Science.gov

Sample records for fever virus strain

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Rift Valley Fever Virus Strain Lunyo.

    PubMed

    Lumley, Sarah; Horton, Daniel L; Marston, Denise A; Johnson, Nicholas; Ellis, Richard J; Fooks, Anthony R; Hewson, Roger

    2016-04-14

    Using next-generation sequencing technologies, the first complete genome sequence of Rift Valley fever virus strain Lunyo is reported here. Originally reported as an attenuated antigenic variant strain from Uganda, genomic sequence analysis shows that Lunyo clusters together with other Ugandan isolates.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Rift Valley Fever Virus Strain Lunyo

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Daniel L.; Marston, Denise A.; Johnson, Nicholas; Ellis, Richard J.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Hewson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Using next-generation sequencing technologies, the first complete genome sequence of Rift Valley fever virus strain Lunyo is reported here. Originally reported as an attenuated antigenic variant strain from Uganda, genomic sequence analysis shows that Lunyo clusters together with other Ugandan isolates. PMID:27081121

  3. Characterization of Rift Valley Fever Virus MP-12 Strain Encoding NSs of Punta Toro Virus or Sandfly Fever Sicilian Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lihoradova, Olga A.; Indran, Sabarish V.; Kalveram, Birte; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Head, Jennifer A.; Gong, Bin; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Juelich, Terry L.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen which can cause hemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans, and a high rate of abortion in ruminants. MP-12 strain, a live-attenuated candidate vaccine, is attenuated in the M- and L-segments, but the S-segment retains the virulent phenotype. MP-12 was manufactured as an Investigational New Drug vaccine by using MRC-5 cells and encodes a functional NSs gene, the major virulence factor of RVFV which 1) induces a shutoff of the host transcription, 2) inhibits interferon (IFN)-β promoter activation, and 3) promotes the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). MP-12 lacks a marker for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Although MP-12 lacking NSs works for DIVA, it does not replicate efficiently in type-I IFN-competent MRC-5 cells, while the use of type-I IFN-incompetent cells may negatively affect its genetic stability. To generate modified MP-12 vaccine candidates encoding a DIVA marker, while still replicating efficiently in MRC-5 cells, we generated recombinant MP-12 encoding Punta Toro virus Adames strain NSs (rMP12-PTNSs) or Sandfly fever Sicilian virus NSs (rMP12-SFSNSs) in place of MP-12 NSs. We have demonstrated that those recombinant MP-12 viruses inhibit IFN-β mRNA synthesis, yet do not promote the degradation of PKR. The rMP12-PTNSs, but not rMP12-SFSNSs, replicated more efficiently than recombinant MP-12 lacking NSs in MRC-5 cells. Mice vaccinated with rMP12-PTNSs or rMP12-SFSNSs induced neutralizing antibodies at a level equivalent to those vaccinated with MP-12, and were efficiently protected from wild-type RVFV challenge. The rMP12-PTNSs and rMP12-SFSNSs did not induce antibodies cross-reactive to anti-RVFV NSs antibody and are therefore applicable to DIVA. Thus, rMP12-PTNSs is highly efficacious, replicates efficiently in MRC-5 cells, and encodes a DIVA marker, all of which are

  4. [Sensitivity of methods of titration of the vaccine strain of porcine fever virus].

    PubMed

    Koritskaia, M A; Demkina, M M; Vlasova, A N

    2005-01-01

    Methods of titration of the CS vaccine strain of classical swine fever virus were compared in vitro and vivo. The titration in the TL and PK-15 cell culture without cytopathic effect is based on the detection of virus antigen by labeled antibodies. The infection intensity in the cell culture virtually correlated with the antigenic and immunogenic activity of dry vaccine used for swine.

  5. Viral strain dependent differences in experimental Argentine hemorrhagic fever (Junin virus) infection of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, R H; Green, D E; Maiztegui, J I; Peters, C J

    1988-01-01

    Guinea pigs infected with low-passage Junin virus of human origin showed viral strain dependent differences in mortality, LD50, time to death, and in viral spread and distribution. Different Junin strains appeared to cause at least two broad patterns of Argentine hemorrhagic fever in guinea pigs. A number of strains of Junin virus caused a viscerotropic type of illness in which virus replicated predominantly in lymph nodes, spleen, and bone marrow. With the most severe visceral forms of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, the guinea pigs became viremic, developed necrosis of spleen, lymph nodes, and bone marrow, showed gastric hemorrhages, and all animals died within 13-15 days. Other Junin strains induced a neurological type of illness with transient viral replication in and lymphocyte depletion of spleen and lymph nodes, with no detectable viremia or viral replication in bone marrow. Subsequently, virus was found in the brain with varying severities of polioencephalitis, and the guinea pigs frequently showed rear leg paralysis before death occurred 28-34 days after inoculation. Not all animals infected with a neurotropic strain developed all these signs. One viral strain induced some signs characteristic of both patterns of illness. Although the disease forms in the guinea pig model did not strictly correlate with those observed in the humans from which these strains were obtained, the different strains of Junin virus consistently caused very different patterns of illness in infected guinea pigs.

  6. Experimental Infection of Calves by Two Genetically-Distinct Strains of Rift Valley Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, William C.; Davis, A. Sally; Gaudreault, Natasha N.; Faburay, Bonto; Trujillo, Jessie D.; Shivanna, Vinay; Sunwoo, Sun Young; Balogh, Aaron; Endalew, Abaineh; Ma, Wenjun; Drolet, Barbara S.; Ruder, Mark G.; Morozov, Igor; McVey, D. Scott; Richt, Juergen A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of Rift Valley fever in ruminant livestock, characterized by mass abortion and high mortality rates in neonates, have raised international interest in improving vaccine control strategies. Previously, we developed a reliable challenge model for sheep that improves the evaluation of existing and novel vaccines in sheep. This sheep model demonstrated differences in the pathogenesis of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection between two genetically-distinct wild-type strains of the virus, Saudi Arabia 2001 (SA01) and Kenya 2006 (Ken06). Here, we evaluated the pathogenicity of these two RVFV strains in mixed breed beef calves. There was a transient increase in rectal temperatures with both virus strains, but this clinical sign was less consistent than previously reported with sheep. Three of the five Ken06-infected animals had an early-onset viremia, one day post-infection (dpi), with viremia lasting at least three days. The same number of SA01-infected animals developed viremia at 2 dpi, but it only persisted through 3 dpi in one animal. The average virus titer for the SA01-infected calves was 1.6 logs less than for the Ken06-infected calves. Calves, inoculated with either strain, seroconverted by 5 dpi and showed time-dependent increases in their virus-neutralizing antibody titers. Consistent with the results obtained in the previous sheep study, elevated liver enzyme levels, more severe liver pathology and higher virus titers occurred with the Ken06 strain as compared to the SA01 strain. These results demonstrate the establishment of a virulent challenge model for vaccine evaluation in calves. PMID:27223298

  7. Early pathogenesis of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strains in Danish pigs.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Uttenthal, Ase

    2012-10-12

    Host-virus interactions play an important role for the clinical outcome of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) infections in pigs. Strain virulence, host characteristics and environment are all factors that markedly influence disease severity. We tested CSFV strains of varying virulence in an experimental set-up, reducing the influence of host and environmental factors. Thus, weaner pigs were inoculated with one of 4 CSFV strains in order to compare the pathogenesis for a 3-week-period after infection. CSFV strains selected were 2 new and 2 previously characterized. None of these strains had been tested in Danish outbred pigs before. Clinical observations grouped the infected pigs into two different categories reflecting either non-specific, mainly gastro-intestinal, problems, or severe disease including high fever within the first week after inoculation. Gross-pathological findings varied between strains, however, lymphoid atrophy and growth retardation represented a consistent finding for all 4 strains. Virus distribution, viral load and in particular virus persistence differed, but supported present practice that recommends lymphoid tissue, most optimal tonsil and lymph nodes, as target material to be applied for early laboratory diagnosis. The present study demonstrated constraints associated with early detection of infections with CSFV strains of low virulence. Since neither clinical symptoms nor pathological lesions observed with these strains constituted characteristic signs of CSF, the risk of neglecting a CSF suspicion is immediate. Therefore, topical information on new outbreaks and continuous enhancement of an efficient surveillance system is of great importance to prevent further spread of CSF within the pig population.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence Analysis of Acute and Mild Strains of Classical Swine Fever Virus Subgenotype 3.2.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-In; Han, Song-Hee; Hyun, HyeSook; Lim, Ji-Ae; Song, Jae-Young; Cho, In-Soo; An, Dong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequences of two classical swine fever virus strains (JJ9811 and YI9908). Both belong to subgenotype 3.2. Strain JJ9811 causes mild symptoms and strain YI9908 causes acute symptoms. The sequences were 95.7% homologous at the nucleotide level and 95.6% homologous at the amino acid level. PMID:26823570

  9. Complete Genome Sequence Analysis of Acute and Mild Strains of Classical Swine Fever Virus Subgenotype 3.2

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seong-In; Han, Song-Hee; Hyun, HyeSook; Lim, Ji-Ae; Song, Jae-Young; Cho, In-Soo

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequences of two classical swine fever virus strains (JJ9811 and YI9908). Both belong to subgenotype 3.2. Strain JJ9811 causes mild symptoms and strain YI9908 causes acute symptoms. The sequences were 95.7% homologous at the nucleotide level and 95.6% homologous at the amino acid level. PMID:26823570

  10. Related strains of African swine fever virus with different virulence: genome comparison and analysis.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Raquel; Coelho, João; Höper, Dirk; Little, Nicole S; Smithson, Chad; Upton, Chris; Martins, Carlos; Leitão, Alexandre; Keil, Günther M

    2015-02-01

    Two strains of African swine fever virus (ASFV), the high-virulence Lisboa60 (L60) and the low-virulence NH/P68 (NHV), which have previously been used in effective immunization/protection studies, were sequenced. Both were isolated in Portugal during the 11-year period after the introduction of ASFV to the European Continent in 1957. The predicted proteins coded by both strains were compared, and where differences were found these were also compared to other strains of known virulence. This highlighted several genes with significant alterations in low-virulence strains of ASFV that may constitute virulence factors, several of which are still uncharacterized regarding their function. Phylogenetic analysis grouped L60 and NHV closest to other P72 genotype I ASFV strains from Europe and West Africa, consistent with the assumed West African origin of all European strains. Interestingly, a relatively lower genomic identity exists between L60 and NHV, both isolated in a similar geographical location 8 years apart, than with other European and west African strains isolated subsequently and in more distant locations. This may reflect the intensive passage in tissue culture, during the early 1960s, of a Portuguese isolate to obtain an attenuated vaccine, which may have led to NHV. This study contributes to a better understanding of the evolution of ASFV, and defines additional potential virulence genes for future studies of pathogenesis towards the development of effective vaccines.

  11. A novel AP92-like Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus strain, Greece.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Chaligiannis, Ilias; Kontana, Natasa; Sourba, Tatiana; Tsioka, Katerina; Tsatsaris, Andreas; Sotiraki, Smaragda

    2014-09-01

    Ticks were collected from various regions of northern Greece and tested for the presence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) RNA. Human and animal sera were collected in the regions where CCHFV-positive ticks were detected, and they were tested for the presence of IgG antibodies against the virus. A CCHFV strain was detected in Rhipicephalus bursa ticks collected from sheep in Kastoria regional unit, differing by 9.7% at the nucleotide level from the AP92 strain, which was isolated in 1975 in another region of Greece. Up to date, CCHF cases have not been reported in these regions. The human seroprevalence in the area was estimated at 6%, while IgG-positive sheep was detected in two of the four neighboring farms tested. The circulation of this specific CCHFV lineage in Greece, especially in a region where the seroprevalence is high, together with the lack of human CCHF cases, suggests a probable antigenic, but non- or low-pathogenic character of this lineage. Further studies on these strains will increase our knowledge about the role of AP92-like strains in the CCHF epidemiology, which might be useful for drug and vaccine design.

  12. Safety of classical swine fever virus vaccine strain LOM in pregnant sows and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-In; Song, Jae-Young; Kim, Jaejo; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Kim, Ha-Young; Cho, In-Soo; Kim, Byounghan; Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Lee, Jung-Bok; An, Dong-Jun

    2016-04-12

    The present study aimed to evaluate the safety of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccine strain LOM in pregnant sows. Pregnant sows with free CSFV antibody were inoculated with a commercial LOM vaccine during early pregnancy (day 38; n=3) or mid-pregnancy (days 49-59; n=11). In pregnant sows vaccinated during the early stages of gestation, abortion (day 109) was observed in one case, with two stillbirths and seven mummified fetuses. The viability of live-born piglets was 34.9% in sows vaccinated during mid-pregnancy compared with 81.8% in the control group. Post-mortem examination of the organs of the sows and piglets did not reveal any pathological lesions caused by CSFV; however, CSFV RNA was detected in the organs of several vaccinated sows and their litters. The LOM strain was transmitted from sows with free CSFV antibody to their fetus, but did not appear to induce immune tolerance in the offspring from vaccinated pregnant sows. Side effects were not observed in pregnant sows with antibody to the LOM strain: transmission from sow to their litters and stillbirth or mummified fetuses. The LOM strain may induce sterile immunity and provide rapid, long-lasting, and complete protection against CSFV; however, it should be contraindicated in pregnant sows due to potential adverse effects in pregnant sows with free CSFV antibody.

  13. Safety of classical swine fever virus vaccine strain LOM in pregnant sows and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-In; Song, Jae-Young; Kim, Jaejo; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Kim, Ha-Young; Cho, In-Soo; Kim, Byounghan; Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Lee, Jung-Bok; An, Dong-Jun

    2016-04-12

    The present study aimed to evaluate the safety of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccine strain LOM in pregnant sows. Pregnant sows with free CSFV antibody were inoculated with a commercial LOM vaccine during early pregnancy (day 38; n=3) or mid-pregnancy (days 49-59; n=11). In pregnant sows vaccinated during the early stages of gestation, abortion (day 109) was observed in one case, with two stillbirths and seven mummified fetuses. The viability of live-born piglets was 34.9% in sows vaccinated during mid-pregnancy compared with 81.8% in the control group. Post-mortem examination of the organs of the sows and piglets did not reveal any pathological lesions caused by CSFV; however, CSFV RNA was detected in the organs of several vaccinated sows and their litters. The LOM strain was transmitted from sows with free CSFV antibody to their fetus, but did not appear to induce immune tolerance in the offspring from vaccinated pregnant sows. Side effects were not observed in pregnant sows with antibody to the LOM strain: transmission from sow to their litters and stillbirth or mummified fetuses. The LOM strain may induce sterile immunity and provide rapid, long-lasting, and complete protection against CSFV; however, it should be contraindicated in pregnant sows due to potential adverse effects in pregnant sows with free CSFV antibody. PMID:26947495

  14. Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus or arbovirus that is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In the last decade, Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have resulted in loss of human and animal life, as well as had significant economic impact. The disease in livestock is primarily a...

  15. Genetic Diversity of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Strains from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Chinikar, Sadegh; Bouzari, Saeid; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Jalali, Tahmineh; Khakifirouz, Sahar; Nowotny, Norbert; Fooks, Anthony R.; Shah-Hosseini, Nariman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of the Bunyaviridae family and Nairovirus genus. It has a negative-sense, single stranded RNA genome approximately 19.2 kb, containing the Small, Medium, and Large segments. CCHFVs are relatively divergent in their genome sequence and grouped in seven distinct clades based on S-segment sequence analysis and six clades based on M-segment sequences. Our aim was to obtain new insights into the molecular epidemiology of CCHFV in Iran. Methods: We analyzed partial and complete nucleotide sequences of the S and M segments derived from 50 Iranian patients. The extracted RNA was amplified using one-step RT-PCR and then sequenced. The sequences were analyzed using Mega5 software. Results: Phylogenetic analysis of partial S segment sequences demonstrated that clade IV-(Asia 1), clade IV-(Asia 2) and clade V-(Europe) accounted for 80 %, 4 % and 14 % of the circulating genomic variants of CCHFV in Iran respectively. However, one of the Iranian strains (Iran-Kerman/22) was associated with none of other sequences and formed a new clade (VII). The phylogenetic analysis of complete S-segment nucleotide sequences from selected Iranian CCHFV strains complemented with representative strains from GenBank revealed similar topology as partial sequences with eight major clusters. A partial M segment phylogeny positioned the Iranian strains in either association with clade III (Asia-Africa) or clade V (Europe). Conclusion: The phylogenetic analysis revealed subtle links between distant geographic locations, which we propose might originate either from international livestock trade or from long-distance carriage of CCHFV by infected ticks via bird migration. PMID:27308271

  16. Dynamics of virus excretion via different routes in pigs experimentally infected with classical swine fever virus strains of high, moderate or low virulence.

    PubMed

    Weesendorp, Eefke; Stegeman, Arjan; Loeffen, Willie

    2009-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is transmitted via secretions and excretions of infected pigs. The efficiency and speed of the transmission depends on a multitude of parameters, like quantities of virus excreted by infected pigs. This study provides quantitative data on excretion of CSFV over time from pigs infected with a highly, moderately or low virulent strain. For each strain, five individually housed pigs were infected. Virus excretion was quantified in oropharyngeal fluid, saliva, nasal fluid, lacrimal fluid, faeces, urine and skin scraping by virus titration and quantitative Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRRT-PCR). Infectious virus was excreted in all secretions and excretions of pigs infected with the highly and moderately virulent strain, while excretion from pigs infected with the low virulent strain was mostly restricted to the oronasal route. Pigs infected with the highly virulent strain excreted significantly more virus in all their secretions and excretions over the entire infectious period than pigs infected with the moderately or low virulent strains. An exception were the pigs that developed the chronic form of infection after inoculation with the moderately virulent strain. During the entire infectious period, they excreted the largest amounts of virus via most secretions and excretions, as they excreted virus continuously and for a long duration. This study highlights the crucial role chronically infected pigs may play in the transmission of CSFV. Furthermore, it demonstrates the importance of discriminating between strains and the clinical appearance of infection when using excretion data for modelling.

  17. Ebola hemorrhagic fever associated with novel virus strain, Uganda, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Wamala, Joseph F; Lukwago, Luswa; Malimbo, Mugagga; Nguku, Patrick; Yoti, Zabulon; Musenero, Monica; Amone, Jackson; Mbabazi, William; Nanyunja, Miriam; Zaramba, Sam; Opio, Alex; Lutwama, Julius J; Talisuna, Ambrose O; Okware, Sam I

    2010-07-01

    During August 2007-February 2008, the novel Bundibugyo ebolavirus species was identified during an outbreak of Ebola viral hemorrhagic fever in Bundibugyo district, western Uganda. To characterize the outbreak as a requisite for determining response, we instituted a case-series investigation. We identified 192 suspected cases, of which 42 (22%) were laboratory positive for the novel species; 74 (38%) were probable, and 77 (40%) were negative. Laboratory confirmation lagged behind outbreak verification by 3 months. Bundibugyo ebolavirus was less fatal (case-fatality rate 34%) than Ebola viruses that had caused previous outbreaks in the region, and most transmission was associated with handling of dead persons without appropriate protection (adjusted odds ratio 3.83, 95% confidence interval 1.78-8.23). Our study highlights the need for maintaining a high index of suspicion for viral hemorrhagic fevers among healthcare workers, building local capacity for laboratory confirmation of viral hemorrhagic fevers, and institutionalizing standard precautions.

  18. [Hemorrhagic fever viruses in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Fontenille, D; Mathiot, C; Coulanges, P

    1988-01-01

    The authors remind, what are the viral haemorrhagic fevers, and explain the situation in Madagascar. The viruses of Crimée-Congo haemorrhagic fever, Rift valley fever and haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome are present in Madagascar. There is no real proof about the presence of Dengue viruses. The yellow fever viruses have never been stown off. It seems that there was not diagnosed outbreak of haemorrhagic fever, since the beginning of our century.

  19. The French neurotropic vaccine strain of yellow fever virus accumulates mutations slowly during passage in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, M R; Li, L; Suderman, M T; Wang, H; Barrett, A D

    2000-08-01

    This study of the yellow fever French neurotropic vaccine strain from the Institut Pasteur (FNV-IP) demonstrates that this viral genome is not as stable as that of the 17D-204 vaccine virus. FNV-IP was plaque-purified three times and then passaged eight times in Vero cells. Viral populations from the second and eighth passage post purification were sequenced and compared to the published sequences of FNV-IP. The passage-2 viral population had 31 nucleotide and nine amino acid changes compared to the parental virus while the passage-8 virus had six additional nucleotide changes encoding a single amino acid substitution. The plaque-purified virus also had two sequence deletions in the 3'-noncoding region. The plaque purification resulted in selection of a passage-2 virus that had a mouse LD(50) of 20 pfu/ml, 67-fold greater than parental FNV-IP which had an LD(50) of 0.3 pfu/ml. Subsequent passage in Vero cells resulted in a passage-8 virus which had increased neurovirulence with an LD(50) of 3.2 pfu/ml. The only amino acid difference between the passage-2 and passage-8 viruses was at amino acid 638 of NS5 which lies within domain V of the RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase. Overall, these data indicate that FNV-IP virus has an inherently less stable genome than 17D vaccine virus and a variable viral population.

  20. Isolation of a non-haemadsorbing, non-cytopathic strain of African swine fever virus in Madagascar.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzague, M.; Roger, F.; Bastos, A.; Burger, C.; Randriamparany, T.; Smondack, S.; Cruciere, C.

    2001-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) suspected clinically in Madagascar (1998-9) was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nucleotide sequencing, following virus isolation. No haemadsorption or cytopathic effect could be detected following leukocyte inoculation, but viral growth in cells was confirmed by PCR. Detection of ASF virus genome was carried out by amplification of a highly conserved region coding for the p72 protein. Nucleotide sequencing of the amplicon revealed 99.2% nucleotide identity between the recent Malagasy strains and a virus recovered from the 1994 outbreak in Mozambique (SPEC265). A serological survey performed on 449 sera, revealed that only 5.3% of the sera taken from pigs between 1998 and 1999 were positive. PMID:11467803

  1. Sequence-based comparative study of classical swine fever virus genogroup 2.2 isolate with pestivirus reference strains

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravi; Rajak, Kaushal Kishor; Chandra, Tribhuwan; Muthuchelvan, Dhanavelu; Saxena, Arpit; Chaudhary, Dheeraj; Kumar, Ajay; Pandey, Awadh Bihari

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was undertaken with the aim to compare and establish the genetic relatedness between classical swine fever virus (CSFV) genogroup 2.2 isolate and pestivirus reference strains. Materials and Methods: The available complete genome sequences of CSFV/IND/UK/LAL-290 strain and other pestivirus reference strains were retrieved from GenBank. The complete genome sequence, complete open reading frame, 5’ and 3’ non-coding region (NCR) sequences were analyzed and compared with reference pestiviruses strains. Clustal W model in MegAlign program of Lasergene 6.0 software was used for analysis of genetic heterogeneity. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out using MEGA 6.06 software package. Results: The complete genome sequence alignment of CSFV/IND/UK/LAL-290 isolate and reference pestivirus strains showed 58.9-72% identities at the nucleotide level and 50.3-76.9% at amino acid level. Sequence homology of 5’ and 3’ NCRs was found to be 64.1-82.3% and 22.9-71.4%, respectively. In phylogenetic analysis, overall tree topology was found similar irrespective of sequences used in this study; however, whole genome phylogeny of pestivirus formed two main clusters, which further distinguished into the monophyletic clade of each pestivirus species. CSFV/IND/UK/LAL-290 isolate placed with the CSFV Eystrup strain in the same clade with close proximity to border disease virus and Aydin strains. Conclusion: CSFV/IND/UK/LAL-290 exhibited the analogous genomic organization to those of all reference pestivirus strains. Based on sequence identity and phylogenetic analysis, the isolate showed close homology to Aydin/04-TR virus and distantly related to Bungowannah virus. PMID:27047198

  2. A multiplex nested RT-PCR for the detection and differentiation of wild-type viruses from C-strain vaccine of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Jian-Jun; Li, Na; Shi, Zixue; Cheng, Dan; Zhu, Qing-Hu; Tu, Changchun; Tong, Guang-Zhi; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2007-07-01

    A multiplex nested RT-PCR (RT-nPCR) was developed for the detection and differentiation of classical swine fever virus (CSFV). A fragment of 447 or 343 bp was amplified from the genomic RNA of C-strain or virulent Shimen strain, respectively, and two fragments of 447 and 343 bp were simultaneously amplified from the mixed samples of C-strain and Shimen. When detecting several wild-type isolates representative of different subgroups (1.1, 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3) circulating in Mainland China and samples from pigs experimentally infected with Shimen strain, the RT-nPCR resulted in an amplification pattern similar to Shimen. No amplification was achieved for uninfected cells, or cells infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and other viruses of porcine origin. The RT-nPCR was able to detect as little as 0.04 pg of CSFV RNA. The restrictive fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) demonstrated unique patterns of wild-type viruses and C-strain. Among the 133 field samples, 42 were tested to contain wild-type viruses and 18 showing presence of C-strain. The RT-nPCR can be used to detect and differentiate pigs infected with wild-type CSFV from those vaccinated with C-strain vaccine, thus minimizing the risk of culling vaccinates during outbreaks.

  3. Complete genome analysis of 33 ecologically and biologically diverse Rift Valley fever virus strains reveals widespread virus movement and low genetic diversity due to recent common ancestry.

    PubMed

    Bird, Brian H; Khristova, Marina L; Rollin, Pierre E; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Nichol, Stuart T

    2007-03-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus is a mosquito-borne RNA virus responsible for large explosive outbreaks of acute febrile disease in humans and livestock in Africa with significant mortality and economic impact. The successful high-throughput generation of the complete genome sequence was achieved for 33 diverse RVF virus strains collected from throughout Africa and Saudi Arabia from 1944 to 2000, including strains differing in pathogenicity in disease models. While several distinct virus genetic lineages were determined, which approximately correlate with geographic origin, multiple exceptions indicative of long-distance virus movement have been found. Virus strains isolated within an epidemic (e.g., Mauritania, 1987, or Egypt, 1977 to 1978) exhibit little diversity, while those in enzootic settings (e.g., 1970s Zimbabwe) can be highly diverse. In addition, the large Saudi Arabian RVF outbreak in 2000 appears to have involved virus introduction from East Africa, based on the close ancestral relationship of a 1998 East African virus. Virus genetic diversity was low (approximately 5%) and primarily involved accumulation of mutations at an average of 2.9 x 10(-4) substitutions/site/year, although some evidence of RNA segment reassortment was found. Bayesian analysis of current RVF virus genetic diversity places the most recent common ancestor of these viruses in the late 1800s, the colonial period in Africa, a time of dramatic changes in agricultural practices and introduction of nonindigenous livestock breeds. In addition to insights into the evolution and ecology of RVF virus, these genomic data also provide a foundation for the design of molecular detection assays and prototype vaccines useful in combating this important disease.

  4. Epidemiology of hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    LeDuc, J W

    1989-01-01

    Twelve distinct viruses associated with hemorrhagic fever in humans are classified among four families: Arenaviridae, which includes Lassa, Junin, and Machupo viruses; Bunyaviridae, which includes Rift Valley fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and Hantaan viruses; Filoviridae, which includes Marburg and Ebola viruses; and Flaviviridae, which includes yellow fever, dengue, Kyasanur Forest disease, and Omsk viruses. Most hemorrhagic fever viruses are zoonoses, with the possible exception of the four dengue viruses, which may continually circulate among humans. Hemorrhagic fever viruses are found in both temperate and tropical habitats and generally infect both sexes and all ages, although the age and sex of those infected are frequently influenced by the possibility of occupational exposure. Transmission to humans is frequently by bite of an infected tick or mosquito or via aerosol from infected rodent hosts. Aerosol and nosocomial transmission are especially important with Lassa, Junin, Machupo, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Marburg, and Ebola viruses. Seasonality of hemorrhagic fever among humans is influenced for the most part by the dynamics of infected arthropod or vertebrate hosts. Mammals, especially rodents, appear to be important natural hosts for many hemorrhagic fever viruses. The transmission cycle for each hemorrhagic fever virus is distinct and is dependent upon the characteristics of the primary vector species and the possibility for its contact with humans.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Two Rift Valley Fever Virus Strains Isolated from Outbreaks in Saudi Arabia (2000) and Kenya (2006 to 2007).

    PubMed

    Shivanna, Vinay; McDowell, Chester; Wilson, William C; Richt, Juergen A

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence, including the untranslated regions, of two Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) strains isolated from mosquitoes that were collected from disease outbreaks in Saudi Arabia (2001) and Kenya (2006 to 2007) were sequenced using next-generation sequencing technology. PMID:27609913

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Two Rift Valley Fever Virus Strains Isolated from Outbreaks in Saudi Arabia (2000) and Kenya (2006 to 2007)

    PubMed Central

    Shivanna, Vinay; McDowell, Chester; Wilson, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence, including the untranslated regions, of two Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) strains isolated from mosquitoes that were collected from disease outbreaks in Saudi Arabia (2001) and Kenya (2006 to 2007) were sequenced using next-generation sequencing technology. PMID:27609913

  7. Vaccine and Wild-Type Strains of Yellow Fever Virus Engage Distinct Entry Mechanisms and Differentially Stimulate Antiviral Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Garcia, Maria Dolores; Meertens, Laurent; Chazal, Maxime; Hafirassou, Mohamed Lamine; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Zamborlini, Alessia; Despres, Philippe; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The live attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D stands as a “gold standard” for a successful vaccine. 17D was developed empirically by passaging the wild-type Asibi strain in mouse and chicken embryo tissues. Despite its immense success, the molecular determinants for virulence attenuation and immunogenicity of the 17D vaccine are poorly understood. 17D evolved several mutations in its genome, most of which lie within the envelope (E) protein. Given the major role played by the YFV E protein during virus entry, it has been hypothesized that the residues that diverge between the Asibi and 17D E proteins may be key determinants of attenuation. In this study, we define the process of YFV entry into target cells and investigate its implication in the activation of the antiviral cytokine response. We found that Asibi infects host cells exclusively via the classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis, while 17D exploits a clathrin-independent pathway for infectious entry. We demonstrate that the mutations in the 17D E protein acquired during the attenuation process are sufficient to explain the differential entry of Asibi versus 17D. Interestingly, we show that 17D binds to and infects host cells more efficiently than Asibi, which culminates in increased delivery of viral RNA into the cytosol and robust activation of the cytokine-mediated antiviral response. Overall, our study reveals that 17D vaccine and Asibi enter target cells through distinct mechanisms and highlights a link between 17D attenuation, virus entry, and immune activation. PMID:26861019

  8. Experimental infection of calves by two genetically-distinct strains of rift valley fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent outbreaks of Rift Valley fever in ruminant livestock, characterized by mass abortion and high mortality rates in neonates, have raised international interest in improving vaccine control strategies. Previously we developed a reliable challenge model for sheep that improves the evaluation of ...

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain JSZL, Belonging to a New Subgenotype, 2.1d, Isolated in China in 2014.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongliang; Feng, Liping; Liu, Chunxiao; Chen, Jiazeng; Leng, Chaoliang; Bai, Yun; Peng, Jinmei; An, Tongqing; Cai, Xuehui; Yang, Xufu; Tian, Zhijun; Tong, Guangzhi

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of classic swine fever virus (CSFV) strain JSZL was determined in this study. JSZL was originally isolated from an immune pig farm in Jiangsu Province, China. JSZL is more closely related to subgenotype 2.1b than to 2.1a and 2.1c. Importantly, JSZL was classified into a new subgenotype, 2.1d. PMID:26294620

  10. Impact of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus-2 infection on the potency of the classical swine fever vaccine (LOM strain).

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-In; Jeoung, Hye-Young; Kim, Byounghan; Song, Jae-Young; Kim, Jaejo; Kim, Ha-Young; Cho, In-Soo; Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Lee, Joong-Bok; An, Dong-Jun

    2016-09-25

    The classical swine fever (CSF) vaccine, which is derived from the LOM strain of the CSF virus (CSFV), induces protective immunity against CSFV infection. However, several factors influence vaccine efficacy. Evidence suggests that infection by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and/or porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) reduces the efficacy of several vaccines. Here, we examined the effect of PRRSV or PCV2 alone or co-infection by PRRSV/PCV2 on the potency of the LOM vaccine in pigs. Neither CSFV antibody levels nor the period during which CSFV antigens were detectable in LOM-vaccinated pigs were negatively affected by infection by PRRSV or PCV2. However, co-infection with PRRSV/PCV2 may affect the replication or activity of the CSF vaccine virus in pigs vaccinated with the LOM strain, although CSFV antibody levels were not negatively affected. Nevertheless, the LOM vaccine afforded complete protection against a virulent strain of CSFV. PMID:27599928

  11. African swine fever virus serotype-specific proteins are significant protective antigens for African swine fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    African swine fever (ASF) is an emerging disease threat for the swine industry worldwide. No ASF vaccine is available and progress is hindered by lack of knowledge concerning the extent of African swine fever virus (ASFV) strain diversity and the viral antigens conferring type specific protective im...

  12. Classical swine fever virus marker vaccine strain CP7_E2alf: genetic stability in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goller, Katja V; Dräger, Carolin; Höper, Dirk; Beer, Martin; Blome, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Recently, CP7_E2alf (SuvaxynCSF Marker), a live marker vaccine against classical swine fever virus, was licensed through the European Medicines Agency. For application of such a genetically engineered virus under field conditions, knowledge about its genetic stability is essential. Here, we report on stability studies that were conducted to assess and compare the mutation rate of CP7_E2alf in vitro and in vivo. Sequence analyses upon passaging confirmed the high stability of CP7_E2alf, and no recombination events were observed in the experimental setup. The data obtained in this study confirm the genetic stability of CP7_E2alf as an important safety component. PMID:26392285

  13. Genome Sequence of African Swine Fever Virus BA71, the Virulent Parental Strain of the Nonpathogenic and Tissue-Culture Adapted BA71V

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Javier M.; Moreno, Leticia Tais; Alejo, Alí; Lacasta, Anna; Rodríguez, Fernando; Salas, María L.

    2015-01-01

    The strain BA71V has played a key role in African swine fever virus (ASFV) research. It was the first genome sequenced, and remains the only genome completely determined. A large part of the studies on the function of ASFV genes, viral transcription, replication, DNA repair and morphogenesis, has been performed using this model. This avirulent strain was obtained by adaptation to grow in Vero cells of the highly virulent BA71 strain. We report here the analysis of the genome sequence of BA71 in comparison with that of BA71V. They possess the smallest genomes for a virulent or an attenuated ASFV, and are essentially identical except for a relatively small number of changes. We discuss the possible contribution of these changes to virulence. Analysis of the BA71 sequence allowed us to identify new similarities among ASFV proteins, and with database proteins including two ASFV proteins that could function as a two-component signaling network. PMID:26618713

  14. Experimental Infection of Ornithodoros erraticus sensu stricto with Two Portuguese African Swine Fever Virus Strains. Study of Factors Involved in the Dynamics of Infection in Ticks.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Rita; Otte, Joachim; Madeira, Sara; Hutchings, Geoff H; Boinas, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a frequently devastating hemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs and wild boar and Ornithodoros erraticus sensu stricto argasid ticks are the only biological vectors of African swine fever virus (ASFV) known to occur in Europe. Recently this disease emerged in Eastern Europe and Russian Federation, showing a huge potential for a rapid spread between countries. There is some risk of re-emergence of ASF in the countries where these ticks exist, that can contribute for the persistence of infection and compromise control measures. In this study we aimed to identify factors that determine the probability of infection and its dynamics in the tick vector Ornithodoros erraticus sensu stricto, with two Portuguese strains of ASFV. Our results suggest that these ticks have a high likelihood of excreting the two haemadsorbing ASF viruses of different host origins and that, in field surveys, the analysis of adults and 5th nymphal stage can provide the best chance of detecting virus infection. The results also indicate that infection of pigs with highly virulent ASF viruses will promote higher rates of infection and a higher likelihood for virus excretion by ticks. Nevertheless, there is also a risk, although lower, that ticks can become infected on pigs that have overcome the acute phase of infection, which was simulated in our study by membrane feeding ticks with low titres of virus. We believe these results can be valuable in designing and interpreting the results of ASF control programmes, and future work can also be undertaken as our dataset is released under open access, to perform studies in risk assessment for ASFV persistence in a region where O. erraticus sensu stricto ticks are present. PMID:26366570

  15. Experimental Infection of Ornithodoros erraticus sensu stricto with Two Portuguese African Swine Fever Virus Strains. Study of Factors Involved in the Dynamics of Infection in Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Sara; Hutchings, Geoff H.; Boinas, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a frequently devastating hemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs and wild boar and Ornithodoros erraticus sensu stricto argasid ticks are the only biological vectors of African swine fever virus (ASFV) known to occur in Europe. Recently this disease emerged in Eastern Europe and Russian Federation, showing a huge potential for a rapid spread between countries. There is some risk of re-emergence of ASF in the countries where these ticks exist, that can contribute for the persistence of infection and compromise control measures. In this study we aimed to identify factors that determine the probability of infection and its dynamics in the tick vector Ornithodoros erraticus sensu stricto, with two Portuguese strains of ASFV. Our results suggest that these ticks have a high likelihood of excreting the two haemadsorbing ASF viruses of different host origins and that, in field surveys, the analysis of adults and 5th nymphal stage can provide the best chance of detecting virus infection. The results also indicate that infection of pigs with highly virulent ASF viruses will promote higher rates of infection and a higher likelihood for virus excretion by ticks. Nevertheless, there is also a risk, although lower, that ticks can become infected on pigs that have overcome the acute phase of infection, which was simulated in our study by membrane feeding ticks with low titres of virus. We believe these results can be valuable in designing and interpreting the results of ASF control programmes, and future work can also be undertaken as our dataset is released under open access, to perform studies in risk assessment for ASFV persistence in a region where O. erraticus sensu stricto ticks are present. PMID:26366570

  16. Antigenic analysis of classical swine fever virus E2 glycoprotein using pig antibodies identifies residues contributing to antigenic variation of the vaccine C-strain and group 2 strains circulating in China

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glycoprotein E2, the immunodominant protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV), can induce neutralizing antibodies and confer protective immunity in pigs. Our previous phylogenetic analysis showed that subgroup 2.1 viruses branched away from subgroup 1.1, the vaccine C-strain lineage, and became dominant in China. The E2 glycoproteins of CSFV C-strain and recent subgroup 2.1 field isolates are genetically different. However, it has not been clearly demonstrated how this diversity affects antigenicity of the protein. Results Antigenic variation of glycoprotein E2 was observed not only between CSFV vaccine C-strain and subgroup 2.1 strains, but also among strains of the same subgroup 2.1 as determined by ELISA-based binding assay using pig antisera to the C-strain and a representative subgroup 2.1 strain QZ-07 currently circulating in China. Antigenic incompatibility of E2 proteins markedly reduced neutralization efficiency against heterologous strains. Single amino acid substitutions of D705N, L709P, G713E, N723S, and S779A on C-strain recombinant E2 (rE2) proteins significantly increased heterologous binding to anti-QZ-07 serum, suggesting that these residues may be responsible for the antigenic variation between the C-strain and subgroup 2.1 strains. Notably, a G713E substitution caused the most dramatic enhancement of binding of the variant C-strain rE2 protein to anti-QZ-07 serum. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the glutamic acid residue at this position is conserved within group 2 strains, while the glycine residue is invariant among the vaccine strains, highlighting the role of the residue at this position as a major determinant of antigenic variation of E2. A variant Simpson's index analysis showed that both codons and amino acids of the residues contributing to antigenic variation have undergone similar diversification. Conclusions These results demonstrate that CSFV vaccine C-strain and group 2 strains circulating in China differ in

  17. T-cell factor-4 and MHC upregulation in pigs receiving a live attenuated classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccine strain with interferon-gamma adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y-H; Lin, Y-L; Hwang, Y-C; Yang, H-C; Chiu, H-C; Chiou, S-H; Jong, M-H; Chow, K-C; Lin, C-C

    2016-10-01

    The effect of co-administration of interferon (IFN)-γ in pigs undergoing vaccination with an attenuated strain (LPC) of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) was investigated. Unvaccinated pigs demonstrated pyrexia and died 7-9 days after challenge with virulent CSFV. Pigs receiving the attenuated vaccine remained healthy after virus challenge, except for mild, transient pyrexia, whereas pigs receiving IFN-γ simultaneously with the vaccine demonstrated normal body temperatures after virus challenge. Examination by nested RT-PCR revealed greater viral load in the spleens of the pigs vaccinated with the attenuated CSFV, compared with those that had additionally received IFN-γ. Expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and MHC class II molecules was upregulated in the spleens of the IFN-γ treated vaccinated pigs, demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. Based on Western blot analysis, anti-CSFV IgG2 antibodies were elevated in vaccinated pigs by co-administration of IFN-γ (IFN-γ(Hi): P < 0.01; IFN-γ(Lo): P <0.05). By employing the suppression subtractive hybridization technique, RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry, T-cell factor-4 (Tcf-4) mRNA and protein expression were found to be upregulated in the spleens of vaccinated pigs that had received IFN-γ. This study suggests involvement of Tcf-4 in IFN-γ-mediated immune regulation following CSFV vaccination. PMID:27687943

  18. Genetic Diversity and Positive Selection Analysis of Classical Swine Fever Virus Envelope Protein Gene E2 in East China under C-Strain Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dongfang; Lv, Lin; Gu, Jinyuan; Chen, Tongyu; Xiao, Yihong; Liu, Sidang

    2016-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes an economically important and highly contagious disease of pigs worldwide. C-strain vaccination is one of the most effective ways to contain this disease. Since 2014, sporadic CSF outbreaks have been occurring in some C-strain vaccinated provinces of China. To decipher the disease etiology, 25 CSFV E2 genes from 169 clinical samples were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all 25 isolates belonged to subgenotype 2.1. Twenty-three of the 25 isolates were clustered in a newly defined subgenotype, 2.1d, and shared some consistent molecular characteristics. To determine whether the complete E2 gene was under positive selection pressure, we used a site-by-site analysis to identify specific codons that underwent evolutionary selection, and seven positively selected codons were found. Three positively selected sites (amino acids 17, 34, and 72) were identified in antigenicity-relevant domains B/C of the amino-terminal half of the E2 protein. In addition, another positively selected site (amino acid 200) exhibited a polarity change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, which may change the antigenicity and virulence of CSFV. The results indicate that the circulating CSFV strains in Shandong province were mostly clustered in subgenotype 2.1d. Moreover, the identification of these positively selected sites could help to reveal molecular determinants of virulence or pathogenesis, and to clarify the driving force of CSFV evolution in East China. PMID:26903966

  19. Genetic Diversity and Positive Selection Analysis of Classical Swine Fever Virus Envelope Protein Gene E2 in East China under C-Strain Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dongfang; Lv, Lin; Gu, Jinyuan; Chen, Tongyu; Xiao, Yihong; Liu, Sidang

    2016-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes an economically important and highly contagious disease of pigs worldwide. C-strain vaccination is one of the most effective ways to contain this disease. Since 2014, sporadic CSF outbreaks have been occurring in some C-strain vaccinated provinces of China. To decipher the disease etiology, 25 CSFV E2 genes from 169 clinical samples were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all 25 isolates belonged to subgenotype 2.1. Twenty-three of the 25 isolates were clustered in a newly defined subgenotype, 2.1d, and shared some consistent molecular characteristics. To determine whether the complete E2 gene was under positive selection pressure, we used a site-by-site analysis to identify specific codons that underwent evolutionary selection, and seven positively selected codons were found. Three positively selected sites (amino acids 17, 34, and 72) were identified in antigenicity-relevant domains B/C of the amino-terminal half of the E2 protein. In addition, another positively selected site (amino acid 200) exhibited a polarity change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, which may change the antigenicity and virulence of CSFV. The results indicate that the circulating CSFV strains in Shandong province were mostly clustered in subgenotype 2.1d. Moreover, the identification of these positively selected sites could help to reveal molecular determinants of virulence or pathogenesis, and to clarify the driving force of CSFV evolution in East China. PMID:26903966

  20. Expression of the structural proteins of dengue 2 virus and yellow fever virus by recombinant vaccinia viruses.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Y S; Lenches, E M; Galler, R; Rice, C M; Dalrymple, J; Strauss, J H

    1990-01-01

    Vaccinia virus recombinants were constructed which contained cDNA sequences encoding the structural region of dengue 2 virus (PR159/S1 strain) or yellow fever virus (17D strain). The flavivirus cDNA sequences were expressed under the control of the vaccinia 7.5k early/late promotor. Cultured cells infected with these recombinants expressed immunologically reactive flavivirus structural proteins, precursor prM and E. These proteins appeared to be cleaved and glycosylated properly since they comigrated with the authentic proteins from dengue 2 virus- and yellow fever virus-infected cells. Mice immunized with the dengue/vaccinia recombinant showed a dengue-specific immune response that included low levels of neutralizing antibodies. Immunization of mice with the yellow fever/vaccinia recombinant was less effective at inducing an immune response to yellow fever virus and in only some of the mice were low titers of neutralizing antibodies produced.

  1. [Haemorrhagic fever viruses, possible bioterrorist use].

    PubMed

    Rigaudeau, Sophie; Bricaire, François; Bossi, Philippe

    2005-01-29

    The majority of haemorrhagic fever viruses are responsible for various clinical manifestations, the mutual characteristics of which are fever and haemorrhage in 5 to 70% of cases. All degrees of severity can be observed, ranging from isolated fever to multi-organ failure and death. These viruses belong to one of the following families: filoviridae, arenaviridae, bunyaviridae, and flaviviridae. They must be considered as dangerous biological weapons that could potentially be used. Most of the viruses responsible for haemorrhagic fever can be transmitted to humans through the air in spray form, except the dengue virus and the agents of haemorrhagic fever from the Congo Crimea and the haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome that are difficult to handle in cell culture. In the event of a bioterrorist act, the management of persons infected or suspected of being so will be made by the referent departments of infectious diseases, defined by the French Biotox plan. Management includes isolation, confirmation or invalidation of the diagnosis and rapid initiation of treatment with ribavirin. Ribavirin is recommended for the treatment and prophylaxis of arenavirus and bunyavirus infections; it is not effective for the other families of virus. Except for yellow fever, there is no vaccination for the other forms of viral haemorrhagic fever. PMID:15687968

  2. [Haemorrhagic fever viruses, possible bioterrorist use].

    PubMed

    Rigaudeau, Sophie; Bricaire, François; Bossi, Philippe

    2005-01-29

    The majority of haemorrhagic fever viruses are responsible for various clinical manifestations, the mutual characteristics of which are fever and haemorrhage in 5 to 70% of cases. All degrees of severity can be observed, ranging from isolated fever to multi-organ failure and death. These viruses belong to one of the following families: filoviridae, arenaviridae, bunyaviridae, and flaviviridae. They must be considered as dangerous biological weapons that could potentially be used. Most of the viruses responsible for haemorrhagic fever can be transmitted to humans through the air in spray form, except the dengue virus and the agents of haemorrhagic fever from the Congo Crimea and the haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome that are difficult to handle in cell culture. In the event of a bioterrorist act, the management of persons infected or suspected of being so will be made by the referent departments of infectious diseases, defined by the French Biotox plan. Management includes isolation, confirmation or invalidation of the diagnosis and rapid initiation of treatment with ribavirin. Ribavirin is recommended for the treatment and prophylaxis of arenavirus and bunyavirus infections; it is not effective for the other families of virus. Except for yellow fever, there is no vaccination for the other forms of viral haemorrhagic fever.

  3. Genome Sequence of Ex-Afghanistan Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus SCT Strain, from an Imported United Kingdom Case in October 2012.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, John; Atkinson, Barry; Logue, Christopher H; Latham, Jennie; Newman, Edmund N C; Hewson, Roger

    2013-05-16

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus is a serious human pathogen causing severe hemorrhagic disease with a fatality rate of up to approximately 30%. We have determined the viral genomic sequence from an isolate that caused a fatal case of imported CCHF in the United Kingdom in October 2012.

  4. The Ep152R ORF of African Swine Fever Virus strain Georgia encodes for an essential gene that interacts with host protein BAG6

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal disease of domestic pigs that has significant economic consequences for the swine industry. The viral genome encodes for more than 150 genes, and only a select few have been studied in some detail. Here we rep...

  5. A plaque assay for malignant catarrhal fever virus and virus neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, D T

    1980-05-01

    A cell-free strain of malignant catarrhal fever virus which produced a readily recognizable cytopathic effect was obtained by serial passage of the virus in a rabbit kidney cell line. Plaque assay of the virus was more rapid and gave higher titres 11 days postinoculation than tube titration, but the latter advantage decreased with a longer incubation period. Plaques were clear with sharp edges and measured 0.5 to 2 mm in diameter after 15 days. A plaque neutralization test was developed and successfully employed for the titration of malignant catarrhal fever virus neutralizing activity in the sera and nasal secretions of blue wildebeest.

  6. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Margo A.; Di, Han; Vatter, Heather A.

    2014-01-01

    Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) is an understudied arterivirus that typically causes asymptomatic, persistent infections in multiple species of African nonhuman primates (NHPs) which are natural hosts but fatal hemorrhagic fever disease in macaques. SHFV genomes found in different species of African primates have recently been sequenced but no biological data for these viruses has yet been reported. The sequence of one SHFV isolate from a long term persistently infected baboon showed a high degree of identity to the genome of SHFV-LVR, the prototype strain isolated in the 1960s. Similar to what was observed in early studies with the prototype SHFV isolate LVR, infection of Japanese macaques with 100 PFU of the baboon isolate efficiently induced fatal hemorrhagic fever disease in macaques. Consistent with the differential infection outcomes observed in macaques and baboons, SHFV infection of macaque macrophages and dendritic cells is more efficiently than that of baboons and infection induces pro39 inflammatory cytokine production in macaque but not baboon cells. A stable full-length SHFV LVR infectious clone was constructed and basic knowledge about the unique functions of SHFV has been expanded by several recent studies. The SHFV genome encodes extra genes compared to those of other arteriviruses; three instead of two papain-like protease one (PLP1) domains are encoded at the 5’ end and two adjacent sets of four minor structural proteins at the 3’ end. SHFV PLP1α, PLP1β and PLP1γ were each shown to be active proteases in vitro and the three expected nsp1proteins were detected in infected cells. The catalytic Cys of PLP1α is adjacent to an Ala instead of canonical Typ and PLP1γ is unique among arterivirus PLPs in being able to cleave at both downstream and upstream sites. Although the duplicated sets of SHFV minor structural proteins were predicted to be functionally redundant, data obtained with a set of mutant infectious clones, each with the start

  7. Genetic Divergence and Dispersal of Yellow Fever Virus, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Juliet E.; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P.A.; Tesh, Robert B.; Rodrigues, Sueli G.; Barrett, Alan D.T.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis of 79 yellow fever virus (YFV) isolates collected from 1935 to 2001 in Brazil showed a single genotype (South America I) circulating in the country, with the exception of a single strain from Rondônia, which represented South America genotype II. Brazilian YFV strains have diverged into two clades; an older clade appears to have become extinct and another has become the dominant lineage in recent years. Pairwise nucleotide diversity between strains ranged from 0% to 7.4%, while amino acid divergence ranged from 0% to 4.6%. Phylogenetic analysis indicated traffic of virus variants through large geographic areas and suggested that migration of infected people may be an important mechanism of virus dispersal. Isolation of vaccine virus from a patient with a fatal case suggests that vaccine-related illness may have been misdiagnosed in the past. PMID:15498159

  8. Interim Report on SNP analysis and forensic microarray probe design for South American hemorrhagic fever viruses, tick-borne encephalitis virus, henipaviruses, Old World Arenaviruses, filoviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever viruses, Rift Valley fever

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, C; Gardner, S

    2012-06-05

    The goal of this project is to develop forensic genotyping assays for select agent viruses, enhancing the current capabilities for the viral bioforensics and law enforcement community. We used a multipronged approach combining bioinformatics analysis, PCR-enriched samples, microarrays and TaqMan assays to develop high resolution and cost effective genotyping methods for strain level forensic discrimination of viruses. We have leveraged substantial experience and efficiency gained through year 1 on software development, SNP discovery, TaqMan signature design and phylogenetic signature mapping to scale up the development of forensics signatures in year 2. In this report, we have summarized the whole genome wide SNP analysis and microarray probe design for forensics characterization of South American hemorrhagic fever viruses, tick-borne encephalitis viruses and henipaviruses, Old World Arenaviruses, filoviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus and Japanese encephalitis virus.

  9. [Isolation of the virus of Syr-Darya Valley fever].

    PubMed

    L'vov, D K; Karimov, S K; Kiriushchenko, T V; Chun-Siun, F; Skvortsova, T M

    1984-01-01

    In the course of studies on the ecological structure of acute febrile diseases in the season of activity of blood-sucking arthropods strains of a virus antigenically related to Sikhote-Alyñ virus were isolated from the blood of a patient and from Ixodid ticks. This paper presents the results of the study on the causative agent and the clinical picture of the disease caused by this virus. The virus was found to be a new one for science; its appurtenance to the family Picornaviridae, genus Cardiovirus, the antigenic group of encephalomyocarditis has been determined. The virus has been designated "Syr-Darya Valley fever virus" by the area of its isolation.

  10. Incubation periods of Yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Michael A; Arana-Vizcarrondo, Neysarí; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Staples, J Erin

    2010-07-01

    Yellow fever virus is a global health threat due to its endemicity in parts of Africa and South America where human infections occur in residents and travelers. To understand yellow fever dynamics, it is critical to characterize the incubation periods of the virus in vector mosquitoes and humans. Here, we compare four statistical models of the yellow fever incubation periods fitted with historical data. The extrinsic incubation period in the urban vector Aedes aegypti was best characterized with a temperature-dependent Weibull model with a median of 10 days at 25 degrees C (middle 95% = 2.0-37 days). The intrinsic incubation period, fitted with a log-normal model, had a median of 4.3 days (middle 95% = 2.3-8.6 days). These estimates and their associated statistical models provide a quantitative basis to assist in exposure assessments, model potential outbreaks, and evaluate the effectiveness of public health interventions.

  11. A Report on Bovine Ephemeral Fever Virus in Turkey: Antigenic Variations of Different Strains of EFV in the 1985 and 2012 Outbreaks Using Partial Glycoprotein Gene Sequences.

    PubMed

    Oğuzoğlu, T Ç; Ertürk, A; Çizmeci, Ş G; Koç, B T; Akça, Y

    2015-10-01

    We described the aetiological agents of outbreaks of bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) that occurred in 1985 and 2012 in Turkey, and identify mutations in the viruses from both outbreaks. Outbreaks have emerged periodically every 4-5 years in the same regions in Turkey. Because these regions are located in a subtropical climatic zone, good conditions for vector populations exist. The results of this study show that the BEFVs from outbreaks in Turkey vary significantly. Effective prevention will require a vaccine that contains BEFVs from different genetic clusters.

  12. Bichat guidelines for the clinical management of haemorrhagic fever viruses and bioterrorism-related haemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Philippe; Tegnell, Anders; Baka, Agoritsa; Van Loock, Frank; Hendriks, Jan; Werner, Albrecht; Maidhof, Heinrich; Gouvras, Georgios

    2004-12-15

    Haemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are a diverse group of viruses that cause a clinical disease associated with fever and bleeding disorder. HFVs that are associated with a potential biological threat are Ebola and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae), Lassa fever and New World arenaviruses (Machupo, Junin, Guanarito and Sabia viruses) (Arenaviridae), Rift Valley fever (Bunyaviridae) and yellow fever, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, and Kyanasur Forest disease (Flaviviridae). In terms of biological warfare concerning dengue, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and Hantaviruses, there is not sufficient knowledge to include them as a major biological threat. Dengue virus is the only one of these that cannot be transmitted via aerosol. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and the agents of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome appear difficult to weaponise. Ribavirin is recommended for the treatment and the prophylaxis of the arenaviruses and the bunyaviruses, but is not effective for the other families. All patients must be isolated and receive intensive supportive therapy.

  13. Infectivity titration of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome virus: use of immune adherence hemagglutination for detection of virus growth.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Y; Sugiyama, K; Morita, C; Morikawa, S; Shiga, S; Komatsu, T; Akao, Y; Kitamura, T

    1984-09-01

    Serial dilutions of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome viruses were inoculated into Vero-E6 cells in microplates. After 2 weeks of incubation, infected cells were disrupted by freezing and thawing, and virus antigens were detected by immune adherence hemagglutination. The infectivity titers of the virus as determined by this method were in close agreement with those obtained by the immunofluorescent antigen endpoint method. Then, a neutralization method was established. Japanese hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome isolates, strains SR-11 and TR-352, were found to be distinct from Hantaan virus, strain 76-118, by the neutralization test.

  14. Phylogeographic Reconstructions of a Rift Valley Fever Virus Strain Reveals Transboundary Animal Movements from Eastern Continental Africa to the Union of the Comoros.

    PubMed

    Maquart, M; Pascalis, H; Abdouroihamane, S; Roger, M; Abdourahime, F; Cardinale, E; Cêtre-Sossah, C

    2016-04-01

    Major explosive outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF), an arthropod borne zoonotic disease, occur in humans and animals with significant mortality and economic impact across continental Africa and the Indian Ocean region (Madagascar, the Comoros archipelago). Recently, sporadic human cases have been reported in Mayotte and Grande Comore, two islands belonging to the Comoros archipelago. To identify the hypothetical source of virus introduction in an inter-epidemic or a post-epidemic period, a longitudinal survey of livestock was set up in Comorian ruminant populations, known to be susceptible hosts. The phylogeographic genomic analysis has shown that RVF virus (RVFV) detected in a zebu collected in Anjouan in August 2011 seems to be related to the last known epidemic of RVF which occurred in East Africa and Madagascar (2007-2009). This result highlights the fact that RVFV is maintained within local livestock populations and transboundary animal movements from eastern continental Africa to Indian Ocean islands likely result in RVFV crossover.

  15. Molecular biology and genetic diversity of Rift Valley fever virus

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus, is the causative agent of Rift Valley fever (RVF), a mosquito-borne disease of ruminant animals and humans. The generation of a large sequence database has facilitated studies of the evolution and spread of the virus. Bayesian analyses indicate that currently circulating strains of RVFV are descended from an ancestral species that emerged from a natural reservoir in Africa when large-scale cattle and sheep farming were introduced during the 19th century. Viruses descended from multiple lineages persist in that region, through infection of reservoir animals and vertical transmission in mosquitoes, emerging in years of heavy rainfall to cause epizootics and epidemics. On a number of occasions, viruses from these lineages have been transported outside the enzootic region through the movement of infected animals or mosquitoes, triggering outbreaks in countries such as Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Mauritania and Madagascar, where RVF had not previously been seen. Such viruses could potentially become established in their new environments through infection of wild and domestic ruminants and other animals and vertical transmission in local mosquito species. Despite their extensive geographic dispersion, all strains of RVFV remain closely related at the nucleotide and amino acid level. The high degree of conservation of genes encoding the virion surface glycoproteins suggests that a single vaccine should protect against all currently circulating RVFV strains. Similarly, preservation of the sequence of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase across viral lineages implies that antiviral drugs targeting the enzyme should be effective against all strains. Researchers should be encouraged to collect additional RVFV isolates and perform whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, so as to enhance our understanding of the continuing evolution of this important virus. This review forms part of a series

  16. The Ep152R ORF of African swine fever virus strain Georgia encodes for an essential gene that interacts with host protein BAG6.

    PubMed

    Borca, Manuel V; O'Donnell, Vivian; Holinka, Lauren G; Rai, Devendra K; Sanford, Brenton; Alfano, Marialexia; Carlson, Jolene; Azzinaro, Paul A; Alonso, Covadonga; Gladue, Douglas P

    2016-09-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal disease of domestic pigs that has significant economic consequences for the swine industry. The viral genome encodes for more than 150 genes, and only a select few of these genes have been studied in some detail. Here we report the characterization of open reading frame Ep152R that has a predicted complement control module/SCR domain. This domain is found in Vaccinia virus proteins that are involved in blocking the immune response during viral infection. A recombinant ASFV harboring a HA tagged version of the Ep152R protein was developed (ASFV-G-Ep152R-HA) and used to demonstrate that Ep152R is an early virus protein. Attempts to construct recombinant viruses having a deleted Ep152R gene were consistently unsuccessful indicating that Ep152R is an essential gene. Interestingly, analysis of host-protein interactions for Ep152R using a yeast two-hybrid screen, identified BAG6, a protein previously identified as being required for ASFV replication. Furthermore, fluorescent microscopy analysis confirms that Ep152R-BAG6 interaction actually occurs in cells infected with ASFV. PMID:27497620

  17. Molecular epidemiology of dengue 3 viruses and genetic relatedness among dengue 3 strains isolated from patients with mild or severe form of dengue fever in French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Chungue, E; Deubel, V; Cassar, O; Laille, M; Martin, P M

    1993-12-01

    The nucleotide sequences of a short fragment of the envelope protein gene encoding amino acids 25 to 89 of 27 dengue 3 viruses were determined by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products, and the viruses were compared regarding their time of isolation and geographic distribution. Four distinct genotypic groups were discerned at 6% divergence between nucleotide sequences. The first group contained isolates from the South Pacific (1988 to 1992), Singapore (1973) and Indonesia (1973 to 1991). The second group comprised viruses from Asia (1956 to 1989) including the reference strain H-87. The third was composed of one isolate from Thailand (1971), and the fourth included the early strains from French Polynesia (1964 to 1969) and from Puerto Rico (1963). Furthermore, the difference between early and recent strains from the South Pacific was as high as 12.3%. This observation suggests that the recent epidemics in the South Pacific were probably the consequence of the spread of a new variant that emerged from New Caledonia. However, relatedness between nucleotide sequence and disease severity, or between strains from epidemics with mild disease (New Caledonia) and strains from epidemics with severe disease (French Polynesia) could not be demonstrated.

  18. [Rift Valley fever virus: evolution in progress].

    PubMed

    Tolou, H; Plumet, S; Leparc-Goffart, I; Couissinier-Paris, P

    2009-06-01

    Several viruses now circulating in tropical zones around the globe are potential threats for ever-increasing human populations even in temperate zones that have long remained unaffected. The mechanisms underlying transport and transmission, which can be enhanced by human activity, can be even stronger in zones where factors needed to support development of these viruses, i.e., hosts, reservoirs and vectors, are already present. This possibility has been illustrated by dengue virus, and now by the rapid spread of the Chikungunya virus on Reunion Island in 2005 and then in Italy in 2007. The spreading of Chikungunya virus despite its mild reputation had a major unexpected impact. It showed that the evolution of the virus, whether a cause or consequence of observed events, could be determinant. The risk of extension of more pathogenic viruses due to similar mechanisms must be considered as a possibility. In this regard the Rift Valley fever virus, that already involves a large area and has a major reservoir, is one of the viruses that deserves close surveillance.

  19. Titration of African swine fever (ASF) virus.

    PubMed

    Enjuanes, L; Carrascosa, A L; Moreno, M A; Viñuela, E

    1976-09-01

    A haemadsorption microtest for African swine fever (ASF) virus is described. This assay is as sensitive and its response is faster than the conventional assay which uses buffy coat cultures in Leighton tubes. The method can also process a larger number of samples by using smaller amounts of swine blood and laboratory space. A plaque assay for ASF virus adapted to grow in VERO cells gives a titre similar to that obtained using the haemadsorption microtest. In both the micromethod and the plaque assay infection may be produced by a single infective particle. PMID:823294

  20. Titration of African swine fever (ASF) virus.

    PubMed

    Enjuanes, L; Carrascosa, A L; Moreno, M A; Viñuela, E

    1976-09-01

    A haemadsorption microtest for African swine fever (ASF) virus is described. This assay is as sensitive and its response is faster than the conventional assay which uses buffy coat cultures in Leighton tubes. The method can also process a larger number of samples by using smaller amounts of swine blood and laboratory space. A plaque assay for ASF virus adapted to grow in VERO cells gives a titre similar to that obtained using the haemadsorption microtest. In both the micromethod and the plaque assay infection may be produced by a single infective particle.

  1. Thermal inactivation of Alkhumra hemorrhagic fever virus.

    PubMed

    Madani, Tariq A; Abuelzein, El-Tayb M E; Azhar, Esam I; Al-Bar, Hussein M S

    2014-10-01

    The physico-chemical and biological characteristics of Alkhumra hemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV) are not yet known. The present study describes the thermal stability of this virus at different temperatures for different periods. The kinetics of thermal inactivation were studied, linear regressions were plotted, the Arrhenius equation was applied, and the activation energy was calculated accordingly. Titers of the residual virus were determined in median tissue culture infective dose (TCID50), and the rate of destruction of infectivity at various temperatures was determined. Infectivity of AHFV was completely lost upon heating for 3 minutes at 60 °C and for 30 min at 56 °C. However, the virus could maintain 33.2 % of its titer after heating for 60 min at 45 °C and 32 % of its titer after heating for 60 min at 50 °C. In conclusion, AHFV is thermo-labile, and its inactivation follows first-order kinetics. PMID:24906524

  2. Zika virus and Zika fever.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoyang; Wang, Peigang; An, Jing

    2016-04-01

    An emerging mosquito-borne arbovirus named Zika virus (ZIKV), of the family Flaviviridae and genus Flavivirus, is becoming a global health threat. ZIKV infection was long neglected due to its sporadic nature and mild symptoms. However, recently, with its rapid spread from Asia to the Americas, affecting more than 30 countries, accumulating evidences have demonstrated a close association between infant microcephaly and Zika infection in pregnant women. Here, we reviewed the virological, epidemiological, and clinical essentials of ZIKV infection.

  3. Challenge of pigs with classical swine fever viruses after C-strain vaccination reveals remarkably rapid protection and insights into early immunity.

    PubMed

    Graham, Simon P; Everett, Helen E; Haines, Felicity J; Johns, Helen L; Sosan, Olubukola A; Salguero, Francisco J; Clifford, Derek J; Steinbach, Falko; Drew, Trevor W; Crooke, Helen R

    2012-01-01

    Pre-emptive culling is becoming increasingly questioned as a means of controlling animal diseases, including classical swine fever (CSF). This has prompted discussions on the use of emergency vaccination to control future CSF outbreaks in domestic pigs. Despite a long history of safe use in endemic areas, there is a paucity of data on aspects important to emergency strategies, such as how rapidly CSFV vaccines would protect against transmission, and if this protection is equivalent for all viral genotypes, including highly divergent genotype 3 strains. To evaluate these questions, pigs were vaccinated with the Riemser® C-strain vaccine at 1, 3 and 5 days prior to challenge with genotype 2.1 and 3.3 challenge strains. The vaccine provided equivalent protection against clinical disease caused by for the two challenge strains and, as expected, protection was complete at 5 days post-vaccination. Substantial protection was achieved after 3 days, which was sufficient to prevent transmission of the 3.3 strain to animals in direct contact. Even by one day post-vaccination approximately half the animals were partially protected, and were able to control the infection, indicating that a reduction of the infectious potential is achieved very rapidly after vaccination. There was a close temporal correlation between T cell IFN-γ responses and protection. Interestingly, compared to responses of animals challenged 5 days after vaccination, challenge of animals 3 or 1 days post-vaccination resulted in impaired vaccine-induced T cell responses. This, together with the failure to detect a T cell IFN-γ response in unprotected and unvaccinated animals, indicates that virulent CSFV can inhibit the potent antiviral host defences primed by C-strain in the early period post vaccination.

  4. Challenge of Pigs with Classical Swine Fever Viruses after C-Strain Vaccination Reveals Remarkably Rapid Protection and Insights into Early Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Felicity J.; Johns, Helen L.; Sosan, Olubukola A.; Salguero, Francisco J.; Clifford, Derek J.; Steinbach, Falko; Drew, Trevor W.; Crooke, Helen R.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-emptive culling is becoming increasingly questioned as a means of controlling animal diseases, including classical swine fever (CSF). This has prompted discussions on the use of emergency vaccination to control future CSF outbreaks in domestic pigs. Despite a long history of safe use in endemic areas, there is a paucity of data on aspects important to emergency strategies, such as how rapidly CSFV vaccines would protect against transmission, and if this protection is equivalent for all viral genotypes, including highly divergent genotype 3 strains. To evaluate these questions, pigs were vaccinated with the Riemser® C-strain vaccine at 1, 3 and 5 days prior to challenge with genotype 2.1 and 3.3 challenge strains. The vaccine provided equivalent protection against clinical disease caused by for the two challenge strains and, as expected, protection was complete at 5 days post-vaccination. Substantial protection was achieved after 3 days, which was sufficient to prevent transmission of the 3.3 strain to animals in direct contact. Even by one day post-vaccination approximately half the animals were partially protected, and were able to control the infection, indicating that a reduction of the infectious potential is achieved very rapidly after vaccination. There was a close temporal correlation between T cell IFN-γ responses and protection. Interestingly, compared to responses of animals challenged 5 days after vaccination, challenge of animals 3 or 1 days post-vaccination resulted in impaired vaccine-induced T cell responses. This, together with the failure to detect a T cell IFN-γ response in unprotected and unvaccinated animals, indicates that virulent CSFV can inhibit the potent antiviral host defences primed by C-strain in the early period post vaccination. PMID:22235283

  5. Laboratory Validation of the Sand Fly Fever Virus Antigen Assay.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Will K; Szymczak, Mitchell Scott; Burkhalter, Kristen L; Miller, Myrna M

    2015-12-01

    Sandfly fever group viruses in the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae) are widely distributed across the globe and are a cause of disease in military troops and indigenous peoples. We assessed the laboratory sensitivity and specificity of the Sand Fly Fever Virus Antigen Assay, a rapid dipstick assay designed to detect sandfly fever Naples virus (SFNV) and Toscana virus (TOSV) against a panel of phleboviruses. The assay detected SFNV and TOSV, as well as other phleboviruses including Aguacate, Anahanga, Arumowot, Chagres, and Punta Toro viruses. It did not detect sandfly fever Sicilian, Heartland, Rio Grande, or Rift Valley fever viruses. It did not produce false positive results in the presence of uninfected sand flies (Lutzomyia longipalpis) or Cache Valley virus, a distantly related bunyavirus. Results from this laboratory evaluation suggest that this assay may be used as a rapid field-deployable assay to detect sand flies infected with TOSV and SFNV, as well as an assortment of other phleboviruses. PMID:26675463

  6. Laboratory Validation of the Sand Fly Fever Virus Antigen Assay.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Will K; Szymczak, Mitchell Scott; Burkhalter, Kristen L; Miller, Myrna M

    2015-12-01

    Sandfly fever group viruses in the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae) are widely distributed across the globe and are a cause of disease in military troops and indigenous peoples. We assessed the laboratory sensitivity and specificity of the Sand Fly Fever Virus Antigen Assay, a rapid dipstick assay designed to detect sandfly fever Naples virus (SFNV) and Toscana virus (TOSV) against a panel of phleboviruses. The assay detected SFNV and TOSV, as well as other phleboviruses including Aguacate, Anahanga, Arumowot, Chagres, and Punta Toro viruses. It did not detect sandfly fever Sicilian, Heartland, Rio Grande, or Rift Valley fever viruses. It did not produce false positive results in the presence of uninfected sand flies (Lutzomyia longipalpis) or Cache Valley virus, a distantly related bunyavirus. Results from this laboratory evaluation suggest that this assay may be used as a rapid field-deployable assay to detect sand flies infected with TOSV and SFNV, as well as an assortment of other phleboviruses.

  7. Reverse Genetics System for Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Benjamin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Aqian; Liang, Mifang; Li, Dexin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is an emerging tick-borne pathogen that was first reported in China in 2009. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral genome showed that SFTS virus represents a new lineage within the Phlebovirus genus, distinct from the existing sandfly fever and Uukuniemi virus groups, in the family Bunyaviridae. SFTS disease is characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms, chills, joint pain, myalgia, thrombocytopenia, leukocytopenia, and some hemorrhagic manifestations with a case fatality rate of about 2 to 15%. Here we report the development of reverse genetics systems to study STFSV replication and pathogenesis. We developed and optimized functional T7 polymerase-based M- and S-segment minigenome assays, which revealed errors in the published terminal sequences of the S segment of the Hubei 29 strain of SFTSV. We then generated recombinant viruses from cloned cDNAs prepared to the antigenomic RNAs both of the minimally passaged virus (HB29) and of a cell culture-adapted strain designated HB29pp. The growth properties, pattern of viral protein synthesis, and subcellular localization of viral N and NSs proteins of wild-type HB29pp (wtHB29pp) and recombinant HB29pp viruses were indistinguishable. We also show that the viruses fail to shut off host cell polypeptide production. The robust reverse genetics system described will be a valuable tool for the design of therapeutics and the development of killed and attenuated vaccines against this important emerging pathogen. IMPORTANCE SFTSV and related tick-borne phleboviruses such as Heartland virus are emerging viruses shown to cause severe disease in humans in the Far East and the United States, respectively. Study of these novel pathogens would be facilitated by technology to manipulate these viruses in a laboratory setting using reverse genetics. Here, we report the generation of infectious SFTSV from cDNA clones and demonstrate that the behavior of recombinant viruses

  8. A humanized monoclonal antibody neutralizes yellow fever virus strain 17D-204 in vitro but does not protect a mouse model from disease.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Piper, Joseph; Bennett, Susan L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Barrett, Alan D T; Roehrig, John T; Blair, Carol D

    2016-07-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D-204 is considered safe and effective, yet rare severe adverse events (SAEs), some resulting in death, have been documented following vaccination. Individuals exhibiting post-vaccinal SAEs are ideal candidates for antiviral monoclonal antibody (MAb) therapy; the time until appearance of clinical signs post-exposure is usually short and patients are quickly hospitalized. We previously developed a murine-human chimeric monoclonal antibody (cMAb), 2C9-cIgG, reactive with both virulent YFV and 17D-204, and demonstrated its ability to prevent and treat YF disease in both AG129 mouse and hamster models of infection. To counteract possible selection of 17D-204 variants that escape neutralization by treatment with a single MAb (2C9-cIgG), we developed a second cMAb, 864-cIgG, for use in combination with 2C9-cIgG in post-vaccinal therapy. MAb 864-cIgG recognizes/neutralizes only YFV 17D-204 vaccine substrain and binds to domain III (DIII) of the viral envelope protein, which is different from the YFV type-specific binding site of 2C9-cIgG in DII. Although it neutralized 17D-204 in vitro, administration of 864-cIgG had no protective capacity in the interferon receptor-deficient AG129 mouse model of 17D-204 infection. The data presented here show that although DIII-specific 864-cIgG neutralizes virus infectivity in vitro, it does not have the ability to abrogate disease in vivo. Therefore, combination of 864-cIgG with 2C9-cIgG for treatment of YF vaccination SAEs does not appear to provide an improvement on 2C9-cIgG therapy alone. PMID:27126613

  9. A humanized monoclonal antibody neutralizes yellow fever virus strain 17D-204 in vitro but does not protect a mouse model from disease.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Piper, Joseph; Bennett, Susan L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Barrett, Alan D T; Roehrig, John T; Blair, Carol D

    2016-07-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D-204 is considered safe and effective, yet rare severe adverse events (SAEs), some resulting in death, have been documented following vaccination. Individuals exhibiting post-vaccinal SAEs are ideal candidates for antiviral monoclonal antibody (MAb) therapy; the time until appearance of clinical signs post-exposure is usually short and patients are quickly hospitalized. We previously developed a murine-human chimeric monoclonal antibody (cMAb), 2C9-cIgG, reactive with both virulent YFV and 17D-204, and demonstrated its ability to prevent and treat YF disease in both AG129 mouse and hamster models of infection. To counteract possible selection of 17D-204 variants that escape neutralization by treatment with a single MAb (2C9-cIgG), we developed a second cMAb, 864-cIgG, for use in combination with 2C9-cIgG in post-vaccinal therapy. MAb 864-cIgG recognizes/neutralizes only YFV 17D-204 vaccine substrain and binds to domain III (DIII) of the viral envelope protein, which is different from the YFV type-specific binding site of 2C9-cIgG in DII. Although it neutralized 17D-204 in vitro, administration of 864-cIgG had no protective capacity in the interferon receptor-deficient AG129 mouse model of 17D-204 infection. The data presented here show that although DIII-specific 864-cIgG neutralizes virus infectivity in vitro, it does not have the ability to abrogate disease in vivo. Therefore, combination of 864-cIgG with 2C9-cIgG for treatment of YF vaccination SAEs does not appear to provide an improvement on 2C9-cIgG therapy alone.

  10. The 17D-204 Vaccine Strain-Induced Protection against Virulent Yellow Fever Virus Is Mediated by Humoral Immunity and CD4+ but not CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, L. K. Metthew; Klimstra, William B.

    2016-01-01

    A gold standard of antiviral vaccination has been the safe and effective live-attenuated 17D-based yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccines. Among more than 500 million vaccinees, only a handful of cases have been reported in which vaccinees developed a virulent wild type YFV infection. This efficacy is presumed to be the result of both neutralizing antibodies and a robust T cell response. However, the particular immune components required for protection against YFV have never been evaluated. An understanding of the immune mechanisms that underlie 17D-based vaccine efficacy is critical to the development of next-generation vaccines against flaviviruses and other pathogens. Here we have addressed this question for the first time using a murine model of disease. Similar to humans, vaccination elicited long-term protection against challenge, characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers and a robust T cell response that formed long-lived memory. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were polyfunctional and cytolytic. Adoptive transfer of immune sera or CD4+ T cells provided partial protection against YFV, but complete protection was achieved by transfer of both immune sera and CD4+ T cells. Thus, robust CD4+ T cell activity may be a critical contributor to protective immunity elicited by highly effective live attenuated vaccines. PMID:27463517

  11. The 17D-204 Vaccine Strain-Induced Protection against Virulent Yellow Fever Virus Is Mediated by Humoral Immunity and CD4+ but not CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Alan M; Lam, L K Metthew; Klimstra, William B; Ryman, Kate D

    2016-07-01

    A gold standard of antiviral vaccination has been the safe and effective live-attenuated 17D-based yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccines. Among more than 500 million vaccinees, only a handful of cases have been reported in which vaccinees developed a virulent wild type YFV infection. This efficacy is presumed to be the result of both neutralizing antibodies and a robust T cell response. However, the particular immune components required for protection against YFV have never been evaluated. An understanding of the immune mechanisms that underlie 17D-based vaccine efficacy is critical to the development of next-generation vaccines against flaviviruses and other pathogens. Here we have addressed this question for the first time using a murine model of disease. Similar to humans, vaccination elicited long-term protection against challenge, characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers and a robust T cell response that formed long-lived memory. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were polyfunctional and cytolytic. Adoptive transfer of immune sera or CD4+ T cells provided partial protection against YFV, but complete protection was achieved by transfer of both immune sera and CD4+ T cells. Thus, robust CD4+ T cell activity may be a critical contributor to protective immunity elicited by highly effective live attenuated vaccines. PMID:27463517

  12. Viruses Causing Hemorrhagic Fever. Safety Laboratory Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are diseases caused by viruses which belong to different families, many of them causing severe diseases. These viruses may produce different symptomatology together with a severe multisystem syndrome, and the final result might be the production of hemorrhages in several sites of the body. The majority of them have no other treatment than supportive therapy, although some antiviral drugs can be used in some circumstances. Transmission of VHF has been demonstrated through contact with animal vectors or person-to-person through the contact with body fluids. No risk of transmission has been found during the incubation period, but when the viral load is high the risk of transmission is greatest. Both health care and clinical laboratory workers must safely handle patients and specimens by taking all required precautions during their management. PMID:27014378

  13. Aedes Mosquito Saliva Modulates Rift Valley Fever Virus Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Le Coupanec, Alain; Babin, Divya; Fiette, Laurence; Jouvion, Grégory; Ave, Patrick; Misse, Dorothee; Bouloy, Michèle; Choumet, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Background Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a severe mosquito-borne disease affecting humans and domestic ruminants. Mosquito saliva contains compounds that counteract the hemostatic, inflammatory, and immune responses of the host. Modulation of these defensive responses may facilitate virus infection. Indeed, Aedes mosquito saliva played a crucial role in the vector's capacity to effectively transfer arboviruses such as the Cache Valley and West Nile viruses. The role of mosquito saliva in the transmission of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) has not been investigated. Objective Using a murine model, we explored the potential for mosquitoes to impact the course of RVF disease by determining whether differences in pathogenesis occurred in the presence or absence of mosquito saliva and salivary gland extract. Methods C57BL/6NRJ male mice were infected with the ZH548 strain of RVFV via intraperitoneal or intradermal route, or via bites from RVFV-exposed mosquitoes. The virus titers in mosquitoes and mouse organs were determined by plaque assays. Findings After intraperitoneal injection, RVFV infection primarily resulted in liver damage. In contrast, RVFV infection via intradermal injection caused both liver and neurological symptoms and this route best mimicked the natural infection by mosquitoes. Co-injections of RVFV with salivary gland extract or saliva via intradermal route increased the mortality rates of mice, as well as the virus titers measured in several organs and in the blood. Furthermore, the blood cell counts of infected mice were altered compared to those of uninfected mice. Interpretation Different routes of infection determine the pattern in which the virus spreads and the organs it targets. Aedes saliva significantly increases the pathogenicity of RVFV. PMID:23785528

  14. Plaque assay for African swine fever virus on swine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bustos, M J; Nogal, M L; Revilla, Y; Carrascosa, A L

    2002-07-01

    A plaque assay developed to detect the infection of African Swine Fever Virus on swine macrophages is described. Plaques were generated by all of the virus isolates tested. The method is suitable not only for virus titration but also for the selection of clones in protocols for isolation/purification of recombinant viruses.

  15. Substitution of specific cysteine residues in E1 glycoprotein of classical swine fever virus strain Brescia affects formation of E1-E2 heterodimers and alters virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E1, along with E^rns and E2, is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E1 and E2 are anchored to the virus envelope at their carboxyl termini and E^rns loosely associates with the viral envelope. In infected cells, E2 forms homodimers and heterodimers with E1,...

  16. Vector Competence of Australian Mosquitoes for Yellow Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    van den Hurk, Andrew F.; McElroy, Kate; Pyke, Alyssa T.; McGee, Charles E.; Hall-Mendelin, Sonja; Day, Andrew; Ryan, Peter A.; Ritchie, Scott A.; Vanlandingham, Dana L.; Higgs, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The vector competence of Australian mosquitoes for yellow fever virus (YFV) was evaluated. Infection and transmission rates in Cairns and Townsville populations of Aedes aegypti and a Brisbane strain of Ae. notoscriptus were not significantly different from a well-characterized YFV-susceptible strain of Ae. aegypti. After exposure to 107.2 tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50)/mL of an African strain of YFV, > 70% of Ae. aegypti and Ae. notoscriptus became infected, and > 50% transmitted the virus. When exposed to 106.7 TCID50/mL of a South American strain of YFV, the highest infection (64%) and transmission (56%) rates were observed in Ae. notoscriptus. The infection and transmission rates in the Cairns Ae. aegypti were both 24%, and they were 36% and 28%, respectively, for the Townsville population. Because competent vectors are present, the limited number of travelers from endemic areas and strict vaccination requirements will influence whether YFV transmission occurs in Australia. PMID:21896802

  17. A simian hemorrhagic fever virus isolate from persistently infected baboons efficiently induces hemorrhagic fever disease in Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Vatter, Heather A; Donaldson, Eric F; Huynh, Jeremy; Rawlings, Stephanie; Manoharan, Minsha; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Dickerson, Mary F; Lewis, Anne D; Colgin, Lois M A; Axthelm, Michael K; Pecotte, Jerilyn K; Baric, Ralph S; Wong, Scott W; Brinton, Margo A

    2015-01-01

    Simian hemorrhagic fever virus is an arterivirus that naturally infects species of African nonhuman primates causing acute or persistent asymptomatic infections. Although it was previously estimated that 1% of baboons are SHFV-positive, more than 10% of wild-caught and captive-bred baboons tested were SHFV positive and the infections persisted for more than 10 years with detectable virus in the blood (100-1000 genomes/ml). The sequences of two baboon SHFV isolates that were amplified by a single passage in primary macaque macrophages had a high degree of identity to each other as well as to the genome of SHFV-LVR, a laboratory strain isolated in the 1960s. Infection of Japanese macaques with 100PFU of a baboon isolate consistently produced high level viremia, pro-inflammatory cytokines, elevated tissue factor levels and clinical signs indicating coagulation defects. The baboon virus isolate provides a reliable BSL2 model of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in macaques.

  18. Characterization of Sepik and Entebbe bat viruses closely related to yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Goro; Chang, Gwong-Jen J

    2006-12-01

    Yellow fever virus has a special place in medical history as the first animal virus isolated and as the prototype virus in the genus Flavivirus, which contains many serious human pathogens. Only recently, its closely related viruses within the group were identified phylogenetically. In this study, we obtained complete or near complete genome sequences of two viruses most closely related to yellow fever virus: Sepik virus of Papua New Guinea and Entebbe bat virus of Africa. Based on full-genomic characterization and genomic traits among related viruses, we identified Sepik virus to be most closely related to yellow fever virus and analyzed the pattern of repeat and conserved sequence motifs in the 3'-noncoding region among the members of yellow fever virus cluster. We also discuss the geographic dispersal as a part of ecological traits of this lineage of flaviviruses.

  19. Application of the pseudo-plaque assay for detection and titration of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus.

    PubMed

    Berber, Engin; Canakoglu, Nurettin; Yoruk, Mustafa D; Tonbak, Sukru; Aktas, Munir; Ertek, Mustafa; Bolat, Yusuf; Kalkan, Ahmet; Ozdarendeli, Aykut

    2013-01-01

    A pseudo-plaque assay was developed for detection and quantitation of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus Turkey-Kelkit06. Enzyme-catalyzed color development of infected cells probed with anti-Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus antibodies was used for determining the titer of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever Turkey-Kelkit06 and for its detection in samples from persons infected with the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. The pseudo-plaque assay accuracy was confirmed by comparing pseudo-plaque assay titers with fluorescent immunofocus assay and focus formation assay titers using three stocks of virus. No significant difference in virus titers of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever Turkey-Kelkit06 among the three methods was observed. The pseudo-plaque assay is more sensitive than the fluorescent immunofocus assay for detecting the virus in primary isolates of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus collected from humans, but no difference in sensitivity between the two methods was observed in the cell-adapted strain of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever Turkey-Kelkit06. The pseudo-plaque assay is suitable for titration of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever Turkey-Kelkit06, which does not develop plaques, suggesting it may also be suitable for the detection of other viruses.

  20. Methods for growing and titrating African swine fever virus: field and laboratory samples.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, Angel L; Bustos, M Jose; de Leon, Patricia

    2011-12-01

    Growing African swine fever virus (ASFV) isolates obtained mainly from the field, but also engineered in the laboratory, is a critical step for diagnosis, titration, or virus infection studies. This unit describes a set of methods and protocols to produce and titrate any ASFV strain in cell cultures. The procedures include (1) basic techniques to prepare virus-sensitive target cells; (2) strategies for growth, concentration, and purification of virus stocks; and (3) the semi-quantitative (end dilution) and quantitative (plaque) assays for the determination of viral titers, and the use of different ASFV-sensitive cells as targets for virus production and titration.

  1. Yellow fever virus exhibits slower evolutionary dynamics than dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Sall, Amadou A; Faye, Ousmane; Diallo, Mawlouth; Firth, Cadhla; Kitchen, Andrew; Holmes, Edward C

    2010-01-01

    Although yellow fever has historically been one of the most important viral infections of humans, relatively little is known about the evolutionary processes that shape its genetic diversity. Similarly, there is limited information on the molecular epidemiology of yellow fever virus (YFV) in Africa even though it most likely first emerged on this continent. Through an analysis of complete E gene sequences, including a newly acquired viral collection from Central and West Africa (Senegal, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, and Mauritania), we show that YFV exhibits markedly lower rates of evolutionary change than dengue virus, despite numerous biological similarities between these two viruses. From this observation, along with a lack of clock-like evolutionary behavior in YFV, we suggest that vertical transmission, itself characterized by lower replication rates, may play an important role in the evolution of YFV in its enzootic setting. Despite a reduced rate of nucleotide substitution, phylogenetic patterns and estimates of times to common ancestry in YFV still accord well with the dual histories of colonialism and the slave trade, with areas of sylvatic transmission (such as Kedougou, Senegal) acting as enzootic/epidemic foci.

  2. Viral hemorrhagic fevers of animals caused by DNA viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we outline serious diseases of food and fiber animals that cause damaging economic effect on products all over the world. The only vector-borne DNA virus is included here, such as African swine fever virus, and the herpes viruses discussed have a complex epidemiology characterized by outbreak...

  3. Seroprevalence of Alkhurma and other hemorrhagic fever viruses, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Memish, Ziad A; Albarrak, Ali; Almazroa, Mohammad A; Al-Omar, Ibrahim; Alhakeem, Rafat; Assiri, Abdullah; Fagbo, Shamsudeen; MacNeil, Adam; Rollin, Pierre E; Abdullah, Nageeb; Stephens, Gwen

    2011-12-01

    A 2009 deployment of military units from several Saudi Arabian provinces to Jazan Province, Saudi Arabia, enabled us to evaluate exposure to Alkhurma, Crimean-Congo, dengue, and Rift Valley hemorrhagic fever viruses. Seroprevalence to all viruses was low; however, Alkhurma virus seroprevalence was higher (1.3%) and less geographically restricted than previously thought.

  4. Genetic Detection and Isolation of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Kosovo, Yugoslavia

    PubMed Central

    Boźović, Bojana; Pavlidou, Vassiliki; Papadimitriou, Evangelia; Pelemis, Mijomir; Antoniadis, Aantonis

    2002-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (C-CHFV) strains were isolated from a fatal case and the attending physician in Kosovo, Yugoslavia. Early, rapid diagnosis of the disease was achieved by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The physician was successfully treated with oral ribavirin. These cases yielded the first genetically studied C-CHFV human isolates in the Balkans. PMID:12141973

  5. Mutations in the classical swine fever virus NS4B protein affects virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NS4B is one of the non-structural proteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), the etiological agent of a severe, highly lethal disease of swine. Protein domain analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of the NS4B protein of highly pathogenic CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) identified a Toll/Inte...

  6. Close Relationship of Ruminant Pestiviruses and Classical Swine Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Postel, Alexander; Schmeiser, Stefanie; Oguzoglu, Tuba Cigdem; Indenbirken, Daniela; Alawi, Malik; Fischer, Nicole; Grundhoff, Adam

    2015-01-01

    To determine why serum from small ruminants infected with ruminant pestiviruses reacted positively to classical swine fever virus (CSFV)–specific diagnostic tests, we analyzed 2 pestiviruses from Turkey. They differed genetically and antigenically from known Pestivirus species and were closely related to CSFV. Cross-reactions would interfere with classical swine fever diagnosis in pigs. PMID:25811683

  7. Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 vaccine encoding Toscana virus NSs retains neuroinvasiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Indran, Sabarish V; Lihoradova, Olga A; Phoenix, Inaia; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Kalveram, Birte; Head, Jennifer A; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Smith, Jennifer K; Zhang, Lihong; Juelich, Terry L; Gong, Bin; Freiberg, Alexander N; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-07-01

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) causes high rates of abortion and fetal malformation in pregnant ruminants, and haemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans. The MP-12 strain is a highly efficacious and safe live-attenuated vaccine candidate for both humans and ruminants. However, MP-12 lacks a marker to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals. In this study, we originally aimed to characterize the efficacy of a recombinant RVFV MP-12 strain encoding Toscana virus (TOSV) NSs gene in place of MP-12 NSs (rMP12-TOSNSs). TOSV NSs promotes the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and inhibits interferon-β gene up-regulation without suppressing host general transcription. Unexpectedly, rMP12-TOSNSs increased death in vaccinated outbred mice and inbred BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice. Immunohistochemistry showed diffusely positive viral antigens in the thalamus, hypothalamus and brainstem, including the medulla. No viral antigens were detected in spleen or liver, which is similar to the antigen distribution of moribund mice infected with MP-12. These results suggest that rMP12-TOSNSs retains neuroinvasiveness in mice. Our findings demonstrate that rMP12-TOSNSs causes neuroinvasion without any hepatic disease and will be useful for studying the neuroinvasion mechanism of RVFV and TOSV.

  8. Genetic Analysis of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Yashina, Lyudmila; Vyshemirskii, Oleg; Seregin, Sergei; Petrova, Irina; Samokhvalov, Evgeny; Lvov, Dmitry; Gutorov, Valery; Kuzina, Irina; Tyunnikov, Georgy; Tang, Yi-Wei; Netesov, Sergei; Petrov, Vladimir

    2003-01-01

    Genetic analysis of wild-type Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus strains recovered in the European part of Russia was performed. Reverse transcriptase PCR followed by direct sequencing was used to recover partial sequences of the CCHF virus medium (M) genome segment (M segment) from four pools of Hyalomma marginatum ticks and six human patients. Phylogenetic analysis of the M-segment sequences from Russian strains revealed a close relatedness of the strains (nucleotide sequence diversity, ≤5.0%). The strains differed significantly from CCHF viruses from other regions of the world (nucleotide sequence diversity, 10.3 to 20.4%), suggesting that CCHF virus strains recovered in the European part of Russia form a distinct group. PMID:12574301

  9. [Adaptation of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus to culture in Vero-E6 cells].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, S E; Karganova, G G; Gmyl', L V

    1997-01-01

    Adaptation of the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus to continuous culturing in Vero-E6 cells was studied by coculturing of infected and intact cells. Adapted strain Hoja-A exerted a complete cytocidal effect and was characterized by a high level of virus accumulation in the early period of the infection. The resultant strain survived through more than 80 passages and retained the newly acquired properties; lyophilized, it can be stored for a long time. Availability of such a strain opens new vistas in studies of the CCHF agent. PMID:9499243

  10. Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection in Golden Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Scharton, Dionna; Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; Bailey, Kevin W.; Vest, Zachary; Westover, Jonna B.; Siddharthan, Venkatraman; Gowen, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a formidable pathogen that causes severe disease and abortion in a variety of livestock species and a range of disease in humans that includes hemorrhagic fever, fulminant hepatitis, encephalitis and blindness. The natural transmission cycle involves mosquito vectors, but exposure can also occur through contact with infected fluids and tissues. The lack of approved antiviral therapies and vaccines for human use underlies the importance of small animal models for proof-of-concept efficacy studies. Several mouse and rat models of RVFV infection have been well characterized and provide useful systems for the study of certain aspects of pathogenesis, as well as antiviral drug and vaccine development. However, certain host-directed therapeutics may not act on mouse or rat pathways. Here, we describe the natural history of disease in golden Syrian hamsters challenged subcutaneously with the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. Peracute disease resulted in rapid lethality within 2 to 3 days of RVFV challenge. High titer viremia and substantial viral loads were observed in most tissues examined; however, histopathology and immunostaining for RVFV antigen were largely restricted to the liver. Acute hepatocellular necrosis associated with a strong presence of viral antigen in the hepatocytes indicates that fulminant hepatitis is the likely cause of mortality. Further studies to assess the susceptibility and disease progression following respiratory route exposure are warranted. The use of the hamsters to model RVFV infection is suitable for early stage antiviral drug and vaccine development studies. PMID:25607955

  11. Viral hemorrhagic fevers of animals caused by DNA viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we outline serious diseases of food and fiber animals that cause damaging economic effects on producers all over the world. The only vector-borne DNA virus is included here (i.e., African swine fever virus), and the herpesviruses discussed have a complex epidemiology characterized by outbreaks ...

  12. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Juan C.; Pauza, C. David; Djavani, Mahmoud M.; Rodas, Juan D.; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets. PMID:21820469

  13. Rift Valley Fever Outbreak with East-Central African Virus Lineage in Mauritania, 2003

    PubMed Central

    Faye, Ousmane; Diallo, Mawlouth; Diop, Djibril; Bezeid, O. Elmamy; Bâ, Hampathé; Niang, Mbayame; Dia, Ibrahima; Mohamed, Sid Ahmed Ould; Ndiaye, Kader; Diallo, Diawo; Ly, Peinda Ogo; Diallo, Boubacar; Nabeth, Pierre; Simon, François; Lô, Baïdy

    2007-01-01

    In October 2003, 9 human cases of hemorrhagic fever were reported in 3 provinces of Mauritania, West Africa. Test results showed acute Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection, and a field investigation found recent circulation of RVFV with a prevalence rate of 25.5% (25/98) and 4 deaths among the 25 laboratory-confirmed case-patients. Immunoglobulin M against RVFV was found in 46% (25/54) of domestic animals. RVFV was also isolated from the mosquito species Culex poicilipes. Genetic comparison of virion segments indicated little variation among the strains isolated. However, phylogenetic studies clearly demonstrated that these strains belonged to the East-Central African lineage for all segments. To our knowledge, this is the first time viruses of this lineage have been observed in an outbreak in West Africa. Whether these strains were introduced or are endemic in West Africa remains to be determined. PMID:18214173

  14. Rift Valley fever outbreak with East-Central African virus lineage in Mauritania, 2003.

    PubMed

    Faye, Ousmane; Diallo, Mawlouth; Diop, Djibril; Bezeid, O Elmamy; Bâ, Hampathé; Niang, Mbayame; Dia, Ibrahima; Mohamed, Sid Ahmed Ould; Ndiaye, Kader; Diallo, Diawo; Ly, Peinda Ogo; Diallo, Boubacar; Nabeth, Pierre; Simon, François; Lô, Baïdy; Diop, Ousmane Madiagne

    2007-07-01

    In October 2003, 9 human cases of hemorrhagic fever were reported in 3 provinces of Mauritania, West Africa. Test results showed acute Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection, and a field investigation found recent circulation of RVFV with a prevalence rate of 25.5% (25/98) and 4 deaths among the 25 laboratory-confirmed case-patients. Immunoglobulin M against RVFV was found in 46% (25/54) of domestic animals. RVFV was also isolated from the mosquito species Culex poicilipes. Genetic comparison of virion segments indicated little variation among the strains isolated. However, phylogenetic studies clearly demonstrated that these strains belonged to the East-Central African lineage for all segments. To our knowledge, this is the first time viruses of this lineage have been observed in an outbreak in West Africa. Whether these strains were introduced or are endemic in West Africa remains to be determined.

  15. Immune Responses Against Classical Swine Fever Virus: Between Ignorance and Lunacy.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Artur; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus infection of pigs causes disease courses from life-threatening to asymptomatic, depending on the virulence of the virus strain and the immunocompetence of the host. The virus targets immune cells, which are central in orchestrating innate and adaptive immune responses such as macrophages and conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Here, we review current knowledge and concepts aiming to explain the immunopathogenesis of the disease at both the host and the cellular level. We propose that the interferon type I system and in particular the interaction of the virus with plasmacytoid dendritic cells and macrophages is crucial to understand elements governing the induction of protective rather than pathogenic immune responses. The review also concludes that despite the knowledge available many aspects of classical swine fever immunopathogenesis are still puzzling. PMID:26664939

  16. Clinical Manifestations and Case Management of Ebola Haemorrhagic Fever Caused by a Newly Identified Virus Strain, Bundibugyo, Uganda, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Roddy, Paul; Howard, Natasha; Van Kerkhove, Maria D.; Lutwama, Julius; Wamala, Joseph; Yoti, Zabulon; Colebunders, Robert; Palma, Pedro Pablo; Sterk, Esther; Jeffs, Benjamin; Van Herp, Michel; Borchert, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    A confirmed Ebola haemorrhagic fever (EHF) outbreak in Bundibugyo, Uganda, November 2007–February 2008, was caused by a putative new species (Bundibugyo ebolavirus). It included 93 putative cases, 56 laboratory-confirmed cases, and 37 deaths (CFR = 25%). Study objectives are to describe clinical manifestations and case management for 26 hospitalised laboratory-confirmed EHF patients. Clinical findings are congruous with previously reported EHF infections. The most frequently experienced symptoms were non-bloody diarrhoea (81%), severe headache (81%), and asthenia (77%). Seven patients reported or were observed with haemorrhagic symptoms, six of whom died. Ebola care remains difficult due to the resource-poor setting of outbreaks and the infection-control procedures required. However, quality data collection is essential to evaluate case definitions and therapeutic interventions, and needs improvement in future epidemics. Organizations usually involved in EHF case management have a particular responsibility in this respect. PMID:23285243

  17. Clinical manifestations and case management of Ebola haemorrhagic fever caused by a newly identified virus strain, Bundibugyo, Uganda, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Roddy, Paul; Howard, Natasha; Van Kerkhove, Maria D; Lutwama, Julius; Wamala, Joseph; Yoti, Zabulon; Colebunders, Robert; Palma, Pedro Pablo; Sterk, Esther; Jeffs, Benjamin; Van Herp, Michel; Borchert, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    A confirmed Ebola haemorrhagic fever (EHF) outbreak in Bundibugyo, Uganda, November 2007-February 2008, was caused by a putative new species (Bundibugyo ebolavirus). It included 93 putative cases, 56 laboratory-confirmed cases, and 37 deaths (CFR = 25%). Study objectives are to describe clinical manifestations and case management for 26 hospitalised laboratory-confirmed EHF patients. Clinical findings are congruous with previously reported EHF infections. The most frequently experienced symptoms were non-bloody diarrhoea (81%), severe headache (81%), and asthenia (77%). Seven patients reported or were observed with haemorrhagic symptoms, six of whom died. Ebola care remains difficult due to the resource-poor setting of outbreaks and the infection-control procedures required. However, quality data collection is essential to evaluate case definitions and therapeutic interventions, and needs improvement in future epidemics. Organizations usually involved in EHF case management have a particular responsibility in this respect.

  18. Complete genome sequence of a Dengue virus serotype 4 strain isolated in Roraima, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Naveca, Felipe G; Souza, Victor C; Silva, George A V; Maito, Rodrigo M; Granja, Fabiana; Siqueira, Thalita; Acosta, Pablo O A

    2012-02-01

    Dengue is the most important arboviral disease worldwide. We report the complete genome sequence of a dengue virus serotype 4, genotype II strain isolated in 2010 from a patient with classical dengue fever in Boa Vista, Roraima, Brazil.

  19. Concentration of Rift Valley fever and Chikungunya viruses by precipitation.

    PubMed

    Klein, F; Mahlandt, B G; Cockey, R R; Lincoln, R E

    1970-09-01

    Simple and efficient methods for concentrating Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus and chikungunya (CHIK) virus are described. Ammonium sulfate, potassium sulfate, or alcohol was used as a precipitating agent and the precipitate was resuspended to volumes suitable for further processing and purification. The methods permitted concentration of live RVF virus and CHIK virus about 100-fold with negligible losses of virus. RVF virus retained a high level of infectivity with potassium aluminum sulfate and alcohol, but CHIK virus retained a higher infectivity level with ammonium sulfate than with potassium aluminum sulfate. The data indicate that serum plays an important role in the concentration of both viruses, at least when the sulfate methods are used.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of recent isolates of classical swine fever virus from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Sabogal, Zonia Yubyll; Mogollón, José Darío; Rincón, Maria Antonia; Clavijo, Alfonso

    2006-01-01

    The ability to discriminate between different classical Swine fever virus (CSFV) isolates is a prerequisite for identifying the possible origin of an outbreak. To determine the relatedness between Colombian isolates from different geographical regions, genetic sequences of the glycoprotein E2 and the 5'UTR of CSFV were amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared with reference strains of different genetic grouping. The viruses originated from classical swine fever (CSF) outbreaks in Colombia during 1998-2002. All viruses characterized belonged to genogroup 1 and were members of the subgroup 1.1. The results indicate that the outbreaks from the year 2002 are caused by a strain related to the virus CSF/Santander, isolated in 1980, suggesting that the current CSF outbreaks are the consequence of a single strain that continues to circulate in the field. For the first time, an association between isolates from outbreaks in Colombia in the 1990s was established with a virus isolate from Brazil, indicating a possible origin of the virus causing the outbreak.

  1. A Recombinant Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Subunit Vaccine Confers Full Protection against Rift Valley Fever Challenge in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Faburay, Bonto; Wilson, William C.; Gaudreault, Natasha N.; Davis, A. Sally; Shivanna, Vinay; Bawa, Bhupinder; Sunwoo, Sun Young; Ma, Wenjun; Drolet, Barbara S.; Morozov, Igor; McVey, D. Scott; Richt, Juergen A.

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen causing disease outbreaks in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The virus has great potential for transboundary spread due to the presence of competent vectors in non-endemic areas. There is currently no fully licensed vaccine suitable for use in livestock or humans outside endemic areas. Here we report the evaluation of the efficacy of a recombinant subunit vaccine based on the RVFV Gn and Gc glycoproteins. In a previous study, the vaccine elicited strong virus neutralizing antibody responses in sheep and was DIVA (differentiating naturally infected from vaccinated animals) compatible. In the current efficacy study, a group of sheep (n = 5) was vaccinated subcutaneously with the glycoprotein-based subunit vaccine candidate and then subjected to heterologous challenge with the virulent Kenya-128B-15 RVFV strain. The vaccine elicited high virus neutralizing antibody titers and conferred complete protection in all vaccinated sheep, as evidenced by prevention of viremia, fever and absence of RVFV-associated histopathological lesions. We conclude that the subunit vaccine platform represents a promising strategy for the prevention and control of RVFV infections in susceptible hosts. PMID:27296136

  2. A Recombinant Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Subunit Vaccine Confers Full Protection against Rift Valley Fever Challenge in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Faburay, Bonto; Wilson, William C; Gaudreault, Natasha N; Davis, A Sally; Shivanna, Vinay; Bawa, Bhupinder; Sunwoo, Sun Young; Ma, Wenjun; Drolet, Barbara S; Morozov, Igor; McVey, D Scott; Richt, Juergen A

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen causing disease outbreaks in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The virus has great potential for transboundary spread due to the presence of competent vectors in non-endemic areas. There is currently no fully licensed vaccine suitable for use in livestock or humans outside endemic areas. Here we report the evaluation of the efficacy of a recombinant subunit vaccine based on the RVFV Gn and Gc glycoproteins. In a previous study, the vaccine elicited strong virus neutralizing antibody responses in sheep and was DIVA (differentiating naturally infected from vaccinated animals) compatible. In the current efficacy study, a group of sheep (n = 5) was vaccinated subcutaneously with the glycoprotein-based subunit vaccine candidate and then subjected to heterologous challenge with the virulent Kenya-128B-15 RVFV strain. The vaccine elicited high virus neutralizing antibody titers and conferred complete protection in all vaccinated sheep, as evidenced by prevention of viremia, fever and absence of RVFV-associated histopathological lesions. We conclude that the subunit vaccine platform represents a promising strategy for the prevention and control of RVFV infections in susceptible hosts. PMID:27296136

  3. [Yellow fever epidemic in the extreme North of Cameroon in 1990: first yellow fever virus isolation in Cameroon].

    PubMed

    Vicens, R; Robert, V; Pignon, D; Zeller, H; Ghipponi, P M; Digoutte, J P

    1993-01-01

    Some two years ago, suspicious cases of yellow fever (YF) were reported in northern Cameroon. A deadly epidemic broke out during the second half of the rainy season (from 15 September to 22 December 1990) with 180 known cases, of which 125 died. The real figures could have been between 5000 and 20,000 cases with between 500 and 1000 deaths. The affected area was within the yellow fever belt, which is situated around latitude 11 degrees North and 14 degrees East. In this mountainous area (altitude, about 800 m) the rural inhabitants are scattered, with a high density of 200,000 people per 1000 km2. Investigations began at the start of the dry season and a strain of yellow fever virus was isolated for the first time in Cameroon. A study of 107 serum samples (23 families in 11 villages) was carried out by immunofluorescence and ELISA, which showed 20% IgM carriers for yellow fever virus and nothing for the three other flaviviruses, although these were largely present; there were up to 98% crossed reactions in IgG with dengue 2 and West Nile strains. The under-10 age group represented 63% of the IgM carriers. An entomological study was carried out at the same time. It permitted the capture of Aedes aegypti, A. furcifer, A. luteocephalus and the identification of numerous potential larval sites, at times still in the productive phase of A. aegypti which is considered to be the principal vector.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Reactive astrogliosis in response to hemorrhagic fever virus: microarray profile of Junin virus-infected human astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arenavirus Junin is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. Limited information is available concerning the pathogenesis of this human disease, especially the pathogenesis of acute and late neurological symptoms. Methods In our study we present for the first time cDNA microarray profile of human astrocytes infected with the virulent strain of Junin virus. Transcriptional profiling was confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and cytokine/chemokine/growth factor assay. Results We demonstrated the impact of virus infection on immune/inflammatory response/interferon signaling and apoptosis. Pro-apoptotic response and amplification with time of pro-inflammatory cascade of human astrocytes suggested neurodegenerative dysfunctional reactive astrogliosis in response to Junin virus infection. Conclusion Our results suggest potential pathogenic role of astroglial cells in the development of neurological symptoms and late neurological syndrome during Argentine hemorrhagic fever. PMID:25015256

  5. A DNA vaccine against yellow fever virus: development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Milton; Cruz, Fábia da Silva Pereira; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; da Motta, Márcia Archer; Cassemiro, Klécia Marília Soares de Melo; Maia, Rita de Cássia Carvalho; de Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz; Galler, Ricardo; Freire, Marcos da Silva; August, Joseph Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T A; Dhalia, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    Attenuated yellow fever (YF) virus 17D/17DD vaccines are the only available protection from YF infection, which remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the tropical areas of the world. The attenuated YF virus vaccine, which is used worldwide, generates both long-lasting neutralizing antibodies and strong T-cell responses. However, on rare occasions, this vaccine has toxic side effects that can be fatal. This study presents the design of two non-viral DNA-based antigen formulations and the characterization of their expression and immunological properties. The two antigen formulations consist of DNA encoding the full-length envelope protein (p/YFE) or the full-length envelope protein fused to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein signal, LAMP-1 (pL/YFE), aimed at diverting antigen processing/presentation through the major histocompatibility complex II precursor compartments. The immune responses triggered by these formulations were evaluated in H2b and H2d backgrounds, corresponding to the C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice strains, respectively. Both DNA constructs were able to induce very strong T-cell responses of similar magnitude against almost all epitopes that are also generated by the YF 17DD vaccine. The pL/YFE formulation performed best overall. In addition to the T-cell response, it was also able to stimulate high titers of anti-YF neutralizing antibodies comparable to the levels elicited by the 17DD vaccine. More importantly, the pL/YFE vaccine conferred 100% protection against the YF virus in intracerebrally challenged mice. These results indicate that pL/YFE DNA is an excellent vaccine candidate and should be considered for further developmental studies.

  6. Curcumin Inhibits Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Senina, Svetlana; Lundberg, Lindsay; Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Das, Ravi; Baer, Alan; Bethel, Laura; Turell, Michael; Hartman, Amy Lynn; Das, Bhaskar; Bailey, Charles; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus that is classified as a select agent, an emerging infectious virus, and an agricultural pathogen. Understanding RVFV-host interactions is imperative to the design of novel therapeutics. Here, we report that an infection by the MP-12 strain of RVFV induces phosphorylation of the p65 component of the NFκB cascade. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of p65 (serine 536) involves phosphorylation of IκBα and occurs through the classical NFκB cascade. A unique, low molecular weight complex of the IKK-β subunit can be observed in MP-12-infected cells, which we have labeled IKK-β2. The IKK-β2 complex retains kinase activity and phosphorylates an IκBα substrate. Inhibition of the IKK complex using inhibitors impairs viral replication, thus alluding to the requirement of an active IKK complex to the viral life cycle. Curcumin strongly down-regulates levels of extracellular infectious virus. Our data demonstrated that curcumin binds to and inhibits kinase activity of the IKK-β2 complex in infected cells. Curcumin partially exerts its inhibitory influence on RVFV replication by interfering with IKK-β2-mediated phosphorylation of the viral protein NSs and by altering the cell cycle of treated cells. Curcumin also demonstrated efficacy against ZH501, the fully virulent version of RVFV. Curcumin treatment down-regulated viral replication in the liver of infected animals. Our data point to the possibility that RVFV infection may result in the generation of novel versions of host components (such as IKK-β2) that, by virtue of altered protein interaction and function, qualify as unique therapeutic targets. PMID:22847000

  7. A DNA vaccine against yellow fever virus: development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Milton; Cruz, Fábia da Silva Pereira; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; da Motta, Márcia Archer; Cassemiro, Klécia Marília Soares de Melo; Maia, Rita de Cássia Carvalho; de Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz; Galler, Ricardo; Freire, Marcos da Silva; August, Joseph Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T A; Dhalia, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    Attenuated yellow fever (YF) virus 17D/17DD vaccines are the only available protection from YF infection, which remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the tropical areas of the world. The attenuated YF virus vaccine, which is used worldwide, generates both long-lasting neutralizing antibodies and strong T-cell responses. However, on rare occasions, this vaccine has toxic side effects that can be fatal. This study presents the design of two non-viral DNA-based antigen formulations and the characterization of their expression and immunological properties. The two antigen formulations consist of DNA encoding the full-length envelope protein (p/YFE) or the full-length envelope protein fused to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein signal, LAMP-1 (pL/YFE), aimed at diverting antigen processing/presentation through the major histocompatibility complex II precursor compartments. The immune responses triggered by these formulations were evaluated in H2b and H2d backgrounds, corresponding to the C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice strains, respectively. Both DNA constructs were able to induce very strong T-cell responses of similar magnitude against almost all epitopes that are also generated by the YF 17DD vaccine. The pL/YFE formulation performed best overall. In addition to the T-cell response, it was also able to stimulate high titers of anti-YF neutralizing antibodies comparable to the levels elicited by the 17DD vaccine. More importantly, the pL/YFE vaccine conferred 100% protection against the YF virus in intracerebrally challenged mice. These results indicate that pL/YFE DNA is an excellent vaccine candidate and should be considered for further developmental studies. PMID:25875109

  8. Expression of African swine fever virus envelope protein j13L inhibits vaccinia virus morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S C; Dixon, L K; Brookes, S M; Smith, G L

    1998-05-01

    The African swine fever virus (ASFV) strain Malawi LIL20/1 open reading frame (ORF) j13L was expressed in vaccinia virus (VV) from a strong synthetic late promoter as either a complete ORF (vSJ1) or lacking codons 1-31 (vSJ2). Each recombinant VV produced a small plaque which rapidly reverted to a normal size upon passage. The yield of infectious virus from a single cycle infection with vSJ1 or vSJ2 was reduced 50- to 100-fold compared to wild-type (wt) and a revertant virus (vSJ5) in which the j13L ORF was removed and the VV thymidine kinase gene restored. PCR analysis of nine spontaneous large plaque revertant viruses, recovered after passage of vSJ1 in BSC-40 cells, showed that six had lost the j13L ORF and the co-inserted beta-galactosidase gene. Three viruses retained the j13L and beta-galactosidase genes, but in each case the j13L protein was not expressed due to a different single base deletion near the 5' end of the j13L coding region which introduced a stop codon a short distance downstream. The formation of intracellular mature virus (IMV) and extracellular enveloped virus was reduced 50- to 75-fold in cells infected with vSJ1 compared to wt VV and revertant vSJ5. Electron microscopy showed aberrant IMV precursor structures in vSJ1-infected cells, and immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that these structures contained j13L protein. These results indicate that expression of the j13L protein is toxic for VV replication due to interference with VV morphogenesis prior to IMV formation.

  9. French Aedes albopictus are able to transmit yellow fever virus

    PubMed Central

    Amraoui, Fadila; Vazeille, Marie; Failloux, Anna Bella

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the ability of a French population of Aedes albopictus to transmit yellow fever virus (YFV). Batches of 30 to 40 female mosquitoes were analysed at 7, 14 and 21 days post-exposure (dpe). Bodies, heads and saliva were screened for YFV. Infectious viral particles were detected in bodies and heads at 7, 14 and 21 dpe whereas the virus was found in saliva only from 14 dpe. Our results showed that Ae. albopictus can potentially transmit YFV. PMID:27719755

  10. A simian hemorrhagic fever virus isolate from persistently infected baboons efficiently induces hemorrhagic fever disease in Japanese macaques

    PubMed Central

    Vatter, Heather A.; Donaldson, Eric F.; Huynh, Jeremy; Rawlings, Stephanie; Manoharan, Minsha; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Dickerson, Mary F.; Lewis, Anne D.; Colgin, Lois M.A.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Pecotte, Jerilyn K.; Baric, Ralph S.; Wong, Scott W.; Brinton, Margo A.

    2014-01-01

    Simian hemorrhagic fever virus is an arterivirus that naturally infects species of African nonhuman primates causing acute or persistent asymptomatic infections. Although it was previously estimated that 1% of baboons are SHFV-positive, more than 10% of wild-caught and captive-bred baboons tested were SHFV positive and the infections persisted for more than 10 years with detectable virus in the blood (100–1000 genomes/ml). The sequences of two baboon SHFV isolates that were amplified by a single passage in primary macaque macrophages showed a very high degree of identity to each other as well as to the genome of SHFV-LVR, a laboratory strain isolated in the 1960s. Infection of Japanese macaques with 100 PFU of a baboon isolate consistently produced high level viremia, pro-inflammatory cytokines, elevated tissue factor levels and clinical signs indicating coagulation defects. The baboon virus isolate provides a reliable BSL2 model of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in macaques. PMID:25463617

  11. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Category A Infectious Pathogens: Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever and Variola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sanchita; Rundell, Mark S.; Mirza, Aashiq H.; Pingle, Maneesh R.; Shigyo, Kristi; Garrison, Aura R.; Paragas, Jason; Smith, Scott K.; Olson, Victoria A.; Larone, Davise H.; Spitzer, Eric D.; Barany, Francis; Golightly, Linnie M.

    2015-01-01

    CDC designated category A infectious agents pose a major risk to national security and require special action for public health preparedness. They include viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) syndrome as well as variola virus, the agent of smallpox. VHF is characterized by hemorrhage and fever with multi-organ failure leading to high morbidity and mortality. Smallpox, a prior scourge, has been eradicated for decades, making it a particularly serious threat if released nefariously in the essentially non-immune world population. Early detection of the causative agents, and the ability to distinguish them from other pathogens, is essential to contain outbreaks, implement proper control measures, and prevent morbidity and mortality. We have developed a multiplex detection assay that uses several species-specific PCR primers to generate amplicons from multiple pathogens; these are then targeted in a ligase detection reaction (LDR). The resultant fluorescently-labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array enabling simultaneous identification of the pathogens. The assay was evaluated on 32 different isolates associated with VHF (ebolavirus, marburgvirus, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Dengue virus, and Yellow fever virus) as well as variola virus and vaccinia virus (the agent of smallpox and its vaccine strain, respectively). The assay was able to detect all viruses tested, including 8 sequences representative of different variola virus strains from the CDC repository. It does not cross react with other emerging zoonoses such as monkeypox virus or cowpox virus, or six flaviviruses tested (St. Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Powassan virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus). PMID:26381398

  12. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Category A Infectious Pathogens: Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever and Variola Virus.

    PubMed

    Das, Sanchita; Rundell, Mark S; Mirza, Aashiq H; Pingle, Maneesh R; Shigyo, Kristi; Garrison, Aura R; Paragas, Jason; Smith, Scott K; Olson, Victoria A; Larone, Davise H; Spitzer, Eric D; Barany, Francis; Golightly, Linnie M

    2015-01-01

    CDC designated category A infectious agents pose a major risk to national security and require special action for public health preparedness. They include viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) syndrome as well as variola virus, the agent of smallpox. VHF is characterized by hemorrhage and fever with multi-organ failure leading to high morbidity and mortality. Smallpox, a prior scourge, has been eradicated for decades, making it a particularly serious threat if released nefariously in the essentially non-immune world population. Early detection of the causative agents, and the ability to distinguish them from other pathogens, is essential to contain outbreaks, implement proper control measures, and prevent morbidity and mortality. We have developed a multiplex detection assay that uses several species-specific PCR primers to generate amplicons from multiple pathogens; these are then targeted in a ligase detection reaction (LDR). The resultant fluorescently-labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array enabling simultaneous identification of the pathogens. The assay was evaluated on 32 different isolates associated with VHF (ebolavirus, marburgvirus, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Dengue virus, and Yellow fever virus) as well as variola virus and vaccinia virus (the agent of smallpox and its vaccine strain, respectively). The assay was able to detect all viruses tested, including 8 sequences representative of different variola virus strains from the CDC repository. It does not cross react with other emerging zoonoses such as monkeypox virus or cowpox virus, or six flaviviruses tested (St. Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Powassan virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus).

  13. THE TITRATION OF YELLOW FEVER VIRUS IN STEGOMYIA MOSQUITOES

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nelson C.; Frobisher, Martin; Lloyd, Wray

    1933-01-01

    Titrations were made of yellow fever virus in stegomyia mosquitoes, using rhesus monkeys as test animals. It was found that: (a) The average mosquito immediately after engorging on highly infectious blood contained between 1 and 2 million lethal doses of virus. The titer of freshly ingested blood was as high as 1 billion lethal doses of virus per cubic centimeter. (b) During the fortnight succeeding a meal on infectious blood there occurred a reduction of titratable virus to not more than 1 per cent of that present in the freshly fed insects. (c) The titer was somewhat higher at later periods. This rise in titer signified possibly not a multiplication, but merely an increase of extracellular virus and of that easily freed by grinding to a titratable form. (d) At no later stage did the quantity of titratable virus equal that demonstrable in freshly fed insects. PMID:19870190

  14. Advanced Yellow Fever Virus Genome Detection in Point-of-Care Facilities and Reference Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pranav; Yillah, Jasmin; Weidmann, Manfred; Méndez, Jairo A.; Nakouné, Emmanuel Rivalyn; Niedrig, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Reported methods for the detection of the yellow fever viral genome are beset by limitations in sensitivity, specificity, strain detection spectra, and suitability to laboratories with simple infrastructure in areas of endemicity. We describe the development of two different approaches affording sensitive and specific detection of the yellow fever genome: a real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and an isothermal protocol employing the same primer-probe set but based on helicase-dependent amplification technology (RT-tHDA). Both assays were evaluated using yellow fever cell culture supernatants as well as spiked and clinical samples. We demonstrate reliable detection by both assays of different strains of yellow fever virus with improved sensitivity and specificity. The RT-qPCR assay is a powerful tool for reference or diagnostic laboratories with real-time PCR capability, while the isothermal RT-tHDA assay represents a useful alternative to earlier amplification techniques for the molecular diagnosis of yellow fever by field or point-of-care laboratories. PMID:23052311

  15. Immune enhancement of yellow fever virus neurovirulence for mice: studies of mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Gould, E A; Buckley, A; Groeger, B K; Cane, P A; Doenhoff, M

    1987-12-01

    Enhancement of yellow fever virus neurovirulence for mice by specific antibody was studied with the French neurotropic vaccine strain. Experimental conditions for enhancement required mice between 14 and 40 days old and intraperitoneal administration of a selected monoclonal antibody 24 h before or up to 72 h after intracerebral virus challenge. Virus infectivity titrations were similar in brains of antibody-treated and untreated mice. Virus recovered from brains of mice with enhanced viral infections was neither qualitatively nor quantitatively different from standard virus. Humoral immune responses in enhanced infections were normal, macrophages did not become infected and viraemia was not significant. Both hydrocortisone treatment and complement depletion with cobra venom resulted in prolongation of mouse survival times but virulence enhancement persisted. Antithymocyte serum had no effect on enhancement although it reduced the humoral immune response. It is proposed that virulence enhancement is due to the combined effects of virus-specific antibody on infected cells, complement-mediated cytolysis and resultant host anti-cellular activity. There is no analogy between mechanisms effecting increased arbovirus growth in vitro in the presence of specific antibody and increased yellow fever virus neurovirulence in vivo after parenteral administration of antibody.

  16. [The Alkhurma virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus): an emerging pathogen responsible for hemorrhage fever in the Middle East].

    PubMed

    Charrel, R N; de Lamballerie, X

    2003-01-01

    To date tick-borne flaviviruses causing hemorrhagic fevers in humans have been isolated in Siberia (Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus), India (Kyasanur Forest disease virus), and Saudi Arabia (Akhurma virus). Because of their potential use as biological weapons for bioterrorism, these 3 viruses require level 4 biosafety handling facilities and have been listed as hypervirulent pathogens by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Alkhurma virus was isolated in 1995 from patients with hemorrhagic fever in Saudi Arabia. Current evidence suggests that transmission to humans can occur either transcutaneously either by contamination of a skin wound with the blood of an infected vertebrate or bites of an infected tick or orally by drinking unpasteurized contaminated milk. To date a total of 24 symptomatic human cases have been recorded with a mortality rate at 25% (6/24). Pauci-symptomatic or asymptomatic cases are likely but epidemiologic data are currently unavailable. The complete coding sequence of the prototype strain of Alkhurma virus was determined and published in 2001 based on international research project involving investigators from France, Great Britain, and Saudi Arabia. Phylogenetic studies demonstrate that closest known relative of Alkhurma virus is Kyasanur Forest disease virus and that both viruses share a common ancestor. Genetic analysis of several human strains sequentially isolated over a 5-year period showed a very low diversity. This finding has important potential implications for diagnosis and vaccination. PMID:14579470

  17. Characterisation of virus-specific peripheral blood cell cytokine responses following vaccination or infection with classical swine fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Graham, Simon P; Everett, Helen E; Johns, Helen L; Haines, Felicity J; La Rocca, S Anna; Khatri, Meenakshi; Wright, Ian K; Drew, Trevor; Crooke, Helen R

    2010-04-21

    Existing live attenuated classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccines provide a rapid onset of complete protection but pose problems in discriminating infected amongst vaccinated animals. With a view to providing additional information on the cellular mechanisms that may contribute to protection, which in turn may aid the development of the next generation of CSFV vaccines, we explored the kinetics of the cytokine responses from peripheral blood cells of pigs vaccinated with an attenuated C-strain vaccine strain and/or infected with a recent CSFV isolate. Peripheral blood cells were isolated over the course of vaccination/infection and stimulated in vitro with C-strain or UK2000/7.1 viruses. Virus-specific responses of peripheral blood cells isolated from C-strain vaccinated pigs were dominated by the production of IFN-gamma. IFN-gamma production in response to the C-strain virus was first detected in vaccinates 9 days post-vaccination and was sustained over the period of observation. In contrast, cells from challenge control animals did not secrete IFN-gamma in response to stimulation with C-strain or UK2000/7.1 viruses. Supernatants from UK2000/7.1 infected animals contained significant levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines from day 8 post-infection and these cytokines were present in both virus and mock stimulated cultures. The results suggest that the C-strain virus is a potent inducer of a type-1 T cell response, which may play a role in the protection afforded by such vaccines, whereas the pro-inflammatory cytokine responses observed in cultures from infected pigs may reflect a pathological pro-inflammatory cascade initiated in vivo following the replication and spread of CSFV.

  18. Yellow Fever Virus in Haemagogus leucocelaenus and Aedes serratus Mosquitoes, Southern Brazil, 2008

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Jáder da C.; de Almeida, Marco A.B.; dos Santos, Edmilson; da Fonseca, Daltro F.; Sallum, Maria A.M.; Noll, Carlos A.; Monteiro, Hamilton A. de O.; Cruz, Ana C.R.; Carvalho, Valéria L.; Pinto, Eliana V.; Castro, Francisco C.; Neto, Joaquim P. Nunes; Segura, Maria N.O.

    2010-01-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) was isolated from Haemagogus leucocelaenus mosquitoes during an epizootic in 2001 in the Rio Grande do Sul State in southern Brazil. In October 2008, a yellow fever outbreak was reported there, with nonhuman primate deaths and human cases. This latter outbreak led to intensification of surveillance measures for early detection of YFV and support for vaccination programs. We report entomologic surveillance in 2 municipalities that recorded nonhuman primate deaths. Mosquitoes were collected at ground level, identified, and processed for virus isolation and molecular analyses. Eight YFV strains were isolated (7 from pools of Hg. leucocelaenus mosquitoes and another from Aedes serratus mosquitoes); 6 were sequenced, and they grouped in the YFV South American genotype I. The results confirmed the role of Hg. leucocelaenus mosquitoes as the main YFV vector in southern Brazil and suggest that Ae. serratus mosquitoes may have a potential role as a secondary vector. PMID:21122222

  19. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of Rift Valley fever virus

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Michael B.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Holbrook, Michael R.; Watowich, Stanley J.

    2009-04-25

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Bunyaviridae; Phlebovirus) is an emerging human and veterinary pathogen causing acute hepatitis in ruminants and has the potential to cause hemorrhagic fever in humans. We report a three-dimensional reconstruction of RVFV vaccine strain MP-12 (RVFV MP-12) by cryo-electron microcopy using icosahedral symmetry of individual virions. Although the genomic core of RVFV MP-12 is apparently poorly ordered, the glycoproteins on the virus surface are highly symmetric and arranged on a T = 12 icosahedral lattice. Our RVFV MP-12 structure allowed clear identification of inter-capsomer contacts and definition of possible glycoprotein arrangements within capsomers. This structure provides a detailed model for phleboviruses, opens new avenues for high-resolution structural studies of the bunyavirus family, and aids the design of antiviral diagnostics and effective subunit vaccines.

  20. Multigene families in African swine fever virus: family 505.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J M; Yañez, R J; Pan, R; Rodriguez, J F; Salas, M L; Viñuela, E

    1994-01-01

    Sequencing of restriction fragment EcoRI A-SalI C of African swine fever virus has revealed the existence of a multigene family, designated family 505 because of the average number of amino acids in the proteins, composed of seven homologous and tandemly arranged genes. All the genes of family 505 are expressed during infection. Primer extension analysis showed that transcription is initiated a short distance (3 to 62 nucleotides) from the start codon of the corresponding open reading frame. The proteins of family 505 showed similarity to those of family 360 from African swine fever virus. In particular, a striking conservation of three regions at the amino terminus of the polypeptides was observed. Images PMID:8139051

  1. Molecular Insights into Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zivcec, Marko; Scholte, Florine; Spiropoulou, Christina; Spengler, Jessica; Bergeron, Éric

    2016-04-21

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne pathogen that causes high morbidity and mortality. Efficacy of vaccines and antivirals to treat human CCHFV infections remains limited and controversial. Research into pathology and underlying molecular mechanisms of CCHFV and other nairoviruses is limited. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of CCHFV replication and pathogenesis in the past decade. Here we review the most recent molecular advances in CCHFV-related research, and provide perspectives on future research.

  2. [Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fever viruses: update on filoviruses].

    PubMed

    Leroy, E; Baize, S; Gonzalez, J P

    2011-04-01

    The Ebola and Marburg viruses are the sole members of the Filoviridae family of viruses. They are characterized by a long filamentous form that is unique in the viral world. Filoviruses are among the most virulent pathogens currently known to infect humans. They cause fulminating disease characterized by acute fever followed by generalized hemorrhagic syndrome that is associated with 90% mortality in the most severe forms. Epidemic outbreaks of Marburg and Ebola viruses have taken a heavy toll on human life in Central Africa and devastated large ape populations in Gabon and Republic of Congo. Since their discovery in 1967 (Marburg) and 1976 (Ebola), more than 2,300 cases and 1,670 deaths have been reported. These numbers pale in comparison with the burden caused by malnutrition or other infectious disease scourges in Africa such as malaria, cholera, AIDS, dengue or tuberculosis. However, due to their extremely high lethality, association with multifocal hemorrhaging and specificity to the African continent, these hemorrhagic fever viruses have given rise to great interest on the part not only of the international scientific community but also of the general public because of their perceived potential as biological weapons. Much research has been performed on these viruses and major progress has been made in knowledge of their ecology, epidemiology and physiopathology and in development of vaccine candidates and therapeutic schemes. The purpose of this review is to present the main developments in these particular fields in the last decade.

  3. Congenital yellow fever virus infection after immunization in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, T F; Paul, R; Lynberg, M C; Letson, G W

    1993-12-01

    To determine whether yellow fever (YF) vaccine administered in pregnancy causes fetal infection, women who were vaccinated during unrecognized pregnancy in a mass campaign in Trinidad were studied retrospectively. Maternal and cord or infant blood were tested for IgM and neutralizing antibodies to YF and dengue viruses. One of 41 infants had IgM and elevated neutralizing antibodies to YF virus, indicating congenital infection. The infant, the first reported case of YF virus infection after immunization in pregnancy, was delivered after an uncomplicated full-term pregnancy and appeared normal. Congenital dengue 1 infection may have occurred in another case. The frequency of fetal infection and adverse events after such exposure could not be estimated; however, the neurotropism of YF virus for the developing nervous system and the now documented possibility of transplacental infection underscores the admonition that YF vaccination in pregnancy should be avoided.

  4. Establishment and characterization of a chimeric infectious cDNA clone of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T S; Xia, Y H

    2016-06-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease among swine that has an important economic impact worldwide. There are two important CSFV strains in China, Shimen and hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV). Shimen strain is highly virulent while HCLV, also referred to as C-strain, is a live attenuated vaccine strain considered to be one of the most effective and safest live vaccines. In this study, a chimeric infectious cDNA clone of CSFV named pT7SM-c was engineered by replacing the E(rns) genomic region of an infectious clone of CSFV Shimen strain, pT7SM, with the same region obtained from HCLV. RNA transcripts of pT7SM-c containing an engineered EcoRI site that served as a genetic marker were directly infectious in PK15 cells. The rescued virus vT7SM-c showed similar growth kinetics and cytopathic effect with the parental virus vT7SM in the cells. The chimeric infectious cDNA clone can be used as a practical tool for further studying of the virulence, protein function and pathogenesis of CSFV through genetic manipulation.

  5. Establishment and characterization of a chimeric infectious cDNA clone of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T S; Xia, Y H

    2016-06-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease among swine that has an important economic impact worldwide. There are two important CSFV strains in China, Shimen and hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV). Shimen strain is highly virulent while HCLV, also referred to as C-strain, is a live attenuated vaccine strain considered to be one of the most effective and safest live vaccines. In this study, a chimeric infectious cDNA clone of CSFV named pT7SM-c was engineered by replacing the E(rns) genomic region of an infectious clone of CSFV Shimen strain, pT7SM, with the same region obtained from HCLV. RNA transcripts of pT7SM-c containing an engineered EcoRI site that served as a genetic marker were directly infectious in PK15 cells. The rescued virus vT7SM-c showed similar growth kinetics and cytopathic effect with the parental virus vT7SM in the cells. The chimeric infectious cDNA clone can be used as a practical tool for further studying of the virulence, protein function and pathogenesis of CSFV through genetic manipulation. PMID:27265471

  6. Hypervariable antigenic region 1 of classical swine fever virus E2 protein impacts antibody neutralization.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xun; Wang, Zuohuan; Cao, Tong; Tong, Chao; Geng, Shichao; Gu, Yuanxing; Zhou, Yingshan; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2016-07-19

    Envelope glycoprotein E2 of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the major antigen that induces neutralizing antibodies and confers protection against CSFV infection. There are three hypervariable antigenic regions (HAR1, HAR2 and HAR3) of E2 that are different between the group 1 vaccine C-strain and group 2 clinical isolates. This study was aimed to characterize the antigenic epitope region recognized by monoclonal antibody 4F4 (mAb-4F4) that is present in the group 2 field isolate HZ1-08, but not in the C-strain, and examine its impact on neutralization titers when antisera from different recombinant viruses were cross-examined. Indirect ELISA with C-strain E2-based chimeric proteins carrying the three HAR regions showed that the mAb-4F4 bound to HAR1 from HZ1-08 E2, but not to HAR2 or HAR3, indicating that the specific epitope is located in the HAR1 region. Of the 6 major residues differences between C-strain and field isolates, Glu713 in the HAR1 region of strain HZ1-08 is critical for mAb-4F4 binding either at the recombinant protein level or using intact recombinant viruses carrying single mutations. C-strain-based recombinant viruses carrying the most antigenic part of E2 or HAR1 from strain HZ1-08 remained non-pathogenic to pigs and induced good antibody responses. By cross-neutralization assay, we observed that the anti-C-strain serum lost most of its neutralization capacity to RecC-HZ-E2 and QZ-14 (subgroup 2.1d field isolate in 2014), and vice versa. More importantly, the RecC-HAR1 virus remained competent in neutralizing ReC-HZ-E2 and QZ-14 strains without compromising the neutralization capability to the recombinant C-strain. Thus, we propose that chimeric C-strain carrying the HAR1 region of field isolates is a good vaccine candidate for classical swine fever.

  7. Hypervariable antigenic region 1 of classical swine fever virus E2 protein impacts antibody neutralization.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xun; Wang, Zuohuan; Cao, Tong; Tong, Chao; Geng, Shichao; Gu, Yuanxing; Zhou, Yingshan; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2016-07-19

    Envelope glycoprotein E2 of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the major antigen that induces neutralizing antibodies and confers protection against CSFV infection. There are three hypervariable antigenic regions (HAR1, HAR2 and HAR3) of E2 that are different between the group 1 vaccine C-strain and group 2 clinical isolates. This study was aimed to characterize the antigenic epitope region recognized by monoclonal antibody 4F4 (mAb-4F4) that is present in the group 2 field isolate HZ1-08, but not in the C-strain, and examine its impact on neutralization titers when antisera from different recombinant viruses were cross-examined. Indirect ELISA with C-strain E2-based chimeric proteins carrying the three HAR regions showed that the mAb-4F4 bound to HAR1 from HZ1-08 E2, but not to HAR2 or HAR3, indicating that the specific epitope is located in the HAR1 region. Of the 6 major residues differences between C-strain and field isolates, Glu713 in the HAR1 region of strain HZ1-08 is critical for mAb-4F4 binding either at the recombinant protein level or using intact recombinant viruses carrying single mutations. C-strain-based recombinant viruses carrying the most antigenic part of E2 or HAR1 from strain HZ1-08 remained non-pathogenic to pigs and induced good antibody responses. By cross-neutralization assay, we observed that the anti-C-strain serum lost most of its neutralization capacity to RecC-HZ-E2 and QZ-14 (subgroup 2.1d field isolate in 2014), and vice versa. More importantly, the RecC-HAR1 virus remained competent in neutralizing ReC-HZ-E2 and QZ-14 strains without compromising the neutralization capability to the recombinant C-strain. Thus, we propose that chimeric C-strain carrying the HAR1 region of field isolates is a good vaccine candidate for classical swine fever. PMID:27317266

  8. Insulated Isothermal Reverse Transcriptase PCR (iiRT-PCR) for Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Classical Swine Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Lung, O; Pasick, J; Fisher, M; Buchanan, C; Erickson, A; Ambagala, A

    2016-10-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an OIE-listed disease that can have a severe impact on the swine industry. User-friendly, sensitive, rapid diagnostic tests that utilize low-cost field-deployable instruments for CSF diagnosis can be useful for disease surveillance and outbreak monitoring. In this study, we describe validation of a new probe-based insulated isothermal reverse transcriptase PCR (iiRT-PCR) assay for rapid detection of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) on a compact, user-friendly device (POCKIT(™) Nucleic Acid Analyzer) that does not need data interpretation by the user. The assay accurately detected CSFV RNA from a diverse panel of 33 CSFV strains representing all three genotypes plus an additional in vitro-transcribed RNA from cloned sequences representing a vaccine strain. No cross-reactivity was observed with a panel of 18 viruses associated with livestock including eight other pestivirus strains (bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 and type 2, border disease virus, HoBi atypical pestivirus), African swine fever virus, swine vesicular disease virus, swine influenza virus, porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus, porcine circovirus 1, porcine circovirus 2, porcine respiratory coronavirus, vesicular exanthema of swine virus, bovine herpes virus type 1 and vesicular stomatitis virus. The iiRT-PCR assay accurately detected CSFV as early as 2 days post-inoculation in RNA extracted from serum samples of experimentally infected pigs, before appearance of clinical signs. The limit of detection (LOD95% ) calculated by probit regression analysis was 23 copies per reaction. The assay has a sample to answer turnaround time of less than an hour using extracted RNA or diluted or low volume of neat serum. The user-friendly, compact device that automatically analyses and displays results could potentially be a useful tool for surveillance and monitoring of CSF in a disease outbreak. PMID:25644051

  9. Immunological relationships between malignant catarrhal fever virus (alcelaphine herpesvirus 1) and bovine cytomegalovirus (bovine herpesvirus 3).

    PubMed

    Rossiter, P B; Gumm, I D; Mirangi, P K

    1988-03-01

    Strains of malignant catarrhal fever virus (alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AHV-1)) and bovine cytomegalovirus (bovine herpesvirus 3 (BHV-3)) were compared for serological relatedness by cross-titration in an indirect immunofluorescent (IIF) antibody assay. There was definite cross-reactivity between these 2 viruses, with heterologous sera staining intracellular and membrane antigens of infected cells. Heterologous antibody titres were approximately 50-fold lower than homologous titres and could be removed by absorption with either homologous or heterologous virus-infected cells, but not with uninfected cells. Regression analyses of IIF antibody titres to AHV-1 and BHV-3 virus in 3 groups of wild ungulate sera also indicated a serological relationship between these herpesviruses. In a cross-immunity trial, 2 of 3 cattle immunized with a BHV-3 virus and 2 of 3 cattle immunized with avirulent AHV-1 resisted challenge with virulent AHV-1-infected blood which killed 3 unimmunized controls. These results are discussed particularly with respect to the involvement of BHV-3 in malignant catarrhal fever.

  10. Virus-like particle-based countermeasures against Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed

    Koukuntla, R; Mandell, R B; Flick, R

    2012-09-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus that causes significant morbidity and mortality in both humans and livestock. With increased world travel and the threat of bioterrorism, there is a real risk of RVFV spreading to naïve geographical areas (Trans. R. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg., 73, 1979, 618; MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly Rep., 49, 2000, 905). The introduction of RVFV would cause critical public health, agricultural and economic damage. Despite the clear need for an efficacious vaccine, there are no United States (US) Food and Drug Administration or US Department of Agriculture approved vaccines against RVFV. To address this need, a virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccine candidate was developed. First, a non-replicating chimeric RVF VLP vaccine candidate was generated that protected mice and rats against a lethal RVFV challenge. This was followed by the development and optimization of conditions for production of RVF VLPs in insect and mammalian cells. Immunological studies demonstrated that VLP-based vaccine candidates elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. Subsequent challenge studies using a lethal wild-type RVFV strain under high-containment conditions showed that RVF VLP vaccine candidates can completely protect mice and rats. PMID:22958258

  11. Domestically acquired seoul virus causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome-Maryland, 2008.

    PubMed

    Woods, Christian; Palekar, Rakhee; Kim, Peter; Blythe, David; de Senarclens, Olivier; Feldman, Katherine; Farnon, Eileen C; Rollin, Pierre E; Albariño, Cesar G; Nichol, Stuart T; Smith, Margo

    2009-11-15

    Hantaviruses are rodent-borne viruses capable of causing human disease. The Seoul virus is a hantavirus that causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in East Asia. To our knowledge, we report the first domestically acquired case of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome caused by the Seoul virus, confirmed by serology testing, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and nucleotide sequence analysis. The patient presented with myalgias and fever, and developed acute renal failure.

  12. Generation and evaluation of a chimeric classical swine fever virus expressing a visible marker gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Wang, Xiao; Sun, Yuan; Li, Lian-Feng; Zhang, Lingkai; Li, Su; Luo, Yuzi; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2016-03-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a noncytopathogenic virus, and the incorporation of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) tag into the viral genome provides a means of direct monitoring of viral infection without immunostaining. It is well established that the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the CSFV plays an important role in viral RNA replication. Although CSFV carrying a reporter gene and chimeric CSFV have been generated and evaluated, a chimeric CSFV with a visible marker has not yet been reported. Here, we generated and evaluated a chimeric virus containing the EGFP tag and the 3'-UTR from vaccine strain HCLV (C-strain) in the genetic background of the highly virulent CSFV Shimen strain. The chimeric marker CSFV was fluorescent and had an approximately 100-fold lower viral titer, lower replication level of viral genome, and weaker fluorescence intensity than the recombinant CSFV with only the EGFP tag or the parental virus. Furthermore, the marker chimera was avirulent and displayed no viremia in inoculated pigs, which were completely protected from lethal CSFV challenge as early as 15 days post-inoculation. The chimeric marker virus was visible in vitro and attenuated in vitro and in vivo, which suggests that CSFV can be engineered to produce attenuated variants with a visible marker to facilitate in vitro studies of CSFV infection and replication and to develop of novel vaccines against CSF. PMID:26614259

  13. Repurposing FDA-approved drugs as therapeutics to treat Rift Valley fever virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Ashwini; Bansal, Neha; Senina, Svetlana; Hooper, Idris; Lundberg, Lindsay; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Narayanan, Aarthi; Gutting, Bradford; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no FDA-approved therapeutics available to treat Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. In an effort to repurpose drugs for RVFV treatment, a library of FDA-approved drugs was screened to determine their ability to inhibit RVFV. Several drugs from varying compound classes, including inhibitors of growth factor receptors, microtubule assembly/disassembly, and DNA synthesis, were found to reduce RVFV replication. The hepatocellular and renal cell carcinoma drug, sorafenib, was the most effective inhibitor, being non-toxic and demonstrating inhibition of RVFV in a cell-type and virus strain independent manner. Mechanism of action studies indicated that sorafenib targets at least two stages in the virus infectious cycle, RNA synthesis and viral egress. Computational modeling studies also support this conclusion. siRNA knockdown of Raf proteins indicated that non-classical targets of sorafenib are likely important for the replication of RVFV. PMID:26217313

  14. Efficacy of a live attenuated vaccine in classical swine fever virus postnatally persistently infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-González, Sara; Perez-Simó, Marta; Muñoz, Marta; Bohorquez, José Alejandro; Rosell, Rosa; Summerfield, Artur; Domingo, Mariano; Ruggli, Nicolas; Ganges, Llilianne

    2015-07-09

    Classical swine fever (CSF) causes major losses in pig farming, with various degrees of disease severity. Efficient live attenuated vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV) are used routinely in endemic countries. However, despite intensive vaccination programs in these areas for more than 20 years, CSF has not been eradicated. Molecular epidemiology studies in these regions suggests that the virus circulating in the field has evolved under the positive selection pressure exerted by the immune response to the vaccine, leading to new attenuated viral variants. Recent work by our group demonstrated that a high proportion of persistently infected piglets can be generated by early postnatal infection with low and moderately virulent CSFV strains. Here, we studied the immune response to a hog cholera lapinised virus vaccine (HCLV), C-strain, in six-week-old persistently infected pigs following post-natal infection. CSFV-negative pigs were vaccinated as controls. The humoral and interferon gamma responses as well as the CSFV RNA loads were monitored for 21 days post-vaccination. No vaccine viral RNA was detected in the serum samples and tonsils from CSFV postnatally persistently infected pigs for 21 days post-vaccination. Furthermore, no E2-specific antibody response or neutralising antibody titres were shown in CSFV persistently infected vaccinated animals. Likewise, no of IFN-gamma producing cell response against CSFV or PHA was observed. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the absence of a response to vaccination in CSFV persistently infected pigs.

  15. Quantification of airborne African swine fever virus after experimental infection.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Ferreira, H C; Weesendorp, E; Quak, S; Stegeman, J A; Loeffen, W L A

    2013-08-30

    Knowledge on African Swine Fever (ASF) transmission routes can be useful when designing control measures against the spread of ASF virus (ASFV). Few studies have focused on the airborne transmission route, and until now no data has been available on quantities of ASF virus (ASFV) in the air. Our aim was to validate an air sampling technique for ASF virus (ASFV) that could be used to detect and quantify virus excreted in the air after experimental infection of pigs. In an animal experiment with the Brazil'78, the Malta'78 and Netherlands'86 isolates, air samples were collected at several time points. For validation of the air sampling technique, ASFV was aerosolised in an isolator, and air samples were obtained using the MD8 air scan device, which was shown to be suitable to detect ASFV. The half-life of ASFV in the air was on average 19 min when analysed by PCR, and on average 14 min when analysed by virus titration. In rooms with infected pigs, viral DNA with titres up to 10(3.2) median tissue culture infective dose equivalents (TCID50eq.)/m(3) could be detected in air samples from day 4 post-inoculation (dpi 4) until the end of the experiments, at dpi 70. In conclusion, this study shows that pigs infected with ASFV will excrete virus in the air, particularly during acute disease. This study provides the first available parameters to model airborne transmission of ASFV.

  16. Effects of Some Disinfectants on African Swine Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Stone, S. S.; Hess, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Ten commercially available disinfectants were tested at high pH in 2% sodium hydroxide and low pH in 2% acetic acid as inactivants for African swine fever (ASF) in a protein-rich blood-spleen homogenate. As assayed in leukocyte cultures, sodium hydroxide and acetic acid, sodium meta silicate and Roccal did not inactivate ASF virus in 1 hr at 22 to 25 C. Some viricidal activity as assayed in leukocyte cultures was found with Weladol, Triton X-100 Amphyl, pHisoHex, sodium dodecyl sulfate, LpH, Environ, Environ D, and One-Stroke Environ. Of these, the last four appeared to be most promising. When assayed in pigs, only One-Stroke Environ (1/E) was viricidal. Concentrations of 1.0, 0.75, and 0.5 were effective, but, at 0.25%, virus was not inactivated. The minimal time to inactivate ASF virus by 1% 1/E is 60 min. A room contaminated with ASF virus was made safe for pigs after 1 hr by spraying with 1% 1/E. The most active component of 1/E is o-phenylphenol. Although another component of 1/E, i.e., o-benzyl-p-chlorophenol, also has some activity, the mixture of the active components of 1/E is most effective against ASF virus. One of the soluble antigens associated with ASF virus is destroyed by 1/E. Images PMID:4631432

  17. Viral diversity of Junín virus field strains.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Sandra E; Stephan, Betina I; Iserte, Javier A; Contigiani, Marta S; Lozano, Mario E; Tenorio, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    The Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever, an endemic disease present in a much of Argentina, is caused by the Junín virus (JUNV). Currently, there are sequences available from several strains of this virus, like those belonging to the vaccine lineage (XJ13, XJ#44 and Candid#1), as well as MC2 (rodent isolate) and IV4454 (human isolate). In this article, we report sequence information on two fragments of genomic segment S of viral isolates from the endemic area. A Nested-RT-PCR was used to amplify discrete genomic regions of 13 isolates of rodent and human origin. The bioinformatics studies revealed a great homogeneity of sequences among the JUNV isolates. The phylogenetic classification showed greater evolutionary distance between the old world arenaviruses (Lassa and LCM virus) than between the new world arenaviruses (JUNV and Machupo virus).

  18. A recombinant Rift Valley fever virus glycoprotein subunit vaccine confers full protection against Rift Valley fever challenge in sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen causing disease outbreaks in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The virus has great potential for transboundary spread due to the presence of competent vectors in non-endemic areas. There is currently no fully licensed vaccine suita...

  19. Dengue-1 virus isolation during first dengue fever outbreak on Easter Island, Chile.

    PubMed

    Perret, Cecilia; Abarca, Katia; Ovalle, Jimena; Ferrer, Pablo; Godoy, Paula; Olea, Andrea; Aguilera, Ximena; Ferrés, Marcela

    2003-11-01

    Dengue virus was detected for the first time in Chile, in an outbreak of dengue fever on Easter Island. The virus was isolated in tissue culture and characterized by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction as being dengue type 1.

  20. First International External Quality Assessment of Molecular Detection of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Escadafal, Camille; Ölschläger, Stephan; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana; Papa, Anna; Vanhomwegen, Jessica; Wölfel, Roman; Mirazimi, Ali; Teichmann, Anette; Donoso-Mantke, Oliver; Niedrig, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a zoonosis caused by a Nairovirus of the family Bunyaviridae. Infection is transmitted to humans mostly by Hyalomma ticks and also by direct contact with the blood or tissues of infected humans or viremic livestock. Clinical features usually include a rapid progression characterized by hemorrhage, myalgia and fever, with a lethality rate up to 30%. CCHF is one of the most widely distributed viral hemorrhagic fevers and has been reported in Africa, the Middle East and Asia, as well as parts of Europe. There is no approved vaccine or specific treatment against CCHF virus (CCHFV) infections. In this context, an accurate diagnosis as well as a reliable surveillance of CCHFV infections is essential. Diagnostic techniques include virus culture, serology and molecular methods, which are now increasingly used. The European Network for the Diagnostics of “Imported” Viral Diseases organized the first international external quality assessment of CCHVF molecular diagnostics in 2011 to assess the efficiency and accurateness of CCHFV molecular methods applied by expert laboratories. A proficiency test panel of 15 samples was distributed to the participants including 10 different CCHFV preparations generated from infected cell cultures, a preparation of plasmid cloned with the nucleoprotein of CCHFV, two CCHFV RNA preparations and two negative controls. Forty-four laboratories worldwide participated in the EQA study and 53 data sets were received. Twenty data sets (38%) met all criteria with optimal performance, 10 (19%) with acceptable performance, while 23 (43%) reported results showing a need for improvement. Differences in performance depended on the method used, the type of strain tested, the concentration of the sample tested and the laboratory performing the test. These results indicate that there is still a need for improving testing conditions and standardizing protocols for the molecular detection of Crimean

  1. Molecular Evolution and Spatial Transmission of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Based on Complete Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Li; Luo, Li-Mei; Liu, Miao-Miao; Sun, Yue; Su, Xiang; Yu, Xue-jie

    2016-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) was a novel tick-borne bunyavirus that caused hemorrhagic fever with a high fatality rate in East Asia. In this study we analyzed the complete genome sequences of 122 SFTSV strains to determine the phylogeny, evolution and reassortment of the virus. We revealed that the evolutionary rate of three genome segments were different, with highest in the S segment and lowest in the L segment. The SFTSV strains were phylogenetically classified into 5 lineages (A, B, C, D and E) with each genome segment. SFTSV strains from China were classified in all 5 lineages, strains from South Korea were classified into 3 lineages (A, D, and E), and all strains from Japan were classified in only linage E. Using the average evolutionary rate of the three genome segments, we found that the extant SFTSV originated 20–87 years ago in the Dabie Mountain area in central China. The viruses were then transmitted to other areas of China, Japan and South Korea. We also found that six SFTSV strains were reassortants. Selection pressure analysis suggested that SFTSV was under purifying selection according to the four genes (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, glycoprotein, nucleocapsid protein, non-structural protein), and two sites (37, 1033) of glycoproteins were identified as being under strong positive selection. We concluded that SFTSV originated in central China and spread to other places recently and the virus was under purifying selection with high frequency of reassortment. PMID:26999664

  2. African swine fever virus infection in Ornithodoros ticks.

    PubMed

    Burrage, Thomas G

    2013-04-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is an arbovirus which is vectored by soft ticks of the Ornithodoros spp. and in the sylvatic cycle infects wart hogs and bush pigs. ASFV infection of domestic swine causes a high mortality disease. On the other hand, ASFV infection of the tick can result in a high-titered and persistent infection depending upon the ASFV isolate and the tick combination. Recently, morphological, classical virology (titration) and recombinant ASFV have been used to study the cellular, molecular and genetic interactions that occur between ASFV and its host tick.

  3. Molecular Insights into Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zivcec, Marko; Scholte, Florine E. M.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Spengler, Jessica R.; Bergeron, Éric

    2016-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne pathogen that causes high morbidity and mortality. Efficacy of vaccines and antivirals to treat human CCHFV infections remains limited and controversial. Research into pathology and underlying molecular mechanisms of CCHFV and other nairoviruses is limited. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of CCHFV replication and pathogenesis in the past decade. Here we review the most recent molecular advances in CCHFV-related research, and provide perspectives on future research. PMID:27110812

  4. A Host-Oriented Inhibitor of Junin Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Egress

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianhong; Han, Ziying; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Wenbo; Lee, Michael S.; Olson, Mark A.; Ruthel, Gordon; Freedman, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are currently no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved vaccines or therapeutics to prevent or treat Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). The causative agent of AHF is Junin virus (JUNV); a New World arenavirus classified as a National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention category A priority pathogen. The PTAP late (L) domain motif within JUNV Z protein facilitates virion egress and transmission by recruiting host Tsg101 and other ESCRT complex proteins to promote scission of the virus particle from the plasma membrane. Here, we describe a novel compound (compound 0013) that blocks the JUNV Z-Tsg101 interaction and inhibits budding of virus-like particles (VLPs) driven by ectopic expression of the Z protein and live-attenuated JUNV Candid-1 strain in cell culture. Since inhibition of the PTAP-Tsg101 interaction inhibits JUNV egress, compound 0013 serves as a prototype therapeutic that could reduce virus dissemination and disease progression in infected individuals. Moreover, since PTAP l-domain-mediated Tsg101 recruitment is utilized by other RNA virus pathogens (e.g., Ebola virus and HIV-1), PTAP inhibitors such as compound 0013 have the potential to function as potent broad-spectrum, host-oriented antiviral drugs. IMPORTANCE There are currently no FDA-approved vaccines or therapeutics to prevent or treat Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). The causative agent of AHF is Junin virus (JUNV); a New World arenavirus classified as an NIAID/CDC category A priority pathogen. Here, we describe a prototype therapeutic that blocks budding of JUNV and has the potential to function as a broad-spectrum antiviral drug. PMID:24522922

  5. Persistence of Rift Valley fever virus in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gachohi, J.; Hansen, F.; Bett, B.; Kitala, P.

    2012-04-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFv) is a mosquito-borne pathogen of livestock, wildlife and humans that causes severe outbreaks in intervals of several years. One of the open questions is how the virus persists between outbreaks. We developed a spatially-explicit, individual-based simulation model of the RVFv transmission dynamics to investigate this question. The model, is based on livestock and mosquito population dynamics. Spatial aspects are explicitly represented by a set of grid cells that represent mosquito breeding sites. A grid cell measures 500 by 500m and the model considers a grid of 100 by 100 grid cells; the model thus operates on the regional scale of 2500km2. Livestock herds move between grid cells, and provide connectivity between the cells. The model is used to explore the spatio-temporal dynamics of RVFv persistence in absence of a wildlife reservoir in an east African semi-arid context. Specifically, the model assesses the importance of local virus persistence in mosquito breeding sites relative to global virus persistence mitigated by movement of hosts. Local persistence is determined by the length of time the virus remains in a mosquito breeding site once introduced. In the model, this is a function of the number of mosquitoes that emerge infected and their lifespan. Global persistence is determined by the level of connectivity between isolated grid cells. Our work gives insights into the ecological and epidemiological conditions under which RVFv persists. The implication for disease surveillance and management are discussed.

  6. Yellow fever and Zika virus epizootics and enzootics in Uganda.

    PubMed

    McCrae, A W; Kirya, B G

    1982-01-01

    Data of monkey serology are presented which, together with past evidence, support the view that yellow fever (YF) virus circulates in its primary sylvan host populations, i.e., forest monkeys, in an enzootic state in Bwamba County in western Uganda but as series of epizootics in the forest-savanna mosaic zone of central Uganda. Evidence of an epizootic of Zika virus at the Zika Forest near Entebbe is described which occurred in two episodes, the first (in 1969) apparently following the build-up of non-immune monkey populations since a previous epizootic of 1962-63 and the second (in 1970) when Aedes africanus biting densities rose. This was followed only 18 months later by an intensive epizootic of YF virus, contradictory to the hypothesis that Zika virus alone would suppress subsequent epizootics of YF virus in nature, at least when redtail monkeys are involved. Conclusions are finally reviewed in the light of more recent evidence of transovarial flavivirus transmission in mosquitoes, pointing out that phlebotomine sandflies also require fresh attention.

  7. A yellow fever epizootic in Zika forest, Uganda, during 1972: Part 1: Virus isolation and sentinel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kirya, B G

    1977-01-01

    The results of the yellow fever immunity survey of Central and East Africa reported by SAWYER & WHITMAN in 1936 prompted scientists to undertake well-planned epidemiological studies on yellow fever in eastern Africa. A Yellow Fever Research Institute (the present East African Virus Research Institute) was established at Entebbe in 1936 for this purpose. One of the areas where much work has been carried out is a strip of typical tropical forest, the Zika Forest, 12 kilometres from the Institute. Routine surveillance work, particularly on the biting activity of the yellow fever vector mosquitoes, has been going on since 1946. It was during one of these studies in 1972 that the first yellow fever virus strain was isolated from Aedes africanus collected from the Zika and Sisa forests and one strain was isolated from Coquillettidia fuscopennata, also from the Zika Forest. Three sentinel rhesus monkeys, nomimmune to YF, which were kept in the Zika Forest during the time of the epizootic died of YF disease. The present observations indicate that YF is still present in Africa, and as such it still remains a potential menace to the human population. The epidemiological implications are discussed.

  8. Malsoor Virus, a Novel Bat Phlebovirus, Is Closely Related to Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus and Heartland Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, P. D.; Basu, A.; Shete, A.; Patil, D. Y.; Zawar, D.; Majumdar, T. D.; Kokate, P.; Sarkale, P.; Raut, C. G.; Jadhav, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    During a survey in the year 2010, a novel phlebovirus was isolated from the Rousettus leschenaultii species of bats in western India. The virus was identified by electron microscopy from infected Vero E6 cells. Phylogenic analysis of the complete genome showed its close relation to severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) and Heartland viruses, which makes it imperative to further study its natural ecology and potential as a novel emerging zoonotic virus. PMID:24390329

  9. Fc receptors do not mediate African swine fever virus replication in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Alcamí, A; Viñuela, E

    1991-04-01

    Titration experiments in swine macrophages have shown that African swine fever virus infectivity was not enhanced in the presence of antiviral antibodies. The early viral protein synthesis and the viral DNA replication in swine macrophages infected with virus-antibody complexes were inhibited in the presence of high doses of uv-inactivated virus, which saturated specific virus receptors, but not when Fc receptors were saturated with antibodies. These results indicate that African swine fever virus does not infect swine macrophages through Fc receptors and that the normal entry pathway through virus receptors is not bypassed by the virus-antibody complexes.

  10. Fc receptors do not mediate African swine fever virus replication in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Alcami, A.; Vinuela, E. )

    1991-04-01

    Titration experiments in swine macrophages have shown that African swine fever virus infectivity was not enhanced in the presence of antiviral antibodies. The early viral protein synthesis and the viral DNA replication in swine macrophages infected with virus-antibody complexes were inhibited in the presence of high doses of uv-inactivated virus, which saturated specific virus receptors, but not when Fc receptors were saturated with antibodies. These results indicate that African swine fever virus does not infect swine macrophages through Fc receptors and that the normal entry pathway through virus receptors is not bypassed by the virus-antibody complexes.

  11. Vectors of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Telmadarraiy, Zakkyeh; Chinikar, Sadegh; Vatandoost, Hassan; Faghihi, Faezeh; Hosseini-Chegeni, Asadollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ticks are important vectors and reservoirs of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) virus. Human beings may be infected whenever the normal life cycle of the infected ticks on non-human vertebrate hosts is interrupted by the undesirable presence of humans in the cycle. A total of 26 species of Argasid and Ixodid ticks have been recorded in Iran; including nine Hyalomma, two Rhipicephalus, two Dermacentor, five Haemaphysalis, two Boophilus, one Ixodes and two Argas as well as three Ornithodoros species as blood sucking ectoparasites of livestock and poultries. The present paper reviews tick vectors of CCHF virus in Iran, focusing on the role of ticks in different provinces of Iran using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Methods: During ten years study, 1054 tick specimens; including two species of Argasidae and 17 species of Ixodidae were examined for their infection to CCHF virus genome. The output of all studies as well as related publications were discussed in the current paper. Results: The results show that Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Hyalomma marginatum, H. anatolicum, H. asiaticum and H. dromedarii were known as the most frequent species which were positive for CCHF virus. Conclusion: The status of ticks which were positive for CCHF virus revealed that unlike the most common idea that Hyalomma species are the most important vectors of CCHF virus, other ticks including Rhipicephalus, Haemaphysalis and Dermacentor can be reservoir of this virus; thus, considering geographical distribution, type of host and environmental conditions, different tick control measurements should be carried out in areas with high incidence of CCHF disease. PMID:26623426

  12. Multigene families in African swine fever virus: family 360.

    PubMed Central

    González, A; Calvo, V; Almazán, F; Almendral, J M; Ramírez, J C; de la Vega, I; Blasco, R; Viñuela, E

    1990-01-01

    A group of cross-hybridizing DNA segments contained within the restriction fragments RK', RL, RJ, and RD' of African swine fever virus DNA were mapped and sequenced. Analysis of these sequences revealed the presence of a family of homologous open reading frames in regions close to the DNA ends. The whole family is composed of six open reading frames with an average length of 360 coding triplets (multigene family 360), four of which are located in the left part of the genome and two of which are in the right terminal EcoRI fragment. In close proximity to the right terminal inverted repeat, we found an additional small open reading frame which was homologous to the 5'-terminal portion of the other open reading frames, suggesting that most of that open reading frame has been deleted. These repeated sequences account for the previously described inverted internal repetitions (J.M. Sogo, J.M. Almendral, A. Talavera, and E. Viñuela, Virology 133:271-275, 1984). Most of the genes of multigene family 360 are transcribed in African swine fever virus-infected cells. A comparison of the predicted protein sequences of family 360 indicated that several residues are conserved, suggesting that an overall structure is maintained for every member of the family. The transcription direction of each open reading frame, as well as the evolutionary relationships among the genes, suggests that the family originated by gene duplication and translocation of sequences between the DNA ends. Images PMID:2325203

  13. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Bulgaria and Turkey.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Marc; Schuster, Isolde; Sas, Miriam A; Vatansever, Zati; Hubalek, Zdenek; Güven, Esin; Deniz, Ahmet; Georgiev, Georgi; Peshev, Raiko; Groschup, Martin H

    2016-09-01

    Infections of humans with the tick-borne Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) can cause a severe hemorrhagic fever with case fatality rates of up to 80%. Most humans are infected by tick bite, crushing infected ticks by hand or by unprotected contact with blood of viremic mammals. Next to the notified human CCHF cases, the real distribution and the situation in animals in Southeastern Europe are nearly unknown. Since domestic ruminants play a crucial role in the life cycle of the vector ticks and the transmission and amplification of the virus, the antibody prevalence in those animals is a good indicator for the presence of CCHFV in a region. Therefore, the prevalence of CCHFV-specific antibodies was investigated in domestic ruminants of different regions of Bulgaria and Turkey. Sera of 1165 ruminants were tested and a prevalence of up to 90% was identified. The overall prevalence for Bulgaria was 26% and for Turkey 57%. The results highlight the risk of human infections in those regions and the importance of the investigation of the prevalence in animals for identification of risk areas. This article provides a unique overview about published CCHFV antibody prevalence in animals in comparison to human incidences in different areas of Bulgaria and Turkey. Although it will help to complete the understanding of the CCHFV situation in these countries, it also demonstrates the lack of unpublished and published data even in these highly endemic areas. PMID:27467142

  14. Different evolutionary patterns of classical swine fever virus envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yang, Zexiao; Zhang, Mingwang

    2016-03-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever, which is a highly contagious disease of the domestic pig as well as wild boar. The proteins E(rns), E1, and E2 are components of the viral envelope membrane. They are also implicated in virus attachment and entry, replication, and (or) anti-immune response. Here, we studied the genetic variations of these envelope proteins in the evolution of CSFV. The results reveal that the envelope proteins underwent different evolutionary fates. In E(rns) and E1, but not E2, a number of amino acid sites experienced functional divergence. Furthermore, the diversification in E(rns) and E1 was generally episodic because the divergence-related changes of E1 only occurred with the separation of 2 major groups of CSFV and that of E(rns) took place with the division of 1 major group. The major divergence-related sites of E(rns) are located on one of the substrate-binding regions of the RNase domain and C-terminal extension. These functional domains have been reported to block activation of the innate immune system and attachment and entry into host cells, respectively. Our results may shed some light on the divergent roles of the envelope proteins. PMID:26911308

  15. Towards a safe, effective vaccine for Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed

    Labeaud, Desiree

    2010-11-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an important animal and human threat and leads to longstanding morbidity and mortality in susceptible hosts. Since no therapies currently exist to treat Rift Valley fever, it remains a public and animal health priority to develop safe, effective RVFV vaccines (whether for animals, humans, or both) that provide long-term protective immunity. In the evaluated article, Bhardwaj and colleagues describe the creation and testing of two successful vaccine strategies against RVFV, a DNA plasmid vaccine expressing Gn coupled to C3d, and an alpha-virus replicon vaccine expressing Gn protein. Both vaccines elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses, prevented morbidity and mortality in RVFV-challenged mice, and enabled protection of naive mice via passive antibody transfer from vaccinated mice. Both DNA and replicon RVFV vaccines have previously been shown to protect against RVFV challenge, but these results allow for direct comparison of the two methods and evaluation of a combined prime-boost method. The results also highlight the specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to vaccination.

  16. Classical Swine Fever Virus vs. Classical Swine Fever Virus: The Superinfection Exclusion Phenomenon in Experimentally Infected Wild Boar

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-González, Sara; Pérez-Simó, Marta; Colom-Cadena, Andreu; Cabezón, Oscar; Bohórquez, José Alejandro; Rosell, Rosa; Pérez, Lester Josué; Marco, Ignasi; Lavín, Santiago; Domingo, Mariano; Ganges, Llilianne

    2016-01-01

    Two groups with three wild boars each were used: Group A (animals 1 to 3) served as the control, and Group B (animals 4 to 6) was postnatally persistently infected with the Cat01 strain of CSFV (primary virus). The animals, six weeks old and clinically healthy, were inoculated with the virulent strain Margarita (secondary virus). For exclusive detection of the Margarita strain, a specific qRT-PCR assay was designed, which proved not to have cross-reactivity with the Cat01 strain. The wild boars persistently infected with CSFV were protected from superinfection by the virulent CSFV Margarita strain, as evidenced by the absence of clinical signs and the absence of Margarita RNA detection in serum, swabs and tissue samples. Additionally, in PBMCs, a well-known target for CSFV viral replication, only the primary infecting virus RNA (Cat01 strain) could be detected, even after the isolation in ST cells, demonstrating SIE at the tissue level in vivo. Furthermore, the data analysis of the Margarita qRT-PCR, by means of calculated ΔCt values, supported that PBMCs from persistently infected animals were substantially protected from superinfection after in vitro inoculation with the Margarita virus strain, while this virus was able to infect naive PBMCs efficiently. In parallel, IFN-α values were undetectable in the sera from animals in Group B after inoculation with the CSFV Margarita strain. Furthermore, these animals were unable to elicit adaptive humoral (no E2-specific or neutralising antibodies) or cellular immune responses (in terms of IFN-γ-producing cells) after inoculation with the second virus. Finally, a sequence analysis could not detect CSFV Margarita RNA in the samples tested from Group B. Our results suggested that the SIE phenomenon might be involved in the evolution and phylogeny of the virus, as well as in CSFV control by vaccination. To the best of our knowledge, this study was one of the first showing efficient suppression of superinfection in animals

  17. Classical Swine Fever Virus vs. Classical Swine Fever Virus: The Superinfection Exclusion Phenomenon in Experimentally Infected Wild Boar.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-González, Sara; Pérez-Simó, Marta; Colom-Cadena, Andreu; Cabezón, Oscar; Bohórquez, José Alejandro; Rosell, Rosa; Pérez, Lester Josué; Marco, Ignasi; Lavín, Santiago; Domingo, Mariano; Ganges, Llilianne

    2016-01-01

    Two groups with three wild boars each were used: Group A (animals 1 to 3) served as the control, and Group B (animals 4 to 6) was postnatally persistently infected with the Cat01 strain of CSFV (primary virus). The animals, six weeks old and clinically healthy, were inoculated with the virulent strain Margarita (secondary virus). For exclusive detection of the Margarita strain, a specific qRT-PCR assay was designed, which proved not to have cross-reactivity with the Cat01 strain. The wild boars persistently infected with CSFV were protected from superinfection by the virulent CSFV Margarita strain, as evidenced by the absence of clinical signs and the absence of Margarita RNA detection in serum, swabs and tissue samples. Additionally, in PBMCs, a well-known target for CSFV viral replication, only the primary infecting virus RNA (Cat01 strain) could be detected, even after the isolation in ST cells, demonstrating SIE at the tissue level in vivo. Furthermore, the data analysis of the Margarita qRT-PCR, by means of calculated ΔCt values, supported that PBMCs from persistently infected animals were substantially protected from superinfection after in vitro inoculation with the Margarita virus strain, while this virus was able to infect naive PBMCs efficiently. In parallel, IFN-α values were undetectable in the sera from animals in Group B after inoculation with the CSFV Margarita strain. Furthermore, these animals were unable to elicit adaptive humoral (no E2-specific or neutralising antibodies) or cellular immune responses (in terms of IFN-γ-producing cells) after inoculation with the second virus. Finally, a sequence analysis could not detect CSFV Margarita RNA in the samples tested from Group B. Our results suggested that the SIE phenomenon might be involved in the evolution and phylogeny of the virus, as well as in CSFV control by vaccination. To the best of our knowledge, this study was one of the first showing efficient suppression of superinfection in animals

  18. Lethal 17D yellow fever encephalitis in mice. I. Passive protection by monoclonal antibodies to the envelope proteins of 17D yellow fever and dengue 2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Brandriss, M W; Schlesinger, J J; Walsh, E E; Briselli, M

    1986-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to the envelope proteins (E) of the 17D vaccine strain of yellow fever virus (17D YF) and to dengue 2 virus were examined for their ability to confer passive protection against lethal 17D YF encephalitis in mice. All 13 IgG anti-17D YF antibodies, regardless of neutralizing capacity, conferred solid protection when given in a relatively high dose prior to intracerebral inoculation of virus. Three antibodies with high in vitro neutralizing titres were all protective at a low dose as were several non-neutralizing antibodies. One flavivirus group-reactive antibody to dengue 2 virus conferred similar protection at low dose. Protection was also observed when antibodies were given several days after virus inoculation when peak infectious virus titres and histopathological evidence of infection were present in brains. The ability of a non-neutralizing antibody to protect could not be attributed to complement-dependent lysis of virus-infected cells and did not correlate with avidity or with proximity of its binding site to a critical neutralizing epitope of the E protein. Some antibodies, characterized as non-neutralizing by plaque reduction assay on Vero cells, inhibited the growth of virus in a mouse neuroblastoma cell line, suggesting one possible mechanism of protection. These results may be relevant to the design of prospective flavivirus vaccines and support the possibility of conferring broadened protection among flaviviruses by stimulating the antibody response to appropriate epitopes of the E protein.

  19. Quantification of different classical swine fever virus transmission routes within a single compartment.

    PubMed

    Weesendorp, Eefke; Backer, Jantien; Loeffen, Willie

    2014-12-01

    During outbreaks of classical swine fever (CSF), CSF virus (CSFV) can be transmitted via different routes. Understanding these transmission routes is crucial in preventing the unlimited spread of the virus in a naïve population, and the subsequent eradication of the virus from that population. The objectives of the present study were to quantify virus transmission within a compartment, differentiating between transmission within a pen, transmission between pens via contact through (open) pen partitions, and transmission via the air. Furthermore, the possible contribution of each of these routes to infection of individual pigs was quantified. A CSFV outbreak was mimicked in a compartment housing 24 pigs in six different pens. Two pigs in one pen were inoculated with the moderately virulent Paderborn strain, and virus transmission to other pigs was followed in time. Virus transmission rates for transmission via the air (β of 0.33 (0.14-0.64) per day) and transmission between adjacent pens (β of 0.30 (0-0.88) per day) were comparable, but significantly lower than for virus transmission within a pen (β of 6.1 (0.86-18) per day). The route via the air created new focal points of infection, from which virus transmission continued through other routes. This shows that, at least within a compartment, transmission via the air is expected to play a relevant role in the fast spread of the virus after an initial slow start. This will have consequences for efficacy of intervention measures, including vaccination during an outbreak.

  20. Inhibitors of cellular kinases with broad-spectrum antiviral activity for hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Emma L; McMullan, Laura K; Lo, Michael K; Spengler, Jessica R; Bergeron, Éric; Albariño, César G; Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Chiang, Cheng-Feng; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Flint, Mike

    2015-08-01

    Host cell kinases are important for the replication of a number of hemorrhagic fever viruses. We tested a panel of kinase inhibitors for their ability to block the replication of multiple hemorrhagic fever viruses. OSU-03012 inhibited the replication of Lassa, Ebola, Marburg and Nipah viruses, whereas BIBX 1382 dihydrochloride inhibited Lassa, Ebola and Marburg viruses. BIBX 1382 blocked both Lassa and Ebola virus glycoprotein-dependent cell entry. These compounds may be used as tools to understand conserved virus-host interactions, and implicate host cell kinases that may be targets for broad spectrum therapeutic intervention.

  1. Genotyping of classical swine fever virus using high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Titov, Ilya; Tsybanov, Sodnom; Malogolovkin, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Discrimination between different field and vaccine strains of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is crucial for meaningful disease diagnosis and epidemiological investigation. In this study, a rapid method for differentiating vaccine strains and outbreak CSFV isolates by combined RT-PCR and high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis has been developed. The assay is based on PCR amplification of short fragments from the most variable region of CSFVgene E2, followed by HRM analysis of amplicons. Real-Time PCR/HRM for CSFV detection and differentiation analysis has sensitivity comparable to RT-qPCR and genotyping resolution comparable to E2 nucleotide sequencing. This assay in one step enables rapid and sensitive identification and genotype discrimination of CSFV in field samples, and thus will be valuable for CSF outbreak response and disease control. PMID:26300371

  2. Chikungunya Fever: Obstetric Considerations on an Emerging Virus.

    PubMed

    Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Grace, Matthew R; Strauss, Robert A; Chescheir, Nancy; Kuller, Jeffrey A

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya fever is an increasingly common viral infection transmitted to humans by species of the Aedes mosquitoes. Characterized by fevers, myalgias, arthralgias, headache, and rash, the infection is endemic to tropical areas. However, identification of disease vectors to Europe and the Americas has raised concern for possible spread of chikungunya to these areas. More recently, these concerns have become a reality; with more than 500,000 new cases in the Western hemisphere in the last 2 years, questions have arisen about the implications of infection during pregnancy and delivery. A literature review was performed using MEDLINE in order to gather information regarding the obstetric implications of this infection. It appears that although this virus can cross the placenta in the first and second trimester leading to fetal infection and miscarriage, this is a very rare occurrence. In contrast, active maternal infection within 4 days of delivery conveys a high risk of vertical transmission. Maternal infection during pregnancy does not appear to be more severe than infection on the nonpregnant female. Given the increasing incidence of chikungunya, obstetric providers should be aware of the disease and its implication for the gravid female.

  3. Characterization of cytopathogenicity of classical swine fever virus isolate induced by Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Raut, S D; Rajak, K K; Kumar, R; Singh, V K; Saxena, A; Chaudhary, D; Muthuchelvan, D; Pandey, A B

    2015-06-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), the causative agent of classical swine fever, belongs to the family Flaviviridae and genus Pestivirus. Some pestiviruses exhibit cytopathic effect in cell culture but exact phenomenon is unknown. Over expression of NS2-3 gene, presence of defective interfering particle and exaltation of Newcastle disease virus (END) phenomenon could be the reasons of cytopathogenicity. In the present study, a CSFV isolate exhibiting cytopathic effect (CPE) in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line was characterized. To characterize cytopathogenicity of such isolate, END test was carried out. Interference of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in MDCK adapted CSFV was confirmed by RT-PCR and virus neutralization test. Absence of CPE and NDV specific nucleic acid after neutralization confirmed the induction of CPE by NDV. Further, identity of the CSFV isolate in MDCK cell line by immunoperoxidase test, immunoblotting and RT-PCR post NDV neutralization established the virus replication without CPE (non-cytopathic isolate). Findings suggest that, there could be a chance of mixed infection of both CSFV and NDV in the piglet from which the sample was collected for virus isolation. PMID:26436124

  4. Development and evaluation of loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for detection of Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in Sudan.

    PubMed

    Osman, Hana A M; Eltom, Kamal H; Musa, Nasreen O; Bilal, Nasreldin M; Elbashir, Mustafa I; Aradaib, Imadeldin E

    2013-06-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus (CCHFV) activity has been detected in Kordufan region of the Sudan in 2008 with high case-fatality rates in villages and rural hospitals in the region. Therefore, in the present study, a reverse transcription (RT) loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed and compared to nested RT-PCR for rapid detection of CCHFV targeting the small (S) RNA segment. A set of RT-LAMP primers, designed from a highly conserved region of the S segment of the viral genome, was employed to identify all the Sudanese CCHFV strains. The sensitivity studies indicated that the RT-LAMP detected 10fg of CCHFV RNA as determined by naked eye turbidity read out, which is more likely the way it would be read in a resource-poor setting. This level of sensitivity is good enough to detect most acute cases. Using agarose gel electrophoresis, the RT-LAMP assay detected as little as 0.1fg of viral RNA (equivalent to 50 viral particle). There was 100% agreement between results of the RT-LAMP and the nested PCR when testing 10-fold serial dilution of CCHFV RNA. The specificity studies indicated that there was no cross-reactivity with other related hemorrhagic fever viruses circulating in Sudan including, Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), Dengue fever virus, and yellow fever virus. The RT-LAMP was performed under isothermal conditions at 63°C and no special apparatus was needed, which rendered the assay more economical and practical than real-time PCR in such developing countries, like Sudan. In addition, the RT-LAMP provides a valuable tool for rapid detection and differentiation of CCHFV during an outbreak of the disease in remote areas and in rural hospitals with resource-poor settings.

  5. Animal Models of Tick-Borne Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zivcec, Marko; Safronetz, David; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Tick-borne hemorrhagic fever viruses (TBHFV) are detected throughout the African and Eurasian continents and are an emerging or re-emerging threat to many nations. Due to the largely sporadic incidences of these severe diseases, information on human cases and research activities in general have been limited. In the past decade, however, novel TBHFVs have emerged and areas of endemicity have expanded. Therefore, the development of countermeasures is of utmost importance in combating TBHFV as elimination of vectors and interrupting enzootic cycles is all but impossible and ecologically questionable. As in vivo models are the only way to test efficacy and safety of countermeasures, understanding of the available animal models and the development and refinement of animal models is critical in negating the detrimental impact of TBHFVs on public and animal health. PMID:25437041

  6. Dengue 1 virus and dengue hemorrhagic fever, French Polynesia, 2001.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Bruno; Halstead, Scott B

    2009-08-01

    An epidemic of dengue 1 virus (DENV-1) occurred in French Polynesia in 2001, 4 years after a DENV-2 epidemic that ended in 1997. Surveillance data from hospitalized case-patients showed that case-patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) exhibited a bimodal age distribution with 1 peak among infants 6-10 months of age and a second peak at 4-11 years of age. The relative risk of DHF developing in children born before rather than after the DENV-2 epidemic was 186 (95% confidence interval 26-1,324). Among children born toward the end of the DENV-2 epidemic, a strong temporal association was found between the month of birth and the risk of being hospitalized for DHF. This study documents epidemic pathogenicity associated with the sequence of DENV-2 infection followed by DENV-1 infection.

  7. Homology of complete genome sequences for dengue virus type-1, from dengue-fever- and dengue-haemorrhagic-fever-associated epidemics in Hawaii and French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Imrie, A; Roche, C; Zhao, Z; Bennett, S; Laille, M; Effler, P; Cao-Lormeau, V-M

    2010-04-01

    Dengue epidemic virulence is thought to be conferred by various factors, including the genotype of the virus involved. Increased or decreased epidemic virulence has been associated not only with the introduction of type-2 (DENV-2) strains into the South Pacific, the Caribbean and South America, but also with newly emergent DENV-3 genotypes in Sri Lanka, and the year-to-year variation in the DENV-4 strains circulating in Puerto Rico. These observations indicate that there are inherent differences among viral genotypes in their capacity to induce severe disease, that is, their virulence potential. The present study involved a comparison of the complete genome sequences of DENV-1 viruses that had been isolated from cases of dengue fever (DF) or dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) that occurred in French Polynesia or Hawaii in 2001, when a virulent DHF-associated dengue epidemic was occurring throughout the Pacific region. Previous studies have identified putative virulence-associated motifs and substitutions in the DENV-2 genome, and the main aim of the present study was to identify similar changes in DENV-1 that may be associated with viral virulence. As no virulence determinants were seen, however, in any gene or untranslated region, it appears that genotype is not the sole determinant of virulence in DENV-1. Further studies, to compare DF- and DHF-associated strains of DENV-1 isolated from epidemics of variable virulence, in the same eco-biological context, are needed.

  8. Culex pipiens, an Experimental Efficient Vector of West Nile and Rift Valley Fever Viruses in the Maghreb Region

    PubMed Central

    Amraoui, Fadila; Krida, Ghazi; Bouattour, Ali; Rhim, Adel; Daaboub, Jabeur; Harrat, Zoubir; Boubidi, Said-Chawki; Tijane, Mhamed; Sarih, Mhammed; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2012-01-01

    West Nile fever (WNF) and Rift Valley fever (RVF) are emerging diseases causing epidemics outside their natural range of distribution. West Nile virus (WNV) circulates widely and harmlessly in the old world among birds as amplifying hosts, and horses and humans as accidental dead-end hosts. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) re-emerges periodically in Africa causing massive outbreaks. In the Maghreb, eco-climatic and entomologic conditions are favourable for WNV and RVFV emergence. Both viruses are transmitted by mosquitoes belonging to the Culex pipiens complex. We evaluated the ability of different populations of Cx. pipiens from North Africa to transmit WNV and the avirulent RVFV Clone 13 strain. Mosquitoes collected in Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia during the summer 2010 were experimentally infected with WNV and RVFV Clone 13 strain at titers of 107.8 and 108.5 plaque forming units/mL, respectively. Disseminated infection and transmission rates were estimated 14–21 days following the exposure to the infectious blood-meal. We show that 14 days after exposure to WNV, all mosquito st developed a high disseminated infection and were able to excrete infectious saliva. However, only 69.2% of mosquito strains developed a disseminated infection with RVFV Clone 13 strain, and among them, 77.8% were able to deliver virus through saliva. Thus, Cx. pipiens from the Maghreb are efficient experimental vectors to transmit WNV and to a lesser extent, RVFV Clone 13 strain. The epidemiologic importance of our findings should be considered in the light of other parameters related to mosquito ecology and biology. PMID:22693557

  9. Dengue virus identification by transmission electron microscopy and molecular methods in fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Limonta, D; Falcón, V; Torres, G; Capó, V; Menéndez, I; Rosario, D; Castellanos, Y; Alvarez, M; Rodríguez-Roche, R; de la Rosa, M C; Pavón, A; López, L; González, K; Guillén, G; Diaz, J; Guzmán, M G

    2012-12-01

    Dengue virus is the most significant virus transmitted by arthropods worldwide and may cause a potentially fatal systemic disease named dengue hemorrhagic fever. In this work, dengue virus serotype 4 was detected in the tissues of one fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever case using electron immunomicroscopy and molecular methods. This is the first report of dengue virus polypeptides findings by electron immunomicroscopy in human samples. In addition, not-previously-documented virus-like particles visualized in spleen, hepatic, brain, and pulmonary tissues from a dengue case are discussed.

  10. African Swine Fever Virus p72 Genotype IX in Domestic Pigs, Congo, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Anchuelo, Raquel; Pelayo, Virginia; Poudevigne, Frédéric; Leon, Tati; Nzoussi, Jacques; Bishop, Richard; Pérez, Covadonga; Soler, Alejandro; Nieto, Raquel; Martín, Hilario; Arias, Marisa

    2011-01-01

    African swine fever virus p72 genotype IX, associated with outbreaks in eastern Africa, is cocirculating in the Republic of the Congo with West African genotype I. Data suggest that viruses from eastern Africa are moving into western Africa, increasing the threat of outbreaks caused by novel viruses in this region. PMID:21801650

  11. Sequence adaptations during growth of rescued classical swine fever viruses in cell culture and within infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Hadsbjerg, Johanne; Friis, Martin B; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Nielsen, Jens; Belsham, Graham J; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    2016-08-30

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes an economically important disease of swine. Four different viruses were rescued from full-length cloned cDNAs derived from the Paderborn strain of CSFV. Three of these viruses had been modified by mutagenesis (with 7 or 8 nt changes) within stem 2 of the subdomain IIIf of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that directs the initiation of protein synthesis. Rescued viruses were inoculated into pigs. The rescued vPader10 virus, without modifications in the IRES, induced clinical disease in pigs that was very similar to that observed previously with the parental field strain and transmission to in-contact pigs occurred. Two sequence reversions, in the NS2 and NS5B coding regions, became dominant within the virus populations in these infected pigs. Rescued viruses, with mutant IRES elements, did not induce disease and only very limited circulation of viral RNA could be detected. However, the animals inoculated with these mutant viruses seroconverted against CSFV. Thus, these mutant viruses were highly attenuated in vivo. All 4 rescued viruses were also passaged up to 20 times in cell culture. Using full genome sequencing, the same two adaptations within each of four independent virus populations were observed that restored the coding sequence to that of the parental field strain. These adaptations occurred with different kinetics. The combination of reverse genetics and in depth, full genome sequencing provides a powerful approach to analyse virus adaptation and to identify key determinants of viral replication efficiency in cells and within host animals. PMID:27527774

  12. Ebola haemorrhagic fever virus: pathogenesis, immune responses, potential prevention.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Nazimek, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Ebola zoonotic RNA filovirus represents human most virulent and lethal pathogens, which induces acute hemorrhagic fever and death within few days in a range of 60-90% of symptomatic individuals. Last outbreak in 2014 in West Africa caused panic that Ebola epidemic can be spread to other continents. Number of deaths in late December reached almost 8,000 individuals out of more than 20,000 symptomatic patients. It seems that only a coordinated international response could counteract the further spread of Ebola. Major innate immunity mechanisms against Ebola are associated with the production of interferons, that are inhibited by viral proteins. Activation of host NK cells was recognized as a leading immune function responsible for recovery of infected people. Uncontrolled cell infection by Ebola leads to an impairment of immunity with cytokine storm, coagulopathy, systemic bleeding, multi-organ failure and death. Tested prevention strategies to induce antiviral immunity include: i. recombinant virus formulations (vaccines); ii. cocktail of monoclonal antibodies (serotherapy); iii. alternative RNA-interference-based antiviral methods. Maintaining the highest standards of aseptic and antiseptic precautions is equally important. Present brief review summarizes a current knowledge concerning pathogenesis of Ebola hemorrhagic disease and the virus interaction with the immune system and discusses recent advances in prevention of Ebola infection by vaccination and serotherapy.

  13. Has Rift Valley fever virus evolved with increasing severity in human populations in East Africa?

    PubMed

    Baba, Marycelin; Masiga, Daniel K; Sang, Rosemary; Villinger, Jandouwe

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have occurred across eastern Africa from 1912 to 2010 approximately every 4-15 years, most of which have not been accompanied by significant epidemics in human populations. However, human epidemics during RVF outbreaks in eastern Africa have involved 478 deaths in 1998, 1107 reported cases with 350 deaths from 2006 to 2007 and 1174 cases with 241 deaths in 2008. We review the history of RVF outbreaks in eastern Africa to identify the epidemiological factors that could have influenced its increasing severity in humans. Diverse ecological factors influence outbreak frequency, whereas virus evolution has a greater impact on its virulence in hosts. Several factors could have influenced the lack of information on RVF in humans during earlier outbreaks, but the explosive nature of human RVF epidemics in recent years mirrors the evolutionary trend of the virus. Comparisons between isolates from different outbreaks have revealed an accumulation of genetic mutations and genomic reassortments that have diversified RVF virus genomes over several decades. The threat to humans posed by the diversified RVF virus strains increases the potential public health and socioeconomic impacts of future outbreaks. Understanding the shifting RVF epidemiology as determined by its evolution is key to developing new strategies for outbreak mitigation and prevention of future human RVF casualties. PMID:27329846

  14. Animal Models for the Study of Rodent-Borne Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses: Arenaviruses and Hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Golden, Joseph W; Hammerbeck, Christopher D; Mucker, Eric M; Brocato, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Human pathogenic hantaviruses and arenaviruses are maintained in nature by persistent infection of rodent carrier populations. Several members of these virus groups can cause significant disease in humans that is generically termed viral hemorrhagic fever (HF) and is characterized as a febrile illness with an increased propensity to cause acute inflammation. Human interaction with rodent carrier populations leads to infection. Arenaviruses are also viewed as potential biological weapons threat agents. There is an increased interest in studying these viruses in animal models to gain a deeper understating not only of viral pathogenesis, but also for the evaluation of medical countermeasures (MCM) to mitigate disease threats. In this review, we examine current knowledge regarding animal models employed in the study of these viruses. We include analysis of infection models in natural reservoirs and also discuss the impact of strain heterogeneity on the susceptibility of animals to infection. This information should provide a comprehensive reference for those interested in the study of arenaviruses and hantaviruses not only for MCM development but also in the study of viral pathogenesis and the biology of these viruses in their natural reservoirs.

  15. Has Rift Valley fever virus evolved with increasing severity in human populations in East Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Marycelin; Masiga, Daniel K; Sang, Rosemary; Villinger, Jandouwe

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have occurred across eastern Africa from 1912 to 2010 approximately every 4–15 years, most of which have not been accompanied by significant epidemics in human populations. However, human epidemics during RVF outbreaks in eastern Africa have involved 478 deaths in 1998, 1107 reported cases with 350 deaths from 2006 to 2007 and 1174 cases with 241 deaths in 2008. We review the history of RVF outbreaks in eastern Africa to identify the epidemiological factors that could have influenced its increasing severity in humans. Diverse ecological factors influence outbreak frequency, whereas virus evolution has a greater impact on its virulence in hosts. Several factors could have influenced the lack of information on RVF in humans during earlier outbreaks, but the explosive nature of human RVF epidemics in recent years mirrors the evolutionary trend of the virus. Comparisons between isolates from different outbreaks have revealed an accumulation of genetic mutations and genomic reassortments that have diversified RVF virus genomes over several decades. The threat to humans posed by the diversified RVF virus strains increases the potential public health and socioeconomic impacts of future outbreaks. Understanding the shifting RVF epidemiology as determined by its evolution is key to developing new strategies for outbreak mitigation and prevention of future human RVF casualties. PMID:27329846

  16. Animal Models for the Study of Rodent-Borne Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses: Arenaviruses and Hantaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Joseph W.; Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Mucker, Eric M.; Brocato, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    Human pathogenic hantaviruses and arenaviruses are maintained in nature by persistent infection of rodent carrier populations. Several members of these virus groups can cause significant disease in humans that is generically termed viral hemorrhagic fever (HF) and is characterized as a febrile illness with an increased propensity to cause acute inflammation. Human interaction with rodent carrier populations leads to infection. Arenaviruses are also viewed as potential biological weapons threat agents. There is an increased interest in studying these viruses in animal models to gain a deeper understating not only of viral pathogenesis, but also for the evaluation of medical countermeasures (MCM) to mitigate disease threats. In this review, we examine current knowledge regarding animal models employed in the study of these viruses. We include analysis of infection models in natural reservoirs and also discuss the impact of strain heterogeneity on the susceptibility of animals to infection. This information should provide a comprehensive reference for those interested in the study of arenaviruses and hantaviruses not only for MCM development but also in the study of viral pathogenesis and the biology of these viruses in their natural reservoirs. PMID:26266264

  17. Analysis of classical swine fever virus RNA replication determinants using replicons.

    PubMed

    Risager, Peter Christian; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Gullberg, Maria; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Belsham, Graham J

    2013-08-01

    Self-replicating RNAs (replicons), with or without reporter gene sequences, derived from the genome of the Paderborn strain of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) have been produced. The full-length viral cDNA, propagated within a bacterial artificial chromosome, was modified by targeted recombination within Escherichia coli. RNA transcripts were produced in vitro and introduced into cells by electroporation. The translation and replication of the replicon RNAs could be followed by the accumulation of luciferase (from Renilla reniformis or Gaussia princeps) protein expression (where appropriate), as well as by detection of CSFV NS3 protein production within the cells. Inclusion of the viral E2 coding region within the replicon was advantageous for replication efficiency. Production of chimeric RNAs, substituting the NS2 and NS3 coding regions (as a unit) from the Paderborn strain with the equivalent sequences from the highly virulent Koslov strain or the vaccine strain Riems, blocked replication. However, replacing the Paderborn NS5B coding sequence with the RNA polymerase coding sequence from the Koslov strain greatly enhanced expression of the reporter protein from the replicon. In contrast, replacement with the Riems NS5B sequence significantly impaired replication efficiency. Thus, these replicons provide a system for determining specific regions of the CSFV genome required for genome replication without the constraints of maintaining infectivity. PMID:23580431

  18. Mapping a Major Gene for Resistance to Rift Valley Fever Virus in Laboratory Rats.

    PubMed

    Busch, Catherine M; Callicott, Ralph J; Peters, Clarence J; Morrill, John C; Womack, James E

    2015-01-01

    The Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) presents an epidemic and epizootic threat in sub-Saharan Africa, Egypt, and the Arabian Peninsula, and has furthermore recently gained attention as a potential weapon of bioterrorism due to its ability to infect both livestock and humans. Inbred rat strains show similar characteristic responses to the disease as humans and livestock, making them a suitable model species. Previous studies had indicated differences in susceptibility to RVFV hepatic disease among various rat strains, including a higher susceptibility of Wistar-Furth (WF) compared to a more resistant Lewis (LEW) strain. Further study revealed that this resistance trait exhibits the pattern of a major dominant gene inherited in Mendelian fashion. A genome scan of a congenic WF.LEW strain, created from the susceptible WF and resistant LEW strains and itself resistant to infection with RVFV, revealed 2 potential regions for the location of the gene, 1 on chromosome 3 and the other on chromosome 9. Through backcrossing of WF.LEW rats to WF rats, genotyping offspring using SNPs and microsatellites, and viral challenges of 3 N1 litters, we have mapped the gene to the distal end of chromosome 3. PMID:26546799

  19. MEK/ERK activation plays a decisive role in yellow fever virus replication: implication as an antiviral therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Albarnaz, Jonas D; De Oliveira, Leonardo C; Torres, Alice A; Palhares, Rafael M; Casteluber, Marisa C; Rodrigues, Claudiney M; Cardozo, Pablo L; De Souza, Aryádina M R; Pacca, Carolina C; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Kroon, Erna G; Nogueira, Maurício L; Bonjardim, Cláudio A

    2014-11-01

    Exploiting the inhibition of host signaling pathways aiming for discovery of potential antiflaviviral compounds is clearly a beneficial strategy for the control of life-threatening diseases caused by flaviviruses. Here we describe the antiviral activity of the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 against Yellow fever virus 17D vaccine strain (YFV-17D). Infection of VERO cells with YFV-17D stimulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation early during infection. Pharmacological inhibition of MEK1/2 through U0126 treatment of VERO cells blockades not only the YFV-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but also inhibits YFV replication by ∼99%. U0126 was also effective against dengue virus (DENV-2 and -3) and Saint-Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Levels of NS4AB, as detected by immunofluorescence, are diminished upon treatment with the inhibitor, as well as the characteristic endoplasmic reticulum membrane invagination stimulated during the infection. Though not protective, treatment of YFV-infected, adult BALB/c mice with U0126 resulted in significant reduction of virus titers in brains. Collectively, our data suggest the potential targeting of the MEK1/2 kinase as a therapeutic tool against diseases caused by flaviviruses such as yellow fever, adverse events associated with yellow fever vaccination and dengue.

  20. MEK/ERK activation plays a decisive role in yellow fever virus replication: implication as an antiviral therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Albarnaz, Jonas D; De Oliveira, Leonardo C; Torres, Alice A; Palhares, Rafael M; Casteluber, Marisa C; Rodrigues, Claudiney M; Cardozo, Pablo L; De Souza, Aryádina M R; Pacca, Carolina C; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Kroon, Erna G; Nogueira, Maurício L; Bonjardim, Cláudio A

    2014-11-01

    Exploiting the inhibition of host signaling pathways aiming for discovery of potential antiflaviviral compounds is clearly a beneficial strategy for the control of life-threatening diseases caused by flaviviruses. Here we describe the antiviral activity of the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 against Yellow fever virus 17D vaccine strain (YFV-17D). Infection of VERO cells with YFV-17D stimulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation early during infection. Pharmacological inhibition of MEK1/2 through U0126 treatment of VERO cells blockades not only the YFV-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but also inhibits YFV replication by ∼99%. U0126 was also effective against dengue virus (DENV-2 and -3) and Saint-Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Levels of NS4AB, as detected by immunofluorescence, are diminished upon treatment with the inhibitor, as well as the characteristic endoplasmic reticulum membrane invagination stimulated during the infection. Though not protective, treatment of YFV-infected, adult BALB/c mice with U0126 resulted in significant reduction of virus titers in brains. Collectively, our data suggest the potential targeting of the MEK1/2 kinase as a therapeutic tool against diseases caused by flaviviruses such as yellow fever, adverse events associated with yellow fever vaccination and dengue. PMID:25241249

  1. Evolution of Bovine Ephemeral Fever Virus in the Australian Episystem

    PubMed Central

    Trinidad, Lee; Blasdell, Kim R.; Joubert, D. Albert; Davis, Steven S.; Melville, Lorna; Kirkland, Peter D.; Coulibaly, Fasséli; Holmes, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) is an arthropod-borne rhabdovirus that causes a debilitating disease of cattle in Africa, Asia, and Australia; however, its global geodynamics are poorly understood. An evolutionary analysis of G gene (envelope glycoprotein) ectodomain sequences of 97 BEFV isolates collected from Australia during 1956 to 2012 revealed that all have a single common ancestor and are phylogenetically distinct from BEFV sampled in other geographical regions. The age of the Australian clade is estimated to be between 56 and 65 years, suggesting that BEFV has entered the continent on few occasions since it was first reported in 1936 and that the 1955-1956 epizootic was the source of all currently circulating viruses. Notably, the Australian clade has evolved as a single genetic lineage across the continent and at a high evolutionary rate of ∼10−3 nucleotide substitutions/site/year. Screening of 66 isolates using monoclonal antibodies indicated that neutralizing antigenic sites G1, G2, and G4 have been relatively stable, although variations in site G3a/b defined four antigenic subtypes. A shift in an epitope at site G3a, which occurred in the mid-1970s, was strongly associated with a K218R substitution. Similarly, a shift at site G3b was associated primarily with substitutions at residues 215, 220, and 223, which map to the tip of the spike on the prefusion form of the G protein. Finally, we propose that positive selection on residue 215 was due to cross-reacting neutralizing antibody to Kimberley virus (KIMV). IMPORTANCE PMID:24227855

  2. [Yellow fever virus, dengue 2 and other arboviruses isolated from mosquitos, in Burkina Faso, from 1983 to 1986. Entomological and epidemiological considerations].

    PubMed

    Robert, V; Lhuillier, M; Meunier, D; Sarthou, J L; Monteny, N; Digoutte, J P; Cornet, M; Germain, M; Cordellier, R

    1993-01-01

    An arbovirus surveillance was carried out in Burkina Faso from 1983 to 1986. It was based on crepuscular catches of mosquitoes on human bait in some wooded areas and in one town. The total collection was 228 catches with an average of 8 men per catch. The total number of mosquitoes caught was 44,956 among which 32,010 potential vector of yellow fever; all these mosquitoes were analysed for arbovirology. In the south-western part of the country (region of Bobo-Dioulasso), surveillance was conducted each year from August to November, whilst the circulation of Aedes-borne arboviruses is well known to be favoured. In 1983, 1984 and 1986, seven strains of yellow fever virus were isolated in circumstances remarkably similar. They came from selvatic areas and never from the town. They concerned only Aedes (Stegomyia) luteocephalus which is the very predominant potential vector of yellow fever in the region. They were obtained in low figure, between 1 and 4 per year. They occurred from 27th of October to 21th of November. These observations confirm that the southern portion of the Sudan savanna zone of West Africa is the setting of a customary circulation of yellow fever virus and therefore belongs to the endemic emergence zone. In 1986, two strains of dengue 2 virus were isolated. One concerned Ae. luteocephalus from the selvatic area, the other Ae. (St.) aegypti from the heart of town. These data suggest two distinct cycles for dengue 2 virus, one urban and one selvatic, which could coexist simultaneously in the same region. In the south-eastern part of the country (region of Fada-N'Gourma) a yellow fever epidemic occurred between September and December 1983; its study has enable to precise their entomological aspects. The entomological inoculation rate of yellow fever virus has been evaluated to 22 infected bites per man during the month of october, for a man living close to forest gallery. 25 strains of yellow fever virus strains was isolated from Ae. (Diceromyia

  3. Yellow Fever Virus Vaccine–associated Deaths in Young Women1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Yellow fever vaccine–associated viscerotropic disease is a rare sequela of live-attenuated virus vaccine. Elderly persons and persons who have had thymectomies have increased susceptibility. A review of published and other data suggested a higher than expected number of deaths from yellow fever vaccine–associated viscerotropic disease among women 19–34 years of age without known immunodeficiency. PMID:22000363

  4. Aedes aegypti in Brazil: genetically differentiated populations with high susceptibility to dengue and yellow fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Lourenço-de-Oliveira, R; Vazeille, M; de Filippis, A M; Failloux, A B

    2004-01-01

    Aedes aegypti was eliminated from Brazil in 1955, but re-infested the country in the 1970s. Dengue outbreaks have occurred since 1981 and became endemic in several cities in Brazil after 1986. Urban yellow fever has not occurred since 1942, and only jungle yellow fever cases have been reported. A population genetic analysis using isoenzyme variation combined with an evaluation of susceptibility to both yellow fever and dengue 2 viruses was conducted among 23 A. aegypti samples from 13 Brazilian states. We demonstrated that experimental infection rates of A. aegypti for both dengue and yellow fever viruses (YFV) are high and heterogeneous, and samples collected in the endemic and transition areas of sylvatic yellow fever were highly susceptible to yellow fever virus. Boa Vista, a border city between Brazil and Venezuela, and Rio de Janeiro in the Southeast region are considered as the most important entry points for dengue dissemination. Considering the high densities of A. aegypti, and its high susceptibility to dengue and yellow fever viruses, the risk of dengue epidemics and yellow fever urbanization in Brazil is more real than ever.

  5. Low-dose ribavirin potentiates the antiviral activity of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Westover, Jonna B; Sefing, Eric J; Bailey, Kevin W; Van Wettere, Arnaud J; Jung, Kie-Hoon; Dagley, Ashley; Wandersee, Luci; Downs, Brittney; Smee, Donald F; Furuta, Yousuke; Bray, Mike; Gowen, Brian B

    2016-02-01

    Favipiravir is approved in Japan to treat novel or re-emerging influenza viruses, and is active against a broad spectrum of RNA viruses, including Ebola. Ribavirin is the only other licensed drug with activity against multiple RNA viruses. Recent studies show that ribavirin and favipiravir act synergistically to inhibit bunyavirus infections in cultured cells and laboratory mice, likely due to their different mechanisms of action. Convalescent immune globulin is the only approved treatment for Argentine hemorrhagic fever caused by the rodent-borne Junin arenavirus. We previously reported that favipiravir is highly effective in a number of small animal models of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. We now report that addition of low dose of ribavirin synergistically potentiates the activity of favipiravir against Junin virus infection of guinea pigs and another arenavirus, Pichinde virus infection of hamsters. This suggests that the efficacy of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses can be further enhanced through the addition of low-dose ribavirin.

  6. Marburg, Ebola and Rift Valley Fever virus antibodies in East African primates.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B K; Gitau, L G; Gichogo, A; Tukei, P M; Else, J G; Suleman, M A; Kimani, R; Sayer, P D

    1982-01-01

    Sera from 464 primates held at four institutes in Kenya were tested by indirect immunofluorescence for the presence of antibodies against Marburg, Ebola, Congo haemorrhagic fever, Rift Valley fever and Lassa viruses. Four of 136 vervet monkeys were positive for Marburg virus antibodies and three of 184 baboons had antibodies against Ebola virus. One baboon was positive for Marburg virus antibodies. Two vervet monkeys, three baboons and one grivet monkey (of 56 tested) had antibodies against Rift Valley fever virus. No Congo or Lassa virus antibodies were detected. A sample of 88 sera of more arboreal primates (Sykes, blue and colobus monkeys) were negative against all five antigens, as were sera from 58 staff members of the institutes who worked with or near the animals.

  7. Yellow Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... tropical and subtropical areas in South America and Africa. The virus is transmitted to people by the ... fever Maps of Yellow fever endemic areas in Africa and South America Yellow fever vaccination Prevention Vaccine ...

  8. Expression Library Immunization Can Confer Protection against Lethal Challenge with African Swine Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lacasta, Anna; Ballester, María; Monteagudo, Paula L.; Rodríguez, Javier M.; Salas, María L.; Accensi, Francesc; Pina-Pedrero, Sonia; Bensaid, Albert; Argilaguet, Jordi; López-Soria, Sergio; Hutet, Evelyne; Le Potier, Marie Frédérique

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT African swine fever is one of the most devastating pig diseases, against which there is no vaccine available. Recent work from our laboratory has demonstrated the protective potential of DNA vaccines encoding three African swine fever viral antigens (p54, p30, and the hemagglutinin extracellular domain) fused to ubiquitin. Partial protection was afforded in the absence of detectable antibodies prior to virus challenge, and survival correlated with the presence of a large number of hemagglutinin-specific CD8+ T cells in blood. Aiming to demonstrate the presence of additional CD8+ T-cell determinants with protective potential, an expression library containing more than 4,000 individual plasmid clones was constructed, each one randomly containing a Sau3AI restriction fragment of the viral genome (p54, p30, and hemagglutinin open reading frames [ORFs] excluded) fused to ubiquitin. Immunization of farm pigs with the expression library yielded 60% protection against lethal challenge with the virulent E75 strain. These results were further confirmed by using specific-pathogen-free pigs after challenging them with 104 hemadsorbing units (HAU) of the cell culture-adapted strain E75CV1. On this occasion, 50% of the vaccinated pigs survived the lethal challenge, and 2 out of the 8 immunized pigs showed no viremia or viral excretion at any time postinfection. In all cases, protection was afforded in the absence of detectable specific antibodies prior to challenge and correlated with the detection of specific T-cell responses at the time of sacrifice. In summary, our results clearly demonstrate the presence of additional protective determinants within the African swine fever virus (ASFV) genome and open up the possibility for their future identification. IMPORTANCE African swine fever is a highly contagious disease of domestic and wild pigs that is endemic in many sub-Saharan countries, where it causes important economic losses and is currently in continuous expansion

  9. High Genetic Diversity and Adaptive Potential of Two Simian Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses in a Wild Primate Population

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Andrea; Sibley, Samuel D.; Dinis, Jorge M.; Bergman, Zachary; Nelson, Chase W.; Correll, Michael; Gleicher, Michael; Hyeroba, David; Tumukunde, Alex; Weny, Geoffrey; Chapman, Colin; Kuhn, Jens H.; Hughes, Austin L.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Goldberg, Tony L.; O'Connor, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Key biological properties such as high genetic diversity and high evolutionary rate enhance the potential of certain RNA viruses to adapt and emerge. Identifying viruses with these properties in their natural hosts could dramatically improve disease forecasting and surveillance. Recently, we discovered two novel members of the viral family Arteriviridae: simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV)-krc1 and SHFV-krc2, infecting a single wild red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus tephrosceles) in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Nearly nothing is known about the biological properties of SHFVs in nature, although the SHFV type strain, SHFV-LVR, has caused devastating outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in captive macaques. Here we detected SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 in 40% and 47% of 60 wild red colobus tested, respectively. We found viral loads in excess of 106–107 RNA copies per milliliter of blood plasma for each of these viruses. SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 also showed high genetic diversity at both the inter- and intra-host levels. Analyses of synonymous and non-synonymous nucleotide diversity across viral genomes revealed patterns suggestive of positive selection in SHFV open reading frames (ORF) 5 (SHFV-krc2 only) and 7 (SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2). Thus, these viruses share several important properties with some of the most rapidly evolving, emergent RNA viruses. PMID:24651479

  10. High genetic diversity and adaptive potential of two simian hemorrhagic fever viruses in a wild primate population.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Adam L; Lauck, Michael; Weiler, Andrea; Sibley, Samuel D; Dinis, Jorge M; Bergman, Zachary; Nelson, Chase W; Correll, Michael; Gleicher, Michael; Hyeroba, David; Tumukunde, Alex; Weny, Geoffrey; Chapman, Colin; Kuhn, Jens H; Hughes, Austin L; Friedrich, Thomas C; Goldberg, Tony L; O'Connor, David H

    2014-01-01

    Key biological properties such as high genetic diversity and high evolutionary rate enhance the potential of certain RNA viruses to adapt and emerge. Identifying viruses with these properties in their natural hosts could dramatically improve disease forecasting and surveillance. Recently, we discovered two novel members of the viral family Arteriviridae: simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV)-krc1 and SHFV-krc2, infecting a single wild red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus tephrosceles) in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Nearly nothing is known about the biological properties of SHFVs in nature, although the SHFV type strain, SHFV-LVR, has caused devastating outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in captive macaques. Here we detected SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 in 40% and 47% of 60 wild red colobus tested, respectively. We found viral loads in excess of 10(6)-10(7) RNA copies per milliliter of blood plasma for each of these viruses. SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 also showed high genetic diversity at both the inter- and intra-host levels. Analyses of synonymous and non-synonymous nucleotide diversity across viral genomes revealed patterns suggestive of positive selection in SHFV open reading frames (ORF) 5 (SHFV-krc2 only) and 7 (SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2). Thus, these viruses share several important properties with some of the most rapidly evolving, emergent RNA viruses.

  11. Assessment of Aerosol Stability of Yellow Fever Virus by Fluorescent-Cell Counting

    PubMed Central

    Mayhew, Charles J.; Zimmerman, W. Douglas; Hahon, Nicholas

    1968-01-01

    The effects of three temperatures [30, 50, and 80 F (-1.11, 10, and 26.67 C)] and three relative humidities (30, 50, and 80%) on biological and physical decay rates of aerosols of yellow fever virus were investigated. Neither temperature nor relative humidity, independently or jointly, significantly affected biological or physical decay rates. The advantages of assaying yellow fever virus by the fluorescent-cell counting technique are discussed. PMID:5645412

  12. Differential receptor usage by measles virus strains.

    PubMed

    Bartz, R; Firsching, R; Rima, B; ter Meulen, V; Schneider-Schaulies, J

    1998-05-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that infection of cells with all measles virus (MV) strains tested was inhibited by antibodies against CD46, although not all strains caused downregulation of the MV receptor CD46 from the surface of human cells. We now show that infection of cells with MV strain WTFb, a variant of wild-type isolate WTF which has been isolated and propagated on human BJAB cells, is not inhibited by antibodies against CD46. In contrast, infection of cells with the closely related strain WTFv, a Vero cell-adapted variant of WTF, is inhibited by antibodies against CD46. This observation led us to investigate the interaction of these viruses and the vaccine strain Edmonston (Edm) with CD46 and target cells. Cellular receptors with high affinity binding for WTFb are present on BJAB cells, but not on transfected CD46-expressing CHO cells. In contrast to the Edm strain, virus particles and solubilized envelope glycoproteins of WTFb have a very limited binding capacity to CD46. Furthermore, we show that recombinant soluble CD46 either does not bind, or binds very weakly, to WTFb glycoproteins expressed on the cell surface. Our findings indicate that wild-type MV strain WTFb and vaccine strain Edm use different binding sites on human cells. In addition, the results suggest that MV strains may alternatively use CD46 and an unknown molecule as receptors, and that the degree of usage of both receptors may be MV strain-specific. PMID:9603316

  13. Infection of Mosquito Cells (C6/36) by Dengue-2 Virus Interferes with Subsequent Infection by Yellow Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Abrao, Emiliana Pereira; da Fonseca, Benedito Antônio Lopes

    2016-02-01

    Dengue is one of the most important diseases caused by arboviruses in the world. Yellow fever is another arthropod-borne disease of great importance to public health that is endemic to tropical regions of Africa and the Americas. Both yellow fever and dengue viruses are flaviviruses transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, and then, it is reasonable to consider that in a given moment, mosquito cells could be coinfected by both viruses. Therefore, we decided to evaluate if sequential infections of dengue and yellow fever viruses (and vice-versa) in mosquito cells could affect the virus replication patterns. Using immunofluorescence and real-time PCR-based replication assays in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells with single or sequential infections with both viruses, we demonstrated the occurrence of viral interference, also called superinfection exclusion, between these two viruses. Our results show that this interference pattern is particularly evident when cells were first infected with dengue virus and subsequently with yellow fever virus (YFV). Reduction in dengue virus replication, although to a lower extent, was also observed when C6/36 cells were initially infected with YFV followed by dengue virus infection. Although the importance that these findings have on nature is unknown, this study provides evidence, at the cellular level, of the occurrence of replication interference between dengue and yellow fever viruses and raises the question if superinfection exclusion could be a possible explanation, at least partially, for the reported lack of urban yellow fever occurrence in regions where a high level of dengue transmission occurs.

  14. Reassortment and distinct evolutionary dynamics of Rift Valley Fever virus genomic segments

    PubMed Central

    Freire, Caio C. M.; Iamarino, Atila; Soumaré, Peinda O. Ly; Faye, Ousmane; Sall, Amadou A.; Zanotto, Paolo M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) is a member of Bunyaviridae family that causes a febrile disease affecting mainly ruminants and occasionally humans in Africa, with symptoms that range from mid to severe. RVFV has a tri-segmented ssRNA genome that permits reassortment and could generate more virulent strains. In this study, we reveal the importance of reassortment for RVFV evolution using viral gene genealogy inference and phylodynamics. We uncovered seven events of reassortment that originated RVFV lineages with discordant origins among segments. Moreover, we also found that despite similar selection regimens, the three segments have distinct evolutionary dynamics; the longer segment L evolves at a significant lower rate. Episodes of discordance between population size estimates per segment also coincided with reassortment dating. Our results show that RVFV segments are decoupled enough to have distinct demographic histories and to evolve under different molecular rates. PMID:26100494

  15. Cytopathogenic effect of African swine fever virus for pig monocytes: characterization and use in microassay.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, R C; Genovesi, E V; Whyard, T C; Wool, S H

    1987-05-01

    A microculture assay is described for the titration of African swine fever virus (ASFV) using swine monocytes contained in mononuclear leucocyte (MNL) microcultures. Titration endpoints were determined by observing cytopathogenic effects (CPE) of ASFV infected monocytes with an inverted microscope at 40 X magnification. CPE was a late event following the detection of ASFV antigens in monocytes by radioimmune assay, immunofluorescence and hemadsorption. It began with the detachment, enlargement and rounding of monocytes which progressively formed into grape-like clusters of 3-20 or more cells which eventually lysed. The characteristic CPE was produced in monocyte microcultures by virulent, moderately virulent, Vero cell adapted, and nonhemadsorbing ASFV strains. The sensitivity and reproducibility of the CPE microassay was similar to that of the hemadsorption microassay.

  16. Reassortment and distinct evolutionary dynamics of Rift Valley Fever virus genomic segments.

    PubMed

    Freire, Caio C M; Iamarino, Atila; Soumaré, Peinda O Ly; Faye, Ousmane; Sall, Amadou A; Zanotto, Paolo M A

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) is a member of Bunyaviridae family that causes a febrile disease affecting mainly ruminants and occasionally humans in Africa, with symptoms that range from mid to severe. RVFV has a tri-segmented ssRNA genome that permits reassortment and could generate more virulent strains. In this study, we reveal the importance of reassortment for RVFV evolution using viral gene genealogy inference and phylodynamics. We uncovered seven events of reassortment that originated RVFV lineages with discordant origins among segments. Moreover, we also found that despite similar selection regimens, the three segments have distinct evolutionary dynamics; the longer segment L evolves at a significant lower rate. Episodes of discordance between population size estimates per segment also coincided with reassortment dating. Our results show that RVFV segments are decoupled enough to have distinct demographic histories and to evolve under different molecular rates. PMID:26100494

  17. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    A fever is a body temperature that is higher than normal. It is not an illness. It is part of your body's defense against infection. Most bacteria ... cause infections do well at the body's normal temperature (98.6 F). A slight fever can make ...

  18. Rapid Molecular Assays for the Detection of Yellow Fever Virus in Low-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Escadafal, Camille; Faye, Oumar; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Faye, Ousmane; Weidmann, Manfred; Strohmeier, Oliver; von Stetten, Felix; Drexler, Josef; Eberhard, Michael; Niedrig, Matthias; Patel, Pranav

    2014-01-01

    Background Yellow fever (YF) is an acute viral hemorrhagic disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. The causative agent, the yellow fever virus (YFV), is found in tropical and subtropical areas of South America and Africa. Although a vaccine is available since the 1930s, YF still causes thousands of deaths and several outbreaks have recently occurred in Africa. Therefore, rapid and reliable diagnostic methods easy to perform in low-resources settings could have a major impact on early detection of outbreaks and implementation of appropriate response strategies such as vaccination and/or vector control. Methodology The aim of this study was to develop a YFV nucleic acid detection method applicable in outbreak investigations and surveillance studies in low-resource and field settings. The method should be simple, robust, rapid and reliable. Therefore, we adopted an isothermal approach and developed a recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay which can be performed with a small portable instrument and easy-to-use lyophilized reagents. The assay was developed in three different formats (real-time with or without microfluidic semi-automated system and lateral-flow assay) to evaluate their application for different purposes. Analytical specificity and sensitivity were evaluated with a wide panel of viruses and serial dilutions of YFV RNA. Mosquito pools and spiked human plasma samples were also tested for assay validation. Finally, real-time RPA in portable format was tested under field conditions in Senegal. Conclusion/Significance The assay was able to detect 20 different YFV strains and demonstrated no cross-reactions with closely related viruses. The RPA assay proved to be a robust, portable method with a low detection limit (<21 genome equivalent copies per reaction) and rapid processing time (<20 min). Results from real-time RPA field testing were comparable to results obtained in the laboratory, thus confirming our method is suitable for YFV detection in

  19. Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... by four families of viruses. These include the Ebola and Marburg, Lassa fever, and yellow fever viruses. ... Some VHFs cause mild disease, but some, like Ebola or Marburg, cause severe disease and death. VHFs ...

  20. Deletion of the thymidine kinase gene induces complete attenuation of the Georgia isolate of African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Sanford, B; Holinka, L G; O'Donnell, V; Krug, P W; Carlson, J; Alfano, M; Carrillo, C; Wu, Ping; Lowe, Andre; Risatti, G R; Gladue, D P; Borca, M V

    2016-02-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal viral disease of domestic pigs. There are no vaccines to control Africa swine fever (ASF). Experimental vaccines have been developed using genetically modified live attenuated ASFVs obtained by specifically deleting virus genes involved in virulence, including the thymidine kinase (TK) gene. TK has been shown to be involved in the virulence of several viruses, including ASFV. Here we report the construction of a recombinant virus (ASFV-G/V-ΔTK) obtained by deleting the TK gene in a virulent strain of ASFV Georgia adapted to replicate in Vero cells (ASFV-G/VP30). ASFV-G/P-ΔTK demonstrated decreased replication both in primary swine macrophage cell cultures and in Vero cells compared with ASFV-G/VP30. In vivo, intramuscular administration of up to 10(6) TCID50 of ASFV-G/V-ΔTK does not result in ASF disease. However, these animals are not protected when challenged with the virulent parental Georgia strain.

  1. Association of the Host Immune Response with Protection Using a Live Attenuated African Swine Fever Virus Model

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jolene; O’Donnell, Vivian; Alfano, Marialexia; Velazquez Salinas, Lauro; Holinka, Lauren G.; Krug, Peter W.; Gladue, Douglas P.; Higgs, Stephen; Borca, Manuel V.

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a lethal hemorrhagic disease of swine caused by a double-stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV). There is no vaccine to prevent the disease and current control measures are limited to culling and restricting animal movement. Swine infected with attenuated strains are protected against challenge with a homologous virulent virus, but there is limited knowledge of the host immune mechanisms generating that protection. Swine infected with Pretoriuskop/96/4 (Pret4) virus develop a fatal severe disease, while a derivative strain lacking virulence-associated gene 9GL (Pret4Δ9GL virus) is completely attenuated. Swine infected with Pret4Δ9GL virus and challenged with the virulent parental virus at 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 days post infection (dpi) showed a progressive acquisition of protection (from 40% at 7 dpi to 80% at 21 and 28 dpi). This animal model was used to associate the presence of host immune response (ASFV-specific antibody and interferon (IFN)-γ responses, or specific cytokine profiles) and protection against challenge. With the exception of ASFV-specific antibodies in survivors challenged at 21 and 28 dpi, no association between the parameters assessed and protection could be established. These results, encompassing data from 65 immunized swine, underscore the complexity of the system under study, suggesting that protection relies on the concurrence of different host immune mechanisms. PMID:27782090

  2. Clustering of classical swine fever virus isolates by codon pair bias

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetic code consists of non-random usage of synonymous codons for the same amino acids, termed codon bias or codon usage. Codon juxtaposition is also non-random, referred to as codon context bias or codon pair bias. The codon and codon pair bias vary among different organisms, as well as with viruses. Reasons for these differences are not completely understood. For classical swine fever virus (CSFV), it was suggested that the synonymous codon usage does not significantly influence virulence, but the relationship between variations in codon pair usage and CSFV virulence is unknown. Virulence can be related to the fitness of a virus: Differences in codon pair usage influence genome translation efficiency, which may in turn relate to the fitness of a virus. Accordingly, the potential of the codon pair bias for clustering CSFV isolates into classes of different virulence was investigated. Results The complete genomic sequences encoding the viral polyprotein of 52 different CSFV isolates were analyzed. This included 49 sequences from the GenBank database (NCBI) and three newly sequenced genomes. The codon usage did not differ among isolates of different virulence or genotype. In contrast, a clustering of isolates based on their codon pair bias was observed, clearly discriminating highly virulent isolates and vaccine strains on one side from moderately virulent strains on the other side. However, phylogenetic trees based on the codon pair bias and on the primary nucleotide sequence resulted in a very similar genotype distribution. Conclusion Clustering of CSFV genomes based on their codon pair bias correlate with the genotype rather than with the virulence of the isolates. PMID:22126254

  3. Experimental infection with bovine ephemeral fever virus and analysis of its antibody response cattle.

    PubMed

    Zheng, F Y; Chen, Q W; Li, Z; Gong, X W; Wang, J D; Yin, H

    2016-02-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) is an arthropod-borne viral disease that occurs throughout mainland China. LS11 obtained in the 2011 BEF epidemic was a wild strain, and its virulence and antibody response have never been studied in China. Therefore, the issues were investigated in this work. Experimental cattle were intravenously infected with different doses of BEF virus, and some non-infected cattle were simultaneously monitored. Blood and serum samples were collected from all animals over the course of our study. Infected cattle were challenged for a second time with BEF virus to determine protective period of the antibodies. BEF virus was detected in blood samples from infected cattle, but not in monitored cattle. The neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against BEFV were easier to be detected and persisted for longer periods in cattle infected with higher doses of BEFV than in those infected with lower doses. When the titer of nAbs was equal to 5 or 6, re-infected cattle still could mount a challenge against BEFV. However, after 3 or 6months, when nAbs were no longer apparent, re-infected cattle displayed typical symptoms of BEF. Our findings indicated that vaccination should be performed once the titer of nAb decreased to 5 or 6.

  4. Biological and phylogenetic characteristics of yellow fever virus lineages from West Africa.

    PubMed

    Stock, Nina K; Laraway, Hewád; Faye, Ousmane; Diallo, Mawlouth; Niedrig, Matthias; Sall, Amadou A

    2013-03-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV), the first proven human-pathogenic virus, although isolated in 1927, is still a major public health problem, especially in West Africa where it causes outbreaks every year. Nevertheless, little is known about its genetic diversity and evolutionary dynamics, mainly due to a limited number of genomic sequences from wild virus isolates. In this study, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of 24 full-length genomes from YFV strains isolated between 1973 and 2005 in a sylvatic context of West Africa, including 14 isolates that had previously not been sequenced. By this, we confirmed genetic variability within one genotype by the identification of various YF lineages circulating in West Africa. Further analyses of the biological properties of these lineages revealed differential growth behavior in human liver and insect cells, correlating with the source of isolation and suggesting host adaptation. For one lineage, repeatedly isolated in a context of vertical transmission, specific characteristics in the growth behavior and unique mutations of the viral genome were observed and deserve further investigation to gain insight into mechanisms involved in YFV emergence and maintenance in nature.

  5. Temperature-sensitive mutations for live-attenuated Rift Valley fever vaccines: implications from other RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to the African continent. RVF is characterized by high rate of abortions in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. RVF is caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV: genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae). Vaccination is the only known effective strategy to prevent the disease, but there are no licensed RVF vaccines available for humans. A live-attenuated vaccine candidate derived from the wild-type pathogenic Egyptian ZH548 strain, MP-12, has been conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the U.S. MP-12 displays a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype and does not replicate at 41°C. The ts mutation limits viral replication at a specific body temperature and may lead to an attenuation of the virus. Here we will review well-characterized ts mutations for RNA viruses, and further discuss the potential in designing novel live-attenuated vaccines for RVF. PMID:26322023

  6. African Swine Fever Virus Georgia isolate harboring deletions of 9GL and MGF360/505 genes in highly attenuated in swine but does not confer protection against parental virus challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) produces a contagious disease of domestic pigs that results in severe economic consequences to the swine industry. Control of the disease has been hampered by the unavailability of vaccines. We recently reported the development of two experimental vaccine strains (...

  7. Live attenuated African swine fever viruses as ideal tools to dissect the mechanisms involved in viral pathogenesis and immune protection.

    PubMed

    Lacasta, Anna; Monteagudo, Paula L; Jiménez-Marín, Ángeles; Accensi, Francesc; Ballester, María; Argilaguet, Jordi; Galindo-Cardiel, Iván; Segalés, Joaquim; Salas, María L; Domínguez, Javier; Moreno, Ángela; Garrido, Juan J; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2015-11-20

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the causal agent of African swine fever, a hemorrhagic and often lethal porcine disease causing enormous economical losses in affected countries. Endemic for decades in most of the sub-Saharan countries and Sardinia, the risk of ASFV-endemicity in Europe has increased since its last introduction into Europe in 2007. Live attenuated viruses have been demonstrated to induce very efficient protective immune responses, albeit most of the time protection was circumscribed to homologous ASFV challenges. However, their use in the field is still far from a reality, mainly due to safety concerns. In this study we compared the course of the in vivo infection caused by two homologous ASFV strains: the virulent E75 and the cell cultured adapted strain E75CV1, obtained from adapting E75 to grow in the CV1 cell-line. Interestingly, the kinetics of both viruses not only differed on the clinical signs that they caused and in the virus loads found, but also in the immunological pathways activated throughout the infections. Furthermore, E75CV1 confirmed its protective potential against the homologous E75 virus challenge and allowed the demonstration of poor cross-protection against BA71, thus defining it as heterologous. The in vitro specificity of the CD8(+) T-cells present at the time of lethal challenge showed a clear activation against the homologous virus (E75) but not against BA71. These findings will be of utility for a better understanding of ASFV pathogenesis and for the rational designing of safe and efficient vaccines against this virus.

  8. Survival of classical swine fever virus at various temperatures in faeces and urine derived from experimentally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Weesendorp, Eefke; Stegeman, Arjan; Loeffen, Willie L A

    2008-12-10

    Indirect transmission of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) can occur through contact with mechanical vectors, like clothing and footwear or transport vehicles, contaminated with the secretions or excretions of infected pigs. A prerequisite for indirect transmission is survival of the virus on the mechanical vector. Consequently, to obtain more insight into these transmission routes, it is important to know how long the virus remains viable outside the host. In this study we examined the survival of classical swine fever virus in faeces and urine derived from pigs intranasally inoculated with a highly or moderately virulent CSFV strain. Faeces and urine were collected between days 5 and 36 post-inoculation, and stored at 5, 12, 20, and 30 degrees C. Next, the virus titres were determined in the samples by virus titration, and a random selection of these samples was also analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRRT-PCR) to determine the viral RNA decay. Survival curves were generated, and it was shown that the inactivation rate was inversely related to the storage temperature. Average half-life values were between 2 and 4 days at 5 degrees C, and between 1 and 3h at 30 degrees C. Significant differences were observed in survival between virus strains in faeces, however, not in urine. The reduction in viral RNA during the entire study period was limited. This study provided detailed information on survival of CSFV in excretions of infected pigs, which can be used to improve control measures or risk-analysis models.

  9. Zika Virus Infection and Zika Fever: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updated: 25 March 2016 ABOUT ZIKA What is Zika virus infection? Zika virus infection is caused by the ... possible to characterize the disease better. How is Zika virus transmitted? Zika virus is transmitted to people through ...

  10. Evaluation of hemostaseological status of pigs experimentally infected with African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zakaryan, Hovakim; Karalova, Elena; Voskanyan, Henrik; Ter-Pogossyan, Zarine; Nersisyan, Narek; Hakobyan, Astghik; Saroyan, David; Karalyan, Zaven

    2014-11-01

    African swine fever is a highly contagious hemorrhagic disease of pigs caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV). Hemorrhages are the most frequently reported lesions in acute and subacute forms of ASF. Hemorrhagic lesions are accompanied by impaired hemostasis, which includes thrombocytopenia and changes in the coagulation system. In the present study, experimental infection was conducted to elucidate whether a highly virulent ASFV genotype II circulating in the Trans-Caucasus and Eastern Europe affects the hemostasis of infected pigs. Platelet count changes and platelet size, as well as coagulation parameters were evaluated upon experimental infection. In contrast to other ASFV strains, ASFV genotype II showed a significant decrease in the number of platelets from 3rd dpi onwards. Furthermore, a decrease in platelet size was observed throughout the entire period of experiment. A significant increase in the number of platelet aggregates was observed from the beginning of infection. Unlike other ASFV strains, ASFV genotype II induced a slight shortening of an activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) throughout the experiment. Thrombin time (TT) was prolonged from day 5 onwards, whereas no changes in prothrombin time (PT) were found upon infection. The level of d-dimers was permanently higher than in control with a peak on day 3 post-infection. ASFV induced a significant decrease in the level of fibrinogen from day 5 till the end of experiment. Thus, it can be concluded that ASFV genotype II isolated in Armenia affects the hemostasis of infected pigs and causes changes that differ from that of other ASFV strains described previously.

  11. Viruses associated with epidemic hemorrhagic fevers of the Philippines and Thailand.

    PubMed

    HAMMON, W M; RUDNICK, A; SATHER, G E

    1960-04-15

    Epidemiologic, clinical, and etiologic studies were carried out on a newly recognized, frequently fatal, pediatric disease syndrome which occurred in urban areas infested with Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Four types of dengue virus (two of which are new), chikungunya virus, and another virus yet to be identified were isolated from the blood of patients. Dengue viruses, types 2 and 3, were isolated from the mosquitoes. Ample serologic confirmation was obtained of concurrent hemorrhagic fever and infection with one or more of these viruses. Thus, it was discovered that viruses of previously recognized types and of closely related new types apparently have etiologic roles in a new and highly dangerous epidemic disease syndrome.

  12. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of dengue virus isolates differentiates dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever from dengue shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tuiskunen, Anne; Monteil, Vanessa; Plumet, Sébastien; Boubis, Laetitia; Wahlström, Maria; Duong, Veasna; Buchy, Philippe; Lundkvist, Ake; Tolou, Hugues; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle

    2011-11-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) cause 50-100 million cases of acute febrile disease every year, including 500,000 reported cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Viral factors have been proposed to influence the severity of the disease, but markers of virulence have never been identified on DENV. Three DENV serotype-1 isolates from the 2007 epidemic in Cambodia that are derived from patients experiencing the various clinical forms of dengue were characterized both phenotypically and genetically. Phenotypic characteristics in vitro, based on replication kinetics in different cell lines and apoptosis response, grouped isolates from DF and DHF patients together, whereas the virus isolate from a DSS patient showed unique features: a lower level of replication in mammalian cells and extensive apoptosis in mosquito cells. Genomic comparison of viruses revealed six unique amino acid residues in the membrane, envelope, and in non-structural genes in the virus isolated from the DSS patient.

  13. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... of charts. A fever is defined as a temperature 1° or more above the normal 98.6°. Minor infections may cause mild or short-term temperature elevations. Temperatures of 103° and above are considered ...

  14. USDA, ARS, ABDRL Research on Countermeasures for Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United State Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Research Service has recently established research program to address countermeasures for of Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus (RVFV). The recent outbreak in Kenya, Tanzania and Somalia demonstrates the impact this virus can have on human and live...

  15. Utility of Antibody Avidity for Rift Valley Fever Virus Vaccine Potency and Immunogenicity Studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease outbreaks caused by arthropod-borne animal viruses (arboviruses) resulting in significant livestock and economic losses world-wide appear to be increasing. Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus is an important arbovirus that causes lethal disease in cattle, camels, sheep and goats in sub-Saharan Afr...

  16. A Glycoprotein Subunit Vaccine Elicits a Strong Rift Valley Fever Virus Neutralizing Antibody Response in Sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Bunyaviridae family, is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen that causes serious morbidity and mortality in livestock and humans. The recent spread of the virus beyond its traditional endemic boundaries in Africa to the Arabian Peninsula coupled with the...

  17. Identification of an NTPase motif in classical swine fever virus NS4B protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease of swine caused by CSF virus (CSFV), a positive sense single-stranded RNA virus in the genus Pestivirus of the Flaviviridae family. Here, we have identified, within CSFV non-structural (NS) protein NS4B, conserved sequence el...

  18. African swine fever virus-cell interactions: from virus entry to cell survival.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Covadonga; Galindo, Inmaculada; Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel Angel; Cabezas, Marta; Hernaez, Bruno; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel

    2013-04-01

    Viruses have adapted to evolve complex and dynamic interactions with their host cell. The viral entry mechanism determines viral tropism and pathogenesis. The entry of African swine fever virus (ASFV) is dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated, but other pathways have been described such as macropinocytosis. During endocytosis, ASFV viral particles undergo disassembly in various compartments that the virus passes through en route to the site of replication. This disassembly relies on the acid pH of late endosomes and on microtubule cytoskeleton transport. ASFV interacts with several regulatory pathways to establish an optimal environment for replication. Examples of these pathways include small GTPases, actin-related signaling, and lipid signaling. Cellular cholesterol, the entire cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, and phosphoinositides are central molecular networks required for successful infection. Here we report new data on the conformation of the viral replication site or viral factory and the remodeling of the subcellular structures. We review the virus-induced regulation of ER stress, apoptosis and autophagy as key mechanisms of cell survival and determinants of infection outcome. Finally, future challenges for the development of new preventive strategies against this virus are proposed on the basis of current knowledge about ASFV-host interactions.

  19. Comparison of methods for isolation and titration of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, A J; Swanepoel, R; Leman, P A; Shepherd, S P

    1986-10-01

    The fluorescence focus assay and the plaque assay in CER cells were compared with mouse inoculation for the isolation and titration of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. The fluorescence focus assay and the plaque assay were of similar sensitivity, but both produced 10- to 100-fold lower titers than did mouse inoculation. For specimens from 26 Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever patients in South Africa, virus was isolated from 20 by mouse inoculation and from only 11 by cell culturing. Although cell cultures were less sensitive for the isolation of virus from clinical specimens, they produced diagnostic results much more rapidly.

  20. Epidemiology and phylogenetic analysis of crimean-congo hemorrhagic fever viruses in xinjiang, china.

    PubMed

    Sun, Surong; Dai, Xiang; Aishan, Muhetaer; Wang, Xinhui; Meng, Weiwei; Feng, Conghui; Zhang, Fuchun; Hang, Changshou; Hu, Zhihong; Zhang, Yujiang

    2009-08-01

    In 2004 and 2005, an epidemiological survey of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) was conducted in Xinjiang, China. A total of 5,629 serum samples of human and livestock were collected and tested for the CCHFV antibody, and 17,319 ticks were collected for viral identification. Reverse passive hemagglutination inhibition assays showed that the average prevalence of CCHFV antibody was 1.7% for the humans and 12.7% for the livestock. A relatively high antibody prevalence, ranging from 19.1% to 23.4%, was found in the livestock of the northwest, southwest, and northeast parts of the Tarim Basin. When the ticks were pooled to inoculate suckling mice, followed by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) to detect CCHFV RNA, the average RT-PCR-positive rates for Hyalomma asiaticum kozlovi and H. asiaticum asiaticum were 12.9% and 2.6%, respectively. A significant correlation was found between the antibody prevalence in the livestock and the CCHFV prevalence in H. asiaticum of the same geographic region. No CCHFV RNA was detected in Dermacentor nivenus, Rhipicephalus turanius, or Rhipicephalus sanguineus. A total of 27 partial S segments of CCHFVs were sequenced and used for phylogeny analysis. All but one Chinese isolate grouped into the Asia 1 clade, which contains the strains from Xinjiang and Uzbekistan, while the other strain, Fub90009, grouped with strains from the Middle East.

  1. Epidemiology and phylogenetic analysis of crimean-congo hemorrhagic fever viruses in xinjiang, china.

    PubMed

    Sun, Surong; Dai, Xiang; Aishan, Muhetaer; Wang, Xinhui; Meng, Weiwei; Feng, Conghui; Zhang, Fuchun; Hang, Changshou; Hu, Zhihong; Zhang, Yujiang

    2009-08-01

    In 2004 and 2005, an epidemiological survey of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) was conducted in Xinjiang, China. A total of 5,629 serum samples of human and livestock were collected and tested for the CCHFV antibody, and 17,319 ticks were collected for viral identification. Reverse passive hemagglutination inhibition assays showed that the average prevalence of CCHFV antibody was 1.7% for the humans and 12.7% for the livestock. A relatively high antibody prevalence, ranging from 19.1% to 23.4%, was found in the livestock of the northwest, southwest, and northeast parts of the Tarim Basin. When the ticks were pooled to inoculate suckling mice, followed by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) to detect CCHFV RNA, the average RT-PCR-positive rates for Hyalomma asiaticum kozlovi and H. asiaticum asiaticum were 12.9% and 2.6%, respectively. A significant correlation was found between the antibody prevalence in the livestock and the CCHFV prevalence in H. asiaticum of the same geographic region. No CCHFV RNA was detected in Dermacentor nivenus, Rhipicephalus turanius, or Rhipicephalus sanguineus. A total of 27 partial S segments of CCHFVs were sequenced and used for phylogeny analysis. All but one Chinese isolate grouped into the Asia 1 clade, which contains the strains from Xinjiang and Uzbekistan, while the other strain, Fub90009, grouped with strains from the Middle East. PMID:19553586

  2. Machupo Virus Expressing GPC of the Candid#1 Vaccine Strain of Junin Virus Is Highly Attenuated and Immunogenic

    PubMed Central

    Koma, Takaaki; Patterson, Michael; Huang, Cheng; Seregin, Alexey V.; Maharaj, Payal D.; Miller, Milagros; Smith, Jeanon N.; Walker, Aida G.; Hallam, Steven

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Machupo virus (MACV) is the causative agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever. Our previous study demonstrated that a MACV strain with a single amino acid substitution (F438I) in the transmembrane domain of glycoprotein is attenuated but genetically unstable in mice. MACV is closely related to Junin virus (JUNV), the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. Others and our group have identified the glycoprotein to be the major viral factor determining JUNV attenuation. In this study, we tested the compatibility of the glycoprotein of the Candid#1 live-attenuated vaccine strain of JUNV in MACV replication and its ability to attenuate MACV in vivo. Recombinant MACV with the Candid#1 glycoprotein (rMACV/Cd#1-GPC) exhibited growth properties similar to those of Candid#1 and was genetically stable in vitro. In a mouse model of lethal infection, rMACV/Cd#1-GPC was fully attenuated, more immunogenic than Candid#1, and fully protective against MACV infection. Therefore, the MACV strain expressing the glycoprotein of Candid#1 is safe, genetically stable, and highly protective against MACV infection in a mouse model. IMPORTANCE Currently, there are no FDA-approved vaccines and/or treatments for Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, which is a fatal human disease caused by MACV. The development of antiviral strategies to combat viral hemorrhagic fevers, including Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, is one of the top priorities of the Implementation Plan of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that MACV expressing glycoprotein of Candid#1 is a safe, genetically stable, highly immunogenic, and protective vaccine candidate against Bolivian hemorrhagic fever. PMID:26581982

  3. Studying classical swine fever virus: making the best of a bad virus.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Guo, Zhen; Ding, Nai-Zheng; He, Cheng-Qiang

    2015-02-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease that affects domestic pigs and wild boars. Outbreak of CSF can cause heavy economic losses to the pig industry. The strategies to prevent, control and eradicate CSF disease are based on containing the disease through a systematic prophylactic vaccination policy and a non-vaccination stamping-out policy. The quest for prevention, control and eradication of CSF has moved research forward in academia and industry, and has produced noticeable advances in understanding fundamental aspects of the virus replication mechanisms, virulence, and led to the development of new vaccines. In this review we summarize recent progress in CSFV epidemiology, molecular features of the genome and proteome, the molecular basis of virulence, and the development of anti-virus technologies.

  4. Dengue virus serotype 2 from a sylvatic lineage isolated from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Cardosa, Jane; Ooi, Mong How; Tio, Phaik Hooi; Perera, David; Holmes, Edward C; Bibi, Khatijar; Abdul Manap, Zahara

    2009-01-01

    Dengue viruses circulate in both human and sylvatic cycles. Although dengue viruses (DENV) infecting humans can cause major epidemics and severe disease, relatively little is known about the epidemiology and etiology of sylvatic dengue viruses. A 20-year-old male developed dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) with thrombocytopenia (12,000/ul) and a raised hematocrit (29.5% above baseline) in January 2008 in Malaysia. Dengue virus serotype 2 was isolated from his blood on day 4 of fever. A phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome sequence revealed that this virus was a member of a sylvatic lineage of DENV-2 and most closely related to a virus isolated from a sentinel monkey in Malaysia in 1970. This is the first identification of a sylvatic DENV circulating in Asia since 1975.

  5. Evolution and molecular epidemiology of classical swine fever virus during a multi-annual outbreak amongst European wild boar.

    PubMed

    Goller, Katja V; Gabriel, Claudia; Dimna, Mireille Le; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique; Rossi, Sophie; Staubach, Christoph; Merboth, Matthias; Beer, Martin; Blome, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    Classical swine fever is a viral disease of pigs that carries tremendous socio-economic impact. In outbreak situations, genetic typing is carried out for the purpose of molecular epidemiology in both domestic pigs and wild boar. These analyses are usually based on harmonized partial sequences. However, for high-resolution analyses towards the understanding of genetic variability and virus evolution, full-genome sequences are more appropriate. In this study, a unique set of representative virus strains was investigated that was collected during an outbreak in French free-ranging wild boar in the Vosges-du-Nord mountains between 2003 and 2007. Comparative sequence and evolutionary analyses of the nearly full-length sequences showed only slow evolution of classical swine fever virus strains over the years and no impact of vaccination on mutation rates. However, substitution rates varied amongst protein genes; furthermore, a spatial and temporal pattern could be observed whereby two separate clusters were formed that coincided with physical barriers. PMID:26684209

  6. Rift Valley Fever Virus Circulating among Ruminants, Mosquitoes and Humans in the Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    Nakouné, Emmanuel; Kamgang, Basile; Berthet, Nicolas; Manirakiza, Alexandre; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2016-01-01

    Background Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes a viral zoonosis, with discontinuous epizootics and sporadic epidemics, essentially in East Africa. Infection with this virus causes severe illness and abortion in sheep, goats, and cattle as well as other domestic animals. Humans can also be exposed through close contact with infectious tissues or by bites from infected mosquitoes, primarily of the Aedes and Culex genuses. Although the cycle of RVFV infection in savannah regions is well documented, its distribution in forest areas in central Africa has been poorly investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate current circulation of RVFV among livestock and humans living in the Central African Republic (CAR), blood samples were collected from sheep, cattle, and goats and from people at risk, such as stock breeders and workers in slaughterhouses and livestock markets. The samples were tested for anti-RVFV immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. We also sequenced the complete genomes of two local strains, one isolated in 1969 from mosquitoes and one isolated in 1985 from humans living in forested areas. The 1271 animals sampled comprised 727 cattle, 325 sheep, and 219 goats at three sites. The overall seroprevalence of anti-RVFV IgM antibodies was 1.9% and that of IgG antibodies was 8.6%. IgM antibodies were found only during the rainy season, but the frequency of IgG antibodies did not differ significantly by season. No evidence of recent RVFV infection was found in 335 people considered at risk; however, 16.7% had evidence of past infection. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of the strains isolated in the CAR with those isolated in other African countries showed that they belonged to the East/Central African cluster. Conclusion and significance This study confirms current circulation of RVFV in CAR. Further studies are needed to determine the potential vectors involved and the virus reservoirs. PMID:27760144

  7. Genetic Characterization of Zika Virus Strains: Geographic Expansion of the Asian Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Haddow, Andrew D.; Schuh, Amy J.; Yasuda, Chadwick Y.; Kasper, Matthew R.; Heang, Vireak; Huy, Rekol; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus distributed throughout much of Africa and Asia. Infection with the virus may cause acute febrile illness that clinically resembles dengue fever. A recent study indicated the existence of three geographically distinct viral lineages; however this analysis utilized only a single viral gene. Although ZIKV has been known to circulate in both Africa and Asia since at least the 1950s, little is known about the genetic relationships between geographically distinct virus strains. Moreover, the geographic origin of the strains responsible for the epidemic that occurred on Yap Island, Federated States of Micronesia in 2007, and a 2010 pediatric case in Cambodia, has not been determined. Methodology/Principal Findings To elucidate the genetic relationships of geographically distinct ZIKV strains and the origin of the strains responsible for the 2007 outbreak on Yap Island and a 2010 Cambodian pediatric case of ZIKV infection, the nucleotide sequences of the open reading frame of five isolates from Cambodia, Malaysia, Nigeria, Uganda, and Senegal collected between 1947 and 2010 were determined. Phylogenetic analyses of these and previously published ZIKV sequences revealed the existence of two main virus lineages (African and Asian) and that the strain responsible for the Yap epidemic and the Cambodian case most likely originated in Southeast Asia. Examination of the nucleotide and amino acid sequence alignments revealed the loss of a potential glycosylation site in some of the virus strains, which may correlate with the passage history of the virus. Conclusions/Significance The basal position of the ZIKV strain isolated in Malaysia in 1966 suggests that the recent outbreak in Micronesia was initiated by a strain from Southeast Asia. Because ZIKV infection in humans produces an illness clinically similar to dengue fever and many other tropical infectious diseases, it is likely greatly misdiagnosed and underreported

  8. Delayed Disease Progression in Cynomolgus Macaques Infected with Ebola Virus Makona Strain.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Hanley, Patrick W; Scott, Dana P; Günther, Stephan; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-10-01

    In late 2013, the largest documented outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever started in Guinea and has since spread to neighboring countries, resulting in almost 27,000 cases and >11,000 deaths in humans. In March 2014, Ebola virus (EBOV) was identified as the causative agent. This study compares the pathogenesis of a new EBOV strain, Makona, which was isolated in Guinea in 2014 with the prototype strain from the 1976 EBOV outbreak in the former Zaire. Both strains cause lethal disease in cynomolgus macaques with similar pathologic changes and hallmark features of Ebola hemorrhagic fever. However, disease progression was delayed in EBOV-Makona-infected animals, suggesting decreased rather than increased virulence of this most recent EBOV strain.

  9. Genetic Relationships and Evolution of Genotypes of Yellow Fever Virus and Other Members of the Yellow Fever Virus Group within the Flavivirus Genus Based on the 3′ Noncoding Region

    PubMed Central

    Mutebi, John-Paul; Rijnbrand, René C. A.; Wang, Heiman; Ryman, Kate D.; Wang, Eryu; Fulop, Lynda D.; Titball, Rick; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2004-01-01

    Genetic relationships among flaviviruses within the yellow fever (YF) virus genetic group were investigated by comparing nucleotide sequences of the 3′ noncoding region (3′NCR). Size heterogeneity was observed between members and even among strains of the same viral species. Size variation between YF strains was due to duplications and/or deletions of repeated nucleotide sequence elements (RYF). West African genotypes had three copies of the RYF (RYF1, RYF2, and RYF3); the Angola and the East and Central African genotypes had two copies (RYF1 and RYF3); and South American genotypes had only a single copy (RYF3). Nucleotide sequence analyses suggest a deletion within the 3′NCR of South American genotypes, including RYF1 and RYF2. Based on studies with the French neurotropic vaccine strain, passage of a YF virus strain in cell culture can result in deletion of RYF1 and RYF2. Taken together, these observations suggest that South American genotypes of YF virus evolved from West African genotypes and that the South American genotypes lost RYF1 and RYF2, possibly in a single event. Repeated sequence elements were found within the 3′NCR of other members of the YF virus genetic group, suggesting that it is probably characteristic for members of the YF virus genetic group. A core sequence of 15 nucleotides, containing two stem-loops, was found within the 3′NCR of all members of the YF genetic group and may represent the progenitor repeat sequence. Secondary structure predictions of the 3′NCR showed very similar structures for viruses that were closely related phylogenetically. PMID:15331698

  10. Prevalence of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus in Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Whan; Song, Bong Gu; Shin, E-Hyun; Yun, Seok-Min; Han, Myung-Guk; Park, Mi Yeoun; Park, Chan; Ryou, Jungsang

    2014-10-01

    Haemaphysalis longicornis a vector that harbors severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is a major species of tick in South Korea. To investigate the existence and prevalence of SFTSV in Korea, we collected ticks from nine provinces in South Korea for detecting SFTSV. In all, we collected 13,053 ticks, and H. longicornis (90.8%, 11,856/13,053) was the most abundant among them. The minimum infection rate (MIR) of SFTSV in H. longicornis was 0.46% (55 pools). SFTSV was detected in ticks during all the developmental stages, showing MIR in larvae (2/350, 0.57%), nymphs (38/10,436, 0.36%), males (2/221, 0.90%), and females (13/849, 1.53%), respectively. Viruses were detected in ticks collected between April and September. A higher MIR was detected in ticks from the southern part of the country. We amplified the M and S segment partial genes from a sample and analyzed the nucleotide sequence. The results showed a 93-98% homology to Chinese and Japanese strains registered in Genbank. In this study, we confirmed the existence of SFTSV for the first time in South Korea. The SFTSV prevalence data from the studies are essential for raising the awareness of SFTS in South Korea.

  11. African swine fever virus ORF P1192R codes for a functional type II DNA topoisomerase.

    PubMed

    Coelho, João; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando; Leitão, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerases modulate the topological state of DNA during processes, such as replication and transcription, that cause overwinding and/or underwinding of the DNA. African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a nucleo-cytoplasmic double-stranded DNA virus shown to contain an OFR (P1192R) with homology to type II topoisomerases. Here we observed that pP1192R is highly conserved among ASFV isolates but dissimilar from other viral, prokaryotic or eukaryotic type II topoisomerases. In both ASFV/Ba71V-infected Vero cells and ASFV/L60-infected pig macrophages we detected pP1192R at intermediate and late phases of infection, cytoplasmically localized and accumulating in the viral factories. Finally, we used a Saccharomyces cerevisiae temperature-sensitive strain in order to demonstrate, through complementation and in vitro decatenation assays, the functionality of P1192R, which we further confirmed by mutating its predicted catalytic residue. Overall, this work strengthens the idea that P1192R constitutes a target for studying, and possibly controlling, ASFV transcription and replication.

  12. [Replicative kinetics of classical swine fever virus in PK-15 cells].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing-Ran; Guo, Huan-Cheng; Shi, Zi-Xue; Xia, Xian-Zhu; Tu, Chang-Chun

    2007-10-01

    In order to understand the replication kinetics of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) in in vitro cells PK-15 cells were seeded in 96-well tissues culture plates. After overnight incubation at 37 degrees C in 5% CO2 environment when growing to 80% confluence, the cells were infected with CSFV strain Shimen at 100 TCID50 per well. At various time post infection (p.i.) the replication of the virus in the cells were analyzed repectively by detection of viral antigen using indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA), RNA replication using reverse transcription real-time PCR and viral production using titration of TCID50. In the results of the IFA the viral antigen could be detected as early as 8hrs p.i. and at 72h hrs p.i. almost all cells showed positive staining, the real-time PCR showed that the synthesis of viral genomic RNA was gradually increased between 8-24 hrs p.i. and reached its peak at 72 hrs p.i.. However, the synthesis of negative strand RNA was maintained at a low level for a whole period of culture although it could be detected at 8hrs p.i.. Titration of TCID50 demonstrated that the production of live virions increased at 8h and peaked between 48 - 72 hrs p.i. without significant lose of titer.

  13. CD8+ T cells complement antibodies in protecting against yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Maria R; Kongsgaard, Michael; Steffensen, Maria A; Fenger, Christina; Rasmussen, Michael; Skjødt, Karsten; Finsen, Bente; Stryhn, Anette; Buus, Søren; Christensen, Jan P; Thomsen, Allan R

    2015-02-01

    The attenuated yellow fever (YF) vaccine (YF-17D) was developed in the 1930s, yet little is known about the protective mechanisms underlying its efficiency. In this study, we analyzed the relative contribution of cell-mediated and humoral immunity to the vaccine-induced protection in a murine model of YF-17D infection. Using different strains of knockout mice, we found that CD4(+) T cells, B cells, and Abs are required for full clinical protection of vaccinated mice, whereas CD8(+) T cells are dispensable for long-term survival after intracerebral challenge. However, by analyzing the immune response inside the infected CNS, we observed an accelerated T cell influx into the brain after intracerebral challenge of vaccinated mice, and this T cell recruitment correlated with improved virus control in the brain. Using mice deficient in B cells we found that, in the absence of Abs, YF vaccination can still induce some antiviral protection, and in vivo depletion of CD8(+) T cells from these animals revealed a pivotal role for CD8(+) T cells in controlling virus replication in the absence of a humoral response. Finally, we demonstrated that effector CD8(+) T cells also contribute to viral control in the presence of circulating YF-specific Abs. To our knowledge, this is the first time that YF-specific CD8(+) T cells have been demonstrated to possess antiviral activity in vivo.

  14. African swine fever virus encodes a serine protein kinase which is packaged into virions.

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, S A; Banham, A H; Vydelingum, S; Dixon, L K; Smith, G L

    1993-01-01

    Nucleotide sequencing of the SalI j region of the virulent Malawi (LIL20/1) strain of African swine fever virus (ASFV) identified an open reading frame (ORF), designated j9L, with extensive similarity to the family of protein kinases. This ORF encodes a 35.1-kDa protein of 299 amino acids which shares 24.6% amino acid identity with the human pim-1 proto-oncogene and 21.0% identity with the vaccinia virus B1R-encoded protein kinase. The ASFV ORF contains the motifs characteristic of serine-threonine protein kinases, with the exception of the presumed ATP-binding site, which is poorly conserved. The ORF was expressed to high levels in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme phosphorylated a calf thymus histone protein on serine residues in vitro. An antibody raised to an amino-terminal peptide of the ASFV protein kinase was reactive with the recombinant protein in Western immunoblot analyses and was used to demonstrate the presence of the protein kinase in ASF virions. Images PMID:8331722

  15. Dynamin- and Clathrin-Dependent Endocytosis in African Swine Fever Virus Entry▿

    PubMed Central

    Hernaez, Bruno; Alonso, Covadonga

    2010-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a large DNA virus that enters host cells after receptor-mediated endocytosis and depends on acidic cellular compartments for productive infection. The exact cellular mechanism, however, is largely unknown. In order to dissect ASFV entry, we have analyzed the major endocytic routes using specific inhibitors and dominant negative mutants and analyzed the consequences for ASFV entry into host cells. Our results indicate that ASFV entry into host cells takes place by clathrin-mediated endocytosis which requires dynamin GTPase activity. Also, the clathrin-coated pit component Eps15 was identified as a relevant cellular factor during infection. The presence of cholesterol in cellular membranes, but not lipid rafts or caveolae, was found to be essential for a productive ASFV infection. In contrast, inhibitors of the Na+/H+ ion channels and actin polymerization inhibition did not significantly modify ASFV infection, suggesting that macropinocytosis does not represent the main entry route for ASFV. These results suggest a dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway of ASFV entry for the cell types and viral strains analyzed. PMID:19939916

  16. Dynamin- and clathrin-dependent endocytosis in African swine fever virus entry.

    PubMed

    Hernaez, Bruno; Alonso, Covadonga

    2010-02-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a large DNA virus that enters host cells after receptor-mediated endocytosis and depends on acidic cellular compartments for productive infection. The exact cellular mechanism, however, is largely unknown. In order to dissect ASFV entry, we have analyzed the major endocytic routes using specific inhibitors and dominant negative mutants and analyzed the consequences for ASFV entry into host cells. Our results indicate that ASFV entry into host cells takes place by clathrin-mediated endocytosis which requires dynamin GTPase activity. Also, the clathrin-coated pit component Eps15 was identified as a relevant cellular factor during infection. The presence of cholesterol in cellular membranes, but not lipid rafts or caveolae, was found to be essential for a productive ASFV infection. In contrast, inhibitors of the Na(+)/H(+) ion channels and actin polymerization inhibition did not significantly modify ASFV infection, suggesting that macropinocytosis does not represent the main entry route for ASFV. These results suggest a dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway of ASFV entry for the cell types and viral strains analyzed.

  17. Haiti: absence of dengue hemorrhagic fever despite hyperendemic dengue virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Halstead, S B; Streit, T G; Lafontant, J G; Putvatana, R; Russell, K; Sun, W; Kanesa-Thasan, N; Hayes, C G; Watts, D M

    2001-09-01

    In 1994-1996, 185 strains of dengue (DEN) virus types 1, 2, and 4 were recovered from febrile United States and other United Nations military personnel in Haiti. We wondered whether risk factors for dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) existed and, if so, were DHF cases occurring among Haitian children. Dengue transmission rates were studied in 210 school children (6-13 years old) resident in Carrefour Borough, Port-au-Prince, Haiti. When sera were tested for plaque-reduction neutralizing antibodies to DEN 1-4 viruses, nearly 85% had antibodies to two or more DEN serotypes. The annual transmission rate was estimated at 30%, a rate observed in countries endemic for DHE Haitian DEN 2 isolates were genotype I, which are repeatedly associated with DHF cases in Southeast Asia and American regions. Despite positive virologic pre-conditions, DHF cases were not recorded by experienced Port-au-Prince pediatricians. These observations, which are reminiscent of those in Africa, provide further evidence of a dengue resistance gene in black populations.

  18. Molecular characterization of dengue virus 1 from autochthonous dengue fever cases in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Kurolt, I C; Betica-Radić, L; Daković-Rode, O; Franco, L; Zelená, H; Tenorio, A; Markotić, A

    2013-03-01

    In the summer of 2010, two autochthonous dengue fever cases were detected in Croatia. Here we report the retrospective detection of an additional case of dengue fever, representing the first sustained autochthonous transmission in Europe since 1928. In addition, we present the phylogenetic analyses based on two sequences from the Pelješac peninsula, southern Croatia. The sequences were identified as dengue virus genotype 1 and recovered from two out of the three Pelješac patients in whom infection occurred.

  19. A two-tube multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection of four hemorrhagic fever viruses: severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus, Hantaan virus, Seoul virus, and dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhifeng; Qi, Xian; Zhou, Minghao; Bao, Changjun; Hu, Jianli; Wu, Bin; Wang, Shenjiao; Tan, Zhongmin; Fu, Jianguang; Shan, Jun; Zhu, Yefei; Tang, Fenyang

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a two-tube multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection and identification of four viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) pathogens, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), Hantaan virus (HTNV), Seoul virus (SEOV), and dengue virus (DENV), from human clinical samples. The two-tube multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay we developed has a sensitivity of 10 copies/μL for each of the targets, and the performance was linear within the range of at least 10(7) transcript copies. Moreover, we evaluated the specificity of the assay using other virus RNA as template, and found no cross-reactivity. This new assay is able to detect SFTSV, HTNV, SEOV and DENV in two reactions and brings a cost of 40 % compared to separate reactions. Evaluation of this assay with clinical serum samples from laboratory-confirmed patients and healthy donors showed 100 % clinical diagnostic sensitivity and over 99 % specificity. The assay was applied for scanning 346 clinical samples collected from patients admitted to the hospital with suspected VHF and compared with virus isolation and immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The assay indentified 59 SFTSV-, 12 HTNV-, 11 SEOV- and 9 DENV-positive samples and showed higher sensitivity. This assay thus provides a reliable and cost-effective screening tool for early clinical diagnosis of SFTSV, HTNV, SEOV and DENV in the acute phase.

  20. First Isolation of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus from Haemaphysalis longicornis Ticks Collected in Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Outbreak Areas in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seok-Min; Song, Bong Gu; Choi, WooYoung; Roh, Jong Yul; Lee, Ye-Ji; Park, Won Il; Han, Myung Guk; Ju, Young Ran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging tick-borne infectious disease that is endemic to China, Japan, and the Republic of Korea (ROK). In this study, 8313 ticks collected from SFTS outbreak areas in the ROK in 2013 were used to detect the SFTS virus (SFTSV). A single SFTSV was isolated in cell culture from one pool of Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks collected from Samcheok-si, Gangwon Province, in the ROK. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the SFTSV isolate was clustered with the SFTSV strain from Japan, which was isolated from humans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first isolation in the world of SFTSV in ticks collected from vegetation. PMID:26745758

  1. Rift Valley fever virus: A review of diagnosis and vaccination, and implications for emergence in Europe.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Karen L; Banyard, Ashley C; McElhinney, Lorraine; Johnson, Nicholas; Horton, Daniel L; Hernández-Triana, Luis M; Fooks, Anthony R

    2015-10-13

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne virus, and is the causative agent of Rift Valley fever (RVF), a zoonotic disease characterised by an increased incidence of abortion or foetal malformation in ruminants. Infection in humans can also lead to clinical manifestations that in severe cases cause encephalitis or haemorrhagic fever. The virus is endemic throughout much of the African continent. However, the emergence of RVFV in the Middle East, northern Egypt and the Comoros Archipelago has highlighted that the geographical range of RVFV may be increasing, and has led to the concern that an incursion into Europe may occur. At present, there is a limited range of veterinary vaccines available for use in endemic areas, and there is no licensed human vaccine. In this review, the methods available for diagnosis of RVFV infection, the current status of vaccine development and possible implications for RVFV emergence in Europe, are discussed.

  2. Human MxA protein inhibits the replication of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yicheng; Pang, Daxin; Wang, Tiedong; Yang, Xin; Wu, Rong; Ren, Linzhu; Yuan, Ting; Huang, Yongye; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2011-03-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) has a spherical enveloped particle with a single stranded RNA genome, the virus belonging to a pestivirus of the family Flaviviridae is the causative agent of an acute contagious disease classical swine fever (CSF). The interferon-induced MxA protein has been widely shown to inhibit the life cycle of certain RNA viruses as members of the Bunyaviridae family and others. Interestingly, it has been reported that expression of MxA in infected cells was blocked by CSFV and whether MxA has an inhibitory effect against CSFV remains unknown to date until present. Here, we report that CSFV replicated poorly in cells stably transfected with human MxA. The proliferation of progeny virus in both PK-15 cell lines and swine fetal fibroblasts (PEF) continuously expressing MxA was shown significantly inhibited as measured by virus titration, indirect immune fluorescence assay and real-time PCR.

  3. Comparison of barley stripe mosaic virus strains.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Elsayed E; Abdel Aleem, Engy E; Fattouh, Faiza A

    2008-01-01

    BSMV (barley stripe mosaic virus) particles were obtained in a pure state from infected host plant tissues of Hordeum vulgare. The three genomic parities (alpha, beta and gamma) were amplified by PCR using specific primers for each particle; each was cloned. Partial sequence of the alpha, beta and gamma segments was determined for the Egyptian isolate of barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV AE1). Alignment of nucleotide sequences with that of other known strains of the virus, BSMV type strains (CV17, ND18 and China), and the generation of phylogenetic trees was performed. A low level of homology was detected comparing 467 bp of the a and 643 bp of the segments to that of the other strains, and thus BSMV alpha and beta segments were in separate clusters. However, 1154 bp of the gamma segments of BSMV AE1 showed a high level of homology especially to strain BSMV ND18, as they both formed a distinct cluster. Northern blotting of pure BSMV AE1 virus and H. vulgare-infected tissue were compared using an alpha ND18 specific probe. Western blotting using antibodies specific for the coat protein (CP) and the triple gene block 1 (TGB1) protein, which are both encoded by the beta ND18 segment, still indicated a high level of similarity between proteins produced by BSMV ND18 and AE1. We suggest that the BSMV AE1 isolate is a distinct strain of BSMV which reflects the genetic evolutionary divergence among BSMV strains and members of the Hordeivirus group. PMID:18533473

  4. Generation and Efficacy Evaluation of a Recombinant Pseudorabies Virus Variant Expressing the E2 Protein of Classical Swine Fever Virus in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Yuan, Jin; Cong, Xin; Qin, Hua-Yang; Wang, Chun-Hua; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Su; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2015-10-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an economically important infectious disease of pigs caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Pseudorabies (PR), which is caused by pseudorabies virus (PRV), is another important infectious disease of pigs and other animals. Coinfections of pigs with PRV and CSFV occur occasionally in the field. The modified live vaccine Bartha-K61 strain has played an important role in the control of PR in many countries, including China. Since late 2011, however, increasing PR outbreaks caused by an emerging PRV variant have been reported in Bartha-K61-vaccinated swine populations on many farms in China. Previously, we generated a gE/gI-deleted PRV (rPRVTJ-delgE) based on this PRV variant, which was shown to be safe and can provide rapid and complete protection against lethal challenge with the PRV variant in pigs. Here, we generated a new recombinant PRV variant expressing the E2 gene of CSFV (rPRVTJ-delgE/gI-E2) and evaluated its immunogenicity and efficacy in pigs. The results showed that rPRVTJ-delgE/gI-E2 was safe for pigs, induced detectable anti-PRV and anti-CSFV neutralizing antibodies, and provided complete protection against the lethal challenge with either the PRV TJ strain or the CSFV Shimen strain. The data indicate that rPRVTJ-delgE/gI-E2 is a promising candidate bivalent vaccine against PRV and CSFV coinfections.

  5. Generation and Efficacy Evaluation of a Recombinant Pseudorabies Virus Variant Expressing the E2 Protein of Classical Swine Fever Virus in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Yuan, Jin; Cong, Xin; Qin, Hua-Yang; Wang, Chun-Hua; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Su; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2015-10-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an economically important infectious disease of pigs caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Pseudorabies (PR), which is caused by pseudorabies virus (PRV), is another important infectious disease of pigs and other animals. Coinfections of pigs with PRV and CSFV occur occasionally in the field. The modified live vaccine Bartha-K61 strain has played an important role in the control of PR in many countries, including China. Since late 2011, however, increasing PR outbreaks caused by an emerging PRV variant have been reported in Bartha-K61-vaccinated swine populations on many farms in China. Previously, we generated a gE/gI-deleted PRV (rPRVTJ-delgE) based on this PRV variant, which was shown to be safe and can provide rapid and complete protection against lethal challenge with the PRV variant in pigs. Here, we generated a new recombinant PRV variant expressing the E2 gene of CSFV (rPRVTJ-delgE/gI-E2) and evaluated its immunogenicity and efficacy in pigs. The results showed that rPRVTJ-delgE/gI-E2 was safe for pigs, induced detectable anti-PRV and anti-CSFV neutralizing antibodies, and provided complete protection against the lethal challenge with either the PRV TJ strain or the CSFV Shimen strain. The data indicate that rPRVTJ-delgE/gI-E2 is a promising candidate bivalent vaccine against PRV and CSFV coinfections. PMID:26311244

  6. Prevalence of classical swine fever virus in domestic pigs in South Korea: 1999-2011.

    PubMed

    Song, J-Y; Lim, S I; Jeoung, H Y; Choi, E-J; Hyun, B-H; Kim, B; Kim, J; Shin, Y-K; Dela Pena, R C; Kim, J B; Joo, H; An, D J

    2013-12-01

    The major policy for eradication of classical swine fever (CSF) in South Korea has focused on the implementation of compulsory vaccination of the susceptible pig population. A vaccine strain of CSF virus, the LOM strain, is used to maintain high herd seroconversion, a practice complementary to the 'stamping-out policy' and restriction of animal movement during disease outbreaks. To survey for the prevalence of CSF in domestic pigs in South Korea over the past 13 years (1999-2011), we tested 4 193 782 and 1 162 645 samples for antibodies and antigens, respectively. Whereas seropositivity for CSF antibodies has been maintained at over 95% in the mainland, in Jeju Island, where no-vaccination has been administered since 1999, seroprevalence has been below 1% during the last 3 years of study (2009-2011). The highest number of outbreaks in South Korea occurred in 2002 and 2003; since then, outbreaks have decreased each year, with the last CSF outbreak recorded in 2009. No outbreaks have occurred during the past 3 years, and a high level of herd immunity has been maintained in the mainland pig population for 8 years; therefore, South Korea could now switch to a no-vaccination policy throughout the country. However, the constant threat of the re-emergence of the disease in the susceptible pig population should be the main consideration in planning and carrying out the last phase of the CSF eradication process.

  7. Fulminant encephalitis associated with a vaccine strain of rubella virus.

    PubMed

    Gualberto, Felipe Augusto Souza; de Oliveira, Maria Isabel; Alves, Venancio A F; Kanamura, Cristina T; Rosemberg, Sérgio; Sato, Helena Keico; Arantes, Benedito A F; Curti, Suely Pires; Figueiredo, Cristina Adelaide

    2013-12-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system is common in measles, but rare in rubella. However, rubella virus (RV) can cause a variety of central nervous system syndromes, including meningitis, encephalitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome and sub acute sclerosing panencephalitis. We report the occurrence of one fatal case of the encephalitis associated with measles-rubella (MR) vaccine during an immunization campaign in São Paulo, Brazil. A 31 year-old-man, previously in good health, was admitted at emergency room, with confusion, agitation, inability to stand and hold his head up. Ten days prior to admission, he was vaccinated with combined MR vaccine (Serum Institute of India) and three days later he developed 'flu-like' illness with fever, myalgia and headache. Results of clinical and laboratory exams were consistent with a pattern of viral encephalitis. During hospitalization, his condition deteriorated rapidly with tetraplegia and progression to coma. On the 3rd day of hospitalization he died. Histopathology confirmed encephalitis and immunohistochemistry was positive for RV on brain tissue. RV was also detected by qPCR and virus isolation in cerebrospinal fluid, brain and other clinical samples. The sequence obtained from the isolated virus was identical to that of the RA 27/3 vaccine strain.

  8. Severity-related molecular differences among nineteen strains of dengue type 2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Pandey, B D; Igarashi, A

    2000-01-01

    Comparative nucleotide sequencing was carried out on dengue type 2 virus (DEN-2) strains isolated from patients in Northeast Thailand during the epidemic season in 1993. The patients exhibited different clinical manifestations ranging from dengue fever (DF) to dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS). The results classified 19 DEN-2 strains into 3 subtypes according to nonsynonymous amino acid replacements. The strain isolated from a DSS patient eliciting secondary serological response belonged to subtype I, whereas 13 strains isolated from DHF patients with secondary response and 2 strains from DF patients with primary response belonged to subtype II. On the other hand, 3 strains isolated from DF cases evoking either primary or secondary response belonged to subtype III. These results suggest that subtype III virus infection could result in clinically milder manifestation irrespective of the serological response compared with subtype I or II viruses. The RNA secondary structure predicted for the 3' noncoding region showed 4 different structures (A, B, C, and D). The result also indicates that different subtypes of DEN-2 serotypes are circulating in a single epidemic in Thailand.

  9. African swine fever virus infection of the bushpig (Potamochoerus porcus) and its significance in the epidemiology of the disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E C; Hutchings, G H; Mukarati, N; Wilkinson, P J

    1998-04-30

    Warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus), giant forest hog (Hylochoerus meinertzhageni) and bushpig (Potamochoerus porcus) are known to be susceptible to infection with African swine fever (ASF) virus. Little however, is known about the ecology of the disease in the bushpig. This study has shown that the bushpig remains viraemic for between 35 and 91 days following infection during which time it is able to infect the tick vector O. moubata. These ticks were able to transmit the disease to pigs. The virus persists in the lymphatic tissues for less than 34 weeks. Bushpigs infected with LIL 20/l virus but not VIC T90/l virus transmitted infection to in-contact pigs. Infected domestic pigs did not transmit the infection to in-contact bushpigs. ASF virus was able to replicate in in vitro cultures of bushpig leucocytes and endothelial cells. Recovered bushpigs could be reinfected with some strains of virus but not others. While it has been demonstrated that bushpigs remain carriers of ASFV following infection a complete understanding of their significance in the epidemiology of the disease awaits further investigations of their association with O. moubata. PMID:9659687

  10. Pathological and virological features of arenavirus disease in guinea pigs. Comparison of two Pichinde virus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, J. F.; Herzog, N. K.; Jerrells, T. R.

    1994-01-01

    A guinea pig passage-adapted strain of the arena-virus Pichinde (adPIC) is highly virulent in inbred guinea pigs, whereas the related strain PIC3739 is attenuated. Both viruses were macrophage tropic and infected peritoneal, splenic, liver, and alveolar macrophages during experimental Pichinde virus infection. Infection with the virulent strain was associated with unlimited viral replication in the face of exaggerated delayed-type hypersensitivity response, manifested by the macrophage disappearance reaction. Histopathological lesions unique to adPIC-infected guinea pigs included intestinal villus blunting with mucosal infiltration by pyknotic debris-laden macrophages and apoptosis of crypt epithelial cells. Splenic red pulp necrosis was also significantly associated with adPIC infection but not PIC3739 infection. These findings may provide clues to the pathogenesis of a group of poorly understood human viral hemorrhagic fevers. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8030751

  11. Yellow fever virus: genetic and phenotypic diversity and implications for detection, prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Beasley, David W C; McAuley, Alexander J; Bente, Dennis A

    2015-03-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) is the prototypical hemorrhagic fever virus, yet our understanding of its phenotypic diversity and any molecular basis for observed differences in disease severity and epidemiology is lacking, when compared to other arthropod-borne and haemorrhagic fever viruses. This is, in part, due to the availability of safe and effective vaccines resulting in basic YFV research taking a back seat to those viruses for which no effective vaccine occurs. However, regular outbreaks occur in endemic areas, and the spread of the virus to new, previously unaffected, areas is possible. Analysis of isolates from endemic areas reveals a strong geographic association for major genotypes, and recent epidemics have demonstrated the emergence of novel sequence variants. This review aims to outline the current understanding of YFV genetic and phenotypic diversity and its sources, as well as the available animal models for characterizing these differences in vivo. The consequences of genetic diversity for detection and diagnosis of yellow fever and development of new vaccines and therapeutics are discussed.

  12. Hemorrhagic fever virus-induced changes in hemostasis and vascular biology.

    PubMed

    Chen, J P; Cosgriff, T M

    2000-07-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) denotes a virus-induced acute febrile, hemorrhagic disease reported from wide areas of the world. Hemorrhagic fever (HF) viruses are encapsulated, single-stranded RNA viruses that are associated with insect or rodent vectors whose interaction with humans defines the mode of disease transmission. There are 14 HF viruses, which belong to four viral families: Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae, Filoviridae and Flaviviridae. This review presents, in order, the following aspects of VHF: (1) epidemiology, (2) anomalies of platelets and coagulation factors, (3) vasculopathy, (4) animal models of VHFs, (5) pathogenic mechanisms, and (6) treatment and future studies. HF viruses produce the manifestations of VHFs either by direct effects on cellular functions or by activation of immune and inflammatory pathways. In Lassa fever, Rift Valley fever and Crimean-Congo HF, the main feature of fatal illness appears to be impaired/delayed cellular immunity, which leads to unchecked viremia. However, in HF with renal syndrome and dengue HF, the immune response plays an active role in disease pathogenesis. The interplay of hemostasis, immune response, and inflammation is very complex. Molecular biologic techniques and the use of animal models have helped to unravel some of these interactions.

  13. The effect of Rift Valley fever virus Clone 13 vaccine on semen quality in rams.

    PubMed

    Brown, Geoff; Venter, Estelle H; Morley, Paul; Annandale, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an arthropod-borne viral disease of importance in livestock and humans. Epidemics occur periodically in domestic ruminants. People in contact with infected livestock may develop disease that varies from mild flu-like symptoms to fatal viraemia. Livestock vaccination may assist in disease control. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) Clone 13 is a relatively new vaccine against RVF, derived from an avirulent natural mutant strain of RVFV, and has been shown to confer protective immunity against experimental infection with RVFV. The hypothesis tested in the current trial was that rams vaccinated with RVFV Clone 13 vaccine would not experience a reduction in semen quality (measured by evaluating the percentage progressively motile and percentage morphologically normal spermatozoa in successive ejaculates) relative to unvaccinated control animals. Ram lambs were screened for antibodies to RVFV using a serum neutralisation test. Animals without detectable antibodies (n = 23) were randomly allocated to either a test group (n = 12) or a control group (n = 11). Animals in the test group were vaccinated with RVFV Clone 13 vaccine. Daily rectal temperature measurements and weekly semen and blood samples were taken from all animals. Seven animals were eliminated from the statistical analysis because of potential confounding factors. Logistic regression analysis was performed on data gathered from the remaining animals to determine whether an association existed between animal group, rectal temperature and semen quality parameters. No correlation existed between the treatment group and values obtained for the semen quality parameters measured. There was no statistically significant post-vaccination decline in the percentage of live morphologically normal spermatozoa, or the percentage of progressively motile spermatozoa, either when assessed amongst all animals or when assessed within individual groups. A repeat study with a larger sample size and a more

  14. The effect of Rift Valley fever virus Clone 13 vaccine on semen quality in rams.

    PubMed

    Brown, Geoff; Venter, Estelle H; Morley, Paul; Annandale, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an arthropod-borne viral disease of importance in livestock and humans. Epidemics occur periodically in domestic ruminants. People in contact with infected livestock may develop disease that varies from mild flu-like symptoms to fatal viraemia. Livestock vaccination may assist in disease control. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) Clone 13 is a relatively new vaccine against RVF, derived from an avirulent natural mutant strain of RVFV, and has been shown to confer protective immunity against experimental infection with RVFV. The hypothesis tested in the current trial was that rams vaccinated with RVFV Clone 13 vaccine would not experience a reduction in semen quality (measured by evaluating the percentage progressively motile and percentage morphologically normal spermatozoa in successive ejaculates) relative to unvaccinated control animals. Ram lambs were screened for antibodies to RVFV using a serum neutralisation test. Animals without detectable antibodies (n = 23) were randomly allocated to either a test group (n = 12) or a control group (n = 11). Animals in the test group were vaccinated with RVFV Clone 13 vaccine. Daily rectal temperature measurements and weekly semen and blood samples were taken from all animals. Seven animals were eliminated from the statistical analysis because of potential confounding factors. Logistic regression analysis was performed on data gathered from the remaining animals to determine whether an association existed between animal group, rectal temperature and semen quality parameters. No correlation existed between the treatment group and values obtained for the semen quality parameters measured. There was no statistically significant post-vaccination decline in the percentage of live morphologically normal spermatozoa, or the percentage of progressively motile spermatozoa, either when assessed amongst all animals or when assessed within individual groups. A repeat study with a larger sample size and a more

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of a Field Isolate of Classical Swine Fever Virus Belonging to Subgenotype 2.1b from Hunan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Shao, Weixing; Liu, Shuang; Wu, Faxing; Zhang, Zhi; Dong, Yaqin; Li, Xiaocheng

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of a field isolate of classical swine fever virus (CSFV), Hunan 23/2013, belonging to the predominant subgenotype 2.1b. This strain was originally isolated from diseased pigs in Hunan Province, China. This report will help in understanding the molecular diversity of CSFV stains circulating in China and in selecting and developing a suitable vaccine candidate for CSF control. PMID:26205876

  16. Dengue fever (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dengue fever, or West Nile fever, is a mild viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes which causes fever, ... second exposure to the virus can result in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening illness.

  17. Cell-mediated immunity and lymphocyte populations in experimental Argentine hemorrhagic fever (Junín Virus).

    PubMed Central

    Carballal, G; Oubiña, J R; Rondinone, S N; Elsner, B; Frigerio, M J

    1981-01-01

    Guinea pigs infected with the XJ prototype strain of Junín virus reproduce the main features of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, showing hemorrhages, leukothrombocytopenia, and focal lymphoid tissue necrosis. Viral lymphotropism is shown by the presence of viral antigens, severe cytopathic effect, and high virus titers in lymphoid organs. A pronounced depression of humoral immune response to sheep erythrocytes as well as to the virus is described. This study was carried out to determine whether cellular immune response was also modified and which cell populations were affected. Delayed hypersensitivity skin reaction to purified protein derivative was found to be markedly depressed after infection. A noticeable decrease in both percentages and absolute T lymphocyte numbers, detected by E rosettes, in spleen and lymph nodes, together with a low absolute T cell number in peripheral blood, were observed. Total cell counts in spleen, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood were also reduced. On the contrary, no modification in percentages of B lymphocytes, as measured by EAC rosettes, was found. These results indicate that cell-mediated immunity is markedly impaired in guinea pigs infected with the XJ strain of Junín virus. Its relationship with the pathogenesis of the disease is discussed. PMID:6273314

  18. Exceptional Simian Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Diversity in a Wild African Primate Community

    PubMed Central

    Lauck, Michael; Sibley, Samuel D.; Hyeroba, David; Tumukunde, Alex; Weny, Geoffrey; Chapman, Colin A.; Ting, Nelson; Switzer, William M.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; O'Connor, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) is an arterivirus that causes severe disease in captive macaques. We describe two new SHFV variants subclinically infecting wild African red-tailed guenons (Cercopithecus ascanius). Both variants are highly divergent from the prototype virus and variants infecting sympatric red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus). All known SHFV variants are monophyletic and share three open reading frames not present in other arteriviruses. Our data suggest a need to modify the current arterivirus classification. PMID:23077302

  19. Development of a real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Barry; Chamberlain, John; Logue, Christopher H; Cook, Nicola; Bruce, Christine; Dowall, Stuart D; Hewson, Roger

    2012-09-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a virulent tick-borne disease with a case fatality rate ranging from 10-50% for tick-borne transmission, and up to 80% for nosocomial transmission. Human cases have been reported in over 30 countries across Europe, Asia, and Africa. It appears to be spreading to new areas with several countries reporting their first human cases of CCHF disease within the past 10 years. We report a novel real-time RT-PCR assay designed to amplify a conserved region of the CCHF virus S segment. It is capable of detecting strains from all 7 groups of CCHF, including the AP92 strain that until recently represented a lineage of strains that were not associated with human disease. The limit of detection of the assay is 5 copies of target RNA, and the assay shows no cross-reactivity with other viruses from within the same genus, or with viruses causing similar human disease.

  20. Molecular tracing of classical swine fever viruses isolated from wild boars and pigs in France from 2002 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Simon, Gaëlle; Le Dimna, Mireille; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique; Pol, Françoise

    2013-10-25

    There were three outbreaks of classical swine fever (CSF) in north-eastern France between 2002 and 2011. The first two occurred in April 2002 in the Moselle department, in a wild boar and pig herd, respectively, while the third occurred in April 2003, in the Bas-Rhin department, in a wild boar. A survey was subsequently implemented in wild boar and domestic pig populations, during which 43 CSF viruses (CSFVs) were genetically characterized to provide information on virus sources, trace virus evolution and help in the monitoring of effective control measures. Phylogenetic analyses, based on fragments of the 5'NTR, E2 and NS5B genes, showed that all French CSFVs could be assigned to genotype 2, subgenotype 2.3. CSFVs isolated in Moselle were classified in the "Rostock" lineage, a strain first described in 2001 in wild boar populations in the Eifel region of north-western Rhineland-Palatinate in Germany, and in Luxemburg. In contrast, the CSFVs isolated in Bas-Rhin were homologous to strains from the "Uelzen" lineage, a strain previously isolated from wild boars in south-eastern Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, as well as in Vosges du Nord, France, during a previous outbreak that had occurred in wild boars between 1992 and 2001. The outbreak in Moselle domestic pigs was quickly resolved as it concerned only one herd. The infection in wild boars from Moselle was extinguished after a few months whereas wild boars from Bas-Rhin remained infected until 2007. Molecular tracing showed that the Bas-Rhin index virus strain evolved slightly during the period but that no strain from a novel lineage was introduced until this outbreak ended after application of a vaccination scheme for six years.

  1. Dengue Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... away from areas that have a dengue fever epidemic, the risk of contracting dengue fever is small for international travelers./p> Reviewed by: Elana Pearl Ben-Joseph, ... Nile Virus First Aid: Vomiting Are Insect Repellents With DEET ...

  2. Genetic diversity and positive selection analysis of classical swine fever virus isolates in south China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haiyan; Pei, Jingjing; Bai, Jialin; Zhao, Mingqiu; Ju, Chunmei; Yi, Lin; Kang, Yanmei; Zhang, Xuetao; Chen, Lijun; Li, Yinguang; Wang, Jiaying; Chen, Jinding

    2011-10-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease that leads to significant economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. However, there is a paucity of knowledge on the accurate genotyping of CSFV isolates in south China. This study genotyped the E2 gene of 14 CSFV strains isolated during 2008-2010 from domestic pigs in different districts of south China. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all of the 14 CSFV isolates were clustered into genetic subgroup 1.1. This contrasts with most parts of China, where group 2 isolates are predominant. Furthermore, the positive selection pressures acting on the E(rns) and E2 envelope protein genes of CSFV were assessed and a site-by-site analysis of the dN/dS ratio was performed to identify specific codons that undergo diversification under positive selection. While no significant evidence for positive selection was observed in E(rns), two positively selected sites at amino acid residues 49 and 72 in the E2 encoding region were identified. Our results revealed that a predominance of subgroup 1.1 CSFV isolates is currently circulating in some districts of south China, which appear to be unrelated to the Chinese C-strain vaccine. Moreover, the envelope protein gene, E2, has undergone positive selection in 14 CSFV strains and two positively selected sites have been identified in this study. Understanding the molecular epidemiology and functional importance of these positively selected amino acid positions could help to predict possible changes in virulence, the development of vaccines and disease control.

  3. Genetic diversity and positive selection analysis of classical swine fever virus isolates in south China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haiyan; Pei, Jingjing; Bai, Jialin; Zhao, Mingqiu; Ju, Chunmei; Yi, Lin; Kang, Yanmei; Zhang, Xuetao; Chen, Lijun; Li, Yinguang; Wang, Jiaying; Chen, Jinding

    2011-10-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease that leads to significant economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. However, there is a paucity of knowledge on the accurate genotyping of CSFV isolates in south China. This study genotyped the E2 gene of 14 CSFV strains isolated during 2008-2010 from domestic pigs in different districts of south China. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all of the 14 CSFV isolates were clustered into genetic subgroup 1.1. This contrasts with most parts of China, where group 2 isolates are predominant. Furthermore, the positive selection pressures acting on the E(rns) and E2 envelope protein genes of CSFV were assessed and a site-by-site analysis of the dN/dS ratio was performed to identify specific codons that undergo diversification under positive selection. While no significant evidence for positive selection was observed in E(rns), two positively selected sites at amino acid residues 49 and 72 in the E2 encoding region were identified. Our results revealed that a predominance of subgroup 1.1 CSFV isolates is currently circulating in some districts of south China, which appear to be unrelated to the Chinese C-strain vaccine. Moreover, the envelope protein gene, E2, has undergone positive selection in 14 CSFV strains and two positively selected sites have been identified in this study. Understanding the molecular epidemiology and functional importance of these positively selected amino acid positions could help to predict possible changes in virulence, the development of vaccines and disease control. PMID:21643769

  4. Highly Sensitive PCR Assay for Routine Diagnosis of African Swine Fever Virus in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Agüero, M.; Fernández, J.; Romero, L.; Sánchez Mascaraque, C.; Arias, M.; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    This work provides a novel, highly sensitive, hot start PCR method for rapid and specific detection of African swine fever virus (ASFV) that can be used as a routine diagnostic test for ASFV in surveillance, control, and eradication programs. A confirmatory test of the specificity of this method based on restriction endonuclease analysis was also developed. PMID:12958285

  5. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in high-risk population, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Turabi; Engin, Aynur; Poyraz, Omer; Elaldi, Nazif; Kaya, Safak; Dokmetas, Ilyas; Bakir, Mehmet; Cinar, Ziynet

    2009-03-01

    In the Tokat and Sivas provinces of Turkey, the overall Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) seroprevalence was 12.8% among 782 members of a high-risk population. CCHFV seroprevalence was associated with history of tick bite or tick removal from animals, employment in animal husbandry or farming, and being >40 years of age. PMID:19239765

  6. First report of sandfly fever virus infection imported from Malta into Switzerland, October 2011.

    PubMed

    Schultze, D; Korte, W; Rafeiner, P; Niedrig, M

    2012-07-05

    We report the first documented cases of sandfly fever virus infection in travellers returning from Malta to Switzerland in autumn 2011. These cases illustrate the importance of considering sandfly-borne viral infection in the differential diagnosis of febrile patients from the Mediterranean island Malta. Raising awareness among physicians is relevant especially now at the beginning of the summer tourist season.

  7. Potential for mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) from Florida to transmit rift valley fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated 8 species of mosquitoes collected in Florida to determine which of these should be targeted for control should Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) be detected in North America. Female mosquitoes that had fed on adult hamsters inoculated with RVFV were incubated for 7-21 d at 26°C, allowed to...

  8. Experimental respiratory Marburg virus haemorrhagic fever infection in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    Smither, Sophie J; Nelson, Michelle; Eastaugh, Lin; Laws, Thomas R; Taylor, Christopher; Smith, Simon A; Salguero, Francisco J; Lever, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Marburg virus causes a highly infectious and lethal haemorrhagic fever in primates and may be exploited as a potential biothreat pathogen. To combat the infection and threat of Marburg haemorrhagic fever, there is a need to develop and license appropriate medical countermeasures. To determine whether the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) would be an appropriate model to assess therapies against Marburg haemorrhagic fever, initial susceptibility, lethality and pathogenesis studies were performed. Low doses of virus, between 4 and 28 TCID50, were sufficient to cause a lethal, reproducible infection. Animals became febrile between days 5 and 6, maintaining a high fever before succumbing to disease between 8 and 11 days postchallenge. Typical signs of Marburg virus infection were observed including haemorrhaging and a transient rash. In pathogenesis studies, virus was isolated from the animals’ lungs from day 3 postchallenge and from the liver, spleen and blood from day 5 postchallenge. Early signs of histopathology were apparent in the kidney and liver from day 3. The most striking features were observed in animals exhibiting severe clinical signs, which included high viral titres in all organs, with the highest levels in the blood, increased levels in liver function enzymes and blood clotting times, decreased levels in platelets, multifocal moderate-to-severe hepatitis and perivascular oedema. PMID:23441639

  9. Effect of environmental temperature on the vector competence of mosquitoes for Rift Valley fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental temperature has been shown to affect the ability of mosquitoes to transmit numerous arboviruses and for Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in particular. We evaluated the effect of incubation temperatures ranging from 14-26ºC on infection, dissemination, and transmission rates for Culex ta...

  10. Potential for Psorophora columbiae and Psorophora ciliata mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) to transmit Rift Valley fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) continues to pose a threat to much of the world. Unlike many arboviruses, numerous mosquito species have been associated with RVFV in nature, and many species have been demonstrated as competent vectors in the laboratory. In this study, we evaluated two field-collect...

  11. Factors Affecting the Ability of American Mosquitoes to Transmit Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent outbreaks of disease caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in Kenya, Mauritania, Yemen, Tanzania, Somalia, and Madagascar indicate the potential for RVFV to cause severe disease in both humans and domestic animals and its potential to be introduced into new areas, including North Ameri...

  12. Potential for North American Mosquitoes to Transmit Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent outbreaks of disease caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in Kenya, Mauritania, Yemen, Tanzania, Somalia, and Madagascar indicate the potential for RVFV to cause severe disease in both humans and domestic animals and its potential to be introduced into new areas, including North Ameri...

  13. Vector Competence of Selected African Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) Species for Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in Egypt, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia have indicated the potential for this disease to spread from its enzootic areas in sub-Saharan Africa. Because little is known about the potential for most African mosquito species to transmit RVF virus (RVFV), we conducted stud...

  14. Potential for North American mosquitoes to transmit Rift Valley fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent outbreaks of disease caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in Kenya, Mauritania, Yemen, Tanzania, Somalia, and Madagascar indicate the potential for RVFV to cause severe disease in both humans and domestic animals and its potential to be introduced into new areas, possibly even North A...

  15. Rift Valley Fever Virus among Wild Ruminants, Etosha National Park, Namibia, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Aschenborn, Ortwin; Pinoni, Chiara; Di Gialleonardo, Luigina; Maseke, Adrianatus; Bortone, Grazia; Polci, Andrea; Scacchia, Massimo; Molini, Umberto; Monaco, Federica

    2016-01-01

    After a May 2011 outbreak of Rift Valley fever among livestock northeast of Etosha National Park, Namibia, wild ruminants in the park were tested for the virus. Antibodies were detected in springbok, wildebeest, and black-faced impala, and viral RNA was detected in springbok. Seroprevalence was high, and immune response was long lasting. PMID:26692385

  16. Malignant catarrhal fever virus identified in free-ranging musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) in Norway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To study the epizootiology of malignant catarrhal fever viruses (MCFV), sera and spleen samples collected in 2004-2011 from a free-ranging musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) population in Dovrefjell, Norway, were examined. Sera were tested for antibodies against MCFV by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbe...

  17. 77 FR 68783 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Veterinary Vaccines for Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ...: Veterinary Vaccines for Rift Valley Fever Virus AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC... use of veterinary vaccines, to practice the inventions listed in the patent applications referred to.... Technology: The technology allows for the generation of precisely defined attenuated vaccine constructs...

  18. Rift Valley Fever Virus among Wild Ruminants, Etosha National Park, Namibia, 2011.

    PubMed

    Capobianco Dondona, Andrea; Aschenborn, Ortwin; Pinoni, Chiara; Di Gialleonardo, Luigina; Maseke, Adrianatus; Bortone, Grazia; Polci, Andrea; Scacchia, Massimo; Molini, Umberto; Monaco, Federica

    2016-01-01

    After a May 2011 outbreak of Rift Valley fever among livestock northeast of Etosha National Park, Namibia, wild ruminants in the park were tested for the virus. Antibodies were detected in springbok, wildebeest, and black-faced impala, and viral RNA was detected in springbok. Seroprevalence was high, and immune response was long lasting.

  19. Development of a Rift Valley fever virus viremia challenge model in sheep and goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, causes severe to fatal disease in newborn ruminants, as well as abortions in pregnant animals; both preventable by vaccination. Availability of a challenge model is a pre-requisite for vaccine efficacy trials. Several modes of ino...

  20. Comparison of Rift Valley fever virus replication in North American livestock and wildlife cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes outbreaks of endemic disease across Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, resulting in high morbidity and mortality among young domestic livestock, frequent abortions in pregnant animals, and potentially severe or fatal disease in humans. The possibility of RVFV spr...

  1. Classical Swine Fever Virus Inhibits Nitric Oxide Production in Infected Macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV)-macrophage interactions during infection were analyzed by examining macrophage transcriptional responses via microarray. Eleven genes had increased mRNA levels (>2.5 fold, p<0.05) in infected cell cultures including arginase-1, an inhibitor of nitric oxide producti...

  2. Effects of glycosylation on antigenicity and immunogenicity of classical swine fever virus envelope proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) harbors three envelope glycoproteins (E(rns), E1 and E2). Previous studies have demonstrated that removal of specific glycosylation sites within these proteins yielded attenuated and immunogenic CSFV mutants. Here we analyzed the effects of lack of glycosylation of...

  3. Classical Swine Fever Virus p7 protein is a viroporin involved in virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The non-structural protein p7 of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) is a hydrophobic polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 7 kDa. The protein contains two hydrophobic stretches of amino acids interrupted by a short charged segment that are predicted to form transmembrane helices and a cytos...

  4. Cross-reactivity of neutralizing antibodies among malignant catarrhal fever viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma herpesviruses in the genus Macavirus are maintained in nature as subclinical infections in well-adapted ungulate hosts. Transmission of these viruses to poorly adapted hosts, such as American bison and cattle, can result in the frequently fatal disease referred to as malignant catarrhal fever ...

  5. The LANL hemorrhagic fever virus database, a new platform for analyzing biothreat viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kuiken, Carla; Thurmond, Jim; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Yoon, Hyejin

    2012-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are a diverse set of over 80 viral species, found in 10 different genera comprising five different families: arena-, bunya-, flavi-, filo- and togaviridae. All these viruses are highly variable and evolve rapidly, making them elusive targets for the immune system and for vaccine and drug design. About 55 000 HFV sequences exist in the public domain today. A central website that provides annotated sequences and analysis tools will be helpful to HFV researchers worldwide. The HFV sequence database collects and stores sequence data and provides a user-friendly search interface and a large number of sequence analysis tools, following the model of the highly regarded and widely used Los Alamos HIV database [Kuiken, C., B. Korber, and R.W. Shafer, HIV sequence databases. AIDS Rev, 2003. 5: p. 52–61]. The database uses an algorithm that aligns each sequence to a species-wide reference sequence. The NCBI RefSeq database [Sayers et al. (2011) Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Nucleic Acids Res., 39, D38–D51.] is used for this; if a reference sequence is not available, a Blast search finds the best candidate. Using this method, sequences in each genus can be retrieved pre-aligned. The HFV website can be accessed via http://hfv.lanl.gov. PMID:22064861

  6. The LANL hemorrhagic fever virus database, a new platform for analyzing biothreat viruses.

    PubMed

    Kuiken, Carla; Thurmond, Jim; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Yoon, Hyejin

    2012-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are a diverse set of over 80 viral species, found in 10 different genera comprising five different families: arena-, bunya-, flavi-, filo- and togaviridae. All these viruses are highly variable and evolve rapidly, making them elusive targets for the immune system and for vaccine and drug design. About 55,000 HFV sequences exist in the public domain today. A central website that provides annotated sequences and analysis tools will be helpful to HFV researchers worldwide. The HFV sequence database collects and stores sequence data and provides a user-friendly search interface and a large number of sequence analysis tools, following the model of the highly regarded and widely used Los Alamos HIV database [Kuiken, C., B. Korber, and R.W. Shafer, HIV sequence databases. AIDS Rev, 2003. 5: p. 52-61]. The database uses an algorithm that aligns each sequence to a species-wide reference sequence. The NCBI RefSeq database [Sayers et al. (2011) Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Nucleic Acids Res., 39, D38-D51.] is used for this; if a reference sequence is not available, a Blast search finds the best candidate. Using this method, sequences in each genus can be retrieved pre-aligned. The HFV website can be accessed via http://hfv.lanl.gov. PMID:22064861

  7. Scarlet fever and types of erythrogenic toxins produced by the infecting streptococcal strains.

    PubMed

    Knöll, H; Srámek, J; Vrbová, K; Gerlach, D; Reichardt, W; Köhler, W

    1991-12-01

    Group A streptococcal strains were isolated from the throats of 46 children suffering from scarlet fever. For detection of erythrogenic toxins (ETs), the culture supernatants were concentrated 100 times by ethanol precipitation and solubilisation in acetate buffer. ELISA was used to identify ETA and double immunodiffusion to identify ETB and ETC. The presence of the ETA gene was detected by a specific DNA probe. ETA (alone or in combination with ETB and/or ETC) was found in 51.9% of the strains, ETB (alone or in combination with ETA and/or ETC) in 76.9% and ETC (in combination with ETA and ETB) in 28.9%. Only 5.8% of strains did not produce any detectable ET. In SDS-PAGE, supernatants of ETB-producing strains showed a pronounced band in either the region of the proteinase zymogen or the active proteinase. There was no correlation between the type of erythrogenic toxin and the serological M or T type of the producing strain. The mitogenic potency of culture supernatants did not differ significantly irrespective of the toxin type(s) present. Culture supernatants of strains without a detectable amount of the known ETs were highly mitogenic, indicating the production of other streptococcal mitogens. A correlation with clinical symptoms was determined with regard to exanthema and fever. Strains producing two or three toxins caused a more intense exanthema. Patient temperature was higher (greater than or equal to 38 degrees C) when the infecting strain produced ETB. The toxin-producing patterns of the strains of this study were compared with those isolated during the last epidemic outbreak of scarlet fever in East Germany.

  8. [Assessment of the risk of introduction to Tunisia of the Rift Valley fever virus by the mosquito Culex pipiens].

    PubMed

    Krida, G; Diancourt, L; Bouattour, A; Rhim, A; Chermiti, B; Failloux, A-B

    2011-10-01

    The mosquito Culex pipiens has been involved as vector of the West Nile virus in Tunisia. Its bio-ecological characteristics in combination with some environmental factors have favoured the emergence of this virus in a West-Nile free zone. This leads to question about the potential risk of introducing another arbovirus, the Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus, in Tunisia from neighbouring countries where RVF circulates. In this study, we have evaluated the vector competence of different populations of Cx. pipiens towards two strains of RVF virus, the virulent ZH548 and the avirulent Clone 13 by experimental infections and the genetic differentiation of these populations of Cx. pipiens using four microsatellite loci. We found disseminated infection rates ranging from 0% to 14.7% and a high genetic differentiation among populations without any geographical pattern (no isolation by distance). Thus, although Cx. pipiens is able to sustain an amplification of RVF virus, viral dissemination through mosquito dispersal would be unlikely. However, as RVF is an emerging disease transmitted by several other potential mosquito species (e.g. Ochlerotatus caspius), attention should be maintained to survey livestock and mosquitoes in Tunisia.

  9. A multiplex PCR for simultaneous detection of classical swine fever virus, African swine fever virus, highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and pseudorabies in swines.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Lin, X Y; Yang, Z X; Yao, X P; Li, G L; Peng, S Z; Wang, Y

    2015-01-01

    In this assay, we developed and evaluated a multiplex PCR (mPCR) for its ability in detecting multiple infections of swine simultaneously. Four pairs of primers were used to detect five viruses. Specific primers were designed for classical swine fever virus (CSFV), African swine fever virus (ASFV) and pseudorabies (PRV). A pair of primers was designed prudently for two different types of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus that respectively were porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV). The detection limits of the mPCR were 1.09 × 10⁴, 1.50 × 10³, 2.10 × 10³, 1.30 × 10³ and 8.97 × 10² copies/reaction for CSFV, ASFV, HP-PRRSV, PRRSV and PRV, respectively. A total of 49 clinical specimens were tested by the mPCR, and the result showed that co-infection by two or three viruses was 51%. In conclusion, the PCR is a useful tool for clinical diagnosis of not only single infections but also mixed infections in swines. PMID:26812812

  10. Prevalence of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Healthy Population, Livestock and Ticks in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Fajs, Luka; Humolli, Isme; Saksida, Ana; Knap, Nataša; Jelovšek, Mateja; Korva, Miša; Dedushaj, Isuf; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute, tick borne disease often associated with hemorrhagic presentations and high case fatality rate. Kosovo is a highly endemic area for CCHF, with a significant case fatality rate. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of CCHF in Kosovo. We tested 1105 serum samples from healthy population in both endemic and non-endemic areas in the country. Our results revealed a seroprevalence of 4.0% (range 0–9.3%) which is comparable to the seroprevalence in other countries. We show that seroprevalence is correlated to the disease incidence in each studied municipality. We also tested 401 animal sera (353 cow, 30 sheep, 10 goat and 8 chicken) in four endemic municipalities in Kosovo. We detected specific antibodies in all animals except in chicken. Seroprevalence in cows is comparable to other endemic areas and correlates to the seroprevalence in humans. No CCHF RNA could be detected in 105 tick samples obtained in 2012 and 2013. Sequencing of CCHFV positive ticks from 2001 revealed that the virus is most closely related to viral strains that were detected in CCHF patients from Kosovo. Results suggest that mild CCHF cases are most probably underdiagnosed and consequently that the burden of disease is higher than reported. Our study provides key information for CCHF surveillance and raises awareness for possible imported cases in CCHF non-endemic countries. PMID:25393542

  11. Mutational Analysis of the Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Precursor Proteins for Gn Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Phoenix, Inaia; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) M-segment encodes the 78 kD, NSm, Gn, and Gc proteins. The 1st AUG generates the 78 kD-Gc precursor, the 2nd AUG generates the NSm-Gn-Gc precursor, and the 3rd AUG makes the NSm’-Gn-Gc precursor. To understand biological changes due to abolishment of the precursors, we quantitatively measured Gn secretion using a reporter assay, in which a Gaussia luciferase (gLuc) protein is fused to the RVFV M-segment pre-Gn region. Using the reporter assay, the relative expression of Gn/gLuc fusion proteins was analyzed among various AUG mutants. The reporter assay showed efficient secretion of Gn/gLuc protein from the precursor made from the 2nd AUG, while the removal of the untranslated region upstream of the 2nd AUG (AUG2-M) increased the secretion of the Gn/gLuc protein. Subsequently, recombinant MP-12 strains encoding mutations in the pre-Gn region were rescued, and virological phenotypes were characterized. Recombinant MP-12 encoding the AUG2-M mutation replicated slightly less efficiently than the control, indicating that viral replication is further influenced by the biological processes occurring after Gn expression, rather than the Gn abundance. This study showed that, not only the abolishment of AUG, but also the truncation of viral UTR, affects the expression of Gn protein by the RVFV M-segment. PMID:27231931

  12. Prevalence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in healthy population, livestock and ticks in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Fajs, Luka; Humolli, Isme; Saksida, Ana; Knap, Nataša; Jelovšek, Mateja; Korva, Miša; Dedushaj, Isuf; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute, tick borne disease often associated with hemorrhagic presentations and high case fatality rate. Kosovo is a highly endemic area for CCHF, with a significant case fatality rate. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of CCHF in Kosovo. We tested 1105 serum samples from healthy population in both endemic and non-endemic areas in the country. Our results revealed a seroprevalence of 4.0% (range 0-9.3%) which is comparable to the seroprevalence in other countries. We show that seroprevalence is correlated to the disease incidence in each studied municipality. We also tested 401 animal sera (353 cow, 30 sheep, 10 goat and 8 chicken) in four endemic municipalities in Kosovo. We detected specific antibodies in all animals except in chicken. Seroprevalence in cows is comparable to other endemic areas and correlates to the seroprevalence in humans. No CCHF RNA could be detected in 105 tick samples obtained in 2012 and 2013. Sequencing of CCHFV positive ticks from 2001 revealed that the virus is most closely related to viral strains that were detected in CCHF patients from Kosovo. Results suggest that mild CCHF cases are most probably underdiagnosed and consequently that the burden of disease is higher than reported. Our study provides key information for CCHF surveillance and raises awareness for possible imported cases in CCHF non-endemic countries. PMID:25393542

  13. The Rift Valley Fever virus protein NSm and putative cellular protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever is an infectious viral disease and an emerging problem in many countries of Africa and on the Arabian Peninsula. The causative virus is predominantly transmitted by mosquitoes and high mortality and abortion rates characterize outbreaks in animals while symptoms ranging from mild to life-threatening encephalitis and hemorrhagic fever are noticed among infected humans. For a better prevention and treatment of the infection, an increased knowledge of the infectious process of the virus is required. The focus of this work was to identify protein-protein interactions between the non-structural protein (NSm), encoded by the M-segment of the virus, and host cell proteins. This study was initiated by screening approximately 26 million cDNA clones of a mouse embryonic cDNA library for interactions with the NSm protein using a yeast two-hybrid system. We have identified nine murine proteins that interact with NSm protein of Rift Valley Fever virus, and the putative protein-protein interactions were confirmed by growth selection procedures and β-gal activity measurements. Our results suggest that the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 2 (Cpsf2), the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (cyclophilin)-like 2 protein (Ppil2), and the synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) are the most promising targets for the NSm protein of the virus during an infection. PMID:22838834

  14. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vector mediates postexposure protection against Sudan Ebola hemorrhagic fever in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Geisbert, Thomas W; Daddario-DiCaprio, Kathleen M; Williams, Kinola J N; Geisbert, Joan B; Leung, Anders; Feldmann, Friederike; Hensley, Lisa E; Feldmann, Heinz; Jones, Steven M

    2008-06-01

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors expressing homologous filoviral glycoproteins can completely protect rhesus monkeys against Marburg virus when administered after exposure and can partially protect macaques after challenge with Zaire ebolavirus. Here, we administered a VSV vector expressing the Sudan ebolavirus (SEBOV) glycoprotein to four rhesus macaques shortly after exposure to SEBOV. All four animals survived SEBOV challenge, while a control animal that received a nonspecific vector developed fulminant SEBOV hemorrhagic fever and succumbed. This is the first demonstration of complete postexposure protection against an Ebola virus in nonhuman primates and provides further evidence that postexposure vaccination may have utility in treating exposures to filoviruses.

  15. Oral receptivity of Aedes aegypti from Cape Verde for yellow fever, dengue, and chikungunya viruses.

    PubMed

    Vazeille, Marie; Yébakima, André; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Andriamahefazafy, Barrysson; Correira, Artur; Rodrigues, Julio Monteiro; Veiga, Antonio; Moreira, Antonio; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Grandadam, Marc; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2009, 21,313 cases of dengue-3 virus (DENV-3) were reported in the islands of Cape Verde, an archipelago located in the Atlantic Ocean 570 km from the coast of western Africa. It was the first dengue outbreak ever reported in Cape Verde. Mosquitoes collected in July 2010 in the city of Praia, on the island of Santiago, were identified morphologically as Aedes aegypti formosus. Using experimental oral infections, we found that this vector showed a moderate ability to transmit the epidemic dengue-3 virus, but was highly susceptible to chikungunya and yellow fever viruses.

  16. Punique virus, a novel phlebovirus, related to sandfly fever Naples virus, isolated from sandflies collected in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Zhioua, Elyes; Moureau, Grégory; Chelbi, Ifhem; Ninove, Laetitia; Bichaud, Laurence; Derbali, Mohamed; Champs, Mylène; Cherni, Saifeddine; Salez, Nicolas; Cook, Shelley; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Charrel, Remi N.

    2012-01-01

    Sandflies are widely distributed around the Mediterranean Basin. Therefore, human populations in this area are potentially exposed to sandfly-transmitted diseases, including those caused by phleboviruses. Whilst there are substantial data in countries located in the northern part of the Mediterranean basin, few data are available for North Africa. In this study, a total of 1489 sandflies were collected in 2008 in Tunisia from two sites, bioclimatically distinct, located 235 km apart, and identified morphologically. Sandfly species comprised Phlebotomus perniciosus (52.2 %), Phlebotomus longicuspis (30.1 %), Phlebotomus papatasi (12 .0%), Phlebotomus perfiliewi (4.6 %), Phlebotomus langeroni (0.4 %) and Sergentomyia minuta (0.5 %). PCR screening, using generic primers for the genus Phlebovirus, resulted in the detection of ten positive pools. Sequence analysis revealed that two pools contained viral RNA corresponding to a novel virus closely related to sandfly fever Naples virus. Virus isolation in Vero cells was achieved from one pool. Genetic and phylogenetic characterization based on sequences in the three genomic segments showed that it was a novel virus distinct from other recognized members of the species. This novel virus was provisionally named Punique virus. Viral sequences in the polymerase gene corresponding to another phlebovirus closely related to but distinct from sandfly fever Sicilian virus were obtained from the eight remaining positive pools. PMID:20089800

  17. Characteristics of group A Streptococcus strains circulating during scarlet fever epidemic, Beijing, China, 2011.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhang, Daitao; Wu, Shuangsheng; Liu, Yimeng; Cui, Shujuan; Lu, Guilan; Duan, Wei; Shi, Weixian; Liu, Shuang; Li, Jing; Wang, Quanyi

    2013-06-01

    Scarlet fever is one of a variety of diseases caused by group A Streptococcus (GAS). During 2011, a scarlet fever epidemic characterized by peak monthly incidence rates 2.9-6.7 times higher than those in 2006-2010 occurred in Beijing, China. During the epidemic, hospital-based enhanced surveillance for scarlet fever and pharyngitis was conducted to determine characteristics of circulating GAS strains. The surveillance identified 3,359 clinical cases of scarlet fever or pharyngitis. GAS was isolated from 647 of the patients; 76.4% of the strains were type emm12, and 17.1% were emm1. Almost all isolates harbored superantigens speC and ssa. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, and resistance rates were 96.1% to erythromycin, 93.7% to tetracycline, and 79.4% to clindamycin. Because emm12 type GAS is not the predominant type in other countries, wider surveillance for the possible spread of emm12 type GAS from China to other countries is warranted.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Vaccinia Virus Strain L-IVP

    PubMed Central

    Shvalov, Alexander N.; Sivolobova, Galina F.; Kuligina, Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the live vaccine doses of vaccinia virus donated to the Intensified Smallpox Eradication Programme after 1971 were prepared using the L-IVP strain. A mixture of three clones of the L-IVP strain was sequenced using MySEQ. Consensus sequence similarity with the vaccinia virus Lister strain is 99.5%. PMID:27174282

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Vaccinia Virus Strain L-IVP.

    PubMed

    Shvalov, Alexander N; Sivolobova, Galina F; Kuligina, Elena V; Kochneva, Galina V

    2016-01-01

    Most of the live vaccine doses of vaccinia virus donated to the Intensified Smallpox Eradication Programme after 1971 were prepared using the L-IVP strain. A mixture of three clones of the L-IVP strain was sequenced using MySEQ. Consensus sequence similarity with the vaccinia virus Lister strain is 99.5%. PMID:27174282

  20. Chapare virus, a newly discovered arenavirus isolated from a fatal hemorrhagic fever case in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Simon; Erickson, Bobbie R; Agudo, Roberto; Blair, Patrick J; Vallejo, Efrain; Albariño, César G; Vargas, Jorge; Comer, James A; Rollin, Pierre E; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Olson, James G; Nichol, Stuart T

    2008-04-18

    A small focus of hemorrhagic fever (HF) cases occurred near Cochabamba, Bolivia, in December 2003 and January 2004. Specimens were available from only one fatal case, which had a clinical course that included fever, headache, arthralgia, myalgia, and vomiting with subsequent deterioration and multiple hemorrhagic signs. A non-cytopathic virus was isolated from two of the patient serum samples, and identified as an arenavirus by IFA staining with a rabbit polyvalent antiserum raised against South American arenaviruses known to be associated with HF (Guanarito, Machupo, and Sabiá). RT-PCR analysis and subsequent analysis of the complete virus S and L RNA segment sequences identified the virus as a member of the New World Clade B arenaviruses, which includes all the pathogenic South American arenaviruses. The virus was shown to be most closely related to Sabiá virus, but with 26% and 30% nucleotide difference in the S and L segments, and 26%, 28%, 15% and 22% amino acid differences for the L, Z, N, and GP proteins, respectively, indicating the virus represents a newly discovered arenavirus, for which we propose the name Chapare virus. In conclusion, two different arenaviruses, Machupo and Chapare, can be associated with severe HF cases in Bolivia.

  1. [The vaccines based on the replicon of the venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus against viral hemorrhagic fevers].

    PubMed

    Petrov, A A; Plekhanova, T M; Sidorova, O N; Borisevich, S V; Makhlay, A A

    2015-01-01

    The status of the various recombinant DNA and RNA-derived candidate vaccines, as well as the Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus (VEEV) replicon vaccine system against extremely hazardous viral hemorrhagic fevers, were reviewed. The VEEV-based replication-incompetent vectors offer attractive features in terms of safety, high expression levels of the heterologous viral antigen, tropism to dendritic cells, robust immune responses, protection efficacy, low potential for pre-existing anti-vector immunity and possibility of engineering multivalent vaccines were tested. These features of the VEEV replicon system hold much promise for the development of new generation vaccine candidates against viral hemorrhagic fevers.

  2. Identification of two amino acids within E2 important for the pathogenicity of chimeric classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui; Li, Ling; Zhao, Yu; Tu, Jun; Pan, Zishu

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that a chimeric classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vSM/CE2 containing the E2 gene of the vaccine C-strain on the genetic background of the virulent CSFV strain Shimen (vSM) was attenuated in swine but reversed to virulence after serial passages in PK15 cells. To investigate the molecular basis of the pathogenicity, the genome of the 11th passage vSM/CE2 variant (vSM/CE2-p11) was sequenced, and two amino acid mutations, T745I and M979K, within E2 of vSM/CE2-p11 were observed. Based on reverse genetic manipulation of the chimeric cDNA clone pSM/CE2, the mutated viruses vSM/CE2/T745I, vSMCE2/M979K and vSM/CE2/T745I;M979K were rescued. The data from infection of pigs demonstrated that the M979K amino acid substitution was responsible for pathogenicity. Studies in vitro indicated that T745I and M979K increased infectious virus production and replication. Our results indicated that two residues located at sites 745 and 979 within E2 play a key role in determining the replication in vitro and pathogenicity in vivo of chimeric CSFV vSM/CE2. PMID:26454191

  3. Development of a novel single-step reverse genetics system for the generation of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Pang, Huining; Wu, Rui; Zhang, Yanwen; Tan, Yiluo; Pan, Zishu

    2016-07-01

    We describe an alternative reverse genetics system for generating classical swine fever virus (CSFV) based on swine RNA polymerase I promoter (pSPI)-mediated vRNA transcription. The recombinant plasmid pSPTI/SM harboring a full-length CSFV Shimen strain cDNA, flanked by a swine RNA polymerase I (pol I) promoter sequence at the 5' end and a murine pol I terminator sequence at the 3' end, was constructed. When the plasmid pSPTI/SM was introduced into PK-15 cells by transfection, an infectious CSFV with termini identical to those of the parental virus was generated directly. CSFV rescued from this reverse genetics system exhibited similar growth kinetics and plaque formation compared with the parental CSFV. When the novel reverse genetics system was used to generate the CSFV vaccine C-strain, infectious virus was detected in the supernatant of PK-15 cells transfected with the recombinant plasmid pSPTI/C. This novel reverse genetics system is a simple and efficient tool for the investigation of the structure and function of the viral genome, for molecular pathogenicity studies, and for the development of genetically engineered vaccines for CSFV. PMID:27068166

  4. The status of dengue fever virus in South Africa--serological studies and diagnosis of a case of dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, N K; Meenehan, G; Aldridge, N

    1987-01-01

    To assess the possibility of a dengue epidemic occurring in South Africa 3 groups of survey sera and 2 groups of patients' sera, from a dengue high risk area of South Africa, were tested for antibodies to several flaviviruses. 3.8% (75/1951) of the survey sera and 9.2% (26/282) of the patients' sera had haemagglutination inhibition antibodies to one or more of the flaviviruses tested. One of 1951 survey sera had a spectrum of complement fixation antibody consistent with a primary dengue infection, and 5 of 282 patients' sera also had complement fixation antibodies to flavivirus antigens. These 5 positive patients had recently travelled to India but in only one was there an antibody spectrum unequivocably consistent with a primary dengue infection. Dengue virus type 1 was successfully isolated from this patient's acute serum. The susceptibility of the population to dengue virus infection, the presence of the main vector of dengue virus and the occurrence of imported cases of dengue fever emphasize the need for continuous vigilance.

  5. Interaction of structural core protein of Classical Swine Fever Virus with endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway protein OS9

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) Core protein is involved in virus RNA protection, transcription regulation and virus virulence. To discover additional Core protein functions a yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify host proteins that interact with Core. Among the identified host proteins, t...

  6. Identification of a Novel Virulence Determinant Within the E2 Structural Glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) E2 glycoprotein contains a discrete epitope (TAVSPTTLR, residues 829-837 of CSFV polyprotein) recognized by monoclonal antibody (mAb) WH303, used to differentiate CSFV from related ruminant Pestiviruses, Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) and Border Disease Virus ...

  7. Animal models for some important RNA viruses of public health concern in SEARO countries: viral hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Badole, Sachin L; Yadav, Pragya D; Patil, Dilip R; Mourya, Devendra T

    2015-03-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) are major public health problems in the South-East Asia Regional (SEAR) countries. VHFs are a group of illnesses; that are caused by four families of viruses, viz. Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae, Filoviridae and Flaviviridae. All VHFs have common features: they affect several organs and damage the blood vessels. These symptoms are often accompanied by hemorrhage. To understand pathogenesis, genetic and environmental influence that increase the risk of VHFs, efficacy and safety studies on candidate vaccines and testing of various therapeutic agents, appropriate animal models are essential tools in public and animals health. In the current review, the suitable animal models for Flavivirus [Dengue hemorhagic fever (DHF), Kyasanur forest disease (KFD)]; Bunyavirus [Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF), Hantavirus fever (HF)]; and Paramyxovirus [Nipah virus fever (NiV)] have been reviewed with specific emphasis on emerging and reemerging viruses in SEAR countries.

  8. Dengue virus 3 genotype 1 associated with dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barcelos Figueiredo, Leandra; Batista Cecílio, Alzira; Portela Ferreira, Gustavo; Paiva Drumond, Betânia; Germano de Oliveira, Jaquelline; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio; Peregrino Ferreira, Paulo César; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2008-02-01

    Dengue serotype 3 viruses were isolated from patients in Brazil from 2002 through 2004. On the basis of phylogenetic analyses, these isolates were assigned genotype 1. This genotype had never been reported in South America before. Its appearance indicates a major risk factor for dengue epidemics and severe disease.

  9. [Population genetics of dengue virus and transmission of dengue fever].

    PubMed

    Falcón-Lezama, Jorge; Sánchez-Burgos, Gilma Guadalupe; Ramos-Castañeda, José

    2009-01-01

    The endemic behavior of dengue fever in Mexico during the past five years is of major concern to every sector related with public health and the effort to control the transmission has been focused on vector control. However, regardless of the effectiveness of the intervention measures it is important to know which elements determine dengue transmission. With regard to the molecular basis for dengue transmission, a great deal of progress has been made due to the introduction of genomic and bioinformatic approaches. The goal of this review is to describe the most recent developments in this area with emphasis on the Mexican situation.

  10. Interplay between the Virus and Host in Rift Valley Fever Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Kaori; Makino, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) belongs to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, and carries single-stranded tripartite RNA segments. The virus is transmitted by mosquitoes and has caused large outbreaks among ruminants and humans in sub-Saharan African and Middle East countries. The disease is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, headache, muscle pain, joint pain, photophobia, and weakness. In most cases, patients recover from the disease after a period of weeks, but some also develop retinal or macular changes, which result in vision impairment that lasts for an undefined period of time, and severe disease, characterized by hemorrhagic fever or encephalitis. The virus also causes febrile illness resulting in a high rate of spontaneous abortions in ruminants. The handling of wild-type RVFV requires high-containment facilities, including biosafety level 4 or enhanced biosafety level 3 laboratories. Nonetheless, studies clarifying the mechanisms of the RVFV-induced diseases and preventing them are areas of active research throughout the world. By primarily referring to recent studies using several animal model systems, protein expression systems, and specific mutant viruses, this review describes the current knowledge about the mechanisms of pathogenesis of RVF and biological functions of various viral proteins that affect RVFV pathogenicity.

  11. Interplay between the Virus and Host in Rift Valley Fever Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Kaori; Makino, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) belongs to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, and carries single-stranded tripartite RNA segments. The virus is transmitted by mosquitoes and has caused large outbreaks among ruminants and humans in sub-Saharan African and Middle East countries. The disease is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, headache, muscle pain, joint pain, photophobia, and weakness. In most cases, patients recover from the disease after a period of weeks, but some also develop retinal or macular changes, which result in vision impairment that lasts for an undefined period of time, and severe disease, characterized by hemorrhagic fever or encephalitis. The virus also causes febrile illness resulting in a high rate of spontaneous abortions in ruminants. The handling of wild-type RVFV requires high-containment facilities, including biosafety level 4 or enhanced biosafety level 3 laboratories. Nonetheless, studies clarifying the mechanisms of the RVFV-induced diseases and preventing them are areas of active research throughout the world. By primarily referring to recent studies using several animal model systems, protein expression systems, and specific mutant viruses, this review describes the current knowledge about the mechanisms of pathogenesis of RVF and biological functions of various viral proteins that affect RVFV pathogenicity. PMID:25766761

  12. Zika virus, a cause of fever in Central Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Olson, J G; Ksiazek, T G; Suhandiman; Triwibowo

    1981-01-01

    In 1977 and 1978 selected in-patients at the Tegalyoso Hospital, Klaten, Indonesia who had recent onsets of acute fever were serologically studied for evidence for alphavirus and flavivirus infections. A brief clinical history was taken and a check list of signs and symptoms was completed on admission. Acute and convalescent phase sera from 30 patients who showed evidence that a flavivirus had caused their illnesses were tested for neutralizing antibodies to several flaviviruses which occur in South-east Asia. Paired sera from seven patients demonstrated a fourfold rise in antibody titre from acute to convalescent phase. The most common clinical manifestations observed in this series of patients included high fever, malaise, stomach ache, dizziness and anorexia. None of the seven patients had headache or rash despite the fact that headache and rash had been associated with two of the three previously studied. The onsets of illness clustered toward the end of the rainy season when populations of Aedes aegypti, a probable vector in Malaysia, were most abundant.

  13. Deletion of the thymidine kinase gene induces complete attenuation of the Georgia isolate of African swine fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal viral disease of domestic pigs. There are no vaccines to control Africa swine fever (ASF). Experimental vaccines have been developed using genetically modified live attenuated ASFVs obtained by specifically de...

  14. Drosophila melanogaster does not exhibit a behavioural fever response when infected with Drosophila C virus.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Pieter A; White, Craig R; Johnson, Karyn N

    2015-12-01

    Behavioural fever is a widely conserved response to infection. The host increases body temperature (Tb) by altering their preferred temperature (Tp), generating a fever and delaying or avoiding pathogen-induced mortality. This response is not ubiquitous in insects, however, although few studies have investigated this response to viral infection. Here, we examined the change in Tp of Drosophila in response to virus infection using a thermal gradient. No difference in Tp was observed. We suggest that the lack of behavioural fever could be due to the increased energy cost of maintaining a higher Tb whilst the immune response is active. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to assay for changes in Tp of infected Drosophila.

  15. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Clades V and VI (Europe 1 and 2) in Ticks in Kosovo, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Muji, Skender; Robaj, Avni; Ahmeti, Salih; Jakupi, Xhevat; Emmerich, Petra; Krüger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Despite being a small country, Kosovo represents one of the few foci of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) in Europe. The distribution of Kosovar tick vectors and the evolution of CCHF virus in ticks are both as yet unknown. A better description of the extent and the genetic diversity of CCHFV in ticks from endemic settings is essential, in order to be controlled. We investigated the 2012 distribution of Kosovar ticks alongside the prevalence and the phylogeography of tick-derived CCHFV. Hyalomma marginatum dominated in the endemic municipalities with 90.2% versus 24.3% in the non-endemic regions. Of 1,102 tested ticks, 40 (3.6%) were CCHFV-positive, belonging to H. marginatum (29), Rhipicephalus bursa (10), and Ixodes ricinus (1). The virus strains clustered with clade V and VI related sequences. They fell into two lineages: Kosovo I and II. Kosovo I comprised strains recovered exclusively from R. bursa ticks and was closely related to AP92 prototype strain. Kosovo II clustered into Kosovo IIa, including human-derived strains, and IIb including only strains detected in H. marginatum and I. ricinus. Our phylogeographic reconstruction suggests two temporally distinct CCHFV introductions: the most probable location of the most recent common ancestor of Kosovo I lineage was in Greece (63 years ago) and that of lineages IIa-b in Turkey (35 years ago). After each CCHFV introduction into Kosovo, subsequent lineage expansions suggest periods of in situ evolution. The study provides the first insight into the genetic variability and the origin of CCHFV in ticks from Kosovo. Our findings indicate the spreading of CCHFV to non-endemic areas, which underlines the importance of further studies in order to monitor and predict future CCHF outbreaks in Kosovo. The AP92-like strains appear to be more widespread than previously thought and may provide a promising target for experimental studies due to their assumed low pathogenicity. PMID:25255381

  16. Establishment of a nanoparticle-assisted RT-PCR assay to distinguish field strains and attenuated strains of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Wang, Gui-Hua; Cui, Yu-Dong; Cui, Shang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) can cause serious disease and even death in neonatal piglets, resulting in serious damage to the swine industry worldwide. Open reading frame 3 (ORF3) is the only accessory gene in the PEDV genome. Previous studies have indicated that PEDV vaccine strains have a partial deletion in ORF3. In this study, a nanoparticle-assisted polymerase chain reaction (nanoparticle-assisted RT-PCR) assay targeting the ORF3 of PEDV was developed to distinguish PEDV field strains from attenuated strains by using a specific pair of primers. The PCR products of field strains and attenuated strains were 264 bp and 215 bp in length, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of this assay were also assessed. The nanoparticle-assisted RT-PCR assay was 10-100 times more sensitive than the conventional RT-PCR assay, with no cross-reactions when amplifying porcine pseudorabies virus (PRV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), classical swine fever virus (CSFV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine rotavirus (RV), and porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). The nanoparticle-assisted RT-PCR assay we describe here can be used to distinguish field strains from vaccine strains of PEDV, and it shows promise for reducing economic loss due to PEDV infection. PMID:27287433

  17. MP-12 virus containing the clone 13 deletion in the NSs gene prevents lethal disease when administered after Rift Valley fever virus infection in hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, Brian B.; Westover, Jonna B.; Sefing, Eric J.; Bailey, Kevin W.; Nishiyama, Shoko; Wandersee, Luci; Scharton, Dionna; Jung, Kie-Hoon; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Bunyaviridae, Phlebovirus) causes a range of illnesses that include retinitis, fulminant hepatitis, neurologic disease, and hemorrhagic fever. In hospitalized individuals, case fatality rates can be as high as 10–20%. There are no vaccines or antivirals approved for human use to prevent or treat severe RVFV infections. We previously tested the efficacy of the MP-12 vaccine strain and related variants with NSs truncations as a post-exposure prophylaxis in mice infected with wild-type pathogenic RVFV strain ZH501. Post-exposure efficacy of the rMP12-C13type, a recombinant MP-12 vaccine virus which encodes an in-frame truncation removing 69% of the NSs protein, resulted in 30% survival when administering the virus within 30 min of subcutaneous ZH501 challenge in mice, while the parental MP-12 virus conferred no protection by post-exposure vaccination. Here, we demonstrate uniform protection of hamsters by post-exposure vaccination with rMP12-C13type administered 6 h post-ZH501 infection while no efficacy was observed with the parental MP-12 virus. Notably, both the MP-12 and rMP12-C13type viruses were highly effective (100% protection) when administered 21 days prior to challenge. In a subsequent study delaying vaccination until 8, 12, and 24 h post-RVFV exposure, we observed 80, 70, and 30% survival, respectively. Our findings indicate that the rapid protective innate immune response elicited by rMP12-C13type may be due to the truncated NSs protein, suggesting that the resulting functional inactivation of NSs plays an important role in the observed post-exposure efficacy. Taken together, the data demonstrate that post-exposure vaccination with rMP12-C13type is effective in limiting ZH501 replication and associated disease in standard pre-exposure vaccination and post-challenge treatment models of RVFV infection, and suggest an extended post-exposure prophylaxis window beyond that initially observed in mice. PMID:26175722

  18. Assessment of Recombination in the S-segment Genome of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Chinikar, Sadegh; Shah-Hosseini, Nariman; Bouzari, Saeid; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Jalali, Tahmineh; Khakifirouz, Sahar; Groschup, Martin H; Niedrig, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (CCHFV) belongs to genus Nairovirus and family Bunyaviridae. The main aim of this study was to investigate the extent of recombination in S-segment genome of CCHFV in Iran. Methods: Samples were isolated from Iranian patients and those available in GenBank, and analyzed by phylogenetic and bootscan methods. Results: Through comparison of the phylogenetic trees based on full length sequences and partial fragments in the S-segment genome of CCHFV, genetic switch was evident, due to recombination event. Moreover, evidence of multiple recombination events was detected in query isolates when bootscan analysis was used by SimPlot software. Conclusion: Switch of different genomic regions between different strains by recombination could contribute to CCHFV diversification and evolution. The occurrence of recombination in CCHFV has a critical impact on epidemiological investigations and vaccine design. PMID:27047968

  19. Mechanistic Insight into the Host Transcription Inhibition Function of Rift Valley Fever Virus NSs and Its Importance in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Kaori; Ramirez, Sydney I.; Makino, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the genus Phlebovirus within the family Bunyaviridae, causes periodic outbreaks in livestocks and humans in countries of the African continent and Middle East. RVFV NSs protein, a nonstructural protein, is a major virulence factor that exhibits several important biological properties. These include suppression of general transcription, inhibition of IFN-β promoter induction and degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase R. Although each of these biological functions of NSs are considered important for countering the antiviral response in the host, the individual contributions of these functions towards RVFV virulence remains unclear. To examine this, we generated two RVFV MP-12 strain-derived mutant viruses. Each carried mutations in NSs that specifically targeted its general transcription inhibition function without affecting its ability to degrade PKR and inhibit IFN-β promoter induction, through its interaction with Sin3-associated protein 30, a part of the repressor complex at the IFN-β promoter. Using these mutant viruses, we have dissected the transcription inhibition function of NSs and examined its importance in RVFV virulence. Both NSs mutant viruses exhibited a differentially impaired ability to inhibit host transcription when compared with MP-12. It has been reported that NSs suppresses general transcription by interfering with the formation of the transcription factor IIH complex, through the degradation of the p62 subunit and sequestration of the p44 subunit. Our study results lead us to suggest that the ability of NSs to induce p62 degradation is the major contributor to its general transcription inhibition property, whereas its interaction with p44 may not play a significant role in this function. Importantly, RVFV MP-12-NSs mutant viruses with an impaired general transcription inhibition function showed a reduced cytotoxicity in cell culture and attenuated virulence in young mice

  20. Construction, Safety, and Immunogenicity in Nonhuman Primates of a Chimeric Yellow Fever-Dengue Virus Tetravalent Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Guirakhoo, F.; Arroyo, J.; Pugachev, K. V.; Miller, C.; Zhang, Z.-X.; Weltzin, R.; Georgakopoulos, K.; Catalan, J.; Ocran, S.; Soike, K.; Ratterree, M.; Monath, T. P.

    2001-01-01

    We previously reported construction of a chimeric yellow fever-dengue type 2 virus (YF/DEN2) and determined its safety and protective efficacy in rhesus monkeys (F. Guirakhoo et al., J. Virol. 74:5477–5485, 2000). In this paper, we describe construction of three additional YF/DEN chimeras using premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes of wild-type (WT) clinical isolates: DEN1 (strain PUO359, isolated in 1980 in Thailand), DEN3 (strain PaH881/88, isolated in 1988 in Thailand), and DEN4 (strain 1228, isolated in 1978 in Indonesia). These chimeric viruses (YF/DEN1, YF/DEN3, and YF/DEN4) replicated to ∼7.5 log10 PFU/ml in Vero cells, were not neurovirulent in 3- to 4-week-old ICR mice inoculated by the intracerebral route, and were immunogenic in monkeys. All rhesus monkeys inoculated subcutaneously with one dose of these chimeric viruses (as monovalent or tetravalent formulation) developed viremia with magnitudes similar to that of the YF 17D vaccine strain (YF-VAX) but significantly lower than those of their parent WT viruses. Eight of nine monkeys inoculated with monovalent YF/DEN1 -3, or -4 vaccine and six of six monkeys inoculated with tetravalent YF/DEN1-4 vaccine seroconverted after a single dose. When monkeys were boosted with a tetravalent YF/DEN1-4 dose 6 months later, four of nine monkeys in the monovalent YF/DEN groups developed low levels of viremia, whereas no viremia was detected in any animals previously inoculated with either YF/DEN1-4 vaccine or WT DEN virus. An anamnestic response was observed in all monkeys after the second dose. No statistically significant difference in levels of neutralizing antibodies was observed between YF virus-immune and nonimmune monkeys which received the tetravalent YF/DEN1-4 vaccine or between tetravalent YF/DEN1-4-immune and nonimmune monkeys which received the YF-VAX. However, preimmune monkeys developed either no detectable viremia or a level of viremia lower than that in nonimmune controls. This is the first

  1. A Virus-Like Particle System Identifies the Endonuclease Domain of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Devignot, Stephanie; Bergeron, Eric; Nichol, Stuart; Mirazimi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV; genus Nairovirus) is an extremely pathogenic member of the Bunyaviridae family. Since handling of the virus requires a biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) facility, little is known about pathomechanisms and host interactions. Here, we describe the establishment of a transcriptionally competent virus-like particle (tc-VLP) system for CCHFV. Recombinant polymerase (L), nucleocapsid protein (N) and a reporter minigenome expressed in human HuH-7 cells resulted in formation of transcriptionally active nucleocapsids that could be packaged by coexpressed CCHFV glycoproteins into tc-VLPs. The tc-VLPs resembled authentic virus particles in their protein composition and neutralization sensitivity to anti-CCHFV antibodies and could recapitulate all steps of the viral replication cycle. Particle attachment, entry, and primary transcription were modeled by infection of naive cells. The subsequent steps of genome replication, secondary transcription, and particle assembly and release can be obtained upon passaging the tc-VLPs on cells expressing CCHFV structural proteins. The utility of the VLP system was demonstrated by showing that the endonuclease domain of L is located around amino acid D693, as was predicted in silico by B. Morin et al. (PLoS Pathog 6:e1001038, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1001038). The tc-VLP system will greatly facilitate studies and diagnostics of CCHFV under non-BSL-4 conditions. IMPORTANCE Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is an extremely virulent pathogen of humans. Since the virus can be handled only at the highest biosafety level, research is restricted to a few specialized laboratories. We developed a plasmid-based system to produce virus-like particles with the ability to infect cells and transcribe a reporter genome. Due to the absence of viral genes, the virus-like particles are unable to spread or cause disease, thus allowing study of aspects of CCHFV biology under relaxed

  2. Seroprevalence of yellow fever virus in selected health facilities in Western Kenya from 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Kwallah, Allan ole; Inoue, Shingo; Thairu-Muigai, Anne Wangari; Kuttoh, Nancy; Morita, Kouichi; Mwau, Matilu

    2015-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF), which is caused by a mosquito-borne virus, is an important viral hemorrhagic fever endemic in equatorial Africa and South America. Yellow fever virus (YFV) is the prototype of the family Flaviviridae and genus Flavivirus. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of YFV in selected health facilities in Western Kenya during the period 2010-2012. A total of 469 serum samples from febrile patients were tested for YFV antibodies using in-house IgM-capture ELISA, in-house indirect IgG ELISA, and 50% focus reduction neutralization test (FRNT50). The present study did not identify any IgM ELISA-positive cases, indicating absence of recent YFV infection in the area. Twenty-eight samples (6%) tested positive for YFV IgG, because of either YFV vaccination or past exposure to various flaviviruses including YFV. Five cases were confirmed by FRNT50; of these, 4 were either vaccination or natural infection during the YF outbreak in 1992-1993 or another period and 1 case was confirmed as a West Nile virus infection. Domestication and routine performance of arboviral differential diagnosis will help to address the phenomenon of pyrexia of unknown origin, contribute to arboviral research in developing countries, and enhance regular surveillance.

  3. Interferon Response Factors 3 and 7 Protect against Chikungunya Virus Hemorrhagic Fever and Shock

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Penny A.; Wilson, Jane; Gardner, Joy; Larcher, Thibaut; Babarit, Candice; Le, Thuy T.; Anraku, Itaru; Kumagai, Yutaro; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael; Akira, Shizuo; Khromykh, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infections can produce severe disease and mortality. Here we show that CHIKV infection of adult mice deficient in interferon response factors 3 and 7 (IRF3/7−/−) is lethal. Mortality was associated with undetectable levels of alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) in serum, ∼50- and ∼10-fold increases in levels of IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), respectively, increased virus replication, edema, vasculitis, hemorrhage, fever followed by hypothermia, oliguria, thrombocytopenia, and raised hematocrits. These features are consistent with hemorrhagic shock and were also evident in infected IFN-α/β receptor-deficient mice. In situ hybridization suggested CHIKV infection of endothelium, fibroblasts, skeletal muscle, mononuclear cells, chondrocytes, and keratinocytes in IRF3/7−/− mice; all but the latter two stained positive in wild-type mice. Vaccination protected IRF3/7−/− mice, suggesting that defective antibody responses were not responsible for mortality. IPS-1- and TRIF-dependent pathways were primarily responsible for IFN-α/β induction, with IRF7 being upregulated >100-fold in infected wild-type mice. These studies suggest that inadequate IFN-α/β responses following virus infection can be sufficient to induce hemorrhagic fever and shock, a finding with implications for understanding severe CHIKV disease and dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. PMID:22761364

  4. Hemorrhagic fever in Cambodia is caused by dengue viruses: evidence for transmission of all four serotypes.

    PubMed

    Rathavuth, H; Vaughn, D W; Minn, K; Nimmannitya, S; Nisalak, A; Raengsakulrach, B; Rorabaugh, M L; Yuvatha, K; Sophal, O

    1997-03-01

    Hemorrhagic fever (HF) has been widespread in Cambodia and thought to be due to dengue virus although laboratory confirmation has been lacking. Between 1980 and 1995, 49,420 cases of HF and 3,032 deaths were reported. Cases increased during this period; large epidemics of HF occurred every two to three years. In 1995 there were 10,208 cases of HF with 424 deaths. Over a two day period in August 1995, 40 consecutive cases were investigated at the National Pediatric Hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. All 40 cases were confirmed as dengue by virus identification and/or serology. Mean age was 6.5 years. Of 39 patients with complete medical records, the diagnoses were: dengue fever (n = 3), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) grade 2 (n = 21), DHF grade 3 (n = 10), and DHF grade 4 (n = 5). The serologic response was secondary in 95%. Dengue virus was identified in 13 of 40 cases. All four dengue serotypes were identified. The high frequency of secondary infections, the low mean age of admission, and identification of all four dengue serotypes support the national statistics to show that DHF is highly endemic in Cambodia.

  5. In vitro inhibition of the replication of classical swine fever virus by porcine Mx1 protein.

    PubMed

    He, Dan-ni; Zhang, Xiao-min; Liu, Ke; Pang, Ran; Zhao, Jin; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Pu-yan

    2014-04-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative pathogen of classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious disease of swine. Mx proteins are interferon-induced dynamin-like GTPases present in all vertebrates with a wide range of antiviral activities. Although Zhao et al. (2011) have reported that human MxA can inhibit CSFV replication, whether porcine Mx1 (poMx1) has anti-CSFV activity remains unknown. In this study, we generated a cell line designated PK-15/EGFP-poMx1 which expressed porcine Mx1 protein constitutively, and we observed that the proliferation of progeny virus in this cell line was significantly inhibited as measured by virus titration, indirect immune fluorescence assay, Q-PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, when PTD-poMx1 fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli (Zhang et al., 2013) was used to treat CSFV-infected PK-15 cells, the results showed that PTD-poMx1 inhibited CSFV replication in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the proliferation of progeny virus was inhibited as measured by virus titration and Q-PCR. Overall, the results demonstrated that poMx1 effectively inhibited CSFV replication, suggesting that poMx1 may be a valuable therapeutic agent against CSFV infection.

  6. Each of the eight simian hemorrhagic fever virus minor structural proteins is functionally important

    PubMed Central

    Vatter, Heather A.; Di, Han; Donaldson, Eric F.; Baric, Ralph S.; Brinton, Margo A.

    2014-01-01

    The simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) genome differs from those of other members of the family Arterivirus in encoding two adjacent sets of four minor structural protein open reading frames (ORFs). A stable, full-length, infectious SHFV-LVR cDNA clone was constructed. Virus produced from this clone had replication characteristics similar to those of the parental virus. A subgenomic mRNA was identified for the SHFV ORF previously identified as 2b. As an initial means of analyzing the functional relevance of each of the SHFV minor structural proteins, a set of mutant infectious clones was generated, each with the start codon of one minor structural protein ORF mutated. Different phenotypes were observed for each ortholog of the pairs of minor glycoproteins and all of the eight minor structural proteins were required for the production of infectious extracellular virus indicating that the duplicated sets of SHFV minor structural proteins are not functionally redundant. PMID:25036340

  7. Efficient, trans-complementing packaging systems for chimeric, pseudoinfectious dengue 2/yellow fever viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Shustov, Alexandr V.

    2010-04-25

    In our previous studies, we have stated to build a new strategy for developing defective, pseudoinfectious flaviviruses (PIVs) and applying them as a new type of vaccine candidates. PIVs combined the efficiency of live vaccines with the safety of inactivated or subunit vaccines. The results of the present work demonstrate further development of chimeric PIVs encoding dengue virus 2 (DEN2V) glycoproteins and yellow fever virus (YFV)-derived replicative machinery as potential vaccine candidates. The newly designed PIVs have synergistically functioning mutations in the prM and NS2A proteins, which abolish processing of the latter proteins and make the defective viruses capable of producing either only noninfectious, immature and/or subviral DEN2V particles. The PIV genomes can be packaged to high titers into infectious virions in vitro using the NS1-deficient YFV helper RNAs, and both PIVs and helpers can then be passaged as two-component genome viruses at an escalating scale.

  8. Development of single dilution immunoassay to detect E2 protein specific classical swine fever virus antibody.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Barman, Nagendra N; Khatoon, Elina; Kumar, Sachin

    2016-04-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of a highly contagious disease in swine. The disease is endemic in different parts of the world and vaccination is the only way to protect pigs from CSFV infection. The virus surface protein E2 is the major immunogenic protein eliciting protective immunity against CSFV infection in swine. The whole virus antigen cannot differentiate CSFV from other pestiviruses as it cross reacts with border disease and bovine viral diarrhoea viruses. Commercial available ELISA is based on the whole CSFV particle and can lead to false positive results. Moreover, the available commercial ELISA is not cost effective. In the present study, a recombinant E2 protein based single serum dilution ELISA was developed which showed enhanced sensitivity, specificity and accuracy as compared to commercial CSFV detection ELISA. The recombinant E2 protein based ELISA could be an alternate to existing diagnostics against CSFV infection in pigs. PMID:27032503

  9. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Reconstructions of Rift Valley Fever Virus: The 2010 Northern Mauritania Outbreak in the Camelus dromedarius Species

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Modou M.; Thiongane, Yaya; Diop, Mariame; Isselmou, Katia; Doumbia, Baba; Baba, Mohammed Ould; El Arbi, Ahmed S.; Lancelot, Renaud; Kane, Y.; Albina, Emmanuel; Cêtre-Sossah, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rift valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne disease of domestic and wild ruminants caused by RVF virus (RVFV), a phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae). RVF is widespread in Sub-Saharan Africa. In September of 2010, an RVF outbreak occurred in northern Mauritania involving mass abortions in small ruminants and camels (Camelus dromedarius) and at least 63 human clinical cases, including 13 deaths. In camels, serological prevalence was 27.5–38.5% (95% confidence interval, n=279). For the first time, clinical signs other than abortions were reported in this species, including hemorrhagic septicemia and severe respiratory distress in animals. We assessed the presence of RVFV in camel sera sampled during this outbreak and generated whole-genome sequences of RVFV to determine the possible origin of this RVFV strain. Phylogenetic analyses suggested a shared ancestor between the Mauritania 2010 strain and strains from Zimbabwe (2269, 763, and 2373), Kenya (155_57 and 56IB8), South Africa (Kakamas, SA75 and SA51VanWyck), Uganda (Entebbe), and other strains linked to the 1987 outbreak of RVF in Mauritania (OS1, OS3, OS8, and OS9). PMID:25514121

  10. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Antigen Detection Using Monoclonal Antibodies to the Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fukuma, Aiko; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Tani, Hideki; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Kurosu, Takeshi; Egawa, Kazutaka; Suda, Yuto; Singh, Harpal; Nomachi, Taro; Gokuden, Mutsuyo; Ando, Katsuyuki; Kida, Kouji; Kan, Miki; Kato, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Akira; Kitamoto, Hiroaki; Sato, Yuko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is a tick-borne infectious disease with a high case fatality rate, and is caused by the SFTS virus (SFTSV). SFTS is endemic to China, South Korea, and Japan. The viral RNA level in sera of patients with SFTS is known to be strongly associated with outcomes. Virological SFTS diagnosis with high sensitivity and specificity are required in disease endemic areas. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated novel monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the SFTSV nucleocapsid (N) protein and developed a sandwich antigen (Ag)-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of N protein of SFTSV using MAb and polyclonal antibody as capture and detection antibodies, respectively. The Ag-capture system was capable of detecting at least 350–1220 TCID50/100 μl/well from the culture supernatants of various SFTSV strains. The efficacy of the Ag-capture ELISA in SFTS diagnosis was evaluated using serum samples collected from patients suspected of having SFTS in Japan. All 24 serum samples (100%) containing high copy numbers of viral RNA (>105 copies/ml) showed a positive reaction in the Ag-capture ELISA, whereas 12 out of 15 serum samples (80%) containing low copy numbers of viral RNA (<105 copies/ml) showed a negative reaction in the Ag-capture ELISA. Among these Ag-capture ELISA-negative 12 samples, 9 (75%) were positive for IgG antibodies against SFTSV. Conclusions The newly developed Ag-capture ELISA is useful for SFTS diagnosis in acute phase patients with high levels of viremia. PMID:27045364

  11. Rift Valley fever virus: a seroepidemiologic study of small terrestrial vertebrates in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, A; Oelofsen, M J; Smith, M S; van der Ryst, E

    1997-12-01

    Epizootics of Rift Valley fever (RVF) are often associated with periods of heavy rainfall, which are favorable for mosquito vectors. However, in seasons with normal or low rainfall, enzootic circulation occurs, suggesting the existence of a natural host that can act as a cryptic carrier during interepizootic periods. To confirm the role of heavy rainfall in epizootic circulation, and to identify a possible natural host of RVF virus, serum samples from small terrestrial mammals in the Free State and Northern Cape regions of South Africa were collected before and after the 1988 floods. These areas are known to support epizootic circulation of RVF virus. The samples were tested for the presence of RVF virus-specific IgG using an ELISA and positive sera were confirmed by a neutralization test. Forty-seven (15%) of 312 Aethomys namaquensis (Namaqua rock rat) had antibodies to RVF virus. Of these positive sera, nine (6%) of 141 were collected before the floods of 1988 and 38 (22%) of 171 were collected afterwards (P = 0.001). Naive A. namaquensis were inoculated with RVF virus and developed a viremia, but no clinical symptoms, suggesting that they can act as temporary asymptomatic carriers of the virus. These results suggest a role for A. namaquensis as a cryptic carrier for RVF virus during interepizootic periods and support the results of other studies suggesting an amplifying role for heavy rainfall in the circulation of RVF virus. PMID:9430529

  12. Post-Exposure Vaccination with MP-12 Lacking NSs Protects Mice Against Lethal Rift Valley Fever Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, Brian B.; Bailey, Kevin W.; Scharton, Dionna; Vest, Zachery; Westover, Jonna B.; Skirpstunas, Ramona; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes severe disease in humans and livestock. There are currently no approved antivirals or vaccines for the treatment or prevention of RVF disease in humans. A major virulence factor of RVFV is the NSs protein, which inhibits host transcription including the interferon (IFN)-β gene and promotes the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase, PKR. We analyzed the efficacy of the live-attenuated MP-12 vaccine strain and MP-12 variants that lack the NSs protein as post-exposure vaccinations. Although parental MP-12 failed to elicit a protective effect in mice challenged with wild-type (wt) RVFV by the intranasal route, significant protection was demonstrated by vaccination with MP-12 strains lacking NSs when they were administered at 20 to 30 min post-exposure. Viremia and virus replication in liver, spleen and brain were also inhibited by post-exposure vaccination with MP-12 lacking NSs. The protective effect was mostly lost when vaccination was delayed 6 or 24 h after intranasal RVFV challenge. When mice were challenged subcutaneously, efficacy of MP-12 lacking NSs was diminished, most likely due to more rapid dissemination of wt RVFV. Our findings suggest that post-exposure vaccination with MP-12 lacking NSs may be developed as a novel post-exposure treatment to prevent RVF. PMID:23523764

  13. Detection of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Hanta, and sandfly fever viruses by real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sofi M; Aitichou, Mohamed; Hardick, Justin; Blow, Jamie; O'Guinn, Monica L; Schmaljohn, Connie

    2011-01-01

    The development of sensitive and specific nucleic acid diagnostic assays for viral pathogens is essential for proper medical intervention. This chapter describes four fluorescence-based PCR assays to detect the Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHFV), Andes (ANDV), Hantaan (HANV), and Sandfly Fever Sicilian (SFSV) Viruses. These assays are based on species-specific hydrolysis probes targeting the nucleocapsid protein gene for CCHFV and SFSV and the glycoprotein gene for ANDV and HANV. All four assays were optimized for LightCycler 2.0 (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN) or Ruggedized Advanced Pathogen Identification Device (R.A.P.I.D.; Idaho Technology Inc., Salt Lake City, UT). The assays were evaluated using the protocols described in the Subheading 3. The limits of detection were approximately 5, 2, 2, and 5 plaque-forming units (PFUs) for CCHFV, ANDV, HTNV, and SFSV assays, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the assays were evaluated with test panels that consisted of 20-60 known positive and 30-135 known negative samples, representing 7-34 genetically diverse bacterial and viral species. The CCHFV assay detected 59 out of the 60 positive samples and no false positives, resulting in 98.3% sensitivity at LOD of 5 PFU and 100% specificity. The ANDV and HTNV assays correctly identified all the positive samples with no false positive reactions; therefore, the sensitivity and specificity of these assays were determined to be 100% at LOD of 2 PFU. The SFSV assay missed three positive samples and cross-reacted with one of 48 negative samples, resulting in 95% sensitivity at LOD of 5 PFU and 98% specificity.

  14. [Behavior of Argentine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus strains in rodents].

    PubMed

    Saavedra, María del Cármen; Ambrosio, Ana M; Riera, Laura; Sabattini, Marta S

    2007-01-01

    The activity of LCM virus was first reported in Argentina at the beginning of the seventies and only five strains have been isolated from rodents Mus domesticus and two from humans. The objective of this paper was to find differential biological characteristics of Argentine strains of LCM virus comparing them in relation to the historical strains WE and Armstrong. Regarding the results obtained in tissue culture, when L 929 cells were used, plaque forming units (PFU) were obtained with human and mouse strains, whilst on Vero cells only human strains developed PFU. Differentials characteristics of historical and Argentine strain's plates were not found, neither differences related to the strain's origin. Neither historical nor Argentine strains were lethal to new-born mice giving a persistent infection, that was demonstrated when we inoculated new-born mouse by intracranial route with different strains of LCM virus and virus was isolated from brains harvested at different days post inoculation. The only exception was Cba An 13065 strain that exhibited virulence in new-born mice, only with 0.026 PFU was obtained 1 DL50. All the strains resulted lethal to adult mice. The mouse strains were more virulent than human strains, being Cba An 13065 the most virulent. These results demonstrate a different behavior in tissue culture between human and mouse strains and allow the identification of virulence markers by intracranial inoculation into new-born or adult mice.

  15. Genotype determination of three dengue type 2 virus strains from Myanmar by sequencing E/NSI gene junction.

    PubMed

    Kyaw-Zin-Thant; Khin-Mar-Aye; Soe-Thein; Than-Swe; Hasebe, F; Morita, K; Igarashi, A

    1995-12-01

    Genotype of three dengue-2 virus strains from Myanmar was determined as genotype II by sequencing 240 nucleotide long fragment across the E/NS1 gene junction by the primer extension dideoxy chain termination method, applying direct sequencing of the PCR product. These strains were isolated from a dengue shock syndrome (DSS) patient and two patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) grade 1, in Yangon (Rangoon), Myanmar (Burma), in 1987. Sequence homology of all three strains were highest (96%) to New Guinea C strain (genotype II), lesser homology (93%) to Jamaican 1409 strain (genotype III), and the least homology (91%) to PR 159/S1 strain (genotype I). Two DHF strains revealed only 2 nucleotide and 3 nucleotide differences compared with DSS strain, all at the 3rd position of the codons which resulted in silent mutations.

  16. First molecular assessment of the African swine fever virus status of Ornithodoros ticks from Swaziland.

    PubMed

    Boshoff, Carin I; Bastos, Armanda D S; Dube, Mzwandi M; Heath, Livio

    2014-12-03

    African swine fever (ASF) is an economically significant haemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs. It is caused by the African swine fever virus (ASFV), a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)arbovirus. Argasid ticks of the genus Ornithodoros, which are widely distributed throughout southern Africa, play a primary role in virus maintenance and spread within the endemic sylvatic cycle. The ASF status of Swaziland is unknown, but this land-locked country is surrounded by ASF-positive countries, has a burgeoning pig industry and sylvatic cycle hosts present within its borders. In this first assessment of ASF status, warthog burrows in seven nature reserves and game management areas in Swaziland were investigated for tick and virus presence. Tick infestation rates of between 33.3% - 88.8% were recovered for the four Ornithodoros-infested reserves. A total of 562 ticks were screened for virus genome presence using a duplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) that targets the C-terminal end of the p72 gene of the ASFV and confirms DNA integrity through amplification of the 16S rRNA tick host gene. All samples were negative for virus genome presence and positive for the tick genome target. Nucleotide sequencing of the latter confirmed that Ornithodoros ticks from Swaziland are identical to those from the Kruger National Park in South Africa across the gene region characterised. Whilst this first evaluation of ASF presence in Swaziland indicates that the virus does not appear to be present in the key virus vector, the presence of sylvatic cycle hosts, together with the country's proximity to ASF-affected countries calls for expanded investigations and regular monitoring of the ASF status of Swaziland.

  17. Development and characterization of a Rift Valley fever virus cell-cell fusion assay using alphavirus replicon vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Filone, Claire Marie; Heise, Mark; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Bertolotti-Ciarlet, Andrea . E-mail: aciarlet@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-12-20

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Phlebovirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family, is transmitted by mosquitoes and infects both humans and domestic animals, particularly cattle and sheep. Since primary RVFV strains must be handled in BSL-3+ or BSL-4 facilities, a RVFV cell-cell fusion assay will facilitate the investigation of RVFV glycoprotein function under BSL-2 conditions. As for other members of the Bunyaviridae family, RVFV glycoproteins are targeted to the Golgi, where the virus buds, and are not efficiently delivered to the cell surface. However, overexpression of RVFV glycoproteins using an alphavirus replicon vector resulted in the expression of the glycoproteins on the surface of multiple cell types. Brief treatment of RVFV glycoprotein expressing cells with mildly acidic media (pH 6.2 and below) resulted in rapid and efficient syncytia formation, which we quantified by {beta}-galactosidase {alpha}-complementation. Fusion was observed with several cell types, suggesting that the receptor(s) for RVFV is widely expressed or that this acid-dependent virus does not require a specific receptor to mediate cell-cell fusion. Fusion occurred over a broad temperature range, as expected for a virus with both mosquito and mammalian hosts. In contrast to cell fusion mediated by the VSV-G glycoprotein, RVFV glycoprotein-dependent cell fusion could be prevented by treating target cells with trypsin, indicating that one or more proteins (or protein-associated carbohydrate) on the host cell surface are needed to support membrane fusion. The cell-cell fusion assay reported here will make it possible to study the membrane fusion activity of RVFV glycoproteins in a high-throughput format and to screen small molecule inhibitors for the ability to block virus-specific membrane fusion.

  18. Serological Strains of Tobacco Ringspot Virus Transmitted by Xiphinema americanum.

    PubMed

    Rush, M C

    1970-07-01

    Five serological strains of tobacco ringspot virus isolated from naturally infected tobacco in North Carolina, and a strain isolated from watermelon in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas were transmitted from cucumber to cucumber by mass-screened and handpicked Xiphinerna americanum from North Carolina. The Eucharis mottle strain from Peru was not transmitted, indicating that a specific strain-vector relationship may exist between the geographically isolated strains from North and South America.

  19. Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus nucleoprotein reveals endonuclease activity in bunyaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu; Wang, Wenming; Ji, Wei; Deng, Maping; Sun, Yuna; Zhou, Honggang; Yang, Cheng; Deng, Fei; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong; Lou, Zhiyong; Rao, Zihe

    2012-01-01

    Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), a virus with high mortality in humans, is a member of the genus Nairovirus in the family Bunyaviridae, and is a causative agent of severe hemorrhagic fever (HF). It is classified as a biosafety level 4 pathogen and a potential bioterrorism agent due to its aerosol infectivity and its ability to cause HF outbreaks with high case fatality (∼30%). However, little is known about the structural features and function of nucleoproteins (NPs) in the Bunyaviridae, especially in CCHFV. Here we report a 2.3-Å resolution crystal structure of the CCHFV nucleoprotein. The protein has a racket-shaped overall structure with distinct “head” and “stalk” domains and differs significantly with NPs reported so far from other negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Furthermore, CCHFV NP shows a distinct metal-dependent DNA-specific endonuclease activity. Single residue mutations in the predicted active site resulted in a significant reduction in the observed endonuclease activity. Our results present a new folding mechanism and function for a negative-strand RNA virus nucleoprotein, extend our structural insight into bunyavirus NPs, and provide a potential target for antiviral drug development to treat CCHFV infection. PMID:22421137

  20. Malignant catarrhal fever. I. Response of American cattle to malignant catarrhal virus isolated in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kalunda, M; Dardiri, A H; Lee, K M

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-three American cattle were inoculated with malignant catarrhal fever virus isolated from a wildebeest in Kenya. Three animals showed the mild form of the disease and recovered, and 47 showed the severe form of the disease. The other three did not react. Of the 47 cattle, 28 died, 16 were killed for the collection of specimens and three recovered. The incubation period for the 47 cattle ranged from 16 to 29 days and the course of the fatal disease for 28 cattle averaged three to 23 days. Virus titration of specimens from nine infected steers yielded a mean titer of 10(4)/TCID50 per gm for lymph nodes, 10(3) TCID50 per mL for buffy coats and 10(2.3) TCID50 per gm for spleens. Smaller amounts of virus were found in the liver, kidneys, adrenals and thyroids. Malignant catarrhal fever virus was also found in nasal secretions and saliva of viremic cattle. Viral infectivity was shown in bovine buffy coat cells stored at 4 degrees C for two days but was immediately destroyed upon freezing even when glycerine or dimethylsulfoxide was added. Viral particles were not found in infected animal tissues by electron microscopy. The disease was successfully transmitted in steers by intratracheal intubation and by aerosol inhalation but not by contact.

  1. Synthetic strategy and antiviral evaluation of diamide containing heterocycles targeting dengue and yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Saudi, Milind; Zmurko, Joanna; Kaptein, Suzanne; Rozenski, Jef; Gadakh, Bharat; Chaltin, Patrick; Marchand, Arnaud; Neyts, Johan; Van Aerschot, Arthur

    2016-10-01

    High-throughput screening of a subset of the CD3 chemical library (Centre for Drug Design and Discovery; KU Leuven) provided us with a lead compound 1, displaying low micromolar potency against dengue virus and yellow fever virus. Within a project aimed at discovering new inhibitors of flaviviruses, substitution of its central imidazole ring led to synthesis of variably substituted pyrazine dicarboxylamides and phthalic diamides, which were evaluated in cell-based assays for cytotoxicity and antiviral activity against the dengue virus (DENV) and yellow fever virus (YFV). Fourteen compounds inhibited DENV replication (EC50 ranging between 0.5 and 3.4 μM), with compounds 6b and 6d being the most potent inhibitors (EC50 0.5 μM) with selectivity indices (SI) > 235. Compound 7a likewise exhibited anti-DENV activity with an EC50 of 0.5 μM and an SI of >235. In addition, good antiviral activity of seven compounds in the series was also noted against the YFV with EC50 values ranging between 0.4 and 3.3 μM, with compound 6n being the most potent for this series with an EC50 0.4 μM and a selectivity index of >34. Finally, reversal of one of the central amide bonds as in series 13 proved deleterious to the inhibitory activity. PMID:27240271

  2. A fatal yellow fever virus infection in China: description and lessons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihai; Liu, Lin; Lv, Yanning; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jiandong; Zhang, Yi; Di, Tian; Zhang, Shuo; Liu, Jingyuan; Li, Jie; Qu, Jing; Hua, Wenhao; Li, Chuan; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Quanfu; Xu, Yanli; Jiang, Rongmeng; Wang, Qin; Chen, Lijuan; Wang, Shiwen; Pang, Xinghuo; Liang, Mifang; Ma, Xuejun; Li, Xingwang; Wang, Quanyi; Zhang, Fujie; Li, Dexin

    2016-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) is a viral disease endemic to the tropical regions of Africa and South America. An outbreak of YF has been occurring in Angola, since the beginning of 2016. In March 2016, a 32-year-old Chinese man who returned from Angola was hospitalized and diagnosed with the first case of imported YF in China. Clinical observations, blood viral RNA detection, serological testing and treatments for the patient were performed daily. The virus was isolated in Vero cells, and the complete viral genome was sequenced and analyzed using the next-generation genomic sequencing platform. The patient presented with hemorrhagic fever, jaundice and oliguria at day 3 after onset, which rapidly progressed to multisystem organ failure with extremely elevated liver, pancreatic and myocardial enzymes. The patient died despite the intensive supportive treatments that were performed. A liver biopsy showed severe and multilobular necrosis. Viral RNA was detectable throughout the clinical course of the disease. Whole-genomic sequence analysis revealed that the virus belongs to the Angola71 genotype. Although the virus has been circulating in Angola for 45 years, only 14 amino-acid substitutions and no amino-acid changes were observed in the membrane and envelope proteins compared with the virus collected in 1971. The presence of this imported YF case in China indicated that with the increase in business travel among countries, YF outbreaks in Africa can lead to the international spread of the disease. The production and use of YF vaccines is, therefore, an urgent issue. PMID:27406389

  3. The use of COS-1 cells for studies of field and laboratory African swine fever virus samples.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Carolina; Bustos, María José; Carrascosa, Angel L

    2010-03-01

    Different naturally occurring, cell adapted or genetically manipulated stocks of African swine fever virus were able to infect directly cultures of COS-1 cells, producing extensive cytopathic effects and amounts from 10(6) to 10(7) of infective progeny virus per ml. The induction of late virus-specific proteins, demonstrated by RT-PCR and immunoblotting, and the development of lysis plaques by all the virus samples tested so far, allowed the optimization of both titration and diagnostic assays, as well as the proposal of a method for selection of virus clones during the generation of virus mutants with specific gene deletions.

  4. IFITM-2 and IFITM-3 but Not IFITM-1 Restrict Rift Valley Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Mudhasani, Rajini; Tran, Julie P.; Retterer, Cary; Radoshitzky, Sheli R.; Kota, Krishna P.; Altamura, Louis A.; Smith, Jeffrey M.; Packard, Beverly Z.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Costantino, Julie; Garrison, Aura R.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We show that interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM-1), IFITM-2, and IFITM-3 exhibit a broad spectrum of antiviral activity against several members of the Bunyaviridae family, including Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), La Crosse virus, Andes virus, and Hantaan virus, all of which can cause severe disease in humans and animals. We found that RVFV was restricted by IFITM-2 and -3 but not by IFITM-1, whereas the remaining viruses were equally restricted by all IFITMs. Indeed, at low doses of alpha interferon (IFN-α), IFITM-2 and -3 mediated more than half of the antiviral activity of IFN-α against RVFV. IFITM-2 and -3 restricted RVFV infection mostly by preventing virus membrane fusion with endosomes, while they had no effect on virion attachment to cells, endocytosis, or viral replication kinetics. We found that large fractions of IFITM-2 and IFITM-3 occupy vesicular compartments that are distinct from the vesicles coated by IFITM-1. In addition, although overexpression of all IFITMs expanded vesicular and acidified compartments within cells, there were marked phenotypic differences among the vesicular compartments occupied by IFITMs. Collectively, our data provide new insights into the possible mechanisms by which the IFITM family members restrict distinct viruses. PMID:23720721

  5. Seroprevalence of Rift Valley fever virus in sheep and goats in Zambézia, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Blomström, Anne-Lie; Scharin, Isabelle; Stenberg, Hedvig; Figueiredo, Jaquline; Nhambirre, Ofélia; Abilio, Ana; Berg, Mikael; Fafetine, José

    2016-01-01

    Background The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a vector-borne virus that causes disease in ruminants, but it can also infect humans. In humans, the infection can be asymptomatic but can also lead to illness, ranging from a mild disease with fever, headache and muscle pain to a severe disease with encephalitis and haemorrhagic fever. In rare cases, death can occur. In infected animals, influenza-like symptoms can occur, and abortion and mortality in young animals are indicative of RVFV infection. Since the initial outbreak in Kenya in the 1930s, the virus has become endemic to most of sub-Saharan Africa. In 2000, the virus appeared in Yemen and Saudi Arabia; this was the first outbreak of RVF outside of Africa. Rift Valley fever epidemics are often connected to heavy rainfall, leading to an increased vector population and spread of the virus to animals and/or humans. However, the virus needs to be maintained during the inter-epidemic periods. In this study, we investigated the circulation of RVFV in small ruminants (goats and sheep) in Zambézia, Mozambique, an area with a close vector/wildlife/livestock/human interface. Materials and methods Between September and October 2013, 181 sheep and 187 goat blood samples were collected from eight localities in the central region of Zambézia, Mozambique. The samples were analysed for the presence of antibodies against RVFV using a commercial competitive ELISA. Results and discussion The overall seroprevalence was higher in sheep (44.2%) than goats (25.1%); however, there was a high variation in seroprevalence between different localities. The data indicate an increased seroprevalence for sheep compared to 2010, when a similar study was conducted in this region and in overlapping villages. No noticeable health problems in the herds were reported. Conclusions This study shows an inter-epidemic circulation of RVFV in small ruminants in Zambézia, Mozambique. Neither outbreaks of RVF nor typical clinical signs of RVFV have

  6. The Laminin Receptor Is a Cellular Attachment Receptor for Classical Swine Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianing; He, Wen-Rui; Shen, Liang; Dong, Hong; Yu, Jiahui; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shaoxiong; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Su; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious, economically important viral disease in many countries. The Erns and E2 envelope glycoproteins are responsible for the binding to and entry into the host cell by CSFV. To date, only one cellular receptor, heparan sulfate (HS), has been identified as being involved in CSFV attachment. HS is also present on the surface of various cells that are nonpermissive to CSFV. Hence, there must be another receptor(s) that has been unidentified to date. In this study, we used a set of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against a number of porcine cell membrane protein genes to screen cellular proteins involved in CSFV infection. This approach resulted in the identification of several proteins, and of these, the laminin receptor (LamR) has been demonstrated to be a cellular receptor for several viruses. Confocal analysis showed that LamR is colocalized with CSFV virions on the membrane, and a coimmunoprecipitation assay indicated that LamR interacts with the CSFV Erns protein. In inhibition assays, anti-LamR antibodies, soluble laminin, or LamR protein significantly inhibited CSFV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Transduction of PK-15 cells with a recombinant lentivirus expressing LamR yielded higher viral titers. Moreover, an attachment assay demonstrated that LamR functions during virus attachment. We also demonstrate that LamR acts as an alternative attachment receptor, especially in SK6 cells. These results indicate that LamR is a cellular attachment receptor for CSFV. IMPORTANCE Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), an economically important viral disease affecting the pig industry in many countries. To date, only heparan sulfate (HS) has been identified to be an attachment receptor for CSFV. Here, using RNA interference screening with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against a number of porcine membrane

  7. Draft genome sequences of two Streptococcus pyogenes strains involved in abnormal sharp raised scarlet fever in China, 2011.

    PubMed

    You, Yuanhai; Yang, Xianwei; Song, Yanyan; Yan, Xiaomei; Yuan, Yanting; Li, Dongfang; Yan, Yanfeng; Wang, Haibin; Tao, Xiaoxia; Li, Leilei; Jiang, Xihong; Zhou, Hao; Xiao, Di; Jin, Lianmei; Feng, Zijian; Yang, Ruifu; Luo, Fengji; Cui, Yujun; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2012-11-01

    A scarlet fever outbreak caused by Streptococcus pyogenes occurred in China in 2011. To determine the genomic features of the outbreak strains, we deciphered genomes of two strains isolated from the regions with the highest incidence rates. The sequences will provide valuable information for comprehensive study of mechanisms related to this outbreak.

  8. Efficacy of a recombinant Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 with NSm deletion as a vaccine candidate in sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a mosquito-borne virus in the Bunyaviridae family and Phlebovirus genus, causes RVF, a disease of ruminants and man, endemic in Sub-Saharan African countries. However, outbreaks in Yemen and Saudi Arabia demonstrate the ability for RVFV to spread into virgin territory...

  9. Cross-sectional Serosurvey of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus IgG in Livestock, India, 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pragya D.; Shete, Anita M.; Sathe, Padmakar S.; Sarkale, Prasad C.; Pattnaik, Bramhadev; Sharma, Gaurav; Upadhyay, Kamlesh J.; Gosavi, Surekha; Patil, Deepak Y.; Chaubal, Gouri Y.; Majumdar, Triparna D.; Katoch, Vishwa M.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional serosurvey of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) among livestock in 22 states and 1 union territory of India. A total of 5,636 samples from bovines, sheep, and goats were screened for CCHF virus IgG. IgG was detected in 354 samples, indicating that this virus is widespread in this country. PMID:26402332

  10. Cross-sectional Serosurvey of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus IgG in Livestock, India, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Mourya, Devendra T; Yadav, Pragya D; Shete, Anita M; Sathe, Padmakar S; Sarkale, Prasad C; Pattnaik, Bramhadev; Sharma, Gaurav; Upadhyay, Kamlesh J; Gosavi, Surekha; Patil, Deepak Y; Chaubal, Gouri Y; Majumdar, Triparna D; Katoch, Vishwa M

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional serosurvey of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) among livestock in 22 states and 1 union territory of India. A total of 5,636 samples from bovines, sheep, and goats were screened for CCHF virus IgG. IgG was detected in 354 samples, indicating that this virus is widespread in this country.

  11. Cross-sectional Serosurvey of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus IgG in Livestock, India, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Mourya, Devendra T; Yadav, Pragya D; Shete, Anita M; Sathe, Padmakar S; Sarkale, Prasad C; Pattnaik, Bramhadev; Sharma, Gaurav; Upadhyay, Kamlesh J; Gosavi, Surekha; Patil, Deepak Y; Chaubal, Gouri Y; Majumdar, Triparna D; Katoch, Vishwa M

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional serosurvey of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) among livestock in 22 states and 1 union territory of India. A total of 5,636 samples from bovines, sheep, and goats were screened for CCHF virus IgG. IgG was detected in 354 samples, indicating that this virus is widespread in this country. PMID:26402332

  12. Recoding structural glycoprotein E2 in classical swine fever virus (CSFV) produces complete virus attenuation in swine and protects infected animals against disease.

    PubMed

    Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Risatti, Guillermo R; Holinka, Lauren G; O'Donnell, Vivian; Carlson, Jolene; Alfano, Marialexia; Rodriguez, Luis L; Carrillo, Consuelo; Gladue, Douglas P; Borca, Manuel V

    2016-07-01

    Controlling classical swine fever (CSF) mainly involves vaccination with live attenuated vaccines (LAV). Experimental CSFV LAVs has been lately developed through reverse genetics using several different approaches. Here we present that codon de-optimization in the major CSFV structural glycoprotein E2 coding region, causes virus attenuation in swine. Four different mutated constructs (pCSFm1-pCSFm4) were designed using various mutational approaches based on the genetic background of the highly virulent strain Brescia (BICv). Three of these constructs produced infectious viruses (CSFm2v, CSFm3v, and CSFm4v). Animals infected with CSFm2v presented a reduced and extended viremia but did not display any CSF-related clinical signs. Animals that were infected with CSFm2v were protected against challenge with virulent parental BICv. This is the first report describing the development of an attenuated CSFV experimental vaccine by codon usage de-optimization, and one of the few examples of virus attenuation using this methodology that is assessed in a natural host. PMID:27110709

  13. Aerosolized rift valley fever virus causes fatal encephalitis in african green monkeys and common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Amy L; Powell, Diana S; Bethel, Laura M; Caroline, Amy L; Schmid, Richard J; Oury, Tim; Reed, Douglas S

    2014-02-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a veterinary and human disease in Africa and the Middle East. The causative agent, RVF virus (RVFV), can be naturally transmitted by mosquito, direct contact, or aerosol. We sought to develop a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of severe RVF in humans to better understand the pathogenesis of RVF and to use for evaluation of medical countermeasures. NHP from four different species were exposed to aerosols containing RVFV. Both cynomolgus and rhesus macaques developed mild fevers after inhalation of RVFV, but no other clinical signs were noted and no macaque succumbed to RVFV infection. In contrast, both marmosets and African green monkeys (AGM) proved susceptible to aerosolized RVF virus. Fever onset was earlier with the marmosets and had a biphasic pattern similar to what has been reported in humans. Beginning around day 8 to day 10 postexposure, clinical signs consistent with encephalitis were noted in both AGM and marmosets; animals of both species succumbed between days 9 and 11 postexposure. Marmosets were susceptible to lower doses of RVFV than AGM. Histological examination confirmed viral meningoencephalitis in both species. Hematological analyses indicated a drop in platelet counts in both AGM and marmosets suggestive of thrombosis, as well as leukocytosis that consisted mostly of granulocytes. Both AGM and marmosets would serve as useful models of aerosol infection with RVFV.

  14. Computational genomic analysis of hemorrhagic fever viruses. Viral selenoproteins as a potential factor in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, C S; Taylor, E W

    1997-01-01

    A number of distinct viruses are known as hemorrhagic fever viruses based on a shared ability to induce hemorrhage by poorly understood mechanisms, typically involving the formation of blood clots ("disseminated intravascular coagulation"). It is well documented that selenium plays a significant role in the regulation of blood clotting via its effects on the thromboxane/prostacyclin ratio, and effects on the complement system. Selenium has an anticlotting effect, whereas selenium deficiency has a proclotting or thrombotic effect. It is also well documented that extreme dietary selenium deficiency, which is almost never seen in humans, has been associated with hemorrhagic effects in animals. Thus, the possibility that viral selenoprotein synthesis might contribute to hemorrhagic symptoms merits further consideration. Computational genomic analysis of certain hemorrhagic fever viruses reveals the presence of potential protein coding regions (PPCRs) containing large numbers of in-frame UGA codons, particularly in the -1 reading frame. In some cases, these clusterings of UGA codons are very unlikely to have arisen by chance, suggesting that these UGAs may have some function other than being a stop codon, such as encoding selenocysteine. For this to be possible, a downstream selenocysteine insertion element (SECIS) is required. Ebola Zaire, the most notorious hemorrhagic fever virus, has a PCR with 17 UGA codons, and several potential SECIS elements can be identified in the viral genome. One potential viral selenoprotein may contain up to 16 selenium atoms per molecule. Biosynthesis of this protein could impose an unprecedented selenium demand on the host, potentially, leading to severe lipid peroxidation and cell membrane destruction, and contributing to hemorrhagic symptoms. Alternatively, even in the absence of programmed selenoprotein synthesis, it is possible that random slippage errors would lead to increased encounters with UGA codons in overlapping reading

  15. Single-cycle replicable Rift Valley fever virus mutants as safe vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Kaori; Tercero, Breanna R; Makino, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus circulating between ruminants and mosquitoes to maintain its enzootic cycle. Humans are infected with RVFV through mosquito bites or direct contact with materials of infected animals. The virus causes Rift Valley fever (RVF), which was first recognized in the Great Rift Valley of Kenya in 1931. RVF is characterized by a febrile illness resulting in a high rate of abortions in ruminants and an acute febrile illness, followed by fatal hemorrhagic fever and encephalitis in humans. Initially, the virus was restricted to the eastern region of Africa, but the disease has now spread to southern and western Africa, as well as outside of the African continent, e.g., Madagascar, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. There is a serious concern that the virus may spread to other areas, such as North America and Europe. As vaccination is an effective tool to control RVFV epidemics, formalin-inactivated vaccines and live-attenuated RVFV vaccines have been used in endemic areas. The formalin-inactivated vaccines require boosters for effective protection, whereas the live-attenuated vaccines enable the induction of protective immunity by a single vaccination. However, the use of live-attenuated RVFV vaccines for large human populations having a varied health status is of concern, because of these vaccines' residual neuro-invasiveness and neurovirulence. Recently, novel vaccine candidates have been developed using replication-defective RVFV that can undergo only a single round of replication in infected cells. The single-cycle replicable RVFV does not cause systemic infection in immunized hosts, but enables the conferring of protective immunity. This review summarizes the properties of various RVFV vaccines and recent progress on the development of the single-cycle replicable RVFV vaccines. PMID:26022573

  16. The yellow fever 17D virus as a platform for new live attenuated vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bonaldo, Myrna C; Sequeira, Patrícia C; Galler, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The live-attenuated yellow fever 17D virus is one of the most outstanding human vaccines ever developed. It induces efficacious immune responses at a low production cost with a well-established manufacture process. These advantages make the YF17D virus attractive as a vector for the development of new vaccines. At the beginning of vector development studies, YF17D was genetically manipulated to express other flavivirus prM and E proteins, components of the viral envelope. While these 17D recombinants are based on the substitution of equivalent YF17D genes, other antigens from unrelated pathogens have also been successfully expressed and delivered by recombinant YF17D viruses employing alternative strategies for genetic manipulation of the YF17D genome. Herein, we discuss these strategies in terms of possibilities of single epitope or larger sequence expression and the main properties of these replication-competent viral platforms.

  17. No detection of severe Fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus from ixodid ticks collected in seoul.

    PubMed

    Ham, Heejin; Jo, Sukju; Jang, Jungim; Choi, Sungmin

    2014-04-01

    Larvae, nymphs, and adult stages of 3 species of ixodid ticks were collected by tick drag methods in Seoul during June-October 2013, and their infection status with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus was examined using RT-PCR. During the period, 732 Haemaphysalis longicornis, 62 Haemaphysalis flava, and 2 Ixodes nipponensis specimens were collected. Among the specimens of H. longicornis, the number of female adults, male adults, nymphs, and larvae were 53, 11, 240, and 446, respectively. Ticks were grouped into 63 pools according to the collection site, species, and developmental stage, and assayed for SFTS virus. None of the pools of ticks were found to be positive for SFTS virus gene.

  18. Implications of previous subclinical dengue infection but not virus load in dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Wen-Ting; Chen, Rong-Fu; Wang, Lin; Liu, Jien-Wei; Shaio, Men-Fang; Yang, Kuender D

    2006-10-01

    In a study comparing the virus load and immune reaction between patients with primary and secondary dengue-2 (DEN-2) infections in a hospital-based analysis, we found that 40.7% (55/135) of the 135 patients had secondary DEN-2 infection following a DEN-2 outbreak in southern Taiwan. Most of the secondary infections had subclinical primary dengue infections (78.2%; 43/55). Patients with secondary DEN-2 infections had lower platelet counts, and blood interferon-alpha and virus load, but significantly higher interleukin-10 (P=0.030) and anti-DEN-1 neutralization titers (P=0.013) than those with primary infection. Patients with secondary DEN-2 infection also had a higher rate of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) (61.7% vs. 36.3%). A previous subclinical dengue infection is involved in the secondary DEN-2 infection associated with altered immune reaction and higher DHF rate, but lower blood virus load.

  19. Experimental infection of warthos (Phacochoerus aethiopicus) with African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Thomson, G R; Gainaru, M D; Van Dellen, A F

    1980-03-01

    Although there were no obvious signs of illness following experimental infection of young warthog with African swine fever virus, the animals developed viraemias between 10(2,4) and 10(3,6) HD50/ml within the first week of infection, and virus concentrations in a number of lymphatic tissues attained high levels (greater than or equal to 10(6) HD50/g). Unlike in blood, and to some extent in the spleen, virus titres in lymph nodes did not decline appreciable during the 33-day observation period, since at the end of the period lymphatic tissues from 2 warthog were still infectious for domestic pigs to which these tissues were fed. PMID:7454231

  20. Enzyme immuno assay for the detection of virus specific IgG and IgM antibody in patients with haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A P; Tkachenko, E A; Petrov, V A; Pashkov, A J; Dzagurova, T K; Vladimirova, T P; Voronkova, G M; van der Groen, G

    1988-01-01

    Consecutive serum samples collected from 235 patients with Haemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS), between two days and two years after onset of disease, have been analysed for the presence of IgG and IgM type of antibodies specific for Hanta-viruses. The sera were screened in parallel by a newly developed indirect Immuno Enzyme Assay (EIA) in parallel with Indirect Immunofluorescent Antibody Assay (IFA). In both tests the Hantaan virus strain 76-118 was used as the antigen. The EIA was much more sensitive than the IFA test for the detection of IgM type antibodies. With the indirect EIA IgM type antibodies against Hantaan virus 76-118 have been detected in HFRS patient's sera from the second day of illness indicating the usefulness of this test for the early serological diagnosis of this disease.

  1. Co-expression of Erns and E2 genes of classical swine fever virus by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus completely protects pigs against virulent challenge with classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongke; Yang, Yuai; Zheng, Huanli; Xi, Dongmei; Lin, Mingxing; Zhang, Xiaomin; Yang, Linfu; Yan, Yulin; Chu, Xiaohui; Bi, Baoliang

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a recombinant adenovirus for future CSFV vaccines used in the pig industry for the reduction of losses involved in CSF outbreaks. The Erns and E2 genes of classical swine fever virus (CSFV), which encode the two main protective glycoproteins from the "Shimen" strain of CSFV, were combined and inserted into the replication-defective human adenovirus type-5 and named the rAd-Erns-E2. Nine pigs were randomly assigned to three treatment groups (three pigs in each group) including the rAd-Erns-E2, hAd-CMV control and DMEM control. Intramuscular vaccination with 2×10(6) TCID(50) of the rAd-Erns-E2 was administered two times with an interval of 21 days. At 42 days post inoculation, pigs in all groups were challenged with a lethal dose of 1×10(3) TCID(50) CSFV "Shimen" strain. Observation of clinical signs was made and the existence of CSFV RNA was detected. Animals in the hAd-CMV and DMEM groups showed severe clinical CSF symptoms and were euthanized from 7 to 10 days after the challenge. However, no adverse clinical CSF signs were observed in vaccinated pigs after the administration of rAd-Erns-E2 and even after CSFV challenge. Neither CSFV RNA nor pathological changes were detected in the tissues of interest of the above vaccinated pigs. These results implied that the recombination adenovirus carrying the Erns-E2 genes could be used to prevent swine from classical swine fever.

  2. Serological surveillance studies confirm the Rift Valley fever virus free status in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Park, Jee-Yong; Jeoung, Hye-Young; Yeh, Jung-Yong; Cho, Yun-Sang; Choi, Jeong-Soo; Lee, Ji-Youn; Cho, In-Soo; Yoo, Han-Sang

    2015-10-01

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease of domestic ruminants. This disease causes abortions in pregnant animals, and it has a high mortality rate in newborn animals. Recently, a Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) outbreak in the Arabian Peninsula increased its potential spread to new regions worldwide. In non-endemic or disease-free countries, early detection and surveillance are important for preventing the introduction of RVFV. In this study, a serological surveillance was conducted to detect antibodies against RVFV. A total of 2382 serum samples from goats and cattle were randomly collected from nine areas in South Korea from 2011 to 2013. These samples were tested for antibodies against RVFV, using commercial ELISA kits. None of the goats and cattle were positive for antibodies against RVFV. This finding suggests that this disease is not present in South Korea, and furthermore presents the evidence of the RVFV-free status of this country.

  3. Comparison of PCR methods for detection of classical swine fever virus and other pestiviruses.

    PubMed

    Podgórska, K; Kamieniecka, K; Stadejek, T; Pejsak, Z

    2012-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a notifiable, highly contagious disease of swine controlled mainly with costly administrative methods. Swine may be infected not only with classical swine fever virus (CSFV), but also with other, non porcine, genetically and antigenically related pestiviruses. Differentiation of infections with CSFV and other pestiviruses is a crucial element of diagnostics. In the present study two real-time PCR methods and conventional one-tube nested PCR for specific detection of CSFV were compared. Additionally, two methods designed for detection of all pestivirus species real-time SYBR Green I and one-tube nested PCR were included into the study. Analyzed methods varied considerably regarding their sensitivity and specificity, what suggests that careful selection of diagnostic methods and their evaluation on a regular basis is necessary.

  4. RNA interference screening of interferon-stimulated genes with antiviral activities against classical swine fever virus using a reporter virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Lian-Feng; Shen, Liang; Zhang, Lingkai; Yu, Jiahui; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Li, Su; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2016-04-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease of pigs, which leads to significant economic losses in many countries. Viral infection can induce the production of interferons (IFNs), giving rise to the transcription of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) to exert antiviral effects. Although numerous ISGs have been identified to possess antiviral activities against different viruses, rare anti-CSFV ISGs have been reported to date. In this study, to screen anti-CSFV ISGs, twenty-one ISGs reported previously were individually knocked down using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) followed by infection with a reporter CSFV expressing Renilla luciferase (Rluc). As a result, four novel anti-CSFV ISGs were identified, including natural-resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1), cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase III A (NT5C3A), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10), and 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), which were further verified to exhibit antiviral activities against wild-type CSFV. We conclude that the reporter virus is a useful tool for efficient screening anti-CSFV ISGs.

  5. RNA interference screening of interferon-stimulated genes with antiviral activities against classical swine fever virus using a reporter virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Lian-Feng; Shen, Liang; Zhang, Lingkai; Yu, Jiahui; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Li, Su; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2016-04-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease of pigs, which leads to significant economic losses in many countries. Viral infection can induce the production of interferons (IFNs), giving rise to the transcription of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) to exert antiviral effects. Although numerous ISGs have been identified to possess antiviral activities against different viruses, rare anti-CSFV ISGs have been reported to date. In this study, to screen anti-CSFV ISGs, twenty-one ISGs reported previously were individually knocked down using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) followed by infection with a reporter CSFV expressing Renilla luciferase (Rluc). As a result, four novel anti-CSFV ISGs were identified, including natural-resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1), cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase III A (NT5C3A), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10), and 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), which were further verified to exhibit antiviral activities against wild-type CSFV. We conclude that the reporter virus is a useful tool for efficient screening anti-CSFV ISGs. PMID:26868874

  6. Rift Valley fever virus (Bunyaviridae: Phlebovirus): an update on pathogenesis, molecular epidemiology, vectors, diagnostics and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Michel; Bouloy, Michèle; Bird, Brian H.; Kemp, Alan; Paweska, Janusz

    2010-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus is an arbovirus in the Bunyaviridae family that, from phylogenetic analysis, appears to have first emerged in the mid-19th century and was only identified at the begininning of the 1930s in the Rift Valley region of Kenya. Despite being an arbovirus with a relatively simple but temporally and geographically stable genome, this zoonotic virus has already demonstrated a real capacity for emerging in new territories, as exemplified by the outbreaks in Egypt (1977), Western Africa (1988) and the Arabian Peninsula (2000), or for re-emerging after long periods of silence as observed very recently in Kenya and South Africa. The presence of competent vectors in countries previously free of RVF, the high viral titres in viraemic animals and the global changes in climate, travel and trade all contribute to make this virus a threat that must not be neglected as the consequences of RVF are dramatic, both for human and animal health. In this review, we present the latest advances in RVF virus research. In spite of this renewed interest, aspects of the epidemiology of RVF virus are still not fully understood and safe, effective vaccines are still not freely available for protecting humans and livestock against the dramatic consequences of this virus. PMID:21188836

  7. Alteration of a second putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 of Classical Swine Fever Virus alters virus replication and virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    E2, the major envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), is involved in several critical virus functions including cell attachment, host range susceptibility, and virulence in natural hosts. Functional structural analysis of E2 based on Wimley-White interfacial hydrophobicity dis...

  8. West Nile virus infection and serologic response among persons previously vaccinated against yellow fever and Japanese encephalitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B W; Kosoy, O; Martin, D A; Noga, A J; Russell, B J; Johnson, A A; Petersen, L R

    2005-01-01

    It is hypothesized that previous heterologous flaviviral exposure may modulate clinical illness among persons infected with West Nile virus (WNV). Little is known about the serological response in such persons. In summer 2003, a WNV outbreak occurred in Colorado, the location of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases (DVBID). DVBID employees, most previously vaccinated with yellow fever virus (YFV) or Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccines, were studied to determine whether previous vaccination affected symptom development among those subsequently infected with WNV during the outbreak, as well as their serological response. Serum samples collected in December 2003 and previously banked samples were tested using the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) against WNV, Saint Louis encephalitis virus, dengue- 4 virus, JEV, and YFV. Specimens shown to have WNV antibody by PRNT were tested by IgM and IgG enzymelinked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Ten (9%) of 113 serosurvey participants had WNV neutralizing antibody titers in December 2003. PRNT titers from previous specimens showed that one of the ten had seroconverted to WNV before 2003. Of the remaining nine participants, seven reported illness in the summer of 2003, two of which were unvaccinated and five previously vaccinated. In the December 2003 specimens, five persons previously unvaccinated or vaccinated only against YFV had a fourfold or greater neutralizing titer with WNV than with other flaviviruses, whereas no persons previously vaccinated against JEV or JEV and YFV showed a similar difference in neutralizing titers. Eight of nine persons infected in 2003 had negative or indeterminate WNV MAC-ELISA results in the December 2003 sample; the ninth person was vaccinated against YFV one month previously, and was also YFV positive by MAC-ELISA. We conclude that previous flaviviral vaccination does not markedly affect the development of WNV fever and

  9. Haemaphysalis longicornis Ticks as Reservoir and Vector of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus in China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Li-Mei; Zhao, Li; Wen, Hong-Ling; Zhang, Zhen-Tang; Liu, Jian-Wei; Fang, Li-Zhu; Xue, Zai-Feng; Ma, Dong-Qiang; Zhang, Xiao-Shuang; Ding, Shu-Jun; Lei, Xiao-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging hemorrhagic fever in East Asia caused by SFTS virus (SFTSV), a newly discovered phlebovirus. The Haemaphysalis longicornis tick has been suspected to be the vector of SFTSV. To determine whether SFTSV can be transmitted among ticks, from ticks to animals, and from animals to ticks, we conducted transmission studies between developmental stages of H. longicornis ticks and between ticks and mice. Using reverse transcription PCR, we also analyzed the prevalence of SFTSV infection among H. longicornis ticks collected from vegetation in Shandong Province, China. Our results showed a low prevalence of SFTSV among collected ticks (0.2%, 8/3,300 ticks), and we showed that ticks fed on SFTSV-infected mice could acquire the virus and transstadially and transovarially transmit it to other developmental stages of ticks. Furthermore, SFTSV-infected ticks could transmit the virus to mice during feeding. Our findings indicate ticks could serve as a vector and reservoir of SFTSV. PMID:26402039

  10. An outbreak of yellow fever with concurrent chikungunya virus transmission in South Kordofan, Sudan, 2005.

    PubMed

    Gould, L Hannah; Osman, Magdi S; Farnon, Eileen C; Griffith, Kevin S; Godsey, Marvin S; Karch, Said; Mulenda, Basimike; El Kholy, Amgad; Grandesso, Francesco; de Radiguès, Xavier; Brair, Maria-Emanuela; Briand, Sylvie; El Tayeb, El Sadig Mahgoub; Hayes, Edward B; Zeller, Herve; Perea, William

    2008-12-01

    From September through December 2005, an outbreak of hemorrhagic fever occurred in South Kordofan, Sudan. Initial laboratory test results identified IgM antibodies against yellow fever (YF) virus in patient samples, and a YF outbreak was declared on 14 November. To control the outbreak, a YF mass vaccination campaign was conducted and vector control implemented in parts of South Kordofan. Surveillance data were obtained from the Sudan Federal Ministry of Health. Clinical information and serum samples were obtained from a subset of patients with illness during the outbreak. Nomads, health personnel and village chiefs were interviewed about the outbreak. Mosquitoes were collected in 11 villages and towns in North and South Kordofan. From 10 September to 9 December 2005 a total of 605 cases of outbreak-related illness were reported, of which 45% were in nomads. Twenty-nine percent of 177 patients seen at clinics in Julud and Abu Jubaiyah had illness consistent with YF. Five of 18 unvaccinated persons with recent illness and 4 of 16 unvaccinated asymptomatic persons had IgM antibodies to YF virus. IgM antibodies to chikungunya virus were detected in five (27%) ill persons and three (19%) asymptomatic persons. These results indicate that both chikungunya and YF occurred during the outbreak.

  11. A Promising Trigene Recombinant Human Adenovirus Vaccine Against Classical Swine Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Helin; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Yanming

    2016-05-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) vaccine based on HAdV-5 had achieved an efficient protection in swine. Both classical swine fever virus (CSFV) E0 glycoprotein and E2 glycoprotein were the targets for neutralizing antibodies and related to immune protection against CSF. Interleukin-2 (IL2), as an adjuvant, also had been used in CSF vaccine research. In this study, coexpression of the CSFV E0, E2, and IL2 genes by HAdV-5 (rAdV-E0-E2-IL2) was constructed and immunized to evaluate its efficacy. Three expressed genes had been sequentially connected with foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A (FMDV 2A). The vaccine was administered by intramuscular inoculation to CSFV-free pigs (10(8) TCID50) twice at triweekly intervals. No adverse clinical signs were observed in any of the pigs after vaccination. The vaccine induced strong humoral and cellular responses that led to complete protection against clinical signs of lethal CSFV infection, viremia, and shedding of challenge virus. The rAdV-E0-E2-IL2 is a promising, efficient, and safe marker vaccine candidate against CSFV. PMID:26918463

  12. Fever versus Fever: the role of host and vector susceptibility and interspecific competition in shaping the current and future distributions of the sylvatic cycles of dengue virus and yellow fever virus

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Kathryn A.; Monath, Thomas P.; Weaver, Scott C.; Rossi, Shannan L.; Richman, Rebecca L.; Vasilakis, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Two different species of flaviviruses, dengue virus (DENV) and yellow fever virus (YFV), that originated in sylvatic cycles maintained in non-human primates and forest-dwelling mosquitoes have emerged repeatedly into sustained human-to-human transmission by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Sylvatic cycles of both viruses remain active, and where the two viruses overlap in West Africa they utilize similar suites of monkeys and Aedes mosquitoes. These extensive similarities render the differences in the biogeography and epidemiology of the two viruses all the more striking. First, the sylvatic cycle of YFV originated in Africa and was introduced into the New World, probably as a result of the slave trade, but is absent in Asia; in contrast, sylvatic DENV likely originated in Asia and has spread to Africa but not to the New World. Second, while sylvatic YFV can emerge into extensive urban outbreaks in humans, these invariably die out, whereas four different types of DENV have established human transmission cycles that are ecologically and evolutionarily distinct from their sylvatic ancestors. Finally, transmission of YFV among humans has been documented only in Africa and the Americas, whereas DENV is transmitted among humans across most of the range of competent Aedes vectors, which in the last decade has included every continent save Antarctica. This review summarizes current understanding of sylvatic transmission cycles of YFV and DENV, considers possible explanations for their disjunct distributions, and speculates on the potential consequences of future establishment of a sylvatic cycle of DENV in the Americas. PMID:23523817

  13. Fever versus fever: the role of host and vector susceptibility and interspecific competition in shaping the current and future distributions of the sylvatic cycles of dengue virus and yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Kathryn A; Monath, Thomas P; Weaver, Scott C; Rossi, Shannan L; Richman, Rebecca L; Vasilakis, Nikos

    2013-10-01

    Two different species of flaviviruses, dengue virus (DENV) and yellow fever virus (YFV), that originated in sylvatic cycles maintained in non-human primates and forest-dwelling mosquitoes have emerged repeatedly into sustained human-to-human transmission by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Sylvatic cycles of both viruses remain active, and where the two viruses overlap in West Africa they utilize similar suites of monkeys and Aedes mosquitoes. These extensive similarities render the differences in the biogeography and epidemiology of the two viruses all the more striking. First, the sylvatic cycle of YFV originated in Africa and was introduced into the New World, probably as a result of the slave trade, but is absent in Asia; in contrast, sylvatic DENV likely originated in Asia and has spread to Africa but not to the New World. Second, while sylvatic YFV can emerge into extensive urban outbreaks in humans, these invariably die out, whereas four different types of DENV have established human transmission cycles that are ecologically and evolutionarily distinct from their sylvatic ancestors. Finally, transmission of YFV among humans has been documented only in Africa and the Americas, whereas DENV is transmitted among humans across most of the range of competent Aedes vectors, which in the last decade has included every continent save Antarctica. This review summarizes current understanding of sylvatic transmission cycles of YFV and DENV, considers possible explanations for their disjunct distributions, and speculates on the potential consequences of future establishment of a sylvatic cycle of DENV in the Americas.

  14. Genetic selection of a flavivirus-refractory strain of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Miller, B R; Mitchell, C J

    1991-10-01

    Two inbred (isofemale) Aedes aegypti mosquito lines were derived that manifested a resistant or susceptible phenotype following ingestion of yellow fever virus; lack of virus movement from the midgut defined the resistant phenotype. Other flaviviruses, including dengue 1-4, Uganda S, and Zika, viruses behaved in a similar fashion in the two mosquito lines. Crosses between the two lines produced progeny that were of intermediate susceptibility, indicating codominance; F2 backcrosses to the parents yielded results consistent with a major controlling genetic locus and provide evidence of a second locus capable of modulating the phenotype of the major gene. The rapid selection necessary to fix the susceptible and refractory phenotypes support the hypothesis of a single major controlling locus. Viral movement across the midgut is likely to be governed by a single major gene and modifying minor genes or a group of closely linked genes. These inbred mosquito lines will be useful in discovering the molecular basis for flavivirus resistance in Ae. aegypti.

  15. Haemorrhagic Fevers, Viral

    MedlinePlus

    ... fever, dengue, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur forest disease). Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015 All information on Ebola virus disease Ebola features map Dashboard - Progress update ...

  16. Dynamics of African swine fever virus shedding and excretion in domestic pigs infected by intramuscular inoculation and contact transmission.

    PubMed

    Guinat, Claire; Reis, Ana Luisa; Netherton, Christopher L; Goatley, Lynnette; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Dixon, Linda

    2014-09-26

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a highly virulent swine pathogen that has spread across Eastern Europe since 2007 and for which there is no effective vaccine or treatment available. The dynamics of shedding and excretion is not well known for this currently circulating ASFV strain. Therefore, susceptible pigs were exposed to pigs intramuscularly infected with the Georgia 2007/1 ASFV strain to measure those dynamics through within- and between-pen transmission scenarios. Blood, oral, nasal and rectal fluid samples were tested for the presence of ASFV by virus titration (VT) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Serum was tested for the presence of ASFV-specific antibodies. Both intramuscular inoculation and contact transmission resulted in development of acute disease in all pigs although the experiments indicated that the pathogenesis of the disease might be different, depending on the route of infection. Infectious ASFV was first isolated in blood among the inoculated pigs by day 3, and then chronologically among the direct and indirect contact pigs, by day 10 and 13, respectively. Close to the onset of clinical signs, higher ASFV titres were found in blood compared with nasal and rectal fluid samples among all pigs. No infectious ASFV was isolated in oral fluid samples although ASFV genome copies were detected. Only one animal developed antibodies starting after 12 days post-inoculation. The results provide quantitative data on shedding and excretion of the Georgia 2007/1 ASFV strain among domestic pigs and suggest a limited potential of this isolate to cause persistent infection.

  17. Amino acid sequence and structural properties of protein p12, an African swine fever virus attachment protein.

    PubMed Central

    Alcamí, A; Angulo, A; López-Otín, C; Muñoz, M; Freije, J M; Carrascosa, A L; Viñuela, E

    1992-01-01

    The gene encoding the African swine fever virus protein p12, which is involved in virus attachment to the host cell, has been mapped and sequenced in the genome of the Vero-adapted virus strain BA71V. The determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence and the hybridization of oligonucleotide probes derived from this sequence to cloned restriction fragments allowed the mapping of the gene in fragment EcoRI-O, located in the central region of the viral genome. The DNA sequence of an EcoRI-XbaI fragment showed an open reading frame which is predicted to encode a polypeptide of 61 amino acids. The expression of this open reading frame in rabbit reticulocyte lysates and in Escherichia coli gave rise to a 12-kDa polypeptide that was immunoprecipitated with a monoclonal antibody specific for protein p12. The hydrophilicity profile indicated the existence of a stretch of 22 hydrophobic residues in the central part that may anchor the protein in the virus envelope. Three forms of the protein with apparent molecular masses of 17, 12, and 10 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis have been observed, depending on the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol and alkylation with 4-vinylpyridine, indicating that disulfide bonds are responsible for the multimerization of the protein. This result was in agreement with the existence of a cysteine-rich domain in the C-terminal region of the predicted amino acid sequence. The protein was synthesized at late times of infection, and no posttranslational modifications such as glycosylation, phosphorylation, or fatty acid acylation were detected. Images PMID:1583732

  18. Four-segmented Rift Valley fever virus induces sterile immunity in sheep after a single vaccination.

    PubMed

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J; Kant, Jet; van Keulen, Lucien; Moormann, Rob J M; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2015-03-17

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a mosquito-borne virus in the Bunyaviridae family, causes recurrent outbreaks with severe disease in ruminants and occasionally humans. The virus comprises a segmented genome consisting of a small (S), medium (M) and large (L) RNA segment of negative polarity. The M-segment encodes a glycoprotein precursor (GPC) protein that is co-translationally cleaved into Gn and Gc, which are required for virus entry and fusion. Recently we developed a four-segmented RVFV (RVFV-4s) by splitting the M-genome segment, and used this virus to study RVFV genome packaging. Here we evaluated the potential of a RVFV-4s variant lacking the NSs gene (4s-ΔNSs) to induce protective immunity in sheep. Groups of seven lambs were either mock-vaccinated or vaccinated with 10(5) or 10(6) tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) of 4s-ΔNSs via the intramuscular (IM) or subcutaneous (SC) route. Three weeks post-vaccination all lambs were challenged with wild-type RVFV. Mock-vaccinated lambs developed high fever and high viremia within 2 days post-challenge and three animals eventually succumbed to the infection. In contrast, none of the 4s-ΔNSs vaccinated animals developed clinical signs during the course of the experiment. Vaccination with 10(5) TCID50 via the IM route provided sterile immunity, whereas a 10(6) dose was required to induce sterile immunity via SC vaccination. Protection was strongly correlated with the presence of RVFV neutralizing antibodies. This study shows that 4s-ΔNSs is able to induce sterile immunity in the natural target species after a single vaccination, preferably administrated via the IM route.

  19. A global compendium of human Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus occurrence.

    PubMed

    Messina, Jane P; Pigott, David M; Duda, Kirsten A; Brownstein, John S; Myers, Monica F; George, Dylan B; Hay, Simon I

    2015-01-01

    In order to map global disease risk, a geographic database of human Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) occurrence was produced by surveying peer-reviewed literature and case reports, as well as informal online sources. Here we present this database, comprising occurrence data linked to geographic point or polygon locations dating from 1953 to 2013. We fully describe all data collection, geo-positioning, database management and quality-control procedures. This is the most comprehensive database of confirmed CCHF occurrence in humans to-date, containing 1,721 geo-positioned occurrences in total.

  20. A global compendium of human Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus occurrence.

    PubMed

    Messina, Jane P; Pigott, David M; Duda, Kirsten A; Brownstein, John S; Myers, Monica F; George, Dylan B; Hay, Simon I

    2015-01-01

    In order to map global disease risk, a geographic database of human Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) occurrence was produced by surveying peer-reviewed literature and case reports, as well as informal online sources. Here we present this database, comprising occurrence data linked to geographic point or polygon locations dating from 1953 to 2013. We fully describe all data collection, geo-positioning, database management and quality-control procedures. This is the most comprehensive database of confirmed CCHF occurrence in humans to-date, containing 1,721 geo-positioned occurrences in total. PMID:25977820

  1. Yellow fever and Max Theiler: the only Nobel Prize for a virus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Norrby, Erling

    2007-01-01

    In 1951, Max Theiler of the Rockefeller Foundation received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of an effective vaccine against yellow fever—a discovery first reported in the JEM 70 years ago. This was the first, and so far the only, Nobel Prize given for the development of a virus vaccine. Recently released Nobel archives now reveal how the advances in the yellow fever vaccine field were evaluated more than 50 years ago, and how this led to a prize for Max Theiler. PMID:18039952

  2. Analysis of the dengue disease model with two virus strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adi-Kusumo, F.; Aini, A. N.; Ridwan, M.

    2014-02-01

    Dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) are the disease caused by the dengue virus which is transmitted to the human by infected female mosquitoes. The disease is endemic in more than 100 countries over the world. Dengue virus has four distinct serotypes which are closely related to each other antigenically. A person who infected by the dengue virus will never be infected again by the same serotype, but he looses immunity from the three other serotypes. Infection with one serotype does not provide cross-protective immunity against to others. Here we assume that there are two serotypes exist in the population. Someone who has recovered from one serotype become susceptible to the other serotype and can be reinfected. In this paper we analyze the model of dengue fever with two infections from the different serotype by linear analysis. Then we study the effect of vaccination to the model. In numerical simulation, we use Runge-Kutta order 4 to integrate the solution of the system.

  3. Cross-Protection against Marburg Virus Strains by Using a Live, Attenuated Recombinant Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Daddario-DiCaprio, Kathleen M.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Ströher, Ute; Hensley, Lisa E.; Grolla, Allen; Fritz, Elizabeth A.; Feldmann, Friederike; Feldmann, Heinz; Jones, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) has been associated with sporadic episodes of hemorrhagic fever, including a recent highly publicized outbreak in Angola that produced severe disease and significant mortality in infected patients. MARV is also considered to have potential as a biological weapon. Recently, we reported the development of a promising attenuated, replication-competent vaccine against MARV based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing the glycoprotein of the Musoke strain of MARV (VSVΔG/MARVGP-Musoke). We used this vaccine to demonstrate complete protection of cynomolgus monkeys against a homologous MARV challenge. While these results are highly encouraging, an effective vaccine would need to confer protection against all relevant strains of MARV. Here, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the VSVΔG/MARVGP-Musoke vaccine against two heterologous MARV strains, the seemingly more pathogenic Angola strain and the more distantly related Ravn strain. In this study, seven cynomolgus monkeys were vaccinated with the VSVΔG/MARVGP-Musoke vector. Three of these animals were challenged with the Angola strain, three with the Ravn strain, and a single animal with the Musoke strain of MARV. Two animals served as controls and were each injected with a nonspecific VSV vector; these controls were challenged with the Angola and Ravn strains, respectively. Both controls succumbed to challenge by day 8. However, none of the specifically vaccinated animals showed any evidence of illness either from the vaccination or from the MARV challenges and all of these animals survived. These data suggest that the VSVΔG/MARVGP-Musoke vaccine should be sufficient to protect against all known MARV strains. PMID:16973570

  4. Structure of the Rift Valley fever virus nucleocapsid protein reveals another architecture for RNA encapsidation

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Donald D.; Piper, Mary E.; Gerrard, Sonja R.; Smith, Janet L.

    2010-07-13

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a negative-sense RNA virus (genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) that infects livestock and humans and is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Like all negative-sense viruses, the segmented RNA genome of RVFV is encapsidated by a nucleocapsid protein (N). The 1.93-{angstrom} crystal structure of RVFV N and electron micrographs of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) reveal an encapsidated genome of substantially different organization than in other negative-sense RNA virus families. The RNP polymer, viewed in electron micrographs of both virus RNP and RNP reconstituted from purified N with a defined RNA, has an extended structure without helical symmetry. N-RNA species of {approx}100-kDa apparent molecular weight and heterogeneous composition were obtained by exhaustive ribonuclease treatment of virus RNP, by recombinant expression of N, and by reconstitution from purified N and an RNA oligomer. RNA-free N, obtained by denaturation and refolding, has a novel all-helical fold that is compact and well ordered at both the N and C termini. Unlike N of other negative-sense RNA viruses, RVFV N has no positively charged surface cleft for RNA binding and no protruding termini or loops to stabilize a defined N-RNA oligomer or RNP helix. A potential protein interaction site was identified in a conserved hydrophobic pocket. The nonhelical appearance of phlebovirus RNP, the heterogeneous {approx}100-kDa N-RNA multimer, and the N fold differ substantially from the RNP and N of other negative-sense RNA virus families and provide valuable insights into the structure of the encapsidated phlebovirus genome.

  5. Comparison of two real-time RT-PCR assays for differentiation of C-strain vaccinated from classical swine fever infected pigs and wild boars.

    PubMed

    Widén, F; Everett, H; Blome, S; Fernandez Pinero, J; Uttenthal, A; Cortey, M; von Rosen, T; Tignon, M; Liu, L

    2014-10-01

    Classical swine fever is one of the most important infectious diseases for the pig industry worldwide due to its economic impact. Vaccination is an effective means to control disease, however within the EU its regular use is banned owing to the inability to differentiate infected and vaccinated animals, the so called DIVA principle. This inability complicates monitoring of disease and stops international trade thereby limiting use of the vaccine in many regions. The C-strain vaccine is safe to use and gives good protection. It is licensed for emergency vaccination in the EU in event of an outbreak. Two genetic assays that can distinguish between wild type virus and C-strain vaccines have recently been developed. Here the results from a comparison of these two real-time RT-PCR assays in an interlaboratory exercise are presented. Both assays showed similar performance.

  6. Emergence and continued circulation of dengue-2 (genotype IV) virus strains in northern India.

    PubMed

    Dash, Paban Kumar; Parida, Man Mohan; Saxena, Parag; Kumar, Manoj; Rai, Arvind; Pasha, Sayeed Tazeen; Jana, Asha Mukul

    2004-10-01

    Dengue (DEN) is an acute mosquito borne viral disease of mankind. Off late it has become an important public health concern in Southeast Asia. Although, all the four known dengue virus serotypes (DEN-1 to 4) are reported from time to time, in the recent past, DEN-2 has emerged as the predominant type, being the causative agent of several outbreaks of dengue fever (DF) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) in India. To elucidate the true molecular epidemiology of these viruses, we have sequenced C-prM gene junction (454 nucleotides) of 11 DEN-2 viruses directly from patient serum. The C-prM gene junction was amplified initially by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction followed by automated DNA sequencing. These sequences provide unique information with regard to molecular epidemiology when compared to other DEN-2 sequences from diverse geographic origins. The sequence analysis revealed that most of the mutations in this region remained silent, except a few at the carboxy-terminal of the capsid. Reported phylogenetic analysis classifies DEN-2 viruses into five distinct genotypes. The Gwalior DEN-2 viruses, included in the present study were classified into genotype-IV, and were found to be most closely related to Delhi 1996 DEN-2 viruses and FJ 10/11 strains prevalent in the Fujian state of China. However, two earlier Indian isolates of DEN-2 were classified into genotype-V. The present study indicates that genotype V of DEN-2 has been replaced by genotype IV during the past decade, which continues to circulate silently in north India, and have the potential to reemerge and cause major epidemics of DF and DHF.

  7. Development and characterization of polyclonal peptide antibodies for the detection of Yellow fever virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Stock, N K; Escadafal, C; Achazi, K; Cissé, M; Niedrig, M

    2015-09-15

    There is still a considerable need for development of new tools and methods detecting specific viral proteins for the diagnosis and pathogenesis study of the Yellow fever virus (YFV). This study aimed to develop and characterize polyclonal peptide antisera for detection of YFV-C and -NS1 proteins. The antisera were used further to investigate NS1 protein expression during YFV infection in mammalian cells. YFV target proteins were detected by all antisera in western blot and immunofluorescence assays. No cross-reactivity was observed with Dengue virus, West Nile virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus and Japanese encephalitis virus. Nuclear localization of the YFV-C protein was demonstrated for the first time. Experiments investigating NS1 expression suggested a potential use of the YFV-NS1 antisera for development of diagnostic approaches targeting the secreted form of the NS1 protein. The antisera described in this study offer new possibilities for use in YFV research and for the development of novel diagnostic tests.

  8. Sequential Rift Valley Fever Outbreaks in Eastern Africa Caused by Multiple Lineages of the Virus

    PubMed Central

    Nderitu, Leonard; Lee, John S.; Omolo, Jared; Omulo, Sylvia; O'Guinn, Monica L.; Hightower, Allen; Mosha, Fausta; Mohamed, Mohamed; Munyua, Peninah; Nganga, Zipporah; Hiett, Kelli; Seal, Bruce; Feikin, Daniel R.; Breiman, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Background. During the Rift Valley fever (RVF) epidemic of 2006–2007 in eastern Africa, spatial mapping of the outbreaks across Kenya, Somalia, and Tanzania was performed and the RVF viruses were isolated and genetically characterized. Methods. Following confirmation of the RVF epidemic in Kenya on 19 December 2006 and in Tanzania on 2 February 2007, teams were sent to the field for case finding. Human, livestock, and mosquito specimens were collected and viruses isolated. The World Health Organization response team in Kenya worked with the WHO’s polio surveillance team inside Somalia to collect information and specimens from Somalia. Results. Seven geographical foci that reported hundreds of livestock and >25 cases in humans between December 2006 and June 2007 were identified. The onset of RVF cases in each epidemic focus was preceded by heavy rainfall and flooding for at least 10 days. Full-length genome analysis of 16 RVF virus isolates recovered from humans, livestock, and mosquitoes in 5 of the 7 outbreak foci revealed 3 distinct lineages of the viruses within and across outbreak foci. Conclusion. The findings indicate that the sequential RVF epidemics in the region were caused by multiple lineages of the RVF virus, sometimes independently activated or introduced in distinct outbreak foci. PMID:21282193

  9. Small rho GTPases and cholesterol biosynthetic pathway intermediates in African swine fever virus infection.

    PubMed

    Quetglas, Jose I; Hernáez, Bruno; Galindo, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel A; Alonso, Covadonga

    2012-02-01

    The integrity of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway is required for efficient African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection. Incorporation of prenyl groups into Rho GTPases plays a key role in several stages of ASFV infection, since both geranylgeranyl and farnesyl pyrophosphates are required at different infection steps. We found that Rho GTPase inhibition impaired virus morphogenesis and resulted in an abnormal viral factory size with the accumulation of envelope precursors and immature virions. Furthermore, abundant defective virions reached the plasma membrane, and filopodia formation in exocytosis was abrogated. Rac1 was activated at early ASFV infection stages, coincident with microtubule acetylation, a process that stabilizes microtubules for virus transport. Rac1 inhibition did not affect the viral entry step itself but impaired subsequent virus production. We found that specific Rac1 inhibition impaired viral induced microtubule acetylation and viral intracellular transport. These findings highlight that viral infection is the result of a carefully orchestrated modulation of Rho family GTPase activity within the host cell; this modulation results critical for virus morphogenesis and in turn, triggers cytoskeleton remodeling, such as microtubule stabilization for viral transport during early infection.

  10. Small Rho GTPases and Cholesterol Biosynthetic Pathway Intermediates in African Swine Fever Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Quetglas, Jose I.; Hernáez, Bruno; Galindo, Inmaculada; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    The integrity of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway is required for efficient African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection. Incorporation of prenyl groups into Rho GTPases plays a key role in several stages of ASFV infection, since both geranylgeranyl and farnesyl pyrophosphates are required at different infection steps. We found that Rho GTPase inhibition impaired virus morphogenesis and resulted in an abnormal viral factory size with the accumulation of envelope precursors and immature virions. Furthermore, abundant defective virions reached the plasma membrane, and filopodia formation in exocytosis was abrogated. Rac1 was activated at early ASFV infection stages, coincident with microtubule acetylation, a process that stabilizes microtubules for virus transport. Rac1 inhibition did not affect the viral entry step itself but impaired subsequent virus production. We found that specific Rac1 inhibition impaired viral induced microtubule acetylation and viral intracellular transport. These findings highlight that viral infection is the result of a carefully orchestrated modulation of Rho family GTPase activity within the host cell; this modulation results critical for virus morphogenesis and in turn, triggers cytoskeleton remodeling, such as microtubule stabilization for viral transport during early infection. PMID:22114329

  11. Antiviral Role of IFITM Proteins in African Swine Fever Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Romero, Carles; Barrado-Gil, Lucía; Galindo, Inmaculada; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Alonso, Covadonga

    2016-01-01

    The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) protein family is a group of antiviral restriction factors that impair flexibility and inhibit membrane fusion at the plasma or the endosomal membrane, restricting viral progression at entry. While IFITMs are widely known to inhibit several single-stranded RNA viruses, there are limited reports available regarding their effect in double-stranded DNA viruses. In this work, we have analyzed a possible antiviral function of IFITMs against a double stranded DNA virus, the African swine fever virus (ASFV). Infection with cell-adapted ASFV isolate Ba71V is IFN sensitive and it induces IFITMs expression. Interestingly, high levels of IFITMs caused a collapse of the endosomal pathway to the perinuclear area. Given that ASFV entry is strongly dependent on endocytosis, we investigated whether IFITM expression could impair viral infection. Expression of IFITM1, 2 and 3 reduced virus infectivity in Vero cells, with IFITM2 and IFITM3 having an impact on viral entry/uncoating. The role of IFITM2 in the inhibition of ASFV in Vero cells could be related to impaired endocytosis-mediated viral entry and alterations in the cholesterol efflux, suggesting that IFITM2 is acting at the late endosome, preventing the decapsidation stage of ASFV. PMID:27116236

  12. African swine fever virus encodes a CD2 homolog responsible for the adhesion of erythrocytes to infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, J M; Yáñez, R J; Almazán, F; Viñuela, E; Rodriguez, J F

    1993-01-01

    We have identified an open reading frame, EP402R, within the EcoRI E' fragment of the African swine fever virus genome that encodes a polypeptide of 402 amino acid residues homologous to the adhesion receptor of T cells, CD2. Transcription of EP402R takes place during the late phase of virus replication. The disruption of EP402R, achieved through the replacement of a 354-bp-long fragment from within EP402R by the marker gene lacZ, does not affect the virus growth rate in vitro but abrogates the ability of the virus to induce the adsorption of pig erythrocytes to the surface of infected cells. This result demonstrates that the protein encoded by EP402R is directly involved in the hemadsorption phenomenon induced by the infection of susceptible cells with African swine fever virus. Images PMID:8102411

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Seoul Virus Strain Tchoupitoulas.

    PubMed

    Miles, Rory W; Lewandowski, Kuiama; Atkinson, Barry; Pullan, Steven T; Lloyd, Graham; Bailey, Daniel

    2016-06-09

    Seoul virus (genus Hantavirus; family Bunyaviridae) is an emerging pathogen associated with cases of acute kidney injury in several countries across the globe. We report here the whole-genome sequence of the Tchoupitoulas strain of Seoul virus isolated in New Orleans, LA.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Seoul Virus Strain Tchoupitoulas

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Kuiama; Pullan, Steven T.; Lloyd, Graham; Bailey, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Seoul virus (genus Hantavirus; family Bunyaviridae) is an emerging pathogen associated with cases of acute kidney injury in several countries across the globe. We report here the whole-genome sequence of the Tchoupitoulas strain of Seoul virus isolated in New Orleans, LA. PMID:27284149

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Seoul Virus Strain Tchoupitoulas.

    PubMed

    Miles, Rory W; Lewandowski, Kuiama; Atkinson, Barry; Pullan, Steven T; Lloyd, Graham; Bailey, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Seoul virus (genus Hantavirus; family Bunyaviridae) is an emerging pathogen associated with cases of acute kidney injury in several countries across the globe. We report here the whole-genome sequence of the Tchoupitoulas strain of Seoul virus isolated in New Orleans, LA. PMID:27284149

  16. Dobrava virus carried by the yellow-necked field mouse Apodemus flavicollis, causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Romania.

    PubMed

    Panculescu-Gatej, Raluca Ioana; Sirbu, Anca; Dinu, Sorin; Waldstrom, Maria; Heyman, Paul; Murariu, Dimitru; Petrescu, Angela; Szmal, Camelia; Oprisan, Gabriela; Lundkvist, Ake; Ceianu, Cornelia S

    2014-05-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) has been confirmed by serological methods during recent years in Romania. In the present study, focus-reduction neutralization tests (FRNT) confirmed Dobrava hantavirus (DOBV) as the causative agent in some HFRS cases, but could not distinguish between DOBV and Saaremaa virus (SAAV) infections in other cases. DOBV was detected by a DOBV-specific TaqMan assay in sera of nine patients out of 22 tested. Partial sequences of the M genomic segment of DOBV were obtained from sera of three patients and revealed the circulation of two DOBV lineages in Romania. Investigation of rodents trapped in Romania found three DOBV-positive Apodemus flavicollis out of 83 rodents tested. Two different DOBV lineages were also detected in A. flavicollis as determined from partial sequences of the M and S genomic segments. Sequences of DOBV in A. flavicollis were either identical or closely related to the sequences obtained from the HFRS patients. The DOBV strains circulating in Romania clustered in two monophyletic groups, together with strains from Slovenia and the north of Greece. This is the first evidence for the circulation of DOBV in wild rodents and for a DOBV etiology of HFRS in Romania.

  17. MINIGENOMES, TRANSCRIPTION AND REPLICATION COMPETENT VIRUS-LIKE PARTICLES AND BEYOND: REVERSE GENETICS SYSTEMS FOR FILOVIRUSES AND OTHER NEGATIVE STRANDED HEMORRHAGIC FEVER VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Hoenen, Thomas; Groseth, Allison; de Kok-Mercado, Fabian; Kuhn, Jens H.; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Reverse-genetics systems are powerful tools enabling researchers to study the replication cycle of RNA viruses, including filoviruses and other hemorrhagic fever viruses, as well as to discover new antivirals. They include full-length clone systems as well as a number of life cycle modeling systems. Full-length clone systems allow for the generation of infectious, recombinant viruses, and thus are an important tool for studying the virus replication cycle in its entirety. In contrast, life cycle modeling systems such as minigenome and transcription and replication competent virus-like particle systems can be used to simulate and dissect parts of the virus life cycle outside of containment facilities. Minigenome systems are used to model viral genome replication and transcription, whereas transcription and replication competent virus-like particle systems also model morphogenesis and budding as well as infection of target cells. As such, these modeling systems have tremendous potential to further the discovery and screening of new antivirals targeting hemorrhagic fever viruses. This review provides an overview of currently established reverse genetics systems for hemorrhagic fever-causing negative-sense RNA viruses, with a particular emphasis on filoviruses, and the potential application of these systems for antiviral research. PMID:21699921

  18. Cross-reactive immunity among different serotypes of virus causing haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Asada, H; Balachandra, K; Tamura, M; Kondo, K; Yamanishi, K

    1989-04-01

    Spleen cells primed by Prospect Hill (PH) or Puumala (Pu) virus could cross-react with Hantaan virus (HV) 76-118 strain-infected target cells after in vitro stimulation with HV-infected cells, although anti-PH or anti-Pu immune serum showed no cross-reactive neutralizing (NT) activity to HV without complement. These results and our previous findings with cross-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) suggest that some epitopes recognized by CTLs might be common among the hantavirus genus, while the epitopes related to NT activity were mainly specific to each virus of this genus. Next, to evaluate the cross-reactive immunities demonstrated by in vitro study, we investigated the effect of transferring T lymphocytes and sera from BALB/c mice immunized with PH or Pu virus into nude mice before HV inoculation. Transferring T lymphocytes primed by PH or Pu virus reduced HV titres in lungs and spleens of nude mice, corresponding with the results of the in vitro CTL assays. Transferring anti-Pu immune serum also decreased HV titres in nude mice, which seemed to reflect complement-dependent NT activity. Moreover ICR mice previously immunized with PH or Pu virus showed resistance to challenge with a lethal dose of the HV KHF strain, indicating that cross-reactive immunity induced by PH or Pu virus could protect ICR mice against pathogenic HV infection.

  19. Expression, purification and crystallization of the Crimean–Congo haemorrhagic fever virus nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Carter, S. D.; Barr, J. N.; Edwards, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    Crimean–Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of the Nairovirus genus within the Bunyaviridae family of segmented negative-sense RNA viruses. This paper describes the expression, purification and crystallization of full-length CCHFV nucleocapsid (N) protein and the collection of a 2.1 Å resolution X-ray diffraction data set using synchrotron radiation. Crystals of the CCHFV N protein belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 150.38, b = 72.06, c = 101.23 Å, β = 110.70° and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Circular-dichroism analysis provided insight into the secondary structure, whilst gel-filtration analysis revealed possible oligomeric states of the N protein. Structural determination is ongoing. PMID:22691790

  20. Fever of Unknown Origin in a Patient with Confirmed West Nile Virus Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Sabre, Alexander; Farricielli, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV), an RNA arbovirus and member of the Japanese encephalitis virus antigenic complex, causes a wide range of clinical symptoms, from asymptomatic to encephalitis and meningitis. Nearly all human infections of WNV are due to mosquito bites with birds being the primary amplifying hosts. Advanced age is the most important risk factor for neurological disease leading most often to poor prognosis in those afflicted. We report a case of WNV meningoencephalitis in a 93-year-old Caucasian male who presented with fever of unknown origin (FUO) and nuchal rigidity that rapidly decompensated within 24 h to a persistent altered mental state during inpatient stay. The patient's ELISA antibody titers confirmed pathogenesis of disease by WNV; he given supportive measures and advanced to an excellent recovery. In regard to the approach of FUO, it is important to remain impartial yet insightful to all elements when determining pathogenesis in atypical presentation. PMID:25580318

  1. Tick cell lines for study of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus and other arboviruses.

    PubMed

    Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Kohl, Alain; Bente, Dennis A; Fazakerley, John K

    2012-09-01

    Continuous cell lines derived from many of the vectors of tick-borne arboviruses of medical and veterinary importance are now available. Their role as tools in arbovirus research to date is reviewed and their potential application in studies of tick cell responses to virus infection is explored, by comparison with recent progress in understanding mosquito immunity to arbovirus infection. A preliminary study of propagation of the human pathogen Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) in tick cell lines is reported; CCHFV replicated in seven cell lines derived from the ticks Hyalomma anatolicum (a known vector), Amblyomma variegatum, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, and Ixodes ricinus, but not in three cell lines derived from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus and Ornithodoros moubata. This indicates that tick cell lines can be used to study growth of CCHFV in arthropod cells and that there may be species-specific restriction in permissive CCHFV infection at the cellular level.

  2. Mild Clinical Course of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Infection in an Elderly Japanese Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ohagi, Yuko; Nakamoto, Chiaki; Nakamoto, Hiromichi; Saijo, Masayuki; Shimojima, Masayuki; Nakano, Yoshio; Fujimoto, Tokuzo

    2014-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging infectious and hemorrhagic disease recently described in China and western Japan. A 71-year-old healthy Japanese woman noticed a tick biting her after harvesting in an orchard and removed it herself. She developed diarrhea, anorexia, and chills eight days later. Because these symptoms continued, she visited a primary care physician 6 days after the onset. Laboratory data revealed thrombocytopenia, leukocytopenia, and elevated liver enzymes. She was then referred to our hospital. Although not completely fulfilling the diagnostic criteria used in a retrospective study in Japan, SFTS was suspected, and we detected SFTS virus in the patient's blood using RT-PCR. However, she recovered without intensive treatment and severe complications 13 days after the onset. In this report, we present a mild clinical course of SFTS virus infection in Japan in detail. PMID:25574405

  3. Isolation of African swine fever virus from ticks of the Ornithodoros moubata complex (Ixodoidea: Argasidae) collected within the African swine fever enzootic area of Malawi.

    PubMed Central

    Haresnape, J. M.; Wilkinson, P. J.; Mellor, P. S.

    1988-01-01

    Ticks of the Ornithodoros moubata complex were collected from domestic pig sties and dwelling houses, and from a warthog habitat, and tested for the presence of African swine fever (ASF) virus. Collections were made in 9 of the 24 districts of Malawi, these being primarily the districts in which O. moubata is most numerous. ASF virus was isolated from ticks collected in both domestic pig sties and houses in certain villages in Mchinji district where ASF outbreaks had recently occurred. Mchinji district is in the centre of a large ASF enzootic area which stretches into other districts of Malawi and also into Zambia and Mozambique. The high titre of virus in some of the ticks demonstrates that O. moubata can act as a virus reservoir and potential vector of disease in the field situation in Malawi. PMID:3402546

  4. Synthesis and antiviral activity of a novel glycosyl sulfoxide against classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Krol, Ewelina; Pastuch-Gawolek, Gabriela; Nidzworski, Dawid; Rychlowski, Michal; Szeja, Wieslaw; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Szewczyk, Boguslaw

    2014-05-01

    A novel compound-2″,3″,4″,6″-tetra-O-acetyl-β-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→4)-2',3',6'-tri-O-acetyl-1-thio-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(5-nitro-2-pyridyl) sulfoxide-designated GP6 was synthesized and assayed for cytotoxicity and in vitro antiviral properties against classical swine fever virus (CSFV) in this study. We showed that the examined compound effectively arrested CSFV growth in swine kidney cells (SK6) at a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 5 ± 0.12 μg/ml without significant toxicity for mammalian cells. Moreover, GP6 reduced the viral E2 and E(rns) glycoproteins expression in a dose-dependent manner. We have excluded the possibility that the inhibitor acts at the replication step of virus life cycle as assessed by monitoring of RNA level in cells and culture medium of SK6 cells after single round of infection as a function of GP6 treatment. Using recombinant E(rns) and E2 proteins of classical swine fever virus produced in baculovirus expression system we have demonstrated that GP6 did not influence glycoprotein production and maturation in insect cells. In contrast to mammalian glycosylation pathway, insect cells support only the ER-dependent early steps of this process. Therefore, we concluded that the late steps of glycosylation process are probably the main targets of GP6. Due to the observed antiviral effect accompanied by low cytotoxicity, this inhibitor represents potential candidate for the development of antiviral agents for anti-flavivirus therapy. Further experiments are needed for investigating whether this compound can be used as a safe antiviral agent against other viruses from unrelated groups.

  5. BacMam immunization partially protects pigs against sublethal challenge with African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Argilaguet, Jordi M; Pérez-Martín, Eva; López, Sergio; Goethe, Martin; Escribano, J M; Giesow, Katrin; Keil, Günther M; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    Lack of vaccines and efficient control measures complicate the control and eradication of African swine fever (ASF). Limitations of conventional inactivated and attenuated virus-based vaccines against African swine fever virus (ASFV) highlight the need to use new technologies to develop efficient and safe vaccines against this virus. With this aim in mind, in this study we have constructed BacMam-sHAPQ, a baculovirus based vector for gene transfer into mammalian cells, expressing a fusion protein comprising three in tandem ASFV antigens: p54, p30 and the extracellular domain of the viral hemagglutinin (secretory hemagglutinin, sHA), under the control of the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter (CMVie). Confirming its correct in vitro expression, BacMam-sHAPQ induced specific T-cell responses directly after in vivo immunization. Conversely, no specific antibody responses were detectable prior to ASFV challenge. The protective potential of this recombinant vaccine candidate was tested by a homologous sublethal challenge with ASFV following immunization. Four out of six immunized pigs remained viremia-free after ASFV infection, while the other two pigs showed similar viremic titres to control animals. The protection afforded correlated with the presence of a large number of virus-specific IFNγ-secreting T-cells in blood at 17 days post-infection. In contrast, the specific antibody levels observed after ASFV challenge in sera from BacMam-sHAPQ immunized pigs were indistinguishable from those found in control pigs. These results highlight the importance of the cellular responses in protection against ASFV and point towards BacMam vectors as potential tools for future vaccine development.

  6. Laboratory transmission of Rift Valley fever virus by Phlebotomus duboscqi, Phlebotomus papatasi, Phlebotomus sergenti, and Sergentomyia schwetzi (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    PubMed

    Dohm, D J; Rowton, E D; Lawyer, P G; O'Guinn, M; Turell, M J

    2000-05-01

    We examined the potential for Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli), Phlebotomus duboscqi (Neveu-Lemarie), Phlebotomus sergenti (Parrot), and Sergentomyia schwetzi (Adler, Theodor, & Parrot) to transmit Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus. After feeding on hamsters that had been inoculated with RVF virus, P. papatasi, P. sergenti, and S. schwetzi became infected and developed disseminated infections. All P. papatasi and P. duboscqi inoculated with RVF virus developed high-titer infections. In contrast, only 41% of the inoculated S. schwetzi contained detectable virus, and infected individuals contained significantly less virus than the two Phlebotomus species. Although 50% of the inoculated P. duboscqi transmitted RVF virus to hamsters, only 14% of P. papatasi and none of the S. schwetzi transmitted this virus. Additional studies are needed to determine the role of sand flies as vectors of RVF virus.

  7. RIG-I Mediates an Antiviral Response to Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Jessica R.; Patel, Jenish R.; Chakrabarti, Ayan K.; Zivcec, Marko; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Spiropoulou, Christina F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the cytoplasm, the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) senses the RNA genomes of several RNA viruses. RIG-I binds to viral RNA, eliciting an antiviral response via the cellular adaptor MAVS. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), a negative-sense RNA virus with a 5′-monophosphorylated genome, is a highly pathogenic zoonotic agent with significant public health implications. We found that, during CCHFV infection, RIG-I mediated a type I interferon (IFN) response via MAVS. Interfering with RIG-I signaling reduced IFN production and IFN-stimulated gene expression and increased viral replication. Immunostimulatory RNA was isolated from CCHFV-infected cells and from virion preparations, and RIG-I coimmunoprecipitation of infected cell lysates isolated immunostimulatory CCHFV RNA. This report serves as the first description of a pattern recognition receptor for CCHFV and highlights a critical signaling pathway in the antiviral response to CCHFV. IMPORTANCE CCHFV is a tick-borne virus with a significant public health impact. In order for cells to respond to virus infection, they must recognize the virus as foreign and initiate antiviral signaling. To date, the receptors involved in immune recognition of CCHFV are not known. Here, we investigate and identify RIG-I as a receptor involved in initiating an antiviral response to CCHFV. This receptor initially was not expected to play a role in CCHFV recognition because of characteristics of the viral genome. These findings are important in understanding the antiviral response to CCHFV and support continued investigation into the spectrum of potential viruses recognized by RIG-I. PMID:26223644

  8. African Swine Fever Virus Georgia Isolate Harboring Deletions of MGF360 and MGF505 Genes Is Attenuated in Swine and Confers Protection against Challenge with Virulent Parental Virus

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Vivian; Holinka, Lauren G.; Gladue, Douglas P.; Sanford, Brenton; Krug, Peter W.; Lu, Xiqiang; Arzt, Jonathan; Reese, Bo; Carrillo, Consuelo; Risatti, Guillermo R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal disease of domestic pigs that has significant economic consequences for the swine industry. The control of African swine fever (ASF) has been hampered by the unavailability of vaccines. Experimental vaccines have been developed using genetically modified live attenuated ASFVs where viral genes involved in virus virulence were removed from the genome. Multigene family 360 (MGF360) and MGF505 represent a group of genes sharing partial sequence and structural identities that have been connected with ASFV host range specificity, blocking of the host innate response, and virus virulence. Here we report the construction of a recombinant virus (ASFV-G-ΔMGF) derived from the highly virulent ASFV Georgia 2007 isolate (ASFV-G) by specifically deleting six genes belonging to MGF360 or MGF505: MGF505-1R, MGF360-12L, MGF360-13L, MGF360-14L, MGF505-2R, and MGF505-3R. ASFV-G-ΔMGF replicates as efficiently in primary swine macrophage cell cultures as the parental virus. In vivo, ASFV-G-ΔMGF is completely attenuated in swine, since pigs inoculated intramuscularly (i.m.) with either 102 or 104 50% hemadsorbing doses (HAD50) remained healthy, without signs of the disease. Importantly, when these animals were subsequently exposed to highly virulent parental ASFV-G, no signs of the disease were observed, although a proportion of these animals harbored the challenge virus. This is the first report demonstrating the role of MGF genes acting as independent determinants of ASFV virulence. Additionally, ASFV-G-ΔMGF is the first experimental vaccine reported to induce protection in pigs challenged with highly virulent and epidemiologically relevant ASFV-G. IMPORTANCE The main problem for controlling ASF is the lack of vaccines. Studies focusing on understanding ASFV virulence led to the production of genetically modified recombinant viruses that, while attenuated, are able to confer

  9. FKBP8 interact with classical swine fever virus NS5A protein and promote virus RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Helin; Zhang, Chengcheng; Cui, Hongjie; Guo, Kangkang; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Tianyue; Liang, Wulong; Lv, Qizhuang; Zhang, Yanming

    2016-02-01

    The non-structural 5A (NS5A) protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is proven to be involved in viral replication and can also modulate cellular signaling and host cellular responses via to its ability to interact with various cellular proteins. FKBP8 is also reported to promote virus replication. Here, we show that NS5A specifically interacts with FKBP8 through coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pulldown studies. Additionally, confocal microscopy study showed that NS5A and FKBP8 colocalized in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of FKBP8 via the eukaryotic expression plasmid pDsRED N1 significantly promoted viral RNA synthesis. The cells knockdown of FKBP8 by lentivirus-mediated shRNA markedly decreased the virus replication when infected with CSFV. These data suggest that FKBP8 plays a critical role in the viral life cycle, particularly during the virus RNA replication period. The investigation of FKBP8 protein functions may be beneficial for developing new strategies to treat CSFV infection. PMID:26748656

  10. Evidence for widespread infection of African bats with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever-like viruses.

    PubMed

    Müller, Marcel A; Devignot, Stéphanie; Lattwein, Erik; Corman, Victor Max; Maganga, Gaël D; Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Binger, Tabea; Vallo, Peter; Emmerich, Petra; Cottontail, Veronika M; Tschapka, Marco; Oppong, Samuel; Drexler, Jan Felix; Weber, Friedemann; Leroy, Eric M; Drosten, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a highly virulent tick-borne pathogen that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans. The geographic range of human CCHF cases largely reflects the presence of ticks. However, highly similar CCHFV lineages occur in geographically distant regions. Tick-infested migratory birds have been suggested, but not confirmed, to contribute to the dispersal. Bats have recently been shown to carry nairoviruses distinct from CCHFV. In order to assess the presence of CCHFV in a wide range of bat species over a wide geographic range, we analyzed 1,135 sera from 16 different bat species collected in Congo, Gabon, Ghana, Germany, and Panama. Using a CCHFV glycoprotein-based indirect immunofluorescence test (IIFT), we identified reactive antibodies in 10.0% (114/1,135) of tested bats, pertaining to 12/16 tested species. Depending on the species, 3.6%-42.9% of cave-dwelling bats and 0.6%-7.1% of foliage-living bats were seropositive (two-tailed t-test, p = 0.0447 cave versus foliage). 11/30 IIFT-reactive sera from 10 different African bat species had neutralizing activity in a virus-like particle assay. Neutralization of full CCHFV was confirmed in 5 of 7 sera. Widespread infection of cave-dwelling bats may indicate a role for bats in the life cycle and geographic dispersal of CCHFV. PMID:27217069

  11. Evidence for widespread infection of African bats with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever-like viruses

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Marcel A.; Devignot, Stéphanie; Lattwein, Erik; Corman, Victor Max; Maganga, Gaël D.; Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Binger, Tabea; Vallo, Peter; Emmerich, Petra; Cottontail, Veronika M.; Tschapka, Marco; Oppong, Samuel; Drexler, Jan Felix; Weber, Friedemann; Leroy, Eric M.; Drosten, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a highly virulent tick-borne pathogen that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans. The geographic range of human CCHF cases largely reflects the presence of ticks. However, highly similar CCHFV lineages occur in geographically distant regions. Tick-infested migratory birds have been suggested, but not confirmed, to contribute to the dispersal. Bats have recently been shown to carry nairoviruses distinct from CCHFV. In order to assess the presence of CCHFV in a wide range of bat species over a wide geographic range, we analyzed 1,135 sera from 16 different bat species collected in Congo, Gabon, Ghana, Germany, and Panama. Using a CCHFV glycoprotein-based indirect immunofluorescence test (IIFT), we identified reactive antibodies in 10.0% (114/1,135) of tested bats, pertaining to 12/16 tested species. Depending on the species, 3.6%–42.9% of cave-dwelling bats and 0.6%–7.1% of foliage-living bats were seropositive (two-tailed t-test, p = 0.0447 cave versus foliage). 11/30 IIFT-reactive sera from 10 different African bat species had neutralizing activity in a virus-like particle assay. Neutralization of full CCHFV was confirmed in 5 of 7 sera. Widespread infection of cave-dwelling bats may indicate a role for bats in the life cycle and geographic dispersal of CCHFV. PMID:27217069

  12. [Construction of recombinant yellow fever virus 17D containing 2A fragment as a vaccine vector].

    PubMed

    Xiaowu, Pang; Fu, Wen-Chuan; Guo, Yin-Han; Zhang, Li-Shu; Xie, Tian-Pei; Xinbin, Gu

    2006-05-01

    The Yellow Fever (YF) vaccine, an attenuated yellow fever 17D (YF-17D) live vaccine, is one of the most effective and safest vaccines in the world and is regarded as one of the best candidates for viral expression vector. We here first reported in China the construction and characterization of the recombinant expression vector of yellow fever 17D which contained the proteinase 2A fragment of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Three cDNA fragments representing the full-length YF-17D genome, named 5'-end cDNA (A), 3'-end cDNA (B) and middle cDNA (C), were obtained by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), together with the introduction of SP6 enhancer, necessary restriction sites and overlaps for homologous recombination in yeast. Fragment A and B were then introduced into pRS424 in turn by DNA recombination, followed by transfection of fragment C and the recombinant pRS424 containing A and B (pRS-A-B) into yeast. A recombinant vector containing full length cDNA of YF-17D (pRS-YF) was obtained by screening on medium lack of tryptophan and uracil. A recombinant YF-17D expression vector containing FMDV-2A gene fragment (pRS-YF-2A1) was then constructed by methods of DNA recombination and homologous recombination in yeast described above. In vitro transcription of the recombinant vector pRS-YF-2A1 was then carried out and introduced into BHK-21 cells by electroporation. Results of indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and titer determination showed a stable infectious recombinant virus was gotten, whose features such as growth curve were similar to those of the parental YF-17D. The results suggest that the recombinant vector pRS-YF-2A1, by introduction of heterogenous genes via 2A region, is potential to be an effective live vaccine expression vector.

  13. Clinical and virological outcome of an infection with the Belgian equine arteritis virus strain 08P178.

    PubMed

    Vairo, Sabrina; Vandekerckhove, Annelies; Steukers, Lennert; Glorieux, Sarah; Van den Broeck, Wim; Nauwynck, Hans

    2012-06-15

    Equine viral arteritis (EVA) is an infectious disease with variable clinical outcome. Outbreaks, causing important economic losses, are becoming more frequent. Currently, there is a shortage of pathogenesis studies performed with European strains. In the present study, eight seronegative ponies were experimentally inoculated with the Belgian strain of equine arteritis virus (EAV) 08P178 (EU-1 clade) and monitored daily for clinical signs of EVA. Nasopharyngeal swabs, ocular swabs, bronchoalveolar cells and blood were collected for virological and serological testing. Two ponies were euthanized at 3, 7, 14, and 28 days post infection (DPI). After necropsy, specimens were collected for virus titration and immunofluorescence. EVA symptoms such as fever and lymphadenomegaly were evident from 3 to 10 DPI. Virus was isolated in nasal secretions from 2 to 9 DPI and in bronchoalveolar cells from 3 to 7 DPI. A cell-associated viraemia was detected from 3 to 10 DPI. After replication in the respiratory tract and draining lymph nodes, EAV reached secondary target organs (high virus titers in internal organs sampled at 7 DPI). At 14 DPI, virus titers dropped drastically and, at 28 DPI, only tonsils were positive. Immunofluorescence revealed both individual and clustered EAV-infected cells. Antibodies were detected starting from 7 DPI. It can be concluded that the Belgian strain 08P178 is a European mildly virulent subtype. At present, most European EAV strain infections were thought to run a subclinical course. This study is a proof that mildly virulent European EAV strains do exist in the field.

  14. Rickettsia sp. Strain Atlantic Rainforest Infection in a Patient from a Spotted Fever-Endemic Area in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Krawczak, Felipe S; Muñoz-Leal, Sebastián; Guztzazky, Ana Carolina; Oliveira, Stefan V; Santos, Fabiana C P; Angerami, Rodrigo N; Moraes-Filho, Jonas; de Souza, Julio C; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2016-09-01

    Santa Catarina State in southern Brazil is the state with the second highest number of laboratory-confirmed cases of spotted fever illness in Brazil. However, all these cases were confirmed solely by serological analysis (seroconversion to spotted fever group rickettsiae), which has not allowed identification of the rickettsial agent. Here, a clinical case of spotted fever illness from Santa Catarina is shown by seroconversion and molecular analysis to be caused by Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest. This is the third confirmed clinical case due to this emerging rickettsial agent in Brazil. Like the previous two cases, the patient presented an inoculation eschar at the tick bite site. Our molecular diagnosis was performed on DNA extracted from the crust removed from the eschar. These results are supported by previous epidemiological studies in Santa Catarina, which showed that nearly 10% of the most common human-biting ticks were infected by Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest. PMID:27325804

  15. Isolation and serotyping of dengue viruses by mosquito inoculation technique from clinically suspected cases of dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Pervin, M; Tabassum, S; Islam, M N

    2002-12-01

    Dengue virus was isolated from 44 clinically suspected cases of dengue fever by mosquito inoculation technique using Aedes aegypti mosquito in the department of virology, BSMMU in the year 2000. Identification of dengue virus was done by direct fluorescent antibody technique using FITC conjugated anti-dengue monoclonal antibody and serotyping was carried out by indirect fluorescent antibody technique using serotype specific monoclonal anti-dengue antibody. The dengue virus isolation rate was 41.9%. The result of serotyping revealed circulation of all four serotypes of dengue viruses in Dhaka, Bangladesh and DEN-3 was the predominant (70.5%) serotype during the outbreak in 2000. The rate of isolation was higher in patient's serum at an early stage of fever (p<0.01) and with higher body temperature (p<0.01). The rate of isolation was 77.77% in patient's serum collected on the 1st day of fever, and then the rate gradually declined and lowest (16.6%) on the 5th day of fever. The mosquito inoculation technique is an easy, economical and sensitive method for dengue virus isolation and is recommended for routine virological surveillance in laboratories of Bangladesh where sophisticated facilities are limited.

  16. The distribution of African swine fever virus isolated from Ornithodoros moubata in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, P J; Pegram, R G; Perry, B D; Lemche, J; Schels, H F

    1988-12-01

    African swine fever (ASF) has been reported in the Eastern Province of Zambia since 1912 and is now considered to be enzootic there. A survey of the distribution of ASF virus in Zambia was carried out by virus isolation from Ornithodoros moubata ticks collected from animal burrows in National Parks and Game Management Areas in northern, eastern, central and southern Zambia. ASF virus was isolated from ticks in all areas examined. The prevalence of infection in O. moubata was between 0.4% in South Luangwa National Park and 5.1% in Livingstone Game Park and mean infectious virus titres ranged from 10(3.4) HAD50/tick in Kakumbe Game Management Area to 10(5.9) HAD50/tick in Chunga and Nalusanga Game Management Areas. The prevalence of infection in adult ticks was between 4.7% and 5.3% in all areas examined except Sumbu National Park and Livingstone Game Park, where the prevalence was 15.1% and 13.2% respectively in adult ticks. The ratio of infected females to males for all the infected adult ticks in all areas of Zambia was 3.2:1.

  17. Cross-Reactivity of Neutralizing Antibodies among Malignant Catarrhal Fever Viruses.

    PubMed

    Taus, Naomi S; Cunha, Cristina W; Marquard, Jana; O'Toole, Donal; Li, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Some members of the gamma herpesvirus genus Macavirus are maintained in nature as subclinical infections in well-adapted ungulate hosts. Transmission of these viruses to poorly adapted hosts, such as American bison and cattle, can result in the frequently fatal disease malignant catarrhal fever (MCF). Based on phylogenetic analysis, the MCF viruses (MCFV) cluster into two subgroups corresponding to the reservoir hosts' subfamilies: Alcelaphinae/Hippotraginae and Caprinae. Antibody cross-reactivity among MCFVs has been demonstrated using techniques such as enzyme linked immunosorbent and immunofluorescence assays. However, minimal information is available as to whether virus neutralizing antibodies generated against one MCFV cross react with other members of the genus. This study tested the neutralizing activity of serum and plasma from select MCFV-infected reservoir hosts against alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) and ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2). Neutralizing antibody activity against AlHV-1 was detected in samples from infected hosts in the Alcelaphinae and Hippotraginae subfamilies, but not from hosts in the Caprinae subfamily. OvHV-2 neutralizing activity was demonstrated in samples from goats (Caprinae) but not from wildebeest (Alcelaphinae). These results show that neutralizing antibody cross reactivity is present to MCFVs within a virus subgroup but not between subgroups. This information is important for diagnosing infection with MCFVs and in the development of vaccines against MCF. PMID:26658281

  18. The distribution of African swine fever virus isolated from Ornithodoros moubata in Zambia.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, P. J.; Pegram, R. G.; Perry, B. D.; Lemche, J.; Schels, H. F.

    1988-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) has been reported in the Eastern Province of Zambia since 1912 and is now considered to be enzootic there. A survey of the distribution of ASF virus in Zambia was carried out by virus isolation from Ornithodoros moubata ticks collected from animal burrows in National Parks and Game Management Areas in northern, eastern, central and southern Zambia. ASF virus was isolated from ticks in all areas examined. The prevalence of infection in O. moubata was between 0.4% in South Luangwa National Park and 5.1% in Livingstone Game Park and mean infectious virus titres ranged from 10(3.4) HAD50/tick in Kakumbe Game Management Area to 10(5.9) HAD50/tick in Chunga and Nalusanga Game Management Areas. The prevalence of infection in adult ticks was between 4.7% and 5.3% in all areas examined except Sumbu National Park and Livingstone Game Park, where the prevalence was 15.1% and 13.2% respectively in adult ticks. The ratio of infected females to males for all the infected adult ticks in all areas of Zambia was 3.2:1. PMID:3215286

  19. Propagation and titration of Alkhumra hemorrhagic fever virus in the brains of newborn Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Madani, Tariq A; Kao, Moujahed; Abuelzein, El-Tayeb M E; Azhar, Esam I; Al-Bar, Hussein M S; Abu-Araki, Huda; Bokhary, Rana Y; Ksiazek, Thomas G

    2014-04-01

    Alkhumra hemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV) is a novel flavivirus identified first in Saudi Arabia. In this study, successful propagation of AHFV in the brains of newborn Wistar rats is described and the median rat lethal dose (RLD50) is determined. AHFV-RNA-positive human sera diluted 1:10 were injected intracerebrally into 16, ≤24h old rats. Post-inoculation, the rats were observed daily for 30 days. Brains of moribund rats were tested for AHFV-RNA using RT-PCR and cultured in LLC-MK2 cells. The titer of the isolated virus was determined and expressed in median tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50). To determine the RLD50, AHFV brain suspension was 10-fold diluted serially and each dilution was inoculated in the cerebral hemispheres of 10 rats for a total of 90 rats. Three days post-inoculation, the rats developed tremor, irritability, convulsion, opisthotonus, and spastic paresis starting in the hind limbs and ascending to involve the whole body. All infected rats died within 3-7 days with histopathologically confirmed meningoencephalitis. AHFV-RNA was detected in the brains of all infected rats and the virus titer was 10(9.4) RLD50/ml. The virus titer in LLC-MK2 was 10(8.2) TCID50/ml. In conclusion, AHFV was propagated successfully to high titers in the brains of newborn Wistar rats.

  20. Preliminary survey of domestic animals of the Sudan for precipitating antibodies to Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed Central

    Eisa, M.

    1984-01-01

    In a preliminary seroepidemiological survey a total of 780 serum samples derived from various domestic animals of the Sudan were examined for Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus precipitating antibodies. The incidence was approximately 34.3% in sheep, 33.2% in cattle, 22% in goats, 7.9% in camels and 4% in donkeys. The findings indicated that RVF is mainly prevalent in the rich savanna areas of the south as well as the irrigated areas close to the Nile in the north. Circumstantial evidence suggests that the detected antibodies were induced by a long-standing cryptically cycling infection and that resurgence of extensive epizootics is unlikely although limited outbreaks may occur. It is concluded that RVF virus circulates across the country in a south-north range along the Nile Valley with little or no extension to the drier lands to the east and west, and that ruminants are the primary species involved in virus maintenance. These species evidently serve as main amplifiers of infection during epizootics, but whether or not they also serve as sole virus reservoirs in inter-epizootic periods has yet to be determined. PMID:6512261

  1. Characterization of the cellular receptors for the South American hemorrhagic fever viruses Junin, Guanarito, and Machupo.

    PubMed

    Rojek, Jillian M; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Kunz, Stefan

    2006-06-01

    The New World arenaviruses Junin, Machupo, and Guanarito are the causative agents of hemorrhagic fevers (HF) with high mortality in humans. The cellular receptor for Old World arenaviruses and one subgroup of the New World arenaviruses (Clade C) have been identified as alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG). In contrast, the receptor(s) of the South American HF viruses, which belong to the Clade B New World arenaviruses, are currently unknown. To begin to characterize the cellular receptors used by these pathogens, we generated recombinant retroviral pseudotypes with the glycoproteins of Guanarito, Junin, and Machupo. Infection with the South American HF viruses is independent of alpha-DG and functional receptors for Guanarito, Junin, and Machupo were found on most human cell types and cells derived from non-human primate and rodents. Guanarito, Junin, and Machupo share a common receptor, which is distinct from the receptor(s) used by the closely related non-pathogenic Clade B virus Amapari, and the genetically more distant Clade A and C New World arenaviruses. We show that the cellular receptor(s) for the South American HF viruses are proteins or protein-linked entities and that infection is not dependent on protein-linked N-glycans, O-glycans, or glycosaminoglycans.

  2. Pathology of experimental Machupo virus infection, Chicava strain, in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) by intramuscular and aerosol exposure.

    PubMed

    Bell, T M; Shaia, C I; Bunton, T E; Robinson, C G; Wilkinson, E R; Hensley, L E; Cashman, K A

    2015-01-01

    Machupo virus, the causative agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF), is a highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever of which little is known and for which no Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines or therapeutics are available. This study evaluated the cynomolgus macaque as an animal model using the Machupo virus, Chicava strain, via intramuscular and aerosol challenge. The incubation period was 6 to 10 days with initial signs of depression, anorexia, diarrhea, mild fever, and a petechial skin rash. These were often followed by neurologic signs and death within an average of 18 days. Complete blood counts revealed leukopenia as well as marked thrombocytopenia. Serum chemistry values identified a decrease in total protein, marked increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, and moderate increases in alkaline phosphatase. Gross pathology findings included a macular rash extending across the axillary and inguinal regions beginning at approximately 10 days postexposure as well as enlarged lymph nodes and spleen, enlarged and friable liver, and sporadic hemorrhages along the gastrointestinal mucosa and serosa. Histologic lesions consisted of foci of degeneration and necrosis/apoptosis in the haired skin, liver, pancreas, adrenal glands, lymph nodes, tongue, esophagus, salivary glands, stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. Lymphohistiocytic interstitial pneumonia was also present. Inflammation within the central nervous system (nonsuppurative encephalitis) was histologically apparent approximately 16 days postexposure and was generally progressive. This study provides insight into the course of Machupo virus infection in cynomolgus macaques and supports the usefulness of cynomolgus macaques as a viable model of human Machupo virus infection.

  3. Visualization of the African swine fever virus infection in living cells by incorporation into the virus particle of green fluorescent protein-p54 membrane protein chimera

    SciTech Connect

    Hernaez, Bruno . E-mail: hernaez@inia.es; Escribano, Jose M. . E-mail: escriban@inia.es; Alonso, Covadonga . E-mail: calonso@inia.es

    2006-06-20

    Many stages of African swine fever virus infection have not yet been studied in detail. To track the behavior of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in the infected cells in real time, we produced an infectious recombinant ASFV (B54GFP-2) that expresses and incorporates into the virus particle a chimera of the p54 envelope protein fused to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The incorporation of the fusion protein into the virus particle was confirmed immunologically and it was determined that p54-EGFP was fully functional by confirmation that the recombinant virus made normal-sized plaques and presented similar growth curves to the wild-type virus. The tagged virus was visualized as individual fluorescent particles during the first stages of infection and allowed to visualize the infection progression in living cells through the viral life cycle by confocal microscopy. In this work, diverse potential applications of B54GFP-2 to study different aspects of ASFV infection are shown. By using this recombinant virus it was possible to determine the trajectory and speed of intracellular virus movement. Additionally, we have been able to visualize for first time the ASFV factory formation dynamics and the cytophatic effect of the virus in live infected cells. Finally, we have analyzed virus progression along the infection cycle and infected cell death as time-lapse animations.

  4. Disinfection of foot-and-mouth disease and African swine fever viruses with citric acid and sodium hypochlorite on birch wood carriers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transboundary animal disease viruses such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and African swine fever virus (ASFV) are highly contagious and cause severe morbidity and mortality in livestock. Proper disinfection during an outbreak can help prevent virus spread and will shorten the time for contam...

  5. Attenuated oncolytic Measles Virus strains as cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Msaouel, P.; Iankov, I.D.; Dispenzieri, A.; Galanis, E.

    2011-01-01

    Attenuated measles virus vaccine strains have emerged as a promising oncolytic vector platform, having shown significant anti-tumor activity against a broad range of malignant neoplasms. Measles virus strains derived from the attenuated Edmonston-B (MV-Edm) vaccine lineage have been shown to selectively infect, replicate in and lyse cancer cells while causing minimal cytopathic effect on normal tissues. This review summarizes the preclinical data that led to the rapid clinical translation of oncolytic measles vaccine strains and provides an overview of early clinical data using this oncolytic platform. Furthermore, novel approaches currently under development to further enhance the oncolytic efficacy of MV-Edm strains, including strategies to circumvent immunity or modulate immune system responses, combinatorial approaches with standard treatment modalities, virus retargeting as well as strategies for in vivo monitoring of viral replication are discussed. PMID:21740361

  6. Replication of clinical measles virus strains in hispid cotton rats.

    PubMed

    Wyde, P R; Moore-Poveda, D K; Daley, N J; Oshitani, H

    1999-05-01

    An alternative model to nonhuman primates to study measles virus (MV) pathogenesis, to evaluate potential MV vaccines, or to screen for potential antivirals effective against this virus is highly desirable. The laboratory-adapted Edmonston strain of MV has been reported to replicate in the lungs of hispid cotton rats following intranasal inoculation, immunosuppress infected animals, and disseminate widely from the lungs, making these animals a candidate model. However, clinical MV strains have generally not been found to grow in these animals, limiting the utility and acceptance of this model. In the present studies we demonstrate reproducible replication of several clinical MV strains in hispid cotton rats. As with the Edmonston strain, leukocytes appear to be the primary target cells of these viruses following intranasal inoculation, and extrapulmonary dissemination is common. It is also demonstrated that prior MV infection or immunization of test animals with MV vaccine prevents pulmonary tract infection. These findings should make the MV-cotton rat model more acceptable.

  7. Evolution of and Evolutionary Relationships between Extant Vaccinia Virus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li; Favis, Nicole; Famulski, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although vaccinia virus (VACV) was once used as a vaccine to eradicate smallpox on a worldwide scale, the biological origins of VACV are uncertain, as are the historical relationships between the different strains once used as smallpox vaccines. Here, we sequenced additional VACV strains that either represent relatively pristine examples of old vaccines (e.g., Dryvax, Lister, and Tashkent) or have been subjected to additional laboratory passage (e.g., IHD-W and WR). These genome sequences were compared with those previously reported for other VACVs as well as other orthopoxviruses. These extant VACVs do not always cluster in simple phylogenetic trees that are aligned with the known historical relationships between these strains. Rather, the pattern of deletions suggests that all existing strains likely come from a complex stock of viruses that has been passaged, distributed, and randomly sampled over time, thus obscuring simple historical or geographic links. We examined surviving nonclonal vaccine stocks, like Dryvax, which continue to harbor larger and now rare variants, including one that we have designated “clone DPP25.” DPP25 encodes genes not found in most VACV strains, including an ankyrin-F-box protein, a homolog of the variola virus (Bangladesh) B18R gene which we show can be deleted without affecting virulence in mice. We propose a simple common mechanism by which recombination of a larger and hypothetical DPP25-like ancestral strain, combined with selection for retention of critically important genes near the terminal inverted repeat boundaries (vaccinia virus growth factor gene and an interferon alpha/beta receptor homolog), could produce all known VACV variants. IMPORTANCE Smallpox was eradicated by using a combination of intensive disease surveillance and vaccination using vaccinia virus (VACV). Interestingly, little is known about the historical relationships between different strains of VACV and how these viruses may have evolved from a

  8. Molecular Assay on Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Ticks (Ixodidae) Collected from Kermanshah Province, Western Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadian, Maria; Chinikar, Sadegh; Telmadarraiy, Zakkyeh; Vatandoost, Hassan; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Sedaghat, Mohammad Mehdi; Noroozi, Mehdi; Faghihi, Faezeh; Jalali, Tahmineh; Khakifirouz, Sahar; Shahhosseini, Nariman; Farhadpour, Firoozeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a feverous and hemorrhagic disease endemic in some parts of Iran and caused by an arbovirus related to Bunyaviridae family and Nairovirusgenus. The main virus reservoir in the nature is ticks, however small vertebrates and a wide range of domestic and wild animals are regarded as reservoir hosts. This study was conducted to determine the infection rate of CCHF virus in hard ticks of Sarpole-Zahab County, Kermanshah province, west of Iran. Methods: From total number of 851 collected ticks from 8 villages, 131 ticks were selected randomlyand investigated for detection of CCHF virus using RT-PCR. Results: The virus was found in 3.8% of the tested ticks. Hyalommaanatolicum, H. asiaticum and Rhipicephalus sanguineus species were found to have viral infection, with the highest infection rate (11.11%) in Rh. sanguineus. Conclusion: These findings provide epidemiological evidence for planning control strategies of the disease in the study area. PMID:27308296

  9. Vector competence of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) for DEN2-43 and New Guinea C virus strains of dengue 2 virus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Xia; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Li, Chun-Xiao; Dong, Yan-De; Zhang, Ying-Mei; Xing, Dan; Xue, Rui-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Zhao, Tong-Yan

    2013-12-01

    The vector competence of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti with regard to DEN2-43 and New Guinea C (NGC) virus strains of Dengue 2 viruses was assessed and compared. The infection and dissemination rate and distribution of DEN2-43 antigens in orally infected Ae. albopictus was investigated using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and an indirect immunofluorescence assay. To better understand the initial infection, dissemination and transmission of these viral strains in vector mosquitoes, Ae. albopoictus and Ae. aegypti were fed an artificial blood meal containing either the DEN2-43 or NGC strain. There was no significant difference in the infection and dissemination rates of DEN2-43 and NGC virus strains in Ae. albopictus, however, Ae. aegypti was more susceptible to infection by NGC than DEN2-43 vrius strain. Ae. albopictus mosquitoes infected with the NGC strain developed a higher percentage of midgut infections than those infected with the DEN2-43 strain (t=2.893, df=7, P=0.024). Approximately 26.7% of midgut samples were positive for the NGC antigen 5 days after infection, and 80% of mosquitoes had infected midgets after 15 days. The NGC antigen first became evident in mosquito salivary glands on Day 5, and 40% of mosquitoes had infected salivary by Day 9. In contrast, the DEN2-43 antigen first became evident in salivary glands on Day 7. The infection rate of NGC and DEN2-43 virus strains in salivary glands were similar. These results indicate that Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti are moderately competent vectors for the DEN2-43 virus, which could provide basic data for the epidemiology study of dengue fever in China.

  10. Protection of monkeys against Machupo virus by the passive administration of Bolivian haemorrhagic fever immunoglobulin (human origin).

    PubMed

    Eddy, G A; Wagner, F S; Scott, S K; Mahlandt, B J

    1975-01-01

    Bolivian haemorrhagic fever immunoglobulin of human origin, given either prior to or shortly after experimental infection with Machupo virus, protected rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys against initial clinical illness. Some survivors developed severe neurological signs 30-47 days after virus inoculation and died 4-6 days later. Results from one of the experiments suggested that the development of neurological signs was associated more frequently with high doses of immunoglobulin than with intermediate or low doses.

  11. Limited replication of yellow fever 17DD and 17D-Dengue recombinant viruses in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Gisela F; Marchevsky, Renato S; Fillipis, Ana M B de; Nogueira, Rita M R; Bonaldo, Myrna C; Acero, Pedro C; Caride, Elena; Freire, Marcos S; Galler, Ricardo

    2008-06-01

    For the development of safe live attenuated flavivirus vaccines one of the main properties to be established is viral replication. We have used real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and virus titration by plaque assay to determine the replication of yellow fever 17DD virus (YFV 17DD) and recombinant yellow fever 17D viruses expressing envelope proteins of dengue virus serotypes 2 and 4 (17D-DENV-2 and 17D-DENV-4). Serum samples from rhesus monkeys inoculated with YFV 17DD and 17D-DENV chimeras by intracerebral or subcutaneous route were used to determine and compare the viremia induced by these viruses. Viral load quantification in samples from monkeys inoculated by either route with YFV 17DD virus suggested a restricted capability of the virus to replicate reaching not more than 2.0 log10 PFU mL(-1) or 3.29 log10 copies mL(-1). Recombinant 17D-dengue viruses were shown by plaquing and real-time PCR to be as attenuated as YF 17DD virus with the highest mean peak titer of 1.97 log10 PFU mL(-1) or 3.53 log10 copies mL(-1). These data serve as a comparative basis for the characterization of other 17D-based live attenuated candidate vaccines against other diseases.

  12. Interference activity of bovine herpes virus 1 strains against Aujeszky's disease virus in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Peshev, R; Bostandjieva, R; Haralambiev, H

    1997-02-01

    The interference-inducing activity of different low- and high-virulence strains of bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1) against Aujeszky's disease virus was studied by a parallel titration on permissive and non-permissive cell culture. The low-virulence BHV-1 strains possessed better interference-inducing activity than the high-virulence strains. An interference blocking test (IBT) was developed for the detection of BHV-1 antibodies in bovine sera. Comparative results of IBT and the virus neutralisation reaction did not show statistically reliable differences.

  13. Survey for evidence of Colorado tick fever virus outside of the known endemic area in California.

    PubMed

    Lane, R S; Emmons, R W; Devlin, V; Dondero, D V; Nelson, B C

    1982-07-01

    A virus very similar or identical to Colorado tick fever (CTF) virus was recovered from the blood clot of one of 104 black-tailed jack rabbits (Lepus californicus) examined during a survey for various zoonotic agents in mammals and ticks from the University of California, Hopland Field Station, Mendocino County, California, 1974--79. This is the first reported isolation of a CTF-like virus from L. californicus, and only the second time such a virus has been found in northwestern California. Mendocino County is located far outside the known distributional ranges of the most common mammalian hosts of CTF virus and of Dermacentor andersoni, the only proven tick vector for man. The viral isolate is very similar to a CTF-like virus previously recovered from the blood and spleen of a western gray squirrel (Sciurus griseus) from San Luis Obispo County, an area also outside of the previously-known CTF area. Virus was not isolated from 14 additional species of mammals (354 specimens) or from eight species of ticks (4,487 individuals), but CTF-neutralizing antibodies were detected in 28 of 771 (3.6%) sera from seven of 15 mammalian species including significant titers (greater than or equal to 1:8) in two species and one subspecies not previously reported as natural hosts, i.e., brush mouse (Peromyscus boylii), pinyon mouse (P. truei), and Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus). CTF indirect immunofluorescent antibodies also were detected in 26 of 129 (20.2%) sera belonging to four of five mammalian species tested. Neutralizing antibodies were found in sera of deer from other localities in Mendocino County, from a deer mouse from Napa County, and from a brush rabbit from Monterey County as well. These findings suggest that a virus identical or similar to CTF virus is widespread in northwestern-westcentral California, and that surveillance for human cases of CTF or a similar disease should be extended to cover this region. PMID:7102919

  14. Intracellular membrane association of the N-terminal domain of classical swine fever virus NS4B determines viral genome replication and virulence.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tomokazu; Ruggli, Nicolas; Nagashima, Naofumi; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Igarashi, Manabu; Mine, Junki; Hofmann, Martin A; Liniger, Matthias; Summerfield, Artur; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2015-09-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease in pigs that can range from a severe haemorrhagic fever to a nearly unapparent disease, depending on the virulence of the virus strain. Little is known about the viral molecular determinants of CSFV virulence. The nonstructural protein NS4B is essential for viral replication. However, the roles of CSFV NS4B in viral genome replication and pathogenesis have not yet been elucidated. NS4B of the GPE-  vaccine strain and of the highly virulent Eystrup strain differ by a total of seven amino acid residues, two of which are located in the predicted trans-membrane domains of NS4B and were described previously to relate to virulence, and five residues clustering in the N-terminal part. In the present study, we examined the potential role of these five amino acids in modulating genome replication and determining pathogenicity in pigs. A chimeric low virulent GPE- -derived virus carrying the complete Eystrup NS4B showed enhanced pathogenicity in pigs. The in vitro replication efficiency of the NS4B chimeric GPE-  replicon was significantly higher than that of the replicon carrying only the two Eystrup-specific amino acids in NS4B. In silico and in vitro data suggest that the N-terminal part of NS4B forms an amphipathic α-helix structure. The N-terminal NS4B with these five amino acid residues is associated with the intracellular membranes. Taken together, this is the first gain-of-function study showing that the N-terminal domain of NS4B can determine CSFV genome replication in cell culture and viral pathogenicity in pigs. PMID:26018962

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) field isolates from outbreaks in South and Central America.

    PubMed

    Pereda, A J; Greiser-Wilke, I; Schmitt, B; Rincon, M A; Mogollon, J D; Sabogal, Z Y; Lora, A M; Sanguinetti, H; Piccone, M E

    2005-06-01

    To date, there is little information concerning the epidemiological situation of classical swine fever (CSF) in the Americas. Besides summarizing the available data, genotyping of isolates from outbreaks in domestic pigs in several countries of South and Central America was performed. For this, a 190 base fragment of the E2 envelope glycoprotein gene was used. European strains and isolates, and historical isolates from the United States (US) were included for comparison. In contrast to the situation in most parts of Europe, where group 2 isolates predominate, it was found that all the isolates from the American continent analyzed belonged to group 1 and were further resolved into three subgroups. The Cuban isolates clustered in subgroup 1.2, whereas the isolates from Honduras and Guatemala clustered in subgroup 1.3. The remaining isolates from Argentina, Brazil, Colombia and Mexico generated four poorly resolved clusters in subgroup 1.1, together with the vaccine strains, with historical European and US isolates, and with a recent Russian isolate. While the vaccine strains and the historical European isolates formed a relatively distinct cluster, one of the US isolates clustered together with the Mexican, and another one with Colombian isolates. Historically, CSF (hog cholera) was observed almost simultaneously in the US and in Europe in the first half of the 19th century, and its origin remains a matter of discussion. Our results showed that the US isolates are closely related to isolates from South America, while appearance of isolates in Cuba on one hand and in Honduras and Guatemala on the other hand, seems to have been due to unrelated events. This allows to speculate that at least in the American continent, CSF virus may have appeared independently in several regions, and spreading may have been a secondary effect.

  16. RB virus: a strain of Friend virus that produces a 'Friend virus-like' disease in Fv-2rr mice.

    PubMed

    Geib, R W; Seaward, M B; Stevens, M L; Cho, C L; Majumdar, M

    1989-10-01

    RB virus is a newly derived strain of Friend virus that was adapted to produce a 'Friend-like' disease in mice that are genetically resistant to wild-type Friend virus. RB virus was produced by passing high titers of the wild-type Friend virus (Lilly-Steeves polycythemia-producing strain) through adult Fv-2rr mice. Titration of the defective spleen focus-forming virus indicated RB virus infected similar numbers of Fv-2ss or Fv-2rr target cells. Analysis of the spleens from mice infected with RB virus indicated that RB induced the early stage of Friend disease (erythroid proliferation) in both Fv-2rr and Fv-2ss mice. Fv-2ss mice infected with RB virus developed the classical Friend disease within 3 weeks. In contrast, the percentage of Fv-2rr mice developing the 'Friend-like' disease after infection with RB virus never exceeded 60%. The latency period of RBV in Fv-2rr mice was strain dependent. D2.R16 (Fv-2rr) developed the syndrome more rapidly than C57BL/6 (Fv-2rr). RB virus retained the capacity to transform erythroprogenitor cells from both Fv-2ss and Fv-2rr animals. Cells infected with RB virus consistently produced a modified SFFV envelope protein, gp48.

  17. 77 FR 68783 - Prospective Grant of Co-Exclusive License: Veterinary Vaccines for Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ...: Veterinary Vaccines for Rift Valley Fever Virus AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC...-exclusive license in Africa, in the field of use of veterinary vaccines, to practice the inventions listed... attenuated vaccine constructs that contain complete deletions of critical virulence factors of Rift...

  18. Interaction between core protein of classical swine fever virus with cellular IQGAP1 proetin appears essential for virulence in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we show that IQGAP1, a cellular protein that plays a pivotal role as a regulator of the cytoskeleton affecting cell adhesion, polarization and migration, interacts with Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) Core protein. Sequence analyses identified a defined set of residues within CSFV Core prote...

  19. Seroprevalence of Infections with Dengue, Rift Valley Fever and Chikungunya Viruses in Kenya, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, Caroline; Ahenda, Petronella; Vittor, Amy Y.; Nyoka, Raymond; Gikunju, Stella; Wachira, Cyrus; Waiboci, Lilian; Umuro, Mamo; Kim, Andrea A.; Nderitu, Leonard; Juma, Bonventure; Montgomery, Joel M.; Breiman, Robert F.; Fields, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses are a major constituent of emerging infectious diseases worldwide, but limited data are available on the prevalence, distribution, and risk factors for transmission in Kenya and East Africa. In this study, we used 1,091 HIV-negative blood specimens from the 2007 Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey (KAIS 2007) to test for the presence of IgG antibodies to dengue virus (DENV), chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV).The KAIS 2007 was a national population-based survey conducted by the Government of Kenya to provide comprehensive information needed to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Antibody testing for arboviruses was performed on stored blood specimens from KAIS 2007 through a two-step sandwich IgG ELISA using either commercially available kits or CDC-developed assays. Out of the 1,091 samples tested, 210 (19.2%) were positive for IgG antibodies against at least one of the three arboviruses. DENV was the most common of the three viruses tested (12.5% positive), followed by RVFV and CHIKV (4.5% and 0.97%, respectively). For DENV and RVFV, the participant’s province of residence was significantly associated (P≤.01) with seropositivity. Seroprevalence of DENV and RVFV increased with age, while there was no correlation between province of residence/age and seropositivity for CHIKV. Females had twelve times higher odds of exposure to CHIK as opposed to DENV and RVFV where both males and females had the same odds of exposure. Lack of education was significantly associated with a higher odds of previous infection with either DENV or RVFV (p <0.01). These data show that a number of people are at risk of arbovirus infections depending on their geographic location in Kenya and transmission of these pathogens is greater than previously appreciated. This poses a public health risk, especially for DENV. PMID:26177451

  20. Seroprevalence of Infections with Dengue, Rift Valley Fever and Chikungunya Viruses in Kenya, 2007.

    PubMed

    Ochieng, Caroline; Ahenda, Petronella; Vittor, Amy Y; Nyoka, Raymond; Gikunju, Stella; Wachira, Cyrus; Waiboci, Lilian; Umuro, Mamo; Kim, Andrea A; Nderitu, Leonard; Juma, Bonventure; Montgomery, Joel M; Breiman, Robert F; Fields, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses are a major constituent of emerging infectious diseases worldwide, but limited data are available on the prevalence, distribution, and risk factors for transmission in Kenya and East Africa. In this study, we used 1,091 HIV-negative blood specimens from the 2007 Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey (KAIS 2007) to test for the presence of IgG antibodies to dengue virus (DENV), chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV).The KAIS 2007 was a national population-based survey conducted by the Government of Kenya to provide comprehensive information needed to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Antibody testing for arboviruses was performed on stored blood specimens from KAIS 2007 through a two-step sandwich IgG ELISA using either commercially available kits or CDC-developed assays. Out of the 1,091 samples tested, 210 (19.2%) were positive for IgG antibodies against at least one of the three arboviruses. DENV was the most common of the three viruses tested (12.5% positive), followed by RVFV and CHIKV (4.5% and 0.97%, respectively). For DENV and RVFV, the participant's province of residence was significantly associated (P≤.01) with seropositivity. Seroprevalence of DENV and RVFV increased with age, while there was no correlation between province of residence/age and seropositivity for CHIKV. Females had twelve times higher odds of exposure to CHIK as opposed to DENV and RVFV where both males and females had the same odds of exposure. Lack of education was significantly associated with a higher odds of previous infection with either DENV or RVFV (p <0.01). These data show that a number of people are at risk of arbovirus infections depending on their geographic location in Kenya and transmission of these pathogens is greater than previously appreciated. This poses a public health risk, especially for DENV.

  1. Plant-produced Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus nucleoprotein for use in indirect ELISA.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Richard; Burt, Felicity; Rybicki, Edward P; Meyers, Ann E

    2016-10-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a disease of serious public concern caused by the CCHF virus (CCHFV). Anti-CCHFV IgG in humans can be detected using ELISA with native antigen prepared from cell cultures which have been infected with virus or from brain tissue of suckling mice which have been inoculated with virus. However, the preparation of these reagents requires high biosafety levels and is expensive. A safer, more cost-effective recombinantly-produced NP reagent is desirable. Recently, plants have been shown to be a cost-effective and safe system for expression of recombinant proteins. This work describes cloning of the CCHFV NP gene into three different plant expression systems and comparison of expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The highest expressing construct was selected. Expressed NP was purified by ammonium sulphate fractionation prior to histidine affinity chromatography. Purified NP was tested in an indirect ELISA to determine if the recombinant antigen was able to detect anti-CCHFV IgG in sera from convalescent patients. Plant-produced NP detected IgG antibodies against CCHFV in 13/13 serum samples from convalescent patients and 0/13 samples collected from volunteers with no history of CCHFV infection. Results were compared with commercially available immunofluorescent assays and 100% concordance was obtained between the two assays. This suggests that a full evaluation of the plant produced NP for application as a safe recombinant is warranted. PMID:27474493

  2. Epidemiological Survey of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus in Ticks in Nagasaki, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hayasaka, Daisuke; Shimada, Satoshi; Aoki, Kotaro; Takamatsu, Yuki; Uchida, Leo; Horio, Masahiro; Fuxun, Yu; Morita, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging disease endemic in East Asia. Transmitted to other organisms by infected ticks, the SFTS virus (SFTSV) and is endemic to Nagasaki in western Japan. However, epidemiological information regarding SFTSV in Nagasaki ticks has not been available to date. In this study, we began by examining the sensitivities of SFTSV gene detection by real-time RT-PCR and virus isolation in cultured cells and mice. These methods could detect SFTSV in the samples containing more than 4 × 100 ffu. Next, we attempted to isolate SFTSV and to detect viral gene in 2,222 nymph and adult ticks collected from May to August 2013 among seven regions of Nagasaki. However, neither virus isolation nor viral gene detection were confirmed in the tick pools. SFTSV positivity rates are considered to be very low in ticks, and viral loads are also very limited. Further investigations increasing the number of ticks and including larval samples as well as improved detection methods, may be required to find SFTSV-positive ticks in this region. PMID:26543390

  3. Episodic adaptive diversification of classical swine fever virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5B.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yang, Zexiao

    2015-12-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the pathogen that causes a highly infectious disease of pigs and has led to disastrous losses to pig farms and related industries. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) NS5B is a central component of the replicase complex (RC) in some single-stranded RNA viruses, including CSFV. On the basis of genetic variation, the CSFV RdRps could be clearly divided into 2 major groups and a minor group, which is consistent with the phylogenetic relationships and virulence diversification of the CSFV isolates. However, the adaptive signature underlying such an evolutionary profile of the polymerase and the virus is still an interesting open question. We analyzed the evolutionary trajectory of the CSFV RdRps over different timescales to evaluate the potential adaptation. We found that adaptive selection has driven the diversification of the RdRps between, but not within, CSFV major groups. Further, the major adaptive divergence-related sites are located in the surfaces relevant to the interaction with other component(s) of RC and the entrance and exit of the template-binding channel. These results might shed some light on the nature of the RdRp in virulence diversification of CSFV groups.

  4. Vector competence of Kenyan Culex zombaensis and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes for Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed

    Turell, M J; Lee, J S; Richardson, J H; Sang, R C; Kioko, E N; Agawo, M O; Pecor, J; O'Guinn, M L

    2007-12-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) continues to be a significant problem in Kenya as well as in Egypt, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia. In order to determine the ability of Kenyan mosquitoes to transmit RVF virus (RVFV), we collected mosquitoes in the Lake Naivasha region of Kenya and evaluated them for their potential to transmit RVFV under laboratory conditions. After feeding on a hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) with a viremia of 10(9.7) plaque-forming units of virus/ml of blood, Culex zombaensis were highly susceptible to infection with RVFV, with 89% becoming infected. In contrast, Cx. quinquefasciatus that were fed on the same hamsters were marginally susceptible, with only 20% becoming infected. Differences in percentages of mosquitoes that developed a disseminated infection were equally disparate, with 55% and 8%, for Cx. zombaensis and Cx. quinquefasciatus, respectively. Forty-eight percent of the Cx. zombaensis with a disseminated infection that fed on a susceptible hamster transmitted virus by bite, indicating a moderate salivary gland barrier. However, the presence of a salivary gland barrier could not be determined for Cx. quinquefasciatus because none of the 18 mosquitoes that took a 2nd blood meal had a disseminated infection. These studies illustrate the need to identify the ability of individual mosquito species to transmit RVFV so that correct decisions can be made concerning the application of appropriate control measures during an outbreak.

  5. Potential for Psorophora columbiae and Psorophora ciliata Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) to Transmit Rift Valley Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Turell, Michael J; Britch, Seth C; Aldridge, Robert L; Xue, Rui-De; Smith, Mike L; Cohnstaedt, Lee W; Linthicum, Kenneth J

    2015-09-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) continues to pose a threat to much of the world. Unlike many arboviruses, numerous mosquito species have been associated with RVFV in nature, and many species have been demonstrated as competent vectors in the laboratory. In this study, we evaluated two field-collected Psorophora species, Psorophora columbiae (Dyar and Knab) and Psorophora ciliata (F.) for their potential to transmit RVFV in North America. Both species were susceptible to infection after feeding on a hamster with a viremia of 10(7) plaque-forming units/ml, with infection rates of 65 and 83% for Ps. columbiae and Ps. ciliata, respectively (with nearly all specimens becoming infected when feeding on a hamster with a higher viremia). However, both species had a significant salivary gland barrier, as only 2/35 Ps. columbiae and 0/3 Ps. ciliata with a disseminated infection transmitted virus by bite. Despite the presence of the salivary gland barrier, due to the very high population that can occur and its propensity to feed on large mammals, Ps. columbiae might play a role in amplifying RVFV should that virus be introduced into an area where this species is common.

  6. Seroprevalence of antibodies against Chikungunya, Dengue, and Rift Valley fever viruses after febrile illness outbreak, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Norbert G; Girmann, Mirko; Randriamampionona, Njary; Bialonski, Alexandra; Maus, Deborah; Krefis, Anne Caroline; Njarasoa, Christine; Rajanalison, Jeanne Fleury; Ramandrisoa, Herly Daniel; Randriarison, Maurice Lucien; May, Jürgen; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Rakotozandrindrainy, Raphael

    2012-11-01

    In October 2009, two-3 months after an outbreak of a febrile disease with joint pain on the eastern coast of Madagascar, we assessed serologic markers for chikungunya virus (CHIKV), dengue virus (DENV), and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in 1,244 pregnant women at 6 locations. In 2 eastern coast towns, IgG seroprevalence against CHIKV was 45% and 23%; IgM seroprevalence was 28% and 5%. IgG seroprevalence against DENV was 17% and 11%. No anti-DENV IgM was detected. At 4 locations, 450-1,300 m high, IgG seroprevalence against CHIKV was 0%-3%, suggesting CHIKV had not spread to higher inland-altitudes. Four women had IgG against RVFV, probably antibodies from a 2008 epidemic. Most (78%) women from coastal locations with CHIKV-specific IgG reported joint pain and stiffness; 21% reported no symptoms. CHIKV infection was significantly associated with high bodyweight. The outbreak was an isolated CHIKV epidemic without relevant DENV co-transmission.

  7. Yellow Fever 17DD Vaccine Virus Infection Causes Detectable Changes in Chicken Embryos.

    PubMed

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Dias de Oliveira, Barbara C E P; de Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho; Maia de Souza, Yuli Rodrigues; Ferro, Jessica Maria dos Santos; da Silva, Igor José; Caputo, Luzia Fátima Gonçalves; Guedes, Priscila Tavares; dos Santos, Alexandre Araujo Cunha; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most effective human vaccines ever created. The YF vaccine has been produced since 1937 in embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with the YF 17D virus. Yet, little information is available about the infection mechanism of YF 17DD virus in this biological model. To better understand this mechanism, we infected embryos of Gallus gallus domesticus and analyzed their histopathology after 72 hours of YF infection. Some embryos showed few apoptotic bodies in infected tissues, suggesting mild focal infection processes. Confocal and super-resolution microscopic analysis allowed us to identify as targets of viral infection: skeletal muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, nervous system cells, renal tubular epithelium, lung parenchyma, and fibroblasts associated with connective tissue in the perichondrium and dermis. The virus replication was heaviest in muscle tissues. In all of these specimens, RT-PCR methods confirmed the presence of replicative intermediate and genomic YF RNA. This clearer characterization of cell targets in chicken embryos paves the way for future development of a new YF vaccine based on a new cell culture system. PMID:26371874

  8. Yellow Fever 17DD Vaccine Virus Infection Causes Detectable Changes in Chicken Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Dias de Oliveira, Barbara C. E. P.; de Sequeira, Patrícia Carvalho; Maia de Souza, Yuli Rodrigues; Ferro, Jessica Maria dos Santos; da Silva, Igor José; Caputo, Luzia Fátima Gonçalves; Guedes, Priscila Tavares; dos Santos, Alexandre Araujo Cunha; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Bonaldo, Myrna Cristina; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine is one of the most effective human vaccines ever created. The YF vaccine has been produced since 1937 in embryonated chicken eggs inoculated with the YF 17D virus. Yet, little information is available about the infection mechanism of YF 17DD virus in this biological model. To better understand this mechanism, we infected embryos of Gallus gallus domesticus and analyzed their histopathology after 72 hours of YF infection. Some embryos showed few apoptotic bodies in infected tissues, suggesting mild focal infection processes. Confocal and super-resolution microscopic analysis allowed us to identify as targets of viral infection: skeletal muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, nervous system cells, renal tubular epithelium, lung parenchyma, and fibroblasts associated with connective tissue in the perichondrium and dermis. The virus replication was heaviest in muscle tissues. In all of these specimens, RT-PCR methods confirmed the presence of replicative intermediate and genomic YF RNA. This clearer characterization of cell targets in chicken embryos paves the way for future development of a new YF vaccine based on a new cell culture system. PMID:26371874

  9. Data-Driven Modeling to Assess Receptivity for Rift Valley Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Christopher M.; Niu, Tianchan; Reisen, William K.; Hartley, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) is an enzootic virus that causes extensive morbidity and mortality in domestic ruminants in Africa, and it has shown the potential to invade other areas such as the Arabian Peninsula. Here, we develop methods for linking mathematical models to real-world data that could be used for continent-scale risk assessment given adequate data on local host and vector populations. We have applied the methods to a well-studied agricultural region of California with 1 million dairy cattle, abundant and competent mosquito vectors, and a permissive climate that has enabled consistent transmission of West Nile virus and historically other arboviruses. Our results suggest that RVFV outbreaks could occur from February–November, but would progress slowly during winter–early spring or early fall and be limited spatially to areas with early increases in vector abundance. Risk was greatest in summer, when the areas at risk broadened to include most of the dairy farms in the study region, indicating the potential for considerable economic losses if an introduction were to occur. To assess the threat that RVFV poses to North America, including what-if scenarios for introduction and control strategies, models such as this one should be an integral part of the process; however, modeling must be paralleled by efforts to address the numerous remaining gaps in data and knowledge for this system. PMID:24244769

  10. Molecular typing and phylogenetic analysis of classical swine fever virus isolates from Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Nimisha; Ravishankar, Chintu; Rajasekhar, R; Sumod, K; Sumithra, T G; John, Koshy; Mini, M; Ravindran, Reghu; Shaji, Shiju; Aishwarya, J

    2015-12-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an economically important disease of pigs caused by CSF virus (CSFV) belonging to the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae. The disease is endemic in many countries including India. A comprehensive study was carried out to assess the type of CSFV circulating in the South Indian state of Kerala. During the period 2013-2014, clinical samples were collected from 19 suspected CSF outbreaks of domestic pigs in different districts of Kerala. The samples were tested using nested reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) targeting the E2 gene and RT-PCR for 5'UTR of the virus. Partial 5' UTR and E2 gene regions of six CSFV isolates were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the CSFV isolates belonged to subgroup 2.2. The isolates showed close resemblance to the other CSFV isolates circulating in India. It was also observed that the CSFV viruses from Kannur district were distinct from those circulating in the other districts as evidenced by their divergence from other Kerala isolates in the phylogenetic tree. Close relationship was seen to the CSFV isolates from South East Asian countries. PMID:26645036

  11. Episodic adaptive diversification of classical swine fever virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5B.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yang, Zexiao

    2015-12-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the pathogen that causes a highly infectious disease of pigs and has led to disastrous losses to pig farms and related industries. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) NS5B is a central component of the replicase complex (RC) in some single-stranded RNA viruses, including CSFV. On the basis of genetic variation, the CSFV RdRps could be clearly divided into 2 major groups and a minor group, which is consistent with the phylogenetic relationships and virulence diversification of the CSFV isolates. However, the adaptive signature underlying such an evolutionary profile of the polymerase and the virus is still an interesting open question. We analyzed the evolutionary trajectory of the CSFV RdRps over different timescales to evaluate the potential adaptation. We found that adaptive selection has driven the diversification of the RdRps between, but not within, CSFV major groups. Further, the major adaptive divergence-related sites are located in the surfaces relevant to the interaction with other component(s) of RC and the entrance and exit of the template-binding channel. These results might shed some light on the nature of the RdRp in virulence diversification of CSFV groups. PMID:26485449

  12. A sequence database allowing automated genotyping of Classical swine fever virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Sabrina; Zimmermann, Bernd; Moennig, Volker; Greiser-Wilke, Irene

    2007-03-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious viral disease of pigs. According to the OIE classification of diseases it is classified as a notifiable (previously List A) disease, thus having the potential for causing severe socio-economic problems and affecting severely the international trade of pigs and pig products. Effective control measures are compulsory, and to expose weaknesses a reliable tracing of the spread of the virus is necessary. Genetic typing has proved to be the method of choice. However, genotyping involves the use of multiple software applications, which is laborious and complex. The implementation of a sequence database, which is accessible by the World Wide Web with the option to type automatically new CSF virus isolates once the sequence is available is described. The sequence to be typed is tested for correct orientation and, if necessary, adjusted to the right length. The alignment and the neighbor-joining phylogenetic analysis with a standard set of sequences can then be calculated. The results are displayed as a graph. As an example, the determination is shown of the genetic subgroup of the isolate obtained from the outbreaks registered in Russia, in 2005. After registration (Irene.greiser-wilke@tiho-hannover.de) the database including the module for genotyping are accessible under http://viro08.tiho-hannover.de/eg/eurl_virus_db.htm.

  13. Effect of specific amino acid substitutions in the putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 on Classical Swine Fever Virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Sainz, I.J.; Largo, E.; Gladue, D.P.; Fletcher, P.; O’Donnell, V.; Holinka, L.G.; Carey, L.B.; Lu, X.; Nieva, J.L.; Borca, M.V.

    2014-05-15

    E2, along with E{sup rns} and E1, is an envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E2 is involved in several virus functions: cell attachment, host range susceptibility and virulence in natural hosts. Here we evaluate the role of a specific E2 region, {sup 818}CPIGWTGVIEC{sup 828}, containing a putative fusion peptide (FP) sequence. Reverse genetics utilizing a full-length infectious clone of the highly virulent CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) was used to evaluate how individual amino acid substitutions within this region of E2 may affect replication of BICv. A synthetic peptide representing the complete E2 FP amino acid sequence adopted a β-type extended conformation in membrane mimetics, penetrated into model membranes, and perturbed lipid bilayer integrity in vitro. Similar peptides harboring amino acid substitutions adopted comparable conformations but exhibited different membrane activities. Therefore, a preliminary characterization of the putative FP {sup 818}CPIGWTGVIEC{sup 828} indicates a membrane fusion activity and a critical role in virus replication. - Highlights: • A putative fusion peptide (FP) region in CSFV E2 protein was shown to be critical for virus growth. • Synthetic FPs were shown to efficiently penetrate into lipid membranes using an in vitro model. • Individual residues in the FP affecting virus replication were identified by reverse genetics. • The same FP residues are also responsible for mediating membrane fusion.

  14. Rickettsia massiliae and Rickettsia conorii Israeli Spotted Fever Strain Differentially Regulate Endothelial Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Bechelli, Jeremy; Smalley, Claire; Milhano, Natacha; Walker, David H; Fang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Rickettsiae primarily target microvascular endothelial cells. However, it remains elusive how endothelial cell responses to rickettsiae play a role in the pathogenesis of rickettsial diseases. In the present study, we employed two rickettsial species with high sequence homology but differing virulence to investigate the pathological endothelial cell responses. Rickettsia massiliae is a newly documented human pathogen that causes a mild spotted fever rickettsiosis. The "Israeli spotted fever" strain of R. conorii (ISF) causes severe disease with a mortality rate up to 30% in hospitalized patients. At 48 hours post infection (HPI), R. conorii (ISF) induced a significant elevation of IL-8 and IL-6 while R. massiliae induced a statistically significant elevated amount of MCP-1 at both transcriptional and protein synthesis levels. Strikingly, R. conorii (ISF), but not R. massiliae, caused a significant level of cell death or injury in HMEC-1 cells at 72 HPI, demonstrated by live-dead cell staining, annexin V staining and lactate dehydrogenase release. Monolayers of endothelial cells infected with R. conorii (ISF) showed a statistically significant decrease in electrical resistance across the monolayer compared to both R. massiliae-infected and uninfected cells at 72 HPI, suggesting increased endothelial permeability. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibitors of caspase-1 significantly reduced the release of lactate dehydrogenase by R. conorii (ISF)-infected HMEC-1 cells, which suggests the role of caspase-1 in mediating the death of endothelial cells. Taken together, our data illustrated that a distinct proinflammatory cytokine profile and endothelial dysfunction, as evidenced by endothelial cell death/injury and increased permeability, are associated with the severity of rickettsial diseases.

  15. Outbreak-related porcine epidemic diarrhea virus strains similar to US strains, South Korea, 2013.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunhee; Lee, Changhee

    2014-07-01

    In late 2013, outbreaks of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) infection recurred in South Korea. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses showed that isolates from the outbreaks were most closely related to emergent US strains of PEDV. These US strain-like PEDV variants are prevalent in South Korea and responsible for recent outbreaks in the country.

  16. Prevalence of antibody to malignant catarrhal fever virus in wild and domestic ruminants by competitive-inhibition ELISA.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Shen, D T; Jessup, D A; Knowles, D P; Gorham, J R; Thorne, T; O'Toole, D; Crawford, T B

    1996-07-01

    A competitive-inhibition ELISA (CI-ELISA), based on a monoclonal antibody to an epitope conserved among malignant catarrhal fever virus (MCFV) strains of both wildebeest and sheep origin, was used to determine the prevalence of antibody to MCFV in selected domestic and wild ruminants, both free-ranging and captive, from the USA. We evaluated 2528 sera from 14 species between 1990 and 1995, including 80 pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana), 339 bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), 103 biston (Bison bison), 17 black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus), 395 domestic cattle (Bos taurus), 291 domestic goats (Capra hircus), 680 domestic sheep (Ovis ammon), 323 elk (Cervus elaphus), 41 llamas (Lama glama), 21 mouflon sheep (Ovis musimon), 54 mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), 101 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), 20 muskox (Ovibos moschatus), and 63 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). A high seroprevalence (37 to 62%) was observed in domestic sheep, domestic goats, muskox, and some bighorn sheep populations. Seroprevalence in these species was generally age-related: a very low seroprevalence was present in these animals under one year of age. A low seroprevalence (2% to 13%) was found in clinically-susceptible species such as domestic cattle, deer, elk and bison, supporting the concept that significant numbers of non-lethal infections occur among clinically susceptible ruminants.

  17. Prevalence of antibody to malignant catarrhal fever virus in wild and domestic ruminants by competitive-inhibition ELISA.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Shen, D T; Jessup, D A; Knowles, D P; Gorham, J R; Thorne, T; O'Toole, D; Crawford, T B

    1996-07-01

    A competitive-inhibition ELISA (CI-ELISA), based on a monoclonal antibody to an epitope conserved among malignant catarrhal fever virus (MCFV) strains of both wildebeest and sheep origin, was used to determine the prevalence of antibody to MCFV in selected domestic and wild ruminants, both free-ranging and captive, from the USA. We evaluated 2528 sera from 14 species between 1990 and 1995, including 80 pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana), 339 bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), 103 biston (Bison bison), 17 black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus), 395 domestic cattle (Bos taurus), 291 domestic goats (Capra hircus), 680 domestic sheep (Ovis ammon), 323 elk (Cervus elaphus), 41 llamas (Lama glama), 21 mouflon sheep (Ovis musimon), 54 mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), 101 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), 20 muskox (Ovibos moschatus), and 63 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). A high seroprevalence (37 to 62%) was observed in domestic sheep, domestic goats, muskox, and some bighorn sheep populations. Seroprevalence in these species was generally age-related: a very low seroprevalence was present in these animals under one year of age. A low seroprevalence (2% to 13%) was found in clinically-susceptible species such as domestic cattle, deer, elk and bison, supporting the concept that significant numbers of non-lethal infections occur among clinically susceptible ruminants. PMID:8827669

  18. A study of lymphoid organs and serum proinflammatory cytokines in pigs infected with African swine fever virus genotype II.

    PubMed

    Zakaryan, Hovakim; Cholakyans, Victorya; Simonyan, Lusine; Misakyan, Alla; Karalova, Elena; Chavushyan, Andranik; Karalyan, Zaven

    2015-06-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV), the causative agent of one of the most important viral diseases of domestic pigs for which no vaccine is available, causes immune system disorders in infected animals. In this study, the serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, as well as the histological and cellular constitution of lymphoid organs of pigs infected with ASFV genotype II were investigated. The results showed a high degree of lymphocyte depletion in the lymphoid organs, particularly in the spleen and lymph nodes, where ASFV infection led to a twofold decrease in the number of lymphocytes on the final day of infection. Additionally, ASFV-infected pigs had atypical forms of lymphocytes found in all lymphoid organs. In contrast to lymphocytes, the number of immature immune cells, particularly myelocytes, increased dramatically and reached a maximum on day 7 postinfection. The serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 were evaluated. Proinflammatory cytokines showed increased levels after ASFV infection, with peak values at 7 days postinfection, and this highlights their role in the pathogenesis of ASFV. In conclusion, this study showed that ASFV genotype II, like other highly virulent strains, causes severe pathological changes in the immune system of pigs.

  19. IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDIES WITH A STRAIN OF LEPTOSPIRA ISOLATED FROM A CASE OF YELLOW FEVER IN MERIDA, YUCATAN

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hideyo; Kligler, I. J.

    1920-01-01

    Identification of the leptospira isolated from a case of yellow fever in Merida was accomplished by means of an anti-icteroides immune serum prepared in a horse with several Guayaquil strains of Leptospira icteroides. The immune serum showed a protective action of high titer against the Merida strain, thus establishing its efficacy as a therapeutic agent against this strain. Polyvalent anti-icteroides immune serum prepared in the horse or monovalent anti-icteroides immune serums prepared in the rabbit had a definite devitalizing action upon the Merida strain, while immune serums similarly prepared with strains of icterohœmorrhagiœ had no perceptible effect upon the Merida strain. Serums from yellow fever convalescents in Merida gave a positive Pfeiffer reaction with the Merida strain of Leptospira icteroides. The reactions between the Guayaquil strains (Nos. 1 and 5) and two of these serums from convalescents varied from definitely positive to doubtful, owing probably to the diminution of active immune principles in the serums during the prolonged and unfavorable conditions of their transportation. PMID:19868465

  20. Serosurvey of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in domestic animals, Gujarat, India, 2013.

    PubMed

    Mourya, Devendra T; Yadav, Pragya D; Shete, Anita; Majumdar, Triparna D; Kanani, Amit; Kapadia, Dhirendra; Chandra, Vartika; Kachhiapatel, Anantdevesh J; Joshi, Pravinchandra T; Upadhyay, Kamalesh J; Dave, Paresh; Raval, Dinkar

    2014-09-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tick-borne viral disease that causes a fatal hemorrhagic illness in humans. This disease is asymptomatic in animals. CCHF was first confirmed in a nosocomial outbreak in 2011 in Gujarat State. Another notifiable outbreak occurred in July, 2013, in Karyana Village, Amreli district, Gujarat State. Anti-CCHF virus (CCHFV) immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were detected in domestic animals from the adjoining villages of the affected area, indicating a considerable amount of positivity against domestic animals. The present serosurvey was carried out to determine the prevalence of CCHFV among bovine, sheep, and goat populations from 15 districts of Gujarat State, India. A total of 1226 serum samples from domestic animals were screened for IgG antibodies using a CCHF animal IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibodies were detected in all the 15 districts surveyed; with positivity of 12.09%, 41.21%, and 33.62% in bovine, sheep, and goat respectively. This necessitates the surveillance of CCHFV IgG antibodies in animals and hemorrhagic fever cases in human. PMID:25229708

  1. [Study on using NSP2 protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HuN4-F112) to express E2 neutralizing epitope of classical swine fever virus].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan-Zhao; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Tong, Wu; Li, Ling; Jiang, Yi-Feng; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Establishment of recombinant porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) with co-expression E2 Epitope of Classical Swine Fever virus (CSFV) is a crucial step to develop a genetic engineered vaccine against PRRSV and CSFV. Reverse genetic manipulation could be adopted as a com monly used technique. In this study, we focus on using nonessential regions of NSP2 (aa480-532 and aa508-532) as viral vector to express E2 Epitope of CSFV. A neutralizing epitope of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) E2 protein was inserted into the two nonessential region of nsp2 by the method of mutant PCR, basing on the infectious clone of HuN4-F112 vaccine strain. The co-expressed full-length cDNA clones (psk-HuN4-F112-delta508-532 + E2 and psk-HuN4-F112-delta480-532 + E2) were assembled by cloning and splice of the gene fragments. The completely assembled full-length cDNA clones were confirmed by sequence and Swa I enzyme digestion. Capped RNAs were transcribed in vitro from a full-length cDNA clone of the viral genome and transfected into BHK-21 cells by liposome to acquire the rescued virus. The rescued recombinant viruses were passaged on MARC-145 cells. The successfully rescued viruses were tested by RT-PCR, digestion, and genome sequence. The results showed that these rescued viruses could be distinguished from the parental virus (HuN4-F112) with the mutant genetic marker (Mlu I enzyme site of virual genome at 14 667nt was created by synonymous mutation) and the inserted nsp2 gene region. The results of IFA showed that the inserted E2 epitope could be expressed by the recombinant viruses and the E2 epitope gene was stable during the viral serial passage. The results of plaque assay and viral growth curve showed that the recovery viruses possessed similar characterses of viral growth to those of the parental virus. In summary, the full-length infectious cDNA clones containing the marker gene were constructed and the marker recombinant viruses were rescued. The

  2. Seroepidemiological Studies of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Domestic and Wild Animals

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Jessica R.; Bergeron, Éric; Rollin, Pierre E.

    2016-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a widely distributed, tick-borne viral disease. Humans are the only species known to develop illness after CCHF virus (CCHFV) infection, characterized by a nonspecific febrile illness that can progress to severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic disease. A variety of animals may serve as asymptomatic reservoirs of CCHFV in an endemic cycle of transmission. Seroepidemiological studies have been instrumental in elucidating CCHFV reservoirs and in determining endemic foci of viral transmission. Herein, we review over 50 years of CCHFV seroepidemiological studies in domestic and wild animals. This review highlights the role of livestock in the maintenance and transmission of CCHFV, and provides a detailed summary of seroepidemiological studies of wild animal species, reflecting their relative roles in CCHFV ecology. PMID:26741652

  3. Ultrastructural study of Rift Valley fever virus in the mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Christopher; Steele, Keith E.; Honko, Anna; Shamblin, Joshua; Hensley, Lisa E.; Smith, Darci R.

    2012-09-15

    Detailed ultrastructural studies of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in the mouse model are needed to develop and characterize a small animal model of RVF for the evaluation of potential vaccines and therapeutics. In this study, the ultrastructural features of RVFV infection in the mouse model were analyzed. The main changes in the liver included the presence of viral particles in hepatocytes and hepatic stem cells accompanied by hepatocyte apoptosis. However, viral particles were observed rarely in the liver; in contrast, particles were extremely abundant in the CNS. Despite extensive lymphocytolysis, direct evidence of viral replication was not observed in the lymphoid tissue. These results correlate with the acute-onset hepatitis and delayed-onset encephalitis that are dominant features of severe human RVF, but suggest that host immune-mediated mechanisms contribute significantly to pathology. The results of this study expand our knowledge of RVFV-host interactions and further characterize the mouse model of RVF.

  4. Seroprevalence of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus in southeastern China and analysis of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Sun, J M; Zhang, Y J; Gong, Z Y; Zhang, L; Lv, H K; Lin, J F; Chai, C L; Ling, F; Liu, S L; Gu, S P; Zhu, Z H; Zheng, X H; Lan, Y Q; Ding, F; Huang, W Z; Xu, J R; Chen, E F; Jiang, J M

    2015-03-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) has been prevalent for some time in China and it was first identified in 2010. However, the seroprevalence of SFTSV in the general population in southeastern China and risk factors associated with the infection are currently unclear. Blood samples were collected from seven counties across Zhejiang province and tested for the presence of SFTSV-specific IgG antibodies by ELISA. A total of 1380 blood samples were collected of which 5·51% were seropositive for SFTSV with seroprevalence varying significantly between sites. Seroprevalence of SFTSV in people who were family members of the patient, lived in the same village as the patient, or lived in a different village than the patient varied significantly. There was significant difference in seroprevalence between participants who bred domestic animals and participants who did not. Domestic animals are probably potential reservoir hosts and contact with domestic animals may be a transmission route of SFTSV. PMID:24866248

  5. [Research Progress in the Core Proteins of the Classical Swine Fever Virus].

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuzhen; Zhao, Dantong; Liu, Guoying; He, Fan; Liu, Bin; Fu, Shaoyin; Hao, Yongqing; Zhang, Wenguang

    2015-09-01

    The core protein (CP) of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is one of its structural proteins. Apart from forming the nucleocapsid to protect internal viral genomic RNA, this protein is involved in transcriptional regulation. Also, during viral infection, the CP is involved in interactions with many host proteins. In this review, we combine study of this protein with its disorders, structural/functional characteristics, as well as its interactions with the non-structural proteins NS3, NS5B and host proteins such as SUMO-1, UBC9, OS9 and IQGAP1. We also summarize the important part played by the CP in CSFV pathogenicity, virulence and replication of genomic RNA. We also provide guidelines for further studies in the CP of the CSFV. PMID:26738299

  6. Seroepidemiological Studies of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Domestic and Wild Animals.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Jessica R; Bergeron, Éric; Rollin, Pierre E

    2016-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a widely distributed, tick-borne viral disease. Humans are the only species known to develop illness after CCHF virus (CCHFV) infection, characterized by a nonspecific febrile illness that can progress to severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic disease. A variety of animals may serve as asymptomatic reservoirs of CCHFV in an endemic cycle of transmission. Seroepidemiological studies have been instrumental in elucidating CCHFV reservoirs and in determining endemic foci of viral transmission. Herein, we review over 50 years of CCHFV seroepidemiological studies in domestic and wild animals. This review highlights the role of livestock in the maintenance and transmission of CCHFV, and provides a detailed summary of seroepidemiological studies of wild animal species, reflecting their relative roles in CCHFV ecology.

  7. Four dengue virus serotypes found circulating during an outbreak of dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in Jakarta, Indonesia, during 2004.

    PubMed

    Suwandono, Agus; Kosasih, Herman; Nurhayati; Kusriastuti, Rita; Harun, Syahrial; Ma'roef, Chairin; Wuryadi, Suharyono; Herianto, Bambang; Yuwono, Djoko; Porter, Kevin R; Beckett, Charmagne G; Blair, Patrick J

    2006-09-01

    Periodic outbreaks of dengue have emerged in Indonesia since 1968, with the severity of resulting disease increasing in subsequent years. In early 2004, a purported dengue outbreak erupted across the archipelago, with over 50,000 cases and 603 deaths reported. To confirm the disease aetiology and to provide an epidemiological framework of this epidemic, an investigation was conducted in ten hospitals within the capital city of Jakarta. Clinical and laboratory findings were determined from a cohort of 272 hospitalised patients. Exposure to dengue virus was determined in 180 (66.2%) patients. When clinically assessed, 100 (55.6%) of the 180 patients were classified as having dengue fever (DF), 31 (17.2%) as DF with haemorrhagic manifestations and 49 (27.2%) as dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Evidence from haemagglutination inhibition assays suggested that 33/40 (82.5%) of those with DHF from which laboratory evidence was available suffered from a secondary dengue infection. All four dengue viruses were identified upon viral isolation, with DEN-3 being the most predominant serotype recovered, followed by DEN-4, DEN-2 and DEN-1. In summary, the 2004 outbreak of dengue in Jakarta, Indonesia, was characterised by the circulation of multiple virus serotypes and resulted in a relatively high percentage of a representative population of hospitalised patients developing DHF.

  8. Dengue hemorrhagic fever in Jakarta, Indonesia in 1988: isolation of dengue virus from patient whole blood using cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Fujita, N; Hotta, S; Konishi, E; Esaki, H; Sumarmo; Sujudi

    1997-03-01

    During an outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) in Jakarta, Indonesia in 1988, we attempted to isolate dengue virus using mosquito cells and a medium containing heparin. Whole blood, immediately after being drawn from patients, was inoculated into Aedes albopictus cell cultures temporarily maintained in the heparin-containing medium. The overall virus isolation rate was 25% (17 of 69) samples collected within three days after admission of the patients to hospital. No virus was obtained thereafter. The successful virus isolation was apparently not related to titers of anti-dengue virus hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies present in patients' sera. The viruses were recovered from cases of each of the four World Health Organization grades of DHF without significant differences. The technique is simple and easily performed at bedside.

  9. The yellow fever 17D vaccine virus as a vector for the expression of foreign proteins: development of new live flavivirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bonaldo, M C; Caufour, P S; Freire, M S; Galler, R

    2000-01-01

    The Flaviviridae is a family of about 70 mostly arthropod-borne viruses many of which are major public health problems with members being present in most continents. Among the most important are yellow fever (YF), dengue with its four serotypes and Japanese encephalitis virus. A live attenuated virus is used as a cost effective, safe and efficacious vaccine against YF but no other live flavivirus vaccines have been licensed. The rise of recombinant DNA technology and its application to study flavivirus genome structure and expression has opened new possibilities for flavivirus vaccine development. One new approach is the use of cDNAs encopassing the whole viral genome to generate infectious RNA after in vitro transcription. This methodology allows the genetic mapping of specific viral functions and the design of viral mutants with considerable potential as new live attenuated viruses. The use of infectious cDNA as a carrier for heterologous antigens is gaining importance as chimeric viruses are shown to be viable, immunogenic and less virulent as compared to the parental viruses. The use of DNA to overcome mutation rates intrinsic of RNA virus populations in conjunction with vaccine production in cell culture should improve the reliability and lower the cost for production of live attenuated vaccines. The YF virus despite a long period ignored by researchers probably due to the effectiveness of the vaccine has made a come back, both in nature as human populations grow and reach endemic areas as well as in the laboratory being a suitable model to understand the biology of flaviviruses in general and providing new alternatives for vaccine development through the use of the 17D vaccine strain.

  10. Virus load in pigs affected with different clinical forms of classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Rout, M; Saikumar, G

    2012-04-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an endemic disease in India, but the real magnitude of the problem is not known as only outbreaks of acute CSF are reported and many cases of chronic and clinically inapparent forms of the disease, which manifest a confusing clinical picture, remain undiagnosed. The real status of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) infection can only be known by testing pigs with highly specific and sensitive diagnostic assays. To obtain the baseline prevalence of CSFV infection among pigs in an endemic region where no vaccination was being performed, a real-time PCR assay was used to detect viral genetic material in tissue samples collected from a slaughterhouse in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh in India. In total, 1120 slaughtered pigs were examined for the presence of CSF suggestive pathological lesions and tissues from suspected cases were tested for the presence of CSFV antigen and nucleic acids by indirect immuno-peroxidase test and real-time PCR, respectively. Based on the detection of viral genetic material in the tonsils, the prevalence of CSFV infection among slaughtered pigs was found to be 7.67%. Pigs detected positive for viral genome by quantitative real-time PCR assay when categorized into different forms of CSF, depending upon the pathological lesions observed, the viral load in the tonsils of some of the pigs with chronic or clinically inapparent form of the disease was similar to that detected in pigs with acute CSF. The results of the study suggested that the risk posed by pigs with chronic disease or those infected but showing no clinical disease may be relatively higher as they can transmit the virus to new susceptible hosts over a longer period of time.

  11. Genetic diversity of subgenotype 2.1 isolates of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenjie; Wu, Jianmin; Lu, Zongji; Zhang, Li; Qin, Shaomin; Chen, Fenglian; Peng, Zhicheng; Wang, Qin; Ma, Ling; Bai, Anbin; Guo, Huancheng; Shi, Jishu; Tu, Changchun

    2016-07-01

    As the causative agent of classical swine fever, the economically devastating swine disease worldwide, classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is currently classified into the 11 subgenotypes, of which subgenotype 2.1 is distributed worldwide and showing more genetic diversity than other subgenotypes. Prior to this report, subgenotype 2.1 was divided into three sub-subgenotypes (2.1a-2.1c). To further analyze the genetic diversity of CSFV isolates in China, 39 CSFV isolates collected between 2004 and 2012 in two Chinese provinces Guangxi and Guangdong were sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analysis together with reference sequences retrieved from GenBank. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 190-nt and/or 1119-nt full length E2 gene fragments showed that current CSFV subgenotype 2.1 virus isolates in the world could be divided into 10 sub-subgenotypes (2.1a-2.1j) and the 39 isolates collected in this study were grouped into 7 of them (2.1a-2.1c and 2.1g-2.1j). Among the 10 sub-subgenotypes, 2.1d-2.1j were newly identified. Sub-subgenotype 2.1d isolates were circulated only in India, however the rest 9 sub-subgenotypes were from China with some of them closely related to isolates from European and neighboring Asian countries. According to the temporal and spatial distribution of CSFV subgenotype 2.1 isolates, the newly classified 10 sub-subgenotypes were further categorized into three groups: dominant sub-subgenotype, minor sub-subgenotype and silent sub-subgenotype, and each sub-subgenotype can be found only in certain geographical areas. Taken together, this study reveals the complex genetic diversity of CSFV subgenotype 2.1 and improves our understanding about the epidemiological trends of CSFV subgenotype 2.1 in the world, particularly in China. PMID:27085291

  12. Complex adenovirus-vectored vaccine protects guinea pigs from three strains of Marburg virus challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Danher; Hevey, Michael; Juompan, Laure Y.; Trubey, Charles M.; Raja, Nicholas U.; Deitz, Stephen B.; Woraratanadharm, Jan; Luo Min; Yu Hong; Swain, Benjamin M.; Moore, Kevin M.; Dong, John Y. . E-mail: dongj@genphar.com

    2006-09-30

    The Marburg virus (MARV), an African filovirus closely related to the Ebola virus, causes a deadly hemorrhagic fever in humans, with up to 90% mortality. Currently, treatment of disease is only supportive, and no vaccines are available to prevent spread of MARV infections. In order to address this need, we have developed and characterized a novel recombinant vaccine that utilizes a single complex adenovirus-vectored vaccine (cAdVax) to overexpress a MARV glycoprotein (GP) fusion protein derived from the Musoke and Ci67 strains of MARV. Vaccination with the cAdVaxM(fus) vaccine led to efficient production of MARV-specific antibodies in both mice and guinea pigs. Significantly, guinea pigs vaccinated with at least 5 x 10{sup 7} pfu of cAdVaxM(fus) vaccine were 100% protected against lethal challenges by the Musoke, Ci67 and Ravn strains of MARV, making it a vaccine with trivalent protective efficacy. Therefore, the cAdVaxM(fus) vaccine serves as a promising vaccine candidate to prevent and contain multi-strain infections by MARV.

  13. Viruses of Entamoeba histolytica. 3. Properties of the polyhedral virus of the HB-301 strain.

    PubMed

    Hruska, J F; Mattern, C F; Diamond, L S; Keister, D B

    1973-01-01

    Some biological characteristics and bioassay of a polyhedral virus isolated from normal-appearing strain HB-301 of Entamoeba histolytica are described. The virus produced lysis of susceptible strains of E. histolytica, yet it caused no cytopathological effect in the host strain, HB-301. The virus and host amoeba existed in an equilibrium; approximately 10(4) mean infective dose units of virus were produced per million HB-301 amoebae. Superinfection and antiviral antiserum treatment failed to disturb this equilibrium permanently. The mechanism of viral persistence in strain HB-301 amoebae remains to be determined. Purification of the virus was attempted. Ninety-nine percent of the viral infectivity was associated with a low-speed pellet which consisted of complexes of virus and cellular membranes. Various treatments of this low-speed pellet failed to release virus. Biologically active, membrane-free virus of low titer was prepared by differential centrifugation of supernatant solutions and employed in electron microscopy and other studies. PMID:4346278

  14. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yu; McArthur, Monica A.; Cohen, Melanie; Jahrling, Peter B.; Janosko, Krisztina B.; Josleyn, Nicole; Kang, Kai; Zhang, Tengfei; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and dendritic cells (MoDC) from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease. PMID:27191161

  15. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yu; McArthur, Monica A; Cohen, Melanie; Jahrling, Peter B; Janosko, Krisztina B; Josleyn, Nicole; Kang, Kai; Zhang, Tengfei; Holbrook, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and dendritic cells (MoDC) from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease. PMID:27191161

  16. The role of B cells in the immune response to pestivirus (classical Swine Fever virus).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cordón, P J; Romero-Trevejo, J L; Pedrera, M; Raya, A I; Gómez-Villamandos, J C

    2006-07-01

    Pigs inoculated with the Alfort 187 isolate of classical swine fever (CSF) virus were used to study the immunological mechanisms associated with the humoral immune response in the disease. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the B-cell population (lambda light chain [C-lambda]-positive, immunoglobulins [Ig]-M-positive, and IgG-positive were demonstrated in the spleen, thymus and ileocaecal lymph node. Blood and serum samples were used to examine changes in leucocytes, albumin/globulin ratios and specific antibodies against CSF virus titration. Despite the lymphoid depletion shown by infected animals, an increase in B cells and potentially immunoglobulin-producing C-lambda+ plasma cells was observed in the lymphoid organs from the onset of disease. The increase in C-lambda+ B cells was matched by a parallel increase in IgM+ cells, which attained peak values from 7 days post-inoculation (dpi), while IgG+ cells increased from 11 dpi onwards. The enhanced biosynthetic capacity of these cells may have been linked to the initiation of a humoral response to CSF virus, and to the progressive decline in the albumin/globulin ratios of inoculated animals. Activation, proliferation and differentiation of B cells coincided with the presence of viral antigen, and with an intense phagocytic and biosynthetic activity of monocytes-macrophages and T lymphocytes. The previously reported increase of cytokine (TNFalpha, IL-1alpha and IL-6) production by monocytes-macrophages, and the release of IL-2, IL-4 and IFNgamma by T lymphocytes, may play a role in the initiation of the humoral immune response in CSF. These changes may have influenced the late appearance of virus-specific antibodies in the study, as well as the progressive increase of immunoglobulins.

  17. Single-Molecule FISH Reveals Non-selective Packaging of Rift Valley Fever Virus Genome Segments.

    PubMed

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    The bunyavirus genome comprises a small (S), medium (M), and large (L) RNA segment of negative polarity. Although genome segmentation confers evolutionary advantages by enabling genome reassortment events with related viruses, genome segmentation also complicates genome replication and packaging. Accumulating evidence suggests that genomes of viruses with eight or more genome segments are incorporated into virions by highly selective processes. Remarkably, little is known about the genome packaging process of the tri-segmented bunyaviruses. Here, we evaluated, by single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the intracellular spatio-temporal distribution and replication kinetics of the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) genome and determined the segment composition of mature virions. The results reveal that the RVFV genome segments start to replicate near the site of infection before spreading and replicating throughout the cytoplasm followed by translocation to the virion assembly site at the Golgi network. Despite the average intracellular S, M and L genome segments approached a 1:1:1 ratio, major differences in genome segment ratios were observed among cells. We also observed a significant amount of cells lacking evidence of M-segment replication. Analysis of two-segmented replicons and four-segmented viruses subsequently confirmed the previous notion that Golgi recruitment is mediated by the Gn glycoprotein. The absence of colocalization of the different segments in the cytoplasm and the successful rescue of a tri-segmented variant with a codon shuffled M-segment suggested that inter-segment interactions are unlikely to drive the copackaging of the different segments into a single virion. The latter was confirmed by direct visualization of RNPs inside mature virions which showed that the majority of virions lack one or more genome segments. Altogether, this study suggests that RVFV genome packaging is a non-selective process. PMID:27548280

  18. Single-Molecule FISH Reveals Non-selective Packaging of Rift Valley Fever Virus Genome Segments

    PubMed Central

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J.; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The bunyavirus genome comprises a small (S), medium (M), and large (L) RNA segment of negative polarity. Although genome segmentation confers evolutionary advantages by enabling genome reassortment events with related viruses, genome segmentation also complicates genome replication and packaging. Accumulating evidence suggests that genomes of viruses with eight or more genome segments are incorporated into virions by highly selective processes. Remarkably, little is known about the genome packaging process of the tri-segmented bunyaviruses. Here, we evaluated, by single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the intracellular spatio-temporal distribution and replication kinetics of the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) genome and determined the segment composition of mature virions. The results reveal that the RVFV genome segments start to replicate near the site of infection before spreading and replicating throughout the cytoplasm followed by translocation to the virion assembly site at the Golgi network. Despite the average intracellular S, M and L genome segments approached a 1:1:1 ratio, major differences in genome segment ratios were observed among cells. We also observed a significant amount of cells lacking evidence of M-segment replication. Analysis of two-segmented replicons and four-segmented viruses subsequently confirmed the previous notion that Golgi recruitment is mediated by the Gn glycoprotein. The absence of colocalization of the different segments in the cytoplasm and the successful rescue of a tri-segmented variant with a codon shuffled M-segment suggested that inter-segment interactions are unlikely to drive the copackaging of the different segments into a single virion. The latter was confirmed by direct visualization of RNPs inside mature virions which showed that the majority of virions lack one or more genome segments. Altogether, this study suggests that RVFV genome packaging is a non-selective process. PMID:27548280

  19. Favipiravir (T-705) protects against peracute Rift Valley fever virus infection and reduces delayed-onset neurologic disease observed with ribavirin treatment.

    PubMed

    Scharton, Dionna; Bailey, Kevin W; Vest, Zachary; Westover, Jonna B; Kumaki, Yohichi; Van Wettere, Arnaud; Furuta, Yousuke; Gowen, Brian B

    2014-04-01

    Rift Valley fever is a zoonotic, arthropod-borne disease that affects livestock and humans. The etiologic agent, Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Bunyaviridae, Phlebovirus) is primarily transmitted through mosquito bites, but can also be transmitted by exposure to infectious aerosols. There are presently no licensed vaccines or therapeutics to prevent or treat severe RVFV infection in humans. We have previously reported on the activity of favipiravir (T-705) against the MP-12 vaccine strain of RVFV and other bunyaviruses in cell culture. In addition, efficacy has also been documented in mouse and hamster models of infection with the related Punta Toro virus. Here, hamsters challenged with the highly pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV were used to evaluate the activity of favipiravir against lethal infection. Subcutaneous RVFV challenge resulted in substantial serum and tissue viral loads and caused severe disease and mortality within 2-3 days of infection. Oral favipiravir (200 mg/kg/day) prevented mortality in 60% or greater of hamsters challenged with RVFV when administered within 1 or 6h post-exposure and reduced RVFV titers in serum and tissues relative to the time of treatment initiation. In contrast, although ribavirin (75 mg/kg/day) was effective at protecting animals from the peracute RVFV disease, most ultimately succumbed from a delayed-onset neurologic disease associated with high RVFV burden observed in the brain in moribund animals. When combined, T-705 and ribavirin treatment started 24 h post-infection significantly improved survival outcome and reduced serum and tissue virus titers compared to monotherapy. Our findings demonstrate significant post-RVFV exposure efficacy with favipiravir against both peracute disease and delayed-onset neuroinvasion, and suggest added benefit when combined with ribavirin.

  20. Favipiravir (T-705) protects against peracute Rift Valley fever virus infection and reduces delayed-onset neurologic disease observed with ribavirin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Scharton, Dionna; Bailey, Kevin W.; Vest, Zachary; Westover, Jonna B.; Kumaki, Yohichi; Van Wettere, Arnaud; Furuta, Yousuke; Gowen, Brian B.

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever is a zoonotic, arthropod-borne disease that affects livestock and humans. The etiologic agent, Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Bunyaviridae, Phlebovirus) is primarily transmitted through mosquito bites, but can also be transmitted by exposure to infectious aerosols. There are presently no licensed vaccines or therapeutics to prevent or treat severe RVFV infection in humans. We have previously reported on the activity of favipiravir (T-705) against the MP-12 vaccine strain of RVFV and other bunyaviruses in cell culture. In addition, efficacy has also been documented in mouse and hamster models of infection with the related Punta Toro virus. Here, we challenged hamsters with the highly pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV to evaluate the activity of favipiravir against lethal infection. Subcutaneous RVFV challenge resulted in substantial serum and tissue viral loads and caused severe disease and mortality within 2–3 days after infection. Oral favipiravir (200 mg/kg/day) prevented mortality in 60% or greater in hamsters challenged with RVFV when administered within 1 or 6 h post-exposure and reduced RVFV titers in serum and tissues relative to the time of treatment initiation. In contrast, although ribavirin (75 mg/kg/day) was effective at protecting animals from the peracute RVFV disease, most ultimately succumbed from a delayed-onset neurologic disease associated with high RVFV burden in the brain observed in moribund animals. When combined, T-705 and ribavirin treatment started 24 h post-infection significantly improved survival outcome and reduced serum and tissue virus titers compared to monotherapy. Our findings demonstrate significant post-RVFV exposure efficacy with favipiravir against both peracute disease and delayed-onset neuroinvasion, and suggest added benefit when combined with ribavirin. PMID:24486952

  1. Reverse-phase phosphoproteome analysis of signaling pathways induced by Rift valley fever virus in human small airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Popova, Taissia G; Turell, Michael J; Espina, Virginia; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kidd, Jessica; Narayanan, Aarthi; Liotta, Lance; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Kashanchi, Fatah; Bailey, Charles; Popov, Serguei G

    2010-01-01

    Rift valley fever virus (RVFV) infection is an emerging zoonotic disease endemic in many countries of sub-Saharan Africa and in Egypt. In this study we show that human small airway epithelial cells are highly susceptible to RVFV virulent strain ZH-501 and the attenuated strain MP-12. We used the reverse-phase protein arrays technology to identify phosphoprotein signaling pathways modulated during infection of cultured airway epithelium. ZH-501 infection induced activation of MAP kinases (p38, JNK and ERK) and downstream transcriptional factors [STAT1 (Y701), ATF2 (T69/71), MSK1 (S360) and CREB (S133)]. NF-κB phosphorylation was also increased. Activation of p53 (S15, S46) correlated with the increased levels of cleaved effector caspase-3, -6 and -7, indicating activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. RVFV infection downregulated phosphorylation of a major anti-apoptotic regulator of survival pathways, AKT (S473), along with phosphorylation of FOX 01/03 (T24/31) which controls cell cycle arrest downstream from AKT. Consistent with this, the level of apoptosis inhibitor XIAP was decreased. However, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway marker, caspase-9, demonstrated only a marginal activation accompanied by an increased level of the inhibitor of apoptosome formation, HSP27. Concentration of the autophagy marker, LC3B, which often accompanies the pro-survival signaling, was decreased. Cumulatively, our analysis of RVFV infection in lung epithelium indicated a viral strategy directed toward the control of cell apoptosis through a number of transcriptional factors. Analyses of MP-12 titers in challenged cells in the presence of MAPK inhibitors indicated that activation of p38 represents a protective cell response while ERK activation controls viral replication. PMID:21072193

  2. Cytokine response in mouse bone marrow derived macrophages after infection with pathogenic and non-pathogenic Rift Valley fever virus

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kimberly K.; Hill, Terence E.; Davis, Melissa N.; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is the most pathogenic member of the genus Phlebovirus within the family Bunyaviridae, and can cause severe disease in humans and livestock. Until recently, limited information has been published on the cellular host response elicited by RVFV, particularly in macrophages and dendritic cells, which play critical roles in stimulating adaptive and innate immune responses to viral infection. In an effort to define the initial response of host immunomodulatory cells to infection, primary mouse bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were infected with the pathogenic RVFV strain ZH501, or attenuated strains MP-12 or MP-12 based Clone13 type (rMP12-C13 type), and cytokine secretion profiles examined. The secretion of T helper (Th)1-associated antiviral cytokines, chemokines and various interleukins increased rapidly after infection with the attenuated rMP12-C13 type RVFV, which lacks a functional NSs virulence gene. In comparison, infection with live-attenuated MP-12 encoding a functional NSs gene appeared to cause a delayed immune response, while pathogenic ZH501 ablates the immune response almost entirely. These data demonstrate that NSs can inhibit components of the BMDM antiviral response and supports previous work indicating that NSs can specifically regulate the type I interferon response in macrophages. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that genetic differences between ZH501 and MP-12 reduce the ability of MP-12 to inhibit antiviral signalling and subsequently reduce virulence in BMDM, demonstrating that viral components other than NSs play a critical role in regulating the host response to RVFV infection. PMID:25759029

  3. Cell fusion by haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) viruses and its application for titration of virus infectivity and neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, J; Takashima, I; Hashimoto, N

    1985-01-01

    Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome viruses, are members of the family Bunyaviridae. They cause cell to cell fusion from within under acidic conditions. This phenomenon was found to occur under a pH range of between 4.9 to 6.3 for all the viruses examined. The pH range which causes cell fusion was similar to that reported for the La Crosse virus of the Bunyaviridae, hence indicating that this property is a common biological characteristic among this family of viruses. Titration of virus infectivity and neutralizing antibody was done by counting the number of fused cell foci produced in infected Vero cell monolayers after low pH treatment. This method was simpler and more rapid than the ordinary plaque formation method or that of counting infected cell foci by IFA or immunoenzyme assay. In addition, this method may also be applicable in the detection of other enveloped viruses which do not cause a typical cytopathic effect.

  4. [Yellow fever].

    PubMed

    Sabbatani, Sergio; Fiorino, Sirio

    2007-06-01

    After the discovery of the New World, yellow fever proved to be an important risk factor of morbidity and mortality for Caribbean populations. In the following centuries epidemic risk, expanded by sea trade and travel, progressively reached the settlements in North America and Brazil as well as the Atlantic seaboard of tropical and equatorial Africa. In the eighteenth century and the first half of the nineteenth century epidemics of yellow fever were reported in some coastal towns in the Iberian peninsula, French coast, Great Britain and Italy, where, in 1804 at Leghorn, only one epidemic was documented. Prevention and control programs against yellow fever, developed at the beginning of the twentieth century in Cuba and in Panama, were a major breakthrough in understanding definitively its aetiology and pathogenesis. Subsequently, further advances in knowledge of yellow fever epidemiology were obtained when French scientists, working in West and Central Africa, showed that monkeys were major hosts of the yellow fever virus (the wild yellow fever virus), besides man. In addition, advances in research, contributing to the development of vaccines against the yellow fever virus in the first half of the nineteenth century, are reported in this paper. PMID:17599002

  5. Emerging Infections of CNS: Avian Influenza A Virus, Rift Valley Fever Virus and Human Parechovirus.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Clayton A; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Ross, Ted M; Bissel, Stephanie J

    2015-09-01

    History is replete with emergent pandemic infections that have decimated the human population. Given the shear mass of humans that now crowd the earth, there is every reason to suspect history will repeat itself. We describe three RNA viruses that have recently emerged in the human population to mediate severe neurological disease. These new diseases are results of new mutations in the infectious agents or new exposure pathways to the agents or both. To appreciate their pathogenesis, we summarize the essential virology and immune response to each agent. Infection is described in the context of known host defenses. Once the viruses evade immune defenses and enter central nervous system (CNS) cells, they rapidly co-opt host RNA processing to a cataclysmic extent. It is not clear why the brain is particularly susceptible to RNA viruses; but perhaps because of its tremendous dependence on RNA processing for physiological functioning, classical mechanisms of host defense (eg, interferon disruption of viral replication) are diminished or not available. Effectiveness of immunity, immunization and pharmacological therapies is reviewed to contextualize the scope of the public health challenge. Unfortunately, vaccines that confer protection from systemic disease do not necessarily confer protection for the brain after exposure through unconventional routes.

  6. Chemotactic and Inflammatory Responses in the Liver and Brain Are Associated with Pathogenesis of Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Juelich, Terry L.; Agar, Stacy L.; Poussard, Allison; Ragland, Dan; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a major human and animal pathogen associated with severe disease including hemorrhagic fever or encephalitis. RVFV is endemic to parts of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, but there is significant concern regarding its introduction into non-endemic regions and the potentially devastating effect to livestock populations with concurrent infections of humans. To date, there is little detailed data directly comparing the host response to infection with wild-type or vaccine strains of RVFV and correlation with viral pathogenesis. Here we characterized clinical and systemic immune responses to infection with wild-type strain ZH501 or IND vaccine strain MP-12 in the C57BL/6 mouse. Animals infected with live-attenuated MP-12 survived productive viral infection with little evidence of clinical disease and minimal cytokine response in evaluated tissues. In contrast, ZH501 infection was lethal, caused depletion of lymphocytes and platelets and elicited a strong, systemic cytokine response which correlated with high virus titers and significant tissue pathology. Lymphopenia and platelet depletion were indicators of disease onset with indications of lymphocyte recovery correlating with increases in G-CSF production. RVFV is hepatotropic and in these studies significant clinical and histological data supported these findings; however, significant evidence of a pro-inflammatory response in the liver was not apparent. Rather, viral infection resulted in a chemokine response indicating infiltration of immunoreactive cells, such as neutrophils, which was supported by histological data. In brains of ZH501 infected mice, a significant chemokine and pro-inflammatory cytokine response was evident, but with little pathology indicating meningoencephalitis. These data suggest that RVFV pathogenesis in mice is associated with a loss of liver function due to liver necrosis and hepatitis yet the long-term course of disease for those that might survive the

  7. Serum antibody prevalence of malignant catarrhal fever viruses in seven wildlife species from Alaska.

    PubMed

    Zarnke, Randall L; Li, Hong; Crawford, Timothy B

    2002-07-01

    Blood samples were collected from seven species of free-ranging ungulates in Alaska. Sera were tested for evidence of exposure to malignant catarrhal fever viruses (MCFV) by means of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody prevalences were as follows: muskox (Ovibos moschatus) 100 positive samples of 104 tested (96%); Dall sheep (Ovis dalli) 212 of 222 (95%); elk (Cervus elaphus) 14 of 51 (27%); bison (Bison bison) 34 of 197 (17%); caribou (Rangifer tarandus) nine of 232 (4%); Sitka black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis) one of 49 (2%); and moose (Alces alces) three of 219 (1%). Antibody prevalence in a bison population from the Interior was stable over a 5 yr period. These results indicate that at least one virus in the MCF group is enzootic in Dall sheep and muskox in Alaska. Lower antibody prevalences in the other species in this survey suggest that MCFV are latent or subclinical in these free-ranging ruminants. Whole blood samples were collected from 14 Dall sheep and subjected to a polymerase chain reaction assay. Fragments of ovine herpesvirus-2 DNA were detected in six of the samples. The significance of these findings for the health of free-ranging ungulates in Alaska is unknown.

  8. Serologic evidence of exposure to Rift Valley fever virus detected in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Bosworth, A.; Ghabbari, T.; Dowall, S.; Varghese, A.; Fares, W.; Hewson, R.; Zhioua, E.; Chakroun, M.; Tiouiri, H.; Ben Jemaa, M.; Znazen, A.; Letaief, A.

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFv) is capable of causing dramatic outbreaks amongst economically important animal species and is capable of causing severe symptoms and mortality in humans. RVFv is known to circulate widely throughout East Africa; serologic evidence of exposure has also been found in some northern African countries, including Mauritania. This study aimed to ascertain whether RVFv is circulating in regions beyond its known geographic range. Samples from febrile patients (n = 181) and nonfebrile healthy agricultural and slaughterhouse workers (n = 38) were collected during the summer of 2014 and surveyed for exposure to RVFv by both serologic tests and PCR. Of the 219 samples tested, 7.8% of nonfebrile participants showed immunoglobulin G reactivity to RVFv nucleoprotein and 8.3% of febrile patients showed immunoglobulin M reactivity, with the latter samples indicating recent exposure to the virus. Our results suggest an active circulation of RVFv and evidence of human exposure in the population of Tunisia. PMID:26740887

  9. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus in Kazakhstan (1948-2013).

    PubMed

    Nurmakhanov, Talgat; Sansyzbaev, Yerlan; Atshabar, Bakhyt; Deryabin, Pavel; Kazakov, Stanislav; Zholshorinov, Aitmagambet; Matzhanova, Almagul; Sadvakassova, Alya; Saylaubekuly, Ratbek; Kyraubaev, Kakimzhan; Hay, John; Atkinson, Barry; Hewson, Roger

    2015-09-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a pathogenic and often fatal arboviral disease with a distribution spanning large areas of Africa, Europe and Asia. The causative agent is a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus classified within the Nairovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family. Cases of CCHF have been officially recorded in Kazakhstan since the disease was first officially reported in modern medicine. Serological surveillance of human and animal populations provide evidence that the virus was perpetually circulating in a local enzoonotic cycle involving mammals, ticks and humans in the southern regions of the country. Most cases of human disease were associated with agricultural professions such as farming, shepherding and fruit-picking; the typical route of infection was via tick-bite although several cases of contact transmission associated with caring for sick patients have been documented. In total, 704 confirmed human cases of CCHF have been registered in Kazakhstan from 1948-2013 with an overall case fatality rate of 14.8% for cases with a documented outcome. The southern regions of Kazakhstan should be considered endemic for CCHF with cases reported from these territories on an annual basis. Modern diagnostic technologies allow for rapid clinical diagnosis and for surveillance studies to monitor for potential expansion in known risk areas.

  10. Transmission routes of African swine fever virus to domestic pigs: current knowledge and future research directions.

    PubMed

    Guinat, Claire; Gogin, Andrey; Blome, Sandra; Keil, Guenther; Pollin, Reiko; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Dixon, Linda

    2016-03-12

    African swine fever (ASF) is a major threat to the pig industry in Europe. Since 2007, ASF outbreaks have been ongoing in the Caucasus, Eastern Europe and the Baltic countries, causing severe economic losses for many pig farmers and pork producers. In addition, the number of ASF cases in wild boar populations has dramatically increased over the past few years. Evidence supports direct contact with infectious domestic pigs and wild boars, and consumption of contaminated feed, as the main transmission routes of ASF virus (ASFV) to domestic pigs. However, significant knowledge gaps highlight the urgent need for research to investigate the dynamics of indirect transmission via the environment, the minimal infective doses for contaminated feed ingestion, the probability of effective contacts between infectious wild boars and domestic pigs, the potential for recovered animals to become carriers and a reservoir for transmission, the potential virus persistence within wild boar populations and the influence of human behaviour for the spread of ASFV. This will provide an improved scientific basis to optimise current interventions and develop new tools and strategies to reduce the risk of ASFV transmission to domestic pigs. PMID:26966305

  11. Serologic evidence of exposure to Rift Valley fever virus detected in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Bosworth, A; Ghabbari, T; Dowall, S; Varghese, A; Fares, W; Hewson, R; Zhioua, E; Chakroun, M; Tiouiri, H; Ben Jemaa, M; Znazen, A; Letaief, A

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFv) is capable of causing dramatic outbreaks amongst economically important animal species and is capable of causing severe symptoms and mortality in humans. RVFv is known to circulate widely throughout East Africa; serologic evidence of exposure has also been found in some northern African countries, including Mauritania. This study aimed to ascertain whether RVFv is circulating in regions beyond its known geographic range. Samples from febrile patients (n = 181) and nonfebrile healthy agricultural and slaughterhouse workers (n = 38) were collected during the summer of 2014 and surveyed for exposure to RVFv by both serologic tests and PCR. Of the 219 samples tested, 7.8% of nonfebrile participants showed immunoglobulin G reactivity to RVFv nucleoprotein and 8.3% of febrile patients showed immunoglobulin M reactivity, with the latter samples indicating recent exposure to the virus. Our results suggest an active circulation of RVFv and evidence of human exposure in the population of Tunisia.

  12. Transmission routes of African swine fever virus to domestic pigs: current knowledge and future research directions

    PubMed Central

    Guinat, Claire; Gogin, Andrey; Blome, Sandra; Keil, Guenther; Pollin, Reiko; Pfeiffer, Dirk U.; Dixon, Linda

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a major threat to the pig industry in Europe. Since 2007, ASF outbreaks have been ongoing in the Caucasus, Eastern Europe and the Baltic countries, causing severe economic losses for many pig farmers and pork producers. In addition, the number of ASF cases in wild boar populations has dramatically increased over the past few years. Evidence supports direct contact with infectious domestic pigs and wild boars, and consumption of contaminated feed, as the main transmission routes of ASF virus (ASFV) to domestic pigs. However, significant knowledge gaps highlight the urgent need for research to investigate the dynamics of indirect transmission via the environment, the minimal infective doses for contaminated feed ingestion, the probability of effective contacts between infectious wild boars and domestic pigs, the potential for recovered animals to become carriers and a reservoir for transmission, the potential virus persistence within wild boar populations and the influence of human behaviour for the spread of ASFV. This will provide an improved scientific basis to optimise current interventions and develop new tools and strategies to reduce the risk of ASFV transmission to domestic pigs. PMID:26966305

  13. Serum antibody prevalence of malignant catarrhal fever viruses in seven wildlife species from Alaska.

    PubMed

    Zarnke, Randall L; Li, Hong; Crawford, Timothy B

    2002-07-01

    Blood samples were collected from seven species of free-ranging ungulates in Alaska. Sera were tested for evidence of exposure to malignant catarrhal fever viruses (MCFV) by means of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody prevalences were as follows: muskox (Ovibos moschatus) 100 positive samples of 104 tested (96%); Dall sheep (Ovis dalli) 212 of 222 (95%); elk (Cervus elaphus) 14 of 51 (27%); bison (Bison bison) 34 of 197 (17%); caribou (Rangifer tarandus) nine of 232 (4%); Sitka black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis) one of 49 (2%); and moose (Alces alces) three of 219 (1%). Antibody prevalence in a bison population from the Interior was stable over a 5 yr period. These results indicate that at least one virus in the MCF group is enzootic in Dall sheep and muskox in Alaska. Lower antibody prevalences in the other species in this survey suggest that MCFV are latent or subclinical in these free-ranging ruminants. Whole blood samples were collected from 14 Dall sheep and subjected to a polymerase chain reaction assay. Fragments of ovine herpesvirus-2 DNA were detected in six of the samples. The significance of these findings for the health of free-ranging ungulates in Alaska is unknown. PMID:12238366

  14. Transmission routes of African swine fever virus to domestic pigs: current knowledge and future research directions.

    PubMed

    Guinat, Claire; Gogin, Andrey; Blome, Sandra; Keil, Guenther; Pollin, Reiko; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Dixon, Linda

    2016-03-12

    African swine fever (ASF) is a major threat to the pig industry in Europe. Since 2007, ASF outbreaks have been ongoing in the Caucasus, Eastern Europe and the Baltic countries, causing severe economic losses for many pig farmers and pork producers. In addition, the number of ASF cases in wild boar populations has dramatically increased over the past few years. Evidence supports direct contact with infectious domestic pigs and wild boars, and consumption of contaminated feed, as the main transmission routes of ASF virus (ASFV) to domestic pigs. However, significant knowledge gaps highlight the urgent need for research to investigate the dynamics of indirect transmission via the environment, the minimal infective doses for contaminated feed ingestion, the probability of effective contacts between infectious wild boars and domestic pigs, the potential for recovered animals to become carriers and a reservoir for transmission, the potential virus persistence within wild boar populations and the influence of human behaviour for the spread of ASFV. This will provide an improved scientific basis to optimise current interventions and develop new tools and strategies to reduce the risk of ASFV transmission to domestic pigs.

  15. Detection of antibodies against classical swine fever virus in fecal samples from wild boar.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang won; Sunwoo, Sun young; Hyun, Bang hoon; Lyoo, Young S

    2012-12-28

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a contagious viral disease that affects pigs. Wild boars can play an important epidemiological role in CSF outbreaks. In the past decades, studies conducted in many countries have reported that the CSF virus (CSFV) may persist in wild boar populations. The existence of CSFV in the free-ranging wild boar populations was indirectly confirmed by determining the prevalence of antibodies against CSFV in the serum of hunted wild boars. However, analyzing sero-prevalence in hunted wild boars to study the risk of CSF outbreaks is difficult due to insufficient number of samples, limitation of hunting area and biased age distribution of hunted wild boars. To improve this survey method, we collected feces of wild boars from their habitat and tested them using CSFV antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and CSF virus neutralization (VN) test. In this study, ELISA was found to be highly sensitive for detecting antibodies against CSFV in fecal samples. Most of doubtful or positive results obtained in CSFV ELISA were confirmed by VN tests. Despite the high coincidence rate of antibody-positive samples between CSFV ELISA and VN test, the possibility of false positive reaction should be considered. In the regional distribution, a fact that antibody-positive fecal and serum samples were found in geographically close area was shown. Hence, presence of antibodies in fecal samples may provide vital information regarding the risk of CSF outbreaks in wild boar groups in geographical proximity. PMID:22841406

  16. Alterations of Nuclear Architecture and Epigenetic Signatures during African Swine Fever Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Margarida; Rino, José; Pinheiro, Inês; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Viral interactions with host nucleus have been thoroughly studied, clarifying molecular mechanisms and providing new antiviral targets. Considering that African swine fever virus (ASFV) intranuclear phase of infection is poorly understood, viral interplay with subnuclear domains and chromatin architecture were addressed. Nuclear speckles, Cajal bodies, and promyelocytic leukaemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) were evaluated by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blot. Further, efficient PML protein knockdown by shRNA lentiviral transduction was used to determine PML-NBs relevance during infection. Nuclear distribution of different histone H3 methylation marks at lysine’s 9, 27 and 36, heterochromatin protein 1 isoforms (HP1α, HPβ and HPγ) and several histone deacetylases (HDACs) were also evaluated to assess chromatin status of the host. Our results reveal morphological disruption of all studied subnuclear domains and severe reduction of viral progeny in PML-knockdown cells. ASFV promotes H3K9me3 and HP1β foci formation from early infection, followed by HP1α and HDAC2 nuclear enrichment, suggesting heterochromatinization of host genome. Finally, closeness between DNA damage response factors, disrupted PML-NBs, and virus-induced heterochromatic regions were identified. In sum, our results demonstrate that ASFV orchestrates spatio-temporal nuclear rearrangements, changing subnuclear domains, relocating Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Rad-3 related (ATR)-related factors and promoting heterochromatinization, probably controlling transcription, repressing host gene expression, and favouring viral replication. PMID:26389938

  17. Human Hemorrhagic Fever Causing Arenaviruses: Molecular Mechanisms Contributing to Virus Virulence and Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Junjie; Liang, Yuying; Ly, Hinh

    2015-01-01

    Arenaviruses include multiple human pathogens ranging from the low-risk lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to highly virulent hemorrhagic fever (HF) causing viruses such as Lassa (LASV), Junin (JUNV), Machupo (MACV), Lujo (LUJV), Sabia (SABV), Guanarito (GTOV), and Chapare (CHPV), for which there are limited preventative and therapeutic measures. Why some arenaviruses can cause virulent human infections while others cannot, even though they are isolated from the same rodent hosts, is an enigma. Recent studies have revealed several potential pathogenic mechanisms of arenaviruses, including factors that increase viral replication capacity and suppress host innate immunity, which leads to high viremia and generalized immune suppression as the hallmarks of severe and lethal arenaviral HF diseases. This review summarizes current knowledge of the roles of each of the four viral proteins and some known cellular factors in the pathogenesis of arenaviral HF as well as of some human primary cell-culture and animal models that lend themselves to studying arenavirus-induced HF disease pathogenesis. Knowledge gained from these studies can be applied towards the development of novel therapeutics and vaccines against these deadly human pathogens. PMID:26011826

  18. Human hemorrhagic Fever causing arenaviruses: molecular mechanisms contributing to virus virulence and disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Junjie; Liang, Yuying; Ly, Hinh

    2015-05-21

    Arenaviruses include multiple human pathogens ranging from the low-risk lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to highly virulent hemorrhagic fever (HF) causing viruses such as Lassa (LASV), Junin (JUNV), Machupo (MACV), Lujo (LUJV), Sabia (SABV), Guanarito (GTOV), and Chapare (CHPV), for which there are limited preventative and therapeutic measures. Why some arenaviruses can cause virulent human infections while others cannot, even though they are isolated from the same rodent hosts, is an enigma. Recent studies have revealed several potential pathogenic mechanisms of arenaviruses, including factors that increase viral replication capacity and suppress host innate immunity, which leads to high viremia and generalized immune suppression as the hallmarks of severe and lethal arenaviral HF diseases. This review summarizes current knowledge of the roles of each of the four viral proteins and some known cellular factors in the pathogenesis of arenaviral HF as well as of some human primary cell-culture and animal models that lend themselves to studying arenavirus-induced HF disease pathogenesis. Knowledge gained from these studies can be applied towards the development of novel therapeutics and vaccines against these deadly human pathogens.

  19. Diagnosis and genotyping of African swine fever viruses from 2015 outbreaks in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Thoromo, Jonas; Simulundu, Edgar; Chambaro, Herman M; Mataa, Liywalii; Lubaba, Caesar H; Pandey, Girja S; Takada, Ayato; Misinzo, Gerald; Mweene, Aaron S

    2016-01-01

    In early 2015, a highly fatal haemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs resembling African swine fever (ASF) occurred in North Western, Copperbelt, and Lusaka provinces of Zambia. Molecular diagnosis by polymerase chain reaction targeting specific amplification of p72 (B646L) gene of ASF virus (ASFV) was conducted. Fourteen out of 16 domestic pigs from the affected provinces were found to be positive for ASFV. Phylogenetic analyses based on part of the p72 and the complete p54 (E183L) genes revealed that all the ASFVs detected belonged to genotypes I and Id, respectively. Additionally, epidemiological data suggest that the same ASFV spread from Lusaka to other provinces possibly through uncontrolled and/or illegal pig movements. Although the origin of the ASFV that caused outbreaks in domestic pigs in Zambia could not be ascertained, it appears likely that the virus may have emerged from within the country or region, probably from a sylvatic cycle. It is recommended that surveillance of ASF, strict biosecurity, and quarantine measures be imposed in order to prevent further spread and emergence of new ASF outbreaks in Zambia. PMID:27247062

  20. Pepper Mild Mottle Virus, a Plant Virus Associated with Specific Immune Responses, Fever, Abdominal Pains, and Pruritus in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Philippe; Richet, Hervé; Desnues, Christelle; Balique, Fanny; Moal, Valérie; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Berbis, Philippe; Lecoq, Hervé; Harlé, Jean-Robert; Berland, Yvon; Raoult, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, metagenomic studies have identified viable Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), a plant virus, in the stool of healthy subjects. However, its source and role as pathogen have not been determined. Methods and Findings 21 commercialized food products containing peppers, 357 stool samples from 304 adults and 208 stool samples from 137 children were tested for PMMoV using real-time PCR, sequencing, and electron microscopy. Anti-PMMoV IgM antibody testing was concurrently performed. A case-control study tested the association of biological and clinical symptoms with the presence of PMMoV in the stool. Twelve (57%) food products were positive for PMMoV RNA sequencing. Stool samples from twenty-two (7.2%) adults and one child (0.7%) were positive for PMMoV by real-time PCR. Positive cases were significantly more likely to have been sampled in Dermatology Units (p<10−6), to be seropositive for anti-PMMoV IgM antibodies (p = 0.026) and to be patients who exhibited fever, abdominal pains, and pruritus (p = 0.045, 0.038 and 0.046, respectively). Conclusions Our study identified a local source of PMMoV and linked the presence of PMMoV RNA in stool with a specific immune response and clinical symptoms. Although clinical symptoms may be imputable to another cofactor, including spicy food, our data suggest the possibility of a direct or indirect pathogenic role of plant viruses in humans. PMID:20386604