLS II group PI = 2.039 (+/- 0.262), RI = 0.868 (+/- 0.037), and in DLS III group PI = 2,500 (+/- 0.100), RI = 0.900 (+/- 0.100). Comparing the ultrasonographic evaluation of fetal lung maturity with fetal pulmonary artery blood flow allows more accurate assessment of fetal lung maturity. Fetal lung maturity can not be evaluated univocally on the basis of blood flow assessment. Because of the divergence of blood flow parameters further studies including bigger population seem to be necessary for verification of the results and for establishing the reference values.

  16. ENDEMIC INFECTION OF STRANDED SOUTHERN SEA OTTERS (ENHYDRA LUTRIS NEREIS) WITH NOVEL PARVOVIRUS, POLYOMAVIRUS, AND ADENOVIRUS.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Juliana D; Ng, Terry F; Miller, Melissa; Li, Linlin; Deng, Xutao; Dodd, Erin; Batac, Francesca; Delwart, Eric

    2017-07-01

    Over the past century, the southern sea otter (SSO; Enhydra lutris nereis) population has been slowly recovering from near extinction due to overharvest. The SSO is a threatened subspecies under federal law and a fully protected species under California law, US. Through a multiagency collaborative program, stranded animals are rehabilitated and released, while deceased animals are necropsied and tissues are cryopreserved to facilitate scientific study. Here, we processed archival tissues to enrich particle-associated viral nucleic acids, which we randomly amplified and deeply sequenced to identify viral genomes through sequence similarities. Anelloviruses and endogenous retroviral sequences made up over 50% of observed viral sequences. Polyomavirus, parvovirus, and adenovirus sequences made up most of the remaining reads. We characterized and phylogenetically analyzed the full genome of sea otter polyomavirus 1 and the complete coding sequence of sea otter parvovirus 1 and found that the closest known viruses infect primates and domestic pigs ( Sus scrofa domesticus), respectively. We tested archived tissues from 69 stranded SSO necropsied over 14 yr (2000-13) by PCR. Polyomavirus, parvovirus, and adenovirus infections were detected in 51, 61, and 29% of examined animals, respectively, with no significant increase in frequency over time, suggesting endemic infection. We found that 80% of tested SSO were infected with at least one of the three DNA viruses, whose tissue distribution we determined in 261 tissue samples. Parvovirus DNA was most frequently detected in mesenteric lymph node, polyomavirus DNA in spleen, and adenovirus DNA in multiple tissues (spleen, retropharyngeal and mesenteric lymph node, lung, and liver). This study describes the virome in tissues of a threatened species and shows that stranded SSO are frequently infected with multiple viruses, warranting future research to investigate associations between these infections and observed lesions.

  17. Achieving high mass-throughput of therapeutic proteins through parvovirus retentive filters.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Glen R; Basha, Jonida; Lacasse, Daniel P

    2010-01-01

    Parvovirus retentive filters that assure removal of viruses and virus-like particles during the production of therapeutic proteins significantly contribute to total manufacturing costs. Operational approaches that can increase throughput and reduce filtration area would result in a significant cost savings. A combination of methods was used to achieve high throughputs of an antibody or therapeutic protein solution through three parvovirus retentive filters. These methods included evaluation of diatomaceous earth or size-based prefilters, the addition of additives, and the optimization of protein concentration, temperature, buffer composition, and solution pH. An optimum temperature of 35°C was found for maximizing throughput through the Virosart CPV and Viresolve Pro filters. Mass-throughput values of 7.3, 26.4, and 76.2 kg/m(2) were achieved through the Asahi Planova 20N, Virosart CPV, and Viresolve Pro filters, respectively, in 4 h of processing. Mass-throughput values of 73, 137, and 192 kg/m(2) were achieved through a Millipore Viresolve Pro filter in 4.0, 8.8, and 22.1 h of processing, respectively, during a single experiment. However, large-scale parvovirus filtration operations are typically controlled to limit volumetric throughput to below the level achieved during small-scale virus spiking experiments. The virus spike may cause significant filter plugging, limiting throughput. Therefore newer parvovirus filter spiking strategies should be adopted that may lead to more representative viral clearance data and higher utilization of large-scale filter capacity.

  18. Expression of goose parvovirus whole VP3 protein and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Tarasiuk, K; Woźniakowski, G; Holec-Gąsior, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was the expression of goose parvovirus capsid protein (VP3) and its epitopes in Escherichia coli cells. Expression of the whole VP3 protein provided an insufficient amount of protein. In contrast, the expression of two VP3 epitopes (VP3ep4, VP3ep6) in E. coli, resulted in very high expression levels. This may suggest that smaller parts of the GPV antigenic determinants are more efficiently expressed than the complete VP3 gene.

  19. Human parvovirus 4 in nasal and fecal specimens from children, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Reber, Ulrike; Muth, Doreen; Herzog, Petra; Annan, Augustina; Ebach, Fabian; Sarpong, Nimarko; Acquah, Samuel; Adlkofer, Julia; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Panning, Marcus; Tannich, Egbert; May, Jürgen; Drosten, Christian; Eis-Hübinger, Anna Maria

    2012-10-01

    Nonparenteral transmission might contribute to human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PARV4 DNA was detected in 8 (0.83%) of 961 nasal samples and 5 (0.53%) of 943 fecal samples from 1,904 children in Ghana. Virus concentrations ≤ 6-7 log(10) copies/mL suggest respiratory or fecal-oral modes of PARV4 transmission.

  20. A rapid method for establishment of a reverse genetics system for canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongle; Su, Jun; Wang, Jigui; Xi, Ji; Mao, Yaping; Hou, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Liu, Weiquan

    2017-08-14

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is an important and highly prevalent pathogen of dogs that causes acute hemorrhagic enteritis disease. Here, we describe a rapid method for the construction and characterization of a full-length infectious clone (rCPV) of CPV. Feline kidney (F81) cells were transfected with rCPV incorporating an engineered EcoR I site that served as a genetic marker. The rescued virus was indistinguishable from that of wild-type virus in its biological properties.

  1. Human Parvovirus 4 in Nasal and Fecal Specimens from Children, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Reber, Ulrike; Muth, Doreen; Herzog, Petra; Annan, Augustina; Ebach, Fabian; Sarpong, Nimarko; Acquah, Samuel; Adlkofer, Julia; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Panning, Marcus; Tannich, Egbert; May, Jürgen; Drosten, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Nonparenteral transmission might contribute to human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) infections in sub-Saharan Africa. PARV4 DNA was detected in 8 (0.83%) of 961 nasal samples and 5 (0.53%) of 943 fecal samples from 1,904 children in Ghana. Virus concentrations ≤6–7 log10 copies/mL suggest respiratory or fecal–oral modes of PARV4 transmission. PMID:23018024

  2. Identification of Multiple Novel Viruses, Including a Parvovirus and a Hepevirus, in Feces of Red Foxes

    PubMed Central

    van der Giessen, Joke; Haagmans, Bart L.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Smits, Saskia L.

    2013-01-01

    Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) are the most widespread members of the order of Carnivora. Since they often live in (peri)urban areas, they are a potential reservoir of viruses that transmit from wildlife to humans or domestic animals. Here we evaluated the fecal viral microbiome of 13 red foxes by random PCR in combination with next-generation sequencing. Various novel viruses, including a parvovirus, bocavirus, adeno-associated virus, hepevirus, astroviruses, and picobirnaviruses, were identified. PMID:23616657

  3. B19 parvovirus infection in children with malignant solid tumors receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, S P; Miller, S T; Cohen, B J

    1994-01-01

    Two children with rhabdomyosarcoma developed severe anemia following chemotherapy; anemia was more severe compared to that observed following earlier chemotherapy cycles. While one patient had a brisk reticulocytosis, the other had no demonstrable reticulocytes. Both patients had evidence of acute B19 parovirus infection and subsequently developed appropriate antibody response. A diagnosis of B19 parvovirus infection should be considered in any patient who develops persistent or severe anemia while on chemotherapy.

  4. Antiviral activity of a novel composition of peracetic acid disinfectant on parvoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Dagher, Fadi; Jiang, Jun; Tijssen, Peter; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2017-01-01

    Porcine parvoviruses (PPV) are known to be particularly resistant to many disinfectants used to control other non-enveloped viruses. However, effective disinfectants used against PPV are harsh and corrosive to animal health facilities and the environment. We propose a noncorrosive “green” disinfectant that generates peracetic acid in-situ and is capable of inactivating PPV completely at a 1% concentration for a 10-minute contact time. PMID:28154460

  5. Antiviral activity of a novel composition of peracetic acid disinfectant on parvoviruses.

    PubMed

    Dagher, Fadi; Jiang, Jun; Tijssen, Peter; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2017-01-01

    Porcine parvoviruses (PPV) are known to be particularly resistant to many disinfectants used to control other non-enveloped viruses. However, effective disinfectants used against PPV are harsh and corrosive to animal health facilities and the environment. We propose a noncorrosive "green" disinfectant that generates peracetic acid in-situ and is capable of inactivating PPV completely at a 1% concentration for a 10-minute contact time.

  6. Cerebellar hypoplasia in three sibling cats after intrauterine or early postnatal parvovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Aeffner, F; Ulrich, R; Schulze-Rückamp, L; Beineke, A

    2006-11-01

    The present report describes the case of an intrauterine or early postnatal parvovirus infection with subsequent cerebellar hypoplasia in three kittens from the same litter. Clinical examination of affected cats revealed neurologic signs indicative of cerebellar ataxia. Due to poor prognosis, animals were euthanised and submitted for necropsy. Post mortem examination demonstrated variable degrees of cerebellar hypoplasia. Histologically, brain lesions were characterised by segmental loss of the external and internal granular layer and decreased numbers of Purkinje cells. Reactive proliferation of astrocytes in the central nervous system was verified by the detection of GFAP-expressing glial cells in affected areas using immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, parvovirus antigen was detected immunohistochemically in neuronal cells of the cerebellum, but not in other parts of the brain and spinal cord or non-neuronal tissues. The present report demonstrates the usefulness of post mortem examination and detection of viral antigen by immunohistochemistry for the discrimination of neurologic disorders in feline species. Neurologic deficiencies due to cerebellar hypoplasia caused by in utero or perinatal feline parvovirus infection should be taken into consideration as differential diagnoses for ataxia in neonatal and juvenile cats.

  7. Association of parvovirus B19 infection and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in children.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Hartwig W; Lutterbüse, Nicola; Plentz, Annelie; Akkurt, Ilker; Albers, Norbert; Hauffa, Berthold P; Hiort, Olaf; Schoenau, Eckhard; Modrow, Susanne

    2008-09-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a common autoimmune disorder of the thyroid gland. It has been linked to infections with hepatitis C, EBV, HTLV-1, and Yersinia enterocolitica. As parvovirus B19 has been associated with a wide spectrum of autoimmune diseases, we investigated the potential role of B19 infection in inducing Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Serum samples derived from 73 children and adolescents with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and from 73 age-matched controls were included in the study. The mean age of disease manifestation was 10 y 7 mo. All samples were analyzed for the presence of viral DNA and for antibodies against VP1, VP2, and NS1 proteins. VP1- and VP2-specific antibodies were present in 38 patients (52%) and 43 controls (59%; N.S.). NS1-specific antibodies were detectable in 23 patients (32%) and 19 controls (26%; N.S.). Parvovirus B19 DNA was detectable in 9 patients (12%) and 2 controls (3%; p < 0.03), indicating recent B19-infection. A negative correlation between disease duration and the detection of viral DNA was seen. The mean disease duration in B19-DNA-positive patients was 6 mo, compared to 29 mo in the remainder (p < 0.01). There is strong evidence that acute parvovirus B19 infections are involved in the pathogenesis of some cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  8. Chicken parvovirus-induced runting-stunting syndrome in young broilers.

    PubMed

    Zsak, Laszlo; Cha, Ra Mi; Day, J Michael

    2013-03-01

    Previously we identified a novel parvovirus from enteric contents of chickens that were affected by enteric diseases. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the chicken parvovirus (ChPV) represented a new member in the Parvoviridae family. Here, we describe some of the pathogenic characteristics of ChPV in young broilers. Following experimental infection, 2-day-old broiler chickens showed characteristic signs of enteric disease. Runting-stunting syndrome (RSS) was observed in four of five experimental groups with significant growth retardation between 7 and 28 days postinoculation (DPI). Viral growth in small intestine and shedding was detected at early times postinoculation, which was followed by viremia and generalization of infection. ChPV could be detected in most of the major tissues for 3 to 4 wk postinoculation. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed parvovirus-positive cells in the duodenum of inoculated birds at 7 and 14 DPI. Our data indicate that ChPV alone induces RSS in broilers and is important determinant in the complex etiology of enteric diseases of poultry.

  9. A novel approach to achieving modular retrovirus clearance for a parvovirus filter.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Juliana; Strauss, Daniel; Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Gao, Jinxin; Luo, Wen; Quertinmont, Michelle; O'Donnell, Sean; Chen, Dayue

    2014-01-01

    Viral filtration is routinely incorporated into the downstream purification processes for the production of biologics produced in mammalian cell cultures (MCC) to remove potential viral contaminants. In recent years, the use of retentive filters designed for retaining parvovirus (~20 nm) has become an industry standard in a conscious effort to further improve product safety. Since retentive filters remove viruses primarily by the size exclusion mechanism, it is expected that filters designed for parvovirus removal can effectively clear larger viruses such as retroviruses (~100 nm). In an attempt to reduce the number of viral clearance studies, we have taken a novel approach to demonstrate the feasibility of claiming modular retrovirus clearance for Asahi Planova 20N filters. Porcine parvovirus (PPV) and xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMuLV) were co-spiked into six different feedstreams and then subjected to laboratory scale Planova 20N filtration. Our results indicate that Planova 20N filters consistently retain retroviruses and no retrovirus has ever been detected in the filtrates even when significant PPV breakthrough is observed. Based on the data from multiple in-house viral validation studies and the results from the co-spiking experiments, we have successfully claimed a modular retrovirus clearance of greater than 6 log10 reduction factors (LRF) to support clinical trial applications in both USA and Europe.

  10. Generation of an adenovirus-parvovirus chimera with enhanced oncolytic potential.

    PubMed

    El-Andaloussi, Nazim; Bonifati, Serena; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Mailly, Laurent; Daeffler, Laurent; Deryckère, François; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Rommelaere, Jean; Marchini, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    In this study, our goal was to generate a chimeric adenovirus-parvovirus (Ad-PV) vector that combines the high-titer and efficient gene transfer of adenovirus with the anticancer potential of rodent parvovirus. To this end, the entire oncolytic PV genome was inserted into a replication-defective E1- and E3-deleted Ad5 vector genome. As we found that parvoviral NS expression inhibited Ad-PV chimera production, we engineered the parvoviral P4 early promoter, which governs NS expression, by inserting into its sequence tetracycline operator elements. As a result of these modifications, P4-driven expression was blocked in the packaging T-REx-293 cells, which constitutively express the tetracycline repressor, allowing high-yield chimera production. The chimera effectively delivered the PV genome into cancer cells, from which fully infectious replication-competent parvovirus particles were generated. Remarkably, the Ad-PV chimera exerted stronger cytotoxic activities against various cancer cell lines, compared with the PV and Ad parental viruses, while being still innocuous to a panel of tested healthy primary human cells. This Ad-PV chimera represents a novel versatile anticancer agent which can be subjected to further genetic manipulations in order to reinforce its enhanced oncolytic capacity through arming with transgenes or retargeting into tumor cells.

  11. Generation of an Adenovirus-Parvovirus Chimera with Enhanced Oncolytic Potential

    PubMed Central

    El-Andaloussi, Nazim; Bonifati, Serena; Kaufmann, Johanna K.; Mailly, Laurent; Daeffler, Laurent; Deryckère, François; Nettelbeck, Dirk M.; Rommelaere, Jean

    2012-01-01

    In this study, our goal was to generate a chimeric adenovirus-parvovirus (Ad-PV) vector that combines the high-titer and efficient gene transfer of adenovirus with the anticancer potential of rodent parvovirus. To this end, the entire oncolytic PV genome was inserted into a replication-defective E1- and E3-deleted Ad5 vector genome. As we found that parvoviral NS expression inhibited Ad-PV chimera production, we engineered the parvoviral P4 early promoter, which governs NS expression, by inserting into its sequence tetracycline operator elements. As a result of these modifications, P4-driven expression was blocked in the packaging T-REx-293 cells, which constitutively express the tetracycline repressor, allowing high-yield chimera production. The chimera effectively delivered the PV genome into cancer cells, from which fully infectious replication-competent parvovirus particles were generated. Remarkably, the Ad-PV chimera exerted stronger cytotoxic activities against various cancer cell lines, compared with the PV and Ad parental viruses, while being still innocuous to a panel of tested healthy primary human cells. This Ad-PV chimera represents a novel versatile anticancer agent which can be subjected to further genetic manipulations in order to reinforce its enhanced oncolytic capacity through arming with transgenes or retargeting into tumor cells. PMID:22787235

  12. Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring during Labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... of monitoring? • How is auscultation performed? • How is electronic fetal monitoring performed? • How is external monitoring performed? • ... method of periodically listening to the fetal heartbeat. Electronic fetal monitoring is a procedure in which instruments ...

  13. Is fetal analgesia necessary during prenatal surgery?

    PubMed

    Bellieni, C V; Vannuccini, S; Petraglia, F

    2017-03-24

    Fetal anesthesia is still matter of debate: some authors hypothesize that several intrauterine endogenous neuroinhibitors (ENIn) anesthetize the fetus, keeping it in a constant state of sleep, and making pharmacological fetal anaesthesia useless for fetal surgery.

  14. Assessment of fetal heart disorder by means of fetal magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łozińska, Maria; Dunajski, Zbigniew

    2006-10-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography is new method for investigations of electrical activity of the fetal heart. The idea and build of system for magnetic signal registration is described. Two cases of premature atrial contraction and complete AV block diagnosis by means of magnetic field recording system are described.

  15. Fetal breathing movements: antepartum monitoring of fetal condition.

    PubMed

    Manning, F A; Platt, L D

    1979-08-01

    Until recently, the relative inaccessibility of the human fetus to physical assessment has made antepartum assessment of its condition difficult. The development of methods for accurate antepartum fetal heart rate monitoring and the subsequent study of heart rate responses to various stimuli have resulted in a significant improvement in accuracy of antepartum fetal surveillance. The development of real time B-mode ultrasound enables the clinician to assess many additional fetal biophysical variables including fetal breathing movements. In our observations, the combination of heart rate and fetal breathing assessment has produced a significant improvement in differentiating the normal from the compromised fetus. The addition of other biophysical variables (tone, movements and amniotic fluid volume) have further refined the ability to identify the fetus at risk. At this point, we have evaluated only a few of many possible variables. It seems probable that, as other fetal biophysical variables are included with the overall assessment, for example fetal reflexes or fetal biophysical response to exogenous stimuli, the identification of the fetus at risk and the quantitation of the magnitude of risk will become increasingly more precise.

  16. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects in Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pancratz, Diane R.

    This literature review defines Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) and considers their causes, diagnoses, prevalence, and educational ramifications. Effects of alcohol during each of the trimesters of pregnancy are summarized. Specific diagnostic characteristics of FAS are listed: (1) growth deficiency, (2) a…

  17. A Novel Tool for Specific Detection and Quantification of Chicken/Turkey Parvoviruses To Trace Poultry Fecal Contamination in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Carratalà, Anna; Rusinol, Marta; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Biarnes, Mar; Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Kern, Anita; Suñen, Ester; Bofill-Mas, Sílvia

    2012-01-01

    Poultry farming may introduce pathogens into the environment and food chains. High concentrations of chicken/turkey parvoviruses were detected in chicken stools and slaughterhouse and downstream urban wastewaters by applying new PCR-based specific detection and quantification techniques. Our results confirm that chicken/turkey parvoviruses may be useful viral indicators of poultry fecal contamination. PMID:22904047

  18. Experimental reproduction of beak atrophy and dwarfism syndrome by infection in cherry valley ducklings with a novel goose parvovirus-related parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Dou, Yanguo; Tang, Yi; Zheng, Xiaoqiang; Niu, Xiaoyu; Yang, Jing; Yu, Xianglong; Diao, Youxiang

    2016-02-01

    Infection of clinically susceptible ducks, including cherry valley and Muscovy ducks, with a novel goose parvovirus (GPV)-related virus (N-GPV) can result in beak atrophy and dwarfism syndrome (BADS). To obtain new insights into the host range and pathogenic potential of this novel waterfowl parvovirus, cherry valley ducklings (n=20) were experimentally infected with N-GPV strain SDLC01. An equal number of ducklings served as uninfected controls. The appearance of clinical signs, histopathological changes, viral shedding, and seroconversion was monitored for 20 days post-infection. Infection status of all ducks was monitored using indirect ELISA, virus neutralization test, nested PCR, clinical indicators, and microscopic examination. Three ducks developed the typical clinical, gross, and histological changes of BADS. By study day 6, the infected ducks had seroconverted to N-GPV. The antibodies raised were neutralizing against the SDLC01 strain in vitro. Here we successfully developed an experimental infection model for studying the pathogenicity and role of N-GPV in BADS.

  19. Isolation and Genomic Characterization of a Duck-Origin GPV-Related Parvovirus from Cherry Valley Ducklings in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Dou, Yanguo; Tang, Yi; Zhang, Zhenjie; Zheng, Xiaoqiang; Niu, Xiaoyu; Yang, Jing; Yu, Xianglong; Diao, Youxiang

    2015-01-01

    A newly emerged duck parvovirus, which causes beak atrophy and dwarfism syndrome (BADS) in Cherry Valley ducks, has appeared in Northern China since March 2015. To explore the genetic diversity among waterfowl parvovirus isolates, the complete genome of an identified isolate designated SDLC01 was sequenced and analyzed in the present study. Genomic sequence analysis showed that SDLC01 shared 90.8%-94.6% of nucleotide identity with goose parvovirus (GPV) isolates and 78.6%-81.6% of nucleotide identity with classical Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of 443 nucleotides (nt) of the fragment A showed that SDLC01 was highly similar to a mule duck isolate (strain D146/02) and close to European GPV isolates but separate from Asian GPV isolates. Analysis of the left inverted terminal repeat regions revealed that SDLC01 had two major segments deleted between positions 160-176 and 306-322 nt compared with field GPV and MDPV isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of Rep and VP1 encoded by two major open reading frames of parvoviruses revealed that SDLC01 was distinct from all GPV and MDPV isolates. The viral pathogenicity and genome characterization of SDLC01 suggest that the novel GPV (N-GPV) is the causative agent of BADS and belongs to a distinct GPV-related subgroup. Furthermore, N-GPV sequences were detected in diseased ducks by polymerase chain reaction and viral proliferation was demonstrated in duck embryos and duck embryo fibroblast cells.

  20. Isolation and Genomic Characterization of a Duck-Origin GPV-Related Parvovirus from Cherry Valley Ducklings in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Dou, Yanguo; Tang, Yi; Zhang, Zhenjie; Zheng, Xiaoqiang; Niu, Xiaoyu; Yang, Jing; Yu, Xianglong; Diao, Youxiang

    2015-01-01

    A newly emerged duck parvovirus, which causes beak atrophy and dwarfism syndrome (BADS) in Cherry Valley ducks, has appeared in Northern China since March 2015. To explore the genetic diversity among waterfowl parvovirus isolates, the complete genome of an identified isolate designated SDLC01 was sequenced and analyzed in the present study. Genomic sequence analysis showed that SDLC01 shared 90.8%–94.6% of nucleotide identity with goose parvovirus (GPV) isolates and 78.6%–81.6% of nucleotide identity with classical Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of 443 nucleotides (nt) of the fragment A showed that SDLC01 was highly similar to a mule duck isolate (strain D146/02) and close to European GPV isolates but separate from Asian GPV isolates. Analysis of the left inverted terminal repeat regions revealed that SDLC01 had two major segments deleted between positions 160–176 and 306–322 nt compared with field GPV and MDPV isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of Rep and VP1 encoded by two major open reading frames of parvoviruses revealed that SDLC01 was distinct from all GPV and MDPV isolates. The viral pathogenicity and genome characterization of SDLC01 suggest that the novel GPV (N-GPV) is the causative agent of BADS and belongs to a distinct GPV-related subgroup. Furthermore, N-GPV sequences were detected in diseased ducks by polymerase chain reaction and viral proliferation was demonstrated in duck embryos and duck embryo fibroblast cells. PMID:26465143

  1. Self-assembled B19 parvovirus capsids, produced in a baculovirus system, are antigenically and immunogenically similar to native virions.

    PubMed Central

    Kajigaya, S; Fujii, H; Field, A; Anderson, S; Rosenfeld, S; Anderson, L J; Shimada, T; Young, N S

    1991-01-01

    B19 parvovirus is pathogenic in humans, causing fifth disease, transient aplastic crisis, some cases of hydrops fetalis, and acquired pure red cell aplasia. Efforts to develop serologic assays and vaccine development have been hampered by the virus's extreme tropism for human bone marrow and the absence of a convenient culture system. We constructed recombinants containing either the major (VP2) or minor (VP1) structural proteins of B19 in a baculovirus-based plasmid, from which the polyhedrin gene had been deleted; these recombinant plasmids were used to generate recombinant infectious baculovirus. Subsequent infection of insect cells in vitro resulted in high-level expression of either B19VP1 or VP2. Parvovirus capsids were obtained by self-assembly in cell cultures coinfected with either VP1- and VP2-containing baculoviruses or, surprisingly, VP2-containing baculoviruses alone. Empty B19 capsids composed of VP1 and VP2 could replace serum virus as a source of antigen in a conventional immunoassay for detection of either IgG or IgM antiparvovirus antibodies in human serum. Immunization of rabbits with capsids composed of VP1 and VP2 resulted in production of antisera that recognized serum parvovirus on immunoblot and neutralized parvovirus infectivity for human erythroid progenitor cells. Baculovirus-derived parvovirus antigen can substitute for scarce viral antigen in immunoassays and should be suitable as a human vaccine. Images PMID:1711206

  2. Fetal Antecedents of Infant Temperament.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined fetal heart rate and movement in 31 healthy fetuses from 20 weeks through birth and at age 6 months. Found that more active fetuses were more difficult, unpredictable, unadaptable, and active as infants that were less active fetuses, and that higher fetal heart rate was associated with lower emotional tone, activity level, and…

  3. Prenatal Depression Restricts Fetal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia; Gonzalez-Quintero, Victor Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify whether prenatal depression is a risk factor for fetal growth restriction. Methods Midgestation (18-20 weeks GA) estimated fetal weight and urine cortisol and birth weight and gestational age at birth data were collected on a sample of 40 depressed and 40 non-depressed women. Estimated fetal weight and birthweight data were then used to compute fetal growth rates. Results Depressed women had a 13% greater incidence of premature delivery (Odds Ratio (OR) = 2.61) and 15% greater incidence of low birthweight (OR = 4.75) than non-depressed women. Depressed women also had elevated prenatal cortisol levels (p = .006) and fetuses who were smaller (p = .001) and who showed slower fetal growth rates (p = .011) and lower birthweights (p = .008). Mediation analyses further revealed that prenatal maternal cortisol levels were a potential mediator for the relationship between maternal symptoms of depression and both gestational age at birth and the rate of fetal growth. After controlling for maternal demographic variables, prenatal maternal cortisol levels were associated with 30% of the variance in gestational age at birth and 14% of the variance in the rate of fetal growth. Conclusion Prenatal depression was associated with adverse perinatal outcomes, including premature delivery and slower fetal growth rates. Prenatal maternal cortisol levels appear to play a role in mediating these outcomes. PMID:18723301

  4. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  5. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  6. Feto-fetal transfusion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galea, P; Scott, J M; Goel, K M

    1982-01-01

    Out of 42 pairs of liveborn monochorial twins there were 32 pairs with vascular anastomoses. Of these, 11 pairs had feto-fetal transfusion syndrome. There were another 8 pairs of stillborn twin fetuses with vascular communications and in these chronic feto-fetal transfusion syndrome might have resulted in intrauterine death. PMID:6890328

  7. High prevelance of human parvovirus infection in patients with malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    LI, YASHA; DONG, YANMING; JIANG, JUN; YANG, YONGBO; LIU, KAIYU; LI, YI

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that the immunity of patients with malignant tumors decreases significantly. An increased parvovirus B19 (B19) infection rate has been observed in immunocompromised hosts. However, only a small amount of literature regarding the risk of human parvovirus infection in patients with malignant tumors is available. To evaluate the correlation of human parvovirus infection with malignant tumors, 288 serum samples from patients with malignant tumors were screened for B19 DNA by nested-PCR. The serum samples, 156 of which were from known clinicopathological cancer patients, were subjected to analysis of the seropositive rate of human bocavirus (HBoV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and transfusion transmitted virus (TTV) by PCR. A total of 800 normal population sera and 941 aspirate samples from children with respiratory tract infections were used as controls for the detection of B19 and HBoV, respectively. Pairwise comparison between cancerous serum and control samples, and the correlation between parvovirus infection and clinicopathological variables, including gender and cancer type, were evaluated using the χ2 test, Fisher’s exact test or the t-test. P<0.05 was considered to indicate a statistically significant difference. The overall prevalence of B19 DNA in cancer patients was 50.69% (146/288), which was significantly higher than that of the healthy controls with 4.5% (36/800) (χ2 test, P<0.0001). Similar results were obtained for HBoV with a 39.74% (62/156) prevalence in cancer patients. However, the infection prevalence of HBV and TTV in the cancer patients was 5.13 (8/156) and 6.41% (10/156), respectively (P<0.0001), which was much less than that of B19 and HBoV. These results revealed that a high risk of B19 and HBoV infection occurred in cancer patients, and a potential correlation exists between parvovirus infection and occurrence of malignant tumors. PMID:22740966

  8. Parvovirus Capsid Structures Required for Infection: Mutations Controlling Receptor Recognition and Protease Cleavages.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Heather M; Feng, Kurtis H; Lee, Donald W; Allison, Andrew B; Pinard, Melissa; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Hafenstein, Susan; Parrish, Colin R

    2017-01-15

    Parvovirus capsids are small but complex molecular machines responsible for undertaking many of the steps of cell infection, genome packing, and cell-to-cell as well as host-to-host transfer. The details of parvovirus infection of cells are still not fully understood, but the processes must involve small changes in the capsid structure that allow the endocytosed virus to escape from the endosome, pass through the cell cytoplasm, and deliver the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) genome to the nucleus, where viral replication occurs. Here, we examine capsid substitutions that eliminate canine parvovirus (CPV) infectivity and identify how those mutations changed the capsid structure or altered interactions with the infectious pathway. Amino acid substitutions on the exterior surface of the capsid (Gly299Lys/Ala300Lys) altered the binding of the capsid to transferrin receptor type 1 (TfR), particularly during virus dissociation from the receptor, but still allowed efficient entry into both feline and canine cells without successful infection. These substitutions likely control specific capsid structural changes resulting from TfR binding required for infection. A second set of changes on the interior surface of the capsid reduced viral infectivity by >100-fold and included two cysteine residues and neighboring residues. One of these substitutions, Cys270Ser, modulates a VP2 cleavage event found in ∼10% of the capsid proteins that also was shown to alter capsid stability. A neighboring substitution, Pro272Lys, significantly reduced capsid assembly, while a Cys273Ser change appeared to alter capsid transport from the nucleus. These mutants reveal additional structural details that explain cell infection processes of parvovirus capsids. Parvoviruses are commonly found in both vertebrate and invertebrate animals and cause widespread disease. They are also being developed as oncolytic therapeutics and as gene therapy vectors. Most functions involved in infection or transduction

  9. Impact of fetal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, John M

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease is now well established for a wide range of cardiac anomalies. Diagnosis of congenital heart disease during fetal life not only identifies the cardiac lesion but may also lead to detection of associated abnormalities. This information allows a detailed discussion of the prognosis with parents. For continuing pregnancies, appropriate preparation can be made to optimize the postnatal outcome. Reduced morbidity and mortality, following antenatal diagnosis, has been reported for coarctation of the aorta, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and transposition of the great arteries. With regard to screening policy, most affected fetuses are in the “low risk” population, emphasizing the importance of appropriate training for those who undertake such obstetric anomaly scans. As a minimum, the four chamber view of the fetal heart should be incorporated into midtrimester anomaly scans, and where feasible, views of the outflow tracts should also be included, to increase the diagnostic yield. Newer screening techniques, such as measurement of nuchal translucency, may contribute to identification of fetuses at high risk for congenital heart disease and prompt referral for detailed cardiac assessment. PMID:20300268

  10. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Dörrie, Nora; Föcker, Manuel; Freunscht, Inga; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is one of the most prevalent and modifiable risk factors for somatic, behavioral, and neurological abnormalities. Affected individuals exhibit a wide range of such features referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). These are characterized by a more or less specific pattern of minor facial dysmorphic features, growth deficiency and central nervous system symptoms. Nevertheless, whereas the diagnosis of the full-blown fetal alcohol syndrome does not pose a major challenge, only a tentative diagnosis of FASD can be reached if only mild features are present and/or maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy cannot be verified. The respective disorders have lifelong implications. The teratogenic mechanisms induced by PAE can lead to various additional somatic findings and structural abnormalities of cerebrum and cerebellum. At the functional level, cognition, motor coordination, attention, language development, executive functions, memory, social perception and emotion processing are impaired to a variable extent. The long-term development is characterized by disruption and failure in many domains; an age-adequate independency is frequently not achieved. In addition to primary prevention, individual therapeutic interventions and tertiary prevention are warranted; provision of extensive education to affected subjects and their caregivers is crucial. Protective environments are often required to prevent negative consequences such as delinquency, indebtedness or experience of physical/sexual abuse.

  11. A history of fetal surgery.

    PubMed

    Jancelewicz, Tim; Harrison, Michael R

    2009-06-01

    Over the past 3 decades, fetal surgery for congenital disease has evolved from merely a fanciful concept to a medical field in its own right. Techniques for open hysterotomy, minimal-access hysteroscopy, and image-guided percutaneous fetal access have become well established, first in animal models and subsequently in humans. At the same time, major advances in fetal imaging and diagnosis, anesthesia, and tocolysis have allowed fetal intervention to become a vital tool for subsets of patients who would otherwise endure significant morbidity and mortality. This article offers a concise overview of the history of fetal surgery, from its tumultuous early days to its current status as an important means for the early treatment of potentially devastating congenital anomalies.

  12. [Fetal audition. Myth or reality].

    PubMed

    Chelli, D; Chanoufi, B

    2008-10-01

    Fetal sensory abilities have been considered for a long time as a philosophical question. The aim of this review is to investigate the scientifically proven knowledge about fetal audition. Fetal audition seems to depend on gestational age and sound characteristics. The onset of human fetal hearing is observed at about 26-28 weeks gestational age. Noises from the placenta, the maternal organs and the maternal voice play a major role as current in utero auditory stimuli. Many studies demonstrate that the fetus forms memories of his hearing experiences allowing some authors to use the term "fetal learning". The fetus can memorize not only his mother's voice but also more complex acoustic external sounds with a big ability of discrimination. Moreover, most studies strengthen the hypothesis of an implicit musical ability of the human brain.

  13. Fetal and Maternal Outcomes in Pregnancies Complicated with Fetal Macrosomia

    PubMed Central

    Alsammani, Mohamed Alkahatim; Ahmed, Salah Roshdy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fetal macrosomia remains a considerable challenge in current obstetrics due to the fetal and maternal complications associated with this condition. Aim: This study was designed to determine the prevalence of fetal macrosomia and associated fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality in the Al Qassim Region of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This register-based study was conducted from January 1, 2011 through December 30, 2011 at the Maternity and Child Hospital, Qassim, Saudi Arabia. Macrosomia was defined as birth weight of 4 kg or greater. Malformed babies and those born dead were excluded. Results: The total number of babies delivered was 9241; of these, 418 were macrosomic. Thus, the prevalence of fetal macrosomia was 4.5%. The most common maternal complications were postpartum hemorrhage (5 cases, 1.2%), perineal tear (7 cases, 1.7%), cervical lacerations (3 cases, 0.7%), and shoulder dystocia (40 cases, 9.6%) that resulted in 4 cases of Erb's palsy (0.96%), and 6 cases of bone fractures (1.4%). The rate of cesarean section among women delivering macrosomic babies was 47.6% (199), while 52.4% (219) delivered vaginally. Conclusion: Despite extensive efforts to reduce fetal and maternal complications associated with macrosomia, considerable fetal and maternal morbidity remain associated with this condition. PMID:22754881

  14. Fetal acoustic stimulation test for early intrapartum fetal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Goonewardene, M; Hanwellage, K

    2011-03-01

    The fetal acoustic stimulation test (FAST) is a simple cost effective screening test for antenatal fetal monitoring. The aim of the study was to evaluate the FAST as a screening test for early intrapartum fetal well being. An initial non stress test (NST) followed by a FAST using corometric model 146 was carried out in 486 participants in early labour with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies and > 32 weeks gestation. A repeat NST was recorded in the participants who had an initial non reactive NST. The results of the NST and FAST were compared with fetal outcome. Maternal perception of fetal movements after FAST, results of NST before and after FAST, and the babies' 5 minute APGAR scores were measured. Of the 486 participants 413 (85%) noticed fetal movements after FAST. Initial NST was non reactive in 203 (42%) but 149 (31%) became reactive after FAST. Compared to the NST, FAST had a better sensitivity (97% vs 62%, p < 0.001), specificity (100% vs 87%, p = 0.017), positive predictive value (100% vs 98%, p = 0.024), negative predictive value (79% vs 17%, p < 0.001) and accuracy (99%vs 64%, p < 0.001) in predicting 5 minute APGAR < 7 in the baby. FAST is a reliable screening test for assessing fetal well being in early labour. It complements the NST and is better than the NST alone.

  15. [A new method in fetal heart electrophysiology - fetal magnetocardiography].

    PubMed

    Wacker-Gussmann, A; Lim, M; Henes, J; Preissl, H; Abele, H; Kiefer, I

    2011-06-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) is used as a non-invasive method for registering the electrophysiological fetal heart activity. Superconducting quantum interference device-based magnetometers are currently used to make fMCG recordings. In contrast to fetal ECG, this method is independent of signal loss due to isolating factors such as, especially, the vernix caesaroa between the 27th and 34th weeks of gestation. We report about a term newborn with a third degree AV block, examined by this method.

  16. Construction of an infectious genomic clone of porcine parvovirus: effect of the 5'-end on DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Casal, J I; Diaz-Aroca, E; Ranz, A I; Manclus, J J

    1990-08-01

    The linear single-stranded DNA genome of the porcine parvovirus, an autonomous parvovirus, was cloned in duplex form into the bacterial plasmid pUC18 using a simple and reliable method. These clones were stable during propagation in Escherichia coli JM109. The recombinant clones of porcine parvovirus were infectious when transfected into monolayers of swine testes cells as identified by the development of cytopathic effect, indirect immunofluorescence with specific antiserum, and hemagglutination assays. DNA isolated from progeny virus arising from transfected infectious clones was found to be indistinguishable from wild-type DNA by restriction enzyme analysis. Defective genomes could also be detected in the progeny DNA even though the infection was initiated with homogeneous, cloned DNA. The presence of the turn of the 5'-end loop seems to be necessary to get stable infectious clones.

  17. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of minute virus of mice and mouse parvovirus infections in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, K W; Chueh, L L; Wang, M H; Huang, Y T; Fang, B H; Chang, C Y; Fang, M C; Chou, J Y; Hsieh, S C; Wan, C H

    2013-04-01

    Mouse parvoviruses are among the most prevalent infectious pathogens in contemporary mouse colonies. To improve the efficiency of routine screening for mouse parvovirus infections, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the VP gene was developed. The assay detected minute virus of mice (MVM), mouse parvovirus (MPV) and a mouse housekeeping gene (α-actin) and was able to specifically detect MVM and MPV at levels as low as 50 copies. Co-infection with the two viruses with up to 200-fold differences in viral concentrations can easily be detected. The multiplex PCR assay developed here could be a useful tool for monitoring mouse health and the viral contamination of biological materials.

  18. Fetal cardiac scanning today.

    PubMed

    Allan, Lindsey

    2010-07-01

    The ability to examine the structure of the fetal heart in real-time started over 30 years ago now. The field has seen very great advances since then, both in terms of technical improvements in ultrasound equipment and in dissemination of operator skills. A great deal has been learnt about normal cardiac function in the human fetus throughout gestation and how it is affected by pathologies of pregnancy. There is increasing recognition of abnormal heart structure during routine obstetric scanning, allowing referral for specialist diagnosis and counselling. It is now possible to make accurate diagnosis of cardiac malformations as early as 12 weeks of gestation. Early diagnosis of a major cardiac malformation in the fetus can provide the parents with a comprehensive prognosis, enabling them to make the most informed choice about the management of the pregnancy.

  19. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jennifer D.; Warren, Kenneth R.; Hewitt, Brenda G.

    2010-01-01

    Forty years ago, alcohol was not commonly recognized as a teratogen, an agent that can disrupt the development of a fetus. Today, we understand that prenatal alcohol exposure induces a variety of adverse effects on physical, neurological, and behavioral development. Research supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) has contributed to the identification of the range and prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), as well as methods for prevention and treatment of FASD. The worldwide prevalence and high personal and societal costs of FASD speak to the importance of this research. This article briefly examines some of the ways that NIAAA has contributed to our understanding of FASD, the challenges that we still face, and how this research is translated into changes in public policy. PMID:23579942

  20. Fetal pain perception and pain management.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; Jani, Jacques; De Buck, Frederik; Deprest, J

    2006-08-01

    This paper gives an overview of current science related to the concept of fetal pain. We have answered three important questions: (1) does fetal pain exist? (2) does management of fetal pain benefit the unborn child? and (3) which techniques are available to provide good fetal analgesia?

  1. Comparison of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, DNA hybridization, hemagglutination, and electron microscopy for detection of canine parvovirus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, Y A; Mildbrand, M M; Carlson, J; Collins, J K; Winston, S

    1984-01-01

    Canine fecal samples were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) by using monoclonal antibodies to the canine parvovirus hemagglutinating protein. These data were compared with results obtained with DNA hybridization assays, hemagglutination assays, and electron microscopy. The highest correlation was observed between the ELISA and the hemagglutination tests, with 94.4% of samples showing agreement. Lower correlation was obtained between ELISA and DNA hybridization tests (73.3%). Correlation between ELISA and electron microscopy was 60.9%. The studies indicated that the ELISA can be used as a sensitive and specific diagnostic assay for canine parvovirus infections. Images PMID:6092425

  2. A False Positive Dengue Fever Rapid Diagnostic Test Result in a Case of Acute Parvovirus B19 Infection.

    PubMed

    Izumida, Toshihide; Sakata, Hidenao; Nakamura, Masahiko; Hayashibara, Yumiko; Inasaki, Noriko; Inahata, Ryo; Hasegawa, Sumiyo; Takizawa, Takenori; Kaya, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of dengue fever occurred in Japan in August 2014. We herein report the case of a 63-year-old man who presented with a persistent fever in September 2014. Acute parvovirus B19 infection led to a false positive finding of dengue fever on a rapid diagnostic test (Panbio Dengue Duo Cassette(TM)). To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of a false positive result for dengue IgM with the dengue rapid diagnostic test. We believe that epidemiological information on the prevalence of parvovirus B19 is useful for guiding the interpretation of a positive result with the dengue rapid diagnostic test.

  3. The Future of Fetal Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    J, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Fetal heart rate monitoring is the most common obstetric procedure, and yet it remains a frustrating technology, plagued by false-positive results and miscommunication between providers. A new generation of invasive and noninvasive monitoring technologies is under development and entering the clinic, including the STAN monitor (Neoventa Medical, Mölndal, Sweden), which improves monitoring accuracy by incorporating a proxy of the fetal ST-segment. New noninvasive fetal electrocardiography and uterine contraction monitoring technologies will bring novel metrics and potentially improved safety to obstetrics in coming years. PMID:23483429

  4. Fetal malposition: impact and management.

    PubMed

    Caughey, Aaron B; Sharshiner, Rita; Cheng, Yvonne W

    2015-06-01

    Fetal malposition, either occiput posterior or transverse (OT), leads to greater risk of cesarean delivery, prolonged labor, and increased perinatal morbidity. Historically, there is a known association between epidural use and malposition that was assumed to be due to the increased discomfort of laboring with a fetus in the occiput posterior position. However, evidence now suggests that the epidural itself may contribute to fetal malposition by impacting the probability of internal rotation. Fetal malposition may be impacted by manual rotation. Manual rotation has been associated with greater rates of delivering in the occiput anterior position and lower rates of cesarean delivery.

  5. Fetal MRI: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Sapna; Joshi, Priscilla; Kelkar, Abhimanyu; Seth, Nagesh

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary method for antenatal fetal evaluation. However, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now become a valuable adjunct to USG in confirming/excluding suspected abnormalities and in the detection of additional abnormalities, thus changing the outcome of pregnancy and optimizing perinatal management. With the development of ultrafast sequences, fetal MRI has made remarkable progress in recent times. In this pictorial essay, we illustrate a spectrum of structural abnormalities affecting the central nervous system, thorax, genitourinary and gastrointestinal tract, as well as miscellaneous anomalies. Anomalies in twin gestations and placental abnormalities have also been included. PMID:27081224

  6. Fetal and maternal analgesia/anesthesia for fetal procedures.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; De Buck, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    For many prenatally diagnosed conditions, treatment is possible before birth. These fetal procedures can range from minimal invasive punctions to full open fetal surgery. Providing anesthesia for these procedures is a challenge, where care has to be taken for both mother and fetus. There are specific physiologic changes that occur with pregnancy that have an impact on the anesthetic management of the mother. When providing maternal anesthesia, there is also an impact on the fetus, with concerns for potential negative side effects of the anesthetic regimen used. The question whether the fetus is capable of feeling pain is difficult to answer, but there are indications that nociceptive stimuli have a physiologic reaction. This nociceptive stimulation of the fetus also has the potential for longer-term effects, so there is a need for fetal analgesic treatment. The extent to which a fetus is influenced by the maternal anesthesia depends on the type of anesthesia, with different needs for extra fetal anesthesia or analgesia. When providing fetal anesthesia, the potential negative consequences have to be balanced against the intended benefits of blocking the physiologic fetal responses to nociceptive stimulation. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF) confers resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNA receptor-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kaowinn, Sirichat; Cho, Il-Rae; Moon, Jeong; Jun, Seung Won; Kim, Chang Seok; Kang, Ho Young; Kim, Manbok; Koh, Sang Seok; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2015-04-03

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma upregulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, plays a crucial role in the development of pancreatic cancer, including its metastasis and proliferation. Therefore, PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer cells could be important targets for oncolytic virus-mediated treatment. Panc-1 cells expressing PAUF (Panc-PAUF) showed relative resistance to parvovirus H-1 infection compared with Panc-1 cells expressing an empty vector (Panc-Vec). Of interest, expression of type I IFN-α receptor (IFNAR) was higher in Panc-PAUF cells than in Panc-Vec cells. Increased expression of IFNAR in turn increased the activation of Stat1 and Tyk2 in Panc-PAUF cells compared with that in Panc-Vec cells. Suppression of Tyk2 and Stat1, which are important downstream molecules for IFN-α signaling, sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. Further, constitutive suppression of PAUF sensitized Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells to parvovirus H-1 infection. Taken together, these results suggested that PAUF conferred resistance to pancreatic cancer cells against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection through IFNAR-mediated signaling. - Highlights: • PAUF confers resistance against oncolytic parvovirus H-1 infection. • PAUF enhances the expression of IFNAR in Panc-1 cells. • Increased activation of Tyk2 or Stat1 by PAUF provides resistance to parvovirus H-1-mediated apoptosis. • Constitutive inhibition of PAUF enhances parvovirus H-1-mediated oncolysis of Bxpc3 pancreatic cancer cells.

  8. Indices and Detectors for Fetal MCG Actography

    PubMed Central

    Lutter, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG) actography, a relatively new method of detecting fetal movement that can be performed in conjunction with fMCG assessment of fetal heart rate and rhythm. In this work, we formulate indices of fetal activity that incorporate information from all channels to achieve improved sensitivity. We also utilize statistical detection to provide an objective means of inferring significant fetal activity. PMID:21427015

  9. Indices and detectors for fetal MCG actography.

    PubMed

    Lutter, William J; Wakai, Ronald T

    2011-06-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG) actography, a relatively new method of detecting fetal movement that can be performed in conjunction with fMCG assessment of fetal heart rate and rhythm. In this study, we formulate indices of fetal activity that incorporate information from all channels to achieve improved sensitivity. We also utilize statistical detection to provide an objective means of inferring significant fetal activity.

  10. Fetal immune response to chorioamnionitis.

    PubMed

    Kallapur, Suhas G; Presicce, Pietro; Rueda, Cesar M; Jobe, Alan H; Chougnet, Claire A

    2014-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is a frequent cause of preterm birth and is associated with an increased risk for injury responses in the lung, gastrointestinal tract, brain, and other fetal organs. Chorioamnionitis is a polymicrobial nontraditional infectious disease because the organisms causing chorioamnionitis are generally of low virulence and colonize the amniotic fluid often for extended periods, and the host (mother and the fetus) does not have typical infection-related symptoms such as fever. In this review, we discuss the effects of chorioamnionitis in experimental animal models that mimic the human disease. Our focus is on the immune changes in multiple fetal organs and the pathogenesis of chorioamnionitis-induced injury in different fetal compartments. As chorioamnionitis disproportionately affects preterm infants, we discuss the relevant developmental context for the immune system. We also provide a clinical context for the fetal responses. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Passive Fetal Heart Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Mowrey, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A fetal heart monitoring system and method for detecting and processing acoustic fetal heart signals transmitted by different signal transmission modes. One signal transmission mode, the direct contact mode, occurs in a first frequency band when the fetus is in direct contact with the maternal abdominal wall. Another signal transmission mode, the fluid propagation mode, occurs in a second frequency band when the fetus is in a recessed position with no direct contact with the maternal abdominal wall. The second frequency band is relatively higher than the first frequency band. The fetal heart monitoring system and method detect and process acoustic fetal heart signals that are in the first frequency band and in the second frequency band.

  12. Difficult Decisions: Fetal Cell Transplants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Irwin L.; Parakh, Jal S.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, techniques used, and details of the issues involved in the controversial issue of fetal cell transplantation are discussed. Questions for use in class discussion are provided. Suggestions for beginning a discussion are provided with accompanying questions. (CW)

  13. Fetal immune response to chorioamnionitis

    PubMed Central

    Kallapur, Suhas G.; Presicce, Pietro; Rueda, Cesar M.; Jobe, Alan H.; Chougnet, Claire A.

    2014-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is a frequent cause of preterm birth and is associated with an increased risk for injury responses in the lung, GI tract, brain and other fetal organs. Chorioamnionitis is a polymicrobial non-traditional infectious disease because the organisms causing chorioamnionitis are generally of low virulence and colonize the amniotic fluid often for extended periods, and the host (mother and the fetus) does not have typical infection related symptoms such as fever. In this review, we discuss the effects of chorioamnionitis in experimental animal models that mimic the human disease. Our focus is on the immune changes in multiple fetal organs and the pathogenesis of chorioamnionitis induced injury in different fetal compartments. Since chorioamnionitis disproportionately affects preterm infants, we discuss the relevant developmental context for the immune system. We also provide a clinical context for the fetal responses. PMID:24390922

  14. Fetal programming of renal function.

    PubMed

    Dötsch, Jörg; Plank, Christian; Amann, Kerstin

    2012-04-01

    Results from large epidemiological studies suggest a clear relation between low birth weight and adverse renal outcome evident as early as during childhood. Such adverse outcomes may include glomerular disease, hypertension, and renal failure and contribute to a phenomenon called fetal programming. Other factors potentially leading to an adverse renal outcome following fetal programming are maternal diabetes mellitus, smoking, salt overload, and use of glucocorticoids during pregnancy. However, clinical data on the latter are scarce. Here, we discuss potential underlying mechanisms of fetal programming, including reduced nephron number via diminished nephrogenesis and other renal (e.g., via the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system) and non-renal (e.g., changes in endothelial function) alterations. It appears likely that the outcomes of fetal programming may be influenced or modified postnatally, for example, by the amount of nutrients given at critical times.

  15. Autonomous Parvoviruses neither Stimulate nor Are Inhibited by the Type I Interferon Response in Human Normal or Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paglino, Justin C.; Andres, Wells

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the genus Parvovirus are small, nonenveloped single-stranded DNA viruses that are nonpathogenic in humans but have potential utility as cancer therapeutics. Because the innate immune response to parvoviruses has received relatively little attention, we compared the response to parvoviruses to that of several other types of viruses in human cells. In normal human glia, fibroblasts, or melanocytes, vesicular stomatitis virus evoked robust beta interferon (IFN-β) responses. Cytomegalovirus, pseudorabies virus, and Sindbis virus all evoked a 2-log-unit or greater upregulation of IFN-β in glia; in contrast, LuIII and MVMp parvoviruses did not evoke a detectable IFN-β or interferon-stimulated gene (ISG; MX1, oligoadenylate synthetase [OAS], IFIT-1) response in the same cell types. The lack of response raised the question of whether parvoviral infection can be attenuated by IFN; interestingly, we found that IFN did not decrease parvovirus (MVMp, LuIII, and H-1) infectivity in normal human glia, fibroblasts, or melanocytes. The same was true in human cancers, including glioma, sarcoma, and melanoma. Similarly, IFN failed to attenuate transduction by the dependovirus vector adeno-associated virus type 2. Progeny production of parvoviruses was also unimpaired by IFN in both glioma and melanoma, whereas vesicular stomatitis virus replication was blocked. Sarcoma cells with upregulated IFN signaling that show high levels of resistance to other viruses showed strong infection by LuIII. Unlike many other oncolytic viruses, we found no evidence that impairment of innate immunity in cancer cells plays a role in the oncoselectivity of parvoviruses in human cells. Parvoviral resistance to the effects of IFN in cancer cells may constitute an advantage in the virotherapy of some tumors. IMPORTANCE Understanding the interactions between oncolytic viruses and the innate immune system will facilitate employing these viruses as therapeutic agents in cancer patients

  16. Genetic characterization of three novel chicken parvovirus strains based on analysis of their coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon-Sang; Lee, Hae-Rim; Jeon, Eun-Ok; Han, Moo-Sung; Min, Kyeong-Cheol; Lee, Seung-Baek; Bae, Yeon-Ji; Cho, Sun-Hyung; Mo, Jong-Suk; Kwon, Hyuk Moo; Sung, Haan Woo; Kim, Jong-Nyeo; Mo, In-Pil

    2015-01-01

    Chicken parvovirus (ChPV) is one of the causative agents of viral enteritis. Recently, the genome of the ABU-P1 strain of ChPV was fully sequenced and determined to have a distinct genomic composition compared with that of vertebrate parvoviruses. However, no comparative sequence analysis of coding regions of ChPVs was possible because of the lack of other sequence information. In this study, we obtained the nucleotide sequences of all genomic coding regions of three ChPVs by polymerase chain reaction using 13 primer sets, and deduced the amino acid sequences from the nucleotide sequences. The non-structural protein 1 (NS1) gene of the three ChPVs showed 95.0 to 95.5% nucleotide sequence identity and 96.5 to 98.1% amino acid sequence identity to those of NS1 from the ABU-P1 strain, respectively, and even higher nucleotide and amino acid similarities to one another. The viral proteins (VP) gene was more divergent between the three ChPV Korean strains and ABU-P1, with 88.1 to 88.3% nucleotide identity and 93.0% amino acid identity. Analysis of the putative tertiary structure of the ChPV VP2 protein showed that variable regions with less than 80% nucleotide similarity between the three Korean strains and ABU-P1 occurred in large loops of the VP2 protein believed to be involved in antigenicity, pathogenicity, and tissue tropism in other parvoviruses. Based on our analysis of full-length coding sequences, we discovered greater variation in ChPV strains than reported previously, especially in partial regions of the VP2 protein.

  17. High prevalence of turkey parvovirus in turkey flocks from Hungary experiencing enteric disease syndromes.

    PubMed

    Palade, Elena Alina; Demeter, Zoltán; Hornyák, Akos; Nemes, Csaba; Kisary, János; Rusvai, Miklós

    2011-09-01

    Samples collected in 2008 and 2009, from 49 turkey flocks of 6 to 43 days in age and presenting clinical signs of enteric disease and high mortality, were tested by polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for the presence of viruses currently associated with enteric disease (ED) syndromes: astrovirus, reovirus, rotavirus, coronavirus, adenovirus, and parvovirus. Turkey astroviruses were found in 83.67% of the cases and turkey astrovirus 2 (TAst-2) in 26.53%. The investigations directly demonstrated the high prevalence of turkey parvovirus (TuPV) in 23 flocks (46.9%) experiencing signs of ED, making this pathogen the second most identified after astroviruses. Phylogenetic analysis on a 527 base pair-long region from the NS1 gene revealed two main clusters, a chicken parvovirus (ChPV) and a TuPV group, but also the presence of a divergent branch of tentatively named "TuPV-like ChPV" strains. The 23 Hungarian TuPV strains were separately positioned in two groups from the American origin sequences in the TuPV cluster. An Avail-based restriction fragment length polymorphism assay has also been developed for the quick differentiation of TuPV, ChPV, and divergent TuPV-like ChPV strains. As most detected enteric viruses have been directly demonstrated in healthy turkey flocks as well, the epidemiology of this disease complex remains unclear, suggesting that a certain combination of pathogens, environmental factors, or both are necessary for the development of clinical signs.

  18. Vesicular transport of progeny parvovirus particles through ER and Golgi regulates maturation and cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Bär, Séverine; Rommelaere, Jean; Nüesch, Jürg P F

    2013-09-01

    Progeny particles of non-enveloped lytic parvoviruses were previously shown to be actively transported to the cell periphery through vesicles in a gelsolin-dependent manner. This process involves rearrangement and destruction of actin filaments, while microtubules become protected throughout the infection. Here the focus is on the intracellular egress pathway, as well as its impact on the properties and release of progeny virions. By colocalization with cellular marker proteins and specific modulation of the pathways through over-expression of variant effector genes transduced by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors, we show that progeny PV particles become engulfed into COPII-vesicles in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are transported through the Golgi to the plasma membrane. Besides known factors like sar1, sec24, rab1, the ERM family proteins, radixin and moesin play (an) essential role(s) in the formation/loading and targeting of virus-containing COPII-vesicles. These proteins also contribute to the transport through ER and Golgi of the well described analogue of cellular proteins, the secreted Gaussia luciferase in absence of virus infection. It is therefore likely that radixin and moesin also serve for a more general function in cellular exocytosis. Finally, parvovirus egress via ER and Golgi appears to be necessary for virions to gain full infectivity through post-assembly modifications (e.g. phosphorylation). While not being absolutely required for cytolysis and progeny virus release, vesicular transport of parvoviruses through ER and Golgi significantly accelerates these processes pointing to a regulatory role of this transport pathway.

  19. Molecular and structural characterization of fluorescent human parvovirus B19 virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Leona; Toivola, Jouni; White, Daniel; Ihalainen, Teemu; Smith, Wesley; Lindholm, Laura; Vuento, Matti; Oker-Blom, Christian

    2005-06-03

    Although sharing a T=1 icosahedral symmetry with other members of the Parvoviridae family, it has been suggested that the fivefold channel of the human parvovirus B19 VP2 capsids is closed at its outside end. To investigate the possibility of placing a relatively large protein moiety at this site of B19, fluorescent virus-like particles (fVLPs) of B19 were developed. The enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was inserted at the N-terminus of the structural protein VP2 and assembly of fVLPs from this fusion protein was obtained. Electron microscopy revealed that these fluorescent protein complexes were very similar in size when compared to wild-type B19 virus. Further, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy showed that an average of nine EGFP domains were associated with these virus-like structures. Atomic force microscopy and immunoprecipitation studies showed that EGFP was displayed on the surface of these fVLPs. Confocal imaging indicated that these chimeric complexes were targeted to late endosomes when expressed in insect cells. The fVLPs were able to efficiently enter cancer cells and traffic to the nucleus via the microtubulus network. Finally, immunoglobulins present in human parvovirus B19 acute and past-immunity serum samples were able to detect antigenic epitopes present in these fVLPs. In summary, we have developed fluorescent virus-like nanoparticles displaying a large heterologous entity that should be of help to elucidate the mechanisms of infection and pathogenesis of human parvovirus B19. In addition, these B19 nanoparticles serve as a model in the development of targetable vehicles designed for delivery of biomolecules.

  20. Vesicular Transport of Progeny Parvovirus Particles through ER and Golgi Regulates Maturation and Cytolysis

    PubMed Central

    Bär, Séverine; Rommelaere, Jean; Nüesch, Jürg P. F.

    2013-01-01

    Progeny particles of non-enveloped lytic parvoviruses were previously shown to be actively transported to the cell periphery through vesicles in a gelsolin-dependent manner. This process involves rearrangement and destruction of actin filaments, while microtubules become protected throughout the infection. Here the focus is on the intracellular egress pathway, as well as its impact on the properties and release of progeny virions. By colocalization with cellular marker proteins and specific modulation of the pathways through over-expression of variant effector genes transduced by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors, we show that progeny PV particles become engulfed into COPII-vesicles in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are transported through the Golgi to the plasma membrane. Besides known factors like sar1, sec24, rab1, the ERM family proteins, radixin and moesin play (an) essential role(s) in the formation/loading and targeting of virus-containing COPII-vesicles. These proteins also contribute to the transport through ER and Golgi of the well described analogue of cellular proteins, the secreted Gaussia luciferase in absence of virus infection. It is therefore likely that radixin and moesin also serve for a more general function in cellular exocytosis. Finally, parvovirus egress via ER and Golgi appears to be necessary for virions to gain full infectivity through post-assembly modifications (e.g. phosphorylation). While not being absolutely required for cytolysis and progeny virus release, vesicular transport of parvoviruses through ER and Golgi significantly accelerates these processes pointing to a regulatory role of this transport pathway. PMID:24068925

  1. Fast fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Lall, Chandana; Aisen, Alex A; Rajesh, Arumugam; Cohen, Mervyn D

    2005-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as a problem-solving tool when ultrasonic findings are equivocal. The role of fetal MRI has increased as obstetricians become aware of its potential and in utero therapy for anomalies becomes increasingly sophisticated. In this pictorial essay, we present a wide range of anomalies diagnosed or confirmed using MRI and discuss findings that help in the differential diagnosis.

  2. Febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann disease (pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta fulminans) associated with parvovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Arti; Alshalfan, Faisal; Al-Otaibi, Mohammad; Al-Sabah, Humoud; Rajy, Jihan M

    2013-06-01

    Febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann disease is a rare fulminant variant of pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta, characterized by a rapidly progressive course with predominant ulceronecrotic lesions associated with fever and systemic manifestations. It carries a great morbidity and is potentially fatal. The exact pathogenesis is not clear, and it has been proposed to be the result of hypersensitivity reaction to an infection. We report a patient with febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann disease in a 12-year-old boy in whom the condition was most likely precipitated by parvovirus infection, and he showed a favorable response to a combination of prednisolone with narrow band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) phototherapy.

  3. B19 parvovirus DNA in solvent/detergent-treated anti-haemophilia concentrates.

    PubMed

    Lefrère, J J; Mariotti, M; Thauvin, M

    1994-01-22

    A transfusional B19 parvovirus infection may have severe consequences in immunocompromised hosts. The presence of B19 DNA was investigated with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay in 30 batches of solvent/detergent-treated clotting factor concentrates (12 batches of factor VIII, 16 batches of factor IX, 1 batch of factor VII, and 1 batch of PPSB). B19 DNA was detected in 6 (20%) batches, including 3 factor VIII and 3 factor IX concentrates. Because of the frequency of B19 DNA in batches of clotting factors, measures to prevent transfusional risk of B19 infection via these blood products are justified, especially in recipients immunocompromised by HIV infection.

  4. Isolation of a goose parvovirus from swan and its molecular characteristics.

    PubMed

    Shao, H; Lv, Y; Ye, J; Qian, K; Jin, W; Qin, A

    2014-01-01

    Goose parvovirus (GPV) causes high mortality and morbidity in goslings and Muscovy ducklings. In this study, a GPV was isolated from a 20-day old swan in Shanghai, China. Complete genome of the swan isolate contained 5,050 nt and showed the highest homology with Taiwanese GPV isolates from 1982. In comparison with the Chinese mainland GPV isolates reported previously, the swan isolate shows two deletions, particularly at positions 67-80 and 334-347 in inverted terminal repeats (ITRs). These findings suggest that the swan could serve as a potential host for GPV and provide insights into molecular characteristics and etiology of GPV.

  5. Cloning and sequence of DNA encoding structural proteins of the autonomous parvovirus feline panleukopenia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, J; Rushlow, K; Maxwell, I; Maxwell, F; Winston, S; Hahn, W

    1985-01-01

    Approximately 80% of the genome of feline panleukopenia virus was cloned into pBR322. This DNA included the transcription unit for the major viral mRNA species. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned portion of the genome was determined. Comparison of the feline panleukopenia virus sequence with the sequences of the parvoviruses minute virus of mice and H-1 revealed considerable homology between the three viruses on both the nucleic acid and protein levels. Based on this homology, a model for the generation of the two size classes of viral structural proteins (VP1 and VP2') is proposed. Images PMID:2991581

  6. Feline Host Range of Canine parvovirus: Recent Emergence of New Antigenic Types in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kazuya; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Tohya, Yukinobu; Takahashi, Eiji; Mochizuki, Masami

    2002-01-01

    Since the emergence of Canine parvovirus (CPV-2) in the late 1970s, CPV-2 has evolved consecutively new antigenic types, CPV-2a and 2b. Although CPV-2 did not have a feline host range, CPV-2a and 2b appear to have gained the ability to replicate in cats. Recent investigations demonstrate the prevalence of CPV-2a and 2b infection in a wide range of cat populations. We illustrate the pathogenic potential of CPV in cats and assesses the risk caused by CPV variants. PMID:11971764

  7. Low Prevalence of Parvovirus 4 in HIV-infected Children in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeldt, Vibeke; Norja, Päivi; Lindberg, Ellinor; Jensen, Lise; Hedman, Lea; Väisänen, Elina; Li, Xuemeng; Hedman, Klaus; von Linstow, Marie-Louise

    2015-07-01

    Parvovirus 4 (PARV4) has been associated with HIV infection in adults. We examined plasma samples from 46 HIV-infected 0-year-old to 16-year-old children for the presence of PARV4. Four children (8.7%) had detectable PARV4 IgG and 1 had IgM. The result of PARV4 polymerase chain reaction was found to be negative in all patients. PARV4 seropositivity was associated with low CD4 count but not with HIV viral load.

  8. Sesavirus: prototype of a new parvovirus genus in feces of a sea lion.

    PubMed

    Phan, Tung Gia; Gulland, Frances; Simeone, Claire; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric

    2015-02-01

    We describe the nearly complete genome of a highly divergent parvovirus, we tentatively name Sesavirus, from the feces of a California sea lion pup (Zalophus californianus) suffering from malnutrition and pneumonia. The 5,049-base-long genome contained two major ORFs encoding a 553-aa nonstructural protein and a 965-aa structural protein which shared closest amino acid identities of 25 and 28 %, respectively, with members of the copiparvovirus genus known to infect pigs and cows. Given the low degree of similarity, Sesavirus might be considered as prototype for a new genus with a proposed name of Marinoparvovirus in the subfamily Parvovirinae.

  9. Rapid and sensitive detection of canine parvovirus type 2 by recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianchang; Liu, Libing; Li, Ruiwen; Wang, Jinfeng; Fu, Qi; Yuan, Wanzhe

    2016-04-01

    A novel recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA)-based method for detection of canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) was developed. Sensitivity analysis showed that the detection limit of RPA was 10 copies of CPV-2 genomic DNA. RPA amplified both CPV-2a and -2b DNA but did not amplify the template of other important dog viruses (CCoV, PRV or CDV), demonstrating high specificity. The method was further validated with 57 canine fecal samples. An outstanding advantage of RPA is that it is an isothermal reaction and can be performed in a water bath, making RPA a potential alternative method for CPV-2 detection in resource-limited settings.

  10. Parvovirus B19 Infection in a Fatal Case of Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Leon, Luciane Amado; Alves, Arthur; Garcia, Rita Cubel; Melgaço, Juliana; de Paula, Vanessa; Pinto, Marcelo

    2017-08-02

    B19V has been proposed as an etiologic agent for hepatitis, mainly in children, but this is a rare clinical occurrence. Here, we report a case of non-A-E acute liver failure (ALF) in an immunocompetent child with B19 infection. The clinical findings of severe anemia and pancytopenia combined with the detection of anti-B19 IgG, B19 DNA and B19 mRNA in liver indicate a persistent infection and suggest a diagnosis of parvovirus B19-associated ALF.

  11. Detection of feline panleukopenia virus using a commercial ELISA for canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Abd-Eldaim, Mohamed; Beall, Melissa J; Kennedy, Melissa A

    2009-01-01

    Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) is a significant pathogen of cats. Rapid virus detection is critical for treatment and management, especially in populations in which spread may occur. This study investigated the ability of the SNAP Canine Parvovirus Antigen Test Kit (SNAP Parvo, IDEXX Laboratories) to detect FPV with confirmation of viral identity by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and genetic sequencing on fecal samples (n = 97) from cats with suspected FPV infection. Fifty-five samples were positive by SNAP Parvo; 54 of 55 were also positive by conventional PCR assay and were identified as FPV by genetic sequencing. This study demonstrates that SNAP Parvo can detect FPV in clinical samples.

  12. Fetal Safety of Macrolides

    PubMed Central

    Bahat Dinur, Anat; Koren, Gideon; Matok, Ilan; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Uziel, Elia; Gorodischer, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Macrolide antibiotics are largely used in pregnancy for different bacterial infections. Their fetal safety has been studied by several groups, yielding opposing results. In particular, there have been studies claiming an association between macrolides and cardiovascular malformations. Exposure in early infancy has been associated with pyloric stenosis and intussusception. This has led to an avoidance in prescribing macrolides to pregnant women in several Scandinavian countries. The Objectives of the present study was to investigate the fetal safety of this class of drug by linking a large administrative database of drug dispensing and pregnancy outcome in Southern Israel. A computerized database of medications dispensed from 1999 to 2009 to all women registered in the Clalit health maintenance organization in southern Israel was linked with two computerized databases containing maternal and infant hospitalization records. Also, medical pregnancy termination data were analyzed. The following confounders were controlled for: maternal age, ethnicity, maternal pregestational diabetes, parity, and the year the mother gave birth or went through medical pregnancy termination. First- and third-trimester exposures to macrolide antibiotics as a group and to individual drugs were analyzed. During the study period there were 105,492 pregnancies among Clalit women that met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 104,380 ended in live births or dead fetuses and 1,112 in abortion due to medical reasons. In the first trimester of pregnancy, 1,033 women were exposed to macrolides. There was no association between macrolides and either major malformations [odds ratio (OR), 1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.84 to 1.38)] or specific malformations, after accounting for maternal age, parity, ethnicity, prepregnancy diabetes, and year of exposure. During the third trimester of pregnancy, 959 women were exposed to macrolides. There was no association between such exposure and perinatal

  13. Fetal ocular measurements by MRI.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao Bing; Kasprian, Gregor; Hodge, Jacqueline C; Jiang, Xiao Li; Bettelheim, Dieter; Brugger, Peter C; Prayer, Daniela

    2010-11-01

    To present fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ocular measurement ranges by gestational age (GA) in normal and growth-restricted fetuses. A total of 298 pregnant women from the 18th to the 39th week of gestation were imaged using MRI. Ocular measurements including binocular distance (BOD), interocular distance (IOD), transverse ocular diameter (OD) and anterior-posterior (AP) OD were measured. The curve estimation analyses for linear, logarithmic and quadratic models were performed. The ocular measurements of the fetuses with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) were compared with that of the normal fetuses. The fetal eye resembles an ellipsoid with significantly longer OD and shorter AP (t = - 22.07, p < 0.001). The quadratic model was the best model in predicting growth of the fetal BOD, IOD, OD and AP. The ocular measurements of the fetuses with IUGR were significantly different from that of the normal fetuses (BOD: t = 3.58, p < 0.001; IOD: t = 5.73, p < 0.001; OD: t = 3.52, p < 0.001; AP: t = 2.19, p < 0.05). Fetal ocular growth can be readily assessed by fetal MRI. Using the normative data provided in this study, fetal ocular anomalies may be detected. Ocular size is frequently reduced in the condition of IUGR, with potential pathologic impact on postnatal vision.

  14. Productive Parvovirus B19 Infection of Primary Human Erythroid Progenitor Cells at Hypoxia Is Regulated by STAT5A and MEK Signaling but not HIFα

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Kleiboeker, Steve; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) causes a variety of human diseases. Disease outcomes of bone marrow failure in patients with high turnover of red blood cells and immunocompromised conditions, and fetal hydrops in pregnant women are resulted from the targeting and destruction of specifically erythroid progenitors of the human bone marrow by B19V. Although the ex vivo expanded erythroid progenitor cells recently used for studies of B19V infection are highly permissive, they produce progeny viruses inefficiently. In the current study, we aimed to identify the mechanism that underlies productive B19V infection of erythroid progenitor cells cultured in a physiologically relevant environment. Here, we demonstrate an effective reverse genetic system of B19V, and that B19V infection of ex vivo expanded erythroid progenitor cells at 1% O2 (hypoxia) produces progeny viruses continuously and efficiently at a level of approximately 10 times higher than that seen in the context of normoxia. With regard to mechanism, we show that hypoxia promotes replication of the B19V genome within the nucleus, and that this is independent of the canonical PHD/HIFα pathway, but dependent on STAT5A and MEK/ERK signaling. We further show that simultaneous upregulation of STAT5A signaling and down-regulation of MEK/ERK signaling boosts the level of B19V infection in erythroid progenitor cells under normoxia to that in cells under hypoxia. We conclude that B19V infection of ex vivo expanded erythroid progenitor cells at hypoxia closely mimics native infection of erythroid progenitors in human bone marrow, maintains erythroid progenitors at a stage conducive to efficient production of progeny viruses, and is regulated by the STAT5A and MEK/ERK pathways. PMID:21698228

  15. Uterine artery blood flow, fetal hypoxia and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Browne, Vaughn A; Julian, Colleen G; Toledo-Jaldin, Lillian; Cioffi-Ragan, Darleen; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G

    2015-03-05

    Evolutionary trade-offs required for bipedalism and brain expansion influence the pregnancy rise in uterine artery (UtA) blood flow and, in turn, reproductive success. We consider the importance of UtA blood flow by reviewing its determinants and presenting data from 191 normotensive (normal, n = 125) or hypertensive (preeclampsia (PE) or gestational hypertension (GH), n = 29) Andean residents of very high (4100-4300 m) or low altitude (400 m, n = 37). Prior studies show that UtA blood flow is reduced in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) but whether the IUGR is due to resultant fetal hypoxia is unclear. We found higher UtA blood flow and Doppler indices of fetal hypoxia in normotensive women at high versus low altitude but similar fetal growth. UtA blood flow was markedly lower in early-onset PE versus normal high-altitude women, and their fetuses more hypoxic as indicated by lower fetal heart rate, Doppler indices and greater IUGR. We concluded that, despite greater fetal hypoxia, fetal growth was well defended by higher UtA blood flows in normal Andeans at high altitude but when compounded by lower UtA blood flow in early-onset PE, exaggerated fetal hypoxia caused the fetus to respond by decreasing cardiac output and redistributing blood flow to help maintain brain development at the expense of growth elsewhere. We speculate that UtA blood flow is not only an important supply line but also a trigger for stimulating the metabolic and other processes regulating feto-placental metabolism and growth. Studies using the natural laboratory of high altitude are valuable for identifying the physiological and genetic mechanisms involved in human reproductive success. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Uterine artery blood flow, fetal hypoxia and fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Vaughn A.; Julian, Colleen G.; Toledo-Jaldin, Lillian; Cioffi-Ragan, Darleen; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary trade-offs required for bipedalism and brain expansion influence the pregnancy rise in uterine artery (UtA) blood flow and, in turn, reproductive success. We consider the importance of UtA blood flow by reviewing its determinants and presenting data from 191 normotensive (normal, n = 125) or hypertensive (preeclampsia (PE) or gestational hypertension (GH), n = 29) Andean residents of very high (4100–4300 m) or low altitude (400 m, n = 37). Prior studies show that UtA blood flow is reduced in pregnancies with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) but whether the IUGR is due to resultant fetal hypoxia is unclear. We found higher UtA blood flow and Doppler indices of fetal hypoxia in normotensive women at high versus low altitude but similar fetal growth. UtA blood flow was markedly lower in early-onset PE versus normal high-altitude women, and their fetuses more hypoxic as indicated by lower fetal heart rate, Doppler indices and greater IUGR. We concluded that, despite greater fetal hypoxia, fetal growth was well defended by higher UtA blood flows in normal Andeans at high altitude but when compounded by lower UtA blood flow in early-onset PE, exaggerated fetal hypoxia caused the fetus to respond by decreasing cardiac output and redistributing blood flow to help maintain brain development at the expense of growth elsewhere. We speculate that UtA blood flow is not only an important supply line but also a trigger for stimulating the metabolic and other processes regulating feto-placental metabolism and growth. Studies using the natural laboratory of high altitude are valuable for identifying the physiological and genetic mechanisms involved in human reproductive success. PMID:25602072

  17. [Experience with fetal pulsoxymetry].

    PubMed

    Koltai, M; Csécsei, K; Kovatsits, B

    2000-07-30

    The authors have had the opportunity to do research on an embryonic pulsoxymetre in twenty cases when traditional cardiotocographic observation and clinical symptoms had indicated intrauterine risk. The results obtained have been compared with those of a control group where embryonic pulsoxymetrical observation was not effected. The comparison was effected using the same criteria. The experiment aimed at defining how specific embryonic pulsoxymetrical observation may be if used as a screening method as well as whether its application would decrease the number of Cesarian sections. During the process of pulsoxymetrical observation, with positive change of the embryonic heart function with clear as well as meconium stained amniotic fluid, if the embryonic oxygen saturation reached levels over 30%, no Cesarian section was performed. At a saturation level under 30%, two Cesarian sections were required. In the control group without pulsoxymetrical analysis four Cesarian sections had to be performed. The oxygen saturation level of the umbilical cord artery blood of babies who underwent pulsoxymetrical observation and of those born with a Cesarian delivery were almost the same, the blood pH level was acidotic. On conclusion uterine pulsoxymetrical observation objectively reflects the intrauterine distress through fetal blood oxygenation and consequently, influences the number of Cesarian sections.

  18. Noninvasive Fetal ECG analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Gari D.; Silva, Ikaro; Behar, Joachim; Moody, George B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the important advances achieved in the field of adult electrocardiography signal processing, the analysis of the non-invasive fetal electrocardiogram (NI-FECG) remains a challenge. Currently no gold standard database exists which provides labelled FECG QRS complexes (and other morphological parameters), and publications rely either on proprietary databases or a very limited set of data recorded from few (or more often, just one) individuals. The PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2013 enables to tackle some of these limitations by releasing a set of NI-FECG data publicly to the scientific community in order to evaluate signal processing techniques for NI-FECG extraction. The Challenge aim was to encourage development of accurate algorithms for locating QRS complexes and estimating the QT interval in noninvasive FECG signals. Using carefully reviewed reference QRS annotations and QT intervals as a gold standard, based on simultaneous direct FECG when possible, the Challenge was designed to measure and compare the performance of participants’ algorithms objectively. Multiple challenge events were designed to test basic FHR estimation accuracy, as well as accuracy in measurement of inter-beat (RR) and QT intervals needed as a basis for derivation of other FECG features. This editorial reviews the background issues, the design of the Challenge, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement. PMID:25071093

  19. Screening for fetal aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Rink, Britton D; Norton, Mary E

    2016-02-01

    Screening is currently recommended in pregnancy for a number of genetic disorders, chromosomal aneuploidy, and structural birth defects in the fetus regardless of maternal age or family history. There is an overwhelming array of sonographic and maternal serum-based options available for carrying out aneuploidy risk assessment in the first and/or second trimester. As with any screening test, the patient should be made aware that a "negative" test or "normal" ultrasound does not guarantee a healthy baby and a "positive" test does not mean the fetus has the condition. The woman should have both pre- and post-test counseling to discuss the benefits, limitations, and options for additional testing. Rapid advancements of genetic technologies have made it possible to screen for the common aneuploidies traditionally associated with advanced maternal age with improved levels of accuracy beyond serum and ultrasound based testing. Prenatal screening for fetal genetic disorders with cell-free DNA has transformed prenatal care with yet unanswered questions related to the financial, ethical, and appropriate application in the provision of prenatal risk assessment.

  20. Fetal testosterone and empathy.

    PubMed

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Raggatt, Peter; Taylor, Kevin; Hackett, Gerald

    2006-03-01

    In animals, fetal testosterone (fT) plays a central role in organizing the brain and in later social behavior. In humans, exposure to atypical levels of prenatal androgens may result in masculine behavior and ability patterns. Normal inter-individual variation in fT levels has also been correlated with later sex-typed behavior. In the current study, 38 children (24 male, 14 female), whose fT was analyzed in amniotic fluid, were followed up at age 4. They were asked to describe cartoons with 2 moving triangles whose interactions with each other suggested social relationships and psychological motivations. Females used more mental and affective state terms to describe the cartoons than males. fT was not associated with the frequency of mental or affective state terms. Females also used more intentional propositions than males. fT was negatively correlated with the frequency of intentional propositions, taking sex differences into account. fT was also negatively correlated with the frequency of intentional propositions when males were examined separately. Males used more neutral propositions than females. fT was directly correlated with the frequency of neutral propositions, taking sex differences into account. This relationship was not seen when males and females were examined separately. These findings implicate fT in human social development. The relevance of our findings to the 'extreme male brain' theory of autism is also discussed.

  1. Canine Parvovirus VP2 Protein Expressed in Silkworm Pupae Self-Assembles into Virus-Like Particles with High Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua-lei; Liang, Meng; Liang, Hongru; Guo, He; Zhao, Pingsen; Yang, Yu-jiao; Zheng, Xue-xing; Zhang, Zhi-fang; Zhao, Yong-kun; Gao, Yu-wei; Yang, Song-tao; Xia, Xian-zhu

    2014-01-01

    The VP2 structural protein of parvovirus can produce virus-like particles (VLPs) by a self-assembly process in vitro, making VLPs attractive vaccine candidates. In this study, the VP2 protein of canine parvovirus (CPV) was expressed using a baculovirus expression system and assembled into parvovirus-like particles in insect cells and pupae. Electron micrographs of VLPs showed that they were very similar in size and morphology when compared to the wild-type parvovirus. The immunogenicity of the VLPs was investigated in mice and dogs. Mice immunized intramuscularly with purified VLPs, in the absence of an adjuvant, elicited CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses and were able to elicit a neutralizing antibody response against CPV, while the oral administration of raw homogenates containing VLPs to the dogs resulted in a systemic immune response and long-lasting immunity. These results demonstrate that the CPV-VLPs stimulate both cellular and humoral immune responses, and so CPV-VLPs may be a promising candidate vaccine for the prevention of CPV-associated disease. PMID:24465364

  2. Development and evaluation of a VP3-ELISA for the detection of goose and Muscovy duck parvovirus antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Li, Yongfeng; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Dabing; Guo, Dongchun; Liu, Chunguo; Zhi, Haidong; Wang, Xiaomei; Li, Gang; Li, Na; Liu, Shiguo; Xiang, Wenhua; Tong, Guangzhi

    2010-02-01

    The VP3-encoding gene of goose parvovirus (GPV) Ep22 strain was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The GPV VP3-encoding gene was 1605 bp in length, and it encoded a 534 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 59.9 kDa. The VP3 fusion protein expressed in E. coli was detected by goose and Muscovy duck anti-parvovirus polyclonal sera. In addition, an ELISA (VP3-ELISA) using the VP3 protein as the coating antigen for the detection of antibodies to GPV in geese and antibodies to Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) in Muscovy ducks was developed. Compared to the virus neutralization test, the specificity and sensitivity of the VP3-ELISA was 90.2% and 95.2% for goose sera and 91.8% and 96.7% for Muscovy duck sera, respectively. The VP3-ELISA did not react with the anti-sera to other goose or duck pathogens, indicating that this protein is specific for the reorganization of goose or duck anti-parvovirus antibodies. Cross-reactivity between immunoglobulin G antibodies from geese and Muscovy ducks was also tested, and the results reflected the phylogenetic distance between these two birds when using the ELISA. In conclusion, the VP3-ELISA is a sensitive and specific method for detecting antibodies against GPV or MDPV.

  3. Canine parvovirus VP2 protein expressed in silkworm pupae self-assembles into virus-like particles with high immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hao; Hu, Gui-qiu; Wang, Hua-lei; Liang, Meng; Liang, Hongru; Guo, He; Zhao, Pingsen; Yang, Yu-jiao; Zheng, Xue-xing; Zhang, Zhi-fang; Zhao, Yong-kun; Gao, Yu-wei; Yang, Song-tao; Xia, Xian-zhu

    2014-01-01

    The VP2 structural protein of parvovirus can produce virus-like particles (VLPs) by a self-assembly process in vitro, making VLPs attractive vaccine candidates. In this study, the VP2 protein of canine parvovirus (CPV) was expressed using a baculovirus expression system and assembled into parvovirus-like particles in insect cells and pupae. Electron micrographs of VLPs showed that they were very similar in size and morphology when compared to the wild-type parvovirus. The immunogenicity of the VLPs was investigated in mice and dogs. Mice immunized intramuscularly with purified VLPs, in the absence of an adjuvant, elicited CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses and were able to elicit a neutralizing antibody response against CPV, while the oral administration of raw homogenates containing VLPs to the dogs resulted in a systemic immune response and long-lasting immunity. These results demonstrate that the CPV-VLPs stimulate both cellular and humoral immune responses, and so CPV-VLPs may be a promising candidate vaccine for the prevention of CPV-associated disease.

  4. Development of a non invasion real-time PCR assay for the quantitation of chicken parvovirus in fecal swabs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The present study describes the development of a real time Taqman polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using a fluorescent labeled probe for the detection and quantitation of chicken parvovirus (ChPV) in feces. The primers and probes were designed based on the nucleotide sequence of the non struct...

  5. Functional analysis and quantitative determination of the expression profile of human parvovirus B19.

    PubMed

    Bonvicini, Francesca; Filippone, Claudia; Manaresi, Elisabetta; Zerbini, Marialuisa; Musiani, Monica; Gallinella, Giorgio

    2008-11-25

    Comprehension of the pathogenetic potential of human parvovirus B19 requires the definition of the complete spectrum of cellular tropism and a functional analysis of the viral genome in infected cells. In this study, we carried out a systematic functional analysis of B19 virus genome in the course of infection of susceptible bone marrow mononuclear cells and myeloblastoid UT7/EpoS1 cells, in terms of dynamics of nucleic acid synthesis. A PCR array was designed and a comprehensive analysis was performed by quantitative PCR and RT-PCR, yielding extended information on the presence and abundance of the diverse classes of viral nucleic acids, on the temporal regulation of genome expression and on its relationship with the cell cycle. The analysis performed indicate that the synthesis of viral nucleic acids is correlated to the progression through the S phase of the cell cycle, that an extended pattern of transcriptional activity occurs throughout the course of infection, with a maximal rate of transcription preceding the onset of S-phase dependent replication of the viral genome, and that utilization of transcript processing signals is relatively constant throughout the course of infection. The information obtained led to the definition of a unified model of functional and expression profiling of parvovirus B19 genome.

  6. Canine parvovirus type 2c infection in a kitten associated with intracranial abscess and convulsions.

    PubMed

    Decaro, Nicola; Desario, Costantina; Amorisco, Francesca; Losurdo, Michele; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Greco, Maria Fiorella; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2011-04-01

    A case of canine parvovirus type 2c (CPV-2c) infection in a 3-month-old feral kitten with a cerebral abscess and neurological disease is reported. The cat displayed ataxia and convulsions together with signs of gastroenteritis and profound alteration of the total and differential white blood cell counts. A parvovirus strain was detected by a TaqMan assay in the blood and faeces of the affected kitten, which was characterised as CPV by means of molecular assays but did not react with any of the CPV type-specific probes. By sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the VP2-protein gene, the CPV-2c strain displayed a non-coding mutation in the probe-binding region. Although the role of CPV-2c in this particular case is unclear, it is possible that it predisposed the kitten to the clinical signs seen. Continuous surveillance is needed to monitor future spreading of this CPV-2c mutant, and any associated clinical signs, in the dog and cat population.

  7. Tumor Selectivity of Oncolytic Parvoviruses: From in vitro and Animal Models to Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Angelova, Assia L.; Geletneky, Karsten; Nüesch, Jürg P. F.; Rommelaere, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy of cancer is among the innovative modalities being under development and especially promising for targeting tumors, which are resistant to conventional treatments. Presently, at least a dozen of viruses, belonging to nine different virus families, are being tested within the frames of various clinical studies in cancer patients. Continuously growing preclinical evidence showing that the autonomous rat parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV) is able to kill tumor cells that resist conventional treatments and to achieve a complete cure of various human tumors in animal models argues for its inclusion in the arsenal of oncolytic viruses with an especially promising bench to bedside translation potential. Oncolytic parvovirus safe administration to humans relies on the intrinsic preference of these agents for quickly proliferating, metabolically, and biochemically disturbed tumor versus normal cells (tumor selectivity or oncotropism). The present review summarizes and discusses (i) preclinical evidence of H-1PV innocuousness for normal cells and healthy tissues in vitro and in animals, respectively, (ii) toxicological assessments of H-1PV mono- or combined therapy in tumor-bearing virus-permissive animal models, as well as (iii) historical results of experimental infection of human cancer patients with H-1PV. Altogether, these data argue against a risk of H-1PV inducing significant toxic effects in human patients. This highly favorable safety profile allowed the translation of H-1PV preclinical research into a Phase I/IIa clinical trial being currently in progress. PMID:25954743

  8. Role of multiple hosts in the cross-species transmission and emergence of a pandemic parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Allison, Andrew B; Harbison, Carole E; Pagan, Israel; Stucker, Karla M; Kaelber, Jason T; Brown, Justin D; Ruder, Mark G; Keel, M Kevin; Dubovi, Edward J; Holmes, Edward C; Parrish, Colin R

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of cross-species virus transmission is critical to anticipating emerging infectious diseases. Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) emerged as a variant of a feline parvovirus when it acquired mutations that allowed binding to the canine transferrin receptor type 1 (TfR). However, CPV-2 was soon replaced by a variant virus (CPV-2a) that differed in antigenicity and receptor binding. Here we show that the emergence of CPV involved an additional host range variant virus that has circulated undetected in raccoons for at least 24 years, with transfers to and from dogs. Raccoon virus capsids showed little binding to the canine TfR, showed little infection of canine cells, and had altered antigenic structures. Remarkably, in capsid protein (VP2) phylogenies, most raccoon viruses fell as evolutionary intermediates between the CPV-2 and CPV-2a strains, suggesting that passage through raccoons assisted in the evolution of CPV-2a. This highlights the potential role of alternative hosts in viral emergence.

  9. Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of a novel parvovirus isolated from chickens in Guangxi, China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bin; Xie, Zhixun; Deng, Xianwen; Xie, Liji; Xie, Zhiqin; Huang, Li; Fan, Qin; Luo, Sisi; Huang, Jiaoling; Zhang, Yanfang; Zeng, Tingting; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Leyi

    2016-11-01

    A previously unidentified chicken parvovirus (ChPV) strain, associated with runting-stunting syndrome (RSS), is now endemic among chickens in China. To explore the genetic diversity of ChPV strains, we determined the first complete genome sequence of a novel ChPV isolate (GX-CH-PV-7) identified in chickens in Guang Xi, China, and showed moderate genome sequence similarity to reference strains. Analysis showed that the viral genome sequence is 86.4 %-93.9 % identical to those of other ChPVs. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses showed that this newly emergent GX-CH-PV-7 is closely related to Gallus gallus enteric parvovirus isolate ChPV 798 from the USA, indicating that they may share a common ancestor. The complete DNA sequence is 4612 bp long with an A+T content of 56.66 %. We determined the first complete genome sequence of a previously unidentified ChPV strain to elucidate its origin and evolutionary status.

  10. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-02

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity.

  11. Evolution of the feline-subgroup parvoviruses and the control of canine host range in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Truyen, U; Gruenberg, A; Chang, S F; Obermaier, B; Veijalainen, P; Parrish, C R

    1995-01-01

    A related group of parvoviruses infects members of many different carnivore families. Some of those viruses differ in host range or antigenic properties, but the true relationships are poorly understood. We examined 24 VP1/VP2 and 8 NS1 gene sequences from various parvovirus isolates to determine the phylogenetic relationships between viruses isolated from cats, dogs, Asiatic raccoon dogs, mink, raccoons, and foxes. There were about 1.3% pairwise sequence differences between the VP1/VP2 genes of viruses collected up to four decades apart. Viruses from cats, mink, foxes, and raccoons were not distinguished from each other phylogenetically, but the canine or Asiatic raccoon dog isolates formed a distinct clade. Characteristic antigenic, tissue culture host range, and other properties of the canine isolates have previously been shown to be determined by differences in the VP1/VP2 gene, and we show here that there are at least 10 nucleotide sequence differences which distinguish all canine isolates from any other virus. The VP1/VP2 gene sequences grouped roughly according to the time of virus isolation, and there were similar rates of sequence divergence among the canine isolates and those from the other species. A smaller number of differences were present in the NS1 gene sequences, but a similar phylogeny was revealed. Inoculation of mutants of a feline virus isolate into dogs showed that three or four CPV-specific differences in the VP1/VP2 gene controlled the in vivo canine host range. PMID:7609035

  12. Evolution of the feline-subgroup parvoviruses and the control of canine host range in vivo.

    PubMed

    Truyen, U; Gruenberg, A; Chang, S F; Obermaier, B; Veijalainen, P; Parrish, C R

    1995-08-01

    A related group of parvoviruses infects members of many different carnivore families. Some of those viruses differ in host range or antigenic properties, but the true relationships are poorly understood. We examined 24 VP1/VP2 and 8 NS1 gene sequences from various parvovirus isolates to determine the phylogenetic relationships between viruses isolated from cats, dogs, Asiatic raccoon dogs, mink, raccoons, and foxes. There were about 1.3% pairwise sequence differences between the VP1/VP2 genes of viruses collected up to four decades apart. Viruses from cats, mink, foxes, and raccoons were not distinguished from each other phylogenetically, but the canine or Asiatic raccoon dog isolates formed a distinct clade. Characteristic antigenic, tissue culture host range, and other properties of the canine isolates have previously been shown to be determined by differences in the VP1/VP2 gene, and we show here that there are at least 10 nucleotide sequence differences which distinguish all canine isolates from any other virus. The VP1/VP2 gene sequences grouped roughly according to the time of virus isolation, and there were similar rates of sequence divergence among the canine isolates and those from the other species. A smaller number of differences were present in the NS1 gene sequences, but a similar phylogeny was revealed. Inoculation of mutants of a feline virus isolate into dogs showed that three or four CPV-specific differences in the VP1/VP2 gene controlled the in vivo canine host range.

  13. Role of Multiple Hosts in the Cross-Species Transmission and Emergence of a Pandemic Parvovirus

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Andrew B.; Harbison, Carole E.; Pagan, Israel; Stucker, Karla M.; Kaelber, Jason T.; Brown, Justin D.; Ruder, Mark G.; Keel, M. Kevin; Dubovi, Edward J.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of cross-species virus transmission is critical to anticipating emerging infectious diseases. Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) emerged as a variant of a feline parvovirus when it acquired mutations that allowed binding to the canine transferrin receptor type 1 (TfR). However, CPV-2 was soon replaced by a variant virus (CPV-2a) that differed in antigenicity and receptor binding. Here we show that the emergence of CPV involved an additional host range variant virus that has circulated undetected in raccoons for at least 24 years, with transfers to and from dogs. Raccoon virus capsids showed little binding to the canine TfR, showed little infection of canine cells, and had altered antigenic structures. Remarkably, in capsid protein (VP2) phylogenies, most raccoon viruses fell as evolutionary intermediates between the CPV-2 and CPV-2a strains, suggesting that passage through raccoons assisted in the evolution of CPV-2a. This highlights the potential role of alternative hosts in viral emergence. PMID:22072763

  14. Molecular detection of Muscovy duck parvovirus by loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Ji, J; Xie, Q M; Chen, C Y; Bai, S W; Zou, L S; Zuo, K J; Cao, Y C; Xue, C Y; Ma, J Y; Bi, Y Z

    2010-03-01

    Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) usually causes high morbidity and mortality in 1- to 3-wk-old Muscovy ducklings due to serious infections, which is an imminent threat to the commercial duck industry in China. The objectives of this study were to develop and evaluate a simple, rapid, and inexpensive loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for specific detection of MDPV and to compare it with the PCR method in rapidity, sensitivity, and accuracy. The novel LAMP assay used a set of 4 specific primers to recognize 6 distinct genomic sequences of capsid protein (VP3) from MDPV, which could be completed within 50 min at 63 degrees C in a simple water bath. The diagnostic results demonstrated that the LAMP assay detected all 7 preserved MDPV isolates, had no cross-reactivity with other duck pathogens (i.e., goose parvovirus, duck plague virus, H9N2 avian influenza virus, duck hepatitis type virus I, and Muscovy duck reovirus). The LAMP assay was at least 10-fold more sensitive than the routine PCR assay and obtained more sensitivity in 61 clinical samples. Therefore, the newly developed LAMP assay provides a specific and sensitive means for detecting MDPV and can be simply applied both in field conditions and in laboratory operations in a cost-effective manner with primary care facilities.

  15. Genotyping and pathobiologic characterization of canine parvovirus circulating in Nanjing, China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Canine parvovirus (CPV) is an important pathogen that causes acute enteric disease in dogs. It has mutated and spread throughout the world in dog populations. We provide an update on the molecular characterization of CPV that circulated in Nanjing, a provincial capital in China between 2009 and 2012. Results Seventy rectal swab samples were collected from the dogs diagnosed with CPV infection in 8 animal hospitals of Nanjing. Sequence analysis of VP2 genes of 31 samples revealed that 29 viral strains belonged to CPV-2a subtype, while other two strains were classified into CPV-2b. To investigate the pathogenicity of the prevalent virus, we isolated CPV-2a and performed the animal experiment. Nine beagles were inoculated with 105.86 of 50% tissue culture infectious doses (TCID50) of the virus. All the experimentally infected beagles exhibited mild to moderate mucoid or watery diarrhea on day 4 post-infection (p.i.). On day 9 p.i., characteristic histopathological lesions were clearly observed in multiple organs of infected dogs, including liver, spleen, kidney, brain and all segments of the small and large intestines, while viral DNA and antigen staining could be detected in the sampled tissues. It is notable that canine parvovirus was isolated in one from two brain samples processed. Conclusion Our results indicated that CPV-2a is the predominant subtype in Nanjing of China. And this virus caused extensive lesions in a variety of tissues, including the brain. PMID:23988202

  16. Diagnostic assays with monoclonal antibodies for the human serum parvovirus-like virus (SPLV).

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, B. J.; Mortimer, P. P.; Pereira, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to the serum parvovirus-like virus (SPLV) were prepared by the hybridoma technique. They provided an antibody reagent which was used to develop solid phase antibody-capture assays for anti-SPLV IgM and IgG and for SPLV antigen. These assays were more sensitive than those based on human convalescent antibody as a reagent, and were more economical in the use of SPLV antigen. Their use enabled the serological responses to SPLV to be studied more fully and their sensitivity revealed the extent of SPLV infection. SPLV antigen was detected in four patients by both counter-immuno electrophoresis (CIE) and radioimmunoassay (RIA) and in two others by RIA alone. Parvovirus particles were seen in all six by electron microscopy. The anti-SPLV IgM response was measured in patients infected by SPLV. It was strong 5-18 days after the onset of illness, then declined and was only detectable in trace amounts after 6 months. Anti-SPLV IgG was also formed early, and persisted for at least 6 months. In a survey of 310 blood donors anti-SPLV was detected in 134 (43%) by CIE, but in 190 (61%) by IgG antibody capture RIA. Images Plate 1 PMID:6886408

  17. Acute parvovirus B19 infection in identical twins unmasking previously unidentified hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Forde, Donall G; Cope, Alison; Stone, Ben

    2014-07-29

    Identical Caucasian male twins, previously fit, presented 1 week apart with short histories of fever and lethargy. The twins were febrile at presentation with profound pancytopaenia and evidence of haemolysis. There was no rash or arthralgia. Both required multiple red cell transfusions. The twins had positive IgM serology for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and parvovirus B19. EBV viral capsid antigen and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen IgGs were also positive however, suggesting past EBV exposure. Parvovirus B19 DNA was detected from peripheral blood PCR; CMV and EBV DNA PCRs were negative. Convalescent serology demonstrated no evolution of the CMV serological response, that is no IgG to CMV developed which implies an initial non-specific polyclonal IgM response. The twins recovered fully over 7 days, the first with a course of prednisolone and the second spontaneously. They were diagnosed with hereditary spherocytosis on convalescent blood films. On further questioning, a family history of hereditary spherocytosis was eventually revealed. The twins' maternal grandmother was known to have the condition asymptomatically. Their mother had prior to this never been tested, but later bloods would reveal a compatible biochemical picture.

  18. Profiling of Host Cell Response to Successive Canine Parvovirus Infection Based on Kinetic Proteomic Change Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hang; Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Yi, Li; Sun, Yaru; Ren, Jingqiang; Tong, Mingwei; Cao, Zhigang; Li, Jiawei; Deng, Jinliang; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) reproduces by co-opting the resources of host cells, inevitably causing cytotoxic effects to the host cells. Feline kidney F81 cells are sensitive to CPV infection and show disparate growing statuses at different time points post-infection. This study analysed the response of F81 cells to CPV infection at successive infection time points by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics. Differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) during 60 h of infection and at selected time points post-infection were identified by an analysis of variance test and a two-tailed unpaired t test, respectively. DEPs with similar quantitative changes were clustered by hierarchical clustering and analysed by gene ontology enrichment, revealing that 12 h and 60 h post-infection were the optimal times to analyse the autonomous parvovirus replication and apoptosis processes, respectively. Using the MetacoreTM database, 29 DEPs were enriched in a network involved in p53 regulation. Besides, a significantly enriched pathway suggests that the CPV-induced cytopathic effect was probably due to the deficiency of functional CFTR caused by CPV infection. This study uncovered the systemic changes in key cellular factors involved in CPV infection and help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of CPV and the cytopathic effects induced by CPV infection. PMID:27406444

  19. Characterization of Parvovirus B19 Genotype 2 in KU812Ep6 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blümel, Johannes; Eis-Hübinger, Anna Maria; Stühler, Albert; Bönsch, Claudia; Gessner, Matthias; Löwer, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    An infectious parvovirus B19 (B19V) genotype 2 variant was identified as a high-titer contaminant in a human plasma donation. Genome analysis revealed a 138-bp insertion within the p6 promoter. The inserted sequence was represented by an additional 30 bp from the end of the inverted terminal repeat adjacent to a 108-bp element found also, in inverted orientation, at the extreme right end of the unique sequence of the genome. However, despite the profound variations in the promoter region, the pattern of gene expression and DNA replication did not differ between genotype 1 and genotype 2 in permissive erythroid KU812Ep6 cells. Capsid proteins of both genotypes differ in their amino acid sequences. However, equivalent kinetics of virus inactivation at 56°C or pH 4 indicated a comparable physicochemical stability of virus capsids. Sera from six individuals infected by B19V genotype 1 were investigated on cross-neutralization of B19V genotype 2 in vitro. Similar neutralization of both B19V genotypes was observed in sera from three individuals, while the sera from three other individuals showed weaker cross-neutralization for genotype 2. In conclusion, the in vitro replication characteristics and physical stability of B19V capsids are very similar between human parvovirus B19 genotypes 1 and 2, and cross-neutralization indicates a close antigenic relation of genotypes 1 and 2. PMID:16254355

  20. Antibodies against canine parvovirus of wolves of Minnesota: A serologic study from 1975 through 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goyal, S.M.; Mech, L.D.; Rademacher, R.A.; Khan, M.A.; Seal, U.S.

    1986-01-01

    Serum samples (n = 137) from 47 wild wolves (Canis lupus; 21 pups and 26 adults) were evaluated from 1975 to 1985 for antibodies against canine parvovirus, using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. In addition, several blood samples (n = 35) from 14 of these wolves (6 pups and 8 adults) were evaluated simultaneously for erythrocyte and leukocyte counts, and for hemoglobin and blood urea nitrogen concentrations. Sixty-nine (50%) of the serum samples (35 wolves) had HI titers of greater than or equal to 256, whereas 68 (50%) of the samples (16 wolves) had HI titers of less than or equal to 128. Significant differences in the geometric mean titers were not found between pups and adults or between males and females. Of the 47 wolves evaluated, 12 (25%) developed a greater than or equal to fourfold increase in antibody titers during the 11-year period, with 2 wolves developing serologic conversions in 1976. The data indicate that canine parvovirus may have begun infecting wolves before or at the same time that it began infecting the dog population in the United States.

  1. Fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) for fetal monitoring during labour.

    PubMed

    Neilson, James P

    2015-12-21

    Hypoxaemia during labour can alter the shape of the fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) waveform, notably the relation of the PR to RR intervals, and elevation or depression of the ST segment. Technical systems have therefore been developed to monitor the fetal ECG during labour as an adjunct to continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring with the aim of improving fetal outcome and minimising unnecessary obstetric interference. To compare the effects of analysis of fetal ECG waveforms during labour with alternative methods of fetal monitoring. The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (latest search 23 September 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised trials comparing fetal ECG waveform analysis with alternative methods of fetal monitoring during labour. One review author independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. One review author assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. Seven trials (27,403 women) were included: six trials of ST waveform analysis (26,446 women) and one trial of PR interval analysis (957 women). The trials were generally at low risk of bias for most domains and the quality of evidence for ST waveform analysis trials was graded moderate to high. In comparison to continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring alone, the use of adjunctive ST waveform analysis made no obvious difference to primary outcomes: births by caesarean section (risk ratio (RR) 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96 to 1.08; six trials, 26,446 women; high quality evidence); the number of babies with severe metabolic acidosis at birth (cord arterial pH less than 7.05 and base deficit greater than 12 mmol/L) (average RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.20; six trials, 25,682 babies; moderate quality evidence); or babies with neonatal encephalopathy (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.30 to 1.22; six trials, 26,410 babies; high quality evidence). There were, however, on average

  2. Fetal maceration and retention of fetal bones in a mare.

    PubMed

    Burns, T E; Card, C E

    2000-09-15

    A 19-year-old Quarter Horse mare was evaluated because of bloody vaginal discharge that was apparent immediately following breeding. On transrectal ultrasonography, it was evident that the uterus was filled with fluid containing echogenic particles; linear hyperechoic structures were also visible. Endoscopy was performed, which revealed a number of bones adhered to the cranial wall and floor of the right uterine horn as well as purulent fluid in both uterine horns. Bacterial endometritis and fetal maceration were diagnosed. The mare was treated with antibiotics, and the fetal bones were manually removed from the uterus. Fetal maceration with intrauterine retention of bones is rare in mares. Use of hysteroscopy supplements ultrasonography in the diagnosis of uncommon conditions of the uterus. Macerated bones may be adhered to the endometrium, thereby requiring manual removal.

  3. Snapshot of Viral Infections in Wild Carnivores Reveals Ubiquity of Parvovirus and Susceptibility of Egyptian Mongoose to Feline Panleukopenia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Margarida D.; Henriques, Ana Margarida; Barros, Sílvia Carla; Fagulha, Teresa; Mendonça, Paula; Carvalho, Paulo; Monteiro, Madalena; Fevereiro, Miguel; Basto, Mafalda P.; Rosalino, Luís Miguel; Barros, Tânia; Bandeira, Victor; Fonseca, Carlos; Cunha, Mónica V.

    2013-01-01

    The exposure of wild carnivores to viral pathogens, with emphasis on parvovirus (CPV/FPLV), was assessed based on the molecular screening of tissue samples from 128 hunted or accidentally road-killed animals collected in Portugal from 2008 to 2011, including Egyptian mongoose (Herpestes ichneumon, n = 99), red fox (Vulpes vulpes, n = 19), stone marten (Martes foina, n = 3), common genet (Genetta genetta, n = 3) and Eurasian badger (Meles meles, n = 4). A high prevalence of parvovirus DNA (63%) was detected among all surveyed species, particularly in mongooses (58%) and red foxes (79%), along with the presence of CPV/FPLV circulating antibodies that were identified in 90% of a subset of parvovirus-DNA positive samples. Most specimens were extensively autolysed, restricting macro and microscopic investigations for lesion evaluation. Whenever possible to examine, signs of active disease were not present, supporting the hypothesis that the parvovirus vp2 gene fragments detected by real-time PCR possibly correspond to viral DNA reminiscent from previous infections. The molecular characterization of viruses, based on the analysis of the complete or partial sequence of the vp2 gene, allowed typifying three viral strains of mongoose and four red fox’s as feline panleukopenia virus (FPLV) and one stone marten’s as newCPV-2b type. The genetic similarity found between the FPLV viruses from free-ranging and captive wild species originated in Portugal and publicly available comparable sequences, suggests a closer genetic relatedness among FPLV circulating in Portugal. Although the clinical and epidemiological significance of infection could not be established, this study evidences that exposure of sympatric wild carnivores to parvovirus is common and geographically widespread, potentially carrying a risk to susceptible populations at the wildlife-domestic interface and to threatened species, such as the wildcat (Felis silvestris) and the critically

  4. Snapshot of viral infections in wild carnivores reveals ubiquity of parvovirus and susceptibility of Egyptian mongoose to feline panleukopenia virus.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Margarida D; Henriques, Ana Margarida; Barros, Sílvia Carla; Fagulha, Teresa; Mendonça, Paula; Carvalho, Paulo; Monteiro, Madalena; Fevereiro, Miguel; Basto, Mafalda P; Rosalino, Luís Miguel; Barros, Tânia; Bandeira, Victor; Fonseca, Carlos; Cunha, Mónica V

    2013-01-01

    The exposure of wild carnivores to viral pathogens, with emphasis on parvovirus (CPV/FPLV), was assessed based on the molecular screening of tissue samples from 128 hunted or accidentally road-killed animals collected in Portugal from 2008 to 2011, including Egyptian mongoose (Herpestes ichneumon, n = 99), red fox (Vulpes vulpes, n = 19), stone marten (Martes foina, n = 3), common genet (Genetta genetta, n = 3) and Eurasian badger (Meles meles, n = 4). A high prevalence of parvovirus DNA (63%) was detected among all surveyed species, particularly in mongooses (58%) and red foxes (79%), along with the presence of CPV/FPLV circulating antibodies that were identified in 90% of a subset of parvovirus-DNA positive samples. Most specimens were extensively autolysed, restricting macro and microscopic investigations for lesion evaluation. Whenever possible to examine, signs of active disease were not present, supporting the hypothesis that the parvovirus vp2 gene fragments detected by real-time PCR possibly correspond to viral DNA reminiscent from previous infections. The molecular characterization of viruses, based on the analysis of the complete or partial sequence of the vp2 gene, allowed typifying three viral strains of mongoose and four red fox's as feline panleukopenia virus (FPLV) and one stone marten's as newCPV-2b type. The genetic similarity found between the FPLV viruses from free-ranging and captive wild species originated in Portugal and publicly available comparable sequences, suggests a closer genetic relatedness among FPLV circulating in Portugal. Although the clinical and epidemiological significance of infection could not be established, this study evidences that exposure of sympatric wild carnivores to parvovirus is common and geographically widespread, potentially carrying a risk to susceptible populations at the wildlife-domestic interface and to threatened species, such as the wildcat (Felis silvestris) and the critically

  5. Clinical and serological response of wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) to vaccination against canine distemper, canine parvovirus infection and rabies.

    PubMed

    van Heerden, J; Bingham, J; van Vuuren, M; Burroughs, R E J; Stylianides, E

    2002-03-01

    Wild dogs Lycaon pictuis (n = 8) were vaccinated 4 times against canine distemper (n = 8) (initially with inactivated and subsequently with live attenuated strains of canine distemper) and canine parvovirus infection (n = 8) over a period of 360 days. Four of the wild dogs were also vaccinated 3 times against rabies using a live oral vaccine and 4 with an inactivated parenteral vaccine. Commercially-available canine distemper, canine parvovirus and parenteral rabies vaccines, intended for use in domestic dogs, were used. None of the vaccinated dogs showed any untoward clinical signs. The inactivated canine distemper vaccine did not result in seroconversion whereas the attenuated live vaccine resulted in seroconversion in all wild dogs. Presumably protective concentrations of antibodies to canine distemper virus were present in all wild dogs for at least 451 days. Canine parvovirus haemagglutination inhibition titres were present in all wild dogs prior to the administration of vaccine and protective concentrations persisted for at least 451 days. Vaccination against parvovirus infection resulted in a temporary increase in canine parvovirus haemagglutination inhibition titres in most dogs. Administration of both inactivated parenteral and live oral rabies vaccine initially resulted in seroconversion in 7 of 8 dogs. These titres, however, dropped to very low concentrations within 100 days. Booster administrations resulted in increased antibody concentrations in all dogs. It was concluded that the vaccines were safe to use in healthy subadult wild dogs and that a vaccination protocol in free-ranging wild dogs should at least incorporate booster vaccinations against rabies 3-6 months after the first inoculation.

  6. Human fetal mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Keelin; Chan, Jerry

    2006-09-01

    Stem cells have been isolated at all stages of development from the early developing embryo to the post-reproductive adult organism. However, the fetal environment is unique as it is the only time in ontogeny that there is migration of stem cells in large numbers into different organ compartments. While fetal neural and haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been well characterised, only recently have mesenchymal stem cells from the human fetus been isolated and evaluated. Our group have characterised in human fetal blood, liver and bone marrow a population of non-haemopoietic, non-endothelial cells with an immunophenotype similar to adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). These cells, human fetal mesenchymal stem cells (hfMSC), are true multipotent stem cells with greater self-renewal and differentiation capacity than their adult counterparts. They circulate in first trimester fetal blood and have been found to traffic into the maternal circulation, engrafting in bone marrow, where they remain microchimeric for decades after pregnancy. Though fetal microchimerism has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, the biological role of hfMSC microchimerism is unknown. Potential downstream applications of hfMSC include their use as a target cell for non-invasive pre-natal diagnosis from maternal blood, and for fetal cellular and gene therapy. Using hfMSC in fetal therapy offers the theoretical advantages of avoidance of immune rejection, increased engraftment, and treatment before disease pathology sets in. Aside from allogeneic hfMSC in utero transplantation, the use of autologous hfMSC has been brought a step forward with the development of early blood sampling techniques, efficient viral transduction and clonal expansion. Work is ongoing to determine hfMSC fate post-transplantation in murine models of genetic disease. In this review we will examine what is known about hfMSC biology, as well as discussing areas for future research. The

  7. Fetal Programming and Cardiovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Barbara T.; Dasinger, John Henry; Intapad, Suttira

    2016-01-01

    Low birth weight serves as a crude proxy for impaired growth during fetal life and indicates a failure for the fetus to achieve its full growth potential. Low birth weight can occur in response to numerous etiologies that include complications during pregnancy, poor prenatal care, parental smoking, maternal alcohol consumption or stress. Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrate that birth weight is inversely associated with blood pressure and coronary heart disease. Sex and age impact the developmental programming of hypertension. In addition, impaired growth during fetal life also programs enhanced vulnerability to a secondary insult. Macrosomia, which occurs in response to maternal obesity, diabetes and excessive weight gain during gestation, is also associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Yet, the exact mechanisms that permanently change the structure, physiology and endocrine health of an individual across their lifespan following altered growth during fetal life are not entirely clear. Transmission of increased risk from one generation to the next in the absence of an additional prenatal insult indicates an important role for epigenetic processes. Experimental studies also indicate that the sympathetic nervous system, the renin angiotensin system, increased production of oxidative stress and increased endothelin play an important role in the developmental programming of blood pressure in later life. Thus, this review will highlight how adverse influences during fetal life and early development program an increased risk for cardiovascular disease including high blood pressure and provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the fetal origins of cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25880521

  8. Fetal tissue engineering: diaphragmatic replacement.

    PubMed

    Fauza, D O; Marler, J J; Koka, R; Forse, R A; Mayer, J E; Vacanti, J P

    2001-01-01

    Prosthetic repair of congenital diaphragmatic hernia has been associated with high complication rates. This study was aimed at applying fetal tissue engineering to diaphragmatic replacement. Fetal lambs underwent harvest of skeletal muscle specimens. Once expanded in vitro, fetal myoblasts were suspended in a collagen hydrogel submitted to controlled radial tension. The construct was then placed in a bioreactor. After birth, all animals underwent creation of 2 diaphragmatic defects. One defect was repaired with the autologous-engineered construct placed in between 2 acellular supporting membranes and the other with an identical construct but without any cells. Each animal was its own control (graft, n = 10). Animals were killed at different time-points postimplantation for histologic examination. Statistical analysis was by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Fetal myoblasts expanded up to twice as fast as neonatal cells. Hydrogel-based radial tension enhanced construct architecture by eliciting cell organization within the scaffold. No eventration was present in 4 of 5 engineered constructs but in 0 of 5 acellular grafts (P<.05). At harvest, engineered constructs were thick and histologically resembled normal skeletal muscle, whereas acellular grafts were thin, floppy, and showed low cell density with increased fibrosis. Unlike acellular grafts, engineered cellular diaphragmatic constructs are anatomically and histologically similar to normal muscle. Fetal tissue engineering may be a viable alternative for diaphragmatic replacement.

  9. Fetal nutrition and adult disease.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, K M; Barker, D J

    2000-05-01

    Recent research suggests that several of the major diseases of later life, including coronary heart disease, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes, originate in impaired intrauterine growth and development. These diseases may be consequences of "programming," whereby a stimulus or insult at a critical, sensitive period of early life has permanent effects on structure, physiology, and metabolism. Evidence that coronary heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes are programmed came from longitudinal studies of 25,000 UK men and women in which size at birth was related to the occurrence of the disease in middle age. People who were small or disproportionate (thin or short) at birth had high rates of coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol concentrations, and abnormal glucose-insulin metabolism. These relations were independent of the length of gestation, suggesting that cardiovascular disease is linked to fetal growth restriction rather than to premature birth. Replication of the UK findings has led to wide acceptance that low rates of fetal growth are associated with cardiovascular disease in later life. Impaired growth and development in utero seem to be widespread in the population, affecting many babies whose birth weights are within the normal range. Although the influences that impair fetal development and program adult cardiovascular disease remain to be defined, there are strong pointers to the importance of the fetal adaptations invoked when the maternoplacental nutrient supply fails to match the fetal nutrient demand.

  10. Fetal risk in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cheri P; Goodman, Lawrence H

    2012-02-01

    It is not uncommon to encounter situations in which radiologic examinations are necessary for accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of an expectant mother. The potential deleterious health consequences to the developing embryo and fetus from in utero irradiation include fetal death, congenital malformations, growth retardation, and carcinogenic and mutagenic effects. The likelihood of each effect is greatly dependent on the radiation dose and the gestational age of the conceptus at the time of exposure. In general, the average fetal doses from diagnostic imaging are <50 mGy (5 rad) and have not been associated with any significant adverse fetal effects. However, each case should be evaluated on an individual basis, and the risks should be explained to the patient before the examination. In addition, every effort should be made to reduce the fetal dose to as low as reasonably achievable. The biological effects of in utero radiation exposure, estimated fetal doses from various radiologic examinations, and general guidelines regarding diagnostic imaging during pregnancy will be discussed in this article. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Two cases of fetal goiter

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Ashish; Reddy, Murli Manohar; Panchani, Roopal; Varma, Tarun; Gupta, Nitinranjan; Tripathi, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Anterior fetal neck masses are rarely encountered. Careful routine ultrasound screening can reveal intrauterine fetal goiters (FGs). The incidence of goitrous hypothyroidism is 1 in 30,000-50,000 live births. The consequences of both FG and impaired thyroid function are serious. Aims and Objectives: To emphasize role of ultrasound in both invasive and non-invasive management of FG. Materials and Methods: Two pregnant patients, during second trimester, underwent routine antenatal ultrasound revealing FG, were investigated and managed. Results: Case 1: Revealed FG with fetal hypothyroidism. Intra-amniotic injection l-thyroxine given. Follow-up ultrasound confirmed the reduction of the goiter size. At birth, thyroid dyshormogenesis was suspected and neonate discharged on 50 mcg levothyroxine/day with normal growth and development so far. Case 2: Hypothyroid mother with twin pregnancy revealed FG, in twin 1, confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 × 1.63 cm). The other twin had no thyroid swelling. Cordocentesis confirmed hypothyroidism in twin 1. Maternal thyroxine dose increased as per biochemical parameters leading to reduction in FG size. Mother delivered preterm and none of the twins had thyroid swelling. Fetal euthyroidism was confirmed on biochemical screening. Conclusion: FG during pregnancy should be thoroughly evaluated, diagnosed and immediately treated; although in utero options for fetal hypothyroidism management are available, emphasis should be laid on non-invasive procedures. Newer and better resolution techniques in ultrasonography are more specific and at the same time are less harmful. PMID:23565428

  12. TLR-9 Contributes to the Antiviral Innate Immune Sensing of Rodent Parvoviruses MVMp and H-1PV by Normal Human Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Raykov, Zahari; Grekova, Svitlana P.; Hörlein, Rita; Leuchs, Barbara; Giese, Thomas; Giese, Nathalia A.; Rommelaere, Jean; Zawatzky, Rainer; Daeffler, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The oncotropism of Minute Virus of Mice (MVMp) is partially related to the stimulation of an antiviral response mediated by type-I interferons (IFNs) in normal but not in transformed mouse cells. The present work was undertaken to assess whether the oncotropism displayed against human cells by MVMp and its rat homolog H-1PV also depends on antiviral mechanisms and to identify the pattern recognition receptor (PRR) involved. Despite their low proliferation rate which represents a drawback for parvovirus multiplication, we used human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) as normal model specifically because all known PRRs are functional in this mixed cell population and moreover because some of its subsets are among the main IFN producers upon infections in mammals. Human transformed models consisted in lines and tumor cells more or less permissive to both parvoviruses. Our results show that irrespective of their permissiveness, transformed cells do not produce IFNs nor develop an antiviral response upon parvovirus infection. However, MVMp- or H-1PV-infected hPBMCs trigger such defense mechanisms despite an absence of parvovirus replication and protein expression, pointing to the viral genome as the activating element. Substantial reduction of an inhibitory oligodeoxynucleotide (iODN) of the latter IFN production identified TLR-9 as a potential PRR for parvoviruses in hPBMCs. However, neither the iODN treatment nor an antibody-induced neutralization of the IFN-triggered effects restored parvovirus multiplication in these cells as expected by their weak proliferation in culture. Finally, given that a TLR-9 activation could also not be observed in parvovirus-infected human lines reported to be endowed with a functional TLR-9 pathway (Namalwa, Raji, and HEK293-TLR9+/+), our data suggest that transformed human cells do not sense MVMp or H-1PV either because of an absence of PRR expression or an intrinsic, or virus-driven defect in the endosomal sensing of the

  13. Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, David; Morris, Rachel K; Kilby, Mark D

    2007-12-01

    Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction affects 2.2 per 10,000 births. It is a consequence of a range of pathological processes, most commonly posterior urethral valves (64%) or urethral atresia (39%). It is a condition of high mortality and morbidity associated with progressive renal dysfunction and oligohydramnios, and hence fetal pulmonary hypoplasia. Accurate detection is possible via ultrasound, but the underlying pathology is often unknown. In future, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be increasingly used alongside ultrasound in the diagnosis and assessment of fetuses with lower urinary tract obstruction. Fetal urine analysis may provide improvements in prenatal determination of renal prognosis, but the optimum criteria to be used remain unclear. It is now possible to decompress the obstruction in utero via percutaneous vesico-amniotic shunting or cystoscopic techniques. In appropriately selected fetuses intervention may improve perinatal survival, but long-term renal morbidity amongst survivors remains problematic.

  14. Passive Fetal Heart Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor); Wynkoop, Mark W. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. H. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A fetal heart monitoring system preferably comprising a backing plate having a generally concave front surface and a generally convex back surface, and at least one sensor element attached to the concave front surface for acquiring acoustic fetal heart signals produced by a fetus within a body. The sensor element has a shape that conforms to the generally concave back surface of the backing plate. In one embodiment, the at least one sensor element comprises an inner sensor, and a plurality of outer sensors surrounding the inner sensor. The fetal heart monitoring system can further comprise a web belt, and a web belt guide movably attached to the web belt. The web belt guide being is to the convex back surface of the backing plate.

  15. Fetal effects of psychoactive drugs.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Amy L; Ponder, Kathryn L; Padbury, James F; Lester, Barry M

    2009-09-01

    Psychoactive drug use by pregnant women has the potential to effect fetal development; the effects are often thought to be drug-specific and gestational age dependent. This article describes the effects of three drugs with similar molecular targets that involve monoaminergic transmitter systems: cocaine, methamphetamine, and selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) used to treat maternal depression during pregnancy. We propose a possible common epigenetic mechanism for their potential effects on the developing child. We suggest that exposure to these substances acts as a stressor that affects fetal programming, disrupts fetal placental monoamine transporter expression and alters neuroendocrine and neurotransmitter system development. We also discuss neurobehavioral techniques that may be useful in the early detection of the effects of in utero drug exposure.

  16. [Fetal macrosomia: mode of delivery].

    PubMed

    Tatarova, S; Popov, I; Khristova, P

    2004-01-01

    This study was provided among 1847 deliveries from January, 1 to December, 31, 2003. The aim of the study was to examine the correlation between antenatal diagnosis "fetal macrosomia" and the mode of delivery. We found that among the cases with birth weight > or = 4000 g and antenatal diagnosis "fetal macrosomia" the rate of cesarean section was fourfold higher than among the cases without such a diagnosis. There weren't statistically significant correlation between the cases with antenatal diagnosis "fetal macrosomia " and the cases with estimated birth weight < or = 3999g in reference to the mother's age and weight, parity, fundal height and abdominal circumference. There are insignificant differences between both of groups in reference to gestacional age and birth.

  17. Physiology of the fetal circulation.

    PubMed

    Kiserud, Torvid

    2005-12-01

    Our understanding of fetal circulatory physiology is based on experimental animal data, and this continues to be an important source of new insight into developmental mechanisms. A growing number of human studies have investigated the human physiology, with results that are similar but not identical to those from animal studies. It is time to appreciate these differences and base more of our clinical approach on human physiology. Accordingly, the present review focuses on distributional patterns and adaptational mechanisms that were mainly discovered by human studies. These include cardiac output, pulmonary and placental circulation, fetal brain and liver, venous return to the heart, and the fetal shunts (ductus venosus, foramen ovale and ductus arteriosus). Placental compromise induces a set of adaptational and compensational mechanisms reflecting the plasticity of the developing circulation, with both short- and long-term implications. Some of these aspects have become part of the clinical physiology of today with consequences for surveillance and treatment.

  18. 3D ultrasound in fetal spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Schramm, T; Gloning, K-P; Minderer, S; Tutschek, B

    2008-12-01

    3D ultrasound can be used to study the fetal spine, but skeletal mode can be inconclusive for the diagnosis of fetal spina bifida. We illustrate a diagnostic approach using 2D and 3D ultrasound and indicate possible pitfalls.

  19. Fetal heart and uterine contraction monitor (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The fetal heart monitor and uterine contraction monitor provide a continuous record of the baby's heart rate and the mother's contraction rate as labor progresses. This device can provide early warning of fetal distress.

  20. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome a Global Problem

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163096.html Fetal Alcohol Syndrome a Global Problem: Report Countries with highest alcohol ... 000 children worldwide are born each year with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), a new report finds. The syndrome refers ...

  1. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs): Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... FASD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are a group of conditions that ...

  2. Verification of fetal brain responses by coregistration of fetal ultrasound and fetal magnetoencephalography data.

    PubMed

    Micheli, C; McCubbin, J; Murphy, P; Eswaran, H; Lowery, C L; Ortiz, E; Preissl, H

    2010-01-15

    Fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG) is used to study neurological functions of the developing fetus by measuring magnetic signals generated by electrical sources within the fetal brain. For this aim either auditory or visual stimuli are presented and evoked brain activity or spontaneous activity is measured at the sensor level. However a limiting factor of this approach is the low signal to noise ratio (SNR) of recorded signals. To overcome this limitation, advanced signal processing techniques such as spatial filters (e.g., beamformer) can be used to increase SNR. One crucial aspect of this technique is the forward model and, in general, a simple spherical head model is used. This head model is an integral part of a model search approach to analyze the data due to the lack of exact knowledge about the location of the fetal head. In the present report we overcome this limitation by a coregistration of volumetric ultrasound images with fMEG data. In a first step we validated the ultrasound to fMEG coregistration with a phantom and were able to show that the coregistration error is below 2 cm. In the second step we compared the results gained by the model search approach to the exact location of the fetal head determined on pregnant mothers by ultrasound. The results of this study clearly show that the results of the model search approach are in accordance with the location of the fetal head.

  3. Evolutionary Reconstructions of the Transferrin Receptor of Caniforms Supports Canine Parvovirus Being a Re-emerged and Not a Novel Pathogen in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kaelber, Jason T.; Demogines, Ann; Harbison, Carole E.; Allison, Andrew B.; Goodman, Laura B.; Ortega, Alicia N.; Sawyer, Sara L.; Parrish, Colin R.

    2012-01-01

    Parvoviruses exploit transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR) for cellular entry in carnivores, and specific interactions are key to control of host range. We show that several key mutations acquired by TfR during the evolution of Caniforms (dogs and related species) modified the interactions with parvovirus capsids by reducing the level of binding. These data, along with signatures of positive selection in the TFRC gene, are consistent with an evolutionary arms race between the TfR of the Caniform clade and parvoviruses. As well as the modifications of amino acid sequence which modify binding, we found that a glycosylation site mutation in the TfR of dogs which provided resistance to the carnivore parvoviruses which were in circulation prior to about 1975 predates the speciation of coyotes and dogs. Because the closely-related black-backed jackal has a TfR similar to their common ancestor and lacks the glycosylation site, reconstructing this mutation into the jackal TfR shows the potency of that site in blocking binding and infection and explains the resistance of dogs until recent times. This alters our understanding of this well-known example of viral emergence by indicating that canine parvovirus emergence likely resulted from the re-adaptation of a parvovirus to the resistant receptor of a former host. PMID:22570610

  4. The inactivation of a bovine enterovirus and a bovine parvovirus in cattle manure by anaerobic digestion, heat treatment, gamma irradiation, ensilage and composting.

    PubMed Central

    Monteith, H. D.; Shannon, E. E.; Derbyshire, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    A bovine enterovirus and a bovine parvovirus seeded into liquid cattle manure were rapidly inactivated by anaerobic digestion under thermophilic conditions (55 degrees C), but the same viruses survived for up to 13 and 8 days respectively under mesophilic conditions (35 degrees C). The enterovirus was inactivated in digested liquid manure heated to 70 degrees C for 30 min, but the parvovirus was not inactivated by this treatment. The enterovirus, seeded into single cell protein (the solids recovered by centrifugation of digested liquid manure), was inactivated by a gamma irradiation dose of 1.0 Mrad, but the parvovirus survived this dose. When single cell protein seeded with bovine enterovirus or bovine parvovirus was ensiled with cracked corn, the enterovirus was inactivated after a period of 30 days, while the parvovirus survived for 30 days in one of two experiments. Neither the enterovirus nor the parvovirus survived composting for 28 days in a thermophilic aerobic environment when seeded into the solid fraction of cattle manure. It was concluded that, of the procedures tested, only anaerobic digestion under thermophilic conditions appeared to be reliable method of viral inactivation to ensure the safety of single cell protein for refeeding to livestock. Composting appeared to be a suitable method for the disinfection of manure for use as a soil conditioner. PMID:3016083

  5. The inactivation of a bovine enterovirus and a bovine parvovirus in cattle manure by anaerobic digestion, heat treatment, gamma irradiation, ensilage and composting.

    PubMed

    Monteith, H D; Shannon, E E; Derbyshire, J B

    1986-08-01

    A bovine enterovirus and a bovine parvovirus seeded into liquid cattle manure were rapidly inactivated by anaerobic digestion under thermophilic conditions (55 degrees C), but the same viruses survived for up to 13 and 8 days respectively under mesophilic conditions (35 degrees C). The enterovirus was inactivated in digested liquid manure heated to 70 degrees C for 30 min, but the parvovirus was not inactivated by this treatment. The enterovirus, seeded into single cell protein (the solids recovered by centrifugation of digested liquid manure), was inactivated by a gamma irradiation dose of 1.0 Mrad, but the parvovirus survived this dose. When single cell protein seeded with bovine enterovirus or bovine parvovirus was ensiled with cracked corn, the enterovirus was inactivated after a period of 30 days, while the parvovirus survived for 30 days in one of two experiments. Neither the enterovirus nor the parvovirus survived composting for 28 days in a thermophilic aerobic environment when seeded into the solid fraction of cattle manure. It was concluded that, of the procedures tested, only anaerobic digestion under thermophilic conditions appeared to be reliable method of viral inactivation to ensure the safety of single cell protein for refeeding to livestock. Composting appeared to be a suitable method for the disinfection of manure for use as a soil conditioner.

  6. Gestational diabetes affects fetal autophagy.

    PubMed

    Avagliano, Laura; Massa, Valentina; Terraneo, Laura; Samaja, Michele; Doi, Patrizia; Bulfamante, Gaetano Pietro; Marconi, Anna Maria

    2017-07-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in the preservation of energy homeostasis and its dysregulation has been implicated in the development of metabolic disorders, including diabetes mellitus. Gestational diabetes mellitus represents a risk for fetal morbidity and mortality. The present study focuses on the autophagy process in human diabetic placenta and fetal pancreas, compared with controls. Analysis of the autophagy markers LC3, Beclin-1 and p62 suggests an impairment of the autophagy process in diabetic placentas. Results indicate an association between gestational diabetes and autophagy, emphasizing the importance of unravelling the mechanisms regulating this relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolic requirements for fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Milley, J R; Simmons, M A

    1979-09-01

    Table 1 outlines a metabolic balance sheet for the sheep fetus. It is clear that maternal substrate concentrations as well as placental function are important in assuring the provision of adequate substrate to meet fetal metabolic and growth requirements. It is intriguing that the fetus appears to use substrates not usually regarded as important in extrauterine diets (lactate) and to use substrates for catabolic purposes normally thought to be primarily anabolic substrates (amino acids). This information emphasizes the hazards of extrapolating metabolic and nutritional patterns seen in extrauterine life in reaching conclusions concerning the fetus. It likewise emphasizes the importance of ongoing studies in maternal and fetal nutrition and metabolism.

  8. Fetal origins of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Barker, D J

    1999-04-01

    Low birthweight, thinness and short body length at birth are now known to be associated with increased rates of cardiovascular disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes in adult life. The fetal origins hypothesis proposes that these diseases originate through adaptations which the fetus makes when it is undernourished. These adaptations may be cardiovascular, metabolic or endocrine. They permanently change the structure and function of the body. Prevention of the diseases may depend on prevention of imbalances in fetal growth or imbalances between prenatal and postnatal growth, or imbalances in nutrient supply to the fetus.

  9. A Sensitive Magnetocardiograph for Fetal Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Abstract-To use fetal magnetocardiography for diagnostic purposes, it is important to know the requirements for the instrument. One of the... magnetocardiography , fetal arrhythmia I. INTRODUCTION The fetal magnetocardiograph is intended to measure magnetic fields arising from currents generated in... Magnetocardiography in the diagnosis of fetal arrhythmia” Br. J. Obstet. Gynaecol., 1999, 106, pp. 1200-1208. [2] T. Menéndes, S. Achenbach, E

  10. The fetal patient – ethical aspects of fetal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Deprest, J.; Toelen, J.; Debyser, Z.; Rodrigues, C.; Devlieger, R.; De Catte, L.; Lewi, L.; Van Mieghem, T.; Naulaers, G.; Vandevelde, M.; Claus, F.; Dierickx, K.

    2011-01-01

    The pregnant patient is a vulnerable subject, and even more so when a serious fetal condition is diagnosed. (Invasive) fetal therapy should only be offered when there is a good chance that the life of the fetus will be saved, or irreversible damage by the disease or disability is prevented. Following diagnosis of a potentially treatable condition, the patient needs to be referred to a center with sufficient expertise in diagnosis and all therapeutic options. Preferences of the physician towards one or another antenatal intervention is not at stake prior to that moment. When fetal therapy is justified, it should be offered with full respect for maternal choice and individual assessment and perception of potential risks, and should be at the location where there is sufficient expertise. For therapies of unproven benefit, the absence of evidence must be disclosed, and therapy should only be undertaken with full voluntary consent of the mother. These ought to be undertaken within well designed and approved trials and only by experts in the treatment modality. Potential risks and eventual morbidities in case of therapeutic failure should be part of the counselling, neither should fetal therapy be presented as an alternative to termination of pregnancy PMID:24753868

  11. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects: Principles for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess,Donna M.; Streissguth, Ann P.

    1992-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), the leading cause of mental retardation, often goes unrecognized because of social and emotional taboos about alcohol and alcoholism. This article describes medical and behavioral characteristics of FAS children and describes guiding principles for educators, based on early intervention, teaching communication and…

  12. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects: Principles for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess,Donna M.; Streissguth, Ann P.

    1992-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), the leading cause of mental retardation, often goes unrecognized because of social and emotional taboos about alcohol and alcoholism. This article describes medical and behavioral characteristics of FAS children and describes guiding principles for educators, based on early intervention, teaching communication and…

  13. Quantitative analysis of waterfowl parvoviruses in geese and Muscovy ducks by real-time polymerase chain reaction: correlation between age, clinical symptoms and DNA copy number of waterfowl parvoviruses.

    PubMed

    Woźniakowski, Grzegorz; Samorek-Salamonowicz, Elżbieta; Kozdruń, Wojciech

    2012-03-15

    Waterfowl parvoviruses cause serious loss in geese and ducks production. Goose parvovirus (GPV) is infectious for geese and ducks while Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) infects Muscovy ducks only. So far, for these viruses' sensitive detection polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) were applied. However, there was no molecular biology method for both waterfowl parvoviruses detection and quantification which could unify the laboratory procedures. The level of GPV and MDPV replication and distribution plays a significant role in the parvoviral infection progress and is strictly correlated to clinical symptoms. Meanwhile, experiments conducted previously on GPV distribution in geese, performed as animal trial, did not involve epidemiological data from the disease field cases. The study on the correlation between age, clinical symptoms and viral DNA copy number may be benefitable in understanding the GPV and MDPV infection. Such data may also aid in determination of the stage and severity of the infection with parvoviruses. Therefore the aim of this study was to develop quantitative real-time PCR for parallel detection of GPV and MDPV in geese and Muscovy ducks and to determine the correlation between the age of the infected birds, clinical symptoms and DNA copy number for the estimation of the disease stage or severity. In order to develop quantitative real-time PCR the viral material was collected from 13 farms of geese and 3 farms of Muscovy ducks. The designed primers and Taqman probe for real-time PCR were complementary to GPV and MDPV inverted terminal repeats region. The pITR plasmid was constructed, purified and used to prepare dilutions for standard curve preparation and DNA quantification. The applied method detected both GPV and MDPV in all the examined samples extracted from the heart and liver of the infected birds. The conducted correlation tests have shown relationship between age, clinical symptoms during

  14. Practice Bulletin No. 173: Fetal Macrosomia.

    PubMed

    2016-11-01

    Suspected fetal macrosomia is encountered commonly in obstetric practice. As birth weight increases, the likelihood of labor abnormalities, shoulder dystocia, birth trauma, and permanent injury to the neonate increases. The purpose of this document is to quantify those risks, address the accuracy and limitations of methods for estimating fetal weight, and suggest clinical management for a pregnancy with suspected fetal macrosomia.

  15. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome "Chemical Genocide."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    In the Northern Plains of the United States, 100% of Indian reservations are affected by alcohol related problems. Approximately 90% of Native American adults are currently alcohol users or abusers or are recovering from alcohol abuse. Alcohol consumption has a devastating effect on the unborn. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is an irreversible birth…

  16. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome "Chemical Genocide."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asetoyer, Charon

    In the Northern Plains of the United States, 100% of Indian reservations are affected by alcohol related problems. Approximately 90% of Native American adults are currently alcohol users or abusers or are recovering from alcohol abuse. Alcohol consumption has a devastating effect on the unborn. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is an irreversible birth…

  17. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    All Indian Pueblo Council, Albuquerque, NM.

    The guide was developed to assist professionals working with American Indian people as a resource in obtaining printed and non-printed materials on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. The resource guide is divided into the following sections: films (4), books (5), bibliographies (2), pamphlets (16), posters (5), slides (2), training curriculum (3), and…

  18. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Lisa

    This resource guide provides information on programs, publications, organizations, and other resources related to prevention of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). The purpose of this guide is to assist health care providers to comply with Indian Health Service (IHS) FAS goals and objectives. It gives examples of community approaches to FAS prevention,…

  19. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    All Indian Pueblo Council, Albuquerque, NM.

    The guide was developed to assist professionals working with American Indian people as a resource in obtaining printed and non-printed materials on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. The resource guide is divided into the following sections: films (4), books (5), bibliographies (2), pamphlets (16), posters (5), slides (2), training curriculum (3), and…

  20. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Lisa

    This resource guide provides information on programs, publications, organizations, and other resources related to prevention of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). The purpose of this guide is to assist health care providers to comply with Indian Health Service (IHS) FAS goals and objectives. It gives examples of community approaches to FAS prevention,…

  1. Fetal growth restriction: current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Caetano, Ana Carolina Rabachini; Zamarian, Ana Cristina Perez; Mazzola, Jaqueline Brandão; Silva, Carolina Pacheco; Marçal, Vivian Macedo Gomes; Lobo, Thalita Frutuoso; Peixoto, Alberto Borges; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2017-05-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a condition that affects 5-10% of pregnancies and is the second most common cause of perinatal mortality. This review presents the most recent knowledge on FGR and focuses on the etiology, classification, prediction, diagnosis, and management of the condition, as well as on its neurological complications. The Pubmed, SCOPUS, and Embase databases were searched using the term "fetal growth restriction". Fetal growth restriction (FGR) may be classified as early or late depending on the time of diagnosis. Early FGR (<32 weeks) is associated with substantial alterations in placental implantation with elevated hypoxia, which requires cardiovascular adaptation. Perinatal morbidity and mortality rates are high. Late FGR (≥32 weeks) presents with slight deficiencies in placentation, which leads to mild hypoxia and requires little cardiovascular adaptation. Perinatal morbidity and mortality rates are lower. The diagnosis of FGR may be clinical; however, an arterial and venous Doppler ultrasound examination is essential for diagnosis and follow-up. There are currently no treatments to control FGR; the time at which pregnancy is interrupted is of vital importance for protecting both the mother and fetus. Early diagnosis of FGR is very important, because it enables the identification of the etiology of the condition and adequate monitoring of the fetal status, thereby minimizing risks of premature birth and intrauterine hypoxia.

  2. Fetal programming and environmental exposures ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fetal programming is an enormously complex process that relies on numerous environmental inputs from uterine tissue, the placenta, the maternal blood supply, and other sources. Recent evidence has made clear that the process is not based entirely on genetics, but rather on a delicate series of interactions between genes and the environment. It is likely that epigenctic (“above the genome”) changes are responsible for modifying gene expression in the developing fetus, and these modifications can have long-lasting health impacts. Determining which epigenetic regulators are most vital in embryonic development will improve pregnancy outcomes and our ability to treat and prevent disorders that emerge later in life. “Fetal Programming and Environmental Exposures: Implications for Prenatal Care and Preterm Birth’ began with a keynote address by Frederick vom Saal, who explained that low-level exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) perturbs hormone systems in utero and can have negative effects on fetal development. vom Saal presented data on the LOC bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen-mimicking compound found in many plastics. He suggested that low-dose exposure to LOCs can alter the development process and enhance chances of acquiring adult diseases, such as breastcancer, diabetes, and even developmental disorders such as attention deficit disorder (ADHD).’ Fetal programming is an enormously complex process that relies on numerous environmental inputs

  3. Fetal programming of neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Faa, Gavino; Manchia, Mirko; Pintus, Roberta; Gerosa, Clara; Marcialis, Maria Antonietta; Fanos, Vassilios

    2016-09-01

    Starting from the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypotheses proposed by David Barker, namely fetal programming, in the past years, there is a growing evidence of the major role played by epigenetic factors during the intrauterine life and the perinatal period. Furthermore, it has been assessed that these factors can affect the health status in infancy and even in adulthood. In this review, we focus our attention on the fetal programming of the brain, analyzing the most recent literature concerning the epigenetic factors that can influence the development of neuropsychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorders, major depressive disorders, and schizophrenia. The perinatal epigenetic factors have been divided in two main groups: maternal factors and fetal factors. The maternal factors include diet, smoking, alcoholism, hypertension, malnutrition, trace elements, stress, diabetes, substance abuse, and exposure to environmental toxicants, while the fetal factors include hypoxia/asphyxia, placental insufficiency, prematurity, low birth weight, drugs administered to the mother or to the baby, and all factors causing intrauterine growth restriction. A better comprehension of the possible mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these diseases may help researchers and clinicians develop new diagnostic tools and treatments to offer these patients a tailored medical treatment strategy to improve their quality of life. Birth Defects Research (Part C) 108:207-223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Hypoxia and Fetal Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, A.J.; Zhang, L

    2010-01-01

    Fetal hearts show a remarkable ability to develop under hypoxic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of fetal hearts allows sustained development under low oxygen conditions. In fact, hypoxia is critical for proper myocardial formation. Particularly, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor play central roles in hypoxia-dependent signaling in fetal heart formation, impacting embryonic outflow track remodeling and coronary vessel growth. Although HIF is not the only gene involved in adaptation to hypoxia, its role places it as a central figure in orchestrating events needed for adaptation to hypoxic stress. Although “normal” hypoxia (lower oxygen tension in the fetus as compared with the adult) is essential in heart formation, further abnormal hypoxia in utero adversely affects cardiogenesis. Prenatal hypoxia alters myocardial structure and causes a decline in cardiac performance. Not only are the effects of hypoxia apparent during the perinatal period, but prolonged hypoxia in utero also causes fetal programming of abnormality in the heart’s development. The altered expression pattern of cardioprotective genes such as protein kinase c epsilon, heat shock protein 70, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, likely predispose the developing heart to increased vulnerability to ischemia and reperfusion injury later in life. The events underlying the long-term changes in gene expression are not clear, but likely involve variation in epigenetic regulation. PMID:20712587

  5. [Fetal alcohol syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Cahuana, A; Krauel, J; Molina, V; Lizárraga, I; Alfonso, H

    1977-01-01

    A case of fetal alcohol syndrome is reported in a intrauterine growth retarded female newborn with dysmorphic features and congenital cardiopathy whose mother suffered from a chronic ethylism during pregnancy. Authors compare this case findings with the reported revisions of other authors.

  6. A Novel Murine Model of Parvovirus Associated Dilated Cardiomyopathy Induced by Immunization with VP1-Unique Region of Parvovirus B19

    PubMed Central

    Šimoliūnas, Egidijus; Rinkūnaitė, Ieva; Smalinskaitė, Luka; Podkopajev, Andrej; Bironaitė, Daiva; Weis, Cleo-Aron; Marx, Alexander; Bukelskienė, Virginija; Gretz, Norbert; Grabauskienė, Virginija; Labeit, Dittmar; Labeit, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Background. Parvovirus B19 (B19V) is a common finding in endomyocardial biopsy specimens from myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy patients. However, current understanding of how B19V is contributing to cardiac damage is rather limited due to the lack of appropriate mice models. In this work we demonstrate that immunization of BALB/c mice with the major immunogenic determinant of B19V located in the unique sequence of capsid protein VP1 (VP1u) is an adequate model to study B19V associated heart damage. Methods and Results. We immunized mice in the experimental group with recombinant VP1u; immunization with cardiac myosin derived peptide served as a positive reference and phosphate buffered saline served as negative control. Cardiac function and dimensions were followed echocardiographically 69 days after immunization. Progressive dilatation of left ventricle and decline of ejection fraction were observed in VP1u- and myosin-immunized mice. Histologically, severe cardiac fibrosis and accumulation of heart failure cells in lungs were observed 69 days after immunization. Transcriptomic profiling revealed ongoing cardiac remodeling and immune process in VP1u- and myosin-immunized mice. Conclusions. Immunization of BALB/c mice with VP1u induces dilated cardiomyopathy in BALB/c mice and it could be used as a model to study clinically relevant B19V associated cardiac damage. PMID:27812527

  7. First isolation of new canine parvovirus 2a from Tibetan mastiff and global analysis of the full-length VP2 gene of canine parvoviruses 2 in China.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhijun; Liang, Luqi; Zhao, Juan; Xu, Xiaoyang; Cao, Xuefeng; Liu, Xuehan; Zhou, Ziyao; Ren, Zhihua; Shen, Liuhong; Geng, Yi; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Guangneng

    2014-07-09

    Canine parvovirus 2 (CPV-2) was first identified in 1978, and is responsible for classic parvoviral enteritis. Despite the widespread vaccination of domestic carnivores, CPVs have remained important pathogens of domestic and wild carnivores. In this study, we isolated CPV-2 from Tibetan mastiffs and performed a global analysis of the complete VP2 gene sequences of CPV-2 strains in China. Six isolates were typed as new CPV-2a, according to key amino acid positions. On a phylogenetic tree, these six sequences formed a distinct clade. Five isolates occurred on the same branch as KF785794 from China and GQ379049 from Thailand; CPV-LS-ZA1 formed a separate subgroup with FJ435347 from China. One hundred ninety-eight sequences from various parts of China and the six sequences isolated here formed seven distinct clusters, indicating the high diversity of CPVs in China. Of 204 VP2 sequences, 183 (91.04%) encoded the mutation Ser297Ala, regardless of the antigenic type, implying that most Chinese CPV-2 strains contain the VP2 mutation Ser297Ala. However, the biological significance of this change from prototype CPV-2a/2b to new CPV-2a/2b types remains unclear. This study is the first to isolate new CPV-2a from the Tibetan mastiff. Our data show that new CPV-2a/2b variants are now circulating in China.

  8. First Isolation of New Canine Parvovirus 2a from Tibetan Mastiff and Global Analysis of the Full-Length VP2 Gene of Canine Parvoviruses 2 in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhijun; Liang, Luqi; Zhao, Juan; Xu, Xiaoyang; Cao, Xuefeng; Liu, Xuehan; Zhou, Ziyao; Ren, Zhihua; Shen, Liuhong; Geng, Yi; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Guangneng

    2014-01-01

    Canine parvovirus 2 (CPV-2) was first identified in 1978, and is responsible for classic parvoviral enteritis. Despite the widespread vaccination of domestic carnivores, CPVs have remained important pathogens of domestic and wild carnivores. In this study, we isolated CPV-2 from Tibetan mastiffs and performed a global analysis of the complete VP2 gene sequences of CPV-2 strains in China. Six isolates were typed as new CPV-2a, according to key amino acid positions. On a phylogenetic tree, these six sequences formed a distinct clade. Five isolates occurred on the same branch as KF785794 from China and GQ379049 from Thailand; CPV-LS-ZA1 formed a separate subgroup with FJ435347 from China. One hundred ninety-eight sequences from various parts of China and the six sequences isolated here formed seven distinct clusters, indicating the high diversity of CPVs in China. Of 204 VP2 sequences, 183 (91.04%) encoded the mutation Ser297Ala, regardless of the antigenic type, implying that most Chinese CPV-2 strains contain the VP2 mutation Ser297Ala. However, the biological significance of this change from prototype CPV-2a/2b to new CPV-2a/2b types remains unclear. This study is the first to isolate new CPV-2a from the Tibetan mastiff. Our data show that new CPV-2a/2b variants are now circulating in China. PMID:25007818

  9. [Prenatal diagnosis and management of fetal megacystis].

    PubMed

    El Fekih, Chiraz; Ouerdiane, Nadia; Mourali, Mechaal; Oueslati, Seddik; Oueslati, Boujemaa; Binous, Naoufel; Chaabène, Mounira; Ben Zineb, Nabil

    2009-12-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of fetal megacystis particularly in the first trimester requires assessement of pronostic and aetiologycal criteria. Report a new case. we report a case of severe megacystis in female fetus diagnosed at 23 weeks of gestation. There are no other associated ultrasound findings. Fetal karyotyping was normal (46XX). Termination of pregnancy for medical indications was realised because of progressive enlargement of the fetal bladder. Post-mortem examination shown megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome. Fetal megacystis is a severe condition when diagnosed early in pregnancy. Ultrasonography follow-up and fetal karyotyping are important to evaluate prognosis.

  10. Fetal neurosurgery: current state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Saadai, Payam; Runyon, Timothy; Farmer, Diana L

    2011-01-01

    Congenital CNS abnormalities have been targets for prenatal intervention since the founding of fetal surgery 30 years ago, but with historically variable results. Open fetal neurosurgery for myelomenigocele has demonstrated the most promising results of any CNS malformation. Improvements in the understanding of congenital diseases and in fetal surgical techniques have reopened the door to applying fetal surgery to other congenital CNS abnormalities. Advances in gene therapy, bioengineering and neonatal neuroprotection will aid in the future expansion of fetal neurosurgery to other CNS disorders. PMID:21709818

  11. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    PubMed Central

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features. PMID:27413248

  12. Unsupervised fetal cortical surface parcellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahdouh, Sonia; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-03-01

    At the core of many neuro-imaging studies, atlas-based brain parcellations are used for example to study normal brain evolution across the lifespan. These atlases rely on the assumption that the same anatomical features are present on all subjects to be studied and that these features are stable enough to allow meaningful comparisons between different brain surfaces and structures These methods, however, often fail when applied to fetal MRI data, due to the lack of consistent anatomical features present across gestation. This paper presents a novel surface-based fetal cortical parcellation framework which attempts to circumvent the lack of consistent anatomical features by proposing a brain parcellation scheme that is based solely on learned geometrical features. A mesh signature incorporating both extrinsic and intrinsic geometrical features is proposed and used in a clustering scheme to define a parcellation of the fetal brain. This parcellation is then learned using a Random Forest (RF) based learning approach and then further refined in an alpha-expansion graph-cut scheme. Based on the votes obtained by the RF inference procedure, a probability map is computed and used as a data term in the graph-cut procedure. The smoothness term is defined by learning a transition matrix based on the dihedral angles of the faces. Qualitative and quantitative results on a cohort of both healthy and high-risk fetuses are presented. Both visual and quantitative assessments show good results demonstrating a reliable method for fetal brain data and the possibility of obtaining a parcellation of the fetal cortical surfaces using only geometrical features.

  13. Human parvovirus 4 prevalence among HTLV-1/2 infected individuals in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Svetoslav Nanev; Otaguiri, Katia Kaori; Smid, Jerusa; de Oliveira, Augusto Cesar Penalva; Casseb, Jorge; Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Eis-Hübinger, Anna Maria; Kashima, Simone

    2017-04-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), a Tetraparvovirus, has been largely found in HIV, HBV, or HCV infected individuals. However, there is no data for the PARV4 occurrence in Human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1/2) infected individuals, despite similar transmission routes. Here, PARV4 viremia was evaluated in 130 HTLV infected patients under care of a Brazilian HTLV outpatient clinic. PARV4 viremia was detected in 6.2% of the HTLV-1 infected patients. Most PARV4 positives showed no evidence for parenterally transmitted infections. It is suggested that in Brazil, transmission routes of PARV4 are more complex than in Europe and North America and resemble those in Africa. J. Med. Virol. 89:748-752, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Double whammy- acute splenic sequestration crisis in patient with aplastic crisis due to acute parvovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Parminder S; K Virdi, Jaspreet; Patel, Rajeshkumar

    2017-07-01

    Splenic dysfunction is a major feature of sickle cell disease (SCD) and can manifest as acute splenic sequestration crisis (ASSC), which is the earliest life-threatening complication seen in patients with SCD. Aplastic crisis is another potentially deadly complication of sickle cell disease that develops when erythrocyte production temporarily drops. Infection with parvovirus B-19 frequently causes aplastic crises. These two complications are known to be mutually exclusive due to their classic presentation signs and symptoms but there have been few cases where a patient can have concomitant presentation of both phenomena, which can result in a fatal outcome. These few cases force us to rethink the etiology and subsequent management guidelines of these complications. We present to you a case of an unfortunate 23-year-old female who had both complications occurring at the same time, resulting in death.

  15. Parsing demographic effects of canine pParvovirus on a Minnesota wolf population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Goyal, Sagar M.

    2011-01-01

    We examined 35 years of relationships among wolf (Canis lupus) pup survival, population change and canine parvovirus (CPV) seroprevalence in Northeastern Minnesota to determine when CPV exerted its strongest effects. Using correlation analysis of data from five periods of 7-years each from 1973 through 2007, we learned that the strongest effect of CPV on pup survival (r = -0.73) and on wolf population change (r = -0.92) was during 1987 to 1993. After that, little effect was documented despite a mean CPV seroprevalence from 1994 of 2007 of 70.8% compared with 52.6% during 1987 to 1993. We conclude that after CPV became endemic and produced its peak effect on the study population, that population developed enough immunity to withstand the disease.

  16. A second neutralizing epitope of B19 parvovirus implicates the spike region in the immune response.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimoto, K; Rosenfeld, S; Frickhofen, N; Kennedy, D; Hills, R; Kajigaya, S; Young, N S

    1991-01-01

    We used 18 monoclonal antibodies against B19 parvovirus to identify neutralizing epitopes on the viral capsid. Of the 18 antibodies, 9 had in vitro neutralizing activity in a bone marrow colony culture assay. The overlapping polypeptide fragments spanning the B19 structural proteins were produced in a pMAL-c Escherichia coli expression system and used to investigate the binding sites of the neutralizing antibodies. One of the nine neutralizing antibodies reacted with both VP1 and VP2 capsid proteins and a single polypeptide fragment on an immunoblot, identifying a linear neutralizing epitope between amino acids 57 and 77 of the VP2 capsid protein. Eight of nine neutralizing antibodies failed to react with either of the capsid proteins or any polypeptide fragments, despite reactivities with intact virions in a radioimmunoassay, suggesting that additional conformationally dependent neutralizing epitopes exist. Images PMID:1719240

  17. Parvovirus particles and movement in the cellular cytoplasm and effects of the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Tan, Min Jie Alvin; Parrish, Colin R

    2014-05-01

    Cell infection by parvoviruses requires that capsids be delivered from outside the cell to the cytoplasm, followed by genome trafficking to the nucleus. Here we microinject capsids into cells that lack receptors and followed their movements within the cell over time. In general the capsids remained close to the positions where they were injected, and most particles did not move to the vicinity of or enter the nucleus. When 70 kDa-dextran was injected along with the capsids that did not enter the nucleus in significant amounts. Capsids conjugated to peptides containing the SV40 large T-antigen nuclear localization signal remained in the cytoplasm, although bovine serum albumen conjugated to the same peptide entered the nucleus rapidly. No effects of disruption of microfilaments, intermediate filaments, or microtubules on the distribution of the capsids were observed. These results suggest that movement of intact capsids within cells is primarily associated with passive processes.

  18. Multiplex real-time PCR for identification of canine parvovirus antigenic types.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Chandra, Mudit; Dwivedi, P N; Narang, Deepti

    2016-07-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is an important disease causing gastroenteritis and/or haemorrhagic gastroenteritis in dogs. There are four antigenic types of CPV reported worldwide viz. CPV 2, CPV 2a, CPV 2b and CPV 2c. The diagnosis of CPV with the identification of the antigen type responsible remains problematic. In the present study, identification as well as antigenic typing of CPV was done using a de novo multiplex real time PCR to combat the problem of antigenic type identification. From the study it could be concluded that the here developed multiplex real time PCR assay could be used for rapid detection of CPV as well as typing of its three antigenic types.

  19. Parvovirus particles and movement in the cellular cytoplasm and effects of the cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Tan, Min Jie Alvin Parrish, Colin R.

    2014-05-15

    Cell infection by parvoviruses requires that capsids be delivered from outside the cell to the cytoplasm, followed by genome trafficking to the nucleus. Here we microinject capsids into cells that lack receptors and followed their movements within the cell over time. In general the capsids remained close to the positions where they were injected, and most particles did not move to the vicinity of or enter the nucleus. When 70 kDa-dextran was injected along with the capsids that did not enter the nucleus in significant amounts. Capsids conjugated to peptides containing the SV40 large T-antigen nuclear localization signal remained in the cytoplasm, although bovine serum albumen conjugated to the same peptide entered the nucleus rapidly. No effects of disruption of microfilaments, intermediate filaments, or microtubules on the distribution of the capsids were observed. These results suggest that movement of intact capsids within cells is primarily associated with passive processes.

  20. Parvovirus particles and movement in the cellular cytoplasm and effects of the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Tan, Min Jie Alvin; Parrish, Colin R.

    2014-01-01

    Cell infection by parvoviruses requires that capsids be delivered from outside the cell to the cytoplasm, followed by genome trafficking to the nucleus. Here we microinject capsids into cells that lack receptors and followed their movements within the cell over time. In general the capsids remained close to the positions where they were injected, and most particles did not move to the vicinity of or enter the nucleus. When 70 kDa-dextran was injected along with the capsids that did not enter the nucleus in significant amounts. Capsids conjugated to peptides containing the SV40 large T antigen nuclear localization signal remained in the cytoplasm, although bovine serum albumen conjugated to the same peptide entered the nucleus rapidly. No effects of disruption of microfilaments, intermediate filaments, or microtubules on the distribution of the capsids were observed. These results suggest that movement of intact capsids within cells is primarily associated with passive processes. PMID:24889253

  1. Parvovirus B19 Nonstructural Protein-Induced Damage of Cellular DNA and Resultant Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Brian D.; Kivovich, Violetta; Gilbert, Leona; Naides, Stanley J.

    2011-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 is a widespread virus with diverse clinical presentations. The viral nonstructural protein, NS1, binds to and cleaves the viral genome, and induces apoptosis when transfected into nonpermissive cells, such as hepatocytes. We hypothesized that the cytotoxicity of NS1 in such cells results from chromosomal DNA damage caused by the DNA-nicking and DNA-attaching activities of NS1. Upon testing this hypothesis, we found that NS1 covalently binds to cellular DNA and is modified by PARP, an enzyme involved in repairing single-stranded DNA nicks. We furthermore discovered that the DNA nick repair pathway initiated by poly(ADPribose)polymerase and the DNA repair pathways initiated by ATM/ATR are necessary for efficient apoptosis resulting from NS1 expression. PMID:21278893

  2. Expression and subcellular targeting of canine parvovirus capsid proteins in baculovirus-transduced NLFK cells.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Leona; Välilehto, Outi; Kirjavainen, Sanna; Tikka, Päivi J; Mellett, Mark; Käpylä, Pirjo; Oker-Blom, Christian; Vuento, Matti

    2005-01-17

    A mammalian baculovirus delivery system was developed to study targeting in Norden Laboratories feline kidney (NLFK) cells of the capsid proteins of canine parvovirus (CPV), VP1 and VP2, or corresponding counterparts fused to EGFP. VP1 and VP2, when expressed alone, both had equal nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution. However, assembled form of VP2 had a predominantly cytoplasmic localization. When VP1 and VP2 were simultaneously present in cells, their nuclear localization increased. Thus, confocal immunofluorescence analysis of cells transduced with the different baculovirus constructs or combinations thereof in the absence or presence of infecting CPV revealed that the VP1 protein is a prerequisite for efficient targeting of VP2 to the nucleus. The baculovirus vectors were functional and the genes of interest efficiently introduced to this CPV susceptible mammalian cell line. Thus, we show evidence that the system could be utilized to study targeting of the CPV capsid proteins.

  3. Primary human parvovirus B19 infection in an HIV infected patient on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Gadwalkar, Srikant R; Deepa, D V; Katageri, Anand; Murthy, P Rama; Dhar, Ravi

    2013-12-01

    Persons with HIV infection frequently present with anaemia from different causes, including use of antiretroviral therapy (typically zidovudine), iron deficiency, vitamin B12 deficiency, opportunistic infections (such as mycobacterial and fungal infections), chronic disease, AIDS-associated malignancies, autoimmune haemolysis, and direct effects of HIV infection itself. Persistent infection with Parvovirus B19 (B19) is an important treatable cause of anaemia in HIV-infected patients. We present a case of anaemia in HIV positive patient who did not respond to change of drug therapy and nutritional supplements. Bone marrow biopsy suggested parvo virus infection. Chronic anaemia due to Parvo virus B19 infection is a treatable cause. Human Parvo virus B19 infection is a diagnosis of exclusion in patients who are started on antiretroviral therapy develop anaemia and later not responding to empirical management. Chronic anaemia requiring recurrent transfusions in HIV positive patient Parvo virus infection should be suspected and evaluated.

  4. Characterization of hepatopancreatic parvo-like virus, a second unusual parvovirus pathogenic for penaeid shrimps.

    PubMed

    Bonami, J R; Mari, J; Poulos, B T; Lightner, D V

    1995-04-01

    The hepatopancreatic parvo-like virus (HPV) of penaeid shrimp was extracted from infected shrimp tissues, purified and subsequently characterized. The viral particles, icosahedral in shape, are 22 nm in diameter and possess a buoyant density of 1.41 g/ml. They contain ssDNA, of approximately 5 kb in size which encodes a single polypeptide of 54 kDa. On the basis of its general characteristics this pathogenic agent belongs to the Parvoviridae family, but because of two unusual characteristics (capsid protein formed with a single polypeptide and genome structure more closely related to the autonomous parvoviruses rather than the densoviruses), it seems to constitute a novel group in the Parvoviridae family.

  5. Red baby syndrome a new disease due to parvovirus B-19 observed in Kerala.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, C K; Sugathan, P; Mampilly, Neena; Agarwal, Ramesh; Khare, Shashi; Lal, Shiv; Jayaram Paniker, C K

    2009-03-01

    Red Baby Syndrome is a new disease seen in infants and young children. Dramatic onset of clinical symptoms with high intensity, short duration and lack of similarity with other cutaneous lesions makes it distinct. Of 50 such patients studied over a period of 5 years, half were below one year of age. Abrupt onset of high fever and generalized erythema involving the entire skin, which is swollen and tender is characteristic. These children were highly irritable and had paradoxical cry when cuddled. Rapid resolution of symptoms occurred in 7-10 days with extensive desquamation. Routine investigations were normal, C-reactive protein was raised only in 10 patients. Human Parvo virus B-19 IgM antibodies were positive in 15 out of 24 patients. Real time polymerase chain reaction was positive for human parvovirus B 19 DNA in one. Histopathological changes in the skin biopsy showed post infectious vascular injury pattern.

  6. First evidence of feline herpesvirus, calicivirus, parvovirus, and Ehrlichia exposure in Brazilian free-ranging felids.

    PubMed

    Filoni, Claudia; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Bay, Gert; Durigon, Edison Luiz; Jorge, Rodrigo Silva Pinto; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2006-04-01

    Serum samples from 18 pumas (Puma concolor), one ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), and two little spotted cats (Leopardus tigrinus) collected from free-ranging animals in Brazil between 1998 and 2004 were tested by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) for antibodies to feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV 1), calicivirus (FCV), coronavirus (FCoV), parvo-virus (FPV), Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma pha-gocytophilum, and Bartonella henselae. Serum samples also were tested, by Western blot and ELISA, for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) specific antibodies and antigen, respectively, by Western blot for antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and by indirect ELISA for antibodies to puma lentivirus (PLV). Antibodies to FHV 1, FCV, FCoV, FPV, FeLV, FIV, PLV or related viruses, and to B. henselae were detected. Furthermore, high-titered antibodies to E. canis or a closely related agent were detected in a puma for the first time.

  7. Serologic investigations of canine parvovirus and canine distemper in relation to wolf (Canis lupus) pup mortalities.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M R; Boyd, D K; Pletscher, D H

    1994-04-01

    Twenty-one serum samples from 18 wolves (Canis lupus) were collected from 1985 to 1990 from northwestern Montana (USA) and southeastern British Columbia, Canada, and evaluated for antibodies to canine parvovirus (CPV), canine distemper (CD), infectious canine hepatitis, and Lyme disease; we found prevalences of 13 (65%) of 19, five (29%) of 17, seven (36%) of 19, and 0 of 20 wolves for these diseases, respectively. Pups died or disappeared in three of the eight packs studied. In these three packs, adult pack members had CPV titers > or = 1,600 or CD titers > or = 1,250. In packs that successfully raised pups, CPV and CD titers were low. We propose that CPV or CD may have caused some pup mortalities.

  8. Recurrent Severe Anaemia: A Rare Presentation of Parvovirus B19 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Gian; Charan, Shiv; Arora, Sahil; Singh, Parampreet

    2014-01-01

    Secondary pure red cell aplasia is usually seen in immunocompromised hosts or patients who have chronic haemolytic anaemia, which is caused by blood transfusion related transmission. The present patient, a 30-year-old immunocompetent female, presented several times with recurrent severe anaemia, over a period of one and half years. Her history, clinical examination and investigations did not reveal any indigenous drug intake, previous blood transfusions, haemolytic disorders, myeloproliferative disorders, pregnancies, autoimmune diseases or thymoma. She was found to have a thalassaemia minor trait, on the basis of which severity and recurrence of anaemia could not be explained, and on further evaluation, she was diagnosed to have acute aplastic crisis caused by Parvovirus B19 induced, acquired pure red cell aplasia. The co- existence of these two haematological disorders in an immunocompetent, non-transfusion dependent individual is rare, which makes our case report unique. PMID:24959472

  9. Further studies on thermal resistance of bovine parvovirus against moist and dry heat.

    PubMed

    Bräuniger, S; Peters, J; Borchers, U; Kao, M

    2000-03-01

    To supplement the results of thermal resistance of bovine parvovirus (Haden strain, BPV) published previously, we carried out assays at 60 degrees C (moist heat) to compare the thermal resistance of BPV with that of hepatitis B-virus (HBV). What we know about the resistance of HBV at a temperature of 60 degrees C is mainly based on data collected within the context of blood product pasteurization. The results suggest that at a temperature of 60 degrees C, BPV shows thermal resistance comparable to HBV. Thus, BPV--which is easier to handle--can be considered a good test virus to verify the efficacy of thermal disinfection techniques against HBV. BPV is very resistant against dry heat of 100 degrees C, the inactivation largely depending upon the residual moisture of the lyophilisate. Reducing the residual moisture from 2% to less than 1%, the exposure time has to be prolonged by ca. 2.5 times to achieve the same virucidal effect.

  10. Detection by PCR of wild-type canine parvovirus which contaminates dog vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Senda, M; Parrish, C R; Harasawa, R; Gamoh, K; Muramatsu, M; Hirayama, N; Itoh, O

    1995-01-01

    A method for detecting wild-type canine parvovirus (CPV) strains which contaminate vaccines for dogs has been developed by PCR. PCR primers which distinguish vaccine strains from the most common, recent strains of wild-type CPV in many countries, including Japan and the United States, were developed. This PCR is based on the differences in nucleotide sequences which determine the two antigenic types of this virus. CPV vaccine strains derived from antigenically old-type virus prevalent in former times were not detected by PCR with differential primers. Detection sensitivity of PCR was 100- to 10,000-fold higher than that of the culture method in Crandell feline kidney cells. PMID:7699026

  11. Epidemiological study of canine parvovirus infection in and around Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

    PubMed Central

    Behera, Monalisa; Panda, S. K.; Sahoo, P. K.; Acharya, A. P.; Patra, R. C.; Das, Sweta; Pati, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: An epidemiological study of canine parvovirus infection in dogs in and around Bhubaneswar, Odisha was conducted between December 2012 to March 2013 and prevalence rate was studied on the basis of age, breed, and sex. Materials and Methods: A total of 71 fecal samples from suspected diarrheic dogs were collected in sterile phosphate buffer saline (10% W/V) and examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of canine parvo virus infection, followed by epidemiological study in relation to age, breed, and sex. Results: Of 71 samples analyzed, 29 (40.85%) were found to be positive by PCR assay. The infection was higher in Deshi/local breeds (34.48%), followed by German shepherd (17.24%), equal incidences in mixed and Labrador retriever (10.34%), Rottweiler and German spitz showed 6.90% each and finally lower incidences in four breeds (3.45%) such as Dalmatians, Nea politan mastiff, Pug and Great Dane. Age-wise prevalence study revealed the infection being more in the age group of 3-6 months (41.37%), followed by equal incidences of 27.59% in 1-3 months and 6-12 months age group, and a low incidence in age groups above 12 months (3.45%). The incidence was predominantly higher in males (86.21%) than females (13.79%). Conclusions: The epidemiological analysis revealed that the breed wise prevalence was found to be more in Deshi breeds as compared to others, age groups below 6 months were found to be more prone to parvovirus infection and males were mostly infected. PMID:27046992

  12. Detecting Small Changes and Additional Peptides in the Canine Parvovirus Capsid Structure▿

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christian D. S.; Minkkinen, Eveliina; Bergkvist, Magnus; Hoelzer, Karin; Fisher, Mathew; Bothner, Brian; Parrish, Colin R.

    2008-01-01

    Parvovirus capsids are assembled from multiple forms of a single protein and are quite stable structurally. However, in order to infect cells, conformational plasticity of the capsid is required and this likely involves the exposure of structures that are buried within the structural models. The presence of functional asymmetry in the otherwise icosahedral capsid has also been proposed. Here we examined the protein composition of canine parvovirus capsids and evaluated their structural variation and permeability by protease sensitivity, spectrofluorometry, and negative staining electron microscopy. Additional protein forms identified included an apparent smaller variant of the virus protein 1 (VP1) and a small proportion of a cleaved form of VP2. Only a small percentage of the proteins in intact capsids were cleaved by any of the proteases tested. The capsid susceptibility to proteolysis varied with temperature but new cleavages were not revealed. No global change in the capsid structure was observed by analysis of Trp fluorescence when capsids were heated between 40°C and 60°C. However, increased polarity of empty capsids was indicated by bis-ANS binding, something not seen for DNA-containing capsids. Removal of calcium with EGTA or exposure to pHs as low as 5.0 had little effect on the structure, but at pH 4.0 changes were revealed by proteinase K digestion. Exposure of viral DNA to the external environment started above 50°C. Some negative stains showed increased permeability of empty capsids at higher temperatures, but no effects were seen after EGTA treatment. PMID:18701590

  13. GENETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF CANINE PARVOVIRUS IN SYMPATRIC FREE-RANGING WILD CARNIVORES IN PORTUGAL.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Carla; Santos, Nuno; Parrish, Colin; Thompson, Gertrude

    2017-10-01

    Since its emergence in the 1970s, canine parvovirus (CPV) has been reported in domestic and nondomestic carnivores worldwide with severe implications on their health and survival. Here, we aim to better understand CPV circulation in multihost-pathogens systems by characterizing CPV DNA or viruses in 227 free-ranging wild carnivores of 12 species from Portugal. Collected samples during 1995-2011 were analyzed by PCR and sequence analysis. The canine parvovirus DNA was detected in 4 (2%) animals of two species, namely in wolves (Canis lupus; 3/63, 5%, 95% confidence interval=1.6-3.15) and in a stone marten (Martes foina; 1/36, 3%, 95% confidence interval=0.5-14.2). Viruses in two wolves had VP2 residue 426 as aspartic acid (so-called CPV-2b) and the third had VP2 residue 426 as asparagine (CPV-2a), while the virus in the stone marten uniquely had VP2 residue 426 as glutamic acid (CPV-2c). The comparative analysis of the full-length VP2 gene of our isolates showed other nonsynonymous mutations. The phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the sequences from wolves clustered together, showing a close relationship with European domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) and wolf strains while the viral sequence from the stone marten grouped with other viruses contained the glutamic acid VP2 426 along with raccoon (Procyon lotor), bobcat (Lynx rufus), and domestic dog strains. This study confirmed that wild carnivores in Portugal are infected by CPV variants, strongly suggesting viral transmission between the wild and domestic populations and suggesting a need for a better understanding of the epidemiology of the disease and its management in wild populations.

  14. Role of Recycling Endosomes and Lysosomes in Dynein-Dependent Entry of Canine Parvovirus

    PubMed Central

    Suikkanen, Sanna; Sääjärvi, Katja; Hirsimäki, Jonna; Välilehto, Outi; Reunanen, Hilkka; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Vuento, Matti

    2002-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a nonenveloped virus with a 5-kb single-stranded DNA genome. Lysosomotropic agents and low temperature are known to prevent CPV infection, indicating that the virus enters its host cells by endocytosis and requires an acidic intracellular compartment for penetration into the cytoplasm. After escape from the endocytotic vesicles, CPV is transported to the nucleus for replication. In the present study the intracellular entry pathway of the canine parvovirus in NLFK (Nordisk Laboratory feline kidney) cells was studied. After clustering in clathrin-coated pits and being taken up in coated vesicles, CPV colocalized with coendocytosed transferrin in endosomes resembling recycling endosomes. Later, CPV was found to enter, via late endosomes, a perinuclear vesicular compartment, where it colocalized with lysosomal markers. There was no indication of CPV entry into the trans-Golgi or the endoplasmic reticulum. Similar results were obtained both with full and with empty capsids. The data thus suggest that CPV or its DNA was released from the lysosomal compartment to the cytoplasm to be then transported to the nucleus. Electron microscopy analysis revealed endosomal vesicles containing CPV to be associated with microtubules. In the presence of nocodazole, a microtubule-disrupting drug, CPV entry was blocked and the virus was found in peripheral vesicles. Thus, some step(s) of the entry process were dependent on microtubules. Microinjection of antibodies to dynein caused CPV to remain in pericellular vesicles. This suggests an important role for the motor protein dynein in transporting vesicles containing CPV along the microtubule network. PMID:11932407

  15. Role of recycling endosomes and lysosomes in dynein-dependent entry of canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Suikkanen, Sanna; Sääjärvi, Katja; Hirsimäki, Jonna; Välilehto, Outi; Reunanen, Hilkka; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Vuento, Matti

    2002-05-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a nonenveloped virus with a 5-kb single-stranded DNA genome. Lysosomotropic agents and low temperature are known to prevent CPV infection, indicating that the virus enters its host cells by endocytosis and requires an acidic intracellular compartment for penetration into the cytoplasm. After escape from the endocytotic vesicles, CPV is transported to the nucleus for replication. In the present study the intracellular entry pathway of the canine parvovirus in NLFK (Nordisk Laboratory feline kidney) cells was studied. After clustering in clathrin-coated pits and being taken up in coated vesicles, CPV colocalized with coendocytosed transferrin in endosomes resembling recycling endosomes. Later, CPV was found to enter, via late endosomes, a perinuclear vesicular compartment, where it colocalized with lysosomal markers. There was no indication of CPV entry into the trans-Golgi or the endoplasmic reticulum. Similar results were obtained both with full and with empty capsids. The data thus suggest that CPV or its DNA was released from the lysosomal compartment to the cytoplasm to be then transported to the nucleus. Electron microscopy analysis revealed endosomal vesicles containing CPV to be associated with microtubules. In the presence of nocodazole, a microtubule-disrupting drug, CPV entry was blocked and the virus was found in peripheral vesicles. Thus, some step(s) of the entry process were dependent on microtubules. Microinjection of antibodies to dynein caused CPV to remain in pericellular vesicles. This suggests an important role for the motor protein dynein in transporting vesicles containing CPV along the microtubule network.

  16. Persistent viremia by a novel parvovirus in a slow loris (Nycticebus coucang) with diffuse histiocytic sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Canuti, Marta; Williams, Cathy V.; Gadi, Sashi R.; Jebbink, Maarten F.; Oude Munnink, Bas B.; Jazaeri Farsani, Seyed Mohammad; Cullen, John M.; van der Hoek, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading health concerns for human and animal health. Since the tumorigenesis process is not completely understood and it is known that some viruses can induce carcinogenesis, it is highly important to identify novel oncoviruses and extensively study underlying oncogenic mechanisms. Here, we investigated a case of diffuse histiocytic sarcoma in a 22 year old slow loris (Nycticebus coucang), using a broad spectrum virus discovery technique. A novel parvovirus was discovered and the phylogenetic analysis performed on its fully sequenced genome demonstrated that it represents the first member of a novel genus. The possible causative correlation between this virus and the malignancy was further investigated and 20 serum and 61 organ samples from 25 animals (N. coucang and N. pygmaeus) were screened for the novel virus but only samples collected from the originally infected animal were positive. The virus was present in all tested organs (intestine, liver, spleen, kidneys, and lungs) and in all banked serum samples collected up to 8 years before death. All attempts to identify a latent viral form (integrated or episomal) were unsuccessful and the increase of variation in the viral sequences during the years was consistent with absence of latency. Since it is well known that parvoviruses are dependent on cell division to successfully replicate, we hypothesized that the virus could have benefitted from the constantly dividing cancer cells and may not have been the cause of the histiocytic sarcoma. It is also possible to conjecture that the virus had a role in delaying the tumor progression and this report might bring new exciting opportunities in recognizing viruses to be used in cancer virotherapy. PMID:25520709

  17. Epidemiological study of canine parvovirus infection in and around Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Behera, Monalisa; Panda, S K; Sahoo, P K; Acharya, A P; Patra, R C; Das, Sweta; Pati, S

    2015-01-01

    An epidemiological study of canine parvovirus infection in dogs in and around Bhubaneswar, Odisha was conducted between December 2012 to March 2013 and prevalence rate was studied on the basis of age, breed, and sex. A total of 71 fecal samples from suspected diarrheic dogs were collected in sterile phosphate buffer saline (10% W/V) and examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of canine parvo virus infection, followed by epidemiological study in relation to age, breed, and sex. Of 71 samples analyzed, 29 (40.85%) were found to be positive by PCR assay. The infection was higher in Deshi/local breeds (34.48%), followed by German shepherd (17.24%), equal incidences in mixed and Labrador retriever (10.34%), Rottweiler and German spitz showed 6.90% each and finally lower incidences in four breeds (3.45%) such as Dalmatians, Nea politan mastiff, Pug and Great Dane. Age-wise prevalence study revealed the infection being more in the age group of 3-6 months (41.37%), followed by equal incidences of 27.59% in 1-3 months and 6-12 months age group, and a low incidence in age groups above 12 months (3.45%). The incidence was predominantly higher in males (86.21%) than females (13.79%). The epidemiological analysis revealed that the breed wise prevalence was found to be more in Deshi breeds as compared to others, age groups below 6 months were found to be more prone to parvovirus infection and males were mostly infected.

  18. Absence of novel human parvovirus (PARV4) in Danish mothers and children.

    PubMed

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Rosenfeldt, Vibeke; Lindberg, Ellinor; Jensen, Lise; Hedman, Lea; Li, Xuemeng; Väisänen, Elina; Hedman, Klaus; Norja, Päivi

    2015-04-01

    The recently discovered human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is found most frequently in injection drug users, HIV-positive patients, and in haemophiliacs. Studies from Ghana report the finding of PARV4 in plasma from 2 to 12% of children without acute infection, and in nasal secretions and faecal samples. Studies of PARV4 in children from industrialized countries are few. We aimed to describe the occurrence of PARV4 in a population-based birth cohort of 228 Danish mothers and their healthy children who previously participated in a study of respiratory tract infections in infancy. Children were included over a whole calendar year and were monitored through monthly home visits through the first year of life. Plasma samples for the present study were available from 228 mothers, 176 newborns, and 202 12-months-old children. All samples were analysed for the presence of PARV4 antibodies by enzyme immunoassay, and samples with detectable antibodies were in addition studied by real-time PCR. One (0.4%) of 228 mothers had PARV4 IgG exceeding the cut-off absorbance level and another had borderline IgG reactivity. No mother among these two had an acute infection, as they were IgM and PARV4 DNA negative. All blood samples from newborns and one-year-old children had IgG and IgM reactivity below cut-off. PARV4 is rare in Danish mothers and infants. Further studies are needed, in both rural and urban settings, to investigate the epidemiology and clinical significance of this novel human parvovirus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Fetal Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Wacker-Gussmann, Annette; Strasburger, Janette F.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and careful stratification of fetal heart rate (FHR) is extremely important in all pregnancies. The most lethal cardiac rhythm disturbances occur during apparently normal pregnancies where FHR and rhythmare regular and within normal or low-normal ranges. These hidden depolarization and repolarization abnormalities, associated with genetic ion channelopathies cannot be detected by echocardiography, and may be responsible for up to 10% of unexplained fetal demise, prompting a need for newer and better fetal diagnostic techniques. Other manifest fetal arrhythmias such as premature beats, tachycardia, and bradycardia are commonly recognized. Heart rhythm diagnosis in obstetrical practice is usually made by M-mode and pulsed Doppler fetal echocardiography, but not all fetal cardiac time intervals are captured by echocardiographic methods. This article reviews different types of fetal arrhythmias, their presentation and treatment strategies, and gives an overview of the present and future diagnostic techniques. PMID:24858320

  20. Scarless fetal skin wound healing update.

    PubMed

    Lo, David D; Zimmermann, Andrew S; Nauta, Allison; Longaker, Michael T; Lorenz, H Peter

    2012-09-01

    Scar formation, a physiologic process in adult wound healing, can have devastating effects for patients; a multitude of pathologic outcomes, affecting all organ systems, stems from an amplification of this process. In contrast to adult wound repair, the early-gestation fetal skin wound heals without scar formation, a phenomenon that appears to be intrinsic to fetal skin. An intensive research effort has focused on unraveling the mechanisms that underlie scarless fetal wound healing in an attempt to improve the quality of healing in both children and adults. Unique properties of fetal cells, extracellular matrix, cytokine profile, and gene expression contribute to this scarless repair. Despite the great increase in knowledge gained over the past decades, the precise mechanisms regulating scarless fetal healing remain unknown. Herein, we describe the current proposed mechanisms underlying fetal scarless wound healing in an effort to recapitulate the fetal phenotype in the postnatal environment. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.