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Sample records for fever virus strain

  1. Characterization of Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 strain encoding NSs of Punta Toro virus or sandfly fever Sicilian virus.

    PubMed

    Lihoradova, Olga A; Indran, Sabarish V; Kalveram, Birte; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Head, Jennifer A; Gong, Bin; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Juelich, Terry L; Freiberg, Alexander N; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen which can cause hemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans, and a high rate of abortion in ruminants. MP-12 strain, a live-attenuated candidate vaccine, is attenuated in the M- and L-segments, but the S-segment retains the virulent phenotype. MP-12 was manufactured as an Investigational New Drug vaccine by using MRC-5 cells and encodes a functional NSs gene, the major virulence factor of RVFV which 1) induces a shutoff of the host transcription, 2) inhibits interferon (IFN)-β promoter activation, and 3) promotes the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). MP-12 lacks a marker for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Although MP-12 lacking NSs works for DIVA, it does not replicate efficiently in type-I IFN-competent MRC-5 cells, while the use of type-I IFN-incompetent cells may negatively affect its genetic stability. To generate modified MP-12 vaccine candidates encoding a DIVA marker, while still replicating efficiently in MRC-5 cells, we generated recombinant MP-12 encoding Punta Toro virus Adames strain NSs (rMP12-PTNSs) or Sandfly fever Sicilian virus NSs (rMP12-SFSNSs) in place of MP-12 NSs. We have demonstrated that those recombinant MP-12 viruses inhibit IFN-β mRNA synthesis, yet do not promote the degradation of PKR. The rMP12-PTNSs, but not rMP12-SFSNSs, replicated more efficiently than recombinant MP-12 lacking NSs in MRC-5 cells. Mice vaccinated with rMP12-PTNSs or rMP12-SFSNSs induced neutralizing antibodies at a level equivalent to those vaccinated with MP-12, and were efficiently protected from wild-type RVFV challenge. The rMP12-PTNSs and rMP12-SFSNSs did not induce antibodies cross-reactive to anti-RVFV NSs antibody and are therefore applicable to DIVA. Thus, rMP12-PTNSs is highly efficacious, replicates efficiently in MRC-5 cells, and encodes a DIVA marker, all of which are

  2. Characterization of Rift Valley Fever Virus MP-12 Strain Encoding NSs of Punta Toro Virus or Sandfly Fever Sicilian Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lihoradova, Olga A.; Indran, Sabarish V.; Kalveram, Birte; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Head, Jennifer A.; Gong, Bin; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Juelich, Terry L.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen which can cause hemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans, and a high rate of abortion in ruminants. MP-12 strain, a live-attenuated candidate vaccine, is attenuated in the M- and L-segments, but the S-segment retains the virulent phenotype. MP-12 was manufactured as an Investigational New Drug vaccine by using MRC-5 cells and encodes a functional NSs gene, the major virulence factor of RVFV which 1) induces a shutoff of the host transcription, 2) inhibits interferon (IFN)-β promoter activation, and 3) promotes the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). MP-12 lacks a marker for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Although MP-12 lacking NSs works for DIVA, it does not replicate efficiently in type-I IFN-competent MRC-5 cells, while the use of type-I IFN-incompetent cells may negatively affect its genetic stability. To generate modified MP-12 vaccine candidates encoding a DIVA marker, while still replicating efficiently in MRC-5 cells, we generated recombinant MP-12 encoding Punta Toro virus Adames strain NSs (rMP12-PTNSs) or Sandfly fever Sicilian virus NSs (rMP12-SFSNSs) in place of MP-12 NSs. We have demonstrated that those recombinant MP-12 viruses inhibit IFN-β mRNA synthesis, yet do not promote the degradation of PKR. The rMP12-PTNSs, but not rMP12-SFSNSs, replicated more efficiently than recombinant MP-12 lacking NSs in MRC-5 cells. Mice vaccinated with rMP12-PTNSs or rMP12-SFSNSs induced neutralizing antibodies at a level equivalent to those vaccinated with MP-12, and were efficiently protected from wild-type RVFV challenge. The rMP12-PTNSs and rMP12-SFSNSs did not induce antibodies cross-reactive to anti-RVFV NSs antibody and are therefore applicable to DIVA. Thus, rMP12-PTNSs is highly efficacious, replicates efficiently in MRC-5 cells, and encodes a DIVA marker, all of which are

  3. Mouse model for the Rift Valley fever virus MP12 strain infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a Category A pathogen and select agent, is the causative agent of Rift Valley fever. To date, no fully licensed vaccine is available in the U.S. for human or animal use and effective antiviral drugs have not been identified. The RVFV MP12 strain is conditionally licen...

  4. Potential for mosquito transmission of attenuated strains of Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed

    Turell, M J; Rossi, C A

    1991-03-01

    Studies were conducted to determine if two attenuated strains of Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus could be transmitted by Culex pipiens mosquitoes. Both strains (RVF MP 12 and T1) replicated in and were transmitted by female Cx. pipiens after intrathoracic inoculation. Mosquitoes also became infected with and transmitted the RVF MP12 strain after ingesting virus from a blood-soaked cotton pledget. However, because of the low viremias produced in infected animals, it is unlikely that mosquitoes would become infected by feeding on an animal inoculated with either of these viruses. Although both strains were transmitted by mosquitoes after intrathoracic inoculation, there was no evidence of reversion to a virulent virus.

  5. Virulent strain of African swine fever virus eclipses its attenuated derivative after challenge.

    PubMed

    Titov, Ilya; Burmakina, Galina; Morgunov, Yuriy; Morgunov, Sergey; Koltsov, Andrey; Malogolovkin, Alexander; Kolbasov, Denis

    2017-07-10

    African swine fever (ASF) is one of the most devastating diseases affecting the swine industry worldwide. No effective vaccine is currently available for disease prevention and control. Although live attenuated vaccines (LAV) have demonstrated great potential for immunizing against homologous strains of African swine fever virus (ASFV), adverse reactions from LAV remain a concern. Here, by using a homologous ASFV Congo strain system, we show passage-attenuated Congo LAV to induce an efficient protective immune response against challenge with the virulent parental Congo strain. Notably, only the parental challenge Congo strain was identified in blood and organs of recovered pigs through B602L gene PCR, long-range PCR, nucleotide sequencing and virus isolation. Thus, despite the great protective potential of homologous attenuated ASFV strain, the challenge Congo strain can persist for weeks in recovered pigs and a recrudescence of virulent virus at late time post-challenge may occur.

  6. Imported lassa fever in Germany: molecular characterization of a new lassa virus strain.

    PubMed

    Günther, S; Emmerich, P; Laue, T; Kühle, O; Asper, M; Jung, A; Grewing, T; ter Meulen, J; Schmitz, H

    2000-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a new Lassa virus strain imported into Germany by a traveler who had visited Ghana, Côte D'Ivoire, and Burkina Faso. This strain, designated "AV," originated from a region in West Africa where Lassa fever has not been reported. Viral S RNA isolated from the patient's serum was amplified and sequenced. A long-range reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction allowed amplification of the full-length (3.4 kb) S RNA. The coding sequences of strain AV differed from those of all known Lassa prototype strains (Josiah, Nigeria, and LP) by approximately 20%, mainly at third codon positions. Phylogenetically, strain AV appears to be most closely related to strain Josiah from Sierra Leone. Lassa viruses comprise a group of genetically highly diverse strains, which has implications for vaccine development. The new method for full-length S RNA amplification may facilitate identification and molecular analysis of new arenaviruses or arenavirus strains.

  7. Early pathogenesis of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strains in Danish pigs.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Uttenthal, Ase

    2012-10-12

    Host-virus interactions play an important role for the clinical outcome of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) infections in pigs. Strain virulence, host characteristics and environment are all factors that markedly influence disease severity. We tested CSFV strains of varying virulence in an experimental set-up, reducing the influence of host and environmental factors. Thus, weaner pigs were inoculated with one of 4 CSFV strains in order to compare the pathogenesis for a 3-week-period after infection. CSFV strains selected were 2 new and 2 previously characterized. None of these strains had been tested in Danish outbred pigs before. Clinical observations grouped the infected pigs into two different categories reflecting either non-specific, mainly gastro-intestinal, problems, or severe disease including high fever within the first week after inoculation. Gross-pathological findings varied between strains, however, lymphoid atrophy and growth retardation represented a consistent finding for all 4 strains. Virus distribution, viral load and in particular virus persistence differed, but supported present practice that recommends lymphoid tissue, most optimal tonsil and lymph nodes, as target material to be applied for early laboratory diagnosis. The present study demonstrated constraints associated with early detection of infections with CSFV strains of low virulence. Since neither clinical symptoms nor pathological lesions observed with these strains constituted characteristic signs of CSF, the risk of neglecting a CSF suspicion is immediate. Therefore, topical information on new outbreaks and continuous enhancement of an efficient surveillance system is of great importance to prevent further spread of CSF within the pig population.

  8. Experimental Infection of Calves by Two Genetically-Distinct Strains of Rift Valley Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, William C.; Davis, A. Sally; Gaudreault, Natasha N.; Faburay, Bonto; Trujillo, Jessie D.; Shivanna, Vinay; Sunwoo, Sun Young; Balogh, Aaron; Endalew, Abaineh; Ma, Wenjun; Drolet, Barbara S.; Ruder, Mark G.; Morozov, Igor; McVey, D. Scott; Richt, Juergen A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of Rift Valley fever in ruminant livestock, characterized by mass abortion and high mortality rates in neonates, have raised international interest in improving vaccine control strategies. Previously, we developed a reliable challenge model for sheep that improves the evaluation of existing and novel vaccines in sheep. This sheep model demonstrated differences in the pathogenesis of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection between two genetically-distinct wild-type strains of the virus, Saudi Arabia 2001 (SA01) and Kenya 2006 (Ken06). Here, we evaluated the pathogenicity of these two RVFV strains in mixed breed beef calves. There was a transient increase in rectal temperatures with both virus strains, but this clinical sign was less consistent than previously reported with sheep. Three of the five Ken06-infected animals had an early-onset viremia, one day post-infection (dpi), with viremia lasting at least three days. The same number of SA01-infected animals developed viremia at 2 dpi, but it only persisted through 3 dpi in one animal. The average virus titer for the SA01-infected calves was 1.6 logs less than for the Ken06-infected calves. Calves, inoculated with either strain, seroconverted by 5 dpi and showed time-dependent increases in their virus-neutralizing antibody titers. Consistent with the results obtained in the previous sheep study, elevated liver enzyme levels, more severe liver pathology and higher virus titers occurred with the Ken06 strain as compared to the SA01 strain. These results demonstrate the establishment of a virulent challenge model for vaccine evaluation in calves. PMID:27223298

  9. Experimental Infection of Calves by Two Genetically-Distinct Strains of Rift Valley Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Wilson, William C; Davis, A Sally; Gaudreault, Natasha N; Faburay, Bonto; Trujillo, Jessie D; Shivanna, Vinay; Sunwoo, Sun Young; Balogh, Aaron; Endalew, Abaineh; Ma, Wenjun; Drolet, Barbara S; Ruder, Mark G; Morozov, Igor; McVey, D Scott; Richt, Juergen A

    2016-05-23

    Recent outbreaks of Rift Valley fever in ruminant livestock, characterized by mass abortion and high mortality rates in neonates, have raised international interest in improving vaccine control strategies. Previously, we developed a reliable challenge model for sheep that improves the evaluation of existing and novel vaccines in sheep. This sheep model demonstrated differences in the pathogenesis of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection between two genetically-distinct wild-type strains of the virus, Saudi Arabia 2001 (SA01) and Kenya 2006 (Ken06). Here, we evaluated the pathogenicity of these two RVFV strains in mixed breed beef calves. There was a transient increase in rectal temperatures with both virus strains, but this clinical sign was less consistent than previously reported with sheep. Three of the five Ken06-infected animals had an early-onset viremia, one day post-infection (dpi), with viremia lasting at least three days. The same number of SA01-infected animals developed viremia at 2 dpi, but it only persisted through 3 dpi in one animal. The average virus titer for the SA01-infected calves was 1.6 logs less than for the Ken06-infected calves. Calves, inoculated with either strain, seroconverted by 5 dpi and showed time-dependent increases in their virus-neutralizing antibody titers. Consistent with the results obtained in the previous sheep study, elevated liver enzyme levels, more severe liver pathology and higher virus titers occurred with the Ken06 strain as compared to the SA01 strain. These results demonstrate the establishment of a virulent challenge model for vaccine evaluation in calves.

  10. Case report: probable transmission of vaccine strain of yellow fever virus to an infant via breast milk.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Susan; Twele-Montecinos, Loreto; MacDonald, Judy; Webster, Patricia; Law, Barbara

    2011-03-08

    The 17D yellow fever vaccine is a live-virus vaccine that has been in use since the 1940s. The incidence of encephalitis after yellow fever vaccination among young infants is much higher than among children older than nine months of age. Until recently, avoidance of vaccination by breastfeeding women who have received yellow fever vaccine had been based on theoretical grounds only. We report the probable transmission of vaccine strain of yellow fever virus from a mother to her infant through breastfeeding.

  11. Immunological reactions of Rift Valley fever virus strains from East and West Africa.

    PubMed

    Tomori, O

    1979-03-01

    Three strains of Rift Valley fever virus, namely Nigerian (NIG), Smithburn's neurotropic (SNT), and Lunyo variant (LUN) were compared by complement fixation (CF), neutralisation (N), haemagglutination/haemagglutination-inhibition (HA/HI) and agar gel diffusion (AGD) tests. They showed reciprocal cross-reactivity in CF tests. In N tests, using immune sheep sera, there was reciprocal cross-neutralisation between the NIG and SNT strains, but not with the LUN strain, the antiserum of which neutralised both NIG and SNT antigens whereas the reverse was not the case. When hyperimmune mouse ascitic fluid was employed in N tests, there was cross-reactivity between the three strains. Both the NIG and SNT strains yielded haemagglutinins, but not the LUN strain. Furthermore, by the antibody absorption and AGD techniques, the NIG and SNT strains were found to be identical and distinct from the LUN variant strain. The techniques found most useful in distinguishing between the three strains were HA and AGD. Laboratory neuro-adaptation of the classical pantropic virus did not appear to affect its haemagglutination activity.

  12. Identification of cleavage of NS5A of C-strain classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jinxin; Guo, Huancheng; Gong, Wenjie; Jiang, Daliang; Zhang, Li; Jia, Junjie; Tu, Changchun

    2017-02-01

    NS5A is a multifunctional non-structural protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) that plays an important role in viral replication, but how it exerts its functions is unknown. Here, we report the cleavage of NS5A of the vaccine C-strain, resulting in two truncated forms (b and c). Further experiments using calpain- and caspase-family-specific inhibitors, followed by a caspase-6-specific shRNAs and inhibitor, showed that the cleavage of C-strain NS5A to produce truncated form c is mediated by caspase-6, mapping to (272)DTTD(275), while the cleavage producing truncated form b is probably mediated by another unknown protease. shRNA-mediated downregulation of caspase-6 and blocking of enzyme activity in ST cells significantly impaired genome replication and virus production, indicating that NS5A cleavage is required for CSFV replication.

  13. The excretion of two virulent strains of African swine fever virus by domestic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Greig, A.; Plowright, W.

    1970-01-01

    Daily observations were made on the excretion of African swine fever (ASF) virus by pigs infected intranasally or by contact. Two strains of virus having mean death times of approximately 3 and 6 days were used, the latter being recently isolated from a warthog. First excretion usually occurred by the nasopharyngeal route, as early as 1 or 2 days before the onset of fever in many cases. The titres of pharyngeal and nasal swabs rose rapidly to reach mean levels of about 104-105 HAD 50 at 48-72 hr. following the onset of pyrexia. Virus in the secretions of the conjunctiva or lower urogenital tract appeared later and did not attain such high levels. Faecal and urinary excretion was of relatively little significance, except in slower infections caused by the recent warthog virus. These results are discussed in relation to the known failure of infected pigs to transmit the disease to stallmates during the first 12-24 hr. of pyrexia and also in relation to recent work on the pathogenesis of ASF in domestic swine. PMID:5276336

  14. The excretion of two virulent strains of African swine fever virus by domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Greig, A; Plowright, W

    1970-12-01

    Daily observations were made on the excretion of African swine fever (ASF) virus by pigs infected intranasally or by contact. Two strains of virus having mean death times of approximately 3 and 6 days were used, the latter being recently isolated from a warthog.First excretion usually occurred by the nasopharyngeal route, as early as 1 or 2 days before the onset of fever in many cases. The titres of pharyngeal and nasal swabs rose rapidly to reach mean levels of about 10(4)-10(5) HAD 50 at 48-72 hr. following the onset of pyrexia. Virus in the secretions of the conjunctiva or lower urogenital tract appeared later and did not attain such high levels. Faecal and urinary excretion was of relatively little significance, except in slower infections caused by the recent warthog virus.These results are discussed in relation to the known failure of infected pigs to transmit the disease to stallmates during the first 12-24 hr. of pyrexia and also in relation to recent work on the pathogenesis of ASF in domestic swine.

  15. N-linked Glycosylation of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia Erns Glycoprotein Alters Virulence in Swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Erns is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). We recently reported the influence of glycosylation of E2 in the virulence of CSFV strain Brescia. Here, we studied the effect of Erns N-linked glycosylation pattern on virulence of CSFV strain Brescia in swine. ...

  16. Related strains of African swine fever virus with different virulence: genome comparison and analysis.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Raquel; Coelho, João; Höper, Dirk; Little, Nicole S; Smithson, Chad; Upton, Chris; Martins, Carlos; Leitão, Alexandre; Keil, Günther M

    2015-02-01

    Two strains of African swine fever virus (ASFV), the high-virulence Lisboa60 (L60) and the low-virulence NH/P68 (NHV), which have previously been used in effective immunization/protection studies, were sequenced. Both were isolated in Portugal during the 11-year period after the introduction of ASFV to the European Continent in 1957. The predicted proteins coded by both strains were compared, and where differences were found these were also compared to other strains of known virulence. This highlighted several genes with significant alterations in low-virulence strains of ASFV that may constitute virulence factors, several of which are still uncharacterized regarding their function. Phylogenetic analysis grouped L60 and NHV closest to other P72 genotype I ASFV strains from Europe and West Africa, consistent with the assumed West African origin of all European strains. Interestingly, a relatively lower genomic identity exists between L60 and NHV, both isolated in a similar geographical location 8 years apart, than with other European and west African strains isolated subsequently and in more distant locations. This may reflect the intensive passage in tissue culture, during the early 1960s, of a Portuguese isolate to obtain an attenuated vaccine, which may have led to NHV. This study contributes to a better understanding of the evolution of ASFV, and defines additional potential virulence genes for future studies of pathogenesis towards the development of effective vaccines.

  17. A novel AP92-like Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus strain, Greece.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Chaligiannis, Ilias; Kontana, Natasa; Sourba, Tatiana; Tsioka, Katerina; Tsatsaris, Andreas; Sotiraki, Smaragda

    2014-09-01

    Ticks were collected from various regions of northern Greece and tested for the presence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) RNA. Human and animal sera were collected in the regions where CCHFV-positive ticks were detected, and they were tested for the presence of IgG antibodies against the virus. A CCHFV strain was detected in Rhipicephalus bursa ticks collected from sheep in Kastoria regional unit, differing by 9.7% at the nucleotide level from the AP92 strain, which was isolated in 1975 in another region of Greece. Up to date, CCHF cases have not been reported in these regions. The human seroprevalence in the area was estimated at 6%, while IgG-positive sheep was detected in two of the four neighboring farms tested. The circulation of this specific CCHFV lineage in Greece, especially in a region where the seroprevalence is high, together with the lack of human CCHF cases, suggests a probable antigenic, but non- or low-pathogenic character of this lineage. Further studies on these strains will increase our knowledge about the role of AP92-like strains in the CCHF epidemiology, which might be useful for drug and vaccine design.

  18. Attenuation of pathogenic Rift Valley fever virus strain through the chimeric S-segment encoding sandfly fever phlebovirus NSs or a dominant-negative PKR.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Shoko; Slack, Olga A L; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Hill, Terence E; Juelich, Terry L; Zhang, Lihong; Smith, Jennifer K; Perez, David; Gong, Bin; Freiberg, Alexander N; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-11-16

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease affecting ruminants and humans. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV: family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) causes abortions and fetal malformations in ruminants, and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or retinitis in humans. The live-attenuated MP-12 vaccine is conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the US. However, this vaccine lacks a marker for the differentiation of vaccinated from infected animals (DIVA). NSs gene is dispensable for RVFV replication, and thus, rMP-12 strains lacking NSs gene is applicable to monitor vaccinated animals. However, the immunogenicity of MP-12 lacking NSs was not as high as parental MP-12. Thus, chimeric MP-12 strains encoding NSs from either Toscana virus (TOSV), sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV) or Punta Toro virus Adames strain (PTA) were characterized previously. Although chimeric MP-12 strains are highly immunogenic, the attenuation through the S-segment remains unknown. Using pathogenic ZH501 strain, we aimed to demonstrate the attenuation of ZH501 strain through chimeric S-segment encoding either the NSs of TOSV, SFSV, PTA, or Punta Toro virus Balliet strain (PTB). In addition, we characterized rZH501 encoding a human dominant-negative PKR (PKRΔE7), which also enhances the immunogenicity of MP-12. Study done on mice revealed that attenuation of rZH501 occurred through the S-segment encoding either PKRΔE7 or SFSV NSs. However, rZH501 encoding either TOSV, PTA, or PTB NSs in the S-segment uniformly caused lethal encephalitis. Our results indicated that the S-segments encoding PKRΔE7 or SFSV NSs are attenuated and thus applicable toward next generation MP-12 vaccine candidates that encode a DIVA marker.

  19. Patterns of Cellular Gene Expression in Swine Macrophages Infected with Highly Virulent Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Experimental exposure of swine to highly virulent Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) strain Brescia causes an invariably fatal disease of all infected animals by 8 to 14 days post-infection. Host mechanisms involved in this severe outcome of infection have not been clearly established. To understa...

  20. Safety of classical swine fever virus vaccine strain LOM in pregnant sows and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-In; Song, Jae-Young; Kim, Jaejo; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Kim, Ha-Young; Cho, In-Soo; Kim, Byounghan; Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Lee, Jung-Bok; An, Dong-Jun

    2016-04-12

    The present study aimed to evaluate the safety of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccine strain LOM in pregnant sows. Pregnant sows with free CSFV antibody were inoculated with a commercial LOM vaccine during early pregnancy (day 38; n=3) or mid-pregnancy (days 49-59; n=11). In pregnant sows vaccinated during the early stages of gestation, abortion (day 109) was observed in one case, with two stillbirths and seven mummified fetuses. The viability of live-born piglets was 34.9% in sows vaccinated during mid-pregnancy compared with 81.8% in the control group. Post-mortem examination of the organs of the sows and piglets did not reveal any pathological lesions caused by CSFV; however, CSFV RNA was detected in the organs of several vaccinated sows and their litters. The LOM strain was transmitted from sows with free CSFV antibody to their fetus, but did not appear to induce immune tolerance in the offspring from vaccinated pregnant sows. Side effects were not observed in pregnant sows with antibody to the LOM strain: transmission from sow to their litters and stillbirth or mummified fetuses. The LOM strain may induce sterile immunity and provide rapid, long-lasting, and complete protection against CSFV; however, it should be contraindicated in pregnant sows due to potential adverse effects in pregnant sows with free CSFV antibody.

  1. Detection and differentiation of classical swine fever virus strains C and Shimen by high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Ning, Pengbo; Li, Helin; Liang, Wulong; Guo, Kangkang; Tan, Xuechao; Cao, Weiwei; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Yanming

    2013-12-01

    Differentiation of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strains is crucial for the development of effective vaccination programs and in epidemiological investigations. Most of current detection methods do not discriminate between wild-type CSFV strains and those used in vaccines. In this study, method involving high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of the C and Shimen strains of CSFV was developed. A specific fragment of the NS2 gene was amplified from various CSFV strains and subjected to HRM curve analysis. Analysis of the melt curve profile for the amplicons of each strain allowed the differentiation of CSFV strains in blood samples taken from the field, or from vaccinated commercial flocks. These findings indicate that HRM curve analysis is a rapid and practical technique for discriminating CSFV isolates/strains; it can contribute to epidemiological studies of CSFV and effective control of classical swine fever.

  2. Assessment of Inhibitors of Pathogenic Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Strains Using Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Zivcec, Marko; Metcalfe, Maureen G.; Albariño, César G.; Guerrero, Lisa W.; Pegan, Scott D.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Bergeron, Éric

    2015-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an often lethal, acute inflammatory illness that affects a large geographic area. The disease is caused by infection with CCHF virus (CCHFV), a nairovirus from the Bunyaviridae family. Basic research on CCHFV has been severely hampered by biosafety requirements and lack of available strains and molecular tools. We report the development of a CCHF transcription- and entry-competent virus-like particle (tecVLP) system that can be used to study cell entry and viral transcription/replication over a broad dynamic range (~4 orders of magnitude). The tecVLPs are morphologically similar to authentic CCHFV. Incubation of immortalized and primary human cells with tecVLPs results in a strong reporter signal that is sensitive to treatment with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and by small molecule inhibitors of CCHFV. We used glycoproteins and minigenomes from divergent CCHFV strains to generate tecVLPs, and in doing so, we identified a monoclonal antibody that can prevent cell entry of tecVLPs containing glycoproteins from 3 pathogenic CCHFV strains. In addition, our data suggest that different glycoprotein moieties confer different cellular entry efficiencies, and that glycoproteins from the commonly used strain IbAr10200 have up to 100-fold lower ability to enter primary human cells compared to glycoproteins from pathogenic CCHFV strains. PMID:26625182

  3. Severe Hemorrhagic Fever in Strain 13/N Guinea Pigs Infected with Lujo Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Brian H.; Dodd, Kimberly A.; Erickson, Bobbie R.; Albariño, César G.; Chakrabarti, Ayan K.; McMullan, Laura K.; Bergeron, Eric; Ströeher, Ute; Cannon, Deborah; Martin, Brock; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.

    2012-01-01

    Lujo virus (LUJV) is a novel member of the Arenaviridae family that was first identified in 2008 after an outbreak of severe hemorrhagic fever (HF). In what was a small but rapidly progressing outbreak, this previously unknown virus was transmitted from the critically ill index patient to 4 attending healthcare workers. Four persons died during this outbreak, for a total case fatality of 80% (4/5). The suspected rodent source of the initial exposure to LUJV remains a mystery. Because of the ease of transmission, high case fatality, and novel nature of LUJV, we sought to establish an animal model of LUJV HF. Initial attempts in mice failed, but infection of inbred strain 13/N guinea pigs resulted in lethal disease. A total of 41 adult strain 13/N guinea pigs were infected with either wild-type LUJV or a full-length recombinant LUJV. Results demonstrated that strain 13/N guinea pigs provide an excellent model of severe and lethal LUJV HF that closely resembles what is known of the human disease. All infected animals experienced consistent weight loss (3–5% per day) and clinical illness characterized by ocular discharge, ruffled fur, hunched posture, and lethargy. Uniform lethality occurred by 11–16 days post-infection. All animals developed disseminated LUJV infection in various organs (liver, spleen, lung, and kidney), and leukopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, and elevated transaminase levels. Serial euthanasia studies revealed a temporal pattern of virus dissemination and increasing severity of disease, primarily targeting the liver, spleen, lungs, and lower gastrointestinal tract. Establishing an animal LUJV model is an important first step towards understanding the high pathogenicity of LUJV and developing vaccines and antiviral therapeutic drugs for this highly transmissible and lethal emerging pathogen. PMID:22953019

  4. Genetic subpopulations of Rift Valley fever virus strains ZH548 and MP-12 and recombinant MP-12 strains.

    PubMed

    Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Freiberg, Alexander N; Morrill, John C; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2012-12-01

    Rift Valley fever virus strain MP-12 was generated by serial plaque passages of parental strain ZH548 12 times in MRC-5 cells in the presence of a chemical mutagen, 5-fluorouracil. As a result, MP-12 encoded 4, 9, and 10 mutations in the S, M, and L segments, respectively. Among them, mutations in the M and L segments were responsible for attenuation, while the MP-12 S segment still encoded a virulent phenotype. We performed high-throughput sequencing of MP-12 vaccine, ZH548, and recombinant MP-12 (rMP-12) viruses. We found that rMP-12 contains very low numbers of viral subpopulations, while MP-12 and ZH548 contain 2 to 4 times more viral genetic subpopulations than rMP-12. MP-12 genetic subpopulations did not encode the ZH548 sequence at the 23 MP-12 consensus mutations. On the other hand, 4 and 2 mutations in M and L segments of MP-12 were found in ZH548 subpopulations. Thus, those 6 mutations were no longer MP-12-specific mutations. ZH548 encoded several unique mutations compared to other Egyptian strains, i.e., strains ZH501, ZH1776, and ZS6365. ZH548 subpopulations shared nucleotides at the mutation site common with those in the Egyptian strains, while MP-12 subpopulations did not share those nucleotides. Thus, MP-12 retains unique genetic subpopulations and has no evidence of reversion to the ZH548 sequence in the subpopulations. This study provides the first information regarding the genetic subpopulations of RVFV and shows the genetic stability of the MP-12 vaccine manufactured in MRC-5 cells.

  5. Genetic Subpopulations of Rift Valley Fever Virus Strains ZH548 and MP-12 and Recombinant MP-12 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Morrill, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus strain MP-12 was generated by serial plaque passages of parental strain ZH548 12 times in MRC-5 cells in the presence of a chemical mutagen, 5-fluorouracil. As a result, MP-12 encoded 4, 9, and 10 mutations in the S, M, and L segments, respectively. Among them, mutations in the M and L segments were responsible for attenuation, while the MP-12 S segment still encoded a virulent phenotype. We performed high-throughput sequencing of MP-12 vaccine, ZH548, and recombinant MP-12 (rMP-12) viruses. We found that rMP-12 contains very low numbers of viral subpopulations, while MP-12 and ZH548 contain 2 to 4 times more viral genetic subpopulations than rMP-12. MP-12 genetic subpopulations did not encode the ZH548 sequence at the 23 MP-12 consensus mutations. On the other hand, 4 and 2 mutations in M and L segments of MP-12 were found in ZH548 subpopulations. Thus, those 6 mutations were no longer MP-12-specific mutations. ZH548 encoded several unique mutations compared to other Egyptian strains, i.e., strains ZH501, ZH1776, and ZS6365. ZH548 subpopulations shared nucleotides at the mutation site common with those in the Egyptian strains, while MP-12 subpopulations did not share those nucleotides. Thus, MP-12 retains unique genetic subpopulations and has no evidence of reversion to the ZH548 sequence in the subpopulations. This study provides the first information regarding the genetic subpopulations of RVFV and shows the genetic stability of the MP-12 vaccine manufactured in MRC-5 cells. PMID:23035230

  6. Genetic Diversity of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Strains from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Chinikar, Sadegh; Bouzari, Saeid; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Jalali, Tahmineh; Khakifirouz, Sahar; Nowotny, Norbert; Fooks, Anthony R.; Shah-Hosseini, Nariman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of the Bunyaviridae family and Nairovirus genus. It has a negative-sense, single stranded RNA genome approximately 19.2 kb, containing the Small, Medium, and Large segments. CCHFVs are relatively divergent in their genome sequence and grouped in seven distinct clades based on S-segment sequence analysis and six clades based on M-segment sequences. Our aim was to obtain new insights into the molecular epidemiology of CCHFV in Iran. Methods: We analyzed partial and complete nucleotide sequences of the S and M segments derived from 50 Iranian patients. The extracted RNA was amplified using one-step RT-PCR and then sequenced. The sequences were analyzed using Mega5 software. Results: Phylogenetic analysis of partial S segment sequences demonstrated that clade IV-(Asia 1), clade IV-(Asia 2) and clade V-(Europe) accounted for 80 %, 4 % and 14 % of the circulating genomic variants of CCHFV in Iran respectively. However, one of the Iranian strains (Iran-Kerman/22) was associated with none of other sequences and formed a new clade (VII). The phylogenetic analysis of complete S-segment nucleotide sequences from selected Iranian CCHFV strains complemented with representative strains from GenBank revealed similar topology as partial sequences with eight major clusters. A partial M segment phylogeny positioned the Iranian strains in either association with clade III (Asia-Africa) or clade V (Europe). Conclusion: The phylogenetic analysis revealed subtle links between distant geographic locations, which we propose might originate either from international livestock trade or from long-distance carriage of CCHFV by infected ticks via bird migration. PMID:27308271

  7. Rift Valley Fever Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus or arbovirus that is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In the last decade, Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have resulted in loss of human and animal life, as well as had significant economic impact. The disease in livestock is primarily a...

  8. In vitro and in vivo antiviral properties of sulfated galactomannans against yellow fever virus (BeH111 strain) and dengue 1 virus (Hawaii strain).

    PubMed

    Ono, Lucy; Wollinger, Wagner; Rocco, Iray M; Coimbra, Terezinha L M; Gorin, Philip A J; Sierakowski, Maria-Rita

    2003-11-01

    Two galactomannans, one extracted from seeds of Mimosa scabrella, having a mannose to galactose ratio of 1.1, and another with a 1.4 ratio from seeds of Leucaena leucocephala, were sulfated. The products from M. scabrella (BRS) and L. leucocephala (LLS) had a degree of sulfation of 0.62 and 0.50, and an average molecular weight of 620x10(3) and 574x10(3) gmol(-1), respectively. Their activities against yellow fever virus (YFV; BeH111 strain) and dengue 1 virus (DEN-1; Hawaii strain) were evaluated. This was carried out in young mice following intraperitoneal infection with YFV. At a dose of 49 mgkg(-1), BRS and LLS gave protection against death in 87.7 and 96.5% of the mice, respectively. When challenged with 37.5 LD50 of YFV, mice previously inoculated with BRS+virus or LLS+virus, showed 93.3 and 100% resistance, respectively, with neutralization titers similar to mice injected with 25 LD50 of formaldehyde-inactivated YFV. In vitro experiments with YFV and DEN-1 in C6/36 cell culture assays in 24-well microplates showed that concentrations that produced a 100-fold decrease in virus titer of YFV were 586 and 385 mgl(-1) for BRS and LLS, respectively. For DEN-1 they were 347 and 37 mgl(-1), respectively. Sulfated galactomannans, thus demonstrate in vitro and in vivo activity against flaviviruses.

  9. Rift Valley fever virus strain MP-12 enters mammalian host cells via caveola-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Brooke; Schudel, Benjamin R; Maar, Dianna; Kozina, Carol; Ikegami, Tetsuro; Tseng, Chien-Te Kent; Negrete, Oscar A

    2012-12-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a zoonotic pathogen capable of causing serious morbidity and mortality in both humans and livestock. The lack of efficient countermeasure strategies, the potential for dispersion into new regions, and the pathogenesis in humans and livestock make RVFV a serious public health concern. The receptors, cellular factors, and entry pathways used by RVFV and other members of the family Bunyaviridae remain largely uncharacterized. Here we provide evidence that RVFV strain MP-12 uses dynamin-dependent caveola-mediated endocytosis for cell entry. Caveolae are lipid raft domains composed of caveolin (the main structural component), cholesterol, and sphingolipids. Caveola-mediated endocytosis is responsible for the uptake of a wide variety of host ligands, as well as bacteria, bacterial toxins, and a number of viruses. To determine the cellular entry mechanism of RVFV, we used small-molecule inhibitors, RNA interference (RNAi), and dominant negative (DN) protein expression to inhibit the major mammalian cell endocytic pathways. Inhibitors and RNAi specific for macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis had no effect on RVFV infection. In contrast, inhibitors of caveola-mediated endocytosis, and RNAi targeted to caveolin-1 and dynamin, drastically reduced RVFV infection in multiple cell lines. Expression of DN caveolin-1 also reduced RVFV infection significantly, while expression of DN EPS15, a protein required for the assembly of clathrin-coated pits, and DN PAK-1, an obligate mediator of macropinocytosis, had no significant impact on RVFV infection. These results together suggest that the primary mechanism of RVFV MP-12 uptake is dynamin-dependent, caveolin-1-mediated endocytosis.

  10. Ebola hemorrhagic fever associated with novel virus strain, Uganda, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Wamala, Joseph F; Lukwago, Luswa; Malimbo, Mugagga; Nguku, Patrick; Yoti, Zabulon; Musenero, Monica; Amone, Jackson; Mbabazi, William; Nanyunja, Miriam; Zaramba, Sam; Opio, Alex; Lutwama, Julius J; Talisuna, Ambrose O; Okware, Sam I

    2010-07-01

    During August 2007-February 2008, the novel Bundibugyo ebolavirus species was identified during an outbreak of Ebola viral hemorrhagic fever in Bundibugyo district, western Uganda. To characterize the outbreak as a requisite for determining response, we instituted a case-series investigation. We identified 192 suspected cases, of which 42 (22%) were laboratory positive for the novel species; 74 (38%) were probable, and 77 (40%) were negative. Laboratory confirmation lagged behind outbreak verification by 3 months. Bundibugyo ebolavirus was less fatal (case-fatality rate 34%) than Ebola viruses that had caused previous outbreaks in the region, and most transmission was associated with handling of dead persons without appropriate protection (adjusted odds ratio 3.83, 95% confidence interval 1.78-8.23). Our study highlights the need for maintaining a high index of suspicion for viral hemorrhagic fevers among healthcare workers, building local capacity for laboratory confirmation of viral hemorrhagic fevers, and institutionalizing standard precautions.

  11. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biological pro...

  12. N-Linked Glycosylation Status of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia E2 Glycoprotein Influences Virulence in Swine▿

    PubMed Central

    Risatti, G. R.; Holinka, L. G.; Fernandez Sainz, I.; Carrillo, C.; Lu, Z.; Borca, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    E2 is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Previous studies indicate that E2 is involved in several functions, including virus attachment and entry to target cells, production of antibodies, induction of protective immune response in swine, and virulence. Here, we have investigated the role of E2 glycosylation of the highly virulent CSFV strain Brescia in infection of the natural host. Seven putative glycosylation sites in E2 were modified by site-directed mutagenesis of a CSFV Brescia infectious clone (BICv). A panel of virus mutants was obtained and used to investigate whether the removal of putative glycosylation sites in the E2 glycoprotein would affect viral virulence/pathogenesis in swine. We observed that rescue of viable virus was completely impaired by removal of all putative glycosylation sites in E2 but restored when mutation N185A reverted to wild-type asparagine produced viable virus that was attenuated in swine. Single mutations of each of the E2 glycosylation sites showed that amino acid N116 (N1v virus) was responsible for BICv attenuation. N1v efficiently protected swine from challenge with virulent BICv at 3 and 28 days postinfection, suggesting that glycosylation of E2 could be modified for development of classical swine fever live attenuated vaccines. PMID:17108025

  13. Inbred Rat Strains Mimic the Disparate Human Response to Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    Norway rats were exquisitely susceptible to the virus and died with extensive hepatic necrosis 3 to I 5 days after inoculation of only 5 plaque...many of the animals necropsied (Table 11). Rats dying of hepatic necrosis uniformly had large quantities of virus in the liver and blood. Their brain...at least a 100-fold difference between the lethality of RVF virus for rats susceptible to hepatic necrosis and more resistant strains. Ten-fold in

  14. Pathological changes in the renal interstitial capillaries of pigs inoculated with two different strains of African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Hervás, J; Méndez, A; Carrasco, L; Villeda, C J; Wilkinson, P J; Sierra, M A

    1995-04-01

    African swine fever is a viral disease of pigs characterized predominantly by haemorrhagic lesions. This paper reports the lesions observed in the renal interstitial capillaries of pigs inoculated with African swine fever virus strains of differing virulence: the Malawi'83 strain (haemadsorbent and highly virulent) and the Dominican Republic'78 strain (haemadsorbent and moderately virulent). In pigs infected with the Malawi'83 strain, petechial haemorrhages and microhaemorrhages were observed 5 days after inoculation and lesions were evident in the renal capillaries. Signs of phagocyte activation were noticeable in endothelial cells, with enlarged fenestrations and even loss of endothelium, leaving the basement membrane of the vessels exposed. Platelet plugs and microthrombi were also observed in these vessels. At 7 days after inoculation these lesions had intensified, and were accompanied by virus replication in the endothelial cells. In pigs infected with the Dominican Republic'78 strain, haemorrhages were more abundant and more extensive, and although no endothelial cell lesions were observed, there was intense vasodilation with diapedesis of erythrocytes.

  15. Quantification of classical swine fever virus in aerosols originating from pigs infected with strains of high, moderate or low virulence.

    PubMed

    Weesendorp, Eefke; Stegeman, Arjan; Loeffen, Willie L A

    2009-03-30

    During epidemics of classical swine fever (CSF), the route of virus introduction into a farm is often unclear. One of the suggested routes is via the air. Under experimental conditions, airborne transmission over a short distance seems possible, but analysis of outbreak data is still inconclusive. For a better understanding of the role of airborne transmission, quantitative information is needed on concentrations of virus emitted by infected pigs. This was studied in four groups of 10 pigs in which three pigs were inoculated with either a low virulent strain (Zoelen), a low or high dose of a moderately virulent strain (Paderborn), or a highly virulent strain (Brescia). The other seven pigs in each group served as contact pigs. At several moments after infection, air samples were obtained using gelatine filters. Infectious virus and viral RNA were detected in the air of rooms housing the pigs infected with the moderately and highly virulent strains with titres of 10(1.2) to 10(3.0)TCID(50)/m(3) of infectious virus, and 10(1.6) to 10(3.8)TCID(50)equiv./m(3) of viral RNA. It was observed that the higher the dose or virulence of the virus strain used for inoculation of the pigs, the sooner virus could be detected in the air samples. This is the first study describing the quantification of (infectious) CSFV in air samples of rooms housing infected pigs, enabling to quantify the contribution of individual infected pigs to virus concentrations in aerosols. This can be used as input for quantitative models of airborne spread over large distances.

  16. The effect of vaccination with the PAV-250 strain classical swine fever (CSF) virus on the airborne transmission of CSF virus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, C; Pijoan, C; Ciprian, A; Correa, P; Mendoza, S

    2001-09-01

    The airborne transmission of Classical Swine Fever (CSF) virus to susceptible pigs, as well as the effect of vaccination with the CSF virus PAV-250 strain was investigated on this mode of transmission. Experiment I: four pigs were inoculated with the ALD CSFV strain (10(4.3) 50% TCID) by the intramuscular route, and at the onset of fever, they were introduced into an enclosed chamber. At the end of the experiment surviving pigs were sedated, anesthetized and euthanatized. Experiment II: four pigs were previously vaccinated with the CSF virus PAV-250 strain, and at 14 days post-vaccination they were challenged with the CSF virus ALD strain. In both experiments, four susceptible pigs were exposed to infectious aerosols by placing them in a chamber connected by a duct to the adjacent pen containing the infected animals and were kept there for 86 hs. In Experiment I, pigs exposed to contaminated air died as a result of infection with CSF virus on days 14, 21 and 28 post-inhalation. These four pigs seroconverted from day 12 post-inhalation. CSF virus was isolated from these animals, and the fluorescent antibody test on tonsils was positive. In Experiment II, a vaccinated pig exposed to contaminated air did not seroconvert, nor was CSF virus isolated from lymphoid tissues. However, mild fluorescence in tonsil sections from these pigs was observed. In conclusion, CSF virus was shown to be transmitted by air at a distance of 1 m to susceptible pigs. Vaccination with the PAV-250 CSF virus strain protected the pigs from clinical disease under the same conditions.

  17. A neutralization assay with a severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus strain that makes plaques in inoculated cells.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Satoshi; Fukuma, Aiko; Tani, Hideki; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Saijo, Masayuki; Shimojima, Masayuki

    2017-06-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is a recently-discovered, potentially fatal infectious disease caused by SFTS virus (SFTSV). Due to the inability of SFTSV to make clear cytopathic effects (CPE) in cell culture, titration and neutralization assays of the virus require immunostaining of inoculated cells; consequently, the assays are time-consuming and expensive. In this report, we demonstrate the use of a highly-passaged SFTSV strain, p50-2, in a neutralization assay, which made clear plaques in inoculated Vero cells under neutral red staining. Furthermore, we performed molecular analyses to determine the characteristics of the strain. The results suggested that a single amino acid mutation within the viral glycoprotein conferred the ability to make clear plaques to SFTSV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Sequence-based comparative study of classical swine fever virus genogroup 2.2 isolate with pestivirus reference strains

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravi; Rajak, Kaushal Kishor; Chandra, Tribhuwan; Muthuchelvan, Dhanavelu; Saxena, Arpit; Chaudhary, Dheeraj; Kumar, Ajay; Pandey, Awadh Bihari

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was undertaken with the aim to compare and establish the genetic relatedness between classical swine fever virus (CSFV) genogroup 2.2 isolate and pestivirus reference strains. Materials and Methods: The available complete genome sequences of CSFV/IND/UK/LAL-290 strain and other pestivirus reference strains were retrieved from GenBank. The complete genome sequence, complete open reading frame, 5’ and 3’ non-coding region (NCR) sequences were analyzed and compared with reference pestiviruses strains. Clustal W model in MegAlign program of Lasergene 6.0 software was used for analysis of genetic heterogeneity. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out using MEGA 6.06 software package. Results: The complete genome sequence alignment of CSFV/IND/UK/LAL-290 isolate and reference pestivirus strains showed 58.9-72% identities at the nucleotide level and 50.3-76.9% at amino acid level. Sequence homology of 5’ and 3’ NCRs was found to be 64.1-82.3% and 22.9-71.4%, respectively. In phylogenetic analysis, overall tree topology was found similar irrespective of sequences used in this study; however, whole genome phylogeny of pestivirus formed two main clusters, which further distinguished into the monophyletic clade of each pestivirus species. CSFV/IND/UK/LAL-290 isolate placed with the CSFV Eystrup strain in the same clade with close proximity to border disease virus and Aydin strains. Conclusion: CSFV/IND/UK/LAL-290 exhibited the analogous genomic organization to those of all reference pestivirus strains. Based on sequence identity and phylogenetic analysis, the isolate showed close homology to Aydin/04-TR virus and distantly related to Bungowannah virus. PMID:27047198

  19. Biological characterization of African swine fever virus genotype II strains from north-eastern Estonia in European wild boar.

    PubMed

    Nurmoja, I; Petrov, A; Breidenstein, C; Zani, L; Forth, J H; Beer, M; Kristian, M; Viltrop, A; Blome, S

    2017-01-24

    Due to its impact on animal health and pig industry, African swine fever (ASF) is regarded as one of the most important viral diseases of pigs. Following the ongoing epidemic in the Transcaucasian countries and the Russian Federation, African swine fever virus was introduced into the Estonian wild boar population in 2014. Epidemiological investigations suggested two different introductions into the southern and the north-eastern part of Estonia. Interestingly, outbreak characteristics varied considerably between the affected regions. While high mortality and mainly virus-positive animals were observed in the southern region, mortality was low in the north-eastern area. In the latter, clinically healthy, antibody-positive animals were found in the hunting bag and detection of virus was rare. Two hypotheses could explain the different behaviour in the north-east: (i) the frequency of antibody detections combined with the low mortality is the tail of an older, so far undetected epidemic wave coming from the east, or (ii) the virus in this region is attenuated and leads to a less severe clinical outcome. To explore the possibility of virus attenuation, a re-isolated ASFV strain from the north-eastern Ida-Viru region was biologically characterized in European wild boar. Oronasal inoculation led to an acute and severe disease course in all animals with typical pathomorphological lesions. However, one animal recovered completely and was subsequently commingled with three sentinels of the same age class to assess disease transmission. By the end of the trial at 96 days post-initial inoculation, all animals were completely healthy and neither virus nor viral genomes were detected in the sentinels or the survivor. The survivor, however, showed high antibody levels. In conclusion, the ASFV strain from north-eastern Estonia was still highly virulent but nevertheless, one animal recovered completely. Under the experimental conditions, no transmission occurred from the survivor

  20. Alteration of the N-linked Glycosylation Condition of E1 Glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia Alters Virulence in Swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    E1, along with Erns and E2 is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). Previously we showed that glycosylation status of virulent CSFV strain Brescia E2 or Erns affects virus virulence. Here, the three putative glycosylation sites of E1 were serially removed by ...

  1. Removal of a N-linked Glycosylation Site on the Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia E(rns) Glycoprotein Affects Virulence in Swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) E(rns) glycoprotein is involved in several functions; including virus attachment and entry to target cells, production of antibodies, and virulence. Here, we describe the role of CSFV strain Brescia E(rns) glycosylation on virulence in swine. Amino acid residue N...

  2. Isolation and characterization of a Brazilian strain of yellow fever virus from an epizootic outbreak in 2009.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Taissa Ricciardi; Mosimann, Ana Luiza Pamplona; Noronha, Lucia de; Maron, Angela; Duarte Dos Santos, Claudia Nunes

    2017-02-01

    During a series of epizootics caused by Yellow fever virus in Brazil between 2007 and 2009, a monkey was found dead (May 2009) in a sylvatic area in the State of Paraná. Brain samples from this animal were used for immunohistochemical analysis and isolation of a wild-type strain of YFV. This viral strain was characterized, and sequence analyzes demonstrated that it is closely related with YFV strains of the recently identified subclade 1E of the South American genotype I. Further characterization included indirect-immunofluorescence of different infected cell lines and analysis of the kinetics of virus replication and infectivity inhibition by type I IFN. The generated data contributes to the knowledge of YFV evolution and phylogeny. Additionally, the reagents generated and characterized during this study, such as a panel of monoclonal antibodies, are useful tools for further studies on YFV. Lastly, this case stresses the importance of yellow fever surveillance through sentinel monkeys. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Passive antibody therapy of Lassa fever in cynomolgus monkeys: importance of neutralizing antibody and Lassa virus strain.

    PubMed

    Jahrling, P B; Peters, C J

    1984-05-01

    Lassa virus-infected cynomolgus monkeys were passively immunized with immune plasma of primate or human origin to gain insight into criteria for plasma selection and administration to human Lassa fever patients. Protective efficacy was correlated with neutralizing antibody concentrations, expressed as a log10 neutralization index (LNI). Convalescent Lassa-immune monkey plasma was titrated for protective efficacy in monkeys by intravenous inoculation with dilutions of plasma on the day of subcutaneous Lassa virus inoculation (day 0) and again on days 3 and 6. Monkeys that received undiluted plasma (LNI = 4.1) (1 ml/kg per treatment) survived a lethal viral dose, whereas those given a 1:3 dilution (LNI = 2.6) of this same plasma (1 ml/kg per treatment) died. Protection was restored when the volume of the 1:3 plasma dilution was increased to 3 ml/kg per treatment. Plasma diluted 1:9 or more (LNI = 1.5 or less) delayed onset and suppressed the magnitude of viremia but failed to confer protection at 3 ml/kg per treatment. Immunological enhancement, defined as increased viremia or accelerated death, did not occur following inadequate treatment. Human convalescent plasma also protected recipient monkeys; reductions in mortality and viremia were accurately predicted by the LNI of the plasma. Plasma of Liberian origin neutralized a Liberian Lassa strain more effectively than a Sierra Leone strain in vitro (LNI = 2.8 and 1.6, respectively) and protected monkeys more effectively against the Liberian strain. Geographic origin is thus a factor in the selection of optimal plasma for treatment of human Lassa fever, since geographically matched plasma is more likely to contain adequate LNI titers against homologous Lassa virus strains.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Choice of inbred rat strain impacts lethality and disease course after respiratory infection with Rift Valley Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bales, Jacquelyn M.; Powell, Diana S.; Bethel, Laura M.; Reed, Douglas S.; Hartman, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    Humans infected with Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV) generally recover after a febrile illness; however, a proportion of patients progress to a more severe clinical outcome such as hemorrhagic fever or meningoencephalitis. RVFV is naturally transmitted to livestock and humans by mosquito bites, but it is also infectious through inhalational exposure, making it a potential bioterror weapon. To better understand the disease caused by inhalation of RVFV, Wistar-Furth, ACI, or Lewis rats were exposed to experimental aerosols containing virulent RVFV. Wistar-Furth rats developed a rapidly progressing lethal hepatic disease after inhalational exposure; ACI rats were 100-fold less susceptible and developed fatal encephalitis after infection. Lewis rats, which do not succumb to parenteral inoculation with RVFV, developed fatal encephalitis after aerosol infection. RVFV was found in the liver, lung, spleen, heart, kidney and brain of Wistar Furth rats that succumbed after aerosol exposure. In contrast, RVFV was found only in the brains of ACI or Lewis rats that succumbed after aerosol exposure. Lewis rats that survived s.c. infection were not protected against subsequent re-challenge by aerosol exposure to the homologous virus. This is the first side-by-side comparison of the lethality and pathogenesis of RVFV in three rat strains after aerosol exposure and the first step toward developing a rodent model suitable for use under the FDA Animal Rule to test potential vaccines and therapeutics for aerosol exposure to RVFV. PMID:22919694

  5. Vaccine and Wild-Type Strains of Yellow Fever Virus Engage Distinct Entry Mechanisms and Differentially Stimulate Antiviral Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Garcia, Maria Dolores; Meertens, Laurent; Chazal, Maxime; Hafirassou, Mohamed Lamine; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Zamborlini, Alessia; Despres, Philippe; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Jouvenet, Nolwenn; Amara, Ali

    2016-02-09

    The live attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D stands as a "gold standard" for a successful vaccine. 17D was developed empirically by passaging the wild-type Asibi strain in mouse and chicken embryo tissues. Despite its immense success, the molecular determinants for virulence attenuation and immunogenicity of the 17D vaccine are poorly understood. 17D evolved several mutations in its genome, most of which lie within the envelope (E) protein. Given the major role played by the YFV E protein during virus entry, it has been hypothesized that the residues that diverge between the Asibi and 17D E proteins may be key determinants of attenuation. In this study, we define the process of YFV entry into target cells and investigate its implication in the activation of the antiviral cytokine response. We found that Asibi infects host cells exclusively via the classical clathrin-mediated endocytosis, while 17D exploits a clathrin-independent pathway for infectious entry. We demonstrate that the mutations in the 17D E protein acquired during the attenuation process are sufficient to explain the differential entry of Asibi versus 17D. Interestingly, we show that 17D binds to and infects host cells more efficiently than Asibi, which culminates in increased delivery of viral RNA into the cytosol and robust activation of the cytokine-mediated antiviral response. Overall, our study reveals that 17D vaccine and Asibi enter target cells through distinct mechanisms and highlights a link between 17D attenuation, virus entry, and immune activation. The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D is one of the safest and most effective live virus vaccines ever developed. The molecular determinants for virulence attenuation and immunogenicity of 17D are poorly understood. 17D was generated by serially passaging the virulent Asibi strain in vertebrate tissues. Here we examined the entry mechanisms engaged by YFV Asibi and the 17D vaccine. We found the two viruses use different entry

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Two Rift Valley Fever Virus Strains Isolated from Outbreaks in Saudi Arabia (2000) and Kenya (2006 to 2007)

    PubMed Central

    Shivanna, Vinay; McDowell, Chester; Wilson, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence, including the untranslated regions, of two Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) strains isolated from mosquitoes that were collected from disease outbreaks in Saudi Arabia (2001) and Kenya (2006 to 2007) were sequenced using next-generation sequencing technology. PMID:27609913

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Two Rift Valley Fever Virus Strains Isolated from Outbreaks in Saudi Arabia (2000) and Kenya (2006 to 2007).

    PubMed

    Shivanna, Vinay; McDowell, Chester; Wilson, William C; Richt, Juergen A

    2016-09-08

    The complete genome sequence, including the untranslated regions, of two Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) strains isolated from mosquitoes that were collected from disease outbreaks in Saudi Arabia (2001) and Kenya (2006 to 2007) were sequenced using next-generation sequencing technology. Copyright © 2016 Shivanna et al.

  8. Experimental pig-to-pig transmission dynamics for African swine fever virus, Georgia 2007/1 strain.

    PubMed

    Guinat, C; Gubbins, S; Vergne, T; Gonzales, J L; Dixon, L; Pfeiffer, D U

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) continues to cause outbreaks in domestic pigs and wild boar in Eastern European countries. To gain insights into its transmission dynamics, we estimated the pig-to-pig basic reproduction number (R 0) for the Georgia 2007/1 ASFV strain using a stochastic susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered (SEIR) model with parameters estimated from transmission experiments. Models showed that R 0 is 2·8 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·3-4·8] within a pen and 1·4 (95% CI 0·6-2·4) between pens. The results furthermore suggest that ASFV genome detection in oronasal samples is an effective diagnostic tool for early detection of infection. This study provides quantitative information on transmission parameters for ASFV in domestic pigs, which are required to more effectively assess the potential impact of strategies for the control of between-farm epidemic spread in European countries.

  9. Apoptosis in porcine macrophages infected in vitro with African swine fever virus (ASFV) strains with different virulence.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Raquel; Leitão, Alexandre; Martins, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) replicates in porcine macrophages. Since modulation of cell death by ASFV strains of different virulence is poorly understood, we studied the development of apoptosis in porcine macrophage cultures during in vitro infection with the high- and low-virulence isolates ASFV/L60 (L60) and ASFV/NH/P68 (NHV), respectively. In cultures inoculated with each isolate, similar numbers of cells hosting infection showed morphological signs of apoptosis, which were visible from a relatively early time of infection (8 h), although a significant proportion of the infected cell populations remained non-apoptotic until 18 h. L60 inhibited caspase-3 activation by 18 h after infection and induced less DNA internucleosomic fragmentation at 8 h than NHV. However, at the late infection time, apoptosis levels were similar in both infections and occurred, at least partially, independently of caspases, suggesting the existence of yet unknown alternative pathways committing ASFV host cells to apoptotic death.

  10. Visual detection and differentiation of Classic Swine Fever Virus strains using nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) and G-quadruplex DNAzyme assay

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaolu; Shi, Xueyao; Wu, Gege; Wu, Tiantian; Qin, Rui; Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    The split G-quadruplex DNAzyme has emerged as a valuable tool for visual DNA detection. Here, we successfully integrated colorimetric split G-quadruplex DNAzyme assay with nucleic acid sequence-based amplification to generate a novel detection approach, allowing visual and rapid detection for the RNA of Shimen and HCLV strains of Classic Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). CSFV is a RNA virus that causes a highly contagious disease in domestic pigs and wild boar. With this method, we were able to detect as little as 10 copies/ml of CSF viral RNA within 3 h in serum samples taken from the field. No interference was encountered in the amplification and detection of Classic Swine Fever Virus in the presence of non-target RNA or DNA. Moreover, Shimen and HCLV strains of Classic Swine Fever Virus could be easily differentiated using the NASBA-DNAzyme system. These findings indicate the NASBA-DNAzyme system is a rapid and practical technique for detecting and discriminating CSFV strains and may be applied to the detection of other RNA viruses. PMID:28287135

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed

    Grobbelaar, Antoinette A; Weyer, Jacqueline; Leman, Patricia A; Kemp, Alan; Paweska, Janusz T; Swanepoel, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Phylogenetic relationships were examined for 198 Rift Valley fever virus isolates and 5 derived strains obtained from various sources in Saudi Arabia and 16 countries in Africa during a 67-year period (1944-2010). A maximum-likelihood tree prepared with sequence data for a 490-nt section of the Gn glycoprotein gene showed that 95 unique sequences sorted into 15 lineages. A 2010 isolate from a patient in South Africa potentially exposed to co-infection with live animal vaccine and wild virus was a reassortant. The potential influence of large-scale use of live animal vaccine on evolution of Rift Valley fever virus is discussed.

  12. Molecular Epidemiology of Rift Valley Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Grobbelaar, Antoinette A.; Weyer, Jacqueline; Leman, Patricia A.; Kemp, Alan; Paweska, Janusz T.

    2011-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships were examined for 198 Rift Valley fever virus isolates and 5 derived strains obtained from various sources in Saudi Arabia and 16 countries in Africa during a 67-year period (1944–2010). A maximum-likelihood tree prepared with sequence data for a 490-nt section of the Gn glycoprotein gene showed that 95 unique sequences sorted into 15 lineages. A 2010 isolate from a patient in South Africa potentially exposed to co-infection with live animal vaccine and wild virus was a reassortant. The potential influence of large-scale use of live animal vaccine on evolution of Rift Valley fever virus is discussed. PMID:22172568

  13. Experimental infection of calves by two genetically-distinct strains of rift valley fever virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent outbreaks of Rift Valley fever in ruminant livestock, characterized by mass abortion and high mortality rates in neonates, have raised international interest in improving vaccine control strategies. Previously we developed a reliable challenge model for sheep that improves the evaluation of ...

  14. Infection of mouse bone marrow-derived immature dendritic cells with classical swine fever virus C-strain promotes cells maturation and lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fu-Ying; Qiu, Chang-Qing; Jia, Huai-Jie; Chen, Guo-Hua; Zeng, Shuang; He, Xiao-Bing; Fang, Yong-Xiang; Lin, Guo-Zhen; Jing, Zhi-Zhong

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the interactions of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) C-strain and the virulent GSLZ strain with mouse bone marrow-derived immature dendritic cells (BM-imDCs) were investigated for the first time. Both the C-strain and the virulent GSLZ strain could effectively infect and replicate in mouse BM-imDCs. C-strain-infected BM-imDCs showed a greatly enhanced degree of maturation, and could effectively promote the expansion and proliferation of allogeneic naive T cells. The C-strain induced a stronger Th1 response. Infection with the virulent GSLZ strain had no obvious influence on cell maturation or lymphocyte proliferation, and failed to induce any obvious immune response. The results of this study provided initial information for research of the immunologic mechanisms of CSFV using mouse DCs as the model cells.

  15. Clinical, virological and serological response of the West African dwarf sheep to experimental infection with different strains of Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed

    Tomori, O

    1979-03-01

    West African dwarf sheep were inoculated with three different strains of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Using infective mouse serum as the source of virus classical RVFV disease characterised by sudden onset, a sharp but transient febrile response, viraemia, abortions and the development of specific RVFV antibodies in surviving animals was observed. The severity of clinical response was, however, dependent on the strain of virus used, with animals inoculated with Smithburn's neuroadapted strain showing a milder response than those inoculated with either the Nigerian or Lunyo strain. The inoculation of sheep with RVFV infective mouse brain material of the three different strains resulted in a mild febrile response with low level viraemia. Immune sera from sheep inoculated with both the Nigerian and Smithburn's neurotropic strains did not neutralise the Lunyo virus strain in a mouse intracerebral neutralisation test; the reverse, however, was not the case. The findings indicate that the West African dwarf sheep is highly susceptible to RVFV infection and that previous reports of only a mild clinical response following inoculation with the Nigerian strain were due to infective mouse brain rather than infective mouse serum.

  16. Enzootic transmission of yellow fever virus, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Auguste, Albert J; Lemey, Philippe; Bergren, Nicholas A; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Moncada, Maria; Morón, Dulce; Hernandez, Rosa; Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Weaver, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of yellow fever virus (YFV) strains isolated from Venezuela strongly supports YFV maintenance in situ in Venezuela, with evidence of regionally independent evolution within the country. However, there is considerable YFV movement from Brazil to Venezuela and between Trinidad and Venezuela.

  17. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Greece.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Sidira, Persefoni; Larichev, Victor; Gavrilova, Ludmila; Kuzmina, Ksenia; Mousavi-Jazi, Mehrdad; Mirazimi, Ali; Ströher, Ute; Nichol, Stuart

    2014-02-01

    Seroprevalence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is high in some regions of Greece, but only 1 case of disease has been reported. We used 4 methods to test 118 serum samples that were positive for CCHFV IgG by commercial ELISA and confirmed the positive results. A nonpathogenic or low-pathogenicity strain may be circulating.

  18. Enzootic Transmission of Yellow Fever Virus, Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Auguste, Albert J.; Lemey, Philippe; Bergren, Nicholas A.; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Moncada, Maria; Morón, Dulce; Hernandez, Rosa; Navarro, Juan-Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of yellow fever virus (YFV) strains isolated from Venezuela strongly supports YFV maintenance in situ in Venezuela, with evidence of regionally independent evolution within the country. However, there is considerable YFV movement from Brazil to Venezuela and between Trinidad and Venezuela. PMID:25531105

  19. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Sidira, Persefoni; Larichev, Victor; Gavrilova, Ludmila; Kuzmina, Ksenia; Mousavi-Jazi, Mehrdad; Mirazimi, Ali; Ströher, Ute; Nichol, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Seroprevalence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is high in some regions of Greece, but only 1 case of disease has been reported. We used 4 methods to test 118 serum samples that were positive for CCHFV IgG by commercial ELISA and confirmed the positive results. A nonpathogenic or low-pathogenicity strain may be circulating. PMID:24447877

  20. Mayaro Fever Virus, Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Raimunda S.S.; Silva, Eliana V.P.; Carvalho, Valéria L.; Rodrigues, Sueli G.; Neto, Joaquim P. Nunes; Monteiro, Hamilton A.O.; Peixoto, Victor S.; Chiang, Jannifer O.; Nunes, Márcio R.T.

    2009-01-01

    In February 2008, a Mayaro fever virus (MAYV) outbreak occurred in a settlement in Santa Barbara municipality, northern Brazil. Patients had rash, fever, and severe arthralgia lasting up to 7 days. Immunoglobulin M against MAYV was detected by ELISA in 36 persons; 3 MAYV isolates sequenced were characterized as genotype D. PMID:19891877

  1. Mayaro fever virus, Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Raimunda S S; Silva, Eliana V P; Carvalho, Valéria L; Rodrigues, Sueli G; Nunes-Neto, Joaquim P; Monteiro, Hamilton; Peixoto, Victor S; Chiang, Jannifer O; Nunes, Márcio R T; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2009-11-01

    In February 2008, a Mayaro fever virus (MAYV) outbreak occurred in a settlement in Santa Barbara municipality, northern Brazil. Patients had rash, fever, and severe arthralgia lasting up to 7 days. Immunoglobulin M against MAYV was detected by ELISA in 36 persons; 3 MAYV isolates sequenced were characterized as genotype D.

  2. Identification of a candidate standard strain of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus for vaccine quality control in China using a cross-neutralization assay.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zheng; Wu, Xiaohong; Wang, Ling; Li, Xiuling; Dai, Xinxian; Liang, Mifang; Cao, Shouchun; Kong, Yan; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Yuhua; Wang, Junzhi

    2017-03-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is caused by a phlebovirus of the Bunyaviridae family, which is designated as SFTS virus (SFTSV). To our knowledge, no efficient SFTSV vaccine exists. Here, we report the identification of a standard virus strain for the eight major SFTSV strains circulating in China for use in evaluating the SFTSV vaccine. Rabbits were immunized with the SFTSV strains and the cross-neutralization capacities of SFTSV anti-sera were determined in microculture cytopathic effect (CPE)-inhibition assays. The mean cross-neutralization capacity of the eight SFTSV anti-sera ranged from 62.4 to 142.6%, compared to autologous strains. The HB29 strain demonstrated strong cross-reactivity with heterologous antibodies, and 33 serum samples from SFTS patients efficiently neutralized HB29, suggesting its broad cross-reactivity. In addition, HB29 demonstrated good replication in Vero and MRC-5 cells (8.0 and 6.0 lg 50% cell culture-infectious dose/mL, respectively) and significant CPE, which satisfied the requirements for a standard virus strain. The HB29 isolate was proven identical to the reported HB29 strain by DNA sequencing, and showed high homology in the S segments with other SFTSV strains (94.8-99.7%). Our results suggest that HB29 may be the best candidate standard strain for use in SFTS vaccine development in China.

  3. Relationship between Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus strains circulating in Iran and Turkey: possibilities for transborder transmission.

    PubMed

    Mahzounieh, Mohammadreza; Dincer, Ender; Faraji, Alireza; Akin, Humay; Akkutay, Ayse Zeynep; Ozkul, Aykut

    2012-09-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an important zoonotic viral disease that is asymptomatic in infected livestock, but poses a serious threat to humans. The high fatality rate may be due to phylogenetic variations in the virus, transmission routes, and a lack of an efficient surveillance system for the disease. The geographical features of the eastern and southeastern borders of Turkey may facilitate transmission of viruses between countries of the region. Therefore in this study we focused on the genetic relationship between Turkish and Iranian CCHF viruses based on their S-segment sequences. The research was performed on a total of 104 blood samples from small ruminants reared in southwest Iran. The results of phylogenetic analysis showed that Iranian CCHF virus isolates were closely related to human-originating Turkish Group II viruses from a European lineage reported previously.

  4. Mapping of the mutations present in the genome of the Rift Valley fever virus attenuated MP12 strain and their putative role in attenuation.

    PubMed

    Vialat, P; Muller, R; Vu, T H; Prehaud, C; Bouloy, M

    1997-11-01

    The MP12 attenuated strain of Rift Valley fever virus was obtained by 12 serial passages of a virulent isolate ZH548 in the presence of 5-fluorouracil (Caplen et al., 1985. Mutagen-directed attenuation of Rift Valley fever virus as a method for vaccine development. J. Gen. Virol., 66, 2271-2277). The comparison of the M segment of the two strains has already been reported by Takehara et al. (Takehara et al., 1989. Identification of mutations in the M RNA of a candidate vaccine strain of Rift Valley fever virus. Virology 169, 452-457). We have completed the comparison and found that altogether a total of nine, 12 and four nucleotides were changed in the L, M and S segments of the two strains, respectively. Three mutations induced amino acid changes in the L protein but none of them was located in the recognized motifs conserved among RNA dependent polymerases. In the S segment, a single change modified an amino acid in the NSs protein and in the M segment, seven of the mutations resulted in amino acid changes in each of the four encoded G1, G2, 14 kDa and 78 kDa proteins. Characterization of the MP12 virus indicated that determinants for attenuation were present in each segment and that they were introduced progressively during the 12 passages in the presence of the mutagen (Saluzzo and Smith, 1990. Use of reassortant viruses to map attenuating and temperature-sensitive mutations of the Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 vaccine. Vaccine 8, 369-375). Passages 4 and 7-9 were found to be essential for introduction of temperature-sensitive lesions and attenuation. In an attempt to correlate some of the mutations with the attenuated or temperature-sensitive phenotypes, we determined by sequencing the passage level at which the different mutations appeared. This work should help to address the question of the role of the viral gene products in Rift Valley fever pathogenesis.

  5. Immunization of African Indigenous Pigs with Attenuated Genotype I African Swine Fever Virus OURT88/3 Induces Protection Against Challenge with Virulent Strains of Genotype I.

    PubMed

    Mulumba-Mfumu, L K; Goatley, L C; Saegerman, C; Takamatsu, H-H; Dixon, L K

    2016-10-01

    The attenuated African swine fever virus genotype I strain OURT88/3 has previously been shown to induce protection of European breeds of domestic pigs against challenge with virulent isolates. To determine whether protective immune responses could also be induced in indigenous breeds of pigs from the Kinshassa region in Democratic Republic of Congo, we immunized a group of eight pigs with OURT88/3 strain and challenged the pigs 3 weeks later with virulent genotype I strain OURT88/1. Four of the pigs were protected against challenge. Three of the eight pigs died from African swine fever virus and a fourth from an unknown cause. The remaining four pigs all survived challenge with a recent virulent genotype I strain from the Democratic Republic of Congo, DRC 085/10. Control groups of non-immune pigs challenged with OURT88/1 or DRC 085/10 developed signs of acute ASFV as expected and had high levels of virus genome in blood. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Chinese border disease virus strain JSLS12-01 infects piglets and down-regulates the antibody responses of classical swine fever virus C strain vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mao, Li; Li, Wenliang; Liu, Xia; Hao, Fei; Yang, Leilei; Deng, Jiawu; Zhang, Wenwen; Wei, Jianzhong; Jiang, Jieyuan

    2015-07-31

    During 2012 and 2013, several border disease virus (BDV) strains were identified from Chinese goat and sheep herds. At the same time, pigs from the same areas were found to be seropositive to BDV by ELISA, without showing clinical signs (unpublished data). To examine the susceptibility of pigs to the Chinese BDV strains, BDV isolate JSLS12-01, isolated from naturally infected sheep, was used to infect pigs. Antibody responses, viremia, clinical signs and pathological changes of the infected animals were examined. It confirmed that the current BDV strain could infect the domestic pigs, the animals showed viremia during 4 to 14 days post infection (dpi) and sero-conversion from 14dpi; no clinical and pathological changes were observed. In addition, CSFV maternal antibody did not influence BDV infection. Subsequently, pigs were infected with the BDV isolate and vaccinated with Hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV) 21 days later to determine the effect of BDV infection on antibody induction of CSFV vaccination. The specific CSFV antibody and neutralizing antibody titers of the BDV infected group remained negative after the primary vaccination. Even after the boost vaccination, they were still significantly lower than those of the uninfected groups (p<0.05). These results indicated that BDV infection could down-regulate the antibody responses of CSFV C-strain vaccination. It should be paid attention that BDV prevalence in pig herds and in live vaccines might hamper the vaccination of CSF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic characterization of the M RNA segment of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus strains isolated in Russia and Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Seregin, Sergei V; Samokhvalov, Evgeny I; Petrova, Irina D; Vyshemirskii, Oleg I; Samokhvalova, Ekaterina G; Lvov, Dmitry K; Gutorov, Valery V; Tyunnikov, Georgy I; Shchelkunov, Sergei N; Netesov, Sergei V; Petrov, Vladimir S

    2004-03-01

    The data on the structure of the M genome segment of CCHF virus strains from Russia and Central Asia (Tajikistan) are presented. Data obtained have been compared with other available published sequences of the middle segment of strains from China, Nigeria, and Pakistan. It has been found that all the known strains can be divided into four genetic groups, based on the nucleotide sequence of the M genome segment and an amino acid sequence of the glycoprotein precursor it encodes, whereas VLG/TI29414 and STV/HU29223 strains from Russia form a separate group. The CCHF virus strain from Tajikistan, TADJ/HU8966, was genetically related to strains 7803 and 75024 from China, and together with these and the Nigerian IbAr 10200 strain, it forms another group.

  8. Experimental infection of nonhuman primates with sandfly fever virus.

    PubMed

    McClain, D J; Summers, P L; Pratt, W D; Davis, K J; Jennings, G B

    1997-05-01

    Due to the lack of an animal model, previous studies of sandfly fever have relied upon human challenge trials. We examined the infectivity and potential pathogenicity of sandfly fever virus in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Three different preparations of sandfly fever virus. Sicilian strain, and a placebo were compared by different routes of administration. The most notable postchallenge clinical event was a decrease in lymphocytes in the intramuscularly challenged monkeys. Plaque-reduction neutralization responses peaked earlier in animals challenged intravenously as compared with those in animals challenged intramuscularly. There was no evidence for neurotropism or meningeal inflammation. Sandfly fever virus was infectious for cynomolgus monkeys, but produced no detectable clinical disease that might serve as a marker for animal modeling studies. On the other hand, the preclinical data provide supportive evidence for safe parenteral administration of a Sicilian strain of sandfly fever virus inoculum to humans as a challenge model for sandfly fever disease.

  9. Efficacy evaluation of the C-strain-based vaccines against the subgenotype 2.1d classical swine fever virus emerging in China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuzi; Ji, Shengwei; Lei, Jian-Lin; Xiang, Guang-Tao; Liu, Yan; Gao, Yao; Meng, Xing-Yu; Zheng, Guanglai; Zhang, En-Yu; Wang, Yimin; Du, Ming-Liang; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Su; He, Xi-Jun; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2017-03-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a devastating infectious disease of pigs caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). The disease has been controlled following extensive vaccination with the lapinized attenuated vaccine C-strain for decades in China. However, frequent CSF outbreaks occurred recently in a large number of C-strain-vaccinated pig farms in China and a new subgenotype 2.1d of CSFV has been reported to be responsible for the outbreaks. Here we analyzed the molecular variations and antigenic differences among the C-strain-based commercial vaccines of different origins from different manufacturers in China, and reevaluated the vaccines against the emerging subgenotype 2.1d strain of CSFV. The results showed that the C-strain adapted to the continuous ST cell line (CST) contain a unique M290K variation on the E2 protein, compared to those of primary BT cells (CBT) or rabbit origin (CRT) and the traditional C-strain sequences available in the GenBank database. Serum neutralization test revealed the antigenic differences between CST and CBT or CRT. Notably, the neutralizing titers of porcine anti-C-strain sera against the CSFV isolate of subgenotype 2.1d were significantly lower than those against C-strain or Shimen strain. The C-strain-vaccinated, subgenotype 2.1d HLJZZ2014 strain-challenged pigs did not show any clinical signs and all survived. However, these pigs displayed mild pathological and histological lesions, and the CSFV viral RNA was detected in the various tissue and blood samples. Taken together, the C-strain-based vaccines of different origins showed molecular variations and antigenic differences, and could provide clinical but not pathological and virological protection against the subgenotype 2.1d CSFV emerging in China. Further investigation is needed to comprehensively assess the efficacy of C-strain of different doses against the subgenotype 2.1d CSFV.

  10. [Antigenic diversity of African swine fever viruses].

    PubMed

    Sereda, A D; Balyshev, V M

    2011-01-01

    Data on the seroimmunotypic and hemadsorbing characteristics of African swine fever virus (ASF) are summarized. According to the results of immunological sampling in pigs and those of hemagglutination inhibition test, the known ASFV strains and isolates were divided into 11 groups, 8 were characterized as seroimmunogroups having their specific reference strains. A 110-140-kD ASFV serotype-specific nonstructural major glycoprotein was identified. It is suggested that it is the glycoprotein that corresponds to the genetic engineering detected virus-specific homolog of lymphocyte membrane protein CD2, gene deletion of which results in the loss of hemadsorbing properties by ASFV.

  11. Hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Pigott, David C

    2005-10-01

    This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral hemorrhagic fever infection. The focus is on clinical management based on case series from naturally occuring outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever infection as well as imported cases of viral hemorrhagic fever encountered in industrialized nations. The potential risk of bioterrorism involving these agents is discussed as well as emergency department and critical care management of isolated cases or larger outbreaks. Important aspects of management, including recognition of infected patients, isolation and decontamination procedures, as well as available vaccines and therapies are emphasized.

  12. THE TRANSMISSION OF NEUROTROPIC YELLOW FEVER VIRUS BY STEGOMYIA MOSQUITOES

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nelson C.; Lloyd, Wray; Frobisher, Martin

    1932-01-01

    1. By the bites of stegomyia mosquitoes carrying neurotropic yellow fever virus, encephalitis has been produced both in white mice and in rhesus monkeys. 2. The fixed neurotropic strain of virus cannot be maintained in the mosquito host as well as can the viscerotropic strains. This is doubtless attributable in part to a smaller amount of virus ingested, because of paucity in the blood stream of the mammalian host. 3. These experiments furnish additional evidence that the long established neurotropic yellow fever virus has changed fundamentally from the parent French strain. PMID:19870108

  13. Classical swine fever virus marker vaccine strain CP7_E2alf: genetic stability in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goller, Katja V; Dräger, Carolin; Höper, Dirk; Beer, Martin; Blome, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Recently, CP7_E2alf (SuvaxynCSF Marker), a live marker vaccine against classical swine fever virus, was licensed through the European Medicines Agency. For application of such a genetically engineered virus under field conditions, knowledge about its genetic stability is essential. Here, we report on stability studies that were conducted to assess and compare the mutation rate of CP7_E2alf in vitro and in vivo. Sequence analyses upon passaging confirmed the high stability of CP7_E2alf, and no recombination events were observed in the experimental setup. The data obtained in this study confirm the genetic stability of CP7_E2alf as an important safety component.

  14. Genome Sequence of African Swine Fever Virus BA71, the Virulent Parental Strain of the Nonpathogenic and Tissue-Culture Adapted BA71V

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Javier M.; Moreno, Leticia Tais; Alejo, Alí; Lacasta, Anna; Rodríguez, Fernando; Salas, María L.

    2015-01-01

    The strain BA71V has played a key role in African swine fever virus (ASFV) research. It was the first genome sequenced, and remains the only genome completely determined. A large part of the studies on the function of ASFV genes, viral transcription, replication, DNA repair and morphogenesis, has been performed using this model. This avirulent strain was obtained by adaptation to grow in Vero cells of the highly virulent BA71 strain. We report here the analysis of the genome sequence of BA71 in comparison with that of BA71V. They possess the smallest genomes for a virulent or an attenuated ASFV, and are essentially identical except for a relatively small number of changes. We discuss the possible contribution of these changes to virulence. Analysis of the BA71 sequence allowed us to identify new similarities among ASFV proteins, and with database proteins including two ASFV proteins that could function as a two-component signaling network. PMID:26618713

  15. Effects of Vaccination with the C-Strain Vaccine on Immune Cells and Cytokines of Pigs Against Classical Swine Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Fan, Xue-Zheng; Zhao, Qi-Zu; Zhang, Zheng-Xing; Chen, Kai; Ning, Yi-Bao; Zhang, Qian-Yi; Zou, Xing-Qi; Zhu, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Cui; Zhang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Qin

    2017-05-17

    The attenuated C-strain vaccine against classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is one of the safest and most effective attenuated vaccines. However, little is known of the host immune response after vaccination with the C-strain vaccine. Blood samples from vaccinated pigs were collected to evaluate the number of immune cells, the level of specific CSFV antibody, and related cytokines induced by the vaccination of C-strain vaccine. The C-strain nucleic acid was gradually removed and specific antibody to vaccine kept increasing; the amount of the lymphocyte, Tc cell, and Th cell increased; some inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α mainly showed downregulated trends, but IL-6 and IL-8 were upregulated greatly; IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-12p40, IL-13, interferon (IFN)-I, and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) kept high expression level after 28 days postvaccination (dpv); IFN-γ was upregulated slightly at 5 and 9 dpv, respectively. These results suggest that the C-strain vaccine induces a Th2 cell response to produce the specific antibody. The vaccine virus replicates at very low level. C-strain vaccine burden has close relationship with the expression of TLRs. The overexpression of TLRs initiates the innate immune system to clear up the vaccine. Meanwhile, ILs expressed by immune system induce the differentiation of B cells and produce specific antibody.

  16. African swine fever virus serotype-specific proteins are significant protective antigens for African swine fever

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African swine fever (ASF) is an emerging disease threat for the swine industry worldwide. No ASF vaccine is available and progress is hindered by lack of knowledge concerning the extent of African swine fever virus (ASFV) strain diversity and the viral antigens conferring type specific protective im...

  17. Sandfly Fever Sicilian Virus, Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Izri, Arezki; Temmam, Sarah; Moureau, Grégory; Hamrioui, Boussad; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV) is present in Algeria, we tested sandflies for phlebovirus RNA. A sequence closely related to that of SFSV was detected in a Phlebotomus ariasi sandfly. Of 60 human serum samples, 3 contained immunoglobulin G against SFSV. These data suggest SFSV is present in Algeria. PMID:18439364

  18. Experimental Infection of Ornithodoros erraticus sensu stricto with Two Portuguese African Swine Fever Virus Strains. Study of Factors Involved in the Dynamics of Infection in Ticks.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Rita; Otte, Joachim; Madeira, Sara; Hutchings, Geoff H; Boinas, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a frequently devastating hemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs and wild boar and Ornithodoros erraticus sensu stricto argasid ticks are the only biological vectors of African swine fever virus (ASFV) known to occur in Europe. Recently this disease emerged in Eastern Europe and Russian Federation, showing a huge potential for a rapid spread between countries. There is some risk of re-emergence of ASF in the countries where these ticks exist, that can contribute for the persistence of infection and compromise control measures. In this study we aimed to identify factors that determine the probability of infection and its dynamics in the tick vector Ornithodoros erraticus sensu stricto, with two Portuguese strains of ASFV. Our results suggest that these ticks have a high likelihood of excreting the two haemadsorbing ASF viruses of different host origins and that, in field surveys, the analysis of adults and 5th nymphal stage can provide the best chance of detecting virus infection. The results also indicate that infection of pigs with highly virulent ASF viruses will promote higher rates of infection and a higher likelihood for virus excretion by ticks. Nevertheless, there is also a risk, although lower, that ticks can become infected on pigs that have overcome the acute phase of infection, which was simulated in our study by membrane feeding ticks with low titres of virus. We believe these results can be valuable in designing and interpreting the results of ASF control programmes, and future work can also be undertaken as our dataset is released under open access, to perform studies in risk assessment for ASFV persistence in a region where O. erraticus sensu stricto ticks are present.

  19. Experimental Infection of Ornithodoros erraticus sensu stricto with Two Portuguese African Swine Fever Virus Strains. Study of Factors Involved in the Dynamics of Infection in Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Sara; Hutchings, Geoff H.; Boinas, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a frequently devastating hemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs and wild boar and Ornithodoros erraticus sensu stricto argasid ticks are the only biological vectors of African swine fever virus (ASFV) known to occur in Europe. Recently this disease emerged in Eastern Europe and Russian Federation, showing a huge potential for a rapid spread between countries. There is some risk of re-emergence of ASF in the countries where these ticks exist, that can contribute for the persistence of infection and compromise control measures. In this study we aimed to identify factors that determine the probability of infection and its dynamics in the tick vector Ornithodoros erraticus sensu stricto, with two Portuguese strains of ASFV. Our results suggest that these ticks have a high likelihood of excreting the two haemadsorbing ASF viruses of different host origins and that, in field surveys, the analysis of adults and 5th nymphal stage can provide the best chance of detecting virus infection. The results also indicate that infection of pigs with highly virulent ASF viruses will promote higher rates of infection and a higher likelihood for virus excretion by ticks. Nevertheless, there is also a risk, although lower, that ticks can become infected on pigs that have overcome the acute phase of infection, which was simulated in our study by membrane feeding ticks with low titres of virus. We believe these results can be valuable in designing and interpreting the results of ASF control programmes, and future work can also be undertaken as our dataset is released under open access, to perform studies in risk assessment for ASFV persistence in a region where O. erraticus sensu stricto ticks are present. PMID:26366570

  20. Evaluation of a multiplex real-time RT-PCR for quantitative and differential detection of wild-type viruses and C-strain vaccine of Classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian-Jun; Cheng, Dan; Li, Na; Sun, Yuan; Shi, Zixue; Zhu, Qing-Hu; Tu, Changchun; Tong, Guang-Zhi; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2008-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), one of OIE listed diseases. Most of the currently available detection methods do not allow discrimination between wild-type CSF viruses and the vaccine strains. This study was designed to develop a multiplex real-time RT-PCR for the quantitative and differential detection of wild-type viruses and C-strain vaccine widely used in China. CSFV specific primers and two differently labeled TaqMan probes for the differentiation of wild-type viruses from C-strain vaccine were designed in the 5'-untranslated region of the viral genome of CSFV. The two TaqMan probes specifically hybridize wild-type viruses of different subgroups and C-strain vaccine, respectively, in the multiplex real-time RT-PCR, with no cross-reaction to a number of non-CSFV porcine viruses. The sensitivity of the assay for detecting wild-type and C-strain-type vaccine viruses was determined to be 41.8 and 81.5copies/microL viral RNA, respectively. Completely correct differentiation of wild-type viruses from C-strain vaccine was achieved when testing reference strains and characterized field isolates of CSFV in China. The multiplex real-time RT-PCR was able to detect the viral RNA in the whole blood samples of experimentally infected pigs as early as 2 days post-infection, 3 to 4 days prior to the onset of clinical signs in co-housed pigs. The agreements between the multiplex real-time RT-PCR and a multiplex RT-nested PCR for detection of wild-type and C-strain-type viruses were 96.9% and 100%, respectively, when detecting 106 different field samples. There is a positive correlation between the titers of C-strain vaccines titrated in rabbits and RNA copies quantitated by the multiplex real-time RT-PCR. The novel assay described here is rapid and sensitive, and is useful for differentiating field strains and C-strain of CSFV in China.

  1. Rescue of the highly virulent classical swine fever virus strain "Koslov" from cloned cDNA and first insights into genome variations relevant for virulence.

    PubMed

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Risager, Peter Christian; Nielsen, Jens; Belsham, Graham J; Höper, Dirk; Beer, Martin; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    2014-11-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strain "Koslov" is highly virulent with a mortality rate of up to 100% in pigs. In this study, we modified non-functional cDNAs generated from the blood of Koslov virus infected pigs by site-directed mutagenesis, removing non-synonymous mutations step-by-step, thereby producing genomes encoding the consensus amino acid sequence. Viruses rescued from the construct corresponding to the inferred parental form were highly virulent, when tested in pigs, with infected animals displaying pronounced clinical symptoms leading to high mortality. The reconstruction therefore gave rise to a functional cDNA corresponding to the highly virulent Koslov strain of CSFV. It could be demonstrated that two single amino acid changes (S763L and P968H) in the surface structural protein E2 resulted in attenuation in the porcine infection system while another single amino acid change within the nonstructural protein NS3 (D2183G) reduced virus growth within cells in vitro.

  2. Epidemiology and Epizootiological Investigations of Haemorrhagic Fever Viruses in Kenya.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    INFECTIOUS DISEASES, KENYA, LABORATORIES, MORTALITY RATES, PUBLIC HEALTH, RATS, RIFT VALLEY FEVER , SURVIVAL(PERSONNEL), THREATS, VETERINARY MEDICINE, WEST AFRICA , YEASTS, YELLOW FEVER , ZAIRE...EPIDEMIOLOGY, *VIRUSES, *VIRUS DISEASES, AFRICA , CONVALESCENCE, DISEASES, ECOLOGY, EQUATORIAL REGIONS, FEVERS , HEMORRHAGIC FEVERS , HUMANS, ILLNESS

  3. Simian Hemorrhagic Fever (SHF) Virus. Phase 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-31

    tlll AD111 CONTRACT NO: DAMDI7-91-C-1006 TITLE: SIMIAN HEMORRHAGIC FEVER (SHF) VIRUS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Margo A. Brinton, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Simian Hemorrhagic Fever (SHF) Virus DAMD17-91-C-1006 6. AUTHOR(S) Margo A. Brinton, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF) virus -specific hybridoma cultures, expand two clones from each clone as well as 50 ml of supernatant fluid from

  4. Antigenic analysis of classical swine fever virus E2 glycoprotein using pig antibodies identifies residues contributing to antigenic variation of the vaccine C-strain and group 2 strains circulating in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Tong, Chao; Li, Dejiang; Wan, Jing; Yuan, Xuemei; Li, Xiaoliang; Peng, Jinrong; Fang, Weihuan

    2010-12-31

    Glycoprotein E2, the immunodominant protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV), can induce neutralizing antibodies and confer protective immunity in pigs. Our previous phylogenetic analysis showed that subgroup 2.1 viruses branched away from subgroup 1.1, the vaccine C-strain lineage, and became dominant in China. The E2 glycoproteins of CSFV C-strain and recent subgroup 2.1 field isolates are genetically different. However, it has not been clearly demonstrated how this diversity affects antigenicity of the protein. Antigenic variation of glycoprotein E2 was observed not only between CSFV vaccine C-strain and subgroup 2.1 strains, but also among strains of the same subgroup 2.1 as determined by ELISA-based binding assay using pig antisera to the C-strain and a representative subgroup 2.1 strain QZ-07 currently circulating in China. Antigenic incompatibility of E2 proteins markedly reduced neutralization efficiency against heterologous strains. Single amino acid substitutions of D705N, L709P, G713E, N723S, and S779A on C-strain recombinant E2 (rE2) proteins significantly increased heterologous binding to anti-QZ-07 serum, suggesting that these residues may be responsible for the antigenic variation between the C-strain and subgroup 2.1 strains. Notably, a G713E substitution caused the most dramatic enhancement of binding of the variant C-strain rE2 protein to anti-QZ-07 serum. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the glutamic acid residue at this position is conserved within group 2 strains, while the glycine residue is invariant among the vaccine strains, highlighting the role of the residue at this position as a major determinant of antigenic variation of E2. A variant Simpson's index analysis showed that both codons and amino acids of the residues contributing to antigenic variation have undergone similar diversification. These results demonstrate that CSFV vaccine C-strain and group 2 strains circulating in China differ in the antigenicity of their E2

  5. Simultaneous deletion of the 9GL and UK genes from the African swine fever virus Georgia 2007 isolate results in virus attenuation and may be a potential virus vaccine strain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal viral disease of domestic pigs that has significant economic consequences for the swine industry. The control of African Swine Fever (ASF) has been hampered by the unavailability of vaccines. Successful experi...

  6. T-cell factor-4 and MHC upregulation in pigs receiving a live attenuated classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccine strain with interferon-gamma adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y-H; Lin, Y-L; Hwang, Y-C; Yang, H-C; Chiu, H-C; Chiou, S-H; Jong, M-H; Chow, K-C; Lin, C-C

    2016-10-01

    The effect of co-administration of interferon (IFN)-γ in pigs undergoing vaccination with an attenuated strain (LPC) of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) was investigated. Unvaccinated pigs demonstrated pyrexia and died 7-9 days after challenge with virulent CSFV. Pigs receiving the attenuated vaccine remained healthy after virus challenge, except for mild, transient pyrexia, whereas pigs receiving IFN-γ simultaneously with the vaccine demonstrated normal body temperatures after virus challenge. Examination by nested RT-PCR revealed greater viral load in the spleens of the pigs vaccinated with the attenuated CSFV, compared with those that had additionally received IFN-γ. Expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and MHC class II molecules was upregulated in the spleens of the IFN-γ treated vaccinated pigs, demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. Based on Western blot analysis, anti-CSFV IgG2 antibodies were elevated in vaccinated pigs by co-administration of IFN-γ (IFN-γ(Hi): P < 0.01; IFN-γ(Lo): P <0.05). By employing the suppression subtractive hybridization technique, RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry, T-cell factor-4 (Tcf-4) mRNA and protein expression were found to be upregulated in the spleens of vaccinated pigs that had received IFN-γ. This study suggests involvement of Tcf-4 in IFN-γ-mediated immune regulation following CSFV vaccination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Phylogeography of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Klimentov, Alexander S.; Dzagurova, Tamara K.; Drexler, Jan Felix; Gmyl, Anatoly P.

    2016-01-01

    Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is one of the most severe viral zoonozes. It is prevalent throughout Africa, Asia and southern Europe. Limited availability of sequence data has hindered phylogeographic studies. The complete genomic sequence of all three segments of 14 Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus strains isolated from 1958–2000 in Russia, Central Asia and Africa was identified. Each genomic segment was independently subjected to continuous Bayesian phylogeographic analysis. The origin of each genomic segment was traced to Africa about 1,000–5,000 years ago. The virus was first introduced to South and Central Asia in the Middle Ages, and then spread to China, India and Russia. Reverse transfers of genomic segments from Asia to Africa were also observed. The European CCHFV genotype V was introduced to Europe via the Astrakhan region in South Russia 280–400 years ago and subsequently gradually spread westward in Russia, to Turkey and the Balkans less than 150 years ago. Only a few recombination events could be suggested in S and L genomic segments, while segment reassortment was very common. The median height of a non-reassortant phylogenetic tree node was 68–156 years. There were reassortment events within the European CCHFV lineage, but not with viruses from other locations. Therefore, CCHFV in Europe is a recently emerged zoonosis that represents a spillover from the global gene pool. PMID:27880794

  8. Continuous Passaging of a Recombinant C-Strain Virus in PK-15 Cells Selects Culture-Adapted Variants that Showed Enhanced Replication but Failed to Induce Fever in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chao; Chen, Ning; Liao, Xun; Yuan, Xuemei; Sun, Mengjiao; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2017-09-28

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the etiologic agent of classical swine fever, a highly contagious disease that causes significant economic losses to the swine industry. The lapinized C-strain, a widely used vaccine strain against CSFV, has low growth efficiency in cell culture, which limits the productivity in the vaccine industry. In this study, a recombinant virus derived from C-strain was constructed and subjected to continuous passaging in PK-15 cells with the goal of acquiring a high progeny virus yield. A cell-adapted virus variant, RecCpp80, had nearly 1,000-fold higher titer than its parent C-strain but lost the ability to induce fever in rabbits. Sequence analysis of cell-adapted RecC variants indicated that at least six nucleotide changes were fixed in RecCpp80. Further adaption of RecCpp80 variant in swine testicle cells led to a higher virus yield without additional mutations. Introduction of each of these residues into the wild-type RecC backbone showed that one mutation, M979R (T3310G), located in the C-terminal region of E2 might be closely related to the cell-adapted phenotype. Rabbit inoculation revealed that RecCpp80+10 failed to induce fever in rabbits, whereas RecCpp40+10 caused a fever response similar to the commercial C-strain vaccine. In conclusion, the C-strain can be adapted to cell culture by introducing specific mutations in its E2 protein. The mutations in RecCpp80 that led to the loss of fever response in rabbits require further investigation. Continuous passaging of the C-strain-based recombinant viruses in PK-15 cells could enhance its in vitro adaption. The non-synonymous mutations at 3310 and 3531 might play major roles in the enhanced capacity of general virus reproduction. Such findings may help design a modified C-strain for improved productivity of commercial vaccines at reduced production cost.

  9. Genetic Diversity and Positive Selection Analysis of Classical Swine Fever Virus Envelope Protein Gene E2 in East China under C-Strain Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dongfang; Lv, Lin; Gu, Jinyuan; Chen, Tongyu; Xiao, Yihong; Liu, Sidang

    2016-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes an economically important and highly contagious disease of pigs worldwide. C-strain vaccination is one of the most effective ways to contain this disease. Since 2014, sporadic CSF outbreaks have been occurring in some C-strain vaccinated provinces of China. To decipher the disease etiology, 25 CSFV E2 genes from 169 clinical samples were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that all 25 isolates belonged to subgenotype 2.1. Twenty-three of the 25 isolates were clustered in a newly defined subgenotype, 2.1d, and shared some consistent molecular characteristics. To determine whether the complete E2 gene was under positive selection pressure, we used a site-by-site analysis to identify specific codons that underwent evolutionary selection, and seven positively selected codons were found. Three positively selected sites (amino acids 17, 34, and 72) were identified in antigenicity-relevant domains B/C of the amino-terminal half of the E2 protein. In addition, another positively selected site (amino acid 200) exhibited a polarity change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic, which may change the antigenicity and virulence of CSFV. The results indicate that the circulating CSFV strains in Shandong province were mostly clustered in subgenotype 2.1d. Moreover, the identification of these positively selected sites could help to reveal molecular determinants of virulence or pathogenesis, and to clarify the driving force of CSFV evolution in East China. PMID:26903966

  10. STUDIES ON THE PATHOGENESIS OF FEVER WITH INFLUENZAL VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Elisha; Huang, Wei Cheng

    1958-01-01

    A substance with pyrogenic properties appears in the blood streams of rabbits made febrile by the intravenous inoculation of the PR8 strain of influenza A and Newcastle disease viruses (NDV). By means of a technique involving passive transfer of sera from animals given virus to recipient rabbits, the titer of circulating pyrogen was found to be closely correlated with the course of fever produced by virus. Certain properties of the pyrogen are described which differentiate it from the originally injected virus and suggest that the induced pyrogen is of endogenous origin. These properties resemble those of endogenous pyrogens occurring in other forms of experimental fever. The source of virus-induced pyrogen is unknown. In vitro incubation of virus with various constituents of the circulation did not result in the appearance of endogenous pyrogen. Granulocytopenia induced by HN2 failed to influence either fever or the production of endogenous pyrogen in rabbits injected with NDV. Similarly, the intraperitoneal inoculation of NDV into prepared exudates did not modify the febrile response. These findings do not lend support to the possibility that the polymorphonuclear leukocyte is a significant source of endogenous pyrogen in virus-induced fever. It is concluded that the liberation of an endogenous pyrogen from some as yet undefined source is an essential step in the pathogenesis of fever caused by the influenza group of viruses. PMID:13513908

  11. Using reverse genetics to manipulate the NSs gene of the Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 strain to improve vaccine safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kalveram, Birte; Lihoradova, Olga; Indran, Sabarish V; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2011-11-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which causes hemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans, and a high rate abortion and fetal malformation in ruminants, has been classified as a HHS/USDA overlap select agent and a risk group 3 pathogen. It belongs to the genus Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae and is one of the most virulent members of this family. Several reverse genetics systems for the RVFV MP-12 vaccine strain as well as wild-type RVFV strains, including ZH548 and ZH501, have been developed since 2006. The MP-12 strain (which is a risk group 2 pathogen and a non-select agent) is highly attenuated by several mutations in its M- and L-segments, but still carries virulent S-segment RNA, which encodes a functional virulence factor, NSs. The rMP12-C13type (C13type) carrying 69% in-frame deletion of NSs ORF lacks all the known NSs functions, while it replicates as efficient as does MP-12 in VeroE6 cells lacking type-I IFN. NSs induces a shut-off of host transcription including interferon (IFN)-beta mRNA and promotes degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) at the post-translational level. IFN-beta is transcriptionally upregulated by interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), NF-kB and activator protein-1 (AP-1), and the binding of IFN-beta to IFN-alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR) stimulates the transcription of IFN-alpha genes or other interferon stimulated genes (ISGs), which induces host antiviral activities, whereas host transcription suppression including IFN-beta gene by NSs prevents the gene upregulations of those ISGs in response to viral replication although IRF-3, NF-kB and activator protein-1 (AP-1) can be activated by RVFV7. Thus, NSs is an excellent target to further attenuate MP-12, and to enhance host innate immune responses by abolishing the IFN-beta suppression function. Here, we describe a protocol for generating a recombinant MP-12 encoding mutated NSs, and provide an example of a screening method to identify

  12. Epidemiology and Epizootiological Investigations of Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses in Kenya

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    vertebrates and/or invertebrates as reservoirs of Haemorrhagic fever viruses particularly Marburg virus . The final results of this particular investigation...Research work done in Kenya has shown that three haemorrhagic fever viruses occur in the country. These are Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVF), Crimean...members for serology and or virus isolation. 2. Virus Isolation Attempts in VRC Haemorrhagic fever viruses are hazardous to culture and handle in

  13. The Ep152R ORF of African Swine Fever Virus strain Georgia encodes for an essential gene that interacts with host protein BAG6

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal disease of domestic pigs that has significant economic consequences for the swine industry. The viral genome encodes for more than 150 genes, and only a select few have been studied in some detail. Here we rep...

  14. THE SURVIVAL OF YELLOW FEVER VIRUS IN CULTURES

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Paul A.

    1930-01-01

    1. The virus of yellow fever has been found to survive in artificial culture media for at least 12 days at a temperature of 35°C. No visible growth has been present and no reproduction of the virus has been demonstrated. 2. Infections have been obtained in rhesus monkeys with two strains of virus in quantities as small as 0.00001 cc. of infectious blood, and with one strain in an amount probably as minute as 0.000001 cc. PMID:19869744

  15. Prospects for development of African swine fever virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Dixon, L K; Abrams, C C; Chapman, D D G; Goatley, L C; Netherton, C L; Taylor, G; Takamatsu, H H

    2013-01-01

    African swine fever virus is a large DNA virus which can cause an acute haemorrhagic fever in pigs resulting in high mortality. No vaccine is available, limiting options for control. The virus encodes up to 165 genes and virus particles are multi-layered and contain more than 50 proteins. Pigs immunised with natural low virulence isolates or attenuated viruses produced by passage in tissue culture and by targeted gene deletions can be protected against challenge with virulent viruses. CD8+ cells are required for protection induced by attenuated strain OURT88/3. Passive transfer of antibodies from immune to naïve pigs can also induce protection. Knowledge of the genome sequences of attenuated and virulent strains and targeted gene deletions from virulent strains have identified a number of virus genes involved in virulence and immune evasion. This information can be used to produce rationally attenuated vaccine strains. Virus antigens that are targets for neutralising antibodies have been identified and immunisation with these recombinant proteins has been shown to induce partial protection. However knowledge of antigens which encode the dominant protective epitopes recognised by CD8+ T cells is lacking.

  16. Vaccination influences the evolution of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Niu, Dan-Dan; Si, Hong-Li; Ding, Nai-Zheng; He, Cheng-Qiang

    2014-07-01

    Classical swine fever is a serious, economically damaging disease caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). The CSFV is composed of two clades, according to phylogenetic estimates. Attenuated live vaccine such as HCLV, has been widely used to protect pigs from CSFV, but the influence of vaccination on the evolution of CSFV has not been studied. We conducted a systemic analysis of the impact of vaccination on the evolution of CSFV by comparing vaccine-related and non-vaccine-related CSFV groups. We found that vaccination may affect strain diversity and immune escape through recombination and point mutation. We also found that vaccination may influence the population dynamics, evolutionary rate and adaptive evolution of classical swine fever virus. Our evidence suggests that the vaccination might also change host adaptation through influencing codon usage of the virus in swine. These findings suggest that it is necessary to avoid excessive use of CSFV attenuated vaccines.

  17. Using Reverse Genetics to Manipulate the NSs Gene of the Rift Valley Fever Virus MP-12 Strain to Improve Vaccine Safety and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Kalveram, Birte; Lihoradova, Olga; Indran, Sabarish V.; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which causes hemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans, and a high rate abortion and fetal malformation in ruminants1, has been classified as a HHS/USDA overlap select agent and a risk group 3 pathogen. It belongs to the genus Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae and is one of the most virulent members of this family. Several reverse genetics systems for the RVFV MP-12 vaccine strain2,3 as well as wild-type RVFV strains 4-6, including ZH548 and ZH501, have been developed since 2006. The MP-12 strain (which is a risk group 2 pathogen and a non-select agent) is highly attenuated by several mutations in its M- and L-segments, but still carries virulent S-segment RNA3, which encodes a functional virulence factor, NSs. The rMP12-C13type (C13type) carrying 69% in-frame deletion of NSs ORF lacks all the known NSs functions, while it replicates as efficient as does MP-12 in VeroE6 cells lacking type-I IFN. NSs induces a shut-off of host transcription including interferon (IFN)-beta mRNA7,8 and promotes degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) at the post-translational level.9,10 IFN-beta is transcriptionally upregulated by interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), NF-kB and activator protein-1 (AP-1), and the binding of IFN-beta to IFN-alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR) stimulates the transcription of IFN-alpha genes or other interferon stimulated genes (ISGs)11, which induces host antiviral activities, whereas host transcription suppression including IFN-beta gene by NSs prevents the gene upregulations of those ISGs in response to viral replication although IRF-3, NF-kB and activator protein-1 (AP-1) can be activated by RVFV7. . Thus, NSs is an excellent target to further attenuate MP-12, and to enhance host innate immune responses by abolishing the IFN-beta suppression function. Here, we describe a protocol for generating a recombinant MP-12 encoding mutated NSs, and provide an example of a

  18. Genetic Divergence and Dispersal of Yellow Fever Virus, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Juliet E.; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P.A.; Tesh, Robert B.; Rodrigues, Sueli G.; Barrett, Alan D.T.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis of 79 yellow fever virus (YFV) isolates collected from 1935 to 2001 in Brazil showed a single genotype (South America I) circulating in the country, with the exception of a single strain from Rondônia, which represented South America genotype II. Brazilian YFV strains have diverged into two clades; an older clade appears to have become extinct and another has become the dominant lineage in recent years. Pairwise nucleotide diversity between strains ranged from 0% to 7.4%, while amino acid divergence ranged from 0% to 4.6%. Phylogenetic analysis indicated traffic of virus variants through large geographic areas and suggested that migration of infected people may be an important mechanism of virus dispersal. Isolation of vaccine virus from a patient with a fatal case suggests that vaccine-related illness may have been misdiagnosed in the past. PMID:15498159

  19. Interim Report on SNP analysis and forensic microarray probe design for South American hemorrhagic fever viruses, tick-borne encephalitis virus, henipaviruses, Old World Arenaviruses, filoviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever viruses, Rift Valley fever

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, C; Gardner, S

    2012-06-05

    The goal of this project is to develop forensic genotyping assays for select agent viruses, enhancing the current capabilities for the viral bioforensics and law enforcement community. We used a multipronged approach combining bioinformatics analysis, PCR-enriched samples, microarrays and TaqMan assays to develop high resolution and cost effective genotyping methods for strain level forensic discrimination of viruses. We have leveraged substantial experience and efficiency gained through year 1 on software development, SNP discovery, TaqMan signature design and phylogenetic signature mapping to scale up the development of forensics signatures in year 2. In this report, we have summarized the whole genome wide SNP analysis and microarray probe design for forensics characterization of South American hemorrhagic fever viruses, tick-borne encephalitis viruses and henipaviruses, Old World Arenaviruses, filoviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus and Japanese encephalitis virus.

  20. Epidemiology and Epizootiological Investigations of Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses in Kenya

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-30

    Virus Research Centre (VRC) permitting the safe handling of specimens suspected to contain haemorrhagic fever viruses . Incidence and prevalence rates of...in Kenya Research work done in Kenya has shown that three naemorrnagic fever viruses occur in the country. These are Rift Valley Fever Virus , Crimean... viruses are nazardous to culture and handle in conventional type I and two oiohazard hoods. It wds therefore necessary to construct an absolute virus

  1. Positive selection pressure on the B/C domains of the E2-gene of classical swine fever virus in endemic areas under C-strain vaccination.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Lester Josué; Díaz de Arce, Heidy; Perera, Carmen Laura; Rosell, Rosa; Frías, Maria T; Percedo, Maria I; Tarradas, Joan; Dominguez, Patricia; Núñez, Jose I; Ganges, Llilianne

    2012-10-01

    In Cuba, classical swine fever (CSF) has become an endemic disease with several outbreaks each year, despite the implemented vaccination program. Interestingly, a trend towards a milder presentation of the disease has been observed among the animals during the last years. This study aimed to assess positive selection pressure acting on partial E2 gene of CSF viruses to gain insights into the mechanisms governing virulence and the driving forces of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) evolution in swine populations under regular vaccination. Selection pressure analysis were performed to detect positive selection acting on a particular lineage as well as among sites of the E2-B/C-domain of CSFV nucleotide sequences, reported in a previous study and in the present work, several models, available in the CODEML module of PAML 4.3, were used. In addition, a representative Cuban CSF isolate was assessed in an experimental infection trial for their clinical virulence in order to expand the knowledge regarding CSF viruses circulating in pig populations. The viral genomes sequenced in this study were grouped in a defined cluster within the genotype 1.2, as it has been reported previously for Cuban CSF viruses. The selection pressure analysis didn't find evidence of positive selection (dN/dS of>1) along any branch. The positive selective pressure analysis estimated six new sites under positive selection on E2 partial gene analysed. Besides, the clinical manifestations of the CSF-disease were related mainly to a mild course of the illness. The high number of positively selected sites suggests that these changes could be associated to viral evasion of the host-immune response. These observations highlight a possible association between escape viral variants and the alterations observed in the virulence and pathogenesis of the virus. Therefore, while the vaccination programs have not led to a genotype change, alterations in virulence were suggested to arise.

  2. A Report on Bovine Ephemeral Fever Virus in Turkey: Antigenic Variations of Different Strains of EFV in the 1985 and 2012 Outbreaks Using Partial Glycoprotein Gene Sequences.

    PubMed

    Oğuzoğlu, T Ç; Ertürk, A; Çizmeci, Ş G; Koç, B T; Akça, Y

    2015-10-01

    We described the aetiological agents of outbreaks of bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) that occurred in 1985 and 2012 in Turkey, and identify mutations in the viruses from both outbreaks. Outbreaks have emerged periodically every 4-5 years in the same regions in Turkey. Because these regions are located in a subtropical climatic zone, good conditions for vector populations exist. The results of this study show that the BEFVs from outbreaks in Turkey vary significantly. Effective prevention will require a vaccine that contains BEFVs from different genetic clusters. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Genetic diversity among Lassa virus strains.

    PubMed

    Bowen, M D; Rollin, P E; Ksiazek, T G; Hustad, H L; Bausch, D G; Demby, A H; Bajani, M D; Peters, C J; Nichol, S T

    2000-08-01

    The arenavirus Lassa virus causes Lassa fever, a viral hemorrhagic fever that is endemic in the countries of Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea and perhaps elsewhere in West Africa. To determine the degree of genetic diversity among Lassa virus strains, partial nucleoprotein (NP) gene sequences were obtained from 54 strains and analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses showed that Lassa viruses comprise four lineages, three of which are found in Nigeria and the fourth in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Overall strain variation in the partial NP gene sequence was found to be as high as 27% at the nucleotide level and 15% at the amino acid level. Genetic distance among Lassa strains was found to correlate with geographic distance rather than time, and no evidence of a "molecular clock" was found. A method for amplifying and cloning full-length arenavirus S RNAs was developed and used to obtain the complete NP and glycoprotein gene (GP1 and GP2) sequences for two representative Nigerian strains of Lassa virus. Comparison of full-length gene sequences for four Lassa virus strains representing the four lineages showed that the NP gene (up to 23.8% nucleotide difference and 12.0% amino acid difference) is more variable than the glycoprotein genes. Although the evolutionary order of descent within Lassa virus strains was not completely resolved, the phylogenetic analyses of full-length NP, GP1, and GP2 gene sequences suggested that Nigerian strains of Lassa virus were ancestral to strains from Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Compared to the New World arenaviruses, Lassa and the other Old World arenaviruses have either undergone a shorter period of diverisification or are evolving at a slower rate. This study represents the first large-scale examination of Lassa virus genetic variation.

  4. Lassa fever encephalopathy: Lassa virus in cerebrospinal fluid but not in serum.

    PubMed

    Günther, S; Weisner, B; Roth, A; Grewing, T; Asper, M; Drosten, C; Emmerich, P; Petersen, J; Wilczek, M; Schmitz, H

    2001-08-01

    The pathogenesis of neurologic complications of Lassa fever is poorly understood. A Nigerian patient had fever, disorientation, seizures, and blood-brain barrier dysfunction, and Lassa virus was found in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) but not in serum. The concentration of Lassa virus RNA in CSF corresponded to 1 x 10(3) pfu/mL, as determined by a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. To characterize the Lassa virus in CSF, the 3.5-kb S RNA was sequenced. In the S RNA coding sequences, the CSF strain differed between 20% and 24.6% from all known prototype strains. These data suggest that Lassa virus or specific Lassa virus strains can persist in the central nervous system and thus contribute to neuropathogenesis. Lassa virus infection should be considered in West African patients or in travelers returning from this area who present only with fever and neurologic signs.

  5. Phylogeographic Reconstructions of a Rift Valley Fever Virus Strain Reveals Transboundary Animal Movements from Eastern Continental Africa to the Union of the Comoros.

    PubMed

    Maquart, M; Pascalis, H; Abdouroihamane, S; Roger, M; Abdourahime, F; Cardinale, E; Cêtre-Sossah, C

    2016-04-01

    Major explosive outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF), an arthropod borne zoonotic disease, occur in humans and animals with significant mortality and economic impact across continental Africa and the Indian Ocean region (Madagascar, the Comoros archipelago). Recently, sporadic human cases have been reported in Mayotte and Grande Comore, two islands belonging to the Comoros archipelago. To identify the hypothetical source of virus introduction in an inter-epidemic or a post-epidemic period, a longitudinal survey of livestock was set up in Comorian ruminant populations, known to be susceptible hosts. The phylogeographic genomic analysis has shown that RVF virus (RVFV) detected in a zebu collected in Anjouan in August 2011 seems to be related to the last known epidemic of RVF which occurred in East Africa and Madagascar (2007-2009). This result highlights the fact that RVFV is maintained within local livestock populations and transboundary animal movements from eastern continental Africa to Indian Ocean islands likely result in RVFV crossover.

  6. Rescue from Cloned cDNAs and In Vivo Characterization of Recombinant Pathogenic Romero and Live-Attenuated Candid #1 Strains of Junin Virus, the Causative Agent of Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever Disease ▿

    PubMed Central

    Emonet, Sebastien F.; Seregin, Alexey V.; Yun, Nadezhda E.; Poussard, Allison L.; Walker, Aida G.; de la Torre, Juan C.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    The New World arenavirus Junin virus (JUNV) is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), which is associated with high morbidity and significant mortality. Several pathogenic strains of JUNV have been documented, and a highly attenuated vaccine strain (Candid #1) was generated and used to vaccinate the human population at risk. The identification and functional characterization of viral genetic determinants associated with AHF and Candid #1 attenuation would contribute to the elucidation of the mechanisms contributing to AHF and the development of better vaccines and therapeutics. To this end, we used reverse genetics to rescue the pathogenic Romero and the attenuated Candid #1 strains of JUNV from cloned cDNAs. Both recombinant Candid #1 (rCandid #1) and Romero (rRomero) had the same growth properties and phenotypic features in cultured cells and in vivo as their corresponding parental viruses. Infection with rRomero caused 100% lethality in guinea pigs, whereas rCandid #1 infection was asymptomatic and provided protection against a lethal challenge with Romero. Notably, Romero and Candid #1 trans-acting proteins, L and NP, required for virus RNA replication and gene expression were exchangeable in a minigenome rescue assay. These findings support the feasibility of studies aimed at determining the contribution of each viral gene to JUNV pathogenesis and attenuation. In addition, we rescued Candid #1 viruses with three segments that efficiently expressed foreign genes introduced into their genomes. This finding opens the way for the development of a safe multivalent arenavirus vaccine. PMID:21123388

  7. Emerging intracellular receptors for hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Jae, Lucas T; Brummelkamp, Thijn R

    2015-07-01

    Ebola virus and Lassa virus belong to different virus families that can cause viral hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening disease in humans with limited treatment options. To infect a target cell, Ebola and Lassa viruses engage receptors at the cell surface and are subsequently shuttled into the endosomal compartment. Upon arrival in late endosomes/lysosomes, the viruses trigger membrane fusion to release their genome into the cytoplasm. Although contact sites at the cell surface were recognized for Ebola virus and Lassa virus, it was postulated that Ebola virus requires a critical receptor inside the cell. Recent screens for host factors identified such internal receptors for both viruses: Niemann-Pick disease type C1 protein (NPC1) for Ebola virus and lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) for Lassa virus. A cellular trigger is needed to permit binding of the viral envelope protein to these intracellular receptors. This 'receptor switch' represents a previously unnoticed step in virus entry with implications for host-pathogen interactions and viral tropism.

  8. Bichat guidelines for the clinical management of haemorrhagic fever viruses and bioterrorism-related haemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Philippe; Tegnell, Anders; Baka, Agoritsa; Van Loock, Frank; Hendriks, Jan; Werner, Albrecht; Maidhof, Heinrich; Gouvras, Georgios

    2004-12-15

    Haemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are a diverse group of viruses that cause a clinical disease associated with fever and bleeding disorder. HFVs that are associated with a potential biological threat are Ebola and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae), Lassa fever and New World arenaviruses (Machupo, Junin, Guanarito and Sabia viruses) (Arenaviridae), Rift Valley fever (Bunyaviridae) and yellow fever, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, and Kyanasur Forest disease (Flaviviridae). In terms of biological warfare concerning dengue, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and Hantaviruses, there is not sufficient knowledge to include them as a major biological threat. Dengue virus is the only one of these that cannot be transmitted via aerosol. Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and the agents of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome appear difficult to weaponise. Ribavirin is recommended for the treatment and the prophylaxis of the arenaviruses and the bunyaviruses, but is not effective for the other families. All patients must be isolated and receive intensive supportive therapy.

  9. The Ep152R ORF of African swine fever virus strain Georgia encodes for an essential gene that interacts with host protein BAG6.

    PubMed

    Borca, Manuel V; O'Donnell, Vivian; Holinka, Lauren G; Rai, Devendra K; Sanford, Brenton; Alfano, Marialexia; Carlson, Jolene; Azzinaro, Paul A; Alonso, Covadonga; Gladue, Douglas P

    2016-09-02

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal disease of domestic pigs that has significant economic consequences for the swine industry. The viral genome encodes for more than 150 genes, and only a select few of these genes have been studied in some detail. Here we report the characterization of open reading frame Ep152R that has a predicted complement control module/SCR domain. This domain is found in Vaccinia virus proteins that are involved in blocking the immune response during viral infection. A recombinant ASFV harboring a HA tagged version of the Ep152R protein was developed (ASFV-G-Ep152R-HA) and used to demonstrate that Ep152R is an early virus protein. Attempts to construct recombinant viruses having a deleted Ep152R gene were consistently unsuccessful indicating that Ep152R is an essential gene. Interestingly, analysis of host-protein interactions for Ep152R using a yeast two-hybrid screen, identified BAG6, a protein previously identified as being required for ASFV replication. Furthermore, fluorescent microscopy analysis confirms that Ep152R-BAG6 interaction actually occurs in cells infected with ASFV. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Molecular biology and genetic diversity of Rift Valley fever virus

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus, is the causative agent of Rift Valley fever (RVF), a mosquito-borne disease of ruminant animals and humans. The generation of a large sequence database has facilitated studies of the evolution and spread of the virus. Bayesian analyses indicate that currently circulating strains of RVFV are descended from an ancestral species that emerged from a natural reservoir in Africa when large-scale cattle and sheep farming were introduced during the 19th century. Viruses descended from multiple lineages persist in that region, through infection of reservoir animals and vertical transmission in mosquitoes, emerging in years of heavy rainfall to cause epizootics and epidemics. On a number of occasions, viruses from these lineages have been transported outside the enzootic region through the movement of infected animals or mosquitoes, triggering outbreaks in countries such as Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Mauritania and Madagascar, where RVF had not previously been seen. Such viruses could potentially become established in their new environments through infection of wild and domestic ruminants and other animals and vertical transmission in local mosquito species. Despite their extensive geographic dispersion, all strains of RVFV remain closely related at the nucleotide and amino acid level. The high degree of conservation of genes encoding the virion surface glycoproteins suggests that a single vaccine should protect against all currently circulating RVFV strains. Similarly, preservation of the sequence of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase across viral lineages implies that antiviral drugs targeting the enzyme should be effective against all strains. Researchers should be encouraged to collect additional RVFV isolates and perform whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, so as to enhance our understanding of the continuing evolution of this important virus. This review forms part of a series

  11. Molecular biology and genetic diversity of Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2012-09-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus, is the causative agent of Rift Valley fever (RVF), a mosquito-borne disease of ruminant animals and humans. The generation of a large sequence database has facilitated studies of the evolution and spread of the virus. Bayesian analyses indicate that currently circulating strains of RVFV are descended from an ancestral species that emerged from a natural reservoir in Africa when large-scale cattle and sheep farming were introduced during the 19th century. Viruses descended from multiple lineages persist in that region, through infection of reservoir animals and vertical transmission in mosquitoes, emerging in years of heavy rainfall to cause epizootics and epidemics. On a number of occasions, viruses from these lineages have been transported outside the enzootic region through the movement of infected animals or mosquitoes, triggering outbreaks in countries such as Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Mauritania and Madagascar, where RVF had not previously been seen. Such viruses could potentially become established in their new environments through infection of wild and domestic ruminants and other animals and vertical transmission in local mosquito species. Despite their extensive geographic dispersion, all strains of RVFV remain closely related at the nucleotide and amino acid level. The high degree of conservation of genes encoding the virion surface glycoproteins suggests that a single vaccine should protect against all currently circulating RVFV strains. Similarly, preservation of the sequence of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase across viral lineages implies that antiviral drugs targeting the enzyme should be effective against all strains. Researchers should be encouraged to collect additional RVFV isolates and perform whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, so as to enhance our understanding of the continuing evolution of this important virus. This review forms part of a series

  12. Challenge of Pigs with Classical Swine Fever Viruses after C-Strain Vaccination Reveals Remarkably Rapid Protection and Insights into Early Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Felicity J.; Johns, Helen L.; Sosan, Olubukola A.; Salguero, Francisco J.; Clifford, Derek J.; Steinbach, Falko; Drew, Trevor W.; Crooke, Helen R.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-emptive culling is becoming increasingly questioned as a means of controlling animal diseases, including classical swine fever (CSF). This has prompted discussions on the use of emergency vaccination to control future CSF outbreaks in domestic pigs. Despite a long history of safe use in endemic areas, there is a paucity of data on aspects important to emergency strategies, such as how rapidly CSFV vaccines would protect against transmission, and if this protection is equivalent for all viral genotypes, including highly divergent genotype 3 strains. To evaluate these questions, pigs were vaccinated with the Riemser® C-strain vaccine at 1, 3 and 5 days prior to challenge with genotype 2.1 and 3.3 challenge strains. The vaccine provided equivalent protection against clinical disease caused by for the two challenge strains and, as expected, protection was complete at 5 days post-vaccination. Substantial protection was achieved after 3 days, which was sufficient to prevent transmission of the 3.3 strain to animals in direct contact. Even by one day post-vaccination approximately half the animals were partially protected, and were able to control the infection, indicating that a reduction of the infectious potential is achieved very rapidly after vaccination. There was a close temporal correlation between T cell IFN-γ responses and protection. Interestingly, compared to responses of animals challenged 5 days after vaccination, challenge of animals 3 or 1 days post-vaccination resulted in impaired vaccine-induced T cell responses. This, together with the failure to detect a T cell IFN-γ response in unprotected and unvaccinated animals, indicates that virulent CSFV can inhibit the potent antiviral host defences primed by C-strain in the early period post vaccination. PMID:22235283

  13. Epidemiology of African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Costard, S; Mur, L; Lubroth, J; Sanchez-Vizcaino, J M; Pfeiffer, D U

    2013-04-01

    African swine fever virus used to occur primarily in Africa. There had been occasional incursions into Europe or America which apart from the endemic situation on the island of Sardinia always had been successfully controlled. But following an introduction of the virus in 2007, it now has expanded its geographical distribution into Caucasus and Eastern Europe where it has not been controlled, to date. African swine fever affects domestic and wild pig species, and can involve tick vectors. The ability of the virus to survive within a particular ecosystem is defined by the ecology of its wild host populations and the characteristics of livestock production systems, which influence host and vector species densities and interrelationships. African swine fever has high morbidity in naïve pig populations and can result in very high mortality. There is no vaccine or treatment available. Apart from stamping out and movement control, there are no control measures, thereby potentially resulting in extreme losses for producers. Prevention and control of the infection requires good understanding of its epidemiology, so that targeted measures can be instigated.

  14. African Swine Fever Virus: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Inmaculada; Alonso, Covadonga

    2017-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a highly contagious viral disease of swine which causes high mortality, approaching 100%, in domestic pigs. ASF is caused by a large, double stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV), which replicates predominantly in the cytoplasm of macrophages and is the only member of the Asfarviridae family, genus Asfivirus. The natural hosts of this virus include wild suids and arthropod vectors of the Ornithodoros genus. The infection of ASFV in its reservoir hosts is usually asymptomatic and develops a persistent infection. In contrast, infection of domestic pigs leads to a lethal hemorrhagic fever for which there is no effective vaccine. Identification of ASFV genes involved in virulence and the characterization of mechanisms used by the virus to evade the immune response of the host are recognized as critical steps in the development of a vaccine. Moreover, the interplay of the viral products with host pathways, which are relevant for virus replication, provides the basic information needed for the identification of potential targets for the development of intervention strategies against this disease. PMID:28489063

  15. African Swine Fever Virus: A Review.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Inmaculada; Alonso, Covadonga

    2017-05-10

    African swine fever (ASF) is a highly contagious viral disease of swine which causes high mortality, approaching 100%, in domestic pigs. ASF is caused by a large, double stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV), which replicates predominantly in the cytoplasm of macrophages and is the only member of the Asfarviridae family, genus Asfivirus. The natural hosts of this virus include wild suids and arthropod vectors of the Ornithodoros genus. The infection of ASFV in its reservoir hosts is usually asymptomatic and develops a persistent infection. In contrast, infection of domestic pigs leads to a lethal hemorrhagic fever for which there is no effective vaccine. Identification of ASFV genes involved in virulence and the characterization of mechanisms used by the virus to evade the immune response of the host are recognized as critical steps in the development of a vaccine. Moreover, the interplay of the viral products with host pathways, which are relevant for virus replication, provides the basic information needed for the identification of potential targets for the development of intervention strategies against this disease.

  16. Zika virus and Zika fever.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoyang; Wang, Peigang; An, Jing

    2016-04-01

    An emerging mosquito-borne arbovirus named Zika virus (ZIKV), of the family Flaviviridae and genus Flavivirus, is becoming a global health threat. ZIKV infection was long neglected due to its sporadic nature and mild symptoms. However, recently, with its rapid spread from Asia to the Americas, affecting more than 30 countries, accumulating evidences have demonstrated a close association between infant microcephaly and Zika infection in pregnant women. Here, we reviewed the virological, epidemiological, and clinical essentials of ZIKV infection.

  17. Mutations in classical swine fever virus NS4B affect virulence in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    NS4B is one of the non-structural proteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), a virus causing a severe disease in swine. Protein domain analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of NS4B in highly pathogenic CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) identified a Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor like domain (TIR...

  18. Comparative studies on the pathogenicity and tissue distribution of three virulence variants of classical swine fever virus, two field isolates and one vaccine strain, with special regard to immunohistochemical investigations

    PubMed Central

    Belák, Katinka; Koenen, Frank; Vanderhallen, Hans; Mittelholzer, Christian; Feliziani, Francesco; De Mia, Gian Mario; Belák, Sándor

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the tissue distribution and pathogenicity of three virulence variants of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and to investigate the applicability of various conventional diagnostic procedures. Methods 64 pigs were divided into three groups and infected with the highly virulent isolate ISS/60, the moderately virulent isolate Wingene'93 and the live attenuated vaccine strain Riems, respectively. Clinical signs, gross and histopathological changes were compared in relation to time elapsed post infection. Virus spread in various organs was followed by virus isolation, by immunohistochemistry, applying monoclonal antibodies in a two-step method and by in situ hybridisation using a digoxigenin-labelled riboprobe. Results The tissue distribution data are discussed in details, analyzing the results of the various diagnostic approaches. The comparative studies revealed remarkable differences in the onset of clinical signs as well as in the development of the macro- and microscopical changes, and in the tissue distribution of CSFV in the three experimental groups. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that in the case of highly and moderately virulent virus variants the virulence does not affect the pattern of the viral spread, however, it influences the outcome, the duration and the intensity of the disease. Immunohistochemistry has the advantage to allow the rapid detection and localisation of the virus, especially in cases of early infection, when clinical signs are still absent. Compared to virus isolation, the advantage of this method is that no cell culture facilities are required. Thus, immunohistochemistry provides simple and sensitive tools for the prompt detection of newly emerging variants of CSFV, including the viruses of very mild virulence. PMID:18775072

  19. Laboratory Validation of the Sand Fly Fever Virus Antigen Assay.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Will K; Szymczak, Mitchell Scott; Burkhalter, Kristen L; Miller, Myrna M

    2015-12-01

    Sandfly fever group viruses in the genus Phlebovirus (family Bunyaviridae) are widely distributed across the globe and are a cause of disease in military troops and indigenous peoples. We assessed the laboratory sensitivity and specificity of the Sand Fly Fever Virus Antigen Assay, a rapid dipstick assay designed to detect sandfly fever Naples virus (SFNV) and Toscana virus (TOSV) against a panel of phleboviruses. The assay detected SFNV and TOSV, as well as other phleboviruses including Aguacate, Anahanga, Arumowot, Chagres, and Punta Toro viruses. It did not detect sandfly fever Sicilian, Heartland, Rio Grande, or Rift Valley fever viruses. It did not produce false positive results in the presence of uninfected sand flies (Lutzomyia longipalpis) or Cache Valley virus, a distantly related bunyavirus. Results from this laboratory evaluation suggest that this assay may be used as a rapid field-deployable assay to detect sand flies infected with TOSV and SFNV, as well as an assortment of other phleboviruses.

  20. Cytokine and immunoglobulin isotype profiles during CP7_E2alf vaccination against a challenge with the highly virulent Koslov strain of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Renson, P; Le Dimna, M; Gabriel, C; Levai, R; Blome, S; Kulcsar, G; Koenen, F; Le Potier, M F

    2014-04-01

    CP7_E2alf is a promising marker vaccine candidate against classical swine fever (CSF). To better understand the mechanisms of protection, cytokine and isotype-specific antibody profiles were investigated in CP7_E2alf vaccinated pigs before and after challenge with the highly virulent CSFV strain "Koslov" at 14 days or 6 months post-vaccination. The interference of vaccination with CSFV pathogeny-related cytokine responses, previously described following a moderately virulent challenge, was confirmed. However, the levels of additional cytokines, TNF-α and IL-6, were significantly attenuated by vaccination following highly virulent challenge. This vaccine interference with cytokine response was not dependent on the immunization route or the consequence of competition between vaccine and challenge strain. Interestingly, IFN-γ enhancement and persistent high IgG2 levels suggested an important role of cell-mediated immunity in long-term protection against CSFV induced by CP7_E2alf vaccination. IgA production also revealed a stimulation of mucosal immunity, especially after oral administration of the vaccine.

  1. The first clinical case due to AP92 like strain of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus and a field survey

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a fatal infection, but no clinical case due to AP92 strain was reported. We described the first clinical case due to AP92 like CCHFV. Methods A case infected by a AP92 like CCHFV was detected in Balkanian part of Turkey. Diagnosis was confirmed by RT-PCR and sequencing. A human serologic and tick survey studies were performed in the region, where the case detected. Results Thirty eight individuals out of 741 were found to be anti CCHFV IgM positive. The attack rate for overall CCHFV was calculated as 5.2%. In univariate analyses, CCHFV IgM positivity was found to be associated with the age (p < 0.001), male gender (p = 0.001), agricultural activity (p = 0.036), and history of tick bite (p = 0.014). In multivariate analysis, older age (OR: 1.03, CI:1.01–1.05, p < 0.001), male gender were found to be the risk factors (OR: 2.5, CI:1.15–5.63, p = 0.020) for CCHFV infection. Conclusion This is the first human case with AP92 like CCHFV infection. Furthermore, this is the first report of AP92 like strain in Turkey. In the region, elderly males carry the highest risk for CCHFV infection. PMID:19515251

  2. Detection of yellow fever virus: a comparison of quantitative real-time PCR and plaque assay.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hi-Gung; Nitsche, Andreas; Teichmann, Anette; Biel, Stefan S; Niedrig, Matthias

    2003-06-30

    Yellow fever virus quantitation is performed routinely by cultivation of virus containing samples using susceptible cells. Counting of the resulting plaques provides a marker for the number of infectious particles present in the sample. This assay usually takes up to 5 days before results are obtained and must be carried out under L2 or L3 laboratory conditions, depending on the yellow fever virus strain used. For clinical diagnosis of yellow fever virus infections the cell culture-based approach takes too long and is of limited practical relevance. Recently, due to its considerable sensitivity, PCR has become a promising method for virus detection. However, whilst PCR can detect virus-specific nucleic acids, it does not allow conclusions to be drawn regarding the infectious potential of the virus detected. Nonetheless, for diagnostic purposes, a rapid, specific and sensitive virus PCR is preferable. Therefore, two independent yellow fever virus-specific real-time PCR assays were established and compared the viral RNA loads to the results of a traditional plaque assay. The estimated ratio of yellow fever virus genomes to infectious particles was between 1000:1 and 5000:1; both approaches displayed a comparable precision of <45%. A significant correlation between genome number as determined by real-time PCR and the corresponding number of plaques in paired samples was found with a Pearson coefficient of correlation of r=0.88 (P<0.0001).

  3. Reverse Genetics System for Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Benjamin; Li, Ping; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Aqian; Liang, Mifang; Li, Dexin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is an emerging tick-borne pathogen that was first reported in China in 2009. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral genome showed that SFTS virus represents a new lineage within the Phlebovirus genus, distinct from the existing sandfly fever and Uukuniemi virus groups, in the family Bunyaviridae. SFTS disease is characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms, chills, joint pain, myalgia, thrombocytopenia, leukocytopenia, and some hemorrhagic manifestations with a case fatality rate of about 2 to 15%. Here we report the development of reverse genetics systems to study STFSV replication and pathogenesis. We developed and optimized functional T7 polymerase-based M- and S-segment minigenome assays, which revealed errors in the published terminal sequences of the S segment of the Hubei 29 strain of SFTSV. We then generated recombinant viruses from cloned cDNAs prepared to the antigenomic RNAs both of the minimally passaged virus (HB29) and of a cell culture-adapted strain designated HB29pp. The growth properties, pattern of viral protein synthesis, and subcellular localization of viral N and NSs proteins of wild-type HB29pp (wtHB29pp) and recombinant HB29pp viruses were indistinguishable. We also show that the viruses fail to shut off host cell polypeptide production. The robust reverse genetics system described will be a valuable tool for the design of therapeutics and the development of killed and attenuated vaccines against this important emerging pathogen. IMPORTANCE SFTSV and related tick-borne phleboviruses such as Heartland virus are emerging viruses shown to cause severe disease in humans in the Far East and the United States, respectively. Study of these novel pathogens would be facilitated by technology to manipulate these viruses in a laboratory setting using reverse genetics. Here, we report the generation of infectious SFTSV from cDNA clones and demonstrate that the behavior of recombinant viruses

  4. The 17D-204 Vaccine Strain-Induced Protection against Virulent Yellow Fever Virus Is Mediated by Humoral Immunity and CD4+ but not CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, L. K. Metthew; Klimstra, William B.

    2016-01-01

    A gold standard of antiviral vaccination has been the safe and effective live-attenuated 17D-based yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccines. Among more than 500 million vaccinees, only a handful of cases have been reported in which vaccinees developed a virulent wild type YFV infection. This efficacy is presumed to be the result of both neutralizing antibodies and a robust T cell response. However, the particular immune components required for protection against YFV have never been evaluated. An understanding of the immune mechanisms that underlie 17D-based vaccine efficacy is critical to the development of next-generation vaccines against flaviviruses and other pathogens. Here we have addressed this question for the first time using a murine model of disease. Similar to humans, vaccination elicited long-term protection against challenge, characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers and a robust T cell response that formed long-lived memory. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were polyfunctional and cytolytic. Adoptive transfer of immune sera or CD4+ T cells provided partial protection against YFV, but complete protection was achieved by transfer of both immune sera and CD4+ T cells. Thus, robust CD4+ T cell activity may be a critical contributor to protective immunity elicited by highly effective live attenuated vaccines. PMID:27463517

  5. The 17D-204 Vaccine Strain-Induced Protection against Virulent Yellow Fever Virus Is Mediated by Humoral Immunity and CD4+ but not CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Alan M; Lam, L K Metthew; Klimstra, William B; Ryman, Kate D

    2016-07-01

    A gold standard of antiviral vaccination has been the safe and effective live-attenuated 17D-based yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccines. Among more than 500 million vaccinees, only a handful of cases have been reported in which vaccinees developed a virulent wild type YFV infection. This efficacy is presumed to be the result of both neutralizing antibodies and a robust T cell response. However, the particular immune components required for protection against YFV have never been evaluated. An understanding of the immune mechanisms that underlie 17D-based vaccine efficacy is critical to the development of next-generation vaccines against flaviviruses and other pathogens. Here we have addressed this question for the first time using a murine model of disease. Similar to humans, vaccination elicited long-term protection against challenge, characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers and a robust T cell response that formed long-lived memory. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were polyfunctional and cytolytic. Adoptive transfer of immune sera or CD4+ T cells provided partial protection against YFV, but complete protection was achieved by transfer of both immune sera and CD4+ T cells. Thus, robust CD4+ T cell activity may be a critical contributor to protective immunity elicited by highly effective live attenuated vaccines.

  6. African swine fever virus uses macropinocytosis to enter host cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Elena G; Quintas, Ana; Pérez-Núñez, Daniel; Nogal, Marisa; Barroso, Susana; Carrascosa, Ángel L; Revilla, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is caused by a large and highly pathogenic DNA virus, African swine fever virus (ASFV), which provokes severe economic losses and expansion threats. Presently, no specific protection or vaccine against ASF is available, despite the high hazard that the continued occurrence of the disease in sub-Saharan Africa, the recent outbreak in the Caucasus in 2007, and the potential dissemination to neighboring countries, represents. Although virus entry is a remarkable target for the development of protection tools, knowledge of the ASFV entry mechanism is still very limited. Whereas early studies have proposed that the virus enters cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis, the specific mechanism used by ASFV remains uncertain. Here we used the ASFV virulent isolate Ba71, adapted to grow in Vero cells (Ba71V), and the virulent strain E70 to demonstrate that entry and internalization of ASFV includes most of the features of macropinocytosis. By a combination of optical and electron microscopy, we show that the virus causes cytoplasm membrane perturbation, blebbing and ruffles. We have also found that internalization of the virions depends on actin reorganization, activity of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, and signaling events typical of the macropinocytic mechanism of endocytosis. The entry of virus into cells appears to directly stimulate dextran uptake, actin polarization and EGFR, PI3K-Akt, Pak1 and Rac1 activation. Inhibition of these key regulators of macropinocytosis, as well as treatment with the drug EIPA, results in a considerable decrease in ASFV entry and infection. In conclusion, this study identifies for the first time the whole pathway for ASFV entry, including the key cellular factors required for the uptake of the virus and the cell signaling involved.

  7. African Swine Fever Virus Uses Macropinocytosis to Enter Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Elena G.; Quintas, Ana; Pérez-Núñez, Daniel; Nogal, Marisa; Barroso, Susana; Carrascosa, Ángel L.; Revilla, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is caused by a large and highly pathogenic DNA virus, African swine fever virus (ASFV), which provokes severe economic losses and expansion threats. Presently, no specific protection or vaccine against ASF is available, despite the high hazard that the continued occurrence of the disease in sub-Saharan Africa, the recent outbreak in the Caucasus in 2007, and the potential dissemination to neighboring countries, represents. Although virus entry is a remarkable target for the development of protection tools, knowledge of the ASFV entry mechanism is still very limited. Whereas early studies have proposed that the virus enters cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis, the specific mechanism used by ASFV remains uncertain. Here we used the ASFV virulent isolate Ba71, adapted to grow in Vero cells (Ba71V), and the virulent strain E70 to demonstrate that entry and internalization of ASFV includes most of the features of macropinocytosis. By a combination of optical and electron microscopy, we show that the virus causes cytoplasm membrane perturbation, blebbing and ruffles. We have also found that internalization of the virions depends on actin reorganization, activity of Na+/H+ exchangers, and signaling events typical of the macropinocytic mechanism of endocytosis. The entry of virus into cells appears to directly stimulate dextran uptake, actin polarization and EGFR, PI3K-Akt, Pak1 and Rac1 activation. Inhibition of these key regulators of macropinocytosis, as well as treatment with the drug EIPA, results in a considerable decrease in ASFV entry and infection. In conclusion, this study identifies for the first time the whole pathway for ASFV entry, including the key cellular factors required for the uptake of the virus and the cell signaling involved. PMID:22719252

  8. The phylogeny of yellow fever virus 17D vaccines.

    PubMed

    Stock, Nina K; Boschetti, Nicola; Herzog, Christian; Appelhans, Marc S; Niedrig, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    In recent years the safety of the yellow fever live vaccine 17D came under scrutiny. The focus was on serious adverse events after vaccinations that resemble a wild type infection with yellow fever and whose reasons are still not known. Also the exact mechanism of attenuation of the vaccine remains unknown to this day. In this context, the standards of safety and surveillance in vaccine production and administration have been discussed. Therein embodied was the demand for improved documentation of the derivation of the seed virus used for yellow fever vaccine production. So far, there was just a historical genealogy available that is based on source area and passage level. However, there is a need for a documentation based on molecular information to get better insights into the mechanisms of pathology. In this work we sequenced the whole genome of different passages of the YFV-17D strain used by Crucell Switzerland AG for vaccine production. Using all other publically available 17D full genome sequences we compared the sequence variance of all vaccine strains and oppose a phylogenetic tree based on full genome sequences to the historical genealogy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Viruses Causing Hemorrhagic Fever. Safety Laboratory Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are diseases caused by viruses which belong to different families, many of them causing severe diseases. These viruses may produce different symptomatology together with a severe multisystem syndrome, and the final result might be the production of hemorrhages in several sites of the body. The majority of them have no other treatment than supportive therapy, although some antiviral drugs can be used in some circumstances. Transmission of VHF has been demonstrated through contact with animal vectors or person-to-person through the contact with body fluids. No risk of transmission has been found during the incubation period, but when the viral load is high the risk of transmission is greatest. Both health care and clinical laboratory workers must safely handle patients and specimens by taking all required precautions during their management. PMID:27014378

  10. Substitution of specific cysteine residues in E1 glycoprotein of classical swine fever virus strain Brescia affects formation of E1-E2 heterodimers and alters virulence in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    E1, along with E^rns and E2, is one of the three envelope glycoproteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E1 and E2 are anchored to the virus envelope at their carboxyl termini and E^rns loosely associates with the viral envelope. In infected cells, E2 forms homodimers and heterodimers with E1,...

  11. A simian hemorrhagic fever virus isolate from persistently infected baboons efficiently induces hemorrhagic fever disease in Japanese macaques.

    PubMed

    Vatter, Heather A; Donaldson, Eric F; Huynh, Jeremy; Rawlings, Stephanie; Manoharan, Minsha; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Dickerson, Mary F; Lewis, Anne D; Colgin, Lois M A; Axthelm, Michael K; Pecotte, Jerilyn K; Baric, Ralph S; Wong, Scott W; Brinton, Margo A

    2015-01-01

    Simian hemorrhagic fever virus is an arterivirus that naturally infects species of African nonhuman primates causing acute or persistent asymptomatic infections. Although it was previously estimated that 1% of baboons are SHFV-positive, more than 10% of wild-caught and captive-bred baboons tested were SHFV positive and the infections persisted for more than 10 years with detectable virus in the blood (100-1000 genomes/ml). The sequences of two baboon SHFV isolates that were amplified by a single passage in primary macaque macrophages had a high degree of identity to each other as well as to the genome of SHFV-LVR, a laboratory strain isolated in the 1960s. Infection of Japanese macaques with 100PFU of a baboon isolate consistently produced high level viremia, pro-inflammatory cytokines, elevated tissue factor levels and clinical signs indicating coagulation defects. The baboon virus isolate provides a reliable BSL2 model of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in macaques.

  12. African swine fever virus eradication in Africa.

    PubMed

    Penrith, Mary-Louise; Vosloo, Wilna; Jori, Ferran; Bastos, Armanda D S

    2013-04-01

    African swine fever was reported in domestic pigs in 26 African countries during the period 2009-2011. The virus exists in an ancient sylvatic cycle between warthogs (Phacochoerus africanus) and argasid ticks of the Ornithodoros moubata complex in many of the countries reporting outbreaks and in two further countries in the region. Eradication of the virus from the countries in eastern and southern Africa where the classic sylvatic cycle occurs is clearly not an option. However, the virus has become endemic in domestic pigs in 20 countries and the great majority of outbreaks in recent decades, even in some countries where the sylvatic cycle occurs, have been associated with movement of infected pigs and pig meat. Pig production and marketing and ASF control in Africa have been examined in order to identify risk factors for the maintenance and spread of ASF. These include large pig populations, traditional free-range husbandry systems, lack of biosecurity in semi-intensive and intensive husbandry systems, lack of organisation in both pig production and pig marketing that results in lack of incentives for investment in pig farming, and ineffective management of ASF. Most of these factors are linked to poverty, yet pigs are recognised as a livestock species that can be used to improve livelihoods and contribute significantly to food security. The changes needed and how they might be implemented in order to reduce the risk of ASF to pig producers in Africa and to the rest of the world are explored.

  13. [Study of the circulation of Crimean hemorrhagic fever virus in Turkmenistan].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, S E; Mamaev, V I; Nepesova, N M; Filipenko, P I; Kalieva, V Ia

    1978-01-01

    Final results of the virological and serological investigations of the circulation of the Crimean hemorrhagic fever virus in the Turkmenian SSR carried out in 1968-1976 are presented in this report. In the examination of 2294 blood serum samples of human beings complement binding antibodies against the Crimean hemorrhagic fever were revealed in 0.4% of cases. It was revealed that five species of ixodes ticks could he infected with this virus; for the first time its strains were also isolated from the Hyalomma dromedarii ticks. Isolation of the Crimean hemorrhagic fever virus from ticks and determination of the precipitating antibodies against this virus in agricultural animals--from 6.2 to 11.1%--in all the regions of the republic pointed out that the natural nidi zones were widespread at the territory of the Turkmenian SSR, and that it was necessary to carry out further study of the given focus.

  14. Application of the pseudo-plaque assay for detection and titration of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus.

    PubMed

    Berber, Engin; Canakoglu, Nurettin; Yoruk, Mustafa D; Tonbak, Sukru; Aktas, Munir; Ertek, Mustafa; Bolat, Yusuf; Kalkan, Ahmet; Ozdarendeli, Aykut

    2013-01-01

    A pseudo-plaque assay was developed for detection and quantitation of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus Turkey-Kelkit06. Enzyme-catalyzed color development of infected cells probed with anti-Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus antibodies was used for determining the titer of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever Turkey-Kelkit06 and for its detection in samples from persons infected with the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. The pseudo-plaque assay accuracy was confirmed by comparing pseudo-plaque assay titers with fluorescent immunofocus assay and focus formation assay titers using three stocks of virus. No significant difference in virus titers of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever Turkey-Kelkit06 among the three methods was observed. The pseudo-plaque assay is more sensitive than the fluorescent immunofocus assay for detecting the virus in primary isolates of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus collected from humans, but no difference in sensitivity between the two methods was observed in the cell-adapted strain of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever Turkey-Kelkit06. The pseudo-plaque assay is suitable for titration of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever Turkey-Kelkit06, which does not develop plaques, suggesting it may also be suitable for the detection of other viruses.

  15. Genetic Reassortment of Rift Valley Fever Virus in Nature

    PubMed Central

    Sall, A. A.; Zanotto, P. M. de A.; Sene, O. K.; Zeller, H. G.; Digoutte, J. P.; Thiongane, Y.; Bouloy, M.

    1999-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a phlebovirus of the Bunyaviridae family, is an arthropod-borne virus which emerges periodically throughout Africa, emphasizing that it poses a major threat for animal and human populations. To assess the genetic variability of RVFV, several isolates from diverse localities of Africa were investigated by means of reverse transcription-PCR followed by direct sequencing of a region of the small (S), medium (M), and large (L) genomic segments. Phylogenetic analysis showed the existence of three major lineages corresponding to geographic variants from West Africa, Egypt, and Central-East Africa. However, incongruences detected between the L, M, and S phylogenies suggested that genetic exchange via reassortment occurred between strains from different lineages. This hypothesis, depicted by parallel phylogenies, was further confirmed by statistical tests. Our findings, which strongly suggest exchanges between strains from areas of endemicity in West and East Africa, strengthen the potential existence of a sylvatic cycle in the tropical rain forest. This also emphasizes the risk of generating uncontrolled chimeric viruses by using live attenuated vaccines in areas of endemicity. PMID:10482570

  16. Viral hemorrhagic fevers of animals caused by DNA viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here we outline serious diseases of food and fiber animals that cause damaging economic effect on products all over the world. The only vector-borne DNA virus is included here, such as African swine fever virus, and the herpes viruses discussed have a complex epidemiology characterized by outbreak...

  17. Genetic detection and isolation of crimean-congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Kosovo, Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Bozovi, Bojana; Pavlidou, Vassiliki; Papadimitriou, Evangelia; Pelemis, Mijomir; Antoniadis, Aantonis

    2002-08-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (C-CHFV) strains were isolated from a fatal case and the attending physician in Kosovo, Yugoslavia. Early, rapid diagnosis of the disease was achieved by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The physician was successfully treated with oral ribavirin. These cases yielded the first genetically studied C-CHFV human isolates in the Balkans.

  18. Mutations in the classical swine fever virus NS4B protein affects virulence in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    NS4B is one of the non-structural proteins of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), the etiological agent of a severe, highly lethal disease of swine. Protein domain analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of the NS4B protein of highly pathogenic CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) identified a Toll/Inte...

  19. Interventions against West Nile virus, Rift Valley fever virus, and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus: where are we?

    PubMed

    Kortekaas, Jeroen; Ergönül, Onder; Moormann, Rob J M

    2010-10-01

    ARBO-ZOONET is an international network financed by the European Commission's seventh framework program. The major goal of this initiative is capacity building for the control of emerging viral vector-borne zoonotic diseases, with a clear focus on West Nile virus, Rift Valley fever virus, and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. To evaluate the status quo of control measures against these viruses, an ARBO-ZOONET meeting was held in Istanbul, Turkey, from 19 to 20 November 2009. The symposium consisted of three themes: (1) vaccines: new and existing ones; (2) antivirals: existing and new developments; and (3) antivector vaccines. In addition, a satellite workshop was held on epidemiology and diagnosis. The meeting brought together foremost international experts on the subjects from both within and without the ARBO-ZOONET consortium. This report highlights selected results from these presentations and major conclusions that emanated from the discussions held.

  20. Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 vaccine encoding Toscana virus NSs retains neuroinvasiveness in mice

    PubMed Central

    Indran, Sabarish V.; Lihoradova, Olga A.; Phoenix, Inaia; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Kalveram, Birte; Head, Jennifer A.; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Smith, Jennifer K.; Zhang, Lihong; Juelich, Terry L.; Gong, Bin; Freiberg, Alexander N.

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) causes high rates of abortion and fetal malformation in pregnant ruminants, and haemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans. The MP-12 strain is a highly efficacious and safe live-attenuated vaccine candidate for both humans and ruminants. However, MP-12 lacks a marker to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals. In this study, we originally aimed to characterize the efficacy of a recombinant RVFV MP-12 strain encoding Toscana virus (TOSV) NSs gene in place of MP-12 NSs (rMP12-TOSNSs). TOSV NSs promotes the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and inhibits interferon-β gene up-regulation without suppressing host general transcription. Unexpectedly, rMP12-TOSNSs increased death in vaccinated outbred mice and inbred BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice. Immunohistochemistry showed diffusely positive viral antigens in the thalamus, hypothalamus and brainstem, including the medulla. No viral antigens were detected in spleen or liver, which is similar to the antigen distribution of moribund mice infected with MP-12. These results suggest that rMP12-TOSNSs retains neuroinvasiveness in mice. Our findings demonstrate that rMP12-TOSNSs causes neuroinvasion without any hepatic disease and will be useful for studying the neuroinvasion mechanism of RVFV and TOSV. PMID:23515022

  1. Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 vaccine encoding Toscana virus NSs retains neuroinvasiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Indran, Sabarish V; Lihoradova, Olga A; Phoenix, Inaia; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Kalveram, Birte; Head, Jennifer A; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Smith, Jennifer K; Zhang, Lihong; Juelich, Terry L; Gong, Bin; Freiberg, Alexander N; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-07-01

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) causes high rates of abortion and fetal malformation in pregnant ruminants, and haemorrhagic fever, neurological disorders or blindness in humans. The MP-12 strain is a highly efficacious and safe live-attenuated vaccine candidate for both humans and ruminants. However, MP-12 lacks a marker to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals. In this study, we originally aimed to characterize the efficacy of a recombinant RVFV MP-12 strain encoding Toscana virus (TOSV) NSs gene in place of MP-12 NSs (rMP12-TOSNSs). TOSV NSs promotes the degradation of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and inhibits interferon-β gene up-regulation without suppressing host general transcription. Unexpectedly, rMP12-TOSNSs increased death in vaccinated outbred mice and inbred BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice. Immunohistochemistry showed diffusely positive viral antigens in the thalamus, hypothalamus and brainstem, including the medulla. No viral antigens were detected in spleen or liver, which is similar to the antigen distribution of moribund mice infected with MP-12. These results suggest that rMP12-TOSNSs retains neuroinvasiveness in mice. Our findings demonstrate that rMP12-TOSNSs causes neuroinvasion without any hepatic disease and will be useful for studying the neuroinvasion mechanism of RVFV and TOSV.

  2. Genetic Analysis of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Yashina, Lyudmila; Vyshemirskii, Oleg; Seregin, Sergei; Petrova, Irina; Samokhvalov, Evgeny; Lvov, Dmitry; Gutorov, Valery; Kuzina, Irina; Tyunnikov, Georgy; Tang, Yi-Wei; Netesov, Sergei; Petrov, Vladimir

    2003-01-01

    Genetic analysis of wild-type Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus strains recovered in the European part of Russia was performed. Reverse transcriptase PCR followed by direct sequencing was used to recover partial sequences of the CCHF virus medium (M) genome segment (M segment) from four pools of Hyalomma marginatum ticks and six human patients. Phylogenetic analysis of the M-segment sequences from Russian strains revealed a close relatedness of the strains (nucleotide sequence diversity, ≤5.0%). The strains differed significantly from CCHF viruses from other regions of the world (nucleotide sequence diversity, 10.3 to 20.4%), suggesting that CCHF virus strains recovered in the European part of Russia form a distinct group. PMID:12574301

  3. Genetic analysis of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in Russia.

    PubMed

    Yashina, Lyudmila; Vyshemirskii, Oleg; Seregin, Sergei; Petrova, Irina; Samokhvalov, Evgeny; Lvov, Dmitry; Gutorov, Valery; Kuzina, Irina; Tyunnikov, Georgy; Tang, Yi-Wei; Netesov, Sergei; Petrov, Vladimir

    2003-02-01

    Genetic analysis of wild-type Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus strains recovered in the European part of Russia was performed. Reverse transcriptase PCR followed by direct sequencing was used to recover partial sequences of the CCHF virus medium (M) genome segment (M segment) from four pools of Hyalomma marginatum ticks and six human patients. Phylogenetic analysis of the M-segment sequences from Russian strains revealed a close relatedness of the strains (nucleotide sequence diversity, strains differed significantly from CCHF viruses from other regions of the world (nucleotide sequence diversity, 10.3 to 20.4%), suggesting that CCHF virus strains recovered in the European part of Russia form a distinct group.

  4. Emergence of African swine fever virus, northwestern Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Pooneh; Sohrabi, Amir; Ashrafihelan, Javad; Edalat, Rosita; Alamdari, Mehran; Masoudi, Mohammadhossein; Mostofi, Saied; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2010-12-01

    In 2008, African swine fever was introduced into Georgia, after which it spread to neighboring Armenia, Azerbaijan, and the Russian Federation. That same year, PCR and sequence analysis identified African swine fever virus in samples from 3 dead female wild boars in northwestern Iran. Wild boars may serve as a reservoir.

  5. Close Relationship of Ruminant Pestiviruses and Classical Swine Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Postel, Alexander; Schmeiser, Stefanie; Oguzoglu, Tuba Cigdem; Indenbirken, Daniela; Alawi, Malik; Fischer, Nicole; Grundhoff, Adam

    2015-01-01

    To determine why serum from small ruminants infected with ruminant pestiviruses reacted positively to classical swine fever virus (CSFV)–specific diagnostic tests, we analyzed 2 pestiviruses from Turkey. They differed genetically and antigenically from known Pestivirus species and were closely related to CSFV. Cross-reactions would interfere with classical swine fever diagnosis in pigs. PMID:25811683

  6. Detection of sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever virus antibodies by complement fixation tests.

    PubMed

    Sentsui, H; Nishimori, T; Nagai, I; Nishioka, N

    1996-01-01

    Some serological diagnosis methods and examinations for detection of antibodies to sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) infection were investigated. The wildebeest-associated MCF virus strain WC11 propagated on fetal bovine thyroid cell cultures was used as an antigen. Antibodies were detected by complement fixation (CF) tests in cattle pathologically diagnosed as having sheep-associated MCF, as well as in cattle experimentally infected with MCF virus strain WC11. However, immunodiffusion precipitation was only detected in cattle infected with MCF virus strain WC11. The results of serological investigation by CF tests indicated that 64.3% of sheep possessed antibodies to MCF virus in the Hokkaido district of Japan and all serum samples which contained CF antibody titers greater than 1:4 had antibody titers larger than 1:8 in indirect immunofluorescence tests. The CF test we demonstrated here is available to quantitatively detect MCF virus antibody titers in epidemiological surveys.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of a Dengue Virus Serotype 4 Strain Isolated in Roraima, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Victor C.; Silva, George A. V.; Maito, Rodrigo M.; Granja, Fabiana; Siqueira, Thalita; Acosta, Pablo O. A.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arboviral disease worldwide. We report the complete genome sequence of a dengue virus serotype 4, genotype II strain isolated in 2010 from a patient with classical dengue fever in Boa Vista, Roraima, Brazil. PMID:22247521

  8. Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection in Golden Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Scharton, Dionna; Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; Bailey, Kevin W.; Vest, Zachary; Westover, Jonna B.; Siddharthan, Venkatraman; Gowen, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a formidable pathogen that causes severe disease and abortion in a variety of livestock species and a range of disease in humans that includes hemorrhagic fever, fulminant hepatitis, encephalitis and blindness. The natural transmission cycle involves mosquito vectors, but exposure can also occur through contact with infected fluids and tissues. The lack of approved antiviral therapies and vaccines for human use underlies the importance of small animal models for proof-of-concept efficacy studies. Several mouse and rat models of RVFV infection have been well characterized and provide useful systems for the study of certain aspects of pathogenesis, as well as antiviral drug and vaccine development. However, certain host-directed therapeutics may not act on mouse or rat pathways. Here, we describe the natural history of disease in golden Syrian hamsters challenged subcutaneously with the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. Peracute disease resulted in rapid lethality within 2 to 3 days of RVFV challenge. High titer viremia and substantial viral loads were observed in most tissues examined; however, histopathology and immunostaining for RVFV antigen were largely restricted to the liver. Acute hepatocellular necrosis associated with a strong presence of viral antigen in the hepatocytes indicates that fulminant hepatitis is the likely cause of mortality. Further studies to assess the susceptibility and disease progression following respiratory route exposure are warranted. The use of the hamsters to model RVFV infection is suitable for early stage antiviral drug and vaccine development studies. PMID:25607955

  9. Rift Valley fever virus infection in golden Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Scharton, Dionna; Van Wettere, Arnaud J; Bailey, Kevin W; Vest, Zachary; Westover, Jonna B; Siddharthan, Venkatraman; Gowen, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a formidable pathogen that causes severe disease and abortion in a variety of livestock species and a range of disease in humans that includes hemorrhagic fever, fulminant hepatitis, encephalitis and blindness. The natural transmission cycle involves mosquito vectors, but exposure can also occur through contact with infected fluids and tissues. The lack of approved antiviral therapies and vaccines for human use underlies the importance of small animal models for proof-of-concept efficacy studies. Several mouse and rat models of RVFV infection have been well characterized and provide useful systems for the study of certain aspects of pathogenesis, as well as antiviral drug and vaccine development. However, certain host-directed therapeutics may not act on mouse or rat pathways. Here, we describe the natural history of disease in golden Syrian hamsters challenged subcutaneously with the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. Peracute disease resulted in rapid lethality within 2 to 3 days of RVFV challenge. High titer viremia and substantial viral loads were observed in most tissues examined; however, histopathology and immunostaining for RVFV antigen were largely restricted to the liver. Acute hepatocellular necrosis associated with a strong presence of viral antigen in the hepatocytes indicates that fulminant hepatitis is the likely cause of mortality. Further studies to assess the susceptibility and disease progression following respiratory route exposure are warranted. The use of the hamsters to model RVFV infection is suitable for early stage antiviral drug and vaccine development studies.

  10. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus: new outbreaks, new discoveries.

    PubMed

    Ergonul, Onder

    2012-04-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a fatal viral infection described in Asia, Africa and Europe. Humans become infected through the bites of ticks, by contact with a patient with CCHF during the acute phase of infection, or by contact with blood or tissues from viremic livestock. The occurrence of CCHF closely approximates the known world distribution of Hyalomma spp. ticks. The novel studies of phylogenetic analyses reveal the interesting relations between the strains from distant outbreaks. The clinical features show common dramatic progress characterized by hemorrhage, myalgia, and fever. Besides the direct infection of endothelium, indirect damage by viral or virus mediated host-derived soluble factors that cause endothelial activations and dysfunction occur. In diagnosis, enzyme linked immunoassay and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction are used. Early diagnosis is critical for the patient and potential nosocomial infections. Supportive therapy is the essential part of the case management. Ribavirin was suggested as an effective drug in recent studies, and it was found to be beneficial. The health care workers are under serious risk of transmission of the infection, particularly during the follow-up of the patient, with hemorrhages from the nose, mouth, gums, vagina, and injection sites.

  11. Human Antibody Neutralizes Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus, an Emerging Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiling; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Wenshuai; Chi, Ying; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Li, Xian; Qi, Xian; Jin, Qiu; Zhang, Xiao; Huang, Mingming; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yin; Bao, Changjun; Hu, Jianli; Liang, Shuyi; Bao, Lin; Wu, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), a newly discovered member of the Bunyaviridae family, is the causative agent of an emerging hemorrhagic fever, SFTS, in China. Currently, there are no vaccines or effective therapies against SFTS. In this study, a combinatorial human antibody library was constructed from the peripheral lymphocytes of 5 patients who had recovered from SFTS. The library was screened against purified virions for the production of single-chain variable-region fragments (ScFv). Of the 6 positive clones, one clone (monoclonal antibody [MAb] 4-5) showed neutralizing activity against SFTSV infection in Vero cells. MAb 4-5 was found to effectively neutralize all of the clinical isolates of SFTSV tested, which were isolated from patients in China from 2010 to 2012. MAb 4-5 was found to bind a linear epitope in the ectodomain of glycoprotein Gn. Its neutralizing activity is attributed to blockage of the interactions between the Gn protein and the cellular receptor, indicating that inhibition of virus-cell attachment is its main mechanism. These data suggest that MAb 4-5 can be used as a promising candidate molecule for immunotherapy against SFTSV infection. PMID:23863504

  12. Viral hemorrhagic fevers of animals caused by DNA viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here we outline serious diseases of food and fiber animals that cause damaging economic effects on producers all over the world. The only vector-borne DNA virus is included here (i.e., African swine fever virus), and the herpesviruses discussed have a complex epidemiology characterized by outbreaks ...

  13. Comparative analysis of African swine fever virus genotypes and serogroups.

    PubMed

    Malogolovkin, Alexander; Burmakina, Galina; Titov, Ilya; Sereda, Alexey; Gogin, Andrey; Baryshnikova, Elena; Kolbasov, Denis

    2015-02-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes highly lethal hemorrhagic disease among pigs, and ASFV's extreme antigenic diversity hinders vaccine development. We show that p72 ASFV phylogenetic analysis does not accurately define ASFV hemadsorption inhibition assay serogroups. Thus, conventional ASFV genotyping cannot discriminate between viruses of different virulence or predict efficacy of a specific ASFV vaccine.

  14. Comparative Analysis of African Swine Fever Virus Genotypes and Serogroups

    PubMed Central

    Burmakina, Galina; Titov, Ilya; Sereda, Alexey; Gogin, Andrey; Baryshnikova, Elena; Kolbasov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes highly lethal hemorrhagic disease among pigs, and ASFV’s extreme antigenic diversity hinders vaccine development. We show that p72 ASFV phylogenetic analysis does not accurately define ASFV hemadsorption inhibition assay serogroups. Thus, conventional ASFV genotyping cannot discriminate between viruses of different virulence or predict efficacy of a specific ASFV vaccine. PMID:25625574

  15. Clinical manifestations and case management of Ebola haemorrhagic fever caused by a newly identified virus strain, Bundibugyo, Uganda, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Roddy, Paul; Howard, Natasha; Van Kerkhove, Maria D; Lutwama, Julius; Wamala, Joseph; Yoti, Zabulon; Colebunders, Robert; Palma, Pedro Pablo; Sterk, Esther; Jeffs, Benjamin; Van Herp, Michel; Borchert, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    A confirmed Ebola haemorrhagic fever (EHF) outbreak in Bundibugyo, Uganda, November 2007-February 2008, was caused by a putative new species (Bundibugyo ebolavirus). It included 93 putative cases, 56 laboratory-confirmed cases, and 37 deaths (CFR = 25%). Study objectives are to describe clinical manifestations and case management for 26 hospitalised laboratory-confirmed EHF patients. Clinical findings are congruous with previously reported EHF infections. The most frequently experienced symptoms were non-bloody diarrhoea (81%), severe headache (81%), and asthenia (77%). Seven patients reported or were observed with haemorrhagic symptoms, six of whom died. Ebola care remains difficult due to the resource-poor setting of outbreaks and the infection-control procedures required. However, quality data collection is essential to evaluate case definitions and therapeutic interventions, and needs improvement in future epidemics. Organizations usually involved in EHF case management have a particular responsibility in this respect.

  16. Clinical Manifestations and Case Management of Ebola Haemorrhagic Fever Caused by a Newly Identified Virus Strain, Bundibugyo, Uganda, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Roddy, Paul; Howard, Natasha; Van Kerkhove, Maria D.; Lutwama, Julius; Wamala, Joseph; Yoti, Zabulon; Colebunders, Robert; Palma, Pedro Pablo; Sterk, Esther; Jeffs, Benjamin; Van Herp, Michel; Borchert, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    A confirmed Ebola haemorrhagic fever (EHF) outbreak in Bundibugyo, Uganda, November 2007–February 2008, was caused by a putative new species (Bundibugyo ebolavirus). It included 93 putative cases, 56 laboratory-confirmed cases, and 37 deaths (CFR = 25%). Study objectives are to describe clinical manifestations and case management for 26 hospitalised laboratory-confirmed EHF patients. Clinical findings are congruous with previously reported EHF infections. The most frequently experienced symptoms were non-bloody diarrhoea (81%), severe headache (81%), and asthenia (77%). Seven patients reported or were observed with haemorrhagic symptoms, six of whom died. Ebola care remains difficult due to the resource-poor setting of outbreaks and the infection-control procedures required. However, quality data collection is essential to evaluate case definitions and therapeutic interventions, and needs improvement in future epidemics. Organizations usually involved in EHF case management have a particular responsibility in this respect. PMID:23285243

  17. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Juan C; Pauza, C David; Djavani, Mahmoud M; Rodas, Juan D; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S; Salvato, Maria S

    2011-11-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets.

  18. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Juan C.; Pauza, C. David; Djavani, Mahmoud M.; Rodas, Juan D.; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets. PMID:21820469

  19. A recombinant Yellow Fever 17D vaccine expressing Lassa virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Bredenbeek, Peter J; Molenkamp, Richard; Spaan, Willy J M; Deubel, Vincent; Marianneau, Phillippe; Salvato, Maria S; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Zapata, Juan; Tikhonov, Ilia; Patterson, Jean; Carrion, Ricardo; Ticer, Anysha; Brasky, Kathleen; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2006-02-20

    The Yellow Fever Vaccine 17D (YFV17D) has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) resulting in construction of YFV17D/LASV-GPC recombinant virus. The virus was replication-competent and processed the LASV-GPC in cell cultures. The recombinant replicated poorly in guinea pigs but still elicited specific antibodies against LASV and YFV17D antigens. A single subcutaneous injection of the recombinant vaccine protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal Lassa Fever. This study demonstrates the potential to develop an YFV17D-based bivalent vaccine against two viruses that are endemic in the same area of Africa.

  20. NON-FATAL INFECTION OF MICE FOLLOWING INTRACEREBRAL INOCULATION OF YELLOW FEVER VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Fox, John P.

    1943-01-01

    -fatal infections, thus, may be important to the accuracy of quantitative determinations of infectivity. Limited observations with virus of the French neurotropic and the pantropic Asibi strains revealed that non-fatal infections do occur, but only rarely. Somewhat more extensive observations with unmodified virus of strains isolated from Brazilian cases of jungle yellow fever, in contrast, revealed an occurrence of non-fatal infections much greater than that observed with the most productive 17D substrains. With these jungle strains, the demonstration of non-fatal infections proved indispensable to any measure of the level of infectivity of virus preparations. The demonstration of the proportional occurrence in mice of non-fatal infections with yellow fever virus provides an additional means by which different virus strains and substrains may be characterized. PMID:19871300

  1. Pathogenesis of XJ and Romero strains of Junin virus in two strains of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Linde, Nathaniel S; Dziuba, Natallia; Zacks, Michele A; Smith, Jeanon N; Smith, Jennifer K; Aronson, Judy F; Chumakova, Olga V; Lander, Heather M; Peters, Clarence J; Paessler, Slobodan

    2008-08-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), a systemic infectious disease caused by infection with Junin virus, affects several organs, and patients can show hematologic, cardiovascular, renal, or neurologic symptoms. We compared the virulence of two Junin virus strains in inbred and outbred guinea pigs with the aim of characterizing this animal model better for future vaccine/antiviral efficacy studies. Our data indicate that this passage of the XJ strain is attenuated in guinea pigs. In contrast, the Romero strain is highly virulent in Strain 13 as well as in Hartley guinea pigs, resulting in systemic infection, thrombocytopenia, elevated aspartate aminotransferase levels, and ultimately, uniformly lethal disease. We detected viral antigen in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Thus, both guinea pig strains are useful animal models for lethal Junin virus (Romero strain) infection and potentially can be used for preclinical trials in vaccine or antiviral drug development.

  2. Pathogenesis of XJ and Romero Strains of Junin Virus in Two Strains of Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Nadezhda E.; Linde, Nathaniel S.; Dziuba, Natallia; Zacks, Michele A.; Smith, Jeanon N.; Smith, Jennifer K.; Aronson, Judy F.; Chumakova, Olga V.; Lander, Heather M.; Peters, Clarence J.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), a systemic infectious disease caused by infection with Junin virus, affects several organs, and patients can show hematologic, cardiovascular, renal, or neurologic symptoms. We compared the virulence of two Junin virus strains in inbred and outbred guinea pigs with the aim of characterizing this animal model better for future vaccine/antiviral efficacy studies. Our data indicate that this passage of the XJ strain is attenuated in guinea pigs. In contrast, the Romero strain is highly virulent in Strain 13 as well as in Hartley guinea pigs, resulting in systemic infection, thrombocytopenia, elevated apartate aminotransferase levels, and ultimately, uniformly lethal disease. We detected viral antigen in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Thus, both guinea pig strains are useful animal models for lethal Junin virus (Romero strain) infection and potentially can be used for preclinical trials in vaccine or antiviral drug development. PMID:18689636

  3. Laboratory Validation of the Sand Fly Fever Virus Antigen Assay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    STATEMENT A. Approved for public release. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Cleared, 88PA, Case # 2015-2928. J of Amer. Mosquito Control Assoc., 31(4):380–383...Arumowot virus, are transmitted by mosquitoes (Tesh 1988). The most clinically significant members of the SF virus group are RVFV, Toscana virus... mosquitoes , and RVFV can cause serious hemorrhagic disease or high fever in humans (Tomori and Fabiyi 1976, Tesh 1988); RVFV is of particular military

  4. Construction of yellow fever-influenza A chimeric virus particles.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, B C E P D; Liberto, M I M; Barth, O M; Cabral, M C

    2002-12-01

    In order to obtain a better understanding of the functional mechanisms involved in the fusogenesis of enveloped viruses, the influenza A (X31) and the yellow fever (17DD) virus particles were used to construct a chimeric structure based on their distinct pH requirements for fusion, and the distinct malleability of their nucleocapsids. The malleable nucleocapsid of the influenza A virus particle is characterized by a pleomorphic configuration when observed by electron microscopy. A heat inactivated preparation of X31 virus was used as a lectin to interact with the sialic acid domains present in the 17DD virus envelope. The E spikes of 17DD virus were induced to promote fusion of both envelopes, creating a double genome enveloped structure, the chimeric yellow fever-influenza A virus particle. These chimeric viral particles, originally denominated 'partículas virais quiméricas' (PVQ), were characterized by their infectious capacity for different biological systems. Cell inoculation with PVQ resulted in viral products that showed similar characteristics to those obtained after 17DD virus infections. Our findings open new opportunities towards the understanding of both virus particles and aspects of cellular physiologic quality control. The yellow fever-influenza A chimeric particles, by means of their hybrid composition, should be a valuable tool in the study of cell biology and the function of viral components.

  5. Genetic and Molecular Studies of the Phlebotomus Fever Group of Viruses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    spec’ies). The viruses studied includejunta Toro (P’ , iarimabad .i AA), Chagres (CHG), Sandfly fever Siaili[h (SFS Tesh and/Sabin isolates), S-a *fly fever... sandfly fever virus isolates, Sicilian and Naples (SFN, SFS), originally were recovered from American troops in 1943-1944 during epidemics of sandfly fever...ICO, PHL 3, Itaporanga (ITP), Buenaventura (BUE), and the Sicilian and Naples sandfly fever (SFS, SFN) viruses, each has a tripartite RNA genome and

  6. Approaches to define the viral genetic basis of classical swine fever virus virulence.

    PubMed

    Leifer, Immanuel; Ruggli, Nicolas; Blome, Sandra

    2013-04-10

    Classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious disease of pigs caused by the classical swine fever virus (CSFV), can lead to important economic losses in the pig industry. Numerous CSFV isolates with various degrees of virulence have been isolated worldwide, ranging from low virulent strains that do not result in any apparent clinical signs to highly virulent strains that cause a severe peracute hemorrhagic fever with nearly 100% mortality. Knowledge of the molecular determinants of CSFV virulence is an important issue for effective disease control and development of safe and effective marker vaccines. In this review, the latest studies in the field of CSFV virulence are discussed. The topic of virulence is addressed from different angles; nonconventional approaches like codon pair usage and quasispecies are considered. Future research approaches in the field of CSFV virulence are proposed.

  7. Hairpin loop structure of African swine fever virus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    González, A; Talavera, A; Almendral, J M; Viñuela, E

    1986-01-01

    The ends of African swine fever virus genome are formed by a 37 nucleotide-long hairpin loop composed, almost entirely, of incompletely paired A and T residues. The loops at each DNA end were present in two equimolar forms that, when compared in opposite polarities, were inverted and complementary (flip-flop), as in the case of poxvirus DNA. The hairpin loops of African swine fever and vaccinia virus DNAs had no homology, but both DNAs had a 16 nucleotide-long sequence, close to the hairpin loops, with an homology of about 80%. An analysis of African swine fever virus replicating DNA showed head-to-head and tail-to-tail linked molecules that may be replicative intermediates. Images PMID:3763393

  8. African swine fever virus infection in Classical swine fever subclinically infected wild boars.

    PubMed

    Cabezón, Oscar; Muñoz-González, Sara; Colom-Cadena, Andreu; Pérez-Simó, Marta; Rosell, Rosa; Lavín, Santiago; Marco, Ignasi; Fraile, Lorenzo; de la Riva, Paloma Martínez; Rodríguez, Fernando; Domínguez, Javier; Ganges, Llilianne

    2017-08-01

    Recently moderate-virulence classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strains have been proven capable of generating postnatal persistent infection (PI), defined by the maintenance of viremia and the inability to generate CSFV-specific immune responses in animals. These animals also showed a type I interferon blockade in the absence of clinical signs. In this study, we assessed the infection generated in 7-week-old CSFV PI wild boars after infection with the African swine fever virus (ASFV). The wild boars were divided in two groups and were infected with ASFV. Group A comprised boars who were CSFV PI in a subclinical form and Group B comprised pestivirus-free wild boars. Some relevant parameters related to CSFV replication and the immune response of CSFV PI animals were studied. Additionally, serum soluble factors such as IFN-α, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ and sCD163 were analysed before and after ASFV infection to assess their role in disease progression. After ASFV infection, only the CSFV PI wild boars showed progressive acute haemorrhagic disease; however, the survival rates following ASFV infection was similar in both experimental groups. Notwithstanding, the CSFV RNA load of CSFV PI animals remained unaltered over the study; likewise, the ASFV DNA load detected after infection was similar between groups. Interestingly, systemic type I FN-α and IL-10 levels in sera were almost undetectable in CSFV PI animals, yet detectable in Group B, while detectable levels of IFN-γ were found in both groups. Finally, the flow cytometry analysis showed an increase in myelomonocytic cells (CD172a(+)) and a decrease in CD4(+) T cells in the PBMCs from CSFV PI animals after ASFV infection. Our results showed that the immune response plays a role in the progression of disease in CSFV subclinically infected wild boars after ASFV infection, and the immune response comprised the systemic type I interferon blockade. ASFV does not produce any interference with CSFV replication, or vice

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of recent isolates of classical swine fever virus from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Sabogal, Zonia Yubyll; Mogollón, José Darío; Rincón, Maria Antonia; Clavijo, Alfonso

    2006-01-01

    The ability to discriminate between different classical Swine fever virus (CSFV) isolates is a prerequisite for identifying the possible origin of an outbreak. To determine the relatedness between Colombian isolates from different geographical regions, genetic sequences of the glycoprotein E2 and the 5'UTR of CSFV were amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared with reference strains of different genetic grouping. The viruses originated from classical swine fever (CSF) outbreaks in Colombia during 1998-2002. All viruses characterized belonged to genogroup 1 and were members of the subgroup 1.1. The results indicate that the outbreaks from the year 2002 are caused by a strain related to the virus CSF/Santander, isolated in 1980, suggesting that the current CSF outbreaks are the consequence of a single strain that continues to circulate in the field. For the first time, an association between isolates from outbreaks in Colombia in the 1990s was established with a virus isolate from Brazil, indicating a possible origin of the virus causing the outbreak.

  10. New circulating genomic variant of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in Iran.

    PubMed

    Chinikar, Sadegh; Shah-Hosseini, Nariman; Bouzari, Saeid; Jalali, Tahmineh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2013-05-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever is a viral infection that is caused by Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV). On May 27, 2012, a woman became ill after accidentally splashing cow's blood into her eyes. Serological and molecular investigations were carried out on the serum of the patient. The test results for serological testing were negative, but RT-PCR was strongly positive for CCHFV. A phylogenetic study on the CCHFV genome sequence showed 50 % similarity to a 520-bp region of Russian strains. By combining historical phylogenetic data and current data, it can be surmised that there are potentially more than five circulating CCHFV genomic variants in Iran.

  11. THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF MARMOSETS TO YELLOW FEVER VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nelson C.

    1930-01-01

    1. It has been possible to introduce yellow fever virus into the small Brazilian monkeys, Callithrix albicollis and Leontocebus ursulus, by the bites of infected mosquitoes and to carry the virus through a series of four passages in each species and back to rhesus monkeys by the bites of Stegomyia mosquitoes fed on the last marmoset of each series. 2. Five specimens of L. ursulus were used. Four developed fever, and all died during the experiments. At least two showed liver necroses comparable to those found in human beings and rhesus monkeys that died of yellow fever. 3. Twenty specimens of C. albicollis were used. Very few showed a temperature reaction following the introduction of virus. Of those that died, none had lesions typical of yellow fever as seen in certain other species of monkeys and in humans. 4. The convalescent serum from each of five C. albicollis protected a rhesus monkey against yellow fever virus, but the serum from a normal marmoset of the same species was found to be non-protective. PMID:19869773

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Classical Swine Fever Virus Isolated near the Demilitarized Zone in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sok; Choe, SeEun; Cha, RaMi; Kim, Ki-Sun; Cho, In-Soo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The YC16CS (genotype 2.1) strain of classical swine fever virus, isolated from infected pigs in Yeoncheon province, Republic of Korea, near the demilitarized zone, has a high identity with the PC11WB strain of the virus. This is significant in that it is the first case of transmission from wild boars to breed pigs revealed by an epidemiological investigation. PMID:28385854

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Classical Swine Fever Virus Isolated near the Demilitarized Zone in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Sok; Choe, SeEun; Cha, RaMi; Kim, Ki-Sun; Cho, In-Soo; An, Dong-Jun

    2017-04-06

    The YC16CS (genotype 2.1) strain of classical swine fever virus, isolated from infected pigs in Yeoncheon province, Republic of Korea, near the demilitarized zone, has a high identity with the PC11WB strain of the virus. This is significant in that it is the first case of transmission from wild boars to breed pigs revealed by an epidemiological investigation. Copyright © 2017 Song et al.

  14. A Recombinant Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Subunit Vaccine Confers Full Protection against Rift Valley Fever Challenge in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Faburay, Bonto; Wilson, William C; Gaudreault, Natasha N; Davis, A Sally; Shivanna, Vinay; Bawa, Bhupinder; Sunwoo, Sun Young; Ma, Wenjun; Drolet, Barbara S; Morozov, Igor; McVey, D Scott; Richt, Juergen A

    2016-06-14

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen causing disease outbreaks in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The virus has great potential for transboundary spread due to the presence of competent vectors in non-endemic areas. There is currently no fully licensed vaccine suitable for use in livestock or humans outside endemic areas. Here we report the evaluation of the efficacy of a recombinant subunit vaccine based on the RVFV Gn and Gc glycoproteins. In a previous study, the vaccine elicited strong virus neutralizing antibody responses in sheep and was DIVA (differentiating naturally infected from vaccinated animals) compatible. In the current efficacy study, a group of sheep (n = 5) was vaccinated subcutaneously with the glycoprotein-based subunit vaccine candidate and then subjected to heterologous challenge with the virulent Kenya-128B-15 RVFV strain. The vaccine elicited high virus neutralizing antibody titers and conferred complete protection in all vaccinated sheep, as evidenced by prevention of viremia, fever and absence of RVFV-associated histopathological lesions. We conclude that the subunit vaccine platform represents a promising strategy for the prevention and control of RVFV infections in susceptible hosts.

  15. A Recombinant Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Subunit Vaccine Confers Full Protection against Rift Valley Fever Challenge in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Faburay, Bonto; Wilson, William C.; Gaudreault, Natasha N.; Davis, A. Sally; Shivanna, Vinay; Bawa, Bhupinder; Sunwoo, Sun Young; Ma, Wenjun; Drolet, Barbara S.; Morozov, Igor; McVey, D. Scott; Richt, Juergen A.

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen causing disease outbreaks in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The virus has great potential for transboundary spread due to the presence of competent vectors in non-endemic areas. There is currently no fully licensed vaccine suitable for use in livestock or humans outside endemic areas. Here we report the evaluation of the efficacy of a recombinant subunit vaccine based on the RVFV Gn and Gc glycoproteins. In a previous study, the vaccine elicited strong virus neutralizing antibody responses in sheep and was DIVA (differentiating naturally infected from vaccinated animals) compatible. In the current efficacy study, a group of sheep (n = 5) was vaccinated subcutaneously with the glycoprotein-based subunit vaccine candidate and then subjected to heterologous challenge with the virulent Kenya-128B-15 RVFV strain. The vaccine elicited high virus neutralizing antibody titers and conferred complete protection in all vaccinated sheep, as evidenced by prevention of viremia, fever and absence of RVFV-associated histopathological lesions. We conclude that the subunit vaccine platform represents a promising strategy for the prevention and control of RVFV infections in susceptible hosts. PMID:27296136

  16. Concentration of Rift Valley Fever and Chikungunya Viruses by Precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Frederick; Mahlandt, Bill G.; Cockey, Ralph R.; Lincoln, Ralph E.

    1970-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods for concentrating Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus and chikungunya (CHIK) virus are described. Ammonium sulfate, potassium sulfate, or alcohol was used as a precipitating agent and the precipitate was resuspended to volumes suitable for further processing and purification. The methods permitted concentration of live RVF virus and CHIK virus about 100-fold with negligible losses of virus. RVF virus retained a high level of infectivity with potassium aluminum sulfate and alcohol, but CHIK virus retained a higher infectivity level with ammonium sulfate than with potassium aluminum sulfate. The data indicate that serum plays an important role in the concentration of both viruses, at least when the sulfate methods are used. PMID:5494763

  17. Epidemiology and Epizootiological Investigations of Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses in the Central African Republic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    virus isolations we were able to show that five hazardous haemorrhagic fever viruses : Ebola, Marburg, Lassa , Congo-Crimean and Rift-Valley- Fever , were...JOHtJSON & WILLIAMS :unpublished observations 9-IVA’JOFF & al:Hemorragic fever in GABON.I.Incidence of Lassa ,Ebola and Marburg virus in Haut Ogout...AD ...... EPIDEMIOLOGY AND EPIZOOTIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF HEMORRHAGIC FEVER VIRUSES IN THE CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC Final Report 000 N 0A. J

  18. Differentiation of a Human Monocytic Cell Line Associated with Increased Production of Rift Valley Fever Virus by Infected Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    Production of Rift Valley Fever Virus by Infected Cells Richard M. Lewis, Thomas M. Cosgriff, Clarence J. Peters, and John C. Morrill Division of Medicine and...Prior studies have shown that RVF virus productively infects peritoneal macrophages from susceptible rat strains. The U937 human monocytic cell line...was used to determine the effect of monocytic cell differentiation on the degree of viral production by cell cultures infected with RVF virus

  19. Curcumin inhibits Rift Valley fever virus replication in human cells.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Senina, Svetlana; Lundberg, Lindsay; Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Das, Ravi; Baer, Alan; Bethel, Laura; Turell, Michael; Hartman, Amy Lynn; Das, Bhaskar; Bailey, Charles; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2012-09-28

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus that is classified as a select agent, an emerging infectious virus, and an agricultural pathogen. Understanding RVFV-host interactions is imperative to the design of novel therapeutics. Here, we report that an infection by the MP-12 strain of RVFV induces phosphorylation of the p65 component of the NFκB cascade. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of p65 (serine 536) involves phosphorylation of IκBα and occurs through the classical NFκB cascade. A unique, low molecular weight complex of the IKK-β subunit can be observed in MP-12-infected cells, which we have labeled IKK-β2. The IKK-β2 complex retains kinase activity and phosphorylates an IκBα substrate. Inhibition of the IKK complex using inhibitors impairs viral replication, thus alluding to the requirement of an active IKK complex to the viral life cycle. Curcumin strongly down-regulates levels of extracellular infectious virus. Our data demonstrated that curcumin binds to and inhibits kinase activity of the IKK-β2 complex in infected cells. Curcumin partially exerts its inhibitory influence on RVFV replication by interfering with IKK-β2-mediated phosphorylation of the viral protein NSs and by altering the cell cycle of treated cells. Curcumin also demonstrated efficacy against ZH501, the fully virulent version of RVFV. Curcumin treatment down-regulated viral replication in the liver of infected animals. Our data point to the possibility that RVFV infection may result in the generation of novel versions of host components (such as IKK-β2) that, by virtue of altered protein interaction and function, qualify as unique therapeutic targets.

  20. Curcumin Inhibits Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Senina, Svetlana; Lundberg, Lindsay; Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Das, Ravi; Baer, Alan; Bethel, Laura; Turell, Michael; Hartman, Amy Lynn; Das, Bhaskar; Bailey, Charles; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an arbovirus that is classified as a select agent, an emerging infectious virus, and an agricultural pathogen. Understanding RVFV-host interactions is imperative to the design of novel therapeutics. Here, we report that an infection by the MP-12 strain of RVFV induces phosphorylation of the p65 component of the NFκB cascade. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of p65 (serine 536) involves phosphorylation of IκBα and occurs through the classical NFκB cascade. A unique, low molecular weight complex of the IKK-β subunit can be observed in MP-12-infected cells, which we have labeled IKK-β2. The IKK-β2 complex retains kinase activity and phosphorylates an IκBα substrate. Inhibition of the IKK complex using inhibitors impairs viral replication, thus alluding to the requirement of an active IKK complex to the viral life cycle. Curcumin strongly down-regulates levels of extracellular infectious virus. Our data demonstrated that curcumin binds to and inhibits kinase activity of the IKK-β2 complex in infected cells. Curcumin partially exerts its inhibitory influence on RVFV replication by interfering with IKK-β2-mediated phosphorylation of the viral protein NSs and by altering the cell cycle of treated cells. Curcumin also demonstrated efficacy against ZH501, the fully virulent version of RVFV. Curcumin treatment down-regulated viral replication in the liver of infected animals. Our data point to the possibility that RVFV infection may result in the generation of novel versions of host components (such as IKK-β2) that, by virtue of altered protein interaction and function, qualify as unique therapeutic targets. PMID:22847000

  1. A DNA Vaccine against Yellow Fever Virus: Development and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Milton; Cruz, Fábia da Silva Pereira; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; da Motta, Márcia Archer; Cassemiro, Klécia Marília Soares de Melo; Maia, Rita de Cássia Carvalho; de Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz; Galler, Ricardo; Freire, Marcos da Silva; August, Joseph Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T. A.; Dhalia, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Attenuated yellow fever (YF) virus 17D/17DD vaccines are the only available protection from YF infection, which remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the tropical areas of the world. The attenuated YF virus vaccine, which is used worldwide, generates both long-lasting neutralizing antibodies and strong T-cell responses. However, on rare occasions, this vaccine has toxic side effects that can be fatal. This study presents the design of two non-viral DNA-based antigen formulations and the characterization of their expression and immunological properties. The two antigen formulations consist of DNA encoding the full-length envelope protein (p/YFE) or the full-length envelope protein fused to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein signal, LAMP-1 (pL/YFE), aimed at diverting antigen processing/presentation through the major histocompatibility complex II precursor compartments. The immune responses triggered by these formulations were evaluated in H2b and H2d backgrounds, corresponding to the C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice strains, respectively. Both DNA constructs were able to induce very strong T-cell responses of similar magnitude against almost all epitopes that are also generated by the YF 17DD vaccine. The pL/YFE formulation performed best overall. In addition to the T-cell response, it was also able to stimulate high titers of anti-YF neutralizing antibodies comparable to the levels elicited by the 17DD vaccine. More importantly, the pL/YFE vaccine conferred 100% protection against the YF virus in intracerebrally challenged mice. These results indicate that pL/YFE DNA is an excellent vaccine candidate and should be considered for further developmental studies. PMID:25875109

  2. A DNA vaccine against yellow fever virus: development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Milton; Cruz, Fábia da Silva Pereira; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; da Motta, Márcia Archer; Cassemiro, Klécia Marília Soares de Melo; Maia, Rita de Cássia Carvalho; de Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz; Galler, Ricardo; Freire, Marcos da Silva; August, Joseph Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T A; Dhalia, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    Attenuated yellow fever (YF) virus 17D/17DD vaccines are the only available protection from YF infection, which remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the tropical areas of the world. The attenuated YF virus vaccine, which is used worldwide, generates both long-lasting neutralizing antibodies and strong T-cell responses. However, on rare occasions, this vaccine has toxic side effects that can be fatal. This study presents the design of two non-viral DNA-based antigen formulations and the characterization of their expression and immunological properties. The two antigen formulations consist of DNA encoding the full-length envelope protein (p/YFE) or the full-length envelope protein fused to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein signal, LAMP-1 (pL/YFE), aimed at diverting antigen processing/presentation through the major histocompatibility complex II precursor compartments. The immune responses triggered by these formulations were evaluated in H2b and H2d backgrounds, corresponding to the C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice strains, respectively. Both DNA constructs were able to induce very strong T-cell responses of similar magnitude against almost all epitopes that are also generated by the YF 17DD vaccine. The pL/YFE formulation performed best overall. In addition to the T-cell response, it was also able to stimulate high titers of anti-YF neutralizing antibodies comparable to the levels elicited by the 17DD vaccine. More importantly, the pL/YFE vaccine conferred 100% protection against the YF virus in intracerebrally challenged mice. These results indicate that pL/YFE DNA is an excellent vaccine candidate and should be considered for further developmental studies.

  3. French Aedes albopictus are able to transmit yellow fever virus

    PubMed Central

    Amraoui, Fadila; Vazeille, Marie; Failloux, Anna Bella

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the ability of a French population of Aedes albopictus to transmit yellow fever virus (YFV). Batches of 30 to 40 female mosquitoes were analysed at 7, 14 and 21 days post-exposure (dpe). Bodies, heads and saliva were screened for YFV. Infectious viral particles were detected in bodies and heads at 7, 14 and 21 dpe whereas the virus was found in saliva only from 14 dpe. Our results showed that Ae. albopictus can potentially transmit YFV. PMID:27719755

  4. Attenuation of classical swine fever virus by deletion of the viral N(pro) gene.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Daniel; Hofmann, Martin A; Tratschin, Jon Duri

    2004-01-02

    We have reported earlier that replacement of the N(pro) gene of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) by the murine ubiquitin gene only slightly affects the characteristics of virus replication in the porcine kidney cell line SK-6 [J. Virol. 72 (1998) 7681]. Here, for the moderately virulent CSFV strain Alfort/187 as well as for the highly virulent strain Eystrup we show that the respective N(pro)-deleted viruses are attenuated. Vaccination of pigs with either of the two deletion mutants resulted in the induction of a strong antibody response. Animals were protected against challenge with a lethal dose of highly virulent CSFV indicating that N(pro) deletion mutants are excellent candidates for a modified live virus vaccine. A chimeric virus obtained by replacement of the N(pro) gene in the Eystrup virus by the corresponding sequence of the avirulent CSFV vaccine strain Riems resulted in a virus that was highly virulent. This indicates that the virulence of CSFV correlates with the presence of N(pro) and also suggests that N(pro) is not responsible for the varying virulence observed between individual strains of CSFV.

  5. Molecular and serological findings in suspected patients with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in Iran.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Helen; Sharifi-Mood, Batool; Mousavi-Jazi, Mehrdad; Dilcher, Meik; Lindegren, Gunnel; Mardani, Masoud; Bereskly, Sandor; Weidmann, Manfred; Mirazimi, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an arthropod-borne disease of humans associated with a severe clinical picture, including hemorrhagic syndrome and a high mortality rate. CCHF virus is widely distributed throughout large areas of the world. To characterize the serological status in CCHF patients, paired clinical samples were collected from suspected CCHF patients and analyzed by microbiological and other laboratory analyses with the aim of: determining the presence of neutralizing antibodies against CCHF virus; investigating the cross-reactivity of these neutralizing antibodies against virus isolated from the same outbreak and against other available laboratory strain; and studying the relationship between the isolated virus with other virus by whole genome sequencing. Patients at Boo-Ali Hospital, Zahedan, Iran, with clinical symptoms ranging from mild to severe hemorrhagic fever were included in the study. Two serum samples were taken from each patient, the first as soon as the patient matched the criteria for CCHF notification and the second when the patient was discharged from hospital (2 weeks later). Commercial and in-house assays revealed a positive IgM signal in acute serum samples from six patients. A novel finding was that CCHF patients develop neutralizing antibodies soon after infection. Interestingly these antibodies were able to neutralize other CCHF virus strains too. The complete sequence of the Zahedan 2007 isolate, including the hitherto unknown first L-segment sequence, was identified using an original clinical sample from one patient with confirmed CCHF infection.

  6. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Category A Infectious Pathogens: Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever and Variola Virus.

    PubMed

    Das, Sanchita; Rundell, Mark S; Mirza, Aashiq H; Pingle, Maneesh R; Shigyo, Kristi; Garrison, Aura R; Paragas, Jason; Smith, Scott K; Olson, Victoria A; Larone, Davise H; Spitzer, Eric D; Barany, Francis; Golightly, Linnie M

    2015-01-01

    CDC designated category A infectious agents pose a major risk to national security and require special action for public health preparedness. They include viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) syndrome as well as variola virus, the agent of smallpox. VHF is characterized by hemorrhage and fever with multi-organ failure leading to high morbidity and mortality. Smallpox, a prior scourge, has been eradicated for decades, making it a particularly serious threat if released nefariously in the essentially non-immune world population. Early detection of the causative agents, and the ability to distinguish them from other pathogens, is essential to contain outbreaks, implement proper control measures, and prevent morbidity and mortality. We have developed a multiplex detection assay that uses several species-specific PCR primers to generate amplicons from multiple pathogens; these are then targeted in a ligase detection reaction (LDR). The resultant fluorescently-labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array enabling simultaneous identification of the pathogens. The assay was evaluated on 32 different isolates associated with VHF (ebolavirus, marburgvirus, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Dengue virus, and Yellow fever virus) as well as variola virus and vaccinia virus (the agent of smallpox and its vaccine strain, respectively). The assay was able to detect all viruses tested, including 8 sequences representative of different variola virus strains from the CDC repository. It does not cross react with other emerging zoonoses such as monkeypox virus or cowpox virus, or six flaviviruses tested (St. Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Powassan virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus).

  7. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Category A Infectious Pathogens: Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever and Variola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sanchita; Rundell, Mark S.; Mirza, Aashiq H.; Pingle, Maneesh R.; Shigyo, Kristi; Garrison, Aura R.; Paragas, Jason; Smith, Scott K.; Olson, Victoria A.; Larone, Davise H.; Spitzer, Eric D.; Barany, Francis; Golightly, Linnie M.

    2015-01-01

    CDC designated category A infectious agents pose a major risk to national security and require special action for public health preparedness. They include viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) syndrome as well as variola virus, the agent of smallpox. VHF is characterized by hemorrhage and fever with multi-organ failure leading to high morbidity and mortality. Smallpox, a prior scourge, has been eradicated for decades, making it a particularly serious threat if released nefariously in the essentially non-immune world population. Early detection of the causative agents, and the ability to distinguish them from other pathogens, is essential to contain outbreaks, implement proper control measures, and prevent morbidity and mortality. We have developed a multiplex detection assay that uses several species-specific PCR primers to generate amplicons from multiple pathogens; these are then targeted in a ligase detection reaction (LDR). The resultant fluorescently-labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array enabling simultaneous identification of the pathogens. The assay was evaluated on 32 different isolates associated with VHF (ebolavirus, marburgvirus, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Dengue virus, and Yellow fever virus) as well as variola virus and vaccinia virus (the agent of smallpox and its vaccine strain, respectively). The assay was able to detect all viruses tested, including 8 sequences representative of different variola virus strains from the CDC repository. It does not cross react with other emerging zoonoses such as monkeypox virus or cowpox virus, or six flaviviruses tested (St. Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Powassan virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus). PMID:26381398

  8. Genetic variability of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus in Russia and Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Yashina, Lyudmila; Petrova, Irina; Seregin, Sergei; Vyshemirskii, Oleg; Lvov, Dmitrii; Aristova, Valeriya; Kuhn, Jens; Morzunov, Sergey; Gutorov, Valery; Kuzina, Irina; Tyunnikov, Georgii; Netesov, Sergei; Petrov, Vladimir

    2003-05-01

    Hyalomma marginatum ticks (449 pools, 4787 ticks in total) collected in European Russia and Dermacentor niveus ticks (100 pools, 1100 ticks in total) collected in Kazakhstan were screened by ELISA for the presence of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV). Virus antigen was found in 10.2 and 3.0 % of the pools, respectively. RT-PCR was used to recover partial sequences of the CCHFV small (S) genome segment from seven pools of antigen-positive H. marginatum ticks, one pool of D. niveus ticks, four CCFH cases and four laboratory virus strains. Additionally, the entire S genome segments of the CCHFV strains STV/HU29223 (isolated from a patient in European Russia) and TI10145 (isolated from H. asiaticum in Uzbekistan) were amplified, cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis placed all CCHFV sequences from Russia in a single, well-supported clade (nucleotide sequence diversity up to 3.2 %). Virus sequences from H. marginatum were closely related or identical to those recovered from patients in the same regions of southern Russia. Newly described CCHFV strains from Central Asian countries fell into two genetic lineages. The first lineage was novel and included closely related virus sequences from Kazakhstan and Tajikistan (nucleotide sequence diversity up to 3.2 %). In contrast, a newly described CCHFV strain from Uzbekistan, strain TI10145, clustered on the phylogenetic trees with strains from China.

  9. Observations on rift valley fever virus and vaccines in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV, genus: Phlebovirus, family: Bunyaviridae), is an arbovirus which causes significant morbidity and mortality in animals and humans. RVFV was introduced for the first time in Egypt in 1977. In endemic areas, the insect vector control and vaccination is considering appropriate measures if applied properly and the used vaccine is completely safe and the vaccination programs cover all the susceptible animals. Egypt is importing livestock and camels from the African Horn & the Sudan for human consumption. The imported livestock and camels were usually not vaccinated against RVFV. But in rare occasions, the imported livestock were vaccinated but with unknown date of vaccination and the unvaccinated control contacts were unavailable for laboratory investigations. Also, large number of the imported livestock and camels are often escaped slaughtering for breeding which led to the spread of new strains of FMD and the introduction of RVFV from the enzootic African countries. This article provide general picture about the present situation of RVFV in Egypt to help in controlling this important disease. PMID:22152149

  10. Host cell targets for African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Galindo, Inmaculada; Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel Ángel; Barrado-Gil, Lucía; Alonso, Covadonga

    2015-11-02

    Viruses are strict intracellular pathogens that require the cellular environment to complete a successful infection. Among them, African swine fever virus (ASFV) is an evolutionary ancient DNA virus, endemic in Africa, which is nowadays causing an emergent disease in Europe with a potential high economic impact in the pig industry. It is well known that host-cell components are critical crossroads mapping the virus path for a productive infection, some of them at the endocytic pathway. Considering that ASFV infectious cycle strongly relies in several factors from the host cell, the study of virus-host interactions remains crucial as they will reveal the obstacles, routes and tracks, hints and the target waypoint in the virus journey to destination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of classical swine fever virus isolates from Peru.

    PubMed

    Araínga, M; Hisanaga, T; Hills, K; Handel, K; Rivera, H; Pasick, J

    2010-08-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is considered to be endemic in Peru with outbreaks reported to the World Organization for Animal Health as recently as 2008 and 2009. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the genetic subgroup(s) of CSF virus that are circulating in Peru or their relationship to recent CSF viruses that have been isolated from neighbouring South American countries or other parts of the world. In this study, we molecularly characterize CSF viruses that were isolated from domestic pigs from different regions of Peru from the middle of 2007 to early 2008. All virus isolates were found to belong to genetic subgroup 1.1, consistent with the subgroup of viruses that have been identified from other South American countries. Although the Peruvian isolates are most closely related to viruses from Colombia and Brazil, they form a monophyletic clade, which suggests they have a distinct evolutionary history.

  12. Advanced yellow fever virus genome detection in point-of-care facilities and reference laboratories.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Cristina; Patel, Pranav; Yillah, Jasmin; Weidmann, Manfred; Méndez, Jairo A; Nakouné, Emmanuel Rivalyn; Niedrig, Matthias

    2012-12-01

    Reported methods for the detection of the yellow fever viral genome are beset by limitations in sensitivity, specificity, strain detection spectra, and suitability to laboratories with simple infrastructure in areas of endemicity. We describe the development of two different approaches affording sensitive and specific detection of the yellow fever genome: a real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and an isothermal protocol employing the same primer-probe set but based on helicase-dependent amplification technology (RT-tHDA). Both assays were evaluated using yellow fever cell culture supernatants as well as spiked and clinical samples. We demonstrate reliable detection by both assays of different strains of yellow fever virus with improved sensitivity and specificity. The RT-qPCR assay is a powerful tool for reference or diagnostic laboratories with real-time PCR capability, while the isothermal RT-tHDA assay represents a useful alternative to earlier amplification techniques for the molecular diagnosis of yellow fever by field or point-of-care laboratories.

  13. Advanced Yellow Fever Virus Genome Detection in Point-of-Care Facilities and Reference Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pranav; Yillah, Jasmin; Weidmann, Manfred; Méndez, Jairo A.; Nakouné, Emmanuel Rivalyn; Niedrig, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Reported methods for the detection of the yellow fever viral genome are beset by limitations in sensitivity, specificity, strain detection spectra, and suitability to laboratories with simple infrastructure in areas of endemicity. We describe the development of two different approaches affording sensitive and specific detection of the yellow fever genome: a real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and an isothermal protocol employing the same primer-probe set but based on helicase-dependent amplification technology (RT-tHDA). Both assays were evaluated using yellow fever cell culture supernatants as well as spiked and clinical samples. We demonstrate reliable detection by both assays of different strains of yellow fever virus with improved sensitivity and specificity. The RT-qPCR assay is a powerful tool for reference or diagnostic laboratories with real-time PCR capability, while the isothermal RT-tHDA assay represents a useful alternative to earlier amplification techniques for the molecular diagnosis of yellow fever by field or point-of-care laboratories. PMID:23052311

  14. [The Alkhurma virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus): an emerging pathogen responsible for hemorrhage fever in the Middle East].

    PubMed

    Charrel, R N; de Lamballerie, X

    2003-01-01

    To date tick-borne flaviviruses causing hemorrhagic fevers in humans have been isolated in Siberia (Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus), India (Kyasanur Forest disease virus), and Saudi Arabia (Akhurma virus). Because of their potential use as biological weapons for bioterrorism, these 3 viruses require level 4 biosafety handling facilities and have been listed as hypervirulent pathogens by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Alkhurma virus was isolated in 1995 from patients with hemorrhagic fever in Saudi Arabia. Current evidence suggests that transmission to humans can occur either transcutaneously either by contamination of a skin wound with the blood of an infected vertebrate or bites of an infected tick or orally by drinking unpasteurized contaminated milk. To date a total of 24 symptomatic human cases have been recorded with a mortality rate at 25% (6/24). Pauci-symptomatic or asymptomatic cases are likely but epidemiologic data are currently unavailable. The complete coding sequence of the prototype strain of Alkhurma virus was determined and published in 2001 based on international research project involving investigators from France, Great Britain, and Saudi Arabia. Phylogenetic studies demonstrate that closest known relative of Alkhurma virus is Kyasanur Forest disease virus and that both viruses share a common ancestor. Genetic analysis of several human strains sequentially isolated over a 5-year period showed a very low diversity. This finding has important potential implications for diagnosis and vaccination.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies specific for African swine fever virus proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, A; García-Barreno, B; Nogal, M L; Viñuela, E; Enjuanes, L

    1985-01-01

    We have obtained 60 stable hybridomas which produced immunoglobulins that recognized 12 proteins from African swine fever virus particles and African swine fever virus-infected cells. Most of the monoclonal antibodies were specific for the three major structural proteins p150, p72, and p12. The specificity of some monoclonal antibodies for the structural proteins p150 and p37 and the nonstructural proteins p220 and p60 indicated that proteins p150 and p220 are antigenically related to proteins p37 and p60. The association of some viral antigens to specific subcellular components was determined by immunofluorescence and analysis of the binding of monoclonal antibodies to infected cells. A host protein (p24) seemed to be associated with the virus particles. Images PMID:3882998

  16. Stampidine prevents mortality in an experimental mouse model of viral hemorrhagic fever caused by lassa virus

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M; Petkevich, Alexander S; Vassilev, Alexei O; Tibbles, Heather E; Titov, Leonid

    2004-01-01

    Background The potential use of microorganisms as agents of biological warfare (BW) is a growing concern. Lassa virus, a member of the Arenavirus class of Hemorrhagic fever (HF) viruses has emerged as a worldwide concern among public health officials. The purpose of the present study was to further elucidate the antiviral activity spectrum of stampidine, a novel nucleoside analog with potent anti-viral activity against the immunodeficiency viruses HIV-1, HIV-2, and FIV, by examining its effects on survival of mice challenged with Lassa virus. Methods We examined the therapeutic effect of Stampidine in CBA mice inoculated with intracerebral injections of the Josiah strain of Lassa virus. Mice were treated either with vehicle or nontoxic doses of stampidine administered intraperitoneally 24 hours prior to, 1 hour prior to, and 24 hours, 48 hours, 72 hours, and 96 hours after virus inoculation. Results The probability of survival following the Lassa challenge was significantly improved for stampidine treated mice (Kaplan Meier, Chi-squared = 11.7, df = 2, Log-Rank p-value = 0.003). Conclusion Therefore, stampidine shows clinical potential as a new agent for treatment of viral hemorrhagic fevers caused by Lassa virus. PMID:14720304

  17. Rapid detection and quantification of RNA of Ebola and Marburg viruses, Lassa virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, dengue virus, and yellow fever virus by real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Drosten, Christian; Göttig, Stephan; Schilling, Stefan; Asper, Marcel; Panning, Marcus; Schmitz, Herbert; Günther, Stephan

    2002-07-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) are acute infections with high case fatality rates. Important VHF agents are Ebola and Marburg viruses (MBGV/EBOV), Lassa virus (LASV), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), dengue virus (DENV), and yellow fever virus (YFV). VHFs are clinically difficult to diagnose and to distinguish; a rapid and reliable laboratory diagnosis is required in suspected cases. We have established six one-step, real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays for these pathogens based on the Superscript reverse transcriptase-Platinum Taq polymerase enzyme mixture. Novel primers and/or 5'-nuclease detection probes were designed for RVFV, DENV, YFV, and CCHFV by using the latest DNA database entries. PCR products were detected in real time on a LightCycler instrument by using 5'-nuclease technology (RVFV, DENV, and YFV) or SybrGreen dye intercalation (MBGV/EBOV, LASV, and CCHFV). The inhibitory effect of SybrGreen on reverse transcription was overcome by initial immobilization of the dye in the reaction capillaries. Universal cycling conditions for SybrGreen and 5'-nuclease probe detection were established. Thus, up to three assays could be performed in parallel, facilitating rapid testing for several pathogens. All assays were thoroughly optimized and validated in terms of analytical sensitivity by using in vitro-transcribed RNA. The >or=95% detection limits as determined by probit regression analysis ranged from 1,545 to 2,835 viral genome equivalents/ml of serum (8.6 to 16 RNA copies per assay). The suitability of the assays was exemplified by detection and quantification of viral RNA in serum samples of VHF patients.

  18. Isolation, characterization, and phylogenic analysis of three new severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome bunyavirus strains derived from Hubei Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfang; Shen, Shu; Shi, Junming; Su, Zhengyuan; Li, Mingyue; Zhang, Wenjing; Li, Mengmeng; Hu, Zhihong; Peng, Cheng; Zheng, Xin; Deng, Fei

    2017-02-01

    Hubei Province is a major epidemic area of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome bunyavirus (SFTSV) in China. However, to date, a few SFTSV strains have been isolated from Hubei Province, preventing effective studies of epidemic outbreaks. Here, we report three confirmed patients (2015-2016) with typical symptoms of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome disease (SFTS) who were farmers resident in different regions in Hubei Province. Three new SFTSV strains were isolated from the serum samples of each patient. Characterization of viral growth properties showed that there were no significant differences in virus production. All strains were completely sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis showed that unlike the other strains from Hubei province, which belonged to the SFTSV C3 genotype, one of the three strains belonged to the SFTSV C2 genotype. These results suggested that multiple SFTSV genotypes have been circulating in Hubei Province, providing insights into SFTSV evolution and improving our understanding of SFTSV prevalence in Hubei Province.

  19. Association of the host immune response with protection using a live attenuated African swine fever virus model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a lethal disease of swine. Infection with attenuated strains protect against challenge but there is limited knowledge of the immune mechanisms generating that protection. ASFV Pret4 produces a fatal disease, while its derivative, lacking virulence-associated g...

  20. Complete Coding Sequences of Six Toscana Virus Strains Isolated from Human Patients in France

    PubMed Central

    Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Piorkowski, Geraldine; Coutard, Bruno; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; De Lamballerie, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV) is an arthropod-borne phlebovirus belonging to the Sandfly fever Naples virus species (genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae). Here, we report the complete coding sequences of six TOSV strains isolated from human patients having acquired the infection in southeastern France during a 12-year period. PMID:27231377

  1. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michael B; Freiberg, Alexander N; Holbrook, Michael R; Watowich, Stanley J

    2009-04-25

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Bunyaviridae; Phlebovirus) is an emerging human and veterinary pathogen causing acute hepatitis in ruminants and has the potential to cause hemorrhagic fever in humans. We report a three-dimensional reconstruction of RVFV vaccine strain MP-12 (RVFV MP-12) by cryo-electron microcopy using icosahedral symmetry of individual virions. Although the genomic core of RVFV MP-12 is apparently poorly ordered, the glycoproteins on the virus surface are highly symmetric and arranged on a T=12 icosahedral lattice. Our RVFV MP-12 structure allowed clear identification of inter-capsomer contacts and definition of possible glycoprotein arrangements within capsomers. This structure provides a detailed model for phleboviruses, opens new avenues for high-resolution structural studies of the bunyavirus family, and aids the design of antiviral diagnostics and effective subunit vaccines.

  2. Yellow Fever Virus in Haemagogus leucocelaenus and Aedes serratus Mosquitoes, Southern Brazil, 2008

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Jáder da C.; de Almeida, Marco A.B.; dos Santos, Edmilson; da Fonseca, Daltro F.; Sallum, Maria A.M.; Noll, Carlos A.; Monteiro, Hamilton A. de O.; Cruz, Ana C.R.; Carvalho, Valéria L.; Pinto, Eliana V.; Castro, Francisco C.; Neto, Joaquim P. Nunes; Segura, Maria N.O.

    2010-01-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) was isolated from Haemagogus leucocelaenus mosquitoes during an epizootic in 2001 in the Rio Grande do Sul State in southern Brazil. In October 2008, a yellow fever outbreak was reported there, with nonhuman primate deaths and human cases. This latter outbreak led to intensification of surveillance measures for early detection of YFV and support for vaccination programs. We report entomologic surveillance in 2 municipalities that recorded nonhuman primate deaths. Mosquitoes were collected at ground level, identified, and processed for virus isolation and molecular analyses. Eight YFV strains were isolated (7 from pools of Hg. leucocelaenus mosquitoes and another from Aedes serratus mosquitoes); 6 were sequenced, and they grouped in the YFV South American genotype I. The results confirmed the role of Hg. leucocelaenus mosquitoes as the main YFV vector in southern Brazil and suggest that Ae. serratus mosquitoes may have a potential role as a secondary vector. PMID:21122222

  3. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of Rift Valley fever virus

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Michael B.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Holbrook, Michael R.; Watowich, Stanley J.

    2009-04-25

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Bunyaviridae; Phlebovirus) is an emerging human and veterinary pathogen causing acute hepatitis in ruminants and has the potential to cause hemorrhagic fever in humans. We report a three-dimensional reconstruction of RVFV vaccine strain MP-12 (RVFV MP-12) by cryo-electron microcopy using icosahedral symmetry of individual virions. Although the genomic core of RVFV MP-12 is apparently poorly ordered, the glycoproteins on the virus surface are highly symmetric and arranged on a T = 12 icosahedral lattice. Our RVFV MP-12 structure allowed clear identification of inter-capsomer contacts and definition of possible glycoprotein arrangements within capsomers. This structure provides a detailed model for phleboviruses, opens new avenues for high-resolution structural studies of the bunyavirus family, and aids the design of antiviral diagnostics and effective subunit vaccines.

  4. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of Rift Valley fever virus

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Michael B.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Holbrook, Michael R.; Watowich, Stanley J.

    2009-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Bunyaviridae; Phlebovirus) is an emerging human veterinary pathogen causing acute hepatitis in ruminants and has the potential to Single-particle cryo-EM reconstruction of RVFV MP-12 hemorrhagic fever in humans. We report a three-dimensional reconstruction of RVFV vaccine strain MP-12 (RVFV MP-12) by cryo-electron microcopy using icosahedral symmetry of individual virions. Although the genomic core of RVFV MP-12 is apparently poorly ordered, the glycoproteins on the virus surface are highly symmetric and arranged on a T=12 icosahedral lattice. Our RVFV MP-12 structure allowed clear identification of inter-capsomer contacts and definition of possible glycoprotein arrangements within capsomers. This structure provides a detailed model for phleboviruses, opens new avenues for high-resolution structural studies of the bunyavirus family, and aids the design of antiviral diagnostics and effective subunit-vaccines. PMID:19304307

  5. Molecular characterization of classical swine fever virus isolates from India during 2012-14.

    PubMed

    Khatoon, Elina; Barman, Nagendra N; Deka, Manab; Rajbongshi, Gitika; Baruah, Kongkon; Deka, Nipu; Bora, Durlav P; Kumar, Sachin

    2017-06-01

    Classical swine fever is a highly contagious and economically important viral disease of pigs. Outbreaks of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) were recorded in different places in the Kamrup district of Assam in India between the years 2012 and 2014. The nucleotide sequences of the 10 CSFV isolates were analyzed based on the partial nucleotide sequences of the E2, 5'NTR and NS5B genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated the dominance of subgroup 2.2 along with 2.1 strains in the northeast part of India. Variation in the nucleotide sequences of E2, 5'NTR and 3'NS5B genes of CSFV allows tracking changes in the virus population over time. The study will provide epidemiological information useful for assessing CSFV circulating genogroups in India. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The complete genome sequence of a Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus isolated from an endemic region in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Duh, Darja; Nichol, Stuart T; Khristova, Marina L; Saksida, Ana; Hafner-Bratkovič, Iva; Petrovec, Miroslav; Dedushaj, Iusuf; Ahmeti, Salih; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    The Balkan region and Kosovo in particular, is a well-known Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) endemic region, with frequent epidemic outbreaks and sporadic cases occurring with a hospitalized case fatality of approximately 30%. Recent analysis of complete genome sequences of diverse CCHF virus strains showed that the genome plasticity of the virus is surprisingly high for an arthropod-borne virus. High levels of nucleotide and amino acid differences, frequent RNA segment reassortment and even RNA recombination have been recently described. This diversity illustrates the need to determine the complete genome sequence of CCHF virus representatives of all geographically distinct endemic areas, particularly in light of the high pathogenicity of the virus and its listing as a potential bioterrorism threat. Here we describe the first complete CCHF virus genome sequence of a virus (strain Kosova Hoti) isolated from a hemorrhagic fever case in the Balkans. This virus strain was isolated from a fatal CCHF case, and passaged only twice on Vero E6 cells prior to sequence analysis. The virus total genome was found to be 19.2 kb in length, consisting of a 1672 nucleotide (nt) S segment, a 5364 nt M segment and a 12150 nt L segment. Phylogenetic analysis of CCHF virus complete genomes placed the Kosova Hoti strain in the Europe/Turkey group, with highest similarity seen with Russian isolates. The virus M segments are the most diverse with up to 31 and 27% differences seen at the nt and amino acid levels, and even 1.9% amino acid difference found between the Kosova Hoti and another strain from Kosovo (9553-01). This suggests that distinct virus strains can coexist in highly endemic areas. PMID:18197964

  7. Potential for Autoimmune Pathogenesis of Rift Valley Fever Virus Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Gerhardt, Shoshana; Muiruri, Samuel; Muchiri, Eric; Peters, Clarence J.; Morrill, John; Lucas, Alexander H.; King, Charles H.; Kazura, James; LaBeaud, Angelle Desiree

    2013-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a significant threat to human health because it can progress to retinitis, encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fever. The timing of onset of Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) retinitis suggests an autoimmune origin. To determine whether RVFV retinitis is associated with increased levels of IgG against retinal tissue, we measured and compared levels of IgG against healthy human eye tissue by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that serum samples from RVFV-exposed Kenyans with retinitis (n = 8) were slightly more likely to have antibodies against retinal tissue than control populations, but the correlation was not statistically significant. Further investigation into the possible immune pathogenesis of RVFV retinitis could lead to improved therapies to prevent or treat this severe complication. PMID:23918215

  8. Potential for autoimmune pathogenesis of Rift Valley Fever virus retinitis.

    PubMed

    Newman-Gerhardt, Shoshana; Muiruri, Samuel; Muchiri, Eric; Peters, Clarence J; Morrill, John; Lucas, Alexander H; King, Charles H; Kazura, James; LaBeaud, Angelle Desiree

    2013-09-01

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a significant threat to human health because it can progress to retinitis, encephalitis, and hemorrhagic fever. The timing of onset of Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) retinitis suggests an autoimmune origin. To determine whether RVFV retinitis is associated with increased levels of IgG against retinal tissue, we measured and compared levels of IgG against healthy human eye tissue by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that serum samples from RVFV-exposed Kenyans with retinitis (n = 8) were slightly more likely to have antibodies against retinal tissue than control populations, but the correlation was not statistically significant. Further investigation into the possible immune pathogenesis of RVFV retinitis could lead to improved therapies to prevent or treat this severe complication.

  9. High Fidelity of Yellow Fever Virus RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Pugachev, Konstantin V.; Guirakhoo, Farshad; Ocran, Simeon W.; Mitchell, Fred; Parsons, Megan; Penal, Caroline; Girakhoo, Soheila; Pougatcheva, Svetlana O.; Arroyo, Juan; Trent, Dennis W.; Monath, Thomas P.

    2004-01-01

    Three consecutive plaque purifications of four chimeric yellow fever virus-dengue virus (ChimeriVax-DEN) vaccine candidates against dengue virus types 1 to 4 were performed. The genome of each candidate was sequenced by the consensus approach after plaque purification and additional passages in cell culture. Our data suggest that the nucleotide sequence error rate for SP6 RNA polymerase used in the in vitro transcription step to initiate virus replication was as high as 1.34 × 10−4 per copied nucleotide and that the error rate of the yellow fever virus RNA polymerase employed by the chimeras for genome replication in infected cells was as low as 1.9 × 10−7 to 2.3 × 10−7. Clustering of beneficial mutations that accumulated after multiple virus passages suggests that the N-terminal part of the prM protein, a specific site in the middle of the E protein, and the NS4B protein may be essential for nucleocapsid-envelope interaction during flavivirus assembly. PMID:14694136

  10. Experimental African swine fever: apoptosis of lymphocytes and virus replication in other cells.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Hervás, J; Méndez, A; Carrasco, L; Martín de las Mulas, J; Villeda, C J; Wilkinson, P J; Sierra, M A

    1995-09-01

    In order to determine the cause of cellular death of lymphocytes in pigs with acute African swine fever and the relationships between African swine fever virus (ASFV) and interstitial cells, ten pigs were inoculated with a highly virulent strain of ASFV (Malawi '83) and samples taken for ultrastructural study of hepatic and renal interstitial tissues. We demonstrated death by apoptosis of lymphocytes and virus replication in fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells in the interstitial tissues of pigs inoculated with ASFV. From day 5 onwards, apoptotic lymphocyte and intense virus replication in hepatic interstitial macrophages and fibroblasts were observed. By day 7, apoptotic lymphocytes and virus replication in macrophages, interstitial capillary endothelial cells and fibroblasts in the kidney were observed. Virus replication was also seen in smooth muscle cells of hepatic and renal arterioles and venules. Our results suggest that mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) cell activation, and the resulting release of cytokines, could induce apoptosis of lymphocytes and virus replication in non-MPS cells.

  11. The NSm proteins of Rift Valley fever virus are dispensable for maturation, replication and infection

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Brian H.; Albariño, Cesar G.; Nichol, Stuart T.

    2007-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus belongs to the Bunyaviridae family of segmented negative-strand RNA viruses and causes mosquito-borne disease in sub-Saharan Africa. We report the development of a T7 RNA polymerase driven plasmid-based genetic system for the virulent Egyptian isolate, ZH501. We have used this system to rescue a virus that has a 387 nucleotide deletion on the genomic M segment that eliminates the coding region for two non-structural proteins known as NSm. This virus, ΔNSm rZH501, is indistinguishable from the parental ZH501 strain with respect to expression of structural proteins and growth in cultured mammalian cells. PMID:17070883

  12. Nucleotide sequence variation of the envelope protein gene identifies two distinct genotypes of yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Chang, G J; Cropp, B C; Kinney, R M; Trent, D W; Gubler, D J

    1995-09-01

    The evolution of yellow fever virus over 67 years was investigated by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the envelope (E) protein genes of 20 viruses isolated in Africa, the Caribbean, and South America. Uniformly weighted parsimony algorithm analysis defined two major evolutionary yellow fever virus lineages designated E genotypes I and II. E genotype I contained viruses isolated from East and Central Africa. E genotype II viruses were divided into two sublineages: IIA viruses from West Africa and IIB viruses from America, except for a 1979 virus isolated from Trinidad (TRINID79A). Unique signature patterns were identified at 111 nucleotide and 12 amino acid positions within the yellow fever virus E gene by signature pattern analysis. Yellow fever viruses from East and Central Africa contained unique signatures at 60 nucleotide and five amino acid positions, those from West Africa contained unique signatures at 25 nucleotide and two amino acid positions, and viruses from America contained such signatures at 30 nucleotide and five amino acid positions in the E gene. The dissemination of yellow fever viruses from Africa to the Americas is supported by the close genetic relatedness of genotype IIA and IIB viruses and genetic evidence of a possible second introduction of yellow fever virus from West Africa, as illustrated by the TRINID79A virus isolate. The E protein genes of American IIB yellow fever viruses had higher frequencies of amino acid substitutions than did genes of yellow fever viruses of genotypes I and IIA on the basis of comparisons with a consensus amino acid sequence for the yellow fever E gene. The great variation in the E proteins of American yellow fever virus probably results from positive selection imposed by virus interaction with different species of mosquitoes or nonhuman primates in the Americas.

  13. Nucleotide sequence variation of the envelope protein gene identifies two distinct genotypes of yellow fever virus.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, G J; Cropp, B C; Kinney, R M; Trent, D W; Gubler, D J

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of yellow fever virus over 67 years was investigated by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the envelope (E) protein genes of 20 viruses isolated in Africa, the Caribbean, and South America. Uniformly weighted parsimony algorithm analysis defined two major evolutionary yellow fever virus lineages designated E genotypes I and II. E genotype I contained viruses isolated from East and Central Africa. E genotype II viruses were divided into two sublineages: IIA viruses from West Africa and IIB viruses from America, except for a 1979 virus isolated from Trinidad (TRINID79A). Unique signature patterns were identified at 111 nucleotide and 12 amino acid positions within the yellow fever virus E gene by signature pattern analysis. Yellow fever viruses from East and Central Africa contained unique signatures at 60 nucleotide and five amino acid positions, those from West Africa contained unique signatures at 25 nucleotide and two amino acid positions, and viruses from America contained such signatures at 30 nucleotide and five amino acid positions in the E gene. The dissemination of yellow fever viruses from Africa to the Americas is supported by the close genetic relatedness of genotype IIA and IIB viruses and genetic evidence of a possible second introduction of yellow fever virus from West Africa, as illustrated by the TRINID79A virus isolate. The E protein genes of American IIB yellow fever viruses had higher frequencies of amino acid substitutions than did genes of yellow fever viruses of genotypes I and IIA on the basis of comparisons with a consensus amino acid sequence for the yellow fever E gene. The great variation in the E proteins of American yellow fever virus probably results from positive selection imposed by virus interaction with different species of mosquitoes or nonhuman primates in the Americas. PMID:7637022

  14. Evaluation of dengue virus strains for human challenge studies.

    PubMed

    Mammen, M P; Lyons, A; Innis, B L; Sun, W; McKinney, D; Chung, R C Y; Eckels, K H; Putnak, R; Kanesa-thasan, N; Scherer, J M; Statler, J; Asher, L V; Thomas, S J; Vaughn, D W

    2014-03-14

    Discordance between the measured levels of dengue virus neutralizing antibody and clinical outcomes in the first-ever efficacy study of a dengue tetravalent vaccine (Lancet, Nov 2012) suggests a need to re-evaluate the process of pre-screening dengue vaccine candidates to better predict clinical benefit prior to large-scale vaccine trials. In the absence of a reliable animal model and established correlates of protection for dengue, a human dengue virus challenge model may provide an approach to down-select vaccine candidates based on their ability to reduce risk of illness following dengue virus challenge. We report here the challenge of flavivirus-naïve adults with cell culture-passaged dengue viruses (DENV) in a controlled setting that resulted in uncomplicated dengue fever (DF). This sets the stage for proof-of-concept efficacy studies that allow the evaluation of dengue vaccine candidates in healthy adult volunteers using qualified DENV challenge strains well before they reach field efficacy trials involving children. Fifteen flavivirus-naïve adult volunteers received 1 of 7 DENV challenge strains (n=12) or placebo (n=3). Of the twelve volunteers who received challenge strains, five (two DENV-1 45AZ5 and three DENV-3 CH53489 cl24/28 recipients) developed DF, prospectively defined as ≥2 typical symptoms, ≥48h of sustained fever (>100.4°F) and concurrent viremia. Based on our study and historical data, we conclude that the DENV-1 and DENV-3 strains can be advanced as human challenge strains. Both of the DENV-2 strains and one DENV-4 strain failed to meet the protocol case definition of DF. The other two DENV-4 strains require additional testing as the illness approximated but did not satisfy the case definition of DF. Three volunteers exhibited effusions (1 pleural/ascites, 2 pericardial) and 1 volunteer exhibited features of dengue (rash, lymphadenopathy, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia), though in the absence of fever and symptoms. The occurrence of

  15. Multigene families in African swine fever virus: family 505.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J M; Yañez, R J; Pan, R; Rodriguez, J F; Salas, M L; Viñuela, E

    1994-01-01

    Sequencing of restriction fragment EcoRI A-SalI C of African swine fever virus has revealed the existence of a multigene family, designated family 505 because of the average number of amino acids in the proteins, composed of seven homologous and tandemly arranged genes. All the genes of family 505 are expressed during infection. Primer extension analysis showed that transcription is initiated a short distance (3 to 62 nucleotides) from the start codon of the corresponding open reading frame. The proteins of family 505 showed similarity to those of family 360 from African swine fever virus. In particular, a striking conservation of three regions at the amino terminus of the polypeptides was observed. Images PMID:8139051

  16. Biological and molecular characterization of classical swine fever challenge virus from India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Parveen; Upmanyu, Vikramaditya; Dhar, Pronab

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was biological and molecular characterization of classical swine fever (CSF) challenge virus from India. CSF challenge virus maintained at Division of Biological standardization was experimentally infected to two seronegative piglets. The biological characterization was done by clinical sign and symptoms along with postmortem findings. For molecular characterization 5'-nontranslated region, E2 and NS5B regions were amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The sequences were compared with that of reference strains and the local field isolates to establish a phylogenetic relation. The virus produced symptoms of acute disease in the piglets with typical post-mortem lesions. Phylogenetic analysis of the three regions showed that the current Indian CSF Challenge virus is having maximum similarity with the BresciaX strain (USA) and Madhya Pradesh isolate (India) and is belonging to subgroup 1.2 under Group 1. Based on biological and molecular characterization of CSF challenge virus from India is described as a highly virulent virus belonging to subgroup 1.2 under Group 1 along with some field isolates from India and Brescia strain.

  17. Selection of Classical Swine Fever Virus with Enhanced Pathogenicity Reveals Synergistic Virulence Determinants in E2 and NS4B

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Tomokazu; Yoshino, Fumi; Nomura, Takushi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yuka; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Ruggli, Nicolas; Kida, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious disease of pigs. There are numerous CSFV strains that differ in virulence, resulting in clinical disease with different degrees of severity. Low-virulent and moderately virulent isolates cause a mild and often chronic disease, while highly virulent isolates cause an acute and mostly lethal hemorrhagic fever. The live attenuated vaccine strain GPE− was produced by multiple passages of the virulent ALD strain in cells of swine, bovine, and guinea pig origin. With the aim of identifying the determinants responsible for the attenuation, the GPE− vaccine virus was readapted to pigs by serial passages of infected tonsil homogenates until prolonged viremia and typical signs of CSF were observed. The GPE−/P-11 virus isolated from the tonsils after the 11th passage in vivo had acquired 3 amino acid substitutions in E2 (T830A) and NS4B (V2475A and A2563V) compared with the virus before passages. Experimental infection of pigs with the mutants reconstructed by reverse genetics confirmed that these amino acid substitutions were responsible for the acquisition of pathogenicity. Studies in vitro indicated that the substitution in E2 influenced virus spreading and that the changes in NS4B enhanced the viral RNA replication. In conclusion, the present study identified residues in E2 and NS4B of CSFV that can act synergistically to influence virus replication efficiency in vitro and pathogenicity in pigs. PMID:22674973

  18. Molecular Insights into Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Zivcec, Marko; Scholte, Florine; Spiropoulou, Christina; Spengler, Jessica; Bergeron, Éric

    2016-04-21

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne pathogen that causes high morbidity and mortality. Efficacy of vaccines and antivirals to treat human CCHFV infections remains limited and controversial. Research into pathology and underlying molecular mechanisms of CCHFV and other nairoviruses is limited. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of CCHFV replication and pathogenesis in the past decade. Here we review the most recent molecular advances in CCHFV-related research, and provide perspectives on future research.

  19. Molecular Insights into Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Zivcec, Marko; Scholte, Florine E M; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Spengler, Jessica R; Bergeron, Éric

    2016-04-21

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne pathogen that causes high morbidity and mortality. Efficacy of vaccines and antivirals to treat human CCHFV infections remains limited and controversial. Research into pathology and underlying molecular mechanisms of CCHFV and other nairoviruses is limited. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of CCHFV replication and pathogenesis in the past decade. Here we review the most recent molecular advances in CCHFV-related research, and provide perspectives on future research.

  20. Molecular Insights into Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    DOE PAGES

    Zivcec, Marko; Scholte, Florine; Spiropoulou, Christina; ...

    2016-04-21

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne pathogen that causes high morbidity and mortality. Efficacy of vaccines and antivirals to treat human CCHFV infections remains limited and controversial. Research into pathology and underlying molecular mechanisms of CCHFV and other nairoviruses is limited. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of CCHFV replication and pathogenesis in the past decade. Here we review the most recent molecular advances in CCHFV-related research, and provide perspectives on future research.

  1. Establishment and characterization of a chimeric infectious cDNA clone of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, T S; Xia, Y H

    2016-06-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes a highly contagious disease among swine that has an important economic impact worldwide. There are two important CSFV strains in China, Shimen and hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV). Shimen strain is highly virulent while HCLV, also referred to as C-strain, is a live attenuated vaccine strain considered to be one of the most effective and safest live vaccines. In this study, a chimeric infectious cDNA clone of CSFV named pT7SM-c was engineered by replacing the E(rns) genomic region of an infectious clone of CSFV Shimen strain, pT7SM, with the same region obtained from HCLV. RNA transcripts of pT7SM-c containing an engineered EcoRI site that served as a genetic marker were directly infectious in PK15 cells. The rescued virus vT7SM-c showed similar growth kinetics and cytopathic effect with the parental virus vT7SM in the cells. The chimeric infectious cDNA clone can be used as a practical tool for further studying of the virulence, protein function and pathogenesis of CSFV through genetic manipulation.

  2. French Aedes albopictus are able to transmit yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Amraoui, Fadila; Vazeille, Marie; Failloux, Anna Bella

    2016-09-29

    We assessed the ability of a French population of Aedes albopictus to transmit yellow fever virus (YFV). Batches of 30 to 40 female mosquitoes were analysed at 7, 14 and 21 days post-exposure (dpe). Bodies, heads and saliva were screened for YFV. Infectious viral particles were detected in bodies and heads at 7, 14 and 21 dpe whereas the virus was found in saliva only from 14 dpe. Our results showed that Ae. albopictus can potentially transmit YFV. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  3. Hypervariable antigenic region 1 of classical swine fever virus E2 protein impacts antibody neutralization.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xun; Wang, Zuohuan; Cao, Tong; Tong, Chao; Geng, Shichao; Gu, Yuanxing; Zhou, Yingshan; Li, Xiaoliang; Fang, Weihuan

    2016-07-19

    Envelope glycoprotein E2 of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the major antigen that induces neutralizing antibodies and confers protection against CSFV infection. There are three hypervariable antigenic regions (HAR1, HAR2 and HAR3) of E2 that are different between the group 1 vaccine C-strain and group 2 clinical isolates. This study was aimed to characterize the antigenic epitope region recognized by monoclonal antibody 4F4 (mAb-4F4) that is present in the group 2 field isolate HZ1-08, but not in the C-strain, and examine its impact on neutralization titers when antisera from different recombinant viruses were cross-examined. Indirect ELISA with C-strain E2-based chimeric proteins carrying the three HAR regions showed that the mAb-4F4 bound to HAR1 from HZ1-08 E2, but not to HAR2 or HAR3, indicating that the specific epitope is located in the HAR1 region. Of the 6 major residues differences between C-strain and field isolates, Glu713 in the HAR1 region of strain HZ1-08 is critical for mAb-4F4 binding either at the recombinant protein level or using intact recombinant viruses carrying single mutations. C-strain-based recombinant viruses carrying the most antigenic part of E2 or HAR1 from strain HZ1-08 remained non-pathogenic to pigs and induced good antibody responses. By cross-neutralization assay, we observed that the anti-C-strain serum lost most of its neutralization capacity to RecC-HZ-E2 and QZ-14 (subgroup 2.1d field isolate in 2014), and vice versa. More importantly, the RecC-HAR1 virus remained competent in neutralizing ReC-HZ-E2 and QZ-14 strains without compromising the neutralization capability to the recombinant C-strain. Thus, we propose that chimeric C-strain carrying the HAR1 region of field isolates is a good vaccine candidate for classical swine fever.

  4. [Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fever viruses: update on filoviruses].

    PubMed

    Leroy, E; Baize, S; Gonzalez, J P

    2011-04-01

    The Ebola and Marburg viruses are the sole members of the Filoviridae family of viruses. They are characterized by a long filamentous form that is unique in the viral world. Filoviruses are among the most virulent pathogens currently known to infect humans. They cause fulminating disease characterized by acute fever followed by generalized hemorrhagic syndrome that is associated with 90% mortality in the most severe forms. Epidemic outbreaks of Marburg and Ebola viruses have taken a heavy toll on human life in Central Africa and devastated large ape populations in Gabon and Republic of Congo. Since their discovery in 1967 (Marburg) and 1976 (Ebola), more than 2,300 cases and 1,670 deaths have been reported. These numbers pale in comparison with the burden caused by malnutrition or other infectious disease scourges in Africa such as malaria, cholera, AIDS, dengue or tuberculosis. However, due to their extremely high lethality, association with multifocal hemorrhaging and specificity to the African continent, these hemorrhagic fever viruses have given rise to great interest on the part not only of the international scientific community but also of the general public because of their perceived potential as biological weapons. Much research has been performed on these viruses and major progress has been made in knowledge of their ecology, epidemiology and physiopathology and in development of vaccine candidates and therapeutic schemes. The purpose of this review is to present the main developments in these particular fields in the last decade.

  5. Congenital yellow fever virus infection after immunization in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, T F; Paul, R; Lynberg, M C; Letson, G W

    1993-12-01

    To determine whether yellow fever (YF) vaccine administered in pregnancy causes fetal infection, women who were vaccinated during unrecognized pregnancy in a mass campaign in Trinidad were studied retrospectively. Maternal and cord or infant blood were tested for IgM and neutralizing antibodies to YF and dengue viruses. One of 41 infants had IgM and elevated neutralizing antibodies to YF virus, indicating congenital infection. The infant, the first reported case of YF virus infection after immunization in pregnancy, was delivered after an uncomplicated full-term pregnancy and appeared normal. Congenital dengue 1 infection may have occurred in another case. The frequency of fetal infection and adverse events after such exposure could not be estimated; however, the neurotropism of YF virus for the developing nervous system and the now documented possibility of transplacental infection underscores the admonition that YF vaccination in pregnancy should be avoided.

  6. Insulated Isothermal Reverse Transcriptase PCR (iiRT-PCR) for Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Classical Swine Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Lung, O; Pasick, J; Fisher, M; Buchanan, C; Erickson, A; Ambagala, A

    2016-10-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an OIE-listed disease that can have a severe impact on the swine industry. User-friendly, sensitive, rapid diagnostic tests that utilize low-cost field-deployable instruments for CSF diagnosis can be useful for disease surveillance and outbreak monitoring. In this study, we describe validation of a new probe-based insulated isothermal reverse transcriptase PCR (iiRT-PCR) assay for rapid detection of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) on a compact, user-friendly device (POCKIT(™) Nucleic Acid Analyzer) that does not need data interpretation by the user. The assay accurately detected CSFV RNA from a diverse panel of 33 CSFV strains representing all three genotypes plus an additional in vitro-transcribed RNA from cloned sequences representing a vaccine strain. No cross-reactivity was observed with a panel of 18 viruses associated with livestock including eight other pestivirus strains (bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 and type 2, border disease virus, HoBi atypical pestivirus), African swine fever virus, swine vesicular disease virus, swine influenza virus, porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus, porcine circovirus 1, porcine circovirus 2, porcine respiratory coronavirus, vesicular exanthema of swine virus, bovine herpes virus type 1 and vesicular stomatitis virus. The iiRT-PCR assay accurately detected CSFV as early as 2 days post-inoculation in RNA extracted from serum samples of experimentally infected pigs, before appearance of clinical signs. The limit of detection (LOD95% ) calculated by probit regression analysis was 23 copies per reaction. The assay has a sample to answer turnaround time of less than an hour using extracted RNA or diluted or low volume of neat serum. The user-friendly, compact device that automatically analyses and displays results could potentially be a useful tool for surveillance and monitoring of CSF in a disease outbreak.

  7. Viral diversity of Junín virus field strains.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Sandra E; Stephan, Betina I; Iserte, Javier A; Contigiani, Marta S; Lozano, Mario E; Tenorio, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    The Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever, an endemic disease present in a much of Argentina, is caused by the Junín virus (JUNV). Currently, there are sequences available from several strains of this virus, like those belonging to the vaccine lineage (XJ13, XJ#44 and Candid#1), as well as MC2 (rodent isolate) and IV4454 (human isolate). In this article, we report sequence information on two fragments of genomic segment S of viral isolates from the endemic area. A Nested-RT-PCR was used to amplify discrete genomic regions of 13 isolates of rodent and human origin. The bioinformatics studies revealed a great homogeneity of sequences among the JUNV isolates. The phylogenetic classification showed greater evolutionary distance between the old world arenaviruses (Lassa and LCM virus) than between the new world arenaviruses (JUNV and Machupo virus).

  8. Patterns of gene expression in swine macrophages infected with classical swine fever virus detected by microarray

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical Swine Fever (CSF) is a highly contagious disease of swine that is characterized by fever, hemorrhage, leukopenia, abortion, and high mortality. The etiological agent, CSF virus (CSFV), is classified as a Pestivirus, along with Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) and Border Disease Virus...

  9. 77 FR 68783 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Veterinary Vaccines for Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... Grant of Exclusive License: Veterinary Vaccines for Rift Valley Fever Virus AGENCY: Centers for Disease..., filed 12/21/2007, entitled ``Development of Rift Valley Fever Virus Utilizing Reverse Genetics,'' US... (RVF) Viruses and Method of Use,'' PCT Application PCT/US2008/ 087023, filed 12/16/2008, entitled...

  10. Antigenic characterization of classical swine fever virus YC11WB isolates from wild boar

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seong-In; Kim, Yong Kwan; Lim, Ji-Ae; Han, Song-Hee; Hyun, Hee-Suk; Kim, Ki-Sun; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Kim, Jae-Jo; Cho, In-Soo; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Seung-Hoe

    2017-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious disease that affects domestic pigs and wild boar, has serious economic implications. The present study examined the virulence and transmission of CSF virus strain YC11WB (isolated from a wild boar in 2011) in breeding wild boar. Virulence of strain YC11WB in domestic pigs was also examined. Based on the severe clinical signs and high mortality observed among breeding wild boar, the pathogenicity of strain YC11WB resembled that of typical acute CSF. Surprisingly, in contrast to strain SW03 (isolated from breeding pigs in 2003), strain YC11WB showed both acute and strong virulence in breeding pigs. None of three specific monoclonal antibodies (7F2, 7F83, and 6F65) raised against the B/C domain of the SW03 E2 protein bound to the B/C domain of strain YC11WB due to amino acid mutations (720K→R and 723N→S) in the YC11WB E2 protein. Although strains YC11WB and SW03 belong to subgroup 2.1b, they had different mortality rates in breeding pigs. Thus, if breeding pigs have not developed protective immunity against CSF virus, they may be susceptible to strain YC11WB transmitted by wild boar, resulting in severe economic losses for the pig industry. PMID:27515269

  11. Protective role of host aquaporin 6 against Hazara virus, a model for Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus infection.

    PubMed

    Molinas, Andrea; Mirazimi, Ali; Holm, Angelika; Loitto, Vesa M; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Vikström, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is an arthropod-borne pathogen that causes infectious disease with severe hemorrhagic manifestations in vascular system in humans. The proper function of the cells in the vascular system is critically regulated by aquaporins (AQP), water channels that facilitate fluxes of water and small solutes across membranes. With Hazara virus as a model for CCHFV, we investigated the effects of viruses on AQP6 and the impact of AQP6 on virus infectivity in host cells, using transiently expressed GFP-AQP6 cells, immunofluorescent assay for virus detection, epifluorescent imaging of living cells and confocal microscopy. In GFP-AQP6 expressing cells, Hazara virus reduced both the cellular and perinuclear AQP6 distribution and changed the cell area. Infection of human cell with CCHFV strain IbAR 10200 downregulated AQP6 expression at mRNA level. Interestingly, the overexpression of AQP6 in host cells decreased the infectivity of Hazara virus, speaking for a protective role of AQP6. We suggest the possibility for AQP6 being a novel player in the virus-host interactions, which may lead to less severe outcomes of an infection. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. A Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Based Lassa Fever Vaccine Protects Guinea Pigs and Macaques against Challenge with Geographically and Genetically Distinct Lassa Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Safronetz, David; Mire, Chad; Rosenke, Kyle; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Geisbert, Thomas; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Background Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic in several West African countries and is the etiological agent of Lassa fever. Despite the high annual incidence and significant morbidity and mortality rates, currently there are no approved vaccines to prevent infection or disease in humans. Genetically, LASV demonstrates a high degree of diversity that correlates with geographic distribution. The genetic heterogeneity observed between geographically distinct viruses raises concerns over the potential efficacy of a “universal” LASV vaccine. To date, several experimental LASV vaccines have been developed; however, few have been evaluated against challenge with various genetically unique Lassa virus isolates in relevant animal models. Methodologies/principle findings Here we demonstrate that a single, prophylactic immunization with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing the glycoproteins of LASV strain Josiah from Sierra Leone protects strain 13 guinea pigs from infection / disease following challenge with LASV isolates originating from Liberia, Mali and Nigeria. Similarly, the VSV-based LASV vaccine yields complete protection against a lethal challenge with the Liberian LASV isolate in the gold-standard macaque model of Lassa fever. Conclusions/significance Our results demonstrate the VSV-based LASV vaccine is capable of preventing morbidity and mortality associated with non-homologous LASV challenge in two animal models of Lassa fever. Additionally, this work highlights the need for the further development of disease models for geographical distinct LASV strains, particularly those from Nigeria, in order to comprehensively evaluate potential vaccines and therapies against this prominent agent of viral hemorrhagic fever. PMID:25884628

  13. Rift Valley fever in Namibia, 2010.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Federica; Pinoni, Chiara; Cosseddu, Gian Mario; Khaiseb, Siegfried; Calistri, Paolo; Molini, Umberto; Bishi, Alec; Conte, Annamaria; Scacchia, Massimo; Lelli, Rossella

    2013-12-01

    During May-July 2010 in Namibia, outbreaks of Rift Valley fever were reported to the National Veterinary Service. Analysis of animal specimens confirmed virus circulation on 7 farms. Molecular characterization showed that all outbreaks were caused by a strain of Rift Valley fever virus closely related to virus strains responsible for outbreaks in South Africa during 2009-2010.

  14. Rift Valley Fever in Namibia, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Federica; Pinoni, Chiara; Khaiseb, Siegfried; Calistri, Paolo; Molini, Umberto; Bishi, Alec; Conte, Annamaria; Scacchia, Massimo; Lelli, Rossella

    2013-01-01

    During May–July 2010 in Namibia, outbreaks of Rift Valley fever were reported to the National Veterinary Service. Analysis of animal specimens confirmed virus circulation on 7 farms. Molecular characterization showed that all outbreaks were caused by a strain of Rift Valley fever virus closely related to virus strains responsible for outbreaks in South Africa during 2009–2010. PMID:24274469

  15. Evaluation of efficacy, potential for vector transmission and duration of immunity testing of MP-12, an attenuated Rift Valley fever virus vaccine candidate, in sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes serious disease in ruminants and humans in Africa. There are currently no fully licensed vaccines for this arthropod-borne virus in the US. Studies in sheep and cattle have found an attenuated strain of RVFV, MP-12, to be both safe and efficacious, and a conditi...

  16. Antigenic characterization of classical swine fever virus YC11WB isolates from wild boar.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-In; Kim, Yong Kwan; Lim, Ji-Ae; Han, Song-Hee; Hyun, Hee-Suk; Kim, Ki-Sun; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Kim, Jae-Jo; Cho, In-Soo; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Seung-Hoe; An, Dong-Jun

    2016-08-10

    Classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious disease that affects domestic pigs and wild boar, has serious economic implications. The present study examined the virulence and transmission of strain YC11WB (isolated from a wild boar in 2011) in breeding wild boar. Virulence in domestic pigs was also examined. Based on the severe clinical signs and high mortality observed among breeding wild boar, the pathogenicity of strain YC11WB resembled that of typical acute CSF. Surprisingly, in contrast to strain SW03 (isolated from breeding pigs in 2003), strain YC11WB also showed both acute and strong virulence in breeding pigs. None of three specific monoclonal antibodies (7F2, 7F83, and 6F65) raised against the B/C domain of the SW03 E2 protein bound to the B/C domain of strain YC11WB due to amino acid mutations ((720)K→R and (723)N→S) in the YC11WB E2 protein. Although strains YC11WB and SW03 belong to subgroup 2.1b, they showed different mortality rates in breeding pigs. Thus, if breeding pigs have not developed protective immunity against classical swine fever virus, they may be susceptible to YC11WB transmitted by wild boar, resulting in severe economic losses for the pig industry.

  17. Purification and properties of African swine fever virus.

    PubMed Central

    Carrascosa, A L; del Val, M; Santarén, J F; Viñuela, E

    1985-01-01

    We describe a method for African swine fever (ASF) virus purification based on equilibrium centrifugation in Percoll density gradients of extracellular virions produced in infected VERO cells that yielded about 15 +/- 9% recovery of the starting infectious virus particles. The purified virus preparations were essentially free of a host membrane fraction (vesicles) that could not be separated from the virus by previously described purification methods. The purified virus sedimented as a single component in sucrose velocity gradients with a sedimentation coefficient of 3,500 +/- 300S, showed a DNA-protein ratio of 0.18 +/- 0.02 and a specific infectivity of 2.7 X 10(7) PFU/micrograms of protein, and remained fully infectious after storage at -70 degrees C for at least 7 months. The relative molecular weights of the 34 polypeptides detected in purified virus particles ranged from 10,000 to 150,000. Some of these proteins were probably cellular components that might account for the reactivity of purified virus with antiserum against VERO cells. Images PMID:3989907

  18. Teratogenicity of a mutagenised Rift Valley fever virus (MVP 12) in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hunter, P; Erasmus, B J; Vorster, J H

    2002-03-01

    A 5-fluorouracil mutagenised Rift Valley fever virus strain, which was shown to be attenuated and immunogenic in cattle and sheep, was evaluated for its ability to cause teratogenic effects in pregnant sheep. A group of 50 sheep at various stages of pregnancy was inoculated with the virus and the pregnancies followed to term. There were two abortions and 14% of the lambs produced by vaccinated ewes showed teratogenic effects, the most prevalent being spinal hypoplasia, hydranencephaly, brachygnathia inferior and arthrygryposis. The foetal malformations of the central nervous and musculo-skeletal systems were mostly consistent with those observed in sheep vaccinated with the attenuated Smithburn RVF strain. The teratogenic effects of MVP12 were not seen in previous experiments by other authors as immunisation of sheep took place in the second to third trimester of pregnancy, when the foetal brain tissue has completed most of its cell division.

  19. Repurposing FDA-approved drugs as therapeutics to treat Rift Valley fever virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Ashwini; Bansal, Neha; Senina, Svetlana; Hooper, Idris; Lundberg, Lindsay; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Narayanan, Aarthi; Gutting, Bradford; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no FDA-approved therapeutics available to treat Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. In an effort to repurpose drugs for RVFV treatment, a library of FDA-approved drugs was screened to determine their ability to inhibit RVFV. Several drugs from varying compound classes, including inhibitors of growth factor receptors, microtubule assembly/disassembly, and DNA synthesis, were found to reduce RVFV replication. The hepatocellular and renal cell carcinoma drug, sorafenib, was the most effective inhibitor, being non-toxic and demonstrating inhibition of RVFV in a cell-type and virus strain independent manner. Mechanism of action studies indicated that sorafenib targets at least two stages in the virus infectious cycle, RNA synthesis and viral egress. Computational modeling studies also support this conclusion. siRNA knockdown of Raf proteins indicated that non-classical targets of sorafenib are likely important for the replication of RVFV. PMID:26217313

  20. Isolations of yellow fever virus from Haemagogus leucocelaenus in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Pedro F; Sperb, Alethéa F; Monteiro, Hamilton A; Torres, Maria A; Sousa, Maria R; Vasconcelos, Helena B; Mardini, Lúcia B; Rodrigues, Sueli G

    2003-01-01

    Following howling monkey (Alouatta caraya) deaths and yellow fever (YF) antigen detection by immunohistochemistry in the liver sample of a dead monkey in April and May 2001 in the municipalities of Garruchos and Santo Antônio das Missões, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, epidemiological field investigations were initiated. Two strains of YF virus were isolated in suckling mice from 23 Haemagogus (Conopostegus) leucocelaenus Dyar & Shannon mosquitoes collected from the study sites. The YF virus was isolated from this species in the 1930s in Brazil and in the 1940s in Colombia. No human cases were reported during the current epizootic outbreak. The YF virus isolation and the absence of Hg. (Haemagogus) janthinomys Dyar from the area suggest that Hg. leucocelaenus may be a secondary YF vector and play an important role in the epidemiology of this disease in the Southern Cone.

  1. Immunogenicity of Combination DNA Vaccines for Rift Valley Fever Virus, Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus, Hantaan Virus, and Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-22

    genus of the family Bunyaviridae and is one of four hantaviruses known to cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). HFRS caused by HTNV...infection is found exclusively in Asia, with most cases occurring in China (reviewed in [2]). Hantaviruses are transmitted to humans by exposure to...before in our studies of antavirus DNA vaccines. We showed that although DNA accines for two hantaviruses , HTNV and Seoul virus, are ighly immunogenic

  2. Efficacy of a live attenuated vaccine in classical swine fever virus postnatally persistently infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-González, Sara; Perez-Simó, Marta; Muñoz, Marta; Bohorquez, José Alejandro; Rosell, Rosa; Summerfield, Artur; Domingo, Mariano; Ruggli, Nicolas; Ganges, Llilianne

    2015-07-09

    Classical swine fever (CSF) causes major losses in pig farming, with various degrees of disease severity. Efficient live attenuated vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV) are used routinely in endemic countries. However, despite intensive vaccination programs in these areas for more than 20 years, CSF has not been eradicated. Molecular epidemiology studies in these regions suggests that the virus circulating in the field has evolved under the positive selection pressure exerted by the immune response to the vaccine, leading to new attenuated viral variants. Recent work by our group demonstrated that a high proportion of persistently infected piglets can be generated by early postnatal infection with low and moderately virulent CSFV strains. Here, we studied the immune response to a hog cholera lapinised virus vaccine (HCLV), C-strain, in six-week-old persistently infected pigs following post-natal infection. CSFV-negative pigs were vaccinated as controls. The humoral and interferon gamma responses as well as the CSFV RNA loads were monitored for 21 days post-vaccination. No vaccine viral RNA was detected in the serum samples and tonsils from CSFV postnatally persistently infected pigs for 21 days post-vaccination. Furthermore, no E2-specific antibody response or neutralising antibody titres were shown in CSFV persistently infected vaccinated animals. Likewise, no of IFN-gamma producing cell response against CSFV or PHA was observed. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the absence of a response to vaccination in CSFV persistently infected pigs.

  3. A Novel System for Identification of Inhibitors of Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Mary E.; Gerrard, Sonja R.

    2010-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a human and livestock pathogen endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. We have developed a T7-dependent system for the efficient production of RVFV-like particles (RVF-VLPs) based on the virulent ZH-501 strain of RVFV. The RVF-VLPs are capable of performing a single round of infection, allowing for the study of viral replication, assembly, and infectivity. We demonstrate that these RVF-VLPs are antigenically indistinguishable from authentic RVFV and respond similarly to a wide array of known and previously unknown chemical inhibitors. This system should be useful for screening for small molecule inhibitors of RVFV replication. PMID:21994655

  4. [The isolation of Dhori viruses (Orthomyxoviridae, Thogotovirus) and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (Bunyaviridae, Nairovirus) from the hare (Lepus europaeus) and its ticks Hyalomma marginatum in the middle zone of the Volga delta, Astrakhan region, 2001].

    PubMed

    L'vov, D N; Dzharkenov, A F; Aristova, V A; Kovtunov, A I; Gromashevskiĭ, V L; Vyshemirskiĭ, O I; Galkina, I V; Larichev, V F; Butenko, A M; L'vov, D K

    2002-01-01

    In August, 2001, in the middle zone of the delta of the Volga River, the Astrakhan region, during investigation of the natural foci of West Nile fever and Crimean--Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF), the material from the hare (Lepus europaeus, Pallas, 1778 (Lagomorpha, Leporidae) and collected from it the ticks Hyalomna marginatum Koch 1844, was obtained. 4 strains of Dhori virus (Orthomyxoviridae, Thogotovirus) and 2 strains of CCHF virus (Bunyaviridae, Nairovirus) were isolated. This is the first isolation of Thogotovirus genus virus from the wild vertebrates. Considering the overlap of the Dhori virus and CCHF virus areas, similar ecology and the isolation both viruses from the same pool of the ticks, the necessity for the use of the test-system for indication of the viruses, differential diagnosis and accumulation of the data concerning the role of Dhori virus in the human and farm animals pathology is discussed.

  5. Mutations in the Carboxyl Terminal Region of E2 Glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus are Responsible for Viral Attenuation in Swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have previously reported that combining specific genetic information from the Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) vaccine strain CS with that of virulent CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) resulted in disease attenuation for pigs. To identify the specific amino acids mediate attenuation, a series of chime...

  6. Genetic variability and distribution of Classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Beer, Martin; Goller, Katja V; Staubach, Christoph; Blome, Sandra

    2015-06-01

    Classical swine fever is a highly contagious disease that affects domestic and wild pigs worldwide. The causative agent of the disease is Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), which belongs to the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae. On the genome level, CSFV can be divided into three genotypes with three to four sub-genotypes. Those genotypes can be assigned to distinct geographical regions. Knowledge about CSFV diversity and distribution is important for the understanding of disease dynamics and evolution, and can thus help to design optimized control strategies. For this reason, the geographical pattern of CSFV diversity and distribution are outlined in the presented review. Moreover, current knowledge with regard to genetic virulence markers or determinants and the role of the quasispecies composition is discussed.

  7. Interepidemic Rift Valley Fever Virus Seropositivity, Northeastern Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Muchiri, Eric M.; Ndzovu, Malik; Mwanje, Mariam T.; Muiruri, Samuel; Peters, Clarence J.; King, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    Most outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF) occur in remote locations after floods. To determine environmental risk factors and long-term sequelae of human RVF, we examined rates of previous Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) exposure by age and location during an interepidemic period in 2006. In a randomized household cluster survey in 2 areas of Ijara District, Kenya, we examined 248 residents of 2 sublocations, Gumarey (village) and Sogan-Godud (town). Overall, the RVFV seropositivity rate was 13% according to immunoglobulin G ELISA; evidence of interepidemic RVFV transmission was detected. Increased seropositivity was found among older persons, those who were male, those who lived in the rural village (Gumarey), and those who had disposed of animal abortus. Rural Gumarey reported more mosquito and animal exposure than Sogan-Godud. Seropositive persons were more likely to have visual impairment and retinal lesions; other physical findings did not differ. PMID:18680647

  8. Quantification of airborne African swine fever virus after experimental infection.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Ferreira, H C; Weesendorp, E; Quak, S; Stegeman, J A; Loeffen, W L A

    2013-08-30

    Knowledge on African Swine Fever (ASF) transmission routes can be useful when designing control measures against the spread of ASF virus (ASFV). Few studies have focused on the airborne transmission route, and until now no data has been available on quantities of ASF virus (ASFV) in the air. Our aim was to validate an air sampling technique for ASF virus (ASFV) that could be used to detect and quantify virus excreted in the air after experimental infection of pigs. In an animal experiment with the Brazil'78, the Malta'78 and Netherlands'86 isolates, air samples were collected at several time points. For validation of the air sampling technique, ASFV was aerosolised in an isolator, and air samples were obtained using the MD8 air scan device, which was shown to be suitable to detect ASFV. The half-life of ASFV in the air was on average 19 min when analysed by PCR, and on average 14 min when analysed by virus titration. In rooms with infected pigs, viral DNA with titres up to 10(3.2) median tissue culture infective dose equivalents (TCID50eq.)/m(3) could be detected in air samples from day 4 post-inoculation (dpi 4) until the end of the experiments, at dpi 70. In conclusion, this study shows that pigs infected with ASFV will excrete virus in the air, particularly during acute disease. This study provides the first available parameters to model airborne transmission of ASFV.

  9. Ngari Virus Is a Bunyamwera Virus Reassortant That Can Be Associated with Large Outbreaks of Hemorrhagic Fever in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, Sonja R.; Li, Li; Barrett, Alan D.; Nichol, Stuart T.

    2004-01-01

    Two isolates of a virus of the genus Orthobunyavirus (family Bunyaviridae) were obtained from hemorrhagic fever cases during a large disease outbreak in East Africa in 1997 and 1998. Sequence analysis of regions of the three genomic RNA segments of the virus (provisionally referred to as Garissa virus) suggested that it was a genetic reassortant virus with S and L segments derived from Bunyamwera virus but an M segment from an unidentified virus of the genus Orthobunyavirus. While high genetic diversity (52%) was revealed by analysis of virus M segment nucleotide sequences obtained from 21 members of the genus Orthobunyavirus, the Garissa and Ngari virus M segments were almost identical. Surprisingly, the Ngari virus L and S segments showed high sequence identity with those of Bunyamwera virus, showing that Garissa virus is an isolate of Ngari virus, which in turn is a Bunyamwera virus reassortant. Ngari virus should be considered when investigating hemorrhagic fever outbreaks throughout sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:15280501

  10. Development of Infectious Clones for Virulent and Avirulent Pichinde Viruses: a Model Virus To Study Arenavirus-Induced Hemorrhagic Fevers ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Shuiyun; McLay Schelde, Lisa; Wang, Jialong; Kumar, Naveen; Ly, Hinh; Liang, Yuying

    2009-01-01

    Several arenaviruses can cause hemorrhagic fever diseases (VHFs) in humans, the pathogenic mechanism of which is poorly understood due to their virulent nature and the lack of molecular clones. A safe, convenient, and economical small animal model of arenavirus hemorrhagic fever is based on guinea pigs infected by the arenavirus Pichinde (PICV). PICV does not cause disease in humans, but an adapted strain of PICV (P18) causes a disease in guinea pigs that mimics arenavirus hemorrhagic fever in humans in many aspects, while a low-passaged strain (P2) remains avirulent in infected animals. In order to identify the virulence determinants within the PICV genome, we developed the molecular clones for both the avirulent P2 and virulent P18 viruses. Recombinant viruses were generated by transfecting plasmids that contain the antigenomic L and S RNA segments of PICV under the control of the T7 promoter into BSRT7-5 cells, which constitutively express T7 RNA polymerase. By analyzing viral growth kinetics in vitro and virulence in vivo, we show that the recombinant viruses accurately recapitulate the replication and virulence natures of their respective parental viruses. Both parental and recombinant virulent viruses led to high levels of viremia and titers in different organs of the infected animals, whereas the avirulent viruses were effectively controlled and cleared by the hosts. These novel infectious clones for the PICV provide essential tools to identify the virulence factors that are responsible for the severe VHF-like disease in infected animals. PMID:19386714

  11. Molecular Evolution and Spatial Transmission of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Based on Complete Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Li; Luo, Li-Mei; Liu, Miao-Miao; Sun, Yue; Su, Xiang; Yu, Xue-jie

    2016-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) was a novel tick-borne bunyavirus that caused hemorrhagic fever with a high fatality rate in East Asia. In this study we analyzed the complete genome sequences of 122 SFTSV strains to determine the phylogeny, evolution and reassortment of the virus. We revealed that the evolutionary rate of three genome segments were different, with highest in the S segment and lowest in the L segment. The SFTSV strains were phylogenetically classified into 5 lineages (A, B, C, D and E) with each genome segment. SFTSV strains from China were classified in all 5 lineages, strains from South Korea were classified into 3 lineages (A, D, and E), and all strains from Japan were classified in only linage E. Using the average evolutionary rate of the three genome segments, we found that the extant SFTSV originated 20–87 years ago in the Dabie Mountain area in central China. The viruses were then transmitted to other areas of China, Japan and South Korea. We also found that six SFTSV strains were reassortants. Selection pressure analysis suggested that SFTSV was under purifying selection according to the four genes (RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, glycoprotein, nucleocapsid protein, non-structural protein), and two sites (37, 1033) of glycoproteins were identified as being under strong positive selection. We concluded that SFTSV originated in central China and spread to other places recently and the virus was under purifying selection with high frequency of reassortment. PMID:26999664

  12. Seroprevalence of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus in Hedgehog from China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Liu, Miao-Miao; Luo, Li-Mei; Zhao, Li; Wen, Hong-Ling; Zhang, Zhen-Tang; Liu, Jian-Wei; Xue, Zai-Feng; Ma, Dong-Qiang; Ding, Shu-Jun; Lei, Xiao-Ying; Yu, Xue-Jie

    2017-05-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome, an emerging hemorrhagic fever, is caused by severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), a tick-borne bunyavirus. Information regarding SFTSV animal hosts is very limited. In this study, we showed that 64% (9/14) of hedgehogs in Shandong Province, China were seropositive to SFTSV antibody, suggesting that hedgehog could be a vertebrate parasitifer for SFTSV.

  13. A recombinant Rift Valley fever virus glycoprotein subunit vaccine confers full protection against Rift Valley fever challenge in sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen causing disease outbreaks in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The virus has great potential for transboundary spread due to the presence of competent vectors in non-endemic areas. There is currently no fully licensed vaccine suita...

  14. Dengue-1 virus isolation during first dengue fever outbreak on Easter Island, Chile.

    PubMed

    Perret, Cecilia; Abarca, Katia; Ovalle, Jimena; Ferrer, Pablo; Godoy, Paula; Olea, Andrea; Aguilera, Ximena; Ferrés, Marcela

    2003-11-01

    Dengue virus was detected for the first time in Chile, in an outbreak of dengue fever on Easter Island. The virus was isolated in tissue culture and characterized by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction as being dengue type 1.

  15. A Host-Oriented Inhibitor of Junin Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Egress

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianhong; Han, Ziying; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Wenbo; Lee, Michael S.; Olson, Mark A.; Ruthel, Gordon; Freedman, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are currently no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved vaccines or therapeutics to prevent or treat Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). The causative agent of AHF is Junin virus (JUNV); a New World arenavirus classified as a National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention category A priority pathogen. The PTAP late (L) domain motif within JUNV Z protein facilitates virion egress and transmission by recruiting host Tsg101 and other ESCRT complex proteins to promote scission of the virus particle from the plasma membrane. Here, we describe a novel compound (compound 0013) that blocks the JUNV Z-Tsg101 interaction and inhibits budding of virus-like particles (VLPs) driven by ectopic expression of the Z protein and live-attenuated JUNV Candid-1 strain in cell culture. Since inhibition of the PTAP-Tsg101 interaction inhibits JUNV egress, compound 0013 serves as a prototype therapeutic that could reduce virus dissemination and disease progression in infected individuals. Moreover, since PTAP l-domain-mediated Tsg101 recruitment is utilized by other RNA virus pathogens (e.g., Ebola virus and HIV-1), PTAP inhibitors such as compound 0013 have the potential to function as potent broad-spectrum, host-oriented antiviral drugs. IMPORTANCE There are currently no FDA-approved vaccines or therapeutics to prevent or treat Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). The causative agent of AHF is Junin virus (JUNV); a New World arenavirus classified as an NIAID/CDC category A priority pathogen. Here, we describe a prototype therapeutic that blocks budding of JUNV and has the potential to function as a broad-spectrum antiviral drug. PMID:24522922

  16. A host-oriented inhibitor of Junin Argentine hemorrhagic fever virus egress.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianhong; Han, Ziying; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Wenbo; Lee, Michael S; Olson, Mark A; Ruthel, Gordon; Freedman, Bruce D; Harty, Ronald N

    2014-05-01

    There are currently no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved vaccines or therapeutics to prevent or treat Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). The causative agent of AHF is Junin virus (JUNV); a New World arenavirus classified as a National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention category A priority pathogen. The PTAP late (L) domain motif within JUNV Z protein facilitates virion egress and transmission by recruiting host Tsg101 and other ESCRT complex proteins to promote scission of the virus particle from the plasma membrane. Here, we describe a novel compound (compound 0013) that blocks the JUNV Z-Tsg101 interaction and inhibits budding of virus-like particles (VLPs) driven by ectopic expression of the Z protein and live-attenuated JUNV Candid-1 strain in cell culture. Since inhibition of the PTAP-Tsg101 interaction inhibits JUNV egress, compound 0013 serves as a prototype therapeutic that could reduce virus dissemination and disease progression in infected individuals. Moreover, since PTAP l-domain-mediated Tsg101 recruitment is utilized by other RNA virus pathogens (e.g., Ebola virus and HIV-1), PTAP inhibitors such as compound 0013 have the potential to function as potent broad-spectrum, host-oriented antiviral drugs. There are currently no FDA-approved vaccines or therapeutics to prevent or treat Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF). The causative agent of AHF is Junin virus (JUNV); a New World arenavirus classified as an NIAID/CDC category A priority pathogen. Here, we describe a prototype therapeutic that blocks budding of JUNV and has the potential to function as a broad-spectrum antiviral drug.

  17. Restriction of Rift Valley Fever Virus Virulence in Mosquito Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Valerie M.; Streeter, Cale C.; Miller, David J.; Gerrard, Sonja R.

    2010-01-01

    Arboviruses are maintained in a natural cycle that requires blood-sucking arthropod and vertebrate hosts. Arboviruses are believed to persistently infect their arthropod host without overt pathology and cause acute infection with viremia in their vertebrate host. We have focused on elucidating how a specific arbovirus, Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus, causes cytopathic effect in cells derived from vertebrates and non-cytopathic infection in cells derived from arthropods. We demonstrate that the vertebrate virulence factor, NSs, is functional in arthropod cells but is expressed at significantly lower levels in infected arthropod versus infected vertebrate cells. PMID:21994651

  18. Molecular Insights into Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zivcec, Marko; Scholte, Florine E. M.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Spengler, Jessica R.; Bergeron, Éric

    2016-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne pathogen that causes high morbidity and mortality. Efficacy of vaccines and antivirals to treat human CCHFV infections remains limited and controversial. Research into pathology and underlying molecular mechanisms of CCHFV and other nairoviruses is limited. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of CCHFV replication and pathogenesis in the past decade. Here we review the most recent molecular advances in CCHFV-related research, and provide perspectives on future research. PMID:27110812

  19. A Haploid Genetic Screen Identifies Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans Supporting Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Riblett, Amber M.; Blomen, Vincent A.; Jae, Lucas T.; Altamura, Louis A.; Doms, Robert W.; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes recurrent insect-borne epizootics throughout the African continent, and infection of humans can lead to a lethal hemorrhagic fever syndrome. Deep mutagenesis of haploid human cells was used to identify host factors required for RVFV infection. This screen identified a suite of enzymes involved in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biogenesis and transport, including several components of the cis-oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex, one of the central components of Golgi complex trafficking. In addition, disruption of PTAR1 led to RVFV resistance as well as reduced heparan sulfate surface levels, consistent with recent observations that PTAR1-deficient cells exhibit altered Golgi complex morphology and glycosylation defects. A variety of biochemical and genetic approaches were utilized to show that both pathogenic and attenuated RVFV strains require GAGs for efficient infection on some, but not all, cell types, with the block to infection being at the level of virion attachment. Examination of other members of the Bunyaviridae family for GAG-dependent infection suggested that the interaction with GAGs is not universal among bunyaviruses, indicating that these viruses, as well as RVFV on certain cell types, employ additional unidentified virion attachment factors and/or receptors. IMPORTANCE Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging pathogen that can cause severe disease in humans and animals. Epizootics among livestock populations lead to high mortality rates and can be economically devastating. Human epidemics of Rift Valley fever, often initiated by contact with infected animals, are characterized by a febrile disease that sometimes leads to encephalitis or hemorrhagic fever. The global burden of the pathogen is increasing because it has recently disseminated beyond Africa, which is of particular concern because the virus can be transmitted by widely distributed mosquito species. There are no FDA-licensed vaccines or antiviral

  20. Recombinant RNA replicons derived from attenuated Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus protect guinea pigs and mice from Ebola hemorrhagic fever virus.

    PubMed

    Pushko, P; Bray, M; Ludwig, G V; Parker, M; Schmaljohn, A; Sanchez, A; Jahrling, P B; Smith, J F

    2000-08-15

    RNA replicons derived from an attenuated strain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE), an alphavirus, were configured as candidate vaccines for Ebola hemorrhagic fever. The Ebola nucleoprotein (NP) or glycoprotein (GP) genes were introduced into the VEE RNA downstream from the VEE 26S promoter in place of the VEE structural protein genes. The resulting recombinant replicons, expressing the NP or GP genes, were packaged into VEE replicon particles (NP-VRP and GP-VRP, respectively) using a bipartite helper system that provided the VEE structural proteins in trans and prevented the regeneration of replication-competent VEE during packaging. The immunogenicity of NP-VRP and GP-VRP and their ability to protect against lethal Ebola infection were evaluated in BALB/c mice and in two strains of guinea pigs. The GP-VRP alone, or in combination with NP-VRP, protected both strains of guinea pigs and BALB/c mice, while immunization with NP-VRP alone protected BALB/c mice, but neither strain of guinea pig. Passive transfer of sera from VRP-immunized animals did not confer protection against lethal challenge. However, the complete protection achieved with active immunization with VRP, as well as the unique characteristics of the VEE replicon vector, warrant further testing of the safety and efficacy of NP-VRP and GP-VRP in primates as candidate vaccines against Ebola hemorrhagic fever.

  1. Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus and Alkhurma (Alkhumra) Virus in Ticks in Djibouti.

    PubMed

    Horton, Katherine C; Fahmy, Nermeen T; Watany, Noha; Zayed, Alia; Mohamed, Abro; Ahmed, Ammar Abdo; Rollin, Pierre E; Dueger, Erica L

    2016-10-01

    Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus and Alkhumra virus, not previously reported in Djibouti, were detected among 141 (infection rate = 15.7 per 100, 95% CI: 13.4-18.1) tick pools from 81 (37%) cattle and 2 (infection rate = 0.2 per 100, 95% CI: 0.0-0.7) tick pools from 2 (1%) cattle, respectively, collected at an abattoir in 2010 and 2011.

  2. Persistence of Rift Valley fever virus in East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gachohi, J.; Hansen, F.; Bett, B.; Kitala, P.

    2012-04-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFv) is a mosquito-borne pathogen of livestock, wildlife and humans that causes severe outbreaks in intervals of several years. One of the open questions is how the virus persists between outbreaks. We developed a spatially-explicit, individual-based simulation model of the RVFv transmission dynamics to investigate this question. The model, is based on livestock and mosquito population dynamics. Spatial aspects are explicitly represented by a set of grid cells that represent mosquito breeding sites. A grid cell measures 500 by 500m and the model considers a grid of 100 by 100 grid cells; the model thus operates on the regional scale of 2500km2. Livestock herds move between grid cells, and provide connectivity between the cells. The model is used to explore the spatio-temporal dynamics of RVFv persistence in absence of a wildlife reservoir in an east African semi-arid context. Specifically, the model assesses the importance of local virus persistence in mosquito breeding sites relative to global virus persistence mitigated by movement of hosts. Local persistence is determined by the length of time the virus remains in a mosquito breeding site once introduced. In the model, this is a function of the number of mosquitoes that emerge infected and their lifespan. Global persistence is determined by the level of connectivity between isolated grid cells. Our work gives insights into the ecological and epidemiological conditions under which RVFv persists. The implication for disease surveillance and management are discussed.

  3. Genetic typing of classical swine fever virus isolates from China.

    PubMed

    Sun, S-Q; Yin, S-H; Guo, H-C; Jin, Y; Shang, Y-J; Liu, X-T

    2013-08-01

    The E2 genes of 73 classical swine fever virus (CSFV) originated from CSF suspected cases in different regions of China were genetically characterized and compared with reference CSF viruses. All Chinese viruses that characterized were segregated into two major groups and subdivided into four subgroups. Most of isolates (61.6%) belonged to group 2 and were further divided into three subgroups: subgroup 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3. Subgroup 2.1 was the largest subgroup which contained 46.6% of isolates, while subgroup 2.3 was the smallest subgroup which contained only one isolate (1.4%). The remaining 38.4% of isolates were classified into subgroup 1.1 within group 1. However, no group 3 and subgroups 1.2 and 1.3 viruses were found in this study. This study has provided epidemiological information useful for assessing the virus origin and establishing a national prevention and control strategy against the disease.

  4. Yellow fever and Zika virus epizootics and enzootics in Uganda.

    PubMed

    McCrae, A W; Kirya, B G

    1982-01-01

    Data of monkey serology are presented which, together with past evidence, support the view that yellow fever (YF) virus circulates in its primary sylvan host populations, i.e., forest monkeys, in an enzootic state in Bwamba County in western Uganda but as series of epizootics in the forest-savanna mosaic zone of central Uganda. Evidence of an epizootic of Zika virus at the Zika Forest near Entebbe is described which occurred in two episodes, the first (in 1969) apparently following the build-up of non-immune monkey populations since a previous epizootic of 1962-63 and the second (in 1970) when Aedes africanus biting densities rose. This was followed only 18 months later by an intensive epizootic of YF virus, contradictory to the hypothesis that Zika virus alone would suppress subsequent epizootics of YF virus in nature, at least when redtail monkeys are involved. Conclusions are finally reviewed in the light of more recent evidence of transovarial flavivirus transmission in mosquitoes, pointing out that phlebotomine sandflies also require fresh attention.

  5. Use of reassortant viruses to map attenuating and temperature-sensitive mutations of the Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Saluzzo, J F; Smith, J F

    1990-08-01

    A live-attenuated vaccine for Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), MP-12, has been developed recently by undirected, serial mutagenesis of a RVFV strain (ZH548) isolated during the 1977 epidemic in Egypt. In the present study, the mutations responsible for attenuation of this virus have been examined by analysis of reassortant viruses generated between the vaccine strain and a wild RVFV strain isolated in Senegal. Reassortant viruses were generated efficiently in multiply infected Vero cells, and were readily isolated without application of selective pressures. The origin of the S and M genomic RNA segments in each cloned reassortant virus was determined with monoclonal antibodies capable of differentiating the nucleocapsid protein (S segment marker) or G1 glycoprotein (M segment marker) of the parental strains. The L segment of the vaccine strain was found to contain a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutation, and the origin of the L segment in most reassortants could be inferred by analysis of their ts phenotype. Analysis of the virulence properties of selected reassortant viruses in mice demonstrated that virulence characteristics were under polygenic control, and that at least one mutation capable of independently attenuating the virus existed on each genome segment. The L and M RNA segments were also found to contain ts mutations. These findings suggest that reversion to virulence is unlikely, and further indicate that genetic reassortment with wild-type viruses during a vaccination programme in endemic areas would also be expected to yield attenuated variants.

  6. Experimentally Induced Sandfly Fever Virus Infection in Man: Effects on Physical Performance,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-23

    REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Experimentally Induced Sandfly Fever Virus Infec- tion in Man: Effects on Physical Performance 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER...7 experimentals, 2 controls) were studied before, during and after an experimentally induced episode of sandfly fever. During the fever, experi...subjects were unable to complete a submaximal exercise walk during the fever. Rectal temperature was elevated throughout the walk but no other

  7. Vectors of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Telmadarraiy, Zakkyeh; Chinikar, Sadegh; Vatandoost, Hassan; Faghihi, Faezeh; Hosseini-Chegeni, Asadollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ticks are important vectors and reservoirs of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) virus. Human beings may be infected whenever the normal life cycle of the infected ticks on non-human vertebrate hosts is interrupted by the undesirable presence of humans in the cycle. A total of 26 species of Argasid and Ixodid ticks have been recorded in Iran; including nine Hyalomma, two Rhipicephalus, two Dermacentor, five Haemaphysalis, two Boophilus, one Ixodes and two Argas as well as three Ornithodoros species as blood sucking ectoparasites of livestock and poultries. The present paper reviews tick vectors of CCHF virus in Iran, focusing on the role of ticks in different provinces of Iran using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Methods: During ten years study, 1054 tick specimens; including two species of Argasidae and 17 species of Ixodidae were examined for their infection to CCHF virus genome. The output of all studies as well as related publications were discussed in the current paper. Results: The results show that Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Hyalomma marginatum, H. anatolicum, H. asiaticum and H. dromedarii were known as the most frequent species which were positive for CCHF virus. Conclusion: The status of ticks which were positive for CCHF virus revealed that unlike the most common idea that Hyalomma species are the most important vectors of CCHF virus, other ticks including Rhipicephalus, Haemaphysalis and Dermacentor can be reservoir of this virus; thus, considering geographical distribution, type of host and environmental conditions, different tick control measurements should be carried out in areas with high incidence of CCHF disease. PMID:26623426

  8. Three-dimensional organization of Rift Valley fever virus revealed by cryoelectron tomography.

    PubMed

    Freiberg, Alexander N; Sherman, Michael B; Morais, Marc C; Holbrook, Michael R; Watowich, Stanley J

    2008-11-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a member of the Bunyaviridae virus family (genus Phlebovirus) and is considered to be one of the most important pathogens in Africa, causing viral zoonoses in livestock and humans. Here, we report the characterization of the three-dimensional structural organization of RVFV vaccine strain MP-12 by cryoelectron tomography. Vitrified-hydrated virions were found to be spherical, with an average diameter of 100 nm. The virus glycoproteins formed cylindrical hollow spikes that clustered into distinct capsomeres. In contrast to previous assertions that RVFV is pleomorphic, the structure of RVFV MP-12 was found to be highly ordered. The three-dimensional map was resolved to a resolution of 6.1 nm, and capsomeres were observed to be arranged on the virus surface in an icosahedral lattice with clear T=12 quasisymmetry. All icosahedral symmetry axes were visible in self-rotation functions calculated using the Fourier transform of the RVFV MP-12 tomogram. To the best of our knowledge, a triangulation number of 12 had previously been reported only for Uukuniemi virus, a bunyavirus also within the Phlebovirus genus. The results presented in this study demonstrate that RVFV MP-12 possesses T=12 icosahedral symmetry and suggest that other members of the Phlebovirus genus, as well as of the Bunyaviridae family, may adopt icosahedral symmetry. Knowledge of the virus architecture may provide a structural template to develop vaccines and diagnostics, since no effective anti-RVFV treatments are available for human use.

  9. Towards a safe, effective vaccine for Rift Valley fever virus

    PubMed Central

    LaBeaud, Desiree

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an important animal and human threat and leads to longstanding morbidity and mortality in susceptible hosts. Since no therapies currently exist to treat Rift Valley fever, it remains a public and animal health priority to develop safe, effective RVFV vaccines (whether for animals, humans, or both) that provide long-term protective immunity. In the evaluated article, Bhardwaj and colleagues describe the creation and testing of two successful vaccine strategies against RVFV, a DNA plasmid vaccine expressing Gn coupled to C3d, and an alpha-virus replicon vaccine expressing Gn protein. Both vaccines elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses, prevented morbidity and mortality in RVFV-challenged mice, and enabled protection of naive mice via passive antibody transfer from vaccinated mice. Both DNA and replicon RVFV vaccines have previously been shown to protect against RVFV challenge, but these results allow for direct comparison of the two methods and evaluation of a combined prime–boost method. The results also highlight the specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to vaccination. PMID:21423850

  10. African Swine Fever Virus: a new old enemy of Europe

    PubMed

    Cisek, Agata A; Dąbrowska, Iwona; Gregorczyk, Karolina P; Wyżewski, Zbigniew

    2016-10-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a highly contagious viral disease of swine with a mortality rate approaching 100 percent. African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV) is a double-stranded DNA virus with a complex molecular structure. Its large genome, encoding multiple virulence factors, allows for efficient replication, which takes place predominantly in the cytoplasm of monocytes and macrophages. Also, ASFV has the ability to interfere with cell signalling pathways, which leads to various modulations in the synthesis profiles of interferon and other cytokines. Sustained viremia favours the persistence of virions in blood and tissues of the convalescents, and the extended circulation of ASFV within the herd. ASFV has been spreading in the Caucasus since 2007, and in 2014 reached the eastern territory of the European Union. Outbreaks pose an economical threat to native pig rearing, especially since a single point source may easily develop into an epizootic event. There is currently no effective vaccine nor treatment for ASF, and eradication is possible only by prevention or the slaughter of diseased animals. This review paper summarizes the current state of knowledge about ASFV.

  11. Multigene families in African swine fever virus: family 360.

    PubMed Central

    González, A; Calvo, V; Almazán, F; Almendral, J M; Ramírez, J C; de la Vega, I; Blasco, R; Viñuela, E

    1990-01-01

    A group of cross-hybridizing DNA segments contained within the restriction fragments RK', RL, RJ, and RD' of African swine fever virus DNA were mapped and sequenced. Analysis of these sequences revealed the presence of a family of homologous open reading frames in regions close to the DNA ends. The whole family is composed of six open reading frames with an average length of 360 coding triplets (multigene family 360), four of which are located in the left part of the genome and two of which are in the right terminal EcoRI fragment. In close proximity to the right terminal inverted repeat, we found an additional small open reading frame which was homologous to the 5'-terminal portion of the other open reading frames, suggesting that most of that open reading frame has been deleted. These repeated sequences account for the previously described inverted internal repetitions (J.M. Sogo, J.M. Almendral, A. Talavera, and E. Viñuela, Virology 133:271-275, 1984). Most of the genes of multigene family 360 are transcribed in African swine fever virus-infected cells. A comparison of the predicted protein sequences of family 360 indicated that several residues are conserved, suggesting that an overall structure is maintained for every member of the family. The transcription direction of each open reading frame, as well as the evolutionary relationships among the genes, suggests that the family originated by gene duplication and translocation of sequences between the DNA ends. Images PMID:2325203

  12. Different evolutionary patterns of classical swine fever virus envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Yang, Zexiao; Zhang, Mingwang

    2016-03-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever, which is a highly contagious disease of the domestic pig as well as wild boar. The proteins E(rns), E1, and E2 are components of the viral envelope membrane. They are also implicated in virus attachment and entry, replication, and (or) anti-immune response. Here, we studied the genetic variations of these envelope proteins in the evolution of CSFV. The results reveal that the envelope proteins underwent different evolutionary fates. In E(rns) and E1, but not E2, a number of amino acid sites experienced functional divergence. Furthermore, the diversification in E(rns) and E1 was generally episodic because the divergence-related changes of E1 only occurred with the separation of 2 major groups of CSFV and that of E(rns) took place with the division of 1 major group. The major divergence-related sites of E(rns) are located on one of the substrate-binding regions of the RNase domain and C-terminal extension. These functional domains have been reported to block activation of the innate immune system and attachment and entry into host cells, respectively. Our results may shed some light on the divergent roles of the envelope proteins.

  13. Innate Immune Response to Rift Valley Fever Virus in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Nfon, Charles K.; Marszal, Peter; Zhang, Shunzhen; Weingartl, Hana M.

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF), a re-emerging mosquito-borne disease of ruminants and man, was endemic in Africa but spread to Saudi Arabia and Yemen, meaning it could spread even further. Little is known about innate and cell-mediated immunity to RVF virus (RVFV) in ruminants, which is knowledge required for adequate vaccine trials. We therefore studied these aspects in experimentally infected goats. We also compared RVFV grown in an insect cell-line and that grown in a mammalian cell-line for differences in the course of infection. Goats developed viremia one day post infection (DPI), which lasted three to four days and some goats had transient fever coinciding with peak viremia. Up to 4% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were positive for RVFV. Monocytes and dendritic cells in PBMCs declined possibly from being directly infected with virus as suggested by in vitro exposure. Infected goats produced serum IFN-γ, IL-12 and other proinflammatory cytokines but not IFN-α. Despite the lack of IFN-α, innate immunity via the IL-12 to IFN-γ circuit possibly contributed to early protection against RVFV since neutralising antibodies were detected after viremia had cleared. The course of infection with insect cell-derived RVFV (IN-RVFV) appeared to be different from mammalian cell-derived RVFV (MAM-RVFV), with the former attaining peak viremia faster, inducing fever and profoundly affecting specific immune cell subpopulations. This indicated possible differences in infections of ruminants acquired from mosquito bites relative to those due to contact with infectious material from other animals. These differences need to be considered when testing RVF vaccines in laboratory settings. PMID:22545170

  14. 77 FR 68783 - Prospective Grant of Co-Exclusive License: Veterinary Vaccines for Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... Grant of Co-Exclusive License: Veterinary Vaccines for Rift Valley Fever Virus AGENCY: Centers for... Valley Fever Virus Utilizing Reverse Genetics,'' US Provisional Application 61/042,987, filed 4/7/2008, entitled ``Recombinant Rift Valley Fever (RVF) Viruses and Method of Use,'' PCT Application PCT/US2008...

  15. Genetic analysis and epidemiology of Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever viruses in Baluchistan province of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pakistan is considered as an endemic country for Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic fever with numerous outbreaks and sporadic cases reported during the past two decades. Majority of cases are reported from Baluchistan province with subsequent transmissions to non-endemic regions mainly through infected animals directly or via infested ticks. We hereby describe the molecular investigations of CCHF cases reported during 2008 in Quetta city of Baluchistan province. Methods Serum Samples from 44 patients, with clinical signs of hemorrhagic fever attending a tertiary care hospital in Quetta city, were collected and tested for CCHF virus antigen and genomic RNA, using capture IgM EIA kit and standard RT-PCR assay, respectively. The partial S-gene fragments were directly sequenced to get information related to the prevailing CCHFV genotypes and their molecular epidemiology in Pakistan. Results Out of the total forty four, sixteen (36%) samples were found positive for CCHF IgM. Similarly, viral RNA was detected in six (16%) samples. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all study viruses belong to genotype Asia-1 with closest similarity (99-100%) to the previously reported strains from Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iran. Conclusion We conclude that CCHF virus remains endemic within Baluchistan and its neighboring regions of Afghanistan warranting a need of incessant surveillance activities. PMID:23641865

  16. Out of Africa: A Molecular Perspective on the Introduction of Yellow Fever Virus into the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Juliet E; Holmes, Edward C; Barrett, Alan D. T

    2007-01-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) remains the cause of severe morbidity and mortality in South America and Africa. To determine the evolutionary history of this important reemerging pathogen, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of the largest YFV data set compiled to date, representing the prM/E gene region from 133 viral isolates sampled from 22 countries over a period of 76 years. We estimate that the currently circulating strains of YFV arose in Africa within the last 1,500 years and emerged in the Americas following the slave trade approximately 300–400 years ago. These viruses then spread westwards across the continent and persist there to this day in the jungles of South America. We therefore illustrate how gene sequence data can be used to test hypotheses of viral dispersal and demographics, and document the role of human migration in the spread of infectious disease. PMID:17511518

  17. Out of Africa: a molecular perspective on the introduction of yellow fever virus into the Americas.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Juliet E; Holmes, Edward C; Barrett, Alan D T

    2007-05-18

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) remains the cause of severe morbidity and mortality in South America and Africa. To determine the evolutionary history of this important reemerging pathogen, we performed a phylogenetic analysis of the largest YFV data set compiled to date, representing the prM/E gene region from 133 viral isolates sampled from 22 countries over a period of 76 years. We estimate that the currently circulating strains of YFV arose in Africa within the last 1,500 years and emerged in the Americas following the slave trade approximately 300-400 years ago. These viruses then spread westwards across the continent and persist there to this day in the jungles of South America. We therefore illustrate how gene sequence data can be used to test hypotheses of viral dispersal and demographics, and document the role of human migration in the spread of infectious disease.

  18. Classical Swine Fever Virus vs. Classical Swine Fever Virus: The Superinfection Exclusion Phenomenon in Experimentally Infected Wild Boar

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-González, Sara; Pérez-Simó, Marta; Colom-Cadena, Andreu; Cabezón, Oscar; Bohórquez, José Alejandro; Rosell, Rosa; Pérez, Lester Josué; Marco, Ignasi; Lavín, Santiago; Domingo, Mariano; Ganges, Llilianne

    2016-01-01

    Two groups with three wild boars each were used: Group A (animals 1 to 3) served as the control, and Group B (animals 4 to 6) was postnatally persistently infected with the Cat01 strain of CSFV (primary virus). The animals, six weeks old and clinically healthy, were inoculated with the virulent strain Margarita (secondary virus). For exclusive detection of the Margarita strain, a specific qRT-PCR assay was designed, which proved not to have cross-reactivity with the Cat01 strain. The wild boars persistently infected with CSFV were protected from superinfection by the virulent CSFV Margarita strain, as evidenced by the absence of clinical signs and the absence of Margarita RNA detection in serum, swabs and tissue samples. Additionally, in PBMCs, a well-known target for CSFV viral replication, only the primary infecting virus RNA (Cat01 strain) could be detected, even after the isolation in ST cells, demonstrating SIE at the tissue level in vivo. Furthermore, the data analysis of the Margarita qRT-PCR, by means of calculated ΔCt values, supported that PBMCs from persistently infected animals were substantially protected from superinfection after in vitro inoculation with the Margarita virus strain, while this virus was able to infect naive PBMCs efficiently. In parallel, IFN-α values were undetectable in the sera from animals in Group B after inoculation with the CSFV Margarita strain. Furthermore, these animals were unable to elicit adaptive humoral (no E2-specific or neutralising antibodies) or cellular immune responses (in terms of IFN-γ-producing cells) after inoculation with the second virus. Finally, a sequence analysis could not detect CSFV Margarita RNA in the samples tested from Group B. Our results suggested that the SIE phenomenon might be involved in the evolution and phylogeny of the virus, as well as in CSFV control by vaccination. To the best of our knowledge, this study was one of the first showing efficient suppression of superinfection in animals

  19. Classical Swine Fever Virus vs. Classical Swine Fever Virus: The Superinfection Exclusion Phenomenon in Experimentally Infected Wild Boar.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-González, Sara; Pérez-Simó, Marta; Colom-Cadena, Andreu; Cabezón, Oscar; Bohórquez, José Alejandro; Rosell, Rosa; Pérez, Lester Josué; Marco, Ignasi; Lavín, Santiago; Domingo, Mariano; Ganges, Llilianne

    2016-01-01

    Two groups with three wild boars each were used: Group A (animals 1 to 3) served as the control, and Group B (animals 4 to 6) was postnatally persistently infected with the Cat01 strain of CSFV (primary virus). The animals, six weeks old and clinically healthy, were inoculated with the virulent strain Margarita (secondary virus). For exclusive detection of the Margarita strain, a specific qRT-PCR assay was designed, which proved not to have cross-reactivity with the Cat01 strain. The wild boars persistently infected with CSFV were protected from superinfection by the virulent CSFV Margarita strain, as evidenced by the absence of clinical signs and the absence of Margarita RNA detection in serum, swabs and tissue samples. Additionally, in PBMCs, a well-known target for CSFV viral replication, only the primary infecting virus RNA (Cat01 strain) could be detected, even after the isolation in ST cells, demonstrating SIE at the tissue level in vivo. Furthermore, the data analysis of the Margarita qRT-PCR, by means of calculated ΔCt values, supported that PBMCs from persistently infected animals were substantially protected from superinfection after in vitro inoculation with the Margarita virus strain, while this virus was able to infect naive PBMCs efficiently. In parallel, IFN-α values were undetectable in the sera from animals in Group B after inoculation with the CSFV Margarita strain. Furthermore, these animals were unable to elicit adaptive humoral (no E2-specific or neutralising antibodies) or cellular immune responses (in terms of IFN-γ-producing cells) after inoculation with the second virus. Finally, a sequence analysis could not detect CSFV Margarita RNA in the samples tested from Group B. Our results suggested that the SIE phenomenon might be involved in the evolution and phylogeny of the virus, as well as in CSFV control by vaccination. To the best of our knowledge, this study was one of the first showing efficient suppression of superinfection in animals

  20. Quantification of different classical swine fever virus transmission routes within a single compartment.

    PubMed

    Weesendorp, Eefke; Backer, Jantien; Loeffen, Willie

    2014-12-05

    During outbreaks of classical swine fever (CSF), CSF virus (CSFV) can be transmitted via different routes. Understanding these transmission routes is crucial in preventing the unlimited spread of the virus in a naïve population, and the subsequent eradication of the virus from that population. The objectives of the present study were to quantify virus transmission within a compartment, differentiating between transmission within a pen, transmission between pens via contact through (open) pen partitions, and transmission via the air. Furthermore, the possible contribution of each of these routes to infection of individual pigs was quantified. A CSFV outbreak was mimicked in a compartment housing 24 pigs in six different pens. Two pigs in one pen were inoculated with the moderately virulent Paderborn strain, and virus transmission to other pigs was followed in time. Virus transmission rates for transmission via the air (β of 0.33 (0.14-0.64) per day) and transmission between adjacent pens (β of 0.30 (0-0.88) per day) were comparable, but significantly lower than for virus transmission within a pen (β of 6.1 (0.86-18) per day). The route via the air created new focal points of infection, from which virus transmission continued through other routes. This shows that, at least within a compartment, transmission via the air is expected to play a relevant role in the fast spread of the virus after an initial slow start. This will have consequences for efficacy of intervention measures, including vaccination during an outbreak.

  1. Phenotyping and susceptibility of established porcine cells lines to African Swine Fever Virus infection and viral production.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Elena G; Riera, Elena; Nogal, Marisa; Gallardo, Carmina; Fernández, Paloma; Bello-Morales, Raquel; López-Guerrero, José Antonio; Chitko-McKown, Carol G; Richt, Jürgen A; Revilla, Yolanda

    2017-09-04

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a highly pathogenic, double-stranded DNA virus with a marked tropism for cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, affecting swine species and provoking severe economic losses and health threats. In the present study, four established porcine cell lines, IPAM-WT, IPAM-CD163, C∆2+ and WSL, were compared to porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM) in terms of surface marker phenotype, susceptibility to ASFV infection and virus production. The virulent ASFV Armenia/07, E70 or the naturally attenuated NHV/P68 strains were used as viral models. Cells expressed only low levels of specific receptors linked to the monocyte/macrophage lineage, with low levels of infection overall, with the exception of WSL, which showed more efficient production of strain NHV/P68 but not of strains E70 and Armenia/07.

  2. Inhibitors of cellular kinases with broad-spectrum antiviral activity for hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Emma L; McMullan, Laura K; Lo, Michael K; Spengler, Jessica R; Bergeron, Éric; Albariño, César G; Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Chiang, Cheng-Feng; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Flint, Mike

    2015-08-01

    Host cell kinases are important for the replication of a number of hemorrhagic fever viruses. We tested a panel of kinase inhibitors for their ability to block the replication of multiple hemorrhagic fever viruses. OSU-03012 inhibited the replication of Lassa, Ebola, Marburg and Nipah viruses, whereas BIBX 1382 dihydrochloride inhibited Lassa, Ebola and Marburg viruses. BIBX 1382 blocked both Lassa and Ebola virus glycoprotein-dependent cell entry. These compounds may be used as tools to understand conserved virus-host interactions, and implicate host cell kinases that may be targets for broad spectrum therapeutic intervention.

  3. Deletion of virulence associated genes from attenuated African swine fever virus isolate OUR T88/3 decreases its ability to protect against challenge with virulent virus.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Charles C; Goatley, Lynnette; Fishbourne, Emma; Chapman, David; Cooke, Lyndsay; Oura, Christopher A; Netherton, Christopher L; Takamatsu, Haru-Hisa; Dixon, Linda K

    2013-08-15

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes an acute haemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs against which there is no effective vaccine. The attenuated ASFV strain OUR T88/3 has been shown previously to protect vaccinated pigs against challenge with some virulent strains including OUR T88/1. Two genes, DP71L and DP96R were deleted from the OUR T88/3 genome to create recombinant virus OUR T88/3ΔDP2. Deletion of these genes from virulent viruses has previously been shown to reduce ASFV virulence in domestic pigs. Groups of 6 pigs were immunised with deletion virus OUR T88/3ΔDP2 or parental virus OUR T88/3 and challenged with virulent OUR T88/1 virus. Four pigs (66%) were protected by inoculation with the deletion virus OUR T88/3ΔDP2 compared to 100% protection with the parental virus OUR T88/3. Thus the deletion of the two genes DP71L and DP96R from OUR T88/3 strain reduced its ability to protect pigs against challenge with virulent virus.

  4. Genotyping of classical swine fever virus using high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Titov, Ilya; Tsybanov, Sodnom; Malogolovkin, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Discrimination between different field and vaccine strains of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is crucial for meaningful disease diagnosis and epidemiological investigation. In this study, a rapid method for differentiating vaccine strains and outbreak CSFV isolates by combined RT-PCR and high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis has been developed. The assay is based on PCR amplification of short fragments from the most variable region of CSFVgene E2, followed by HRM analysis of amplicons. Real-Time PCR/HRM for CSFV detection and differentiation analysis has sensitivity comparable to RT-qPCR and genotyping resolution comparable to E2 nucleotide sequencing. This assay in one step enables rapid and sensitive identification and genotype discrimination of CSFV in field samples, and thus will be valuable for CSF outbreak response and disease control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A promising multiple-epitope recombinant vaccine against classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hong; Hou, Xiangming; Wu, Jinyan; Chen, Yan; Shang, Youjun; Yin, Shuanghui; Zhang, Keshan; Liu, Xiangtao

    2014-01-15

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease of swine. It is caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV), one of the members of the genus Pestivirus of the Flaviviridae family. The development of a safe and effective vaccine against the CSF is critical to pandemic control, this article shows a tandem-repeat multiple-epitope recombinant vaccine can protect pigs from CSFV challenge. That was composed as following: two copies each of glycoprotein E2 residues 693-707, 241-276 and 770-781, and two copies amino acid residues 1446-1460 of the non-structural protein NS2-3. In the challenge test, all of the swine vaccinated with Chinese vaccine strain (C-strain) were fully protected from a challenge with CSFV. However, after three successive vaccinations with the multiple-epitope recombinant vaccine, three out of five pigs were protected from challenge with CSFV (in terms of both clinical signs and viremia). These results demonstrate that multiple-epitope recombinant vaccine which carrying the major CSFV epitopes can induce a high level of epitope-specific antibodies and exhibit a protective capability that parallels induced by C-strain to a certain extent.

  6. Vector Competence of Selected African Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) Species for Rift Valley Fever Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever ( RVF ) in Egypt, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia have indicated the potential...species to transmit RVF virus (RVFV), we conducted studies to determine the vector competence of selected African species of mosquitoes for this virus. All...once enzootic in Africa, to spread to other parts of the world. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Rift Valley fever virus RVF entomology mosquito vector African

  7. Ecology and Epidemiology of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Transmission in the Republic of Senegal.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    ecology of tick-borne Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever ( CCHF ) virus in the West African savannah was devoted to integration and analysis of results, and...continued surveillance at field sites. These observations of tick and virus activity in northern Senegal produced numerous new isolates of CCHF virus...epidemiology of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever ( CCHF ) in West Africa, a widespread, life-threatening, tick-borne, viral zoonosis, remains poorly understood

  8. Bayesian Phylogeography of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Ebranati, Erika; Shkjezi, Renata; Papa, Anna; Luzzago, Camilla; Gabanelli, Elena; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Lai, Alessia; Rezza, Giovanni; Galli, Massimo; Bino, Silvia; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a zoonosis mainly transmitted by ticks that causes severe hemorrhagic fever and has a mortality rate of 5-60%. The first outbreak of CCHF occurred in the Crimean peninsula in 1944-45 and it has recently emerged in the Balkans and eastern Mediterranean. In order to reconstruct the origin and pathway of the worldwide dispersion of the virus at global and regional (eastern European) level, we investigated the phylogeography of the infection by analysing 121 publicly available CCHFV S gene sequences including two recently characterised Albanian isolates. The spatial and temporal phylogeny was reconstructed using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo approach, which estimated a mean evolutionary rate of 2.96 x 10-4 (95%HPD=1.6 and 4.7 x 10-4) substitutions/site/year for the analysed fragment. All of the isolates segregated into seven highly significant clades that correspond to the known geographical clades: in particular the two new isolates from northern Albania clustered significantly within the Europe 1 clade. Our phylogeographical reconstruction suggests that the global CCHFV clades originated about one thousand years ago from a common ancestor probably located in Africa. The virus then spread to Asia in the XV century and entered Europe on at least two occasions: the first in the early 1800s, when a still circulating but less or non-pathogenic virus emerged in Greece and Turkey, and the second in the early 1900s, when a pathogenic CCHFV strain began to spread in eastern Europe. The most probable location for the origin of this European clade 1 was Russia, but Turkey played a central role in spreading the virus throughout Europe. Given the close proximity of the infected areas, our data suggest that the movement of wild and domestic ungulates from endemic areas was probably the main cause of the dissemination of the virus in eastern Europe. PMID:24223988

  9. [Salmonella choleraesuis C500 delivering DNA immunization against classical swine fever virus].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hong-Wei; Sun, Jin-Fu; Han, Wen-Yu; Li, Zuo-Sheng; Yu, Xing-Long; Tu, Chang-Chun

    2005-11-01

    Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) E2 protein eukaryotic expression plasmid pVAXE2 was constructed. The plasmid pVAXE2 was transformed into Salmonella choleraesuis C500 (S. C500) attenuated vaccine strain by electroporation to generate Salmonella choleraesuis engineering strain S. C500/pVAXE2. The characterization of S. C500/pVAXE2 in morphology, growth, biochemistry and serology indicated that it retained the same properties as its original strain S. C500 with exception of kanamycin resistance originated from the plasmid pVAXE2. The plasmid stable in the bacteria after 15 passages. Kunming mice and rabbits were vaccinated three times at two weeks interval with S. C500/pVAXE2 in oral and intramuscular routes at the dosage of 1 x 10(8) CFU for mice and 2 x 10(9) CFU for rabbits each time. The specific antibody response against CSFV and Salmonella choleraesuis was detected by ELISA. Two weeks after the third boost the immunized rabbits were challenged with 20 ID50 of hog cholera lapinized virus (HCLV), followed by a virulent strain of Salmonella choleraesuis two week later than HCLV challenge. The results showed that all immunized mice and rabbits produced significant antibodies against CSFV and Salmonella choleraesuis, and the immunized rabbits demonstrated the effective protection against the challenge of HCLV and virulent Salmonella choleraesuis. These results indicated the potential of developing multiplex swine DNA vaccine by using this bacteria as the vector.

  10. [Genetic variants of the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus circulating in endemic areas of the southern Tajikistan in 2009].

    PubMed

    Petrova, I D; Kononova, Iu V; Chausov, E V; Shestopalov, A M; Tishkova, F Kh

    2013-01-01

    506 Hyalomma anatolicum ticks were collected and assayed in two Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) endemic regions of Tajikistan. Antigen and RNA of CCHF virus were detected in 3.4% of tick pools from Rudaki district using ELISA and RT-PCR tests. As of Tursunzade district, viral antigen was identified in 9.0% of samples and viral RNA was identified in 8.1% of samples. The multiple alignment of the obtained nucleotide sequences of CCHF virus genome S-segment 287-nt region (996-1282) and multiple alignment of deduced amino acid sequences of the samples, carried out to compare with CCHF virus strains from the GenBank database, as well as phylogenetic analysis, enabled us to conclude that Asia 1 and Asia 2 genotypes of CCHF virus are circulating in Tajikistan. It is important to note that the genotype Asia 1 virus was detected for the first time in Tajikistan.

  11. Protein Phosphatase-1 Regulates Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Alan; Shafagati, Nazly; Benedict, Ashwini; Ammosova, Tatiana; Ivanov, Andrey; Hakami, Ramin M.; Terasaki, Kaori; Makino, Shinji; Nekhai, Sergei; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), genus Phlebovirus family Bunyaviridae, is an arthropod-borne virus endemic throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Recent outbreaks have resulted in cyclic epidemics with an increasing geographic footprint, devastating both livestock and human populations. Despite being recognized as an emerging threat, relatively little is known about the virulence mechanisms and host interactions of RVFV. To date there are no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines for RVF and there is an urgent need for their development. The Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) has previously been shown to play a significant role in the replication of several viruses. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PP1 plays a prominent role in RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle. Both siRNA knockdown of PP1α and a novel PP1-targeting small molecule compound 1E7-03, resulted in decreased viral titers across several cell lines. Deregulation of PP1 was found to inhibit viral RNA production, potentially through the disruption of viral RNA transcript/protein interactions, and indicates a potential link between PP1α and the viral L polymerase and nucleoprotein. These results indicate that PP1 activity is important for RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle and may prove an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:26801627

  12. Protein Phosphatase-1 regulates Rift Valley fever virus replication.

    PubMed

    Baer, Alan; Shafagati, Nazly; Benedict, Ashwini; Ammosova, Tatiana; Ivanov, Andrey; Hakami, Ramin M; Terasaki, Kaori; Makino, Shinji; Nekhai, Sergei; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2016-03-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), genus Phlebovirus family Bunyaviridae, is an arthropod-borne virus endemic throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Recent outbreaks have resulted in cyclic epidemics with an increasing geographic footprint, devastating both livestock and human populations. Despite being recognized as an emerging threat, relatively little is known about the virulence mechanisms and host interactions of RVFV. To date there are no FDA approved therapeutics or vaccines for RVF and there is an urgent need for their development. The Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) has previously been shown to play a significant role in the replication of several viruses. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PP1 plays a prominent role in RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle. Both siRNA knockdown of PP1α and a novel PP1-targeting small molecule compound 1E7-03, resulted in decreased viral titers across several cell lines. Deregulation of PP1 was found to inhibit viral RNA production, potentially through the disruption of viral RNA transcript/protein interactions, and indicates a potential link between PP1α and the viral L polymerase and nucleoprotein. These results indicate that PP1 activity is important for RVFV replication early on during the viral life cycle and may prove an attractive therapeutic target.

  13. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever: Tick-Host-Virus Interactions.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Tsergouli, Katerina; Tsioka, Katerina; Mirazimi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is transmitted to humans by bite of infected ticks or by direct contact with blood or tissues of viremic patients or animals. It causes to humans a severe disease with fatality up to 30%. The current knowledge about the vector-host-CCHFV interactions is very limited due to the high-level containment required for CCHFV studies. Among ticks, Hyalomma spp. are considered the most competent virus vectors. CCHFV evades the tick immune response, and following its replication in the lining of the tick's midgut, it is disseminated by the hemolymph in the salivary glands and reproductive organs. The introduction of salivary gland secretions into the host cells is the major route via which CCHFV enters the host. Following an initial amplification at the site of inoculation, the virus is spread to the target organs. Apoptosis is induced via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Genetic factors and immune status of the host may affect the release of cytokines which play a major role in disease progression and outcome. It is expected that the use of new technology of metabolomics, transcriptomics and proteomics will lead to improved understanding of CCHFV-host interactions and identify potential targets for blocking the CCHFV transmission.

  14. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever: Tick-Host-Virus Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Anna; Tsergouli, Katerina; Tsioka, Katerina; Mirazimi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is transmitted to humans by bite of infected ticks or by direct contact with blood or tissues of viremic patients or animals. It causes to humans a severe disease with fatality up to 30%. The current knowledge about the vector-host-CCHFV interactions is very limited due to the high-level containment required for CCHFV studies. Among ticks, Hyalomma spp. are considered the most competent virus vectors. CCHFV evades the tick immune response, and following its replication in the lining of the tick's midgut, it is disseminated by the hemolymph in the salivary glands and reproductive organs. The introduction of salivary gland secretions into the host cells is the major route via which CCHFV enters the host. Following an initial amplification at the site of inoculation, the virus is spread to the target organs. Apoptosis is induced via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Genetic factors and immune status of the host may affect the release of cytokines which play a major role in disease progression and outcome. It is expected that the use of new technology of metabolomics, transcriptomics and proteomics will lead to improved understanding of CCHFV-host interactions and identify potential targets for blocking the CCHFV transmission. PMID:28603698

  15. Development and evaluation of loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for detection of Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in Sudan.

    PubMed

    Osman, Hana A M; Eltom, Kamal H; Musa, Nasreen O; Bilal, Nasreldin M; Elbashir, Mustafa I; Aradaib, Imadeldin E

    2013-06-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus (CCHFV) activity has been detected in Kordufan region of the Sudan in 2008 with high case-fatality rates in villages and rural hospitals in the region. Therefore, in the present study, a reverse transcription (RT) loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed and compared to nested RT-PCR for rapid detection of CCHFV targeting the small (S) RNA segment. A set of RT-LAMP primers, designed from a highly conserved region of the S segment of the viral genome, was employed to identify all the Sudanese CCHFV strains. The sensitivity studies indicated that the RT-LAMP detected 10fg of CCHFV RNA as determined by naked eye turbidity read out, which is more likely the way it would be read in a resource-poor setting. This level of sensitivity is good enough to detect most acute cases. Using agarose gel electrophoresis, the RT-LAMP assay detected as little as 0.1fg of viral RNA (equivalent to 50 viral particle). There was 100% agreement between results of the RT-LAMP and the nested PCR when testing 10-fold serial dilution of CCHFV RNA. The specificity studies indicated that there was no cross-reactivity with other related hemorrhagic fever viruses circulating in Sudan including, Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), Dengue fever virus, and yellow fever virus. The RT-LAMP was performed under isothermal conditions at 63°C and no special apparatus was needed, which rendered the assay more economical and practical than real-time PCR in such developing countries, like Sudan. In addition, the RT-LAMP provides a valuable tool for rapid detection and differentiation of CCHFV during an outbreak of the disease in remote areas and in rural hospitals with resource-poor settings.

  16. Isolation of yellow fever virus from mosquitoes in Misiones province, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Goenaga, Silvina; Fabbri, Cintia; Dueñas, Juan Climaco Rondan; Gardenal, Cristina Noemí; Rossi, Gustavo Carlos; Calderon, Gladys; Morales, Maria Alejandra; Garcia, Jorge Braulio; Enria, Delia Alcira; Levis, Silvana

    2012-11-01

    Yellow fever (YF) is a viral hemorrhagic fever endemic to tropical regions of South America and Africa. From 2007 to 2009 an important epidemic/epizootic of YF was detected in different populations of howler monkeys (Alouatta species) in Misiones, a northeastern Argentinian province. Yellow fever virus (YFV) infection was researched and documented by laboratory tests in humans and in dead Alouatta carayá. The objective of that research was to investigate the circulation of YFV in mosquitoes, which could be implicated in the sylvatic transmission of YF in Argentina. The above-mentioned mosquitoes were captured in the same geographical region where the epizootic took place. A YFV strain was isolated in cell culture from pools of Sabethes albiprivus. This study is not only the first isolation of YFV from mosquitoes in Argentina, but it is also the first YFV isolation reported in the species Sabethes albiprivus, suggesting that this species might be playing a key role in sylvatic YF in Argentina.

  17. Comparison of the Live Attenuated Yellow Fever Vaccine 17D-204 Strain to Its Virulent Parental Strain Asibi by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Andrew; Tesh, Robert B.; Wood, Thomas G.; Widen, Steven G.; Ryman, Kate D.; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The first comparison of a live RNA viral vaccine strain to its wild-type parental strain by deep sequencing is presented using as a model the yellow fever virus (YFV) live vaccine strain 17D-204 and its wild-type parental strain, Asibi. Methods. The YFV 17D-204 vaccine genome was compared to that of the parental strain Asibi by massively parallel methods. Variability was compared on multiple scales of the viral genomes. A modeled exploration of small-frequency variants was performed to reconstruct plausible regions of mutational plasticity. Results. Overt quasispecies diversity is a feature of the parental strain, whereas the live vaccine strain lacks diversity according to multiple independent measurements. A lack of attenuating mutations in the Asibi population relative to that of 17D-204 was observed, demonstrating that the vaccine strain was derived by discrete mutation of Asibi and not by selection of genomes in the wild-type population. Conclusions. Relative quasispecies structure is a plausible correlate of attenuation for live viral vaccines. Analyses such as these of attenuated viruses improve our understanding of the molecular basis of vaccine attenuation and provide critical information on the stability of live vaccines and the risk of reversion to virulence. PMID:24141982

  18. Comparison of the live attenuated yellow fever vaccine 17D-204 strain to its virulent parental strain Asibi by deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Beck, Andrew; Tesh, Robert B; Wood, Thomas G; Widen, Steven G; Ryman, Kate D; Barrett, Alan D T

    2014-02-01

    The first comparison of a live RNA viral vaccine strain to its wild-type parental strain by deep sequencing is presented using as a model the yellow fever virus (YFV) live vaccine strain 17D-204 and its wild-type parental strain, Asibi. The YFV 17D-204 vaccine genome was compared to that of the parental strain Asibi by massively parallel methods. Variability was compared on multiple scales of the viral genomes. A modeled exploration of small-frequency variants was performed to reconstruct plausible regions of mutational plasticity. Overt quasispecies diversity is a feature of the parental strain, whereas the live vaccine strain lacks diversity according to multiple independent measurements. A lack of attenuating mutations in the Asibi population relative to that of 17D-204 was observed, demonstrating that the vaccine strain was derived by discrete mutation of Asibi and not by selection of genomes in the wild-type population. Relative quasispecies structure is a plausible correlate of attenuation for live viral vaccines. Analyses such as these of attenuated viruses improve our understanding of the molecular basis of vaccine attenuation and provide critical information on the stability of live vaccines and the risk of reversion to virulence.

  19. Quasispecies composition and diversity do not reveal any predictors for chronic classical swine fever virus infection.

    PubMed

    Jenckel, Maria; Blome, Sandra; Beer, Martin; Höper, Dirk

    2017-03-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) can run acute, chronic, and prenatal courses in both domestic pigs and wild boar. Although chronic infections are rare events, their epidemiological impact is very high due to the long-term shedding of virus. So far, little is known about the factors that influence disease course and outcome from either the host or virus's perspective. To elucidate the viral determinants, we analyzed the role of the viral populations for the development of chronic CSF virus (CSFV) infections. Three different animal trials that had led to both chronic and acute infections were chosen for a detailed analysis by deep sequencing. The three inocula represented sub-genogroups 2.1 and 2.3, and two viruses were wild-type CSFV, one derived from an infectious cDNA clone. These viruses and samples derived from acutely and chronically infected animals were subjected to next-generation sequencing. Subsequently, the derived full-length genomes were compared at both the consensus and the quasispecies level. At consensus level, no differences were observed between the parental viruses and the viruses obtained from chronically infected animals. Despite a considerable level of variability at the quasispecies level, no indications were found for any predictive pattern with regard to the chronicity of the CSFV infections. While there might be no direct marker for chronicity, moderate virulence of some CSFV strains in itself seems to be a crucial prerequisite for the establishment of long-term infections which does not need further genetic adaption. Thus, general host and virus factors need further investigation.

  20. Culex pipiens, an Experimental Efficient Vector of West Nile and Rift Valley Fever Viruses in the Maghreb Region

    PubMed Central

    Amraoui, Fadila; Krida, Ghazi; Bouattour, Ali; Rhim, Adel; Daaboub, Jabeur; Harrat, Zoubir; Boubidi, Said-Chawki; Tijane, Mhamed; Sarih, Mhammed; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2012-01-01

    West Nile fever (WNF) and Rift Valley fever (RVF) are emerging diseases causing epidemics outside their natural range of distribution. West Nile virus (WNV) circulates widely and harmlessly in the old world among birds as amplifying hosts, and horses and humans as accidental dead-end hosts. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) re-emerges periodically in Africa causing massive outbreaks. In the Maghreb, eco-climatic and entomologic conditions are favourable for WNV and RVFV emergence. Both viruses are transmitted by mosquitoes belonging to the Culex pipiens complex. We evaluated the ability of different populations of Cx. pipiens from North Africa to transmit WNV and the avirulent RVFV Clone 13 strain. Mosquitoes collected in Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia during the summer 2010 were experimentally infected with WNV and RVFV Clone 13 strain at titers of 107.8 and 108.5 plaque forming units/mL, respectively. Disseminated infection and transmission rates were estimated 14–21 days following the exposure to the infectious blood-meal. We show that 14 days after exposure to WNV, all mosquito st developed a high disseminated infection and were able to excrete infectious saliva. However, only 69.2% of mosquito strains developed a disseminated infection with RVFV Clone 13 strain, and among them, 77.8% were able to deliver virus through saliva. Thus, Cx. pipiens from the Maghreb are efficient experimental vectors to transmit WNV and to a lesser extent, RVFV Clone 13 strain. The epidemiologic importance of our findings should be considered in the light of other parameters related to mosquito ecology and biology. PMID:22693557

  1. Culex pipiens, an experimental efficient vector of West Nile and Rift Valley fever viruses in the Maghreb region.

    PubMed

    Amraoui, Fadila; Krida, Ghazi; Bouattour, Ali; Rhim, Adel; Daaboub, Jabeur; Harrat, Zoubir; Boubidi, Said-Chawki; Tijane, Mhamed; Sarih, Mhammed; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2012-01-01

    West Nile fever (WNF) and Rift Valley fever (RVF) are emerging diseases causing epidemics outside their natural range of distribution. West Nile virus (WNV) circulates widely and harmlessly in the old world among birds as amplifying hosts, and horses and humans as accidental dead-end hosts. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) re-emerges periodically in Africa causing massive outbreaks. In the Maghreb, eco-climatic and entomologic conditions are favourable for WNV and RVFV emergence. Both viruses are transmitted by mosquitoes belonging to the Culex pipiens complex. We evaluated the ability of different populations of Cx. pipiens from North Africa to transmit WNV and the avirulent RVFV Clone 13 strain. Mosquitoes collected in Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia during the summer 2010 were experimentally infected with WNV and RVFV Clone 13 strain at titers of 10(7.8) and 10(8.5) plaque forming units/mL, respectively. Disseminated infection and transmission rates were estimated 14-21 days following the exposure to the infectious blood-meal. We show that 14 days after exposure to WNV, all mosquito st developed a high disseminated infection and were able to excrete infectious saliva. However, only 69.2% of mosquito strains developed a disseminated infection with RVFV Clone 13 strain, and among them, 77.8% were able to deliver virus through saliva. Thus, Cx. pipiens from the Maghreb are efficient experimental vectors to transmit WNV and to a lesser extent, RVFV Clone 13 strain. The epidemiologic importance of our findings should be considered in the light of other parameters related to mosquito ecology and biology.

  2. Chikungunya Fever: Obstetric Considerations on an Emerging Virus.

    PubMed

    Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Grace, Matthew R; Strauss, Robert A; Chescheir, Nancy; Kuller, Jeffrey A

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya fever is an increasingly common viral infection transmitted to humans by species of the Aedes mosquitoes. Characterized by fevers, myalgias, arthralgias, headache, and rash, the infection is endemic to tropical areas. However, identification of disease vectors to Europe and the Americas has raised concern for possible spread of chikungunya to these areas. More recently, these concerns have become a reality; with more than 500,000 new cases in the Western hemisphere in the last 2 years, questions have arisen about the implications of infection during pregnancy and delivery. A literature review was performed using MEDLINE in order to gather information regarding the obstetric implications of this infection. It appears that although this virus can cross the placenta in the first and second trimester leading to fetal infection and miscarriage, this is a very rare occurrence. In contrast, active maternal infection within 4 days of delivery conveys a high risk of vertical transmission. Maternal infection during pregnancy does not appear to be more severe than infection on the nonpregnant female. Given the increasing incidence of chikungunya, obstetric providers should be aware of the disease and its implication for the gravid female.

  3. Competitive replication kinetics and pathogenicity in pigs co-infected with historical and newly invading classical swine fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Liang; Deng, Ming-Chung; Tsai, Kuo-Jung; Liu, Hsin-Meng; Huang, Chin-Cheng; Wang, Fun-In; Chang, Chia-Yi

    2017-01-15

    Classical swine fever (CSF), an economically important and highly contagious disease of pigs, is caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). In Taiwan, CSFVs from field outbreaks belong to two distinct genotypes. The historical genotype 3.4 dominated from the 1920s to 1996, and since 1996, the newly invading genotype 2.1 has dominated. To explain the phenomenon of this virus shift in the field, representative viruses belonging to genotypes 2.1 and 3.4 were either inoculated alone (single infection) or co-inoculated (co-infection), both in vivo and in vitro, to compare the virus replication and pathogenesis. In pigs co-infected with the genotype 2.1 TD/96/TWN strain and the genotype 3.4 94.4/IL/94/TWN strain, the newly invading genotype 2.1 was detected earlier in the blood, oral fluid, and feces, and the viral loads were consistently and significantly higher than that of the historical genotype 3.4. In cell cultures, the ratio of secreted virus to cell-associated virus of the genotype 2.1 strain was higher than that of the genotype 3.4 strain. This study is the first to demonstrate a possible explanation of virus shift in the field, wherein the newly invading genotype 2.1 replicates more efficiently than did genotype 3.4 and outcompetes the replication and pathogenicity of genotype 3.4 in pigs in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of an updated PCR assay for detection of African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuzi; Atim, Stella A; Shao, Lina; Ayebazibwe, Chrisostom; Sun, Yuan; Liu, Yan; Ji, Shengwei; Meng, Xing-Yu; Li, Su; Li, Yongfeng; Masembe, Charles; Ståhl, Karl; Widén, Frederik; Liu, Lihong; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2017-01-01

    Due to the current unavailability of vaccines or treatments for African swine fever (ASF), which is caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV), rapid and reliable detection of the virus is essential for timely implementation of emergency control measures and differentiation of ASF from other swine diseases with similar clinical presentations. Here, an improved PCR assay was developed and evaluated for sensitive and universal detection of ASFV. Primers specific for ASFV were designed based on the highly conserved region of the vp72 gene sequences of all ASFV strains available in GenBank, and the PCR assay was established and compared with two OIE-validated PCR tests. The analytic detection limit of the PCR assay was 60 DNA copies per reaction. No amplification signal was observed for several other porcine viruses. The novel PCR assay was more sensitive than two OIE-validated PCR assays when testing 14 strains of ASFV representing four genotypes (I, V, VIII and IX) from diverse geographical areas. A total of 62 clinical swine blood samples collected from Uganda were examined by the novel PCR, giving a high agreement (59/62) with a superior sensitive universal probe library-based real-time PCR. Eight out of 62 samples tested positive, and three samples with higher Ct values (39.15, 38.39 and 37.41) in the real-time PCR were negative for ASFV in the novel PCR. In contrast, one (with a Ct value of 29.75 by the real-time PCR) and two (with Ct values of 29.75 and 33.12) ASFV-positive samples were not identified by the two OIE-validated PCR assays, respectively. Taken together, these data show that the novel PCR assay is specific, sensitive, and applicable for molecular diagnosis and surveillance of ASF.

  5. Dengue virus identification by transmission electron microscopy and molecular methods in fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Limonta, D; Falcón, V; Torres, G; Capó, V; Menéndez, I; Rosario, D; Castellanos, Y; Alvarez, M; Rodríguez-Roche, R; de la Rosa, M C; Pavón, A; López, L; González, K; Guillén, G; Diaz, J; Guzmán, M G

    2012-12-01

    Dengue virus is the most significant virus transmitted by arthropods worldwide and may cause a potentially fatal systemic disease named dengue hemorrhagic fever. In this work, dengue virus serotype 4 was detected in the tissues of one fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever case using electron immunomicroscopy and molecular methods. This is the first report of dengue virus polypeptides findings by electron immunomicroscopy in human samples. In addition, not-previously-documented virus-like particles visualized in spleen, hepatic, brain, and pulmonary tissues from a dengue case are discussed.

  6. Unraveling the Armor of a Killer: Evasion of Host Defenses by African Swine Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Reis, Ana Luisa; Netherton, Chris; Dixon, Linda K

    2017-03-15

    African swine fever is an acute hemorrhagic disease of pigs. Extensive recent spread in the Russian Federation and Eastern Europe has increased the risk to global pig production. The virus is a large DNA virus and is the only member of the Asfarviridae family. In pigs, the virus replicates predominantly in macrophages. We review how the virus overcomes the barriers to replication in the macrophage and the virus mechanism to inhibit key host defense pathways. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Characterization of Sicilian strains of spotted fever group rickettsiae by using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, G; Di Stefano, R; Damiani, G; Mansueto, S

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-two hybridomas producing anti-Rickettsia conorii monoclonal antibodies were obtained by nine fusion experiments. The strain chosen for immunization of mice was MAVI, an R. conorii strain isolated from a Sicilian patient with Boutonneuse fever. When tested for immunoglobulin isotype by an indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay, 46.6% of supernatants from the 22 hybridomas were immunoglobulin M. The supernatants were tested in the IIF assay for binding to the MAVI strain and four spotted fever group rickettsia strains isolated from Sicilian ticks (two virulent and two nonpathogenic when inoculated intraperitoneally in male guinea pigs). Only five of the supernatants showed a positive IIF result on all tested strains, although they produced different titers to the various strains, possibly an indication that they recognized an antigen common to spotted fever group rickettsiae. Immunodominant epitopes for humans were determined by using patient sera to analyze inhibition of binding to the MAVI strain. Although a limited number of serum samples were screened, a high percentage of Boutonneuse fever patients produced antibodies recognizing the same epitopes as were recognized by the mouse monoclonal antibodies. A striking heterogeneity was found both in the expression of mouse-recognized epitopes on the five rickettsial strains and in the serum antibody responses of Boutonneuse fever patients to these epitopes. PMID:2473092

  8. Sequence adaptations during growth of rescued classical swine fever viruses in cell culture and within infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Hadsbjerg, Johanne; Friis, Martin B; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Nielsen, Jens; Belsham, Graham J; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun

    2016-08-30

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) causes an economically important disease of swine. Four different viruses were rescued from full-length cloned cDNAs derived from the Paderborn strain of CSFV. Three of these viruses had been modified by mutagenesis (with 7 or 8 nt changes) within stem 2 of the subdomain IIIf of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that directs the initiation of protein synthesis. Rescued viruses were inoculated into pigs. The rescued vPader10 virus, without modifications in the IRES, induced clinical disease in pigs that was very similar to that observed previously with the parental field strain and transmission to in-contact pigs occurred. Two sequence reversions, in the NS2 and NS5B coding regions, became dominant within the virus populations in these infected pigs. Rescued viruses, with mutant IRES elements, did not induce disease and only very limited circulation of viral RNA could be detected. However, the animals inoculated with these mutant viruses seroconverted against CSFV. Thus, these mutant viruses were highly attenuated in vivo. All 4 rescued viruses were also passaged up to 20 times in cell culture. Using full genome sequencing, the same two adaptations within each of four independent virus populations were observed that restored the coding sequence to that of the parental field strain. These adaptations occurred with different kinetics. The combination of reverse genetics and in depth, full genome sequencing provides a powerful approach to analyse virus adaptation and to identify key determinants of viral replication efficiency in cells and within host animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular detection of Rift Valley fever virus in serum samples from selected areas of Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Chengula, Augustino Alfred; Kasanga, Christopher Jacob; Mdegela, Robinson Hammerthon; Sallu, Raphael; Yongolo, Mmeta

    2014-04-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an acute mosquito-borne viral zoonotic disease affecting domestic animals and humans caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). The virus belongs to the genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae. The main aim of this study was to detect the presence of antibodies to RVFV as well as the virus in the serum samples that were collected from livestock during the 2006/2007 RVF outbreaks in different locations in Tanzania. Analysis of selected samples was done using a RVF-specific inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (I-ELISA) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Genomic viral RNA was extracted directly from serum samples using a QIAamp Viral RNA Mini Kit (QIAGEN), and a one-step RT-PCR protocol was used to amplify the S segment of RVFV. Positive results were obtained in 39.5% (n = 200) samples using the RVF I-ELISA, and 17.6% (n = 108) of samples were positive by RT-PCR. I-ELISA detected 41 (38.7%), 32 (39.0%), and 6 (50.0%) positive results in cattle, goats, and sheep sera, respectively, whereas the RT-PCR detected 11 (0.2%), 7 (0.2%), and 1 (0.1%) positive results in cattle, goats, and sheep sera, respectively. These findings have demonstrated the presence of RVFV in Tanzania during the 2006/2007 RVF outbreaks. To our knowledge, this is the first report to detect RVFV in serum samples from domestic animals in Tanzania using PCR technique. Therefore, a detailed molecular study to characterize the virus from different geographical locations in order to establish the profile of strains circulating in the country and develop more effective and efficient control strategies should be done.

  10. African swine fever virus p72 genotype IX in domestic pigs, Congo, 2009.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Carmina; Anchuelo, Raquel; Pelayo, Virginia; Poudevigne, Frédéric; Leon, Tati; Nzoussi, Jacques; Bishop, Richard; Pérez, Covadonga; Soler, Alejandro; Nieto, Raquel; Martín, Hilario; Arias, Marisa

    2011-08-01

    African swine fever virus p72 genotype IX, associated with outbreaks in eastern Africa, is cocirculating in the Republic of the Congo with West African genotype I. Data suggest that viruses from eastern Africa are moving into western Africa, increasing the threat of outbreaks caused by novel viruses in this region.

  11. The pathogenesis of highly virulent African Swine Fever virus in domestic pigs exposed via intraoropharyngeal, intranasopharyngeal, and intramuscular inoculation, and by direct contact with infected pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In order to optimize novel systems for African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV) vaccine development, domestic pigs were challenged with the highly virulent ASFV-Malawi strain via intraoropharyngeal (IOP), intranasopharyngeal (INP), intramuscular (IM), and direct contact (DC) routes. Direct challenge doses ...

  12. Discovering up-regulated VEGF-C expression in swine umbilical vein endothelial cells by classical swine fever virus Shimen.

    PubMed

    Ning, Pengbo; Zhang, Yanming; Guo, Kangkang; Chen, Ru; Liang, Wulong; Lin, Zhi; Li, Helin

    2014-04-23

    Infection of domestic swine with the highly virulent Shimen strain of classical swine fever virus causes hemorrhagic lymphadenitis and diffuse hemorrhaging in infected swine. We analyzed patterns of gene expression for CSFV Shimen in swine umbilical vein endothelial cells (SUVECs). Transcription of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) C gene (VEGF-C) and translation of the corresponding protein were significantly up-regulated in SUVECs. Our findings suggest that VEGF-C is involved in mechanisms of acute infection caused by virulent strains of CSFV.

  13. Mapping a Major Gene for Resistance to Rift Valley Fever Virus in Laboratory Rats.

    PubMed

    Busch, Catherine M; Callicott, Ralph J; Peters, Clarence J; Morrill, John C; Womack, James E

    2015-01-01

    The Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) presents an epidemic and epizootic threat in sub-Saharan Africa, Egypt, and the Arabian Peninsula, and has furthermore recently gained attention as a potential weapon of bioterrorism due to its ability to infect both livestock and humans. Inbred rat strains show similar characteristic responses to the disease as humans and livestock, making them a suitable model species. Previous studies had indicated differences in susceptibility to RVFV hepatic disease among various rat strains, including a higher susceptibility of Wistar-Furth (WF) compared to a more resistant Lewis (LEW) strain. Further study revealed that this resistance trait exhibits the pattern of a major dominant gene inherited in Mendelian fashion. A genome scan of a congenic WF.LEW strain, created from the susceptible WF and resistant LEW strains and itself resistant to infection with RVFV, revealed 2 potential regions for the location of the gene, 1 on chromosome 3 and the other on chromosome 9. Through backcrossing of WF.LEW rats to WF rats, genotyping offspring using SNPs and microsatellites, and viral challenges of 3 N1 litters, we have mapped the gene to the distal end of chromosome 3. © The American Genetic Association. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Hemorrhagic Fever Occurs After Intravenous, But Not After Intragastric, Inoculation of Rhesus Macaques With Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lukashevich, Igor S.; Djavani, Mahmoud; Rodas, Juan D.; Zapata, Juan C.; Usborne, Amy; Emerson, Carol; Mitchen, Jacque; Jahrling, Peter B.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2008-01-01

    Arenaviruses can cause hemorrhagic fever and death in primates and guinea pigs, but these viruses are not highly pathogenic for most rodent carriers. In the United States, arenaviruses precipitated outbreaks of hepatitis in captive monkeys, and they present an emerging health threat in the tropical areas of Africa and South America. We describe infection of rhesus macaques with the prototype arenavirus, lymphocytic choriome-ningitis virus (LCMV), using the WE strain that has been known to cause both encephalopathy and multifocal hemorrhage. Five macaques were inoculated: two by the intravenous (i.v.) and three by the intragastric (i.g.) route. Whereas the two i.v.-inoculated monkeys developed signs and lesions consistent with fatal hemorrhagic fever, the i.g.-inoculated monkeys had an attenuated infection with no disease. Pathological signs of the primate i.v. infection differ significantly from guinea pig arenavirus infections and make this a superior model for human viral hemorrhagic disease. PMID:11992578

  15. A Live Attenuated Vaccine for Lassa Fever Made by Reassortment of Lassa and Mopeia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lukashevich, Igor S.; Patterson, Jean; Carrion, Ricardo; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Ticer, Anysha; Zapata, Juan; Brasky, Kathleen; Geiger, Robert; Hubbard, Gene B.; Bryant, Joseph; Salvato, Maria S.

    2005-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) and Mopeia virus (MOPV) are closely related Old World arenaviruses that can exchange genomic segments (reassort) during coinfection. Clone ML29, selected from a library of MOPV/LASV (MOP/LAS) reassortants, encodes the major antigens (nucleocapsid and glycoprotein) of LASV and the RNA polymerase and zinc-binding protein of MOPV. Replication of ML29 was attenuated in guinea pigs and nonhuman primates. In murine adoptive-transfer experiments, as little as 150 PFU of ML29 induced protective cell-mediated immunity. All strain 13 guinea pigs vaccinated with clone ML29 survived at least 70 days after LASV challenge without either disease signs or histological lesions. Rhesus macaques inoculated with clone ML29 developed primary virus-specific T cells capable of secreting gamma interferon in response to homologous MOP/LAS and heterologous MOPV and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Detailed examination of two rhesus macaques infected with this MOPV/LAS reassortant revealed no histological lesions or disease signs. Thus, ML29 is a promising attenuated vaccine candidate for Lassa fever. PMID:16254329

  16. Inactivation of classical swine fever virus in porcine casing preserved in salt.

    PubMed

    Wijnker, J J; Depner, K R; Berends, B R

    2008-12-10

    Pig intestines used for the production of natural sausage casings may carry classical swine fever (CSF) virus. Feeding pigs with human food waste that contains pig casings may then spread the virus to CSF-free animals. Casings derived from a pig experimentally infected with CSF by dosing with 10(6) tissue culture infectious doses (TCID50) of the highly virulent CSF virus strain "Koslov", were treated with phosphate supplemented or citrate supplemented NaCl, instead of with NaCl alone, which is the standard preservation treatment for casings. Treated casings were stored for 30 days at either 4 degrees C or 20 degrees C. After storage the casings were fed to 16 susceptible pigs. CSF infection was confirmed in the four animals that had been fed casings treated with citrate supplemented salt and stored at 4 degrees C. All other animals remained healthy. It is therefore possible to avoid the inadvertent spread of CSF virus via porcine sausage casings by treating casings with phosphate supplemented salt and storing them for 30 days at temperatures over 4 degrees C.

  17. Has Rift Valley fever virus evolved with increasing severity in human populations in East Africa?

    PubMed

    Baba, Marycelin; Masiga, Daniel K; Sang, Rosemary; Villinger, Jandouwe

    2016-06-22

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have occurred across eastern Africa from 1912 to 2010 approximately every 4-15 years, most of which have not been accompanied by significant epidemics in human populations. However, human epidemics during RVF outbreaks in eastern Africa have involved 478 deaths in 1998, 1107 reported cases with 350 deaths from 2006 to 2007 and 1174 cases with 241 deaths in 2008. We review the history of RVF outbreaks in eastern Africa to identify the epidemiological factors that could have influenced its increasing severity in humans. Diverse ecological factors influence outbreak frequency, whereas virus evolution has a greater impact on its virulence in hosts. Several factors could have influenced the lack of information on RVF in humans during earlier outbreaks, but the explosive nature of human RVF epidemics in recent years mirrors the evolutionary trend of the virus. Comparisons between isolates from different outbreaks have revealed an accumulation of genetic mutations and genomic reassortments that have diversified RVF virus genomes over several decades. The threat to humans posed by the diversified RVF virus strains increases the potential public health and socioeconomic impacts of future outbreaks. Understanding the shifting RVF epidemiology as determined by its evolution is key to developing new strategies for outbreak mitigation and prevention of future human RVF casualties.

  18. Animal Models for the Study of Rodent-Borne Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses: Arenaviruses and Hantaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Joseph W.; Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Mucker, Eric M.; Brocato, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    Human pathogenic hantaviruses and arenaviruses are maintained in nature by persistent infection of rodent carrier populations. Several members of these virus groups can cause significant disease in humans that is generically termed viral hemorrhagic fever (HF) and is characterized as a febrile illness with an increased propensity to cause acute inflammation. Human interaction with rodent carrier populations leads to infection. Arenaviruses are also viewed as potential biological weapons threat agents. There is an increased interest in studying these viruses in animal models to gain a deeper understating not only of viral pathogenesis, but also for the evaluation of medical countermeasures (MCM) to mitigate disease threats. In this review, we examine current knowledge regarding animal models employed in the study of these viruses. We include analysis of infection models in natural reservoirs and also discuss the impact of strain heterogeneity on the susceptibility of animals to infection. This information should provide a comprehensive reference for those interested in the study of arenaviruses and hantaviruses not only for MCM development but also in the study of viral pathogenesis and the biology of these viruses in their natural reservoirs. PMID:26266264

  19. Animal Models for the Study of Rodent-Borne Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses: Arenaviruses and Hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Golden, Joseph W; Hammerbeck, Christopher D; Mucker, Eric M; Brocato, Rebecca L

    2015-01-01

    Human pathogenic hantaviruses and arenaviruses are maintained in nature by persistent infection of rodent carrier populations. Several members of these virus groups can cause significant disease in humans that is generically termed viral hemorrhagic fever (HF) and is characterized as a febrile illness with an increased propensity to cause acute inflammation. Human interaction with rodent carrier populations leads to infection. Arenaviruses are also viewed as potential biological weapons threat agents. There is an increased interest in studying these viruses in animal models to gain a deeper understating not only of viral pathogenesis, but also for the evaluation of medical countermeasures (MCM) to mitigate disease threats. In this review, we examine current knowledge regarding animal models employed in the study of these viruses. We include analysis of infection models in natural reservoirs and also discuss the impact of strain heterogeneity on the susceptibility of animals to infection. This information should provide a comprehensive reference for those interested in the study of arenaviruses and hantaviruses not only for MCM development but also in the study of viral pathogenesis and the biology of these viruses in their natural reservoirs.

  20. Has Rift Valley fever virus evolved with increasing severity in human populations in East Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Marycelin; Masiga, Daniel K; Sang, Rosemary; Villinger, Jandouwe

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have occurred across eastern Africa from 1912 to 2010 approximately every 4–15 years, most of which have not been accompanied by significant epidemics in human populations. However, human epidemics during RVF outbreaks in eastern Africa have involved 478 deaths in 1998, 1107 reported cases with 350 deaths from 2006 to 2007 and 1174 cases with 241 deaths in 2008. We review the history of RVF outbreaks in eastern Africa to identify the epidemiological factors that could have influenced its increasing severity in humans. Diverse ecological factors influence outbreak frequency, whereas virus evolution has a greater impact on its virulence in hosts. Several factors could have influenced the lack of information on RVF in humans during earlier outbreaks, but the explosive nature of human RVF epidemics in recent years mirrors the evolutionary trend of the virus. Comparisons between isolates from different outbreaks have revealed an accumulation of genetic mutations and genomic reassortments that have diversified RVF virus genomes over several decades. The threat to humans posed by the diversified RVF virus strains increases the potential public health and socioeconomic impacts of future outbreaks. Understanding the shifting RVF epidemiology as determined by its evolution is key to developing new strategies for outbreak mitigation and prevention of future human RVF casualties. PMID:27329846

  1. Ebola haemorrhagic fever virus: pathogenesis, immune responses, potential prevention.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Nazimek, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Ebola zoonotic RNA filovirus represents human most virulent and lethal pathogens, which induces acute hemorrhagic fever and death within few days in a range of 60-90% of symptomatic individuals. Last outbreak in 2014 in West Africa caused panic that Ebola epidemic can be spread to other continents. Number of deaths in late December reached almost 8,000 individuals out of more than 20,000 symptomatic patients. It seems that only a coordinated international response could counteract the further spread of Ebola. Major innate immunity mechanisms against Ebola are associated with the production of interferons, that are inhibited by viral proteins. Activation of host NK cells was recognized as a leading immune function responsible for recovery of infected people. Uncontrolled cell infection by Ebola leads to an impairment of immunity with cytokine storm, coagulopathy, systemic bleeding, multi-organ failure and death. Tested prevention strategies to induce antiviral immunity include: i. recombinant virus formulations (vaccines); ii. cocktail of monoclonal antibodies (serotherapy); iii. alternative RNA-interference-based antiviral methods. Maintaining the highest standards of aseptic and antiseptic precautions is equally important. Present brief review summarizes a current knowledge concerning pathogenesis of Ebola hemorrhagic disease and the virus interaction with the immune system and discusses recent advances in prevention of Ebola infection by vaccination and serotherapy.

  2. Host DNA damage response facilitates African swine fever virus infection.

    PubMed

    Simões, Margarida; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando

    2013-07-26

    Studies with different viral infection models on virus interactions with the host cell nucleus have opened new perspectives on our understanding of the molecular basis of these interactions in African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection. The present study aims to characterize the host DNA damage response (DDR) occurring upon in vitro infection with the ASFV-Ba71V isolate. We evaluated protein levels during ASFV time-course infection, of several signalling cascade factors belonging to DDR pathways involved in double strand break repair - Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM), ATM-Rad 3 related (ATR) and DNA dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). DDR inhibitory trials using caffeine and wortmannin and ATR inducible-expression cell lines were used to confirm specific pathway activation during viral infection. Our results show that ASFV specifically elicits ATR-mediated pathway activation from the early phase of infection with increased levels of H2AX, RPA32, p53, ATR and Chk1 phosphorylated forms. Viral p72 synthesis was abrogated by ATR kinase inhibitors and also in ATR-kd cells. Furthermore, a reduction of viral progeny was identified in these cells when compared to the outcome of infection in ATR-wt. Overall, our results strongly suggest that the ATR pathway plays an essential role for successful ASFV infection of host cells.

  3. Apigenin inhibits African swine fever virus infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hakobyan, Astghik; Arabyan, Erik; Avetisyan, Aida; Abroyan, Liana; Hakobyan, Lina; Zakaryan, Hovakim

    2016-12-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is one of the most devastating diseases of domestic pigs for which no effective vaccines are available. Flavonoids, natural products isolated from plants, have been reported to have significant in vitro and in vivo antiviral activity against different viruses. Here, we tested the antiviral effect of five flavonoids on the replication of ASFV in Vero cells. Our results showed a potent, dose-dependent anti-ASFV effect of apigenin in vitro. Time-of-addition experiments revealed that apigenin was highly effective at the early stages of infection. Apigenin reduced the ASFV yield by more than 99.99 % when it was added at 1 hpi. The antiviral activity of apigenin was further investigated by evaluation of ASFV protein synthesis and viral factories. This flavonoid inhibited ASFV-specific protein synthesis and viral factory formation. ASFV-infected cells continuously treated with apigenin did not display a cytopathic effect. Further studies addressing the use of apigenin in vivo are needed.

  4. Parotitis associated with Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Selçuk; Yilmaz, Gurdal; Ertunç, Barış; Koksal, Iftihar

    2012-02-01

    Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a potentially fatal tick-borne viral disease, the course of which may accompanied by various clinical findings. We describe a picture of non-suppurative parotitis developing in association with CCHF virus. A 48-year-old patient presenting to our hospital with lethargy, hemorrhage and pain and swelling below the left ear was diagnosed with CCHF through IgM antibody and polymerase chain reaction positivity in serum investigated for CCHF virus. A picture of non-suppurative parotitis developed on the 3rd day of admission. Other causes of parotitis were excluded with the help of serological tests, and the case was regarded as one of CCHF-associated parotitis. The patient was put on adjuvant therapy, an improvement in clinical findings was observed and he was discharged in a healthy condition on the 8th day. Ours is the first case in the literature of parotitis seen during CCHF. CCHF should be considered in differential diagnosis in addition to other frequently encountered viral agents in patients from endemic regions presenting with a picture of non-suppurative parotitis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. MEK/ERK activation plays a decisive role in yellow fever virus replication: implication as an antiviral therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Albarnaz, Jonas D; De Oliveira, Leonardo C; Torres, Alice A; Palhares, Rafael M; Casteluber, Marisa C; Rodrigues, Claudiney M; Cardozo, Pablo L; De Souza, Aryádina M R; Pacca, Carolina C; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Kroon, Erna G; Nogueira, Maurício L; Bonjardim, Cláudio A

    2014-11-01

    Exploiting the inhibition of host signaling pathways aiming for discovery of potential antiflaviviral compounds is clearly a beneficial strategy for the control of life-threatening diseases caused by flaviviruses. Here we describe the antiviral activity of the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 against Yellow fever virus 17D vaccine strain (YFV-17D). Infection of VERO cells with YFV-17D stimulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation early during infection. Pharmacological inhibition of MEK1/2 through U0126 treatment of VERO cells blockades not only the YFV-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but also inhibits YFV replication by ∼99%. U0126 was also effective against dengue virus (DENV-2 and -3) and Saint-Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Levels of NS4AB, as detected by immunofluorescence, are diminished upon treatment with the inhibitor, as well as the characteristic endoplasmic reticulum membrane invagination stimulated during the infection. Though not protective, treatment of YFV-infected, adult BALB/c mice with U0126 resulted in significant reduction of virus titers in brains. Collectively, our data suggest the potential targeting of the MEK1/2 kinase as a therapeutic tool against diseases caused by flaviviruses such as yellow fever, adverse events associated with yellow fever vaccination and dengue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sequence Optimized Real-Time RT-PCR Assay for Detection of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-21

    characterization of highly pathogenic viruses : application during Crimean-Congo 313 haemorrhagic fever virus outbreaks in Eastern Europe and the Middle East...1 Sequence optimized real-time RT-PCR assay for detection of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever 1 virus 2 3 JW Koehler1, KL Delp1, AT Hall1, SP...Institute of Infectious Diseases, 1425 Porter 9 Street, Fort Detrick, MD, 21702 USA 10 11 12 Abstract 13 14 Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus

  7. Yellow Fever Virus Vaccine–associated Deaths in Young Women1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Yellow fever vaccine–associated viscerotropic disease is a rare sequela of live-attenuated virus vaccine. Elderly persons and persons who have had thymectomies have increased susceptibility. A review of published and other data suggested a higher than expected number of deaths from yellow fever vaccine–associated viscerotropic disease among women 19–34 years of age without known immunodeficiency. PMID:22000363

  8. Low-dose ribavirin potentiates the antiviral activity of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Westover, Jonna B; Sefing, Eric J; Bailey, Kevin W; Van Wettere, Arnaud J; Jung, Kie-Hoon; Dagley, Ashley; Wandersee, Luci; Downs, Brittney; Smee, Donald F; Furuta, Yousuke; Bray, Mike; Gowen, Brian B

    2016-02-01

    Favipiravir is approved in Japan to treat novel or re-emerging influenza viruses, and is active against a broad spectrum of RNA viruses, including Ebola. Ribavirin is the only other licensed drug with activity against multiple RNA viruses. Recent studies show that ribavirin and favipiravir act synergistically to inhibit bunyavirus infections in cultured cells and laboratory mice, likely due to their different mechanisms of action. Convalescent immune globulin is the only approved treatment for Argentine hemorrhagic fever caused by the rodent-borne Junin arenavirus. We previously reported that favipiravir is highly effective in a number of small animal models of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. We now report that addition of low dose of ribavirin synergistically potentiates the activity of favipiravir against Junin virus infection of guinea pigs and another arenavirus, Pichinde virus infection of hamsters. This suggests that the efficacy of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses can be further enhanced through the addition of low-dose ribavirin.

  9. Low-dose ribavirin potentiates the antiviral activity of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses

    PubMed Central

    Westover, Jonna B.; Sefing, Eric J.; Bailey, Kevin W.; Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; Jung, Kie-Hoon; Dagley, Ashley; Wandersee, Luci; Downs, Brittney; Smee, Donald F.; Furuta, Yousuke; Bray, Mike; Gowen, Brian B.

    2016-01-01

    Favipiravir is approved in Japan to treat novel or re-emerging influenza viruses, and is active against a broad spectrum of RNA viruses, including Ebola. Ribavirin is the only other licensed drug with activity against multiple RNA viruses. Recent studies show that ribavirin and favipiravir act synergistically to inhibit bunyavirus infections in cultured cells and laboratory mice, likely due to their different mechanisms of action. Convalescent immune globulin is the only approved treatment for Argentine hemorrhagic fever caused by the rodent-borne Junin arenavirus. We previously reported that favipiravir is highly effective in a number of small animal models of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. We now report that addition of low dose of ribavirin synergistically potentiates the activity of favipiravir against Junin virus infection of guinea pigs and another arenavirus, Pichinde virus infection of hamsters. This suggests that the efficacy of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses can be further enhanced through the addition of low-dose ribavirin. PMID:26711718

  10. Genetic Evidence for an Interferon-Antagonistic Function of Rift Valley Fever Virus Nonstructural Protein NSs

    PubMed Central

    Bouloy, Michèle; Janzen, Christian; Vialat, Pierre; Khun, Huot; Pavlovic, Jovan; Huerre, Michel; Haller, Otto

    2001-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, is a major public health threat in Egypt and sub-Saharan Africa. The viral and host cellular factors that contribute to RVFV virulence and pathogenicity are still poorly understood. All pathogenic RVFV strains direct the synthesis of a nonstructural phosphoprotein (NSs) that is encoded by the smallest (S) segment of the tripartite genome and has an undefined accessory function. In this report, we show that MP12 and clone 13, two attenuated RVFV strains with mutations in the NSs gene, were highly virulent in IFNAR−/− mice lacking the alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) receptor but remained attenuated in IFN-γ receptor-deficient mice. Both attenuated strains proved to be excellent inducers of early IFN-α/β production. In contrast, the virulent strain ZH548 failed to induce detectable amounts of IFN-α/β and replicated extensively in both IFN-competent and IFN-deficient mice. Clone 13 has a defective NSs gene with a large in-frame deletion. This defect in the NSs gene results in expression of a truncated protein which is rapidly degraded. To investigate whether the presence of the wild-type NSs gene correlated with inhibition of IFN-α/β production, we infected susceptible IFNAR−/− mice with S gene reassortant viruses. When the S segment of ZH548 was replaced by that of clone 13, the resulting reassortants became strong IFN inducers. When the defective S segment of clone 13 was exchanged with the wild-type S segment of ZH548, the reassortant virus lost the capacity to stimulate IFN-α/β production. These results demonstrate that the ability of RVFV to inhibit IFN-α/β production correlates with viral virulence and suggest that the accessory protein NSs is an IFN antagonist. PMID:11152510

  11. Potential for North American Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) to Transmit Rift Valley Fever Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To determine which biting insects should be targeted for control should Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) be detected in North America, we evaluated Culex erraticus, Culex erythrothorax, Culex pipiens, Culex quinquefasciatus, Culex tarsalis, Aedes dorsalis, Aedes vexans, Anopheles quadrimaculatus, and ...

  12. High genetic diversity and adaptive potential of two simian hemorrhagic fever viruses in a wild primate population.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Adam L; Lauck, Michael; Weiler, Andrea; Sibley, Samuel D; Dinis, Jorge M; Bergman, Zachary; Nelson, Chase W; Correll, Michael; Gleicher, Michael; Hyeroba, David; Tumukunde, Alex; Weny, Geoffrey; Chapman, Colin; Kuhn, Jens H; Hughes, Austin L; Friedrich, Thomas C; Goldberg, Tony L; O'Connor, David H

    2014-01-01

    Key biological properties such as high genetic diversity and high evolutionary rate enhance the potential of certain RNA viruses to adapt and emerge. Identifying viruses with these properties in their natural hosts could dramatically improve disease forecasting and surveillance. Recently, we discovered two novel members of the viral family Arteriviridae: simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV)-krc1 and SHFV-krc2, infecting a single wild red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus tephrosceles) in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Nearly nothing is known about the biological properties of SHFVs in nature, although the SHFV type strain, SHFV-LVR, has caused devastating outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in captive macaques. Here we detected SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 in 40% and 47% of 60 wild red colobus tested, respectively. We found viral loads in excess of 10(6)-10(7) RNA copies per milliliter of blood plasma for each of these viruses. SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 also showed high genetic diversity at both the inter- and intra-host levels. Analyses of synonymous and non-synonymous nucleotide diversity across viral genomes revealed patterns suggestive of positive selection in SHFV open reading frames (ORF) 5 (SHFV-krc2 only) and 7 (SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2). Thus, these viruses share several important properties with some of the most rapidly evolving, emergent RNA viruses.

  13. High Genetic Diversity and Adaptive Potential of Two Simian Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses in a Wild Primate Population

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, Andrea; Sibley, Samuel D.; Dinis, Jorge M.; Bergman, Zachary; Nelson, Chase W.; Correll, Michael; Gleicher, Michael; Hyeroba, David; Tumukunde, Alex; Weny, Geoffrey; Chapman, Colin; Kuhn, Jens H.; Hughes, Austin L.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Goldberg, Tony L.; O'Connor, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Key biological properties such as high genetic diversity and high evolutionary rate enhance the potential of certain RNA viruses to adapt and emerge. Identifying viruses with these properties in their natural hosts could dramatically improve disease forecasting and surveillance. Recently, we discovered two novel members of the viral family Arteriviridae: simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV)-krc1 and SHFV-krc2, infecting a single wild red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus tephrosceles) in Kibale National Park, Uganda. Nearly nothing is known about the biological properties of SHFVs in nature, although the SHFV type strain, SHFV-LVR, has caused devastating outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in captive macaques. Here we detected SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 in 40% and 47% of 60 wild red colobus tested, respectively. We found viral loads in excess of 106–107 RNA copies per milliliter of blood plasma for each of these viruses. SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2 also showed high genetic diversity at both the inter- and intra-host levels. Analyses of synonymous and non-synonymous nucleotide diversity across viral genomes revealed patterns suggestive of positive selection in SHFV open reading frames (ORF) 5 (SHFV-krc2 only) and 7 (SHFV-krc1 and SHFV-krc2). Thus, these viruses share several important properties with some of the most rapidly evolving, emergent RNA viruses. PMID:24651479

  14. Influence of Age and Dose of African Swine Fever Virus Infections on Clinical Outcome and Blood Parameters in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Post, Jacob; Weesendorp, Eefke; Montoya, Maria; Loeffen, Willie L

    African swine fever (ASF) is a fatal disease for domestic pigs, leading to serious economic losses in countries where ASF is endemic. Despite extensive research, efficient vaccines against ASF are lacking. Since peripheral blood cells are important mediators for vaccines, we study the impact of ASF on blood parameters in pigs with different ages and infected with different doses of ASF virus. Four different groups were studied: (1) 12 weeks of age/low virus dose; (2) 12 weeks of age/high virus dose; (3) 18 weeks of age/low virus dose; and (4) 18 weeks of age/high virus dose. By varying in age and/or ASFV inoculation dose, we monitor blood parameters during different degrees of disease. Thirty percent of the pigs survived the infection with a moderately virulent strain of African swine fever virus (ASFV). Animals that did survive infection were generally older, independent from the inoculation dose used. A firm reduction in many different cell types at 3-5 days postinfection (DPI) was accompanied by an increase in body temperature, followed by clinical signs and mortality from day 6 PI. While blood parameters generally normalized in survivors, γδ T cells and IL-10 levels could be related to mortality. These conclusions should be considered in new approaches for protection against ASF.

  15. Expression Library Immunization Can Confer Protection against Lethal Challenge with African Swine Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lacasta, Anna; Ballester, María; Monteagudo, Paula L.; Rodríguez, Javier M.; Salas, María L.; Accensi, Francesc; Pina-Pedrero, Sonia; Bensaid, Albert; Argilaguet, Jordi; López-Soria, Sergio; Hutet, Evelyne; Le Potier, Marie Frédérique

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT African swine fever is one of the most devastating pig diseases, against which there is no vaccine available. Recent work from our laboratory has demonstrated the protective potential of DNA vaccines encoding three African swine fever viral antigens (p54, p30, and the hemagglutinin extracellular domain) fused to ubiquitin. Partial protection was afforded in the absence of detectable antibodies prior to virus challenge, and survival correlated with the presence of a large number of hemagglutinin-specific CD8+ T cells in blood. Aiming to demonstrate the presence of additional CD8+ T-cell determinants with protective potential, an expression library containing more than 4,000 individual plasmid clones was constructed, each one randomly containing a Sau3AI restriction fragment of the viral genome (p54, p30, and hemagglutinin open reading frames [ORFs] excluded) fused to ubiquitin. Immunization of farm pigs with the expression library yielded 60% protection against lethal challenge with the virulent E75 strain. These results were further confirmed by using specific-pathogen-free pigs after challenging them with 104 hemadsorbing units (HAU) of the cell culture-adapted strain E75CV1. On this occasion, 50% of the vaccinated pigs survived the lethal challenge, and 2 out of the 8 immunized pigs showed no viremia or viral excretion at any time postinfection. In all cases, protection was afforded in the absence of detectable specific antibodies prior to challenge and correlated with the detection of specific T-cell responses at the time of sacrifice. In summary, our results clearly demonstrate the presence of additional protective determinants within the African swine fever virus (ASFV) genome and open up the possibility for their future identification. IMPORTANCE African swine fever is a highly contagious disease of domestic and wild pigs that is endemic in many sub-Saharan countries, where it causes important economic losses and is currently in continuous expansion

  16. Preventive measures aimed at minimizing the risk of African swine fever virus spread in pig farming systems.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Silvia; Rutili, Domenico; Guberti, Vittorio

    2016-11-29

    African swine fever (ASF) is one of the most severe diseases of pigs; it has a drastic impact on the pig industry, causing serious socio-economic consequences to pig farmers and pork producers. In Europe, there are currently two main clusters of infection; one in Sardinia caused by strains of African swine fever virus (ASFV) belonging to genotype I and another in Eastern Europe caused by strains of ASFV belonging to genotype II. The latter is inducing an acute form of ASF and it represents a serious threat to the pig sector. ASF is a disease for which there is no effective vaccine; therefore, prevention has a pivotal role in the control strategy of the disease. This review describes the main preventive measures to adopt to mitigate the risk of ASF spread in pig farming systems.

  17. A novel bromodeoxyuridine-resistant wild boar lung cell line facilitates generation of African swine fever virus recombinants.

    PubMed

    Keil, Günther M; Giesow, Katrin; Portugal, Raquel

    2014-09-01

    Manipulation of African swine fever virus (ASFV) genomes, in particular those from field strains, is still a challenge. We have shown recently that generation of a green-fluorescent-protein-expressing, thymidine-kinase-negative (TK-) mutant of the low-pathogenic African swine fever virus field strain NHV was supported by a TK- Vero cell line. Since NHV, like other ASFV field strains, does not replicate well in Vero cells, a bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)- resistant cell line derived from wild boar lung (WSL) cells, named WSL-Bu, was selected. WSL cells were used because they are suitable for productive replication of NHV and other ASFV field strains. Here, we show that WSL-Bu cells enable positive selection of both TK- and TK+ ASFV recombinants, which allows for novel strategies for construction of ASFV mutants. We further demonstrate for a low-pathogenic ASFV strain that TK expression is required for infectious replication in macrophages infected at low multiplicity and that vaccinia TK fully complements ASFV TK in this respect.

  18. Aedes (Stegomyia) Bromeliae (Diptera: Culicidae), The Yellow Fever Virus Vector in East Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-31

    J. Med. Entomol. Vol. 23, no. 2: 196-200 31 March 1986 AEDES (STEGOLMYIA) BROMELIAE (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE), THE YELLOW FEVER VIRUS VECTOR IN EAST...lilii, and Ae. bromeliae). The species from which Mahaffy, Had- dow, and others isolated yellow fever virus , and which is the most common and...and western Africa but is less prevalent than Ae. bromeliae, and no females have been recorded as biting man. Literature refer- ences to Ae

  19. Infection of Mosquito Cells (C6/36) by Dengue-2 Virus Interferes with Subsequent Infection by Yellow Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Abrao, Emiliana Pereira; da Fonseca, Benedito Antônio Lopes

    2016-02-01

    Dengue is one of the most important diseases caused by arboviruses in the world. Yellow fever is another arthropod-borne disease of great importance to public health that is endemic to tropical regions of Africa and the Americas. Both yellow fever and dengue viruses are flaviviruses transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, and then, it is reasonable to consider that in a given moment, mosquito cells could be coinfected by both viruses. Therefore, we decided to evaluate if sequential infections of dengue and yellow fever viruses (and vice-versa) in mosquito cells could affect the virus replication patterns. Using immunofluorescence and real-time PCR-based replication assays in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells with single or sequential infections with both viruses, we demonstrated the occurrence of viral interference, also called superinfection exclusion, between these two viruses. Our results show that this interference pattern is particularly evident when cells were first infected with dengue virus and subsequently with yellow fever virus (YFV). Reduction in dengue virus replication, although to a lower extent, was also observed when C6/36 cells were initially infected with YFV followed by dengue virus infection. Although the importance that these findings have on nature is unknown, this study provides evidence, at the cellular level, of the occurrence of replication interference between dengue and yellow fever viruses and raises the question if superinfection exclusion could be a possible explanation, at least partially, for the reported lack of urban yellow fever occurrence in regions where a high level of dengue transmission occurs.

  20. Molecular diagnostic and genetic characterization of highly pathogenic viruses: application during Crimean–Congo haemorrhagic fever virus outbreaks in Eastern Europe and the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Filippone, C; Marianneau, P; Murri, S; Mollard, N; Avsic-Zupanc, T; Chinikar, S; Desprès, P; Caro, V; Gessain, A; Berthet, N; Tordo, N

    2013-01-01

    Several haemorrhagic fevers are caused by highly pathogenic viruses that must be handled in Biosafety level 4 (BSL–4) containment. These zoonotic infections have an important impact on public health and the development of a rapid and differential diagnosis in case of outbreak in risk areas represents a critical priority. We have demonstrated the potential of a DNA resequencing microarray (PathogenID v2.0) for this purpose. The microarray was first validated in vitro using supernatants of cells infected with prototype strains from five different families of BSL-4 viruses (e.g. families Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae, Filoviridae, Flaviviridae and Paramyxoviridae). RNA was amplified based on isothermal amplification by Phi29 polymerase before hybridization. We were able to detect and characterize Nipah virus and Crimean–Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) in the brains of experimentally infected animals. CCHFV was finally used as a paradigm for epidemics because of recent outbreaks in Turkey, Kosovo and Iran. Viral variants present in human sera were characterized by BLASTN analysis. Sensitivity was estimated to be 105–106 PFU/mL of hybridized cDNA. Detection specificity was limited to viral sequences having ∼13–14% of global divergence with the tiled sequence, or stretches of ∼20 identical nucleotides. These results highlight the benefits of using the PathogenID v2.0 resequencing microarray to characterize geographical variants in the follow-up of haemorrhagic fever epidemics; to manage patients and protect communities; and in cases of bioterrorism. PMID:23240764

  1. Detection of Classical swine fever virus infection by individual oral fluid of pigs following experimental inoculation.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Stefano; Pierini, Ilaria; Giammarioli, Monica; Feliziani, Francesco; De Mia, Gian Mario

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the use of oral fluid as an alternative to serum samples for Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) detection. Individual oral fluid and serum samples were collected at different times post-infection from pigs that were experimentally inoculated with CSFV Alfort 187 strain. We found no evidence of CSFV neutralizing antibodies in swine oral fluid samples under our experimental conditions. In contrast, real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction could detect CSFV nucleic acid from the oral fluid as early as 8 d postinfection, which also coincided with the time of initial detection in blood samples. The probability of CSFV detection in oral fluid was identical or even higher than in the corresponding blood sample. Our results support the feasibility of using this sampling method for CSFV genome detection, which may represent an additional cost-effective tool for CSF control.

  2. A new subgenotype 2.1d isolates of classical swine fever virus in China, 2014.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongliang; Leng, Chaoliang; Feng, Liping; Zhai, Hongyue; Chen, Jiazeng; Liu, Chunxiao; Bai, Yun; Ye, Chao; Peng, Jinmei; An, Tongqing; Kan, Yunchao; Cai, Xuehui; Tian, Zhijun; Tong, Guangzhi

    2015-08-01

    The lapinized attenuated vaccine against classical swine fever (CSF) has been used in China for over half a century and has generally prevented large-scale outbreaks in recent years. However, since late 2014, a large number of new cases of CSF were detected in many immunized pig farms in China. Several of these CSV viruses were isolated and characterized. Phylogenetic and genomic sequence analyses indicate that these new isolates, as well as some reference isolates, form a new subgenotype named 2.1d, and share several consistent molecular characteristics. Since these new isolates emerged in disparate geographic regions within 5 months, this suggests that these isolates may be widespread. Given that current vaccines do not appear to provide effective protection against this new subgenotype, further investigation of these strains is urgently needed.

  3. Reassortment and distinct evolutionary dynamics of Rift Valley Fever virus genomic segments.

    PubMed

    Freire, Caio C M; Iamarino, Atila; Soumaré, Peinda O Ly; Faye, Ousmane; Sall, Amadou A; Zanotto, Paolo M A

    2015-06-23

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) is a member of Bunyaviridae family that causes a febrile disease affecting mainly ruminants and occasionally humans in Africa, with symptoms that range from mid to severe. RVFV has a tri-segmented ssRNA genome that permits reassortment and could generate more virulent strains. In this study, we reveal the importance of reassortment for RVFV evolution using viral gene genealogy inference and phylodynamics. We uncovered seven events of reassortment that originated RVFV lineages with discordant origins among segments. Moreover, we also found that despite similar selection regimens, the three segments have distinct evolutionary dynamics; the longer segment L evolves at a significant lower rate. Episodes of discordance between population size estimates per segment also coincided with reassortment dating. Our results show that RVFV segments are decoupled enough to have distinct demographic histories and to evolve under different molecular rates.

  4. Development of a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for yellow fever virus detection.

    PubMed

    Méndez, María C; Domingo, Cristina; Tenorio, Antonio; Pardo, Lissethe C; Rey, Gloria J; Méndez, Jairo A

    2013-09-01

    Yellow fever is considered a re-emerging disease and is endemic in tropical regions of Africa and South America. At present, there are no standardized or commercialized kits available for yellow fever virus detection. Therefore, diagnosis must be made by time-consuming routine techniques, and sometimes, the virus or its proteins are not detected. Furthermore, co-circulation with other flaviviruses, including dengue virus, increases the difficulty of diagnosis. To develop a specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested PCR-based assay to improve the detection and diagnosis of yellow fever virus using both serum and fresh tissue samples. RT-PCR primers were designed to amplify a short fragment of all yellow fever virus genotypes reported. A second set of primers was used in a nested PCR to increase sensitivity. Thirty-three clinical samples were tested with the standardized reaction. The expected amplicon was obtained in 25 out of 33 samples analyzed using this approach, and 2 more samples tested positive after a subsequent nested PCR approach. This improved technique not only ensures the specific detection of a wide range of yellow fever virus genotypes but also may increase the sensitivity of detection by introducing a second round of amplification, allowing a rapid differential diagnosis between dengue and yellow fever infection, which is required for effective surveillance and opportune epidemiologic measures.

  5. Deletion of the thymidine kinase gene induces complete attenuation of the Georgia isolate of African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Sanford, B; Holinka, L G; O'Donnell, V; Krug, P W; Carlson, J; Alfano, M; Carrillo, C; Wu, Ping; Lowe, Andre; Risatti, G R; Gladue, D P; Borca, M V

    2016-02-02

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal viral disease of domestic pigs. There are no vaccines to control Africa swine fever (ASF). Experimental vaccines have been developed using genetically modified live attenuated ASFVs obtained by specifically deleting virus genes involved in virulence, including the thymidine kinase (TK) gene. TK has been shown to be involved in the virulence of several viruses, including ASFV. Here we report the construction of a recombinant virus (ASFV-G/V-ΔTK) obtained by deleting the TK gene in a virulent strain of ASFV Georgia adapted to replicate in Vero cells (ASFV-G/VP30). ASFV-G/P-ΔTK demonstrated decreased replication both in primary swine macrophage cell cultures and in Vero cells compared with ASFV-G/VP30. In vivo, intramuscular administration of up to 10(6) TCID50 of ASFV-G/V-ΔTK does not result in ASF disease. However, these animals are not protected when challenged with the virulent parental Georgia strain.

  6. Rapid Molecular Assays for the Detection of Yellow Fever Virus in Low-Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    Escadafal, Camille; Faye, Oumar; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Faye, Ousmane; Weidmann, Manfred; Strohmeier, Oliver; von Stetten, Felix; Drexler, Josef; Eberhard, Michael; Niedrig, Matthias; Patel, Pranav

    2014-01-01

    Background Yellow fever (YF) is an acute viral hemorrhagic disease transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. The causative agent, the yellow fever virus (YFV), is found in tropical and subtropical areas of South America and Africa. Although a vaccine is available since the 1930s, YF still causes thousands of deaths and several outbreaks have recently occurred in Africa. Therefore, rapid and reliable diagnostic methods easy to perform in low-resources settings could have a major impact on early detection of outbreaks and implementation of appropriate response strategies such as vaccination and/or vector control. Methodology The aim of this study was to develop a YFV nucleic acid detection method applicable in outbreak investigations and surveillance studies in low-resource and field settings. The method should be simple, robust, rapid and reliable. Therefore, we adopted an isothermal approach and developed a recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay which can be performed with a small portable instrument and easy-to-use lyophilized reagents. The assay was developed in three different formats (real-time with or without microfluidic semi-automated system and lateral-flow assay) to evaluate their application for different purposes. Analytical specificity and sensitivity were evaluated with a wide panel of viruses and serial dilutions of YFV RNA. Mosquito pools and spiked human plasma samples were also tested for assay validation. Finally, real-time RPA in portable format was tested under field conditions in Senegal. Conclusion/Significance The assay was able to detect 20 different YFV strains and demonstrated no cross-reactions with closely related viruses. The RPA assay proved to be a robust, portable method with a low detection limit (<21 genome equivalent copies per reaction) and rapid processing time (<20 min). Results from real-time RPA field testing were comparable to results obtained in the laboratory, thus confirming our method is suitable for YFV detection in

  7. Association of the Host Immune Response with Protection Using a Live Attenuated African Swine Fever Virus Model

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Jolene; O’Donnell, Vivian; Alfano, Marialexia; Velazquez Salinas, Lauro; Holinka, Lauren G.; Krug, Peter W.; Gladue, Douglas P.; Higgs, Stephen; Borca, Manuel V.

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a lethal hemorrhagic disease of swine caused by a double-stranded DNA virus, ASF virus (ASFV). There is no vaccine to prevent the disease and current control measures are limited to culling and restricting animal movement. Swine infected with attenuated strains are protected against challenge with a homologous virulent virus, but there is limited knowledge of the host immune mechanisms generating that protection. Swine infected with Pretoriuskop/96/4 (Pret4) virus develop a fatal severe disease, while a derivative strain lacking virulence-associated gene 9GL (Pret4Δ9GL virus) is completely attenuated. Swine infected with Pret4Δ9GL virus and challenged with the virulent parental virus at 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 days post infection (dpi) showed a progressive acquisition of protection (from 40% at 7 dpi to 80% at 21 and 28 dpi). This animal model was used to associate the presence of host immune response (ASFV-specific antibody and interferon (IFN)-γ responses, or specific cytokine profiles) and protection against challenge. With the exception of ASFV-specific antibodies in survivors challenged at 21 and 28 dpi, no association between the parameters assessed and protection could be established. These results, encompassing data from 65 immunized swine, underscore the complexity of the system under study, suggesting that protection relies on the concurrence of different host immune mechanisms. PMID:27782090

  8. Diversity, Replication, Pathogenicity and Cell Biology of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    other viruses , most notably infection and the brain was harvested. Brains were homogenized to the Ebola virus glycoprotein (Simmons et al., 2002). 10% (w...at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), and is directed at working with the intact virus in high...characterization of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus glycoproteins. Bioterrorism and Emerging Infectious Diseases : Antimicrobial, Therapeutics and

  9. Regulation of host translational machinery by African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Castelló, Alfredo; Quintas, Ana; Sánchez, Elena G; Sabina, Prado; Nogal, Marisa; Carrasco, Luis; Revilla, Yolanda

    2009-08-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV), like other complex DNA viruses, deploys a variety of strategies to evade the host's defence systems, such as inflammatory and immune responses and cell death. Here, we analyse the modifications in the translational machinery induced by ASFV. During ASFV infection, eIF4G and eIF4E are phosphorylated (Ser1108 and Ser209, respectively), whereas 4E-BP1 is hyperphosphorylated at early times post infection and hypophosphorylated after 18 h. Indeed, a potent increase in eIF4F assembly is observed in ASFV-infected cells, which is prevented by rapamycin treatment. Phosphorylation of eIF4E, eIF4GI and 4E-BP1 is important to enhance viral protein production, but is not essential for ASFV infection as observed in rapamycin- or CGP57380-treated cells. Nevertheless, eIF4F components are indispensable for ASFV protein synthesis and virus spread, since eIF4E or eIF4G depletion in COS-7 or Vero cells strongly prevents accumulation of viral proteins and decreases virus titre. In addition, eIF4F is not only activated but also redistributed within the viral factories at early times of infection, while eIF4G and eIF4E are surrounding these areas at late times. In fact, other components of translational machinery such as eIF2alpha, eIF3b, eIF4E, eEF2 and ribosomal P protein are enriched in areas surrounding ASFV factories. Notably, the mitochondrial network is polarized in ASFV-infected cells co-localizing with ribosomes. Thus, translation and ATP synthesis seem to be coupled and compartmentalized at the periphery of viral factories. At later times after ASFV infection, polyadenylated mRNAs disappear from the cytoplasm of Vero cells, except within the viral factories. The distribution of these pools of mRNAs is similar to the localization of viral late mRNAs. Therefore, degradation of cellular polyadenylated mRNAs and recruitment of the translation machinery to viral factories may contribute to the inhibition of host protein synthesis, facilitating ASFV

  10. Regulation of Host Translational Machinery by African Swine Fever Virus

    PubMed Central

    Castelló, Alfredo; Quintas, Ana; Sánchez, Elena G.; Sabina, Prado; Nogal, Marisa; Carrasco, Luis; Revilla, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV), like other complex DNA viruses, deploys a variety of strategies to evade the host's defence systems, such as inflammatory and immune responses and cell death. Here, we analyse the modifications in the translational machinery induced by ASFV. During ASFV infection, eIF4G and eIF4E are phosphorylated (Ser1108 and Ser209, respectively), whereas 4E-BP1 is hyperphosphorylated at early times post infection and hypophosphorylated after 18 h. Indeed, a potent increase in eIF4F assembly is observed in ASFV-infected cells, which is prevented by rapamycin treatment. Phosphorylation of eIF4E, eIF4GI and 4E-BP1 is important to enhance viral protein production, but is not essential for ASFV infection as observed in rapamycin- or CGP57380-treated cells. Nevertheless, eIF4F components are indispensable for ASFV protein synthesis and virus spread, since eIF4E or eIF4G depletion in COS-7 or Vero cells strongly prevents accumulation of viral proteins and decreases virus titre. In addition, eIF4F is not only activated but also redistributed within the viral factories at early times of infection, while eIF4G and eIF4E are surrounding these areas at late times. In fact, other components of translational machinery such as eIF2α, eIF3b, eIF4E, eEF2 and ribosomal P protein are enriched in areas surrounding ASFV factories. Notably, the mitochondrial network is polarized in ASFV-infected cells co-localizing with ribosomes. Thus, translation and ATP synthesis seem to be coupled and compartmentalized at the periphery of viral factories. At later times after ASFV infection, polyadenylated mRNAs disappear from the cytoplasm of Vero cells, except within the viral factories. The distribution of these pools of mRNAs is similar to the localization of viral late mRNAs. Therefore, degradation of cellular polyadenylated mRNAs and recruitment of the translation machinery to viral factories may contribute to the inhibition of host protein synthesis, facilitating ASFV

  11. Machupo Virus Expressing GPC of the Candid#1 Vaccine Strain of Junin Virus Is Highly Attenuated and Immunogenic

    PubMed Central

    Koma, Takaaki; Patterson, Michael; Huang, Cheng; Seregin, Alexey V.; Maharaj, Payal D.; Miller, Milagros; Smith, Jeanon N.; Walker, Aida G.; Hallam, Steven

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Machupo virus (MACV) is the causative agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever. Our previous study demonstrated that a MACV strain with a single amino acid substitution (F438I) in the transmembrane domain of glycoprotein is attenuated but genetically unstable in mice. MACV is closely related to Junin virus (JUNV), the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. Others and our group have identified the glycoprotein to be the major viral factor determining JUNV attenuation. In this study, we tested the compatibility of the glycoprotein of the Candid#1 live-attenuated vaccine strain of JUNV in MACV replication and its ability to attenuate MACV in vivo. Recombinant MACV with the Candid#1 glycoprotein (rMACV/Cd#1-GPC) exhibited growth properties similar to those of Candid#1 and was genetically stable in vitro. In a mouse model of lethal infection, rMACV/Cd#1-GPC was fully attenuated, more immunogenic than Candid#1, and fully protective against MACV infection. Therefore, the MACV strain expressing the glycoprotein of Candid#1 is safe, genetically stable, and highly protective against MACV infection in a mouse model. IMPORTANCE Currently, there are no FDA-approved vaccines and/or treatments for Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, which is a fatal human disease caused by MACV. The development of antiviral strategies to combat viral hemorrhagic fevers, including Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, is one of the top priorities of the Implementation Plan of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that MACV expressing glycoprotein of Candid#1 is a safe, genetically stable, highly immunogenic, and protective vaccine candidate against Bolivian hemorrhagic fever. PMID:26581982

  12. Assessment of left ventricular functions with tissue Doppler, strain, and strain rate echocardiography in patients with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Özben; Özgür, Senem; Örün, Utku Arman; Doğan, Vehbi; Yılmaz, Osman; Keskin, Mahmut; Arı, Mehmet Emre; Erdoğan, Özlem; Karademir, Selmin

    2015-08-01

    This study assessed the early changes in regional and global systolic and diastolic myocardial functions in patients with familial Mediterranean fever without any cardiovascular symptoms using tissue Doppler and strain and strain rate echocardiography and compared them to the results of a control group. This study has a cross-sectional and observational design. FMF patients with normal left ventricular function were included in the study. We excluded patients who had arrhythmia, acquired/congenital heart disease, pericarditis, or acute attack. We compared 45 children with familial Mediterranean fever on colchicine therapy and 45 age- and sex-matched healthy children. The 45 patients with familial Mediterranean fever included 24 (55.3%) girls and 21 (46.7%) boys with a mean age of 11.3 ± 3.7 (range 2-18) years. The mean disease duration was 4.6 ± 2.4 (range 0.5-10) years. In the patient group, the homozygous M694V mutation was the most common (64.4%) mutation. The patients with familial Mediterranean fever had statistically lower longitudinal global strain, radial global strain, and strain rates (-14.44 ± 4.77%, 14.80 ± 6.29%, and 0.59 ± 0.24 s, respectively) than the controls (-17.40 ± 1.79%, 17.53 ± 4.63%, and 0.83 ± 0.51 s) (p < 0.05). The circumferential global strain did not differ significantly between the groups. Patients with familial Mediterranean fever who are subclinical from a cardiac aspect might have normal left ventricular function as measured by conventional echocardiography. However, the disease affects their myocardial tissue, and these patients should be followed with conventional, strain, and strain rate echocardiography techniques regularly.

  13. Assessment of left ventricular functions with tissue Doppler, strain, and strain rate echocardiography in patients with familial Mediterranean fever

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Özben; Özgür, Senem; Örün, Utku Arman; Doğan, Vehbi; Yılmaz, Osman; Keskin, Mahmut; Arı, Mehmet Emre; Erdoğan, Özlem; Karademir, Selmin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the early changes in regional and global systolic and diastolic myocardial functions in patients with familial Mediterranean fever without any cardiovascular symptoms using tissue Doppler and strain and strain rate echocardiography and compared them to the results of a control group. Methods: This study has a cross-sectional and observational design. FMF patients with normal left ventricular function were included in the study. We excluded patients who had arrhythmia, acquired/congenital heart disease, pericarditis, or acute attack. We compared 45 children with familial Mediterranean fever on colchicine therapy and 45 age- and sex-matched healthy children. Results: The 45 patients with familial Mediterranean fever included 24 (55.3%) girls and 21 (46.7%) boys with a mean age of 11.3±3.7 (range 2-18) years. The mean disease duration was 4.6±2.4 (range 0.5-10) years. In the patient group, the homozygous M694V mutation was the most common (64.4%) mutation. The patients with familial Mediterranean fever had statistically lower longitudinal global strain, radial global strain, and strain rates (-14.44±4.77%, 14.80±6.29%, and 0.59±0.24 s, respectively) than the controls (-17.40±1.79%, 17.53±4.63%, and 0.83±0.51 s) (p<0.05). The circumferential global strain did not differ significantly between the groups. Conclusion: Patients with familial Mediterranean fever who are subclinical from a cardiac aspect might have normal left ventricular function as measured by conventional echocardiography. However, the disease affects their myocardial tissue, and these patients should be followed with conventional, strain, and strain rate echocardiography techniques regularly. PMID:25550179

  14. T Cell-Mediated Immunity towards Yellow Fever Virus and Useful Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Alan M.; Klimstra, William B.

    2017-01-01

    The 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines is among the most effective vaccines ever created. The humoral and cellular immunity elicited by 17D has been well characterized in humans. Neutralizing antibodies have long been known to provide protection against challenge with a wild-type virus. However, a well characterized T cell immune response that is robust, long-lived and polyfunctional is also elicited by 17D. It remains unclear whether this arm of immunity is protective following challenge with a wild-type virus. Here we introduce the 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines, describe the current state of knowledge regarding the immunity directed towards the vaccines in humans and conclude with a discussion of animal models that are useful for evaluating T cell-mediated immune protection to yellow fever virus. PMID:28398253

  15. T Cell-Mediated Immunity towards Yellow Fever Virus and Useful Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Watson, Alan M; Klimstra, William B

    2017-04-11

    The 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines is among the most effective vaccines ever created. The humoral and cellular immunity elicited by 17D has been well characterized in humans. Neutralizing antibodies have long been known to provide protection against challenge with a wild-type virus. However, a well characterized T cell immune response that is robust, long-lived and polyfunctional is also elicited by 17D. It remains unclear whether this arm of immunity is protective following challenge with a wild-type virus. Here we introduce the 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines, describe the current state of knowledge regarding the immunity directed towards the vaccines in humans and conclude with a discussion of animal models that are useful for evaluating T cell-mediated immune protection to yellow fever virus.

  16. Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... by four families of viruses. These include the Ebola and Marburg, Lassa fever, and yellow fever viruses. ... Some VHFs cause mild disease, but some, like Ebola or Marburg, cause severe disease and death. VHFs ...

  17. Structure, Function, and Evolution of the Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Stephen D.; Surtees, Rebecca; Walter, Cheryl T.; Ariza, Antonio; Bergeron, Éric; Nichol, Stuart T.; Hiscox, Julian A.

    2012-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is an emerging tick-borne virus of the Bunyaviridae family that is responsible for a fatal human disease for which preventative or therapeutic measures do not exist. We solved the crystal structure of the CCHFV strain Baghdad-12 nucleocapsid protein (N), a potential therapeutic target, at a resolution of 2.1 Å. N comprises a large globular domain composed of both N- and C-terminal sequences, likely involved in RNA binding, and a protruding arm domain with a conserved DEVD caspase-3 cleavage site at its apex. Alignment of our structure with that of the recently reported N protein from strain YL04057 shows a close correspondence of all folds but significant transposition of the arm through a rotation of 180 degrees and a translation of 40 Å. These observations suggest a structural flexibility that may provide the basis for switching between alternative N protein conformations during important functions such as RNA binding and oligomerization. Our structure reveals surfaces likely involved in RNA binding and oligomerization, and functionally critical residues within these domains were identified using a minigenome system able to recapitulate CCHFV-specific RNA synthesis in cells. Caspase-3 cleaves the polypeptide chain at the exposed DEVD motif; however, the cleaved N protein remains an intact unit, likely due to the intimate association of N- and C-terminal fragments in the globular domain. Structural alignment with existing N proteins reveals that the closest CCHFV relative is not another bunyavirus but the arenavirus Lassa virus instead, suggesting that current segmented negative-strand RNA virus taxonomy may need revision. PMID:22875964

  18. Clustering of classical swine fever virus isolates by codon pair bias

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetic code consists of non-random usage of synonymous codons for the same amino acids, termed codon bias or codon usage. Codon juxtaposition is also non-random, referred to as codon context bias or codon pair bias. The codon and codon pair bias vary among different organisms, as well as with viruses. Reasons for these differences are not completely understood. For classical swine fever virus (CSFV), it was suggested that the synonymous codon usage does not significantly influence virulence, but the relationship between variations in codon pair usage and CSFV virulence is unknown. Virulence can be related to the fitness of a virus: Differences in codon pair usage influence genome translation efficiency, which may in turn relate to the fitness of a virus. Accordingly, the potential of the codon pair bias for clustering CSFV isolates into classes of different virulence was investigated. Results The complete genomic sequences encoding the viral polyprotein of 52 different CSFV isolates were analyzed. This included 49 sequences from the GenBank database (NCBI) and three newly sequenced genomes. The codon usage did not differ among isolates of different virulence or genotype. In contrast, a clustering of isolates based on their codon pair bias was observed, clearly discriminating highly virulent isolates and vaccine strains on one side from moderately virulent strains on the other side. However, phylogenetic trees based on the codon pair bias and on the primary nucleotide sequence resulted in a very similar genotype distribution. Conclusion Clustering of CSFV genomes based on their codon pair bias correlate with the genotype rather than with the virulence of the isolates. PMID:22126254

  19. Epidemiological study of Rift Valley fever virus in Kigoma, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kifaro, Emmanuel G; Nkangaga, Japhet; Joshua, Gradson; Sallu, Raphael; Yongolo, Mmeta; Dautu, George; Kasanga, Christopher J

    2014-04-23

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an acute, zoonotic viral disease caused by a Phlebovirus, which belongs to the Bunyaviridae family. Among livestock, outbreaks of the disease are economically devastating. They are often characterised by large, sweeping abortion storms and have significant mortality in adult livestock. The aim of the current study was to investigate RVFV infection in the Kigoma region, which is nestled under the hills of the western arm of the Great Rift Valley on the edge of Lake Tanganyika, Tanzania. A region-wide serosurvey was conducted on non-vaccinated small ruminants (sheep and goats, n = 411). Sera samples were tested for the presence of anti-RVFV antibodies and viral antigen, using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The overall past infections were detected in 22 of the 411 animals, 5.4% (Confidence Interval (CI) 95% = 3.5% - 8.1%). The Kigoma rural area recorded the higher seroprevalence of 12.0% (CI 95% = 7.3% - 18.3%; p < 0.0001), followed by Kibondo at 2.3% (CI 95% = 0.5% - 6.5%; p > 0.05) and the Kasulu district at 0.8% (CI 95% = 0.0% - 4.2%; p > 0.05). The prevalence was 12.5% and 4.7% for sheep and goats, respectively. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction results indicated that only eight samples were found to be positive (n = 63). This study has confirmed, for the first time, the presence of the RVFV in the Kigoma region four years after the 2007 epizootic in Tanzania. The study further suggests that the virus activity exists during the inter-epizootic period, even in regions with no history of RVFV.

  20. African Swine Fever Virus Georgia isolate harboring deletions of 9GL and MGF360/505 genes in highly attenuated in swine but does not confer protection against parental virus challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) produces a contagious disease of domestic pigs that results in severe economic consequences to the swine industry. Control of the disease has been hampered by the unavailability of vaccines. We recently reported the development of two experimental vaccine strains (...

  1. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus infection of rhesus macaques as a model of viral hemorrhagic fever: clinical characterization and risk factors for severe disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Reed F; Dodd, Lori E; Yellayi, Srikanth; Gu, Wenjuan; Cann, Jennifer A; Jett, Catherine; Bernbaum, John G; Ragland, Dan R; St Claire, Marisa; Byrum, Russell; Paragas, Jason; Blaney, Joseph E; Jahrling, Peter B

    2011-12-20

    Simian Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (SHFV) has caused sporadic outbreaks of hemorrhagic fevers in macaques at primate research facilities. SHFV is a BSL-2 pathogen that has not been linked to human disease; as such, investigation of SHFV pathogenesis in non-human primates (NHPs) could serve as a model for hemorrhagic fever viruses such as Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses. Here we describe the pathogenesis of SHFV in rhesus macaques inoculated with doses ranging from 50 PFU to 500,000 PFU. Disease severity was independent of dose with an overall mortality rate of 64% with signs of hemorrhagic fever and multiple organ system involvement. Analyses comparing survivors and non-survivors were performed to identify factors associated with survival revealing differences in the kinetics of viremia, immunosuppression, and regulation of hemostasis. Notable similarities between the pathogenesis of SHFV in NHPs and hemorrhagic fever viruses in humans suggest that SHFV may serve as a suitable model of BSL-4 pathogens.

  2. Biological and Phylogenetic Characteristics of Yellow Fever Virus Lineages from West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Laraway, Hewád; Faye, Ousmane; Diallo, Mawlouth; Niedrig, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV), the first proven human-pathogenic virus, although isolated in 1927, is still a major public health problem, especially in West Africa where it causes outbreaks every year. Nevertheless, little is known about its genetic diversity and evolutionary dynamics, mainly due to a limited number of genomic sequences from wild virus isolates. In this study, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of 24 full-length genomes from YFV strains isolated between 1973 and 2005 in a sylvatic context of West Africa, including 14 isolates that had previously not been sequenced. By this, we confirmed genetic variability within one genotype by the identification of various YF lineages circulating in West Africa. Further analyses of the biological properties of these lineages revealed differential growth behavior in human liver and insect cells, correlating with the source of isolation and suggesting host adaptation. For one lineage, repeatedly isolated in a context of vertical transmission, specific characteristics in the growth behavior and unique mutations of the viral genome were observed and deserve further investigation to gain insight into mechanisms involved in YFV emergence and maintenance in nature. PMID:23269797

  3. Experimental infection with bovine ephemeral fever virus and analysis of its antibody response cattle.

    PubMed

    Zheng, F Y; Chen, Q W; Li, Z; Gong, X W; Wang, J D; Yin, H

    2016-02-01

    Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) is an arthropod-borne viral disease that occurs throughout mainland China. LS11 obtained in the 2011 BEF epidemic was a wild strain, and its virulence and antibody response have never been studied in China. Therefore, the issues were investigated in this work. Experimental cattle were intravenously infected with different doses of BEF virus, and some non-infected cattle were simultaneously monitored. Blood and serum samples were collected from all animals over the course of our study. Infected cattle were challenged for a second time with BEF virus to determine protective period of the antibodies. BEF virus was detected in blood samples from infected cattle, but not in monitored cattle. The neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against BEFV were easier to be detected and persisted for longer periods in cattle infected with higher doses of BEFV than in those infected with lower doses. When the titer of nAbs was equal to 5 or 6, re-infected cattle still could mount a challenge against BEFV. However, after 3 or 6months, when nAbs were no longer apparent, re-infected cattle displayed typical symptoms of BEF. Our findings indicated that vaccination should be performed once the titer of nAb decreased to 5 or 6.

  4. Cytokine response in crimean-congo hemorrhagic fever virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ergönül, Önder; Şeref, Ceren; Eren, Şebnem; Çelikbaş, Aysel; Baykam, Nurcan; Dokuzoğuz, Başak; Gönen, Mehmet; Can, Füsun

    2017-10-01

    We described the predictive role of cytokines in fatality of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (CCHFV) infection by using daily clinical sera samples. Consequent serum samples of the selected patients in different severity groups and healthy controls were examined by using human cytokine 17-plex assay. We included 12 (23%) mild, 30 (58%) moderate, 10 (19%) severe patients, and 10 healthy volunteers. The mean age of the patients was 52 (sd 15), 52% were female. Forty-six patients (88%) received ribavirin. During disease course, the median levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-10/12, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and MIP-1b were found to be significantly higher among CCHF patients than the healthy controls. Within the first 5 days after onset of disease, among the fatal cases, the median levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were found to be significantly higher than the survived ones (Fig. 3), and MCP-1 was elevated among fatal cases, but statistical significance was not detected. In receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, IL-8 (92%), IL-6 (92%), MCP-1 (79%) were found to be the most significant cytokines in predicting the fatality rates in the early period of the disease (5 days). IL-6 and IL-8 can predict the poor outcome, within the first 5 days of disease course. Elevated IL-6 and IL-8 levels within first 5 days could be used as prognostic markers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Temperature-sensitive mutations for live-attenuated Rift Valley fever vaccines: implications from other RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to the African continent. RVF is characterized by high rate of abortions in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. RVF is caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV: genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae). Vaccination is the only known effective strategy to prevent the disease, but there are no licensed RVF vaccines available for humans. A live-attenuated vaccine candidate derived from the wild-type pathogenic Egyptian ZH548 strain, MP-12, has been conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the U.S. MP-12 displays a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype and does not replicate at 41°C. The ts mutation limits viral replication at a specific body temperature and may lead to an attenuation of the virus. Here we will review well-characterized ts mutations for RNA viruses, and further discuss the potential in designing novel live-attenuated vaccines for RVF. PMID:26322023

  6. Temperature-sensitive mutations for live-attenuated Rift Valley fever vaccines: implications from other RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to the African continent. RVF is characterized by high rate of abortions in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. RVF is caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV: genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae). Vaccination is the only known effective strategy to prevent the disease, but there are no licensed RVF vaccines available for humans. A live-attenuated vaccine candidate derived from the wild-type pathogenic Egyptian ZH548 strain, MP-12, has been conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the U.S. MP-12 displays a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype and does not replicate at 41°C. The ts mutation limits viral replication at a specific body temperature and may lead to an attenuation of the virus. Here we will review well-characterized ts mutations for RNA viruses, and further discuss the potential in designing novel live-attenuated vaccines for RVF.

  7. Rift Valley fever virus and European mosquitoes: vector competence of Culex pipiens and Stegomyia albopicta (= Aedes albopictus).

    PubMed

    Brustolin, M; Talavera, S; Nuñez, A; Santamaría, C; Rivas, R; Pujol, N; Valle, M; Verdún, M; Brun, A; Pagès, N; Busquets, N

    2017-08-07

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne disease caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Rift Valley fever affects a large number of species, including human, and has severe impact on public health and the economy, especially in African countries. The present study examined the vector competence of three different European mosquito species, Culex pipiens (Linnaeus, 1758) form molestus (Diptera: Culicidae), Culex pipiens hybrid form and Stegomyia albopicta (= Aedes albopictus) (Skuse, 1894) (Diptera: Culicidae). Mosquitoes were artificially fed with blood containing RVFV. Infection, disseminated infection and transmission efficiency were evaluated. This is the first study to assess the transmission efficiency of European mosquito species using a virulent RVFV strain. The virus disseminated in Cx. pipiens hybrid form and in S. albopicta. Moreover, infectious viral particles were isolated from saliva of both species, showing their RVFV transmission capacity. The presence of competent Cx. pipiens and S. albopicta in Spain indicates that an autochthonous outbreak of RVF may occur if the virus is introduced. These findings provide information that will help health authorities to set up efficient entomological surveillance and RVFV vector control programmes. © 2017 The Authors. Medical and Veterinary Entomology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Entomological Society.

  8. Live attenuated African swine fever viruses as ideal tools to dissect the mechanisms involved in viral pathogenesis and immune protection.

    PubMed

    Lacasta, Anna; Monteagudo, Paula L; Jiménez-Marín, Ángeles; Accensi, Francesc; Ballester, María; Argilaguet, Jordi; Galindo-Cardiel, Iván; Segalés, Joaquim; Salas, María L; Domínguez, Javier; Moreno, Ángela; Garrido, Juan J; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2015-11-20

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the causal agent of African swine fever, a hemorrhagic and often lethal porcine disease causing enormous economical losses in affected countries. Endemic for decades in most of the sub-Saharan countries and Sardinia, the risk of ASFV-endemicity in Europe has increased since its last introduction into Europe in 2007. Live attenuated viruses have been demonstrated to induce very efficient protective immune responses, albeit most of the time protection was circumscribed to homologous ASFV challenges. However, their use in the field is still far from a reality, mainly due to safety concerns. In this study we compared the course of the in vivo infection caused by two homologous ASFV strains: the virulent E75 and the cell cultured adapted strain E75CV1, obtained from adapting E75 to grow in the CV1 cell-line. Interestingly, the kinetics of both viruses not only differed on the clinical signs that they caused and in the virus loads found, but also in the immunological pathways activated throughout the infections. Furthermore, E75CV1 confirmed its protective potential against the homologous E75 virus challenge and allowed the demonstration of poor cross-protection against BA71, thus defining it as heterologous. The in vitro specificity of the CD8(+) T-cells present at the time of lethal challenge showed a clear activation against the homologous virus (E75) but not against BA71. These findings will be of utility for a better understanding of ASFV pathogenesis and for the rational designing of safe and efficient vaccines against this virus.

  9. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... MoreBMI Calculator FeverA fever is defined as a temperature 1° or more above the normal 98.6°. Minor infections may cause mild or short-term temperature elevations. Temperatures of 103° and above are considered ...

  10. Fever

    MedlinePlus

    A fever is a body temperature that is higher than normal. It is not an illness. It is part of your body's defense against infection. Most bacteria ... cause infections do well at the body's normal temperature (98.6 F). A slight fever can make ...

  11. Evaluation of hemostaseological status of pigs experimentally infected with African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zakaryan, Hovakim; Karalova, Elena; Voskanyan, Henrik; Ter-Pogossyan, Zarine; Nersisyan, Narek; Hakobyan, Astghik; Saroyan, David; Karalyan, Zaven

    2014-11-07

    African swine fever is a highly contagious hemorrhagic disease of pigs caused by African swine fever virus (ASFV). Hemorrhages are the most frequently reported lesions in acute and subacute forms of ASF. Hemorrhagic lesions are accompanied by impaired hemostasis, which includes thrombocytopenia and changes in the coagulation system. In the present study, experimental infection was conducted to elucidate whether a highly virulent ASFV genotype II circulating in the Trans-Caucasus and Eastern Europe affects the hemostasis of infected pigs. Platelet count changes and platelet size, as well as coagulation parameters were evaluated upon experimental infection. In contrast to other ASFV strains, ASFV genotype II showed a significant decrease in the number of platelets from 3rd dpi onwards. Furthermore, a decrease in platelet size was observed throughout the entire period of experiment. A significant increase in the number of platelet aggregates was observed from the beginning of infection. Unlike other ASFV strains, ASFV genotype II induced a slight shortening of an activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) throughout the experiment. Thrombin time (TT) was prolonged from day 5 onwards, whereas no changes in prothrombin time (PT) were found upon infection. The level of d-dimers was permanently higher than in control with a peak on day 3 post-infection. ASFV induced a significant decrease in the level of fibrinogen from day 5 till the end of experiment. Thus, it can be concluded that ASFV genotype II isolated in Armenia affects the hemostasis of infected pigs and causes changes that differ from that of other ASFV strains described previously.

  12. Prevalence of African swine fever virus in apparently healthy domestic pigs in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Atuhaire, David Kalenzi; Afayoa, Mathias; Ochwo, Sylvester; Mwesigwa, Savannah; Mwiine, Frank Norbert; Okuni, Julius Boniface; Olaho-Mukani, William; Ojok, Lonzy

    2013-12-26

    African swine fever (ASF) is a contagious viral disease which can cause up to 100% mortality among domestic pigs leading to serious socio-economic impact on people's livelihoods. ASF is endemic in Uganda and there is paucity of information on the epidemiology of the disease. The major aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence and prevalence of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in apparently healthy slaughter pigs at Wambizi slaughterhouse in Kampala city, Uganda. We also estimated the presence of ASFV antibodies and circulating viral antigens in pigs from selected districts of Uganda during targeted surveillance. We analysed 540 and 181 blood samples collected from slaughter pigs and pigs from targeted surveillance districts respectively. The prevalence of ASFV in slaughter pigs was 52.96% (95% CI, 48.75-57.14) and 11.5% (95% CI, 9.06-14.45) by ELISA and PCR respectively. In surveillance districts, the proportion of ASFV positive pigs was 53.59% (95% CI, 46.33-60.71) and 0.55% (95% CI, 0.1-3.06) by ELISA and PCR respectively. The study has found out a high seroprevalence of ASFV antibodies in apparently healthy slaughter pigs and also a high proportion of ASFV antibody seropositive pigs in surveyed districts in Uganda indicating exposure to ASFV. However, there was a lower prevalence of ASFV infection implying that there could be low virulent strains of ASFV circulating in domestic pigs in Uganda which requires further investigation.

  13. Delayed Disease Progression in Cynomolgus Macaques Infected with Ebola Virus Makona Strain.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Hanley, Patrick W; Scott, Dana P; Günther, Stephan; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-10-01

    In late 2013, the largest documented outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever started in Guinea and has since spread to neighboring countries, resulting in almost 27,000 cases and >11,000 deaths in humans. In March 2014, Ebola virus (EBOV) was identified as the causative agent. This study compares the pathogenesis of a new EBOV strain, Makona, which was isolated in Guinea in 2014 with the prototype strain from the 1976 EBOV outbreak in the former Zaire. Both strains cause lethal disease in cynomolgus macaques with similar pathologic changes and hallmark features of Ebola hemorrhagic fever. However, disease progression was delayed in EBOV-Makona-infected animals, suggesting decreased rather than increased virulence of this most recent EBOV strain.

  14. Epstein-Barr Virus Strain Variation.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    What is wild-type Epstein-Barr virus and are there genetic differences in EBV strains that contribute to some of the EBV-associated diseases? Recent progress in DNA sequencing has resulted in many new Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome sequences becoming available. EBV isolates worldwide can be grouped into type 1 and type 2, a classification based on the EBNA2 gene sequence. Type 1 transforms human B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines much more efficiently than type 2 EBV and molecular mechanisms that may account for this difference in cell transformation are now becoming understood. Study of geographic variation of EBV strains independent of the type 1/type 2 classification and systematic investigation of the relationship between viral strains, infection and disease are now becoming possible. So we should consider more directly whether viral sequence variation might play a role in the incidence of some EBV-associated diseases.

  15. The Core Protein of Classical Swine Fever Virus Is Dispensable for Virus Propagation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Christiane; Lamp, Benjamin; Heimann, Manuela; König, Matthias; Blome, Sandra; Moennig, Volker; Schüttler, Christian; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen; Rümenapf, Tillmann

    2012-01-01

    Core protein of Flaviviridae is regarded as essential factor for nucleocapsid formation. Yet, core protein is not encoded by all isolates (GBV- A and GBV- C). Pestiviruses are a genus within the family Flaviviridae that affect cloven-hoofed animals, causing economically important diseases like classical swine fever (CSF) and bovine viral diarrhea (BVD). Recent findings describe the ability of NS3 of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) to compensate for disabling size increase of core protein (Riedel et al., 2010). NS3 is a nonstructural protein possessing protease, helicase and NTPase activity and a key player in virus replication. A role of NS3 in particle morphogenesis has also been described for other members of the Flaviviridae (Patkar et al., 2008; Ma et al., 2008). These findings raise questions about the necessity and function of core protein and the role of NS3 in particle assembly. A reverse genetic system for CSFV was employed to generate poorly growing CSFVs by modification of the core gene. After passaging, rescued viruses had acquired single amino acid substitutions (SAAS) within NS3 helicase subdomain 3. Upon introduction of these SAAS in a nonviable CSFV with deletion of almost the entire core gene (Vp447Δc), virus could be rescued. Further characterization of this virus with regard to its physical properties, morphology and behavior in cell culture did not reveal major differences between wildtype (Vp447) and Vp447Δc. Upon infection of the natural host, Vp447Δc was attenuated. Hence we conclude that core protein is not essential for particle assembly of a core-encoding member of the Flaviviridae, but important for its virulence. This raises questions about capsid structure and necessity, the role of NS3 in particle assembly and the function of core protein in general. PMID:22457622

  16. VACCINATION AGAINST YELLOW FEVER WITH IMMUNE SERUM AND VIRUS FIXED FOR MICE

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, W. A.; Kitchen, S. F.; Lloyd, Wray

    1932-01-01

    1. After preliminary experiments in monkeys, 15 persons were actively immunized by a single injection of a dried mixture of living yellow fever virus, fixed for mice, and human immune serum, with separate injections of enough additional serum to make up the amount required for protection. 2. One person was similarly immunized by injecting immune serum and dried virus separately. 3. By titration of the sera of vaccinated persons in mice, it was shown that the immunity rose in a few weeks to a height comparable to that reached after an attack of yellow fever, and remained there throughout an observation period of 6 months. 4. Yellow fever virus could not be recovered from the blood of vaccinated persons or monkeys, except when the latter had received less than the minimal effective amount of immune serum. 5. Neutralization of yellow fever virus by immune serum took place very slowly in vitro at room temperature in our experiments, and could not have been an appreciable factor in vaccination with the serum virus mixtures. 6. A mixture of fixed virus and immune serum retained its immunizing power for 8 months when dried in the frozen state and sealed in glass. 7. It appears that the immunizing reaction after yellow fever vaccination was a part of a true infectious process, as was also the observed leucopenia. PMID:19870044

  17. A Glycoprotein Subunit Vaccine Elicits a Strong Rift Valley Fever Virus Neutralizing Antibody Response in Sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Bunyaviridae family, is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen that causes serious morbidity and mortality in livestock and humans. The recent spread of the virus beyond its traditional endemic boundaries in Africa to the Arabian Peninsula coupled with the...

  18. Identification of an NTPase motif in classical swine fever virus NS4B protein

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease of swine caused by CSF virus (CSFV), a positive sense single-stranded RNA virus in the genus Pestivirus of the Flaviviridae family. Here, we have identified, within CSFV non-structural (NS) protein NS4B, conserved sequence el...

  19. Development of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays Using Expressed Proteins of Rift Valley Fever Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a member of the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae that can cause severe disease in both humans and animals. The disease is enzootic in sub-Saharan Africa and RVFV epidemics/epizootics occur periodically, primarily in eastern and southern Africa. Since the virus...

  20. Utility of Antibody Avidity for Rift Valley Fever Virus Vaccine Potency and Immunogenicity Studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Disease outbreaks caused by arthropod-borne animal viruses (arboviruses) resulting in significant livestock and economic losses world-wide appear to be increasing. Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus is an important arbovirus that causes lethal disease in cattle, camels, sheep and goats in sub-Saharan Afr...

  1. Sumoylation of the Core Protein in Classical Swine Fever Virus is Essential for Virulence in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The classical swine fever virus core protein makes up the nucleocapsid of the virus, and is serves both as a protective function for the viral RNA and a transcriptional regulator in the host cell. To identify host proteins that interact with the viral Core protein we utilized the yeast two-hybrid to...

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of an African Swine Fever Virus Isolate from Sardinia, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Torresi, Claudia; Oggiano, Annalisa; Malmberg, Maja; Iscaro, Carmen; De Mia, Gian Mario; Belák, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Previous genetic characterization of African swine fever virus isolates from the Italian island of Sardinia, where the virus has been present since 1978, has largely been limited to a few selected genomic regions. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the isolate 47/Ss/08 collected during an outbreak in 2008. PMID:27856577

  3. Dengue-1 Virus Isolation during First Dengue Fever Outbreak on Easter Island, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Abarca, Katia; Ovalle, Jimena; Ferrer, Pablo; Godoy, Paula; Olea, Andrea; Aguilera, Ximena; Ferrés, Marcela

    2003-01-01

    Dengue virus was detected for the first time in Chile, in an outbreak of dengue fever on Easter Island. The virus was isolated in tissue culture and characterized by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction as being dengue type 1. PMID:14718094

  4. Pathogenicity and Immunogenicity of a Mutagen-Attenuated Rift Valley Fever Virus Immunogen in Pregnant Ewes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    RVFV antibody titers of < 1:10 at birth, increasing to > animals to produce attenuated virus vaccines."’ Prop- 1:80 after ingestion of colostrum ...lamb had a serum sient viremias. Rift Valley fever virus was not detected PRNT80 titer of - 1:80 to uvV. The colostrum of all in serum samples, but low

  5. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus in Ticks Collected from Humans, South Korea, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seok-Min; Lee, Wook-Gyo; Ryou, Jungsang; Yang, Sung-Chan; Park, Sun-Whan; Roh, Jong Yeol; Lee, Ye-Ji; Park, Chan

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the infection rate for severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) among ticks collected from humans during May–October 2013 in South Korea. Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks have been considered the SFTSV vector. However, we detected the virus in H. longicornis, Amblyomma testudinarium, and Ixodes nipponensis ticks, indicating additional potential SFTSV vectors. PMID:25061851

  6. Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus in ticks collected from humans, South Korea, 2013.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seok-Min; Lee, Wook-Gyo; Ryou, Jungsang; Yang, Sung-Chan; Park, Sun-Whan; Roh, Jong Yeol; Lee, Ye-Ji; Park, Chan; Han, Myung Guk

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the infection rate for severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) among ticks collected from humans during May-October 2013 in South Korea. Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks have been considered the SFTSV vector. However, we detected the virus in H. longicornis, Amblyomma testudinarium, and Ixodes nipponensis ticks, indicating additional potential SFTSV vectors.

  7. USDA, ARS, ABDRL Research on Countermeasures for Rift Valley Fever Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The United State Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Research Service has recently established research program to address countermeasures for of Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus (RVFV). The recent outbreak in Kenya, Tanzania and Somalia demonstrates the impact this virus can have on human and live...

  8. Detection of viruses in young children with fever without an apparent source.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Joshua M; Muenzer, Jared T; Jaffe, David M; Smason, Avraham; Deych, Elena; Shannon, William D; Arens, Max Q; Buller, Richard S; Lee, Wai-Ming; Weinstock, Erica J Sodergren; Weinstock, George M; Storch, Gregory A

    2012-12-01

    Fever without an apparent source is common in young children. Currently in the United States, serious bacterial infection is unusual. Our objective was to determine specific viruses that might be responsible. We enrolled children aged 2 to 36 months with temperature of 38°C or greater without an apparent source or with definite or probable bacterial infection being evaluated in the St Louis Children's Hospital Emergency Department and afebrile children having ambulatory surgery. Blood and nasopharyngeal swab samples were tested with an extensive battery of virus-specific polymerase chain reaction assays. One or more viruses were detected in 76% of 75 children with fever without an apparent source, 40% of 15 children with fever and a definite or probable bacterial infection, and 35% of 116 afebrile children (P < .001). Four viruses (adenovirus, human herpesvirus 6, enterovirus, and parechovirus) were predominant, being detected in 57% of children with fever without a source, 13% of children with fever and definite or probable bacterial infection, and 7% of afebrile children (P < .001). Thirty-four percent of 146 viral infections were detected only by polymerase chain reaction performed on blood. Fifty-one percent of children with viral infections and no evidence of bacterial infection were treated with antibiotics. Viral infections are frequent in children with fever without an apparent source. Testing of blood in addition to nasopharyngeal secretions expanded the range of viruses detected. Future studies should explore the utility of testing for the implicated viruses. Better recognition of viruses that cause undifferentiated fever in young children may help limit unnecessary antibiotic use.

  9. Development of multiple ELISAs for the detection of antibodies against classical swine fever virus in pig sera.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen-hua; Li, Ling; Pan, Zi-shu

    2012-02-01

    The major immunogenic proteins (E(rns), E2 and NS3) of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) (Shimen strain) were expressed in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography. The recombinant antigens were applied to develop multiple enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of specific antibodies in pig sera. Optimum cut-off values were determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis after testing 201 sera of vaccinated pigs and 64 negative sera of unvaccinated piglets. The multiple ELISAs were validated with 265 pig sera yielding high sensitivity and specificity in comparison with the virus neutralization results. The results demonstrated that multiple ELISAs can be a valuable tool for the detection of CSFV infection and serological surveys in CSFV-free countries or for the evaluation of the antibody responses in pigs induced by a live attenuated C-strain vaccination.

  10. African swine fever virus-cell interactions: from virus entry to cell survival.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Covadonga; Galindo, Inmaculada; Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel Angel; Cabezas, Marta; Hernaez, Bruno; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel

    2013-04-01

    Viruses have adapted to evolve complex and dynamic interactions with their host cell. The viral entry mechanism determines viral tropism and pathogenesis. The entry of African swine fever virus (ASFV) is dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated, but other pathways have been described such as macropinocytosis. During endocytosis, ASFV viral particles undergo disassembly in various compartments that the virus passes through en route to the site of replication. This disassembly relies on the acid pH of late endosomes and on microtubule cytoskeleton transport. ASFV interacts with several regulatory pathways to establish an optimal environment for replication. Examples of these pathways include small GTPases, actin-related signaling, and lipid signaling. Cellular cholesterol, the entire cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, and phosphoinositides are central molecular networks required for successful infection. Here we report new data on the conformation of the viral replication site or viral factory and the remodeling of the subcellular structures. We review the virus-induced regulation of ER stress, apoptosis and autophagy as key mechanisms of cell survival and determinants of infection outcome. Finally, future challenges for the development of new preventive strategies against this virus are proposed on the basis of current knowledge about ASFV-host interactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fulminant encephalitis associated with a vaccine strain of rubella virus.

    PubMed

    Gualberto, Felipe Augusto Souza; de Oliveira, Maria Isabel; Alves, Venancio A F; Kanamura, Cristina T; Rosemberg, Sérgio; Sato, Helena Keico; Arantes, Benedito A F; Curti, Suely Pires; Figueiredo, Cristina Adelaide

    2013-12-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system is common in measles, but rare in rubella. However, rubella virus (RV) can cause a variety of central nervous system syndromes, including meningitis, encephalitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome and sub acute sclerosing panencephalitis. We report the occurrence of one fatal case of the encephalitis associated with measles-rubella (MR) vaccine during an immunization campaign in São Paulo, Brazil. A 31 year-old-man, previously in good health, was admitted at emergency room, with confusion, agitation, inability to stand and hold his head up. Ten days prior to admission, he was vaccinated with combined MR vaccine (Serum Institute of India) and three days later he developed 'flu-like' illness with fever, myalgia and headache. Results of clinical and laboratory exams were consistent with a pattern of viral encephalitis. During hospitalization, his condition deteriorated rapidly with tetraplegia and progression to coma. On the 3rd day of hospitalization he died. Histopathology confirmed encephalitis and immunohistochemistry was positive for RV on brain tissue. RV was also detected by qPCR and virus isolation in cerebrospinal fluid, brain and other clinical samples. The sequence obtained from the isolated virus was identical to that of the RA 27/3 vaccine strain.

  12. Seroprevalence study of Toscana virus and viruses belonging to the Sandfly fever Naples antigenic complex in central and southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Serena; Trombetta, Claudia M; Kistner, Otfried; Montomoli, Emanuele

    2017-02-22

    Sandfly fever viruses are transmitted by the bite of phlebotomine sandflies; serotypes sandfly fever Naples virus, sandfly fever Sicilian virus and sandfly fever Cyprus virus cause febrile illness, whereas Toscana virus (TOSV) may cause neuroinvasive infections. Although TOSV is an important cause of aseptic meningitis in central and southern Italy, in many cases the infection is asymptomatic, leading to underestimation of the actual spread of the virus. This serosurvey aimed to assess the seroprevalence of TOSV in a random population in Siena (Tuscany, central Italy) in 2003-2004 and 2013-2014 and Bari (Apulia, southern Italy) in 2004 and 2015. 2132 serum samples were tested for the presence of anti-TOSV/SFNV IgG by means of ELISA and IFA commercial tests. Seroprevalence rates were compared in the two cities and over a ten-year period in the same city. Seroprevalence results in the Siena population (22.95% in 2003-2004 vs 26.75% in 2013-2014) confirmed the endemic circulation of TOSV and closely related viruses in central Italy, without major changes over the last decade, while no significant prevalence was observed in Bari (2.90% in 2004 vs 1.85% in 2015).

  13. Studying classical swine fever virus: making the best of a bad virus.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Guo, Zhen; Ding, Nai-Zheng; He, Cheng-Qiang

    2015-02-02

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease that affects domestic pigs and wild boars. Outbreak of CSF can cause heavy economic losses to the pig industry. The strategies to prevent, control and eradicate CSF disease are based on containing the disease through a systematic prophylactic vaccination policy and a non-vaccination stamping-out policy. The quest for prevention, control and eradication of CSF has moved research forward in academia and industry, and has produced noticeable advances in understanding fundamental aspects of the virus replication mechanisms, virulence, and led to the development of new vaccines. In this review we summarize recent progress in CSFV epidemiology, molecular features of the genome and proteome, the molecular basis of virulence, and the development of anti-virus technologies.

  14. Evolution and molecular epidemiology of classical swine fever virus during a multi-annual outbreak amongst European wild boar.

    PubMed

    Goller, Katja V; Gabriel, Claudia; Dimna, Mireille Le; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique; Rossi, Sophie; Staubach, Christoph; Merboth, Matthias; Beer, Martin; Blome, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    Classical swine fever is a viral disease of pigs that carries tremendous socio-economic impact. In outbreak situations, genetic typing is carried out for the purpose of molecular epidemiology in both domestic pigs and wild boar. These analyses are usually based on harmonized partial sequences. However, for high-resolution analyses towards the understanding of genetic variability and virus evolution, full-genome sequences are more appropriate. In this study, a unique set of representative virus strains was investigated that was collected during an outbreak in French free-ranging wild boar in the Vosges-du-Nord mountains between 2003 and 2007. Comparative sequence and evolutionary analyses of the nearly full-length sequences showed only slow evolution of classical swine fever virus strains over the years and no impact of vaccination on mutation rates. However, substitution rates varied amongst protein genes; furthermore, a spatial and temporal pattern could be observed whereby two separate clusters were formed that coincided with physical barriers.

  15. Neutralization-based seroprevalence of Toscana virus and sandfly fever Sicilian virus in dogs and cats from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Alwassouf, Sulaf; Maia, Carla; Ayhan, Nazli; Coimbra, Monica; Cristovao, Jose Manuel; Richet, Herve; Bichaud, Laurence; Campino, Lenea; Charrel, Remi N

    2016-11-01

    Sandfly-borne phleboviruses are endemic in the Mediterranean basin. However, levels of exposure of human and animal populations are inadequately researched. Toscana virus (TOSV) is present in Portugal where it causes human infection and disease; in contrast there are few data for sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV) which has neither been isolated nor detected by molecular tests and for which there are only limited serological data. The sera collected from 1160 dogs and 189 cats in southern Portugal were tested for the presence of neutralizing antibodies against TOSV and SFSV, two viruses recognized as distinct serocomplexes in the Mediterranean region. Our data showed (i) seropositivity to TOSV and SFSV in dogs at a rate of 6.8 and 50.8 %, respectively, and (ii) that 3.7 % of cats were seropositive for TOSV. TOSV findings are in line with previous results obtained with less stringent serological assays. Our results for SFSV in dogs clearly indicate that the virus is circulating widely and that humans may be exposed to infection via the dogs. Although the presence of SFSV was suggested by haemagglutination inhibition in 4/1690 human sera in 1974, this is the first time, as far as we know, that SFSV has been shown to circulate so widely in dogs in Portugal. Future studies should be directed at isolating strains of SFSV in Portugal from dogs, humans and sandflies collected in high prevalence regions. As dogs appear to be good sentinels for SFSV, their role as a possible reservoir in the natural cycle should also be considered.

  16. Rift Valley fever virus NSS gene expression correlates with a defect in nuclear mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Anna Maria; Van Deusen, Nicole M; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the localization of host mRNA during Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that infection with RVFV altered the localization of host mRNA. mRNA accumulated in the nuclei of RVFV-infected but not mock-infected cells. Further, overexpression of the NSS gene, but not the N, GN or NSM genes correlated with mRNA nuclear accumulation. Nuclear accumulation of host mRNA was not observed in cells infected with a strain of RVFV lacking the gene encoding NSS, confirming that expression of NSS is likely responsible for this phenomenon.

  17. Experimental Vector Incompetence of a Soft Tick, Ornithodoros sonrai (Acari: Argasidae), for Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    hemorrhagic fever ( CCHF ) virus (IbAr 10200 strain). The mean viral titer Wof mouse blood at the time of tick feeding was 1)0:12 plaque-forming units (PFU...per ml. N Samples of ticks were assayed on 12 occasions between days 0 and 31 after the viremic blood meal. Mean CCHF viral titers were 102 A PFU per...more days. Ticks were allowed to feed on sets of three naive suckling mice on days 0, 2, 5, 8, 11, 14, 21, and 28 after the viremic blood meal, but CCHF

  18. Rift Valley Fever Virus Circulating among Ruminants, Mosquitoes and Humans in the Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    Nakouné, Emmanuel; Kamgang, Basile; Berthet, Nicolas; Manirakiza, Alexandre; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2016-01-01

    Background Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes a viral zoonosis, with discontinuous epizootics and sporadic epidemics, essentially in East Africa. Infection with this virus causes severe illness and abortion in sheep, goats, and cattle as well as other domestic animals. Humans can also be exposed through close contact with infectious tissues or by bites from infected mosquitoes, primarily of the Aedes and Culex genuses. Although the cycle of RVFV infection in savannah regions is well documented, its distribution in forest areas in central Africa has been poorly investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate current circulation of RVFV among livestock and humans living in the Central African Republic (CAR), blood samples were collected from sheep, cattle, and goats and from people at risk, such as stock breeders and workers in slaughterhouses and livestock markets. The samples were tested for anti-RVFV immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. We also sequenced the complete genomes of two local strains, one isolated in 1969 from mosquitoes and one isolated in 1985 from humans living in forested areas. The 1271 animals sampled comprised 727 cattle, 325 sheep, and 219 goats at three sites. The overall seroprevalence of anti-RVFV IgM antibodies was 1.9% and that of IgG antibodies was 8.6%. IgM antibodies were found only during the rainy season, but the frequency of IgG antibodies did not differ significantly by season. No evidence of recent RVFV infection was found in 335 people considered at risk; however, 16.7% had evidence of past infection. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of the strains isolated in the CAR with those isolated in other African countries showed that they belonged to the East/Central African cluster. Conclusion and significance This study confirms current circulation of RVFV in CAR. Further studies are needed to determine the potential vectors involved and the virus reservoirs. PMID:27760144

  19. Transmission rate of African swine fever virus under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Ferreira, H C; Backer, J A; Weesendorp, E; Klinkenberg, D; Stegeman, J A; Loeffen, W L A

    2013-08-30

    African swine fever (ASF) is a highly lethal, viral disease of swine. No vaccine is available, so controlling an ASF outbreak is highly dependent on zoosanitary measures, such as stamping out infected herds and quarantining of affected areas. Information on ASF transmission parameters could allow for more efficient application of outbreak control measures. Three transmission experiments were carried out to estimate the transmission parameters of two ASF virus isolates: Malta'78 (in two doses) and Netherlands'86. Different criteria were used for onset of infectiousness of infected pigs and moment of infection of contact pigs. The transmission rate (β), estimated by a Generalized Linear Model, ranged from 0.45 to 3.63 per day. For the infectious period, a minimum as well as a maximum infectious period was determined, to account for uncertainties regarding infectiousness of persistently infected pigs. While the minimum infectious period ranged from 6 to 7 days, the average maximum infectious period ranged from approximately 20 to nearly 40 days. Estimates of the reproduction ratio (R) for the first generation of transmission ranged from 4.9 to 24.2 for the minimum infectious period and from 9.8 to 66.3 for the maximum infectious period, depending on the isolate. A first approximation of the basic reproduction ratio (R0) resulted in an estimate of 18.0 (6.90-46.9) for the Malta'78 isolate. This is the first R0 estimate of an ASFV isolate under experimental conditions. The estimates of the transmission parameters provide a quantitative insight into ASFV epidemiology and can be used for the design and evaluation of more efficient control measures.

  20. Pathological and virological features of arenavirus disease in guinea pigs. Comparison of two Pichinde virus strains.

    PubMed

    Aronson, J F; Herzog, N K; Jerrells, T R

    1994-07-01

    A guinea pig passage-adapted strain of the arena-virus Pichinde (adPIC) is highly virulent in inbred guinea pigs, whereas the related strain PIC3739 is attenuated. Both viruses were macrophage tropic and infected peritoneal, splenic, liver, and alveolar macrophages during experimental Pichinde virus infection. Infection with the virulent strain was associated with unlimited viral replication in the face of exaggerated delayed-type hypersensitivity response, manifested by the macrophage disappearance reaction. Histopathological lesions unique to adPIC-infected guinea pigs included intestinal villus blunting with mucosal infiltration by pyknotic debris-laden macrophages and apoptosis of crypt epithelial cells. Splenic red pulp necrosis was also significantly associated with adPIC infection but not PIC3739 infection. These findings may provide clues to the pathogenesis of a group of poorly understood human viral hemorrhagic fevers.

  1. Pathological and virological features of arenavirus disease in guinea pigs. Comparison of two Pichinde virus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, J. F.; Herzog, N. K.; Jerrells, T. R.

    1994-01-01

    A guinea pig passage-adapted strain of the arena-virus Pichinde (adPIC) is highly virulent in inbred guinea pigs, whereas the related strain PIC3739 is attenuated. Both viruses were macrophage tropic and infected peritoneal, splenic, liver, and alveolar macrophages during experimental Pichinde virus infection. Infection with the virulent strain was associated with unlimited viral replication in the face of exaggerated delayed-type hypersensitivity response, manifested by the macrophage disappearance reaction. Histopathological lesions unique to adPIC-infected guinea pigs included intestinal villus blunting with mucosal infiltration by pyknotic debris-laden macrophages and apoptosis of crypt epithelial cells. Splenic red pulp necrosis was also significantly associated with adPIC infection but not PIC3739 infection. These findings may provide clues to the pathogenesis of a group of poorly understood human viral hemorrhagic fevers. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8030751

  2. Changing pattern of classical swine fever virus genogroup from classical 1.1 to emerging 2.2 in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinod Kumar; Rajak, Kaushal Kishor; Kumar, Ravi; Raut, Sachin D; Saxena, Arpit; Muthuchelvan, Dhanavellu; Singh, Raj Kumar; Pandey, Awadh Bihari

    2017-06-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is one of the most important viral diseases of pigs with high economic impact. The causative agent, Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a member of genus Pestivirus in family Flaviviredae and is structurally and antigenically related to other members of the genus. The identification of virus strains and genotypes can conveniently be used to trace the origin and patterns of virus spread, which contribut substantially in control strategies. In the present study, we have partially sequenced and analysed the 5' untranslated region (UTR) and E2 regions of CSFV clinical samples (n = 24) from various parts of the country. Among the samples, the sequence alignment of 5'UTR and E2 regions revealed 96.7-100 and 94.7-100% identities at the nucleotide level, respectively. The samples under study showed the close resemblance to the other CSFV isolates reported in India. In phylogenetic analysis, all the field samples were clustered in subgroup 2.2. Thus the study presents a further phylogenetic evidence for the emergence of subgroup 2.2 CSFV replacing the predominant subgroup 1.1 viruses in India. As the information regarding the molecular epidemiology the CSFV in india is very little, generation of such epidemiological data is warranted to help in comprehensing the nationwide disease control program to sustain the growth of pig industry in India.

  3. Characterization and molecular basis of heterogeneity of the African swine fever virus envelope protein p54.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, F; Alcaraz, C; Eiras, A; Yáñez, R J; Rodriguez, J M; Alonso, C; Rodriguez, J F; Escribano, J M

    1994-01-01

    It has been reported that the propagation of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in cell culture generates viral subpopulations differing in protein p54 (C. Alcaraz, A. Brun, F. Ruiz-Gonzalvo, and J. M. Escribano, Virus Res. 23:173-182, 1992). A recombinant bacteriophage expressing a 328-bp fragment of the p54 gene was selected in a lambda phage expression library of ASFV genomic fragments by immunoscreening with antibodies against p54 protein. The sequence of this recombinant phage allowed the location of the p54 gene in the EcoRI E fragment of the ASFV genome. Nucleotide sequence obtained from this fragment revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 183 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 19,861. This protein contains a transmembrane domain and a Gly-Gly-X motif, a recognition sequence for protein processing of several ASFV structural proteins. In addition, two direct tandem repetitions were also found within this open reading frame. Further characterization of the transcription and gene product revealed that the p54 gene is translated from a late mRNA and the protein is incorporated to the external membrane of the virus particle. A comparison of the nucleotide sequence of the p54 gene carried by two virulent ASFV strains (E70 and E75) with that obtained from virus Ba71V showed 100% similarity. However, when p54 genes from viral clones generated by cell culture passage and coding for p54 proteins with different electrophoretic mobility were sequenced, they showed changes in the number of copies of a 12-nucleotide sequence repeat. These changes produce alterations in the number of copies of the amino acid sequence Pro-Ala-Ala-Ala present in p54, resulting in stepwise modifications in the molecular weight of the protein. These duplications and deletions of a tandem repeat sequence array within a protein coding region constitute a novel mechanism of genetic diversification in ASFV. Images PMID:7933107

  4. Characterization and molecular basis of heterogeneity of the African swine fever virus envelope protein p54.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, F; Alcaraz, C; Eiras, A; Yáñez, R J; Rodriguez, J M; Alonso, C; Rodriguez, J F; Escribano, J M

    1994-11-01

    It has been reported that the propagation of African swine fever virus (ASFV) in cell culture generates viral subpopulations differing in protein p54 (C. Alcaraz, A. Brun, F. Ruiz-Gonzalvo, and J. M. Escribano, Virus Res. 23:173-182, 1992). A recombinant bacteriophage expressing a 328-bp fragment of the p54 gene was selected in a lambda phage expression library of ASFV genomic fragments by immunoscreening with antibodies against p54 protein. The sequence of this recombinant phage allowed the location of the p54 gene in the EcoRI E fragment of the ASFV genome. Nucleotide sequence obtained from this fragment revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 183 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 19,861. This protein contains a transmembrane domain and a Gly-Gly-X motif, a recognition sequence for protein processing of several ASFV structural proteins. In addition, two direct tandem repetitions were also found within this open reading frame. Further characterization of the transcription and gene product revealed that the p54 gene is translated from a late mRNA and the protein is incorporated to the external membrane of the virus particle. A comparison of the nucleotide sequence of the p54 gene carried by two virulent ASFV strains (E70 and E75) with that obtained from virus Ba71V showed 100% similarity. However, when p54 genes from viral clones generated by cell culture passage and coding for p54 proteins with different electrophoretic mobility were sequenced, they showed changes in the number of copies of a 12-nucleotide sequence repeat. These changes produce alterations in the number of copies of the amino acid sequence Pro-Ala-Ala-Ala present in p54, resulting in stepwise modifications in the molecular weight of the protein. These duplications and deletions of a tandem repeat sequence array within a protein coding region constitute a novel mechanism of genetic diversification in ASFV.

  5. Prevalence of Lassa Virus Disease (LVD) in Nigerian children with fever or fever and convulsions in an endemic area

    PubMed Central

    Akhuemokhan, Odigie C.; Ewah-Odiase, Rosemary O.; Akpede, Nosa; Ehimuan, Jacqueline; Adomeh, Donatus I.; Odia, Ikpomwonsa; Olomu, Sylvia C.; Pahlmann, Meike; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Happi, Christian T.; Asogun, Danny A.; Okogbenin, Sylvanus A.; Okokhere, Peter O.; Dawodu, Osagie S.; Omoike, Irekpono U.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Günther, Stephan; Akpede, George O.

    2017-01-01

    Background Convulsions with fever in children are a common neurologic emergency in the tropics, and determining the contribution of endemic viral infections can be challenging. In particular, there is a dearth of data on the prevalence and clinical differentiation of Lassa virus disease (LVD) in febrile children in endemic areas of Nigeria, which has multiple lineages of the virus. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and presentation of LVD in febrile children with and without convulsions. Methodology/Principal findings This was a prospective study of consecutive febrile children aged ≥1 month– 15 years admitted to the Children’s Emergency Room of Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital over a period of 1 year. Febrile children with convulsions (Cases) were compared with those without convulsions (Controls). LVD was defined by the presence of a positive Lassa virus RT-PCR test. Rates were compared between groups using χ2 or Fisher’s exact tests and p <0.05 taken as significant. 373 (40.9%) of 913 admissions had fever. Of these, 108/373 (29%) presented with convulsions. The overall prevalence of LVD was 13/373 (3.5%; 95% CI = 1.9%, 5.7%) in febrile admissions, 3/108 (2.8%) in Cases and 10/265 (3.8%) in Controls [(Odds Ratio (95% Confidence Interval) (OR (95% CI)) of LVD in Cases versus Controls = 0.73 (0.2, 2.7)]. Only vomiting (OR (95% CI) = 0.09 (0.01, 0.70)) and bleeding (OR (95% CI) = 39.56 (8.52, 183.7)) were significantly associated with an increased prevalence of LVD. Conclusions/Significance LVD is an important cause of fever, including undifferentiated fever in children in endemic areas, but it is not significantly associated with convulsions associated with fever. Its prevalence, and lack of clinical differentiation on presentation, underscores the importance of a high index of suspicion in diagnosis. Screening of febrile children with undifferentiated fever in endemic areas for LVD could be an important medical and public health

  6. Prevalence of Lassa Virus Disease (LVD) in Nigerian children with fever or fever and convulsions in an endemic area.

    PubMed

    Akhuemokhan, Odigie C; Ewah-Odiase, Rosemary O; Akpede, Nosa; Ehimuan, Jacqueline; Adomeh, Donatus I; Odia, Ikpomwonsa; Olomu, Sylvia C; Pahlmann, Meike; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Happi, Christian T; Asogun, Danny A; Okogbenin, Sylvanus A; Okokhere, Peter O; Dawodu, Osagie S; Omoike, Irekpono U; Sabeti, Pardis C; Günther, Stephan; Akpede, George O

    2017-07-01

    Convulsions with fever in children are a common neurologic emergency in the tropics, and determining the contribution of endemic viral infections can be challenging. In particular, there is a dearth of data on the prevalence and clinical differentiation of Lassa virus disease (LVD) in febrile children in endemic areas of Nigeria, which has multiple lineages of the virus. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and presentation of LVD in febrile children with and without convulsions. This was a prospective study of consecutive febrile children aged ≥1 month- 15 years admitted to the Children's Emergency Room of Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital over a period of 1 year. Febrile children with convulsions (Cases) were compared with those without convulsions (Controls). LVD was defined by the presence of a positive Lassa virus RT-PCR test. Rates were compared between groups using χ2 or Fisher's exact tests and p <0.05 taken as significant. 373 (40.9%) of 913 admissions had fever. Of these, 108/373 (29%) presented with convulsions. The overall prevalence of LVD was 13/373 (3.5%; 95% CI = 1.9%, 5.7%) in febrile admissions, 3/108 (2.8%) in Cases and 10/265 (3.8%) in Controls [(Odds Ratio (95% Confidence Interval) (OR (95% CI)) of LVD in Cases versus Controls = 0.73 (0.2, 2.7)]. Only vomiting (OR (95% CI) = 0.09 (0.01, 0.70)) and bleeding (OR (95% CI) = 39.56 (8.52, 183.7)) were significantly associated with an increased prevalence of LVD. LVD is an important cause of fever, including undifferentiated fever in children in endemic areas, but it is not significantly associated with convulsions associated with fever. Its prevalence, and lack of clinical differentiation on presentation, underscores the importance of a high index of suspicion in diagnosis. Screening of febrile children with undifferentiated fever in endemic areas for LVD could be an important medical and public health control measure.

  7. Prevalence of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus in Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Whan; Song, Bong Gu; Shin, E-Hyun; Yun, Seok-Min; Han, Myung-Guk; Park, Mi Yeoun; Park, Chan; Ryou, Jungsang

    2014-10-01

    Haemaphysalis longicornis a vector that harbors severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is a major species of tick in South Korea. To investigate the existence and prevalence of SFTSV in Korea, we collected ticks from nine provinces in South Korea for detecting SFTSV. In all, we collected 13,053 ticks, and H. longicornis (90.8%, 11,856/13,053) was the most abundant among them. The minimum infection rate (MIR) of SFTSV in H. longicornis was 0.46% (55 pools). SFTSV was detected in ticks during all the developmental stages, showing MIR in larvae (2/350, 0.57%), nymphs (38/10,436, 0.36%), males (2/221, 0.90%), and females (13/849, 1.53%), respectively. Viruses were detected in ticks collected between April and September. A higher MIR was detected in ticks from the southern part of the country. We amplified the M and S segment partial genes from a sample and analyzed the nucleotide sequence. The results showed a 93-98% homology to Chinese and Japanese strains registered in Genbank. In this study, we confirmed the existence of SFTSV for the first time in South Korea. The SFTSV prevalence data from the studies are essential for raising the awareness of SFTS in South Korea. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. CD8+ T cells complement antibodies in protecting against yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Maria R; Kongsgaard, Michael; Steffensen, Maria A; Fenger, Christina; Rasmussen, Michael; Skjødt, Karsten; Finsen, Bente; Stryhn, Anette; Buus, Søren; Christensen, Jan P; Thomsen, Allan R

    2015-02-01

    The attenuated yellow fever (YF) vaccine (YF-17D) was developed in the 1930s, yet little is known about the protective mechanisms underlying its efficiency. In this study, we analyzed the relative contribution of cell-mediated and humoral immunity to the vaccine-induced protection in a murine model of YF-17D infection. Using different strains of knockout mice, we found that CD4(+) T cells, B cells, and Abs are required for full clinical protection of vaccinated mice, whereas CD8(+) T cells are dispensable for long-term survival after intracerebral challenge. However, by analyzing the immune response inside the infected CNS, we observed an accelerated T cell influx into the brain after intracerebral challenge of vaccinated mice, and this T cell recruitment correlated with improved virus control in the brain. Using mice deficient in B cells we found that, in the absence of Abs, YF vaccination can still induce some antiviral protection, and in vivo depletion of CD8(+) T cells from these animals revealed a pivotal role for CD8(+) T cells in controlling virus replication in the absence of a humoral response. Finally, we demonstrated that effector CD8(+) T cells also contribute to viral control in the presence of circulating YF-specific Abs. To our knowledge, this is the first time that YF-specific CD8(+) T cells have been demonstrated to possess antiviral activity in vivo. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. African swine fever virus ORF P1192R codes for a functional type II DNA topoisomerase.

    PubMed

    Coelho, João; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando; Leitão, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerases modulate the topological state of DNA during processes, such as replication and transcription, that cause overwinding and/or underwinding of the DNA. African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a nucleo-cytoplasmic double-stranded DNA virus shown to contain an OFR (P1192R) with homology to type II topoisomerases. Here we observed that pP1192R is highly conserved among ASFV isolates but dissimilar from other viral, prokaryotic or eukaryotic type II topoisomerases. In both ASFV/Ba71V-infected Vero cells and ASFV/L60-infected pig macrophages we detected pP1192R at intermediate and late phases of infection, cytoplasmically localized and accumulating in the viral factories. Finally, we used a Saccharomyces cerevisiae temperature-sensitive strain in order to demonstrate, through complementation and in vitro decatenation assays, the functionality of P1192R, which we further confirmed by mutating its predicted catalytic residue. Overall, this work strengthens the idea that P1192R constitutes a target for studying, and possibly controlling, ASFV transcription and replication.

  10. Identification of a New Genotype of African Swine Fever Virus in Domestic Pigs from Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Achenbach, J E; Gallardo, C; Nieto-Pelegrín, E; Rivera-Arroyo, B; Degefa-Negi, T; Arias, M; Jenberie, S; Mulisa, D D; Gizaw, D; Gelaye, E; Chibssa, T R; Belaye, A; Loitsch, A; Forsa, M; Yami, M; Diallo, A; Soler, A; Lamien, C E; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2017-10-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is an important emerging transboundary animal disease (TAD), which currently has an impact on many countries in Africa, Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and the Russian Federation. The current situation in Europe shows the ability of the virus to rapidly spread, which stands to threaten the global swine industry. At present, there is no viable vaccine to minimize spread of the disease and stamping out is the main source of control. In February 2011, Ethiopia had reported its first suspected outbreaks of ASF. Genomic analyses of the collected ASF virus (ASFV) strains were undertaken using 23 tissue samples collected from domestic swine in Ethiopia from 2011 to 2014. The analysis of Ethiopian ASFVs partial p72 gene sequence showed the identification of a new genotype, genotype XXIII, that shares a common ancestor with genotypes IX and X, which comprise isolates circulating in Eastern African countries and the Republic of Congo. Analysis of the p54 gene also followed the p72 pattern and the deduced amino acid sequence of the central variable region (CVR) of the B602L gene showed novel tetramer repeats not previously characterized. © 2016 The Authors. Transboundary and Emerging Diseases Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Recombinant Swinepox Virus Expressing Glycoprotein E2 of Classical Swine Fever Virus Confers Complete Protection in Pigs upon Viral Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huixing; Ma, Zhe; Chen, Lei; Fan, Hongjie

    2017-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and serious viral disease that affects the pig industry worldwide. The glycoprotein E2 of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) can induce neutralizing antibodies, and it is widely used for novel vaccine development. To explore the development of a vaccine against CSFV infections, the gene of glycoprotein E2 was inserted into the swinepox virus (SPV) genome by homologous recombination. The culture titers of rSPV-E2 remained at about 4.3 × 106 TCID50 for more than 60 passages in PK15 and swine testis cell lines. The rSPV-E2 could not be replicated in Vero, MDBK or other non-porcine cell lines. After two to three passages, the SPV specific gene of rSPV-E2 could not been detected in the non-porcine cell culture. To evaluate the immunogenicity of rSPV-E2, 20 CSFV seronegative minipigs were immunized with rSPV-E2, a commercial C-strain vaccine, wild-type SPV (wtSPV; negative control), or PBS (a no-challenge control). After challenge with CSFV, pigs in the rSPV-E2-immunized group showed significantly shorter fever duration compared with the wtSPV-treated group (P < 0.05). E2-specific antibodies in the rSPV-E2-immunized group increased dramatically after vaccination and increased continuously over time. CSFV genomic copies in the serum of rSPV-E2-immunized pigs were significantly less compared with the wtSPV-treated group at all time points after challenge (P < 0.01). Significant reduction in gross lung lesion scores, histopathological liver, spleen, lung, and kidney lesion scores were noted in the rSPV-E2-immunized group compared with the wtSPV-treated group (P < 0.01). The results suggested that the recombinant rSPV-E2 provided pigs with significant protection from CSFV infections; thus, rSPV-E2 offers proof of principle for the development of a vaccine for the prevention of CSFV infections in pigs. PMID:28612010

  12. Recombinant Swinepox Virus Expressing Glycoprotein E2 of Classical Swine Fever Virus Confers Complete Protection in Pigs upon Viral Challenge.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huixing; Ma, Zhe; Chen, Lei; Fan, Hongjie

    2017-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and serious viral disease that affects the pig industry worldwide. The glycoprotein E2 of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) can induce neutralizing antibodies, and it is widely used for novel vaccine development. To explore the development of a vaccine against CSFV infections, the gene of glycoprotein E2 was inserted into the swinepox virus (SPV) genome by homologous recombination. The culture titers of rSPV-E2 remained at about 4.3 × 10(6) TCID50 for more than 60 passages in PK15 and swine testis cell lines. The rSPV-E2 could not be replicated in Vero, MDBK or other non-porcine cell lines. After two to three passages, the SPV specific gene of rSPV-E2 could not been detected in the non-porcine cell culture. To evaluate the immunogenicity of rSPV-E2, 20 CSFV seronegative minipigs were immunized with rSPV-E2, a commercial C-strain vaccine, wild-type SPV (wtSPV; negative control), or PBS (a no-challenge control). After challenge with CSFV, pigs in the rSPV-E2-immunized group showed significantly shorter fever duration compared with the wtSPV-treated group (P < 0.05). E2-specific antibodies in the rSPV-E2-immunized group increased dramatically after vaccination and increased continuously over time. CSFV genomic copies in the serum of rSPV-E2-immunized pigs were significantly less compared with the wtSPV-treated group at all time points after challenge (P < 0.01). Significant reduction in gross lung lesion scores, histopathological liver, spleen, lung, and kidney lesion scores were noted in the rSPV-E2-immunized group compared with the wtSPV-treated group (P < 0.01). The results suggested that the recombinant rSPV-E2 provided pigs with significant protection from CSFV infections; thus, rSPV-E2 offers proof of principle for the development of a vaccine for the prevention of CSFV infections in pigs.

  13. Generation and Efficacy Evaluation of a Recombinant Pseudorabies Virus Variant Expressing the E2 Protein of Classical Swine Fever Virus in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Yuan, Jin; Cong, Xin; Qin, Hua-Yang; Wang, Chun-Hua; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Su; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2015-10-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an economically important infectious disease of pigs caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Pseudorabies (PR), which is caused by pseudorabies virus (PRV), is another important infectious disease of pigs and other animals. Coinfections of pigs with PRV and CSFV occur occasionally in the field. The modified live vaccine Bartha-K61 strain has played an important role in the control of PR in many countries, including China. Since late 2011, however, increasing PR outbreaks caused by an emerging PRV variant have been reported in Bartha-K61-vaccinated swine populations on many farms in China. Previously, we generated a gE/gI-deleted PRV (rPRVTJ-delgE) based on this PRV variant, which was shown to be safe and can provide rapid and complete protection against lethal challenge with the PRV variant in pigs. Here, we generated a new recombinant PRV variant expressing the E2 gene of CSFV (rPRVTJ-delgE/gI-E2) and evaluated its immunogenicity and efficacy in pigs. The results showed that rPRVTJ-delgE/gI-E2 was safe for pigs, induced detectable anti-PRV and anti-CSFV neutralizing antibodies, and provided complete protection against the lethal challenge with either the PRV TJ strain or the CSFV Shimen strain. The data indicate that rPRVTJ-delgE/gI-E2 is a promising candidate bivalent vaccine against PRV and CSFV coinfections.

  14. NSm protein of Rift Valley fever virus suppresses virus-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Won, Sungyong; Ikegami, Tetsuro; Peters, C J; Makino, Shinji

    2007-12-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a member of the genus Phlebovirus within the family Bunyaviridae. It can cause severe epidemics among ruminants and fever, myalgia, a hemorrhagic syndrome, and/or encephalitis in humans. The RVFV M segment encodes the NSm and 78-kDa proteins and two major envelope proteins, Gn and Gc. The biological functions of the NSm and 78-kDa proteins are unknown; both proteins are dispensable for viral replication in cell cultures. To determine the biological functions of the NSm and 78-kDa proteins, we generated the mutant virus arMP-12-del21/384, carrying a large deletion in the pre-Gn region of the M segment. Neither NSm nor the 78-kDa protein was synthesized in arMP-12-del21/384-infected cells. Although arMP-12-del21/384 and its parental virus, arMP-12, showed similar growth kinetics and viral RNA and protein accumulation in infected cells, arMP-12-del21/384-infected cells induced extensive cell death and produced larger plaques than did arMP-12-infected cells. arMP-12-del21/384 replication triggered apoptosis, including the cleavage of caspase-3, the cleavage of its downstream substrate, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and activation of the initiator caspases, caspase-8 and -9, earlier in infection than arMP-12. NSm expression in arMP-12-del21/384-infected cells suppressed the severity of caspase-3 activation. Further, NSm protein expression inhibited the staurosporine-induced activation of caspase-8 and -9, demonstrating that other viral proteins were dispensable for NSm's function in inhibiting apoptosis. RVFV NSm protein is the first identified Phlebovirus protein that has an antiapoptotic function.

  15. BA71ΔCD2: A new recombinant live attenuated African swine fever virus with cross-protective capabilities.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, Paula L; Lacasta, Anna; López, Elisabeth; Bosch, Laia; Collado, Javier; Pina-Pedrero, Sonia; Correa-Fiz, Florencia; Accensi, Francesc; Navas, María Jesús; Vidal, Enric; Bustos, María J; Rodríguez, Javier M; Gallei, Andreas; Nikolin, Veljko; Salas, María L; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2017-08-16

    African swine fever is a highly contagious viral disease of mandatory declaration to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). Lack of available vaccines make its control difficult and thus ASFV represents a major threat to the swine industry. Inactivated vaccines do not confer solid protection against African swine fever virus (ASFV). Conversely, live attenuated viruses (LAV), either naturally isolated or obtained by genetic manipulation, have demonstrated reliable protection against homologous ASFV strains, albeit little or no protection has been demonstrated against heterologous viruses. Safety concerns are a major issue for the use of ASFV attenuated vaccine candidates, and has hampered their implementation in the field so far. While trying to develop safer and efficient ASFV vaccines, we found and demonstrate here that the deletion of the viral CD2v (EP402R) gene, highly attenuated the virulent BA71 strain in vivo. Inoculation of pigs with the deletion mutant virus BA71ΔCD2 conferred protection not only against the lethal challenge with the parental BA71 but also against the heterologous E75 (both genotype I strains). The protection induced was dose-dependent and the cross-protection observed in vivo correlated with the ability of BA71ΔCD2 to induce specific CD8(+) T-cells capable of recognizing both BA71 and E75 viruses in vitro Interestingly, 100% of the pigs immunized with BA71ΔCD2 also survived lethal challenge with Georgia 2007/1, the genotype II strain of ASFV currently circulating in Continental Europe. These results open new avenues to design ASFV cross-protective vaccines, essential to fight ASFV in endemic areas where multiple viruses are circulating.Importance African swine fever virus (ASFV) remains endemic in most countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, today representing a major threat for the development of their swine industry. The uncontrolled presence of ASFV has favored its periodic exportation to other countries, the last event being

  16. Rift Valley fever virus: A review of diagnosis and vaccination, and implications for emergence in Europe.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Karen L; Banyard, Ashley C; McElhinney, Lorraine; Johnson, Nicholas; Horton, Daniel L; Hernández-Triana, Luis M; Fooks, Anthony R

    2015-10-13

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne virus, and is the causative agent of Rift Valley fever (RVF), a zoonotic disease characterised by an increased incidence of abortion or foetal malformation in ruminants. Infection in humans can also lead to clinical manifestations that in severe cases cause encephalitis or haemorrhagic fever. The virus is endemic throughout much of the African continent. However, the emergence of RVFV in the Middle East, northern Egypt and the Comoros Archipelago has highlighted that the geographical range of RVFV may be increasing, and has led to the concern that an incursion into Europe may occur. At present, there is a limited range of veterinary vaccines available for use in endemic areas, and there is no licensed human vaccine. In this review, the methods available for diagnosis of RVFV infection, the current status of vaccine development and possible implications for RVFV emergence in Europe, are discussed.

  17. Hiding the evidence: two strategies for innate immune evasion by hemorrhagic fever viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, Kathryn M.; Bale, Shridhar; Kimberlin, Christopher R.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune system is one of the first lines of defense against invading pathogens. Pathogens have, in turn, evolved different strategies to counteract these responses. Recent studies have illuminated how the hemorrhagic fever viruses Ebola and Lassa fever prevent host sensing of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a key hallmark of viral infection. The ebolavirus protein VP35 adopts a unique bimodal configuration to mask key cellular recognition sites on dsRNA. Conversely, the Lassa fever virus nucleoprotein, NP, actually digests the dsRNA signature. Collectively, these structural and functional studies shed new light on the mechanisms of pathogenesis of these viruses and provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22482712

  18. Prevalence of classical swine fever virus in domestic pigs in South Korea: 1999-2011.

    PubMed

    Song, J-Y; Lim, S I; Jeoung, H Y; Choi, E-J; Hyun, B-H; Kim, B; Kim, J; Shin, Y-K; Dela Pena, R C; Kim, J B; Joo, H; An, D J

    2013-12-01

    The major policy for eradication of classical swine fever (CSF) in South Korea has focused on the implementation of compulsory vaccination of the susceptible pig population. A vaccine strain of CSF virus, the LOM strain, is used to maintain high herd seroconversion, a practice complementary to the 'stamping-out policy' and restriction of animal movement during disease outbreaks. To survey for the prevalence of CSF in domestic pigs in South Korea over the past 13 years (1999-2011), we tested 4 193 782 and 1 162 645 samples for antibodies and antigens, respectively. Whereas seropositivity for CSF antibodies has been maintained at over 95% in the mainland, in Jeju Island, where no-vaccination has been administered since 1999, seroprevalence has been below 1% during the last 3 years of study (2009-2011). The highest number of outbreaks in South Korea occurred in 2002 and 2003; since then, outbreaks have decreased each year, with the last CSF outbreak recorded in 2009. No outbreaks have occurred during the past 3 years, and a high level of herd immunity has been maintained in the mainland pig population for 8 years; therefore, South Korea could now switch to a no-vaccination policy throughout the country. However, the constant threat of the re-emergence of the disease in the susceptible pig population should be the main consideration in planning and carrying out the last phase of the CSF eradication process.

  19. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Clade IV (Asia 1) in Ticks of Western Iran.

    PubMed

    Kayedi, Mohammad Hassan; Chinikar, Sadegh; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Khakifirouz, Sahar; Jalali, Tahmineh; Hosseini-Chegeni, Asadolah; Naghizadeh, Ali; Niedrig, Matthias; Fooks, Anthony R; Shahhosseini, Nariman

    2015-09-01

    Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus (CCHFV) is transmitted through the bite of an infected tick, or by direct contact with CCHFV-infected patients' blood or the products of infected livestock. In 2012, ticks were collected in eight regions of Lorestan Province, Iran. In total, 434 ticks were collected. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used for the detection of CCHFV RNA. Of 434 ticks, 419 (96.6%) ticks were from the family Ixodidae (hard ticks) and 15 (3.5%) ticks were from the family Argasidae (soft ticks). The presence of CCHFV RNA was detected in 29 (6.7%) of 434 ticks. The infected tick species include Hyalomma asiaticum (n = 7, 7.4%), Hyalomma anatolicum (n = 12, 13.2%), Hyalomma marginatum (n = 1, 16.7%), and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (n = 9, 4.3%). These empirical data demonstrated that the majority of CCHFV-positive ticks belonged to the Ixodidae. None of the Argasidae and Haemaphysalis sulcata species was infected with CCHFV. The phylogenetic analyses of the tick-derived CCHFV strains revealed that all 29 viral strains fell in clade IV (Asia 1). The most abundant species of tick collected in this study was R. sanguineus followed by different species of Hyalomma. Given the infection rate among collected ticks, H. marginatum was the most abundant infected tick species (16.7%) followed by H. anatolicum (13.2%), H. asiaticum (7.4%), and R. sanguineus (4.3%).

  20. Seroprevalence of sandfly fever virus infection in military personnel on the western border of Iran.

    PubMed

    Shiraly, Ramin; Khosravi, Afra; Farahangiz, Saman

    Military troops deployed to endemic areas are at risk of contracting sandfly fever, an arthropod-borne viral infection. Although typically a self-limited disease, sandfly fever can cause significant morbidity and loss of function among soldiers. We conducted this study to determine the extent of past SFV infection in a group of healthy Iranian military personnel in Ilam province on the western border of Iran. A total of 201 serum samples were tested by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) to detect four common sandfly fever virus serotypes. Demographic data were also collected. Overall, 37 samples (18.4%) were positive for specific IgG antibodies to sandfly viruses. Sandfly fever Sicilian virus (SFSV) and sandfly fever Naples virus (SFNV) were the most common serotypes. A positive test was inversely related to nativity (P<0.01) but was not associated with age (P=0.163), duration of presence in the border region (P=0.08) or employment status (P=0.179). Our findings indicate that past SFV infection is common among military personnel in the western border region of Iran, a Leishmania-endemic region. Therefore, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of troops presenting with acute febrile illness in similar settings.

  1. Determination of the cytokine expression profile after infection of (PK-15) Porcine cells with classical swine fever virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is caused by the Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), a member of the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae. A highly contagious disease of domestic pigs and wild boars worldwide it causes serious losses to the pig industry. The virulence of CSF viruses is strai...

  2. Association of the host immune response with protection using a live attenuated African swine fever virus model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    African swine fever (ASF) is a lethal hemorrhagic disease of swine caused by a double-stranded DNA virus, African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV). There is no vaccine to prevent the disease and current control measures are limited to culling and restricted animal movement. Swine infected with attenuated st...

  3. [Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in Stavropol region in 2011].

    PubMed

    Iashina, L N; Malyshev, B S; Netesova, N A; Volynkina, A S; Vasilenko, N F

    2014-01-01

    The genetic analysis of the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus circulating in Stavropol region during 2011 year was suggested. A total of 14 RNA isolates from the Crimean hemorrhagic fever patients were genetically typed. The genetic analysis of the CCHF virus stains based on M-segment sequences (positions 2607-2932) supported the circulation of the genotype Europe 1 in the Stavropol region of Russia. In addition to previously known lineage STV-ROS, the second lineage VLG/ROS was observed in Stavropol region.

  4. African swine fever virus infection of the bushpig (Potamochoerus porcus) and its significance in the epidemiology of the disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E C; Hutchings, G H; Mukarati, N; Wilkinson, P J

    1998-04-30

    Warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus), giant forest hog (Hylochoerus meinertzhageni) and bushpig (Potamochoerus porcus) are known to be susceptible to infection with African swine fever (ASF) virus. Little however, is known about the ecology of the disease in the bushpig. This study has shown that the bushpig remains viraemic for between 35 and 91 days following infection during which time it is able to infect the tick vector O. moubata. These ticks were able to transmit the disease to pigs. The virus persists in the lymphatic tissues for less than 34 weeks. Bushpigs infected with LIL 20/l virus but not VIC T90/l virus transmitted infection to in-contact pigs. Infected domestic pigs did not transmit the infection to in-contact bushpigs. ASF virus was able to replicate in in vitro cultures of bushpig leucocytes and endothelial cells. Recovered bushpigs could be reinfected with some strains of virus but not others. While it has been demonstrated that bushpigs remain carriers of ASFV following infection a complete understanding of their significance in the epidemiology of the disease awaits further investigations of their association with O. moubata.

  5. Characterization of the interaction of African swine fever virus with monocytes and derived macrophage subsets.

    PubMed

    Franzoni, Giulia; Graham, Simon P; Giudici, Silvia Dei; Bonelli, Piero; Pilo, Giovannantonio; Anfossi, Antonio G; Pittau, Marco; Nicolussi, Paola S; Laddomada, Alberto; Oggiano, Annalisa

    2017-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a devastating disease for which there is no vaccine available. The ASF virus (ASFV) primarily infects cells of the myeloid lineage and this tropism is thought to be crucial for disease pathogenesis. A detailed in vitro characterization of the interactions of a virulent Sardinian isolate (22653/14) and a tissue culture adapted avirulent strain (BA71V) of ASFV with porcine monocytes, un-activated (moMΦ), classically (moM1) and alternatively (moM2) activated monocyte-derived macrophages was conducted in an attempt to better understand this relationship. Using a multiplicity-of-infection (MOI) of 1, both viruses were able to infect monocytes and macrophage subsets, but BA71V presented a reduced ability to infect moM1 compared to 22653/14, with higher expression of early compared to late proteins. Using an MOI of 0.01, only 22653/14 was able to replicate in all the macrophage subsets, with initially lowest in moM1 and moM2. No differences were observed in the expression of CD163 between ASFV infected and uninfected bystander cells. ASFV down-regulated CD16 expression but did not modulate MHC class II levels in monocytes and macrophage subsets. BA71V-infected but not 22653/14-infected moMΦ and moM2 presented with a reduced expression of MHC class I compared to the mock-infected controls. Higher levels of IL-18, IL1-β and IL-1α were released from moM1 after infection with BA71V compared to 22653/14 or mock-infected control. These results revealed differences between these ASFV strains, suggesting that virulent isolates have evolved mechanisms to counteract activated macrophages responses, promoting their survival, dissemination in the host and so ASF pathogenesis.

  6. Yellow fever virus: genetic and phenotypic diversity and implications for detection, prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Beasley, David W C; McAuley, Alexander J; Bente, Dennis A

    2015-03-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) is the prototypical hemorrhagic fever virus, yet our understanding of its phenotypic diversity and any molecular basis for observed differences in disease severity and epidemiology is lacking, when compared to other arthropod-borne and haemorrhagic fever viruses. This is, in part, due to the availability of safe and effective vaccines resulting in basic YFV research taking a back seat to those viruses for which no effective vaccine occurs. However, regular outbreaks occur in endemic areas, and the spread of the virus to new, previously unaffected, areas is possible. Analysis of isolates from endemic areas reveals a strong geographic association for major genotypes, and recent epidemics have demonstrated the emergence of novel sequence variants. This review aims to outline the current understanding of YFV genetic and phenotypic diversity and its sources, as well as the available animal models for characterizing these differences in vivo. The consequences of genetic diversity for detection and diagnosis of yellow fever and development of new vaccines and therapeutics are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Yellow fever virus envelope protein expressed in insect cells is capable of syncytium formation in lepidopteran cells and could be used for immunodetection of YFV in human sera

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Yellow fever is an haemorrhagic disease caused by a virus that belongs to the genus Flavivirus (Flaviviridae family) and is transmitted by mosquitoes. Among the viral proteins, the envelope protein (E) is the most studied one, due to its high antigenic potencial. Baculovirus are one of the most popular and efficient eukaryotic expression system. In this study a recombinant baculovirus (vSynYFE) containing the envelope gene (env) of the 17D vaccine strain of yellow fever virus was constructed and the recombinant protein antigenicity was tested. Results Insect cells infected with vSynYFE showed syncytium formation, which is a cytopathic effect characteristic of flavivirus infection and expressed a polypeptide of around 54 kDa, which corresponds to the expected size of the recombinant E protein. Furthermore, the recombinant E protein expression was also confirmed by fluorescence microscopy of vSynYFE-infected insect cells. Total vSynYFE-infected insect extracts used as antigens detected the presence of antibodies for yellow fever virus in human sera derived from yellow fever-infected patients in an immunoassay and did not cross react with sera from dengue virus-infected patients. Conclusions The E protein expressed by the recombinant baculovirus in insect cells is antigenically similar to the wild protein and it may be useful for different medical applications, from improved diagnosis of the disease to source of antigens for the development of a subunit vaccine. PMID:21619598

  8. Potential risk of re-emergence of urban transmission of Yellow Fever virus in Brazil facilitated by competent Aedes populations.

    PubMed

    Couto-Lima, Dinair; Madec, Yoann; Bersot, Maria Ignez; Campos, Stephanie Silva; Motta, Monique de Albuquerque; Santos, Flávia Barreto Dos; Vazeille, Marie; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2017-07-07

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) causing a deadly viral disease is transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. In Brazil, YFV is restricted to a forest cycle maintained between non-human primates and forest-canopy mosquitoes, where humans can be tangentially infected. Since late 2016, a growing number of human cases have been reported in Southeastern Brazil at the gates of the most populated areas of South America, the Atlantic coast, with Rio de Janeiro state hosting nearly 16 million people. We showed that the anthropophilic mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus as well as the YFV-enzootic mosquitoes Haemagogus leucocelaenus and Sabethes albiprivus from the YFV-free region of the Atlantic coast were highly susceptible to American and African YFV strains. Therefore, the risk of reemergence of urban YFV epidemics in South America is major with a virus introduced either from a forest cycle or by a traveler returning from the YFV-endemic region of Africa.

  9. Virus Strains Causing Mosaic in Louisiana and Florida Sugarcane

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mosaic caused by Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), respectively, affects sugarcane in Louisiana and Florida. Between 2004 and 2007, surveys were conducted in both states to determine which virus and virus strains were causing mosaic of sugarcane. In Louisiana, leaf sam...

  10. Molecular diagnostic and genetic characterization of highly pathogenic viruses: application during Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus outbreaks in Eastern Europe and the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Filippone, C; Marianneau, P; Murri, S; Mollard, N; Avsic-Zupanc, T; Chinikar, S; Desprès, P; Caro, V; Gessain, A; Berthet, N; Tordo, N

    2013-02-01

    Several haemorrhagic fevers are caused by highly pathogenic viruses that must be handled in Biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment. These zoonotic infections have an important impact on public health and the development of a rapid and differential diagnosis in case of outbreak in risk areas represents a critical priority. We have demonstrated the potential of a DNA resequencing microarray (PathogenID v2.0) for this purpose. The microarray was first validated in vitro using supernatants of cells infected with prototype strains from five different families of BSL-4 viruses (e.g. families Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae, Filoviridae, Flaviviridae and Paramyxoviridae). RNA was amplified based on isothermal amplification by Phi29 polymerase before hybridization. We were able to detect and characterize Nipah virus and Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) in the brains of experimentally infected animals. CCHFV was finally used as a paradigm for epidemics because of recent outbreaks in Turkey, Kosovo and Iran. Viral variants present in human sera were characterized by BLASTN analysis. Sensitivity was estimated to be 10(5) -10(6) PFU/mL of hybridized cDNA. Detection specificity was limited to viral sequences having ~13-14% of global divergence with the tiled sequence, or stretches of ~20 identical nucleotides. These results highlight the benefits of using the PathogenID v2.0 resequencing microarray to characterize geographical variants in the follow-up of haemorrhagic fever epidemics; to manage patients and protect communities; and in cases of bioterrorism. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  11. SAR11 viruses and defensive host strains.

    PubMed

    Våge, Selina; Storesund, Julia E; Thingstad, T Frede

    2013-07-25

    Arising from Y. Zhao et al. Nature 494, 357–360 (2013). The recent findings of abundant SAR11 viruses by Zhao et al. are intriguing, and add new insight into the on-going discussion of why SAR11 bacteria are highly successful in the pelagic ocean. On the basis of high SAR11 virus abundance, Zhao et al. claim that SAR11 bacteria are competition specialists. Alternatively, we show here how their findings could be consistent with a dominance of defensive SAR11 strains. Considering their high abundance, understanding why SAR11 bacteria are so successful has important implications for the study of the pelagic ecosystem. There is a Reply to this Brief Communication Arising by Giovannoni, S., Temperton, B. & Zhao, Y. Nature 499, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature12388 (2013).

  12. Localization of the African swine fever virus attachment protein P12 in the virus particle by immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, A L; Saastre, I; González, P; Viñuela, E

    1993-03-01

    The African swine fever virus attachment protein p12 was localized in the virion by immunoelectron microscopy. Purified virus particles were incubated, before or after different treatments, with p12-specific monoclonal antibody 24BB7 and labeled with protein A-colloidal gold. Untreated virus particles showed labeling only in lateral protrusions that followed the external virus envelope. Mild treatment of African swine fever virions with the nonionic detergent octyl-glucoside or with ethanol onto the electron microscope grid resulted in a heavier and more homogeneous labeling of the virus particles. In contrast, the release of the external virus proteins by either octyl-glucoside or Nonidet-P40 and beta-mercaptoethanol generated a subviral fraction that was not labeled by 24BB7. Preembedding, labeling, and thin-sectioning experiments confirmed that the antigenic determinant recognized by 24BB7 was localized into the external region of the virus particle but required some disruption to make it more accessible. From these results we conclude that protein p12 is situated in a layer above the virus capsid with, at least, one epitope predominantly not exposed in the virion surface; this epitope may not be related to the virus ligand-cell receptor interaction.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of Crimean- Congo hemorrhagic fever virus genome isolated from ticks of Hamadan province of Iran.

    PubMed

    Tahmasebi, F; Ghiasi, S M; Mostafavi, E; Moradi, M; Piazak, N; Mozafari, A; Haeri, A; Fooks, A R; Chinikar, S

    2010-12-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus is a tick-borne member of the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae. CCHFV has been isolated from at least 31 different tick species. The virus is transmitted through the bite of an infected tick, or by direct contact with CCHFV-infected patients or the products of infected livestock. This study was undertaken to study the genetic relationship and distribution of CCHFV in the tick population of Hamadan province of Iran. In this study, RT-PCR has been used for detection of the CCHFV genome. This genome was detected in 19.2% of the ticks collected from livestock of different regions of the Hamadan province in western Iran. The infected species belonged to Hyalomma detritum, H. anatolicum, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Argas reflexus. With one exception, genetic analysis of the virus genome isolates showed high sequence identity to each other. Even though they clustered in the same group with the strain circulating in Iran, they had a closer relationship to the Matin strain. Vector control programs should be applied for reducing population density of potential tick vectors in this province. Further surveys are indicated in this region to provide a better view of the distribution and epidemiology of the virus.

  14. Molecular tracing of classical swine fever viruses isolated from wild boars and pigs in France from 2002 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Simon, Gaëlle; Le Dimna, Mireille; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique; Pol, Françoise

    2013-10-25

    There were three outbreaks of classical swine fever (CSF) in north-eastern France between 2002 and 2011. The first two occurred in April 2002 in the Moselle department, in a wild boar and pig herd, respectively, while the third occurred in April 2003, in the Bas-Rhin department, in a wild boar. A survey was subsequently implemented in wild boar and domestic pig populations, during which 43 CSF viruses (CSFVs) were genetically characterized to provide information on virus sources, trace virus evolution and help in the monitoring of effective control measures. Phylogenetic analyses, based on fragments of the 5'NTR, E2 and NS5B genes, showed that all French CSFVs could be assigned to genotype 2, subgenotype 2.3. CSFVs isolated in Moselle were classified in the "Rostock" lineage, a strain first described in 2001 in wild boar populations in the Eifel region of north-western Rhineland-Palatinate in Germany, and in Luxemburg. In contrast, the CSFVs isolated in Bas-Rhin were homologous to strains from the "Uelzen" lineage, a strain previously isolated from wild boars in south-eastern Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, as well as in Vosges du Nord, France, during a previous outbreak that had occurred in wild boars between 1992 and 2001. The outbreak in Moselle domestic pigs was quickly resolved as it concerned only one herd. The infection in wild boars from Moselle was extinguished after a few months whereas wild boars from Bas-Rhin remained infected until 2007. Molecular tracing showed that the Bas-Rhin index virus strain evolved slightly during the period but that no strain from a novel lineage was introduced until this outbreak ended after application of a vaccination scheme for six years.

  15. Complete genome of a Puumala virus strain from Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hanan Sheikh; Drewes, Stephan; Weber de Melo, Vanessa; Schlegel, Mathias; Freise, Jona; Groschup, Martin H; Heckel, Gerald; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2015-04-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV) is one of the predominant hantavirus species in Europe causing mild to moderate cases of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Parts of Lower Saxony in north-western Germany are endemic for PUUV infections. In this study, the complete PUUV genome sequence of a bank vole-derived tissue sample from the 2007 outbreak was determined by a combined primer-walking and RNA ligation strategy. The S, M and L genome segments were 1,828, 3,680 and 6,550 nucleotides in length, respectively. Sliding-window analyses of the nucleotide sequences of all available complete PUUV genomes indicated a non-homogenous distribution of variability with hypervariable regions located at the 3'-ends of the S and M segments. The overall similarity of the coding genome regions to the other PUUV strains ranged between 80.1 and 84.7 % at the level of the nucleotide sequence and between 89.5 and 98.1 % for the deduced amino acid sequences. In comparison to the phylogenetic trees of the complete coding sequences, trees based on partial segments revealed a general drop in phylogenetic support and a lower resolution. The Astrup strain S and M segment sequences showed the highest similarity to sequences of strains from geographically close sites in the Osnabrück Hills region. In conclusion, a primer-walking-mediated strategy resulted in the determination of the first complete nucleotide sequence of a PUUV strain from Central Europe. Different levels of variability along the genome provide the opportunity to choose regions for analyses according to the particular research question, e.g., large-scale phylogenetics or within-host evolution.

  16. [Results of examination of healthy residents in the southern region of Russia and patients feverish to pappataci fever virus antibodies].

    PubMed

    Klimenko, I S; Butenko, A M; Larichev, V F; Terekhin, S A; Azarian, A R; Arshba, T E; Govorukhina, M V; Zhuravlev, V I; Pilikova, O M; Iunicheva, Iu V

    2009-01-01

    Sera from patients with acute seasonal fevers and apparently healthy individuals living in the Astrakhan Region, Krasnodar Territory, or Rostov Region were examined in two modifications of enzyme immunoassay for detection of IgM and IgG antibodies to Neapolitan and Sicilian pappataci fever viruses. IgM antibodies to Sicilian pappataci fever virus were detected in a patient from the Volodarsky District, Astrakhan Region, who had been admitted for the unverified diagnosis of Q fever. A donor residing in the Novorossiysk District, Krasnodar Territory, was found to have IgA antibodies to Neapolitan pappataci fever virus. The findings show it expedient to conduct further investigations of the serodiagnosis and seroepidemiology of pappataci fevers in the southern Russian region where mosquitoes of the genus Phlebotomus inhabit.

  17. Yellow Fever Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    What is yellow fever?Yellow fever is a serious disease caused by the yellow fever virus. It is found in certain parts of Africa and South America. Yellow fever is spread through the bite of an infected ...

  18. Dengue fever (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dengue fever, or West Nile fever, is a mild viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes which causes fever, ... second exposure to the virus can result in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening illness.

  19. Protocols to Assess Coagulation Following In Vitro Infection with Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-25

    initiator of the extrinsic coagulation cascade, is upregulated in macrophages following infection of nonhuman primates with the filovirus Ebola virus...Jahrling PB, Larsen T, Geisbert JB, Paragas J, Young HA, Fredeking TM, Rote WE, Vlasuk GP. 2003. Treatment of Ebola virus infection with a recombinant...coagulation abnormalities in ebola hemorrhagic fever: overexpression of tissue factor in primate monocytes/macrophages is a key event. J Infect Dis 188:1618

  20. Hantaan Virus, Aetiological Agent of Korean Haemorrhagic Fever, Has Bunyaviridae-Like Morphology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-03

    U It I. ~- U .~ U It U *f, ~ ’I U U 2 ~LC~ It .~ ~ *8 -J -’ 0 U * - ~3 -A* * ~-~zJ~ 0 U ~ ~ .3 .A ~ S U ~ 𔃽 z...The density of sucrose measured by refractometry is in g/nil ( - - A). Presence (+ )or absence (0) of virus particles by electron microscopy is...Abdel Wahab KSE. Rift Valley fever virus: some ultrastructural observations on material from the outbreak in Egypt 1977. .Ge, VI 1979; 42:

  1. [Continuous cell subline A4C2/9K and its application to the african swine fever virus study].

    PubMed

    Balysheva, V I; Prudnikova, E Yu; Galnbek, T V; Balyshev, V M

    2015-01-01

    A new continuous cell subline A4C2/9K highly sensitive to the african swine fever virus (ASFV) was prepared. All the tested ASFV strains isolated in the Russian Federation in 2008-2013 proliferated in this cell culture exhibiting hemadsorption and accumulated at a titer of up to 6.5 Ig HAU50/cm3. The cell culture A4C2/9K can be used for ASFV isolation or determination of its infectious activity and serotype identity. The culture versions of the ASFV strain Stavropol 01/08 at passages 24 and 33 in the cell culture A4C2/9K lost their pathogenicity for pigs.

  2. Dengue fever and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Longo, Cecília Lameirinhas; Brasil, Patricia; Espíndola, Otávio de Melo; Leite, Ana Claudia Celestino Bezerra; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro; Lupi, Otília; Neves, Elizabeth de Souza

    2013-07-01

    Globalization has increased both the number of emergent diseases and the diversity of co-infections, which could in turn mutually influence the pathogenesis of well-known infectious diseases. Here, we report the first series of chronic human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) patients co-infected with the dengue fever virus. As both of these diseases are immuno-mediated, we anticipated interference in the development of both diseases, with atypical clinical and laboratory parameter results. All the patients had classic dengue fever, and the main outstanding abnormality was leukopenia associated with lymphopenia. Although a mutual influence was expected, dengue fever did not affect the clinical course of HTLV-1 infection, and HTLV-1 proviral loads revealed unpredictable patterns of change.

  3. Infection with strains of Citrus tristeza virus does not exclude superinfection by other strains of the virus.

    PubMed

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Robertson, Cecile J; Shilts, Turksen; Folimonov, Alexey S; Hilf, Mark E; Garnsey, Stephen M; Dawson, William O

    2010-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion or homologous interference, a phenomenon in which a primary viral infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed commonly for viruses in various systems, including viruses of bacteria, plants, and animals. With plant viruses, homologous interference initially was used as a test of virus relatedness to define whether two virus isolates were "strains" of the same virus or represented different viruses, and subsequently purposeful infection with a mild isolate was implemented as a protective measure against isolates of the virus causing severe disease. In this study we examined superinfection exclusion of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a positive-sense RNA closterovirus. Thirteen naturally occurring isolates of CTV representing five different virus strains and a set of isolates originated from virus constructs engineered based on an infectious cDNA clone of T36 isolate of CTV, including hybrids containing sequences from different isolates, were examined for their ability to prevent superinfection by another isolate of the virus. We show that superinfection exclusion occurred only between isolates of the same strain and not between isolates of different strains. When isolates of the same strain were used for sequential plant inoculation, the primary infection provided complete exclusion of the challenge isolate, whereas isolates from heterologous strains appeared to have no effect on replication, movement or systemic infection by the challenge virus. Surprisingly, substitution of extended cognate sequences from isolates of the T68 or T30 strains into T36 did not confer the ability of resulting hybrid viruses to exclude superinfection by those donor strains. Overall, these results do not appear to be explained by mechanisms proposed previously for other viruses. Moreover, these observations bring an understanding of some previously unexplained fundamental features of CTV biology and, most

  4. Small molecule inhibitors of ER α-glucosidases are active against multiple hemorrhagic fever viruses

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jinhong; Warren, Travis K.; Zhao, Xuesen; Gill, Tina; Guo, Fang; Wang, Lijuan; Comunale, Mary Ann; Du, Yanming; Alonzi, Dominic S.; Yu, Wenquan; Ye, Hong; Liu, Fei; Guo, Ju-Tao; Mehta, Anand; Cuconati, Andrea; Butters, Terry D.; Bavari, Sina; Xu, Xiaodong; Block, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Host cellular endoplasmic reticulum α-glucosidases I and II are essential for the maturation of viral glycosylated envelope proteins that use the calnexin mediated folding pathway. Inhibition of these glycan processing enzymes leads to the misfolding and degradation of these viral glycoproteins and subsequent reduction in virion secretion. We previously reported that, CM-10-18, an imino sugar α-glucosidase inhibitor, efficiently protected the lethality of dengue virus infection of mice. In the current study, through an extensive structure-activity relationship study, we have identified three CM-10-18 derivatives that demonstrated superior in vitro antiviral activity against representative viruses from four viral families causing hemorrhagic fever. Moreover, the three novel imino sugars significantly reduced the mortality of two of the most pathogenic hemorrhagic fever viruses, Marburg virus and Ebola virus, in mice. Our study thus proves the concept that imino sugars are promising drug candidates for the management of viral hemorrhagic fever caused by variety of viruses. PMID:23578725

  5. Yellow Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Yellow Fever Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Yellow fever virus is found in tropical and subtropical areas ...

  6. Dengue Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... away from areas that have a dengue fever epidemic, the risk of contracting dengue fever is small for international travelers./p> Reviewed by: Elana ... Transfusions Cholera West Nile Virus First Aid: Vomiting Are Insect ...

  7. Cross-reactivity of neutralizing antibodies among malignant catarrhal fever viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gamma herpesviruses in the genus Macavirus are maintained in nature as subclinical infections in well-adapted ungulate hosts. Transmission of these viruses to poorly adapted hosts, such as American bison and cattle, can result in the frequently fatal disease referred to as malignant catarrhal fever ...

  8. Effect of environmental temperature on the vector competence of mosquitoes for Rift Valley fever virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental temperature has been shown to affect the ability of mosquitoes to transmit numerous arboviruses and for Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in particular. We evaluated the effect of incubation temperatures ranging from 14-26ºC on infection, dissemination, and transmission rates for Culex ta...

  9. Rift Valley Fever Virus Growth Curve Kinetics in Cattle and Sheep Peripheral Blood Monocyte Derived Macrophages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), is a mosquito-borne, zoonotic pathogen within genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae that typically causes outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa and recently spread to the Arabian Peninsula. In ruminants, RVFV infections cause mass abortion and high mortality rates in neona...

  10. Pathology Review of Two New Rift Valley Fever Virus Ruminant Models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), is a mosquito-borne, zoonotic pathogen within genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae that typically causes outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa and recently spread to the Arabian Peninsula. In ruminants, RVFV infections cause mass abortion and high mortality rates in neona...

  11. Classical Swine Fever Virus p7 protein is a viroporin involved in virulence in swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The non-structural protein p7 of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) is a hydrophobic polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 7 kDa. The protein contains two hydrophobic stretches of amino acids interrupted by a short charged segment that are predicted to form transmembrane helices and a cytos...

  12. Effects of glycosylation on antigenicity and immunogenicity of classical swine fever virus envelope proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) harbors three envelope glycoproteins (E(rns), E1 and E2). Previous studies have demonstrated that removal of specific glycosylation sites within these proteins yielded attenuated and immunogenic CSFV mutants. Here we analyzed the effects of lack of glycosylation of...

  13. Rift Valley Fever Virus among Wild Ruminants, Etosha National Park, Namibia, 2011.

    PubMed

    Capobianco Dondona, Andrea; Aschenborn, Ortwin; Pinoni, Chiara; Di Gialleonardo, Luigina; Maseke, Adrianatus; Bortone, Grazia; Polci, Andrea; Scacchia, Massimo; Molini, Umberto; Monaco, Federica

    2016-01-01

    After a May 2011 outbreak of Rift Valley fever among livestock northeast of Etosha National Park, Namibia, wild ruminants in the park were tested for the virus. Antibodies were detected in springbok, wildebeest, and black-faced impala, and viral RNA was detected in springbok. Seroprevalence was high, and immune response was long lasting.

  14. Genetic variation among African swine fever genotype II viruses, eastern and central Europe.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Carmina; Fernández-Pinero, Jovita; Pelayo, Virginia; Gazaev, Ismail; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pridotkas, Gediminas; Nieto, Raquel; Fernández-Pacheco, Paloma; Bokhan, Svetlana; Nevolko, Oleg; Drozhzhe, Zhanna; Pérez, Covadonga; Soler, Alejandro; Kolvasov, Denis; Arias, Marisa

    2014-09-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) was first reported in eastern Europe/Eurasia in 2007. Continued spread of ASFV has placed central European countries at risk, and in 2014, ASFV was detected in Lithuania and Poland. Sequencing showed the isolates are identical to a 2013 ASFV from Belarus but differ from ASFV isolated in Georgia in 2007.

  15. Malignant catarrhal fever virus identified in free-ranging musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) in Norway

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To study the epizootiology of malignant catarrhal fever viruses (MCFV), sera and spleen samples collected in 2004-2011 from a free-ranging musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) population in Dovrefjell, Norway, were examined. Sera were tested for antibodies against MCFV by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbe...

  16. Potential for mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) from Florida to transmit rift valley fever virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We evaluated 8 species of mosquitoes collected in Florida to determine which of these should be targeted for control should Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) be detected in North America. Female mosquitoes that had fed on adult hamsters inoculated with RVFV were incubated for 7-21 d at 26°C, allowed to...

  17. Experimental respiratory Marburg virus haemorrhagic fever infection in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Smither, Sophie J; Nelson, Michelle; Eastaugh, Lin; Laws, Thomas R; Taylor, Christopher; Smith, Simon A; Salguero, Francisco J; Lever, Mark S

    2013-04-01

    Marburg virus causes a highly infectious and lethal haemorrhagic fever in primates and may be exploited as a potential biothreat pathogen. To combat the infection and threat of Marburg haemorrhagic fever, there is a need to develop and license appropriate medical countermeasures. To determine whether the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) would be an appropriate model to assess therapies against Marburg haemorrhagic fever, initial susceptibility, lethality and pathogenesis studies were performed. Low doses of virus, between 4 and 28 TCID50 , were sufficient to cause a lethal, reproducible infection. Animals became febrile between days 5 and 6, maintaining a high fever before succumbing to disease between 8 and 11 days postchallenge. Typical signs of Marburg virus infection were observed including haemorrhaging and a transient rash. In pathogenesis studies, virus was isolated from the animals' lungs from day 3 postchallenge and from the liver, spleen and blood from day 5 postchallenge. Early signs of histopathology were apparent in the kidney and liver from day 3. The most striking features were observed in animals exhibiting severe clinical signs, which included high viral titres in all organs, with the highest levels in the blood, increased levels in liver function enzymes and blood clotting times, decreased levels in platelets, multifocal moderate-to-severe hepatitis and perivascular oedema.

  18. High Rates of Neutralizing Antibodies to Toscana and Sandfly Fever Sicilian Viruses in Livestock, Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, Nazli; Sherifi, Kurtesh; Taraku, Arber; Bërxholi, Kristaq; Charrel, Rémi N

    2017-06-01

    Toscana and sandfly fever Sicilian viruses (TOSV and SFSV, respectively), both transmitted by sand flies, are prominent human pathogens in the Old World. Of 1,086 serum samples collected from cattle and sheep during 2013 in various regions of Kosovo (Balkan Peninsula), 4.7% and 53.4% had neutralizing antibodies against TOSV and SFSV, respectively.

  19. High Rates of Neutralizing Antibodies to Toscana and Sandfly Fever Sicilian Viruses in Livestock, Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Ayhan, Nazli; Sherifi, Kurtesh; Taraku, Arber; Bërxholi, Kristaq

    2017-01-01

    Toscana and sandfly fever Sicilian viruses (TOSV and SFSV, respectively), both transmitted by sand flies, are prominent human pathogens in the Old World. Of 1,086 serum samples collected from cattle and sheep during 2013 in various regions of Kosovo (Balkan Peninsula), 4.7% and 53.4% had neutralizing antibodies against TOSV and SFSV, respectively. PMID:28518045

  20. A Simple Assay for Determining Antiviral Activity Against Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    hemorrhagic fever virus isolates in China. Virology 296, 159–164. Nichol, S.T., 2001. Bunyaviruses. In: Knipe, D.M., Howley, P.M. (Eds.), Fields ... Virology , vol. 1, 4th ed. Lippincott Williams and Wikins, Philadephlia, pp. 1603–1633. Papa, A., Bozovi, B., Pavlidou, V., Papadimitriou, E., Pelemis, M

  1. Rift Valley Fever Virus among Wild Ruminants, Etosha National Park, Namibia, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Aschenborn, Ortwin; Pinoni, Chiara; Di Gialleonardo, Luigina; Maseke, Adrianatus; Bortone, Grazia; Polci, Andrea; Scacchia, Massimo; Molini, Umberto; Monaco, Federica

    2016-01-01

    After a May 2011 outbreak of Rift Valley fever among livestock northeast of Etosha National Park, Namibia, wild ruminants in the park were tested for the virus. Antibodies were detected in springbok, wildebeest, and black-faced impala, and viral RNA was detected in springbok. Seroprevalence was high, and immune response was long lasting. PMID:26692385

  2. Genetic Variation among African Swine Fever Genotype II Viruses, Eastern and Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pinero, Jovita; Pelayo, Virginia; Gazaev, Ismail; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pridotkas, Gediminas; Nieto, Raquel; Fernández-Pacheco, Paloma; Bokhan, Svetlana; Nevolko, Oleg; Drozhzhe, Zhanna; Pérez, Covadonga; Soler, Alejandro; Kolvasov, Denis; Arias, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) was first reported in eastern Europe/Eurasia in 2007. Continued spread of ASFV has placed central European countries at risk, and in 2014, ASFV was detected in Lithuania and Poland. Sequencing showed the isolates are identical to a 2013 ASFV from Belarus but differ from ASFV isolated in Georgia in 2007. PMID:25148518

  3. Vector Competence of Selected African Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) Species for Rift Valley Fever Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in Egypt, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia have indicated the potential for this disease to spread from its enzootic areas in sub-Saharan Africa. Because little is known about the potential for most African mosquito species to transmit RVF virus (RVFV), we conducted stud...

  4. Comparison of Rift Valley fever virus replication in North American livestock and wildlife cell lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes outbreaks of endemic disease across Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, resulting in high morbidity and mortality among young domestic livestock, frequent abortions in pregnant animals, and potentially severe or fatal disease in humans. The possibility of RVFV spr...

  5. Development of a Rift Valley fever virus viremia challenge model in sheep and goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, causes severe to fatal disease in newborn ruminants, as well as abortions in pregnant animals; both preventable by vaccination. Availability of a challenge model is a pre-requisite for vaccine efficacy trials. Several modes of ino...

  6. Potential for Psorophora columbiae and Psorophora ciliata mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) to transmit Rift Valley fever virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) continues to pose a threat to much of the world. Unlike many arboviruses, numerous mosquito species have been associated with RVFV in nature, and many species have been demonstrated as competent vectors in the laboratory. In this study, we evaluated two field-collect...

  7. Factors Affecting the Ability of American Mosquitoes to Transmit Rift Valley Fever Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The recent outbreaks of disease caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in Kenya, Mauritania, Yemen, Tanzania, Somalia, and Madagascar indicate the potential for RVFV to cause severe disease in both humans and domestic animals and its potential to be introduced into new areas, including North Ameri...

  8. Potential for North American Mosquitoes to Transmit Rift Valley Fever Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The recent outbreaks of disease caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in Kenya, Mauritania, Yemen, Tanzania, Somalia, and Madagascar indicate the potential for RVFV to cause severe disease in both humans and domestic animals and its potential to be introduced into new areas, including North Ameri...

  9. Potential for North American mosquitoes to transmit Rift Valley fever virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The recent outbreaks of disease caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in Kenya, Mauritania, Yemen, Tanzania, Somalia, and Madagascar indicate the potential for RVFV to cause severe disease in both humans and domestic animals and its potential to be introduced into new areas, possibly even North A...

  10. Experimental respiratory Marburg virus haemorrhagic fever infection in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    Smither, Sophie J; Nelson, Michelle; Eastaugh, Lin; Laws, Thomas R; Taylor, Christopher; Smith, Simon A; Salguero, Francisco J; Lever, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Marburg virus causes a highly infectious and lethal haemorrhagic fever in primates and may be exploited as a potential biothreat pathogen. To combat the infection and threat of Marburg haemorrhagic fever, there is a need to develop and license appropriate medical countermeasures. To determine whether the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) would be an appropriate model to assess therapies against Marburg haemorrhagic fever, initial susceptibility, lethality and pathogenesis studies were performed. Low doses of virus, between 4 and 28 TCID50, were sufficient to cause a lethal, reproducible infection. Animals became febrile between days 5 and 6, maintaining a high fever before succumbing to disease between 8 and 11 days postchallenge. Typical signs of Marburg virus infection were observed including haemorrhaging and a transient rash. In pathogenesis studies, virus was isolated from the animals’ lungs from day 3 postchallenge and from the liver, spleen and blood from day 5 postchallenge. Early signs of histopathology were apparent in the kidney and liver from day 3. The most striking features were observed in animals exhibiting severe clinical signs, which included high viral titres in all organs, with the highest levels in the blood, increased levels in liver function enzymes and blood clotting times, decreased levels in platelets, multifocal moderate-to-severe hepatitis and perivascular oedema. PMID:23441639

  11. The LANL hemorrhagic fever virus database, a new platform for analyzing biothreat viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kuiken, Carla; Thurmond, Jim; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Yoon, Hyejin

    2012-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are a diverse set of over 80 viral species, found in 10 different genera comprising five different families: arena-, bunya-, flavi-, filo- and togaviridae. All these viruses are highly variable and evolve rapidly, making them elusive targets for the immune system and for vaccine and drug design. About 55 000 HFV sequences exist in the public domain today. A central website that provides annotated sequences and analysis tools will be helpful to HFV researchers worldwide. The HFV sequence database collects and stores sequence data and provides a user-friendly search interface and a large number of sequence analysis tools, following the model of the highly regarded and widely used Los Alamos HIV database [Kuiken, C., B. Korber, and R.W. Shafer, HIV sequence databases. AIDS Rev, 2003. 5: p. 52–61]. The database uses an algorithm that aligns each sequence to a species-wide reference sequence. The NCBI RefSeq database [Sayers et al. (2011) Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Nucleic Acids Res., 39, D38–D51.] is used for this; if a reference sequence is not available, a Blast search finds the best candidate. Using this method, sequences in each genus can be retrieved pre-aligned. The HFV website can be accessed via http://hfv.lanl.gov. PMID:22064861

  12. The LANL hemorrhagic fever virus database, a new platform for analyzing biothreat viruses.

    PubMed

    Kuiken, Carla; Thurmond, Jim; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Yoon, Hyejin

    2012-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are a diverse set of over 80 viral species, found in 10 different genera comprising five different families: arena-, bunya-, flavi-, filo- and togaviridae. All these viruses are highly variable and evolve rapidly, making them elusive targets for the immune system and for vaccine and drug design. About 55,000 HFV sequences exist in the public domain today. A central website that provides annotated sequences and analysis tools will be helpful to HFV researchers worldwide. The HFV sequence database collects and stores sequence data and provides a user-friendly search interface and a large number of sequence analysis tools, following the model of the highly regarded and widely used Los Alamos HIV database [Kuiken, C., B. Korber, and R.W. Shafer, HIV sequence databases. AIDS Rev, 2003. 5: p. 52-61]. The database uses an algorithm that aligns each sequence to a species-wide reference sequence. The NCBI RefSeq database [Sayers et al. (2011) Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Nucleic Acids Res., 39, D38-D51.] is used for this; if a reference sequence is not available, a Blast search finds the best candidate. Using this method, sequences in each genus can be retrieved pre-aligned. The HFV website can be accessed via http://hfv.lanl.gov.

  13. Studies on the epidemiology of sandfly fever in Iran. II. The prevalence of human and animal infection with five phlebotomus fever virus serotypes in Isfahan province.

    PubMed

    Saidi, S; Tesh, R; Javadian, E; Sahabi, Z; Nadim, A

    1977-03-01

    Human and animal sera from an endemic area of sandfly fever in Iran were tested by plaque reduction neutralization method against five different Phlebotomus fever virus serotypes (Naples, Sicilian, Karimabad, Salehabad, and I-47). The overall prevalence of Naples, Sicilian, and Karimabad virus antibodies among the human population was 17%, 25%, and 66%, respectively. All sera were negative against Salehabad and I-47 viruses. Age-specific antibody rates suggested that Sicilian and Karimabad viruses were endemic in the study area but that Naples virus activity was sporadic. These observations were confirmed by isolations of Sicilian and Karimabad viruses from sandflies collected in the study area. Among the animal sera tested, evidence of Phlebotomus fever virus infection was detected only in gerbils. Of 38 Rhombomys opimus tested, 34% had neutralizing antibodies against Sicilian virus and 32% against Karimabad. These results indicate that gerbils are infected with these two viruses and possibly might serve as reservoirs or amplifying hosts. The serologic studies also suggest that the ecology of Sicilian and Karimabad viruses involves chiefly sandflies, gerbils, and man, an epidemiologic pattern previously demonstrated for cutaneous leishmaniasis in the same region of Iran.

  14. Genetic characterization of ovine herpesvirus 2 strains involved in water buffaloes malignant catarrhal fever outbreaks in Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Amoroso, Maria Grazia; Galiero, Giorgio; Fusco, Giovanna

    2017-02-01

    Ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) was responsible for two outbreaks of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) on two water buffalo farms in Southern Italy. In this study, the presence of this virus in the nasal swabs from sick animals as well as in the organs of dead buffaloes was ascertained by a Real-time PCR assay. Positive samples also underwent a relative quantitative analysis of the viral DNA in them. All the dead animals had the highest relative viral quantities, while buffaloes recovering from the virus had intermediate quantities, and asymptomatic OvHV-2-positive sheep had the lowest relative quantities (as compared with the calibrator). The strains involved in the MCF outbreaks underwent genetic characterization by sequencing segments of their ORF50, ORF75 and Ov9.5 genes. The results showed that the outbreaks were caused by two specific genetic variants of OvHV-2, and that these variants exhibit nucleotide differences at the loci analysed. Sheep living in the surrounding farms, as well as sheep kept with buffaloes, were also investigated as possible transmitters of the virus. In this regard, local strategies for the control of MCF should consider separating reservoir species from susceptible animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mutational Analysis of the Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Precursor Proteins for Gn Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Phoenix, Inaia; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) M-segment encodes the 78 kD, NSm, Gn, and Gc proteins. The 1st AUG generates the 78 kD-Gc precursor, the 2nd AUG generates the NSm-Gn-Gc precursor, and the 3rd AUG makes the NSm’-Gn-Gc precursor. To understand biological changes due to abolishment of the precursors, we quantitatively measured Gn secretion using a reporter assay, in which a Gaussia luciferase (gLuc) protein is fused to the RVFV M-segment pre-Gn region. Using the reporter assay, the relative expression of Gn/gLuc fusion proteins was analyzed among various AUG mutants. The reporter assay showed efficient secretion of Gn/gLuc protein from the precursor made from the 2nd AUG, while the removal of the untranslated region upstream of the 2nd AUG (AUG2-M) increased the secretion of the Gn/gLuc protein. Subsequently, recombinant MP-12 strains encoding mutations in the pre-Gn region were rescued, and virological phenotypes were characterized. Recombinant MP-12 encoding the AUG2-M mutation replicated slightly less efficiently than the control, indicating that viral replication is further influenced by the biological processes occurring after Gn expression, rather than the Gn abundance. This study showed that, not only the abolishment of AUG, but also the truncation of viral UTR, affects the expression of Gn protein by the RVFV M-segment. PMID:27231931

  16. NSs protein of rift valley fever virus promotes posttranslational downregulation of the TFIIH subunit p62.

    PubMed

    Kalveram, Birte; Lihoradova, Olga; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2011-07-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) is an important emerging pathogen of humans and ruminants. Its NSs protein has previously been identified as a major virulence factor that suppresses host defense through three distinct mechanisms: it directly inhibits beta interferon (IFN-β) promoter activity, it promotes the degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), and it suppresses host transcription by disrupting the assembly of the basal transcription factor TFIIH through sequestration of its p44 subunit. Here, we report that in addition to PKR, NSs also promotes the degradation of the TFIIH subunit p62. Infection of cells with the RVFV MP-12 vaccine strain reduced p62 protein levels to below the detection limit early in the course of infection. This NSs-mediated downregulation of p62 was posttranslational, as it was unaffected by pharmacological inhibition of transcription or translation and MP-12 infection had no effect on p62 mRNA levels. Treatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors but not inhibition of lysosomal acidification or nuclear export resulted in a stabilization of p62 in the presence of NSs. Furthermore, p62 could be coprecipitated with NSs from lysates of infected cells. These data suggest that the RVFV NSs protein is able to interact with the TFIIH subunit p62 inside infected cells and promotes its degradation, which can occur directly in the nucleus.

  17. Mutational Analysis of the Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Precursor Proteins for Gn Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Inaia; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Nishiyama, Shoko; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2016-05-24

    The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) M-segment encodes the 78 kD, NSm, Gn, and Gc proteins. The 1st AUG generates the 78 kD-Gc precursor, the 2nd AUG generates the NSm-Gn-Gc precursor, and the 3rd AUG makes the NSm'-Gn-Gc precursor. To understand biological changes due to abolishment of the precursors, we quantitatively measured Gn secretion using a reporter assay, in which a Gaussia luciferase (gLuc) protein is fused to the RVFV M-segment pre-Gn region. Using the reporter assay, the relative expression of Gn/gLuc fusion proteins was analyzed among various AUG mutants. The reporter assay showed efficient secretion of Gn/gLuc protein from the precursor made from the 2nd AUG, while the removal of the untranslated region upstream of the 2nd AUG (AUG2-M) increased the secretion of the Gn/gLuc protein. Subsequently, recombinant MP-12 strains encoding mutations in the pre-Gn region were rescued, and virological phenotypes were characterized. Recombinant MP-12 encoding the AUG2-M mutation replicated slightly less efficiently than the control, indicating that viral replication is further influenced by the biological processes occurring after Gn expression, rather than the Gn abundance. This study showed that, not only the abolishment of AUG, but also the truncation of viral UTR, affects the expression of Gn protein by the RVFV M-segment.

  18. Prevalence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in healthy population, livestock and ticks in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Fajs, Luka; Humolli, Isme; Saksida, Ana; Knap, Nataša; Jelovšek, Mateja; Korva, Miša; Dedushaj, Isuf; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute, tick borne disease often associated with hemorrhagic presentations and high case fatality rate. Kosovo is a highly endemic area for CCHF, with a significant case fatality rate. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of CCHF in Kosovo. We tested 1105 serum samples from healthy population in both endemic and non-endemic areas in the country. Our results revealed a seroprevalence of 4.0% (range 0-9.3%) which is comparable to the seroprevalence in other countries. We show that seroprevalence is correlated to the disease incidence in each studied municipality. We also tested 401 animal sera (353 cow, 30 sheep, 10 goat and 8 chicken) in four endemic municipalities in Kosovo. We detected specific antibodies in all animals except in chicken. Seroprevalence in cows is comparable to other endemic areas and correlates to the seroprevalence in humans. No CCHF RNA could be detected in 105 tick samples obtained in 2012 and 2013. Sequencing of CCHFV positive ticks from 2001 revealed that the virus is most closely related to viral strains that were detected in CCHF patients from Kosovo. Results suggest that mild CCHF cases are most probably underdiagnosed and consequently that the burden of disease is higher than reported. Our study provides key information for CCHF surveillance and raises awareness for possible imported cases in CCHF non-endemic countries.

  19. Experimental infection of Bama miniature pigs with a highly virulent classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan; Jiang, Qian; Tian, Da-Yong; Lin, Huan; Li, Hong; Han, Qiu-Ying; Han, Wen; Si, Chang-De; Hu, Shou-Ping; Zhang, Zhuo; Qu, Lian-Dong; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2011-09-25

    Currently, larger domestic pigs are only animals widely used in vaccine evaluation and pathogenicity study of classical swine fever virus (CSFV). This study was aimed to create an alternative animal experimental infection model of CSFV. Twenty specific-pathogen-free Bama miniature pigs were randomly divided into two groups and rooms, infected and non-infected, and the pigs in the infected group were inoculated intramuscularly with 104, 105 or 106 TCID50 (median tissue culture infective dose) CSFV Shimen strain (n = 5 × 3) or left uninoculated to serve as in-contact pigs (n = 3). The uninfected control pigs (n = 2) were housed in a separate room. Clinical signs, body temperature, viraemia, tissue antigen distribution, pathological changes and seroconversion were monitored. Clinical signs were observed as early as 2 days post-inoculation (dpi) in all infected pigs (though mild in contact pigs), but not non-infected control pigs. All inoculated pigs showed viraemia by 6 dpi. The in-contact pigs showed lower levels of viraemia. At 10 dpi, seroconversion was noted in five of the 15 inoculated pigs. All inoculated or one in-contact pigs died by 15 dpi. These results show that Bama miniature pigs support productive CSFV infection and display clinical signs and pathological changes consistent with CSFV infections observed in larger domestic pigs.

  20. Prevalence of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Healthy Population, Livestock and Ticks in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Fajs, Luka; Humolli, Isme; Saksida, Ana; Knap, Nataša; Jelovšek, Mateja; Korva, Miša; Dedushaj, Isuf; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute, tick borne disease often associated with hemorrhagic presentations and high case fatality rate. Kosovo is a highly endemic area for CCHF, with a significant case fatality rate. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of CCHF in Kosovo. We tested 1105 serum samples from healthy population in both endemic and non-endemic areas in the country. Our results revealed a seroprevalence of 4.0% (range 0–9.3%) which is comparable to the seroprevalence in other countries. We show that seroprevalence is correlated to the disease incidence in each studied municipality. We also tested 401 animal sera (353 cow, 30 sheep, 10 goat and 8 chicken) in four endemic municipalities in Kosovo. We detected specific antibodies in all animals except in chicken. Seroprevalence in cows is comparable to other endemic areas and correlates to the seroprevalence in humans. No CCHF RNA could be detected in 105 tick samples obtained in 2012 and 2013. Sequencing of CCHFV positive ticks from 2001 revealed that the virus is most closely related to viral strains that were detected in CCHF patients from Kosovo. Results suggest that mild CCHF cases are most probably underdiagnosed and consequently that the burden of disease is higher than reported. Our study provides key information for CCHF surveillance and raises awareness for possible imported cases in CCHF non-endemic countries. PMID:25393542

  1. Complex Virus-Host Interactions Involved in the Regulation of Classical Swine Fever Virus Replication: A Minireview.

    PubMed

    Li, Su; Wang, Jinghan; Yang, Qian; Naveed Anwar, Muhammad; Yu, Shaoxiong; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2017-07-05

    Classical swine fever (CSF), caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV), is one of the most devastating epizootic diseases of pigs in many countries. Viruses are small intracellular parasites and thus rely on the cellular factors for replication. Fundamental aspects of CSFV-host interactions have been well described, such as factors contributing to viral attachment, modulation of genomic replication and translation, antagonism of innate immunity, and inhibition of cell apoptosis. However, those host factors that participate in the viral entry, assembly, and release largely remain to be elucidated. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the virus-host interactions involved in the life cycle of CSFV and analyze the potential mechanisms of viral entry, assembly, and release. We conclude with future perspectives and highlight areas that require further understanding.

  2. DNA vaccination partially protects against African swine fever virus lethal challenge in the absence of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Argilaguet, Jordi M; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Nofrarías, Miquel; Gallardo, Carmina; Accensi, Francesc; Lacasta, Anna; Mora, Mercedes; Ballester, Maria; Galindo-Cardiel, Ivan; López-Soria, Sergio; Escribano, José M; Reche, Pedro A; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The lack of available vaccines against African swine fever virus (ASFV) means that the evaluation of new immunization strategies is required. Here we show that fusion of the extracellular domain of the ASFV Hemagglutinin (sHA) to p54 and p30, two immunodominant structural viral antigens, exponentially improved both the humoral and the cellular responses induced in pigs after DNA immunization. However, immunization with the resulting plasmid (pCMV-sHAPQ) did not confer protection against lethal challenge with the virulent E75 ASFV-strain. Due to the fact that CD8(+) T-cell responses are emerging as key components for ASFV protection, we designed a new plasmid construct, pCMV-UbsHAPQ, encoding the three viral determinants above mentioned (sHA, p54 and p30) fused to ubiquitin, aiming to improve Class I antigen presentation and to enhance the CTL responses induced. As expected, immunization with pCMV-UbsHAPQ induced specific T-cell responses in the absence of antibodies and, more important, protected a proportion of immunized-pigs from lethal challenge with ASFV. In contrast with control pigs, survivor animals showed a peak of CD8(+) T-cells at day 3 post-infection, coinciding with the absence of viremia at this time point. Finally, an in silico prediction of CTL peptides has allowed the identification of two SLA I-restricted 9-mer peptides within the hemagglutinin of the virus, capable of in vitro stimulating the specific secretion of IFNγ when using PBMCs from survivor pigs. Our results confirm the relevance of T-cell responses in protection against ASF and open new expectations for the future development of more efficient recombinant vaccines against this disease.

  3. DNA Vaccination Partially Protects against African Swine Fever Virus Lethal Challenge in the Absence of Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Argilaguet, Jordi M.; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Nofrarías, Miquel; Gallardo, Carmina; Accensi, Francesc; Lacasta, Anna; Mora, Mercedes; Ballester, Maria; Galindo-Cardiel, Ivan; López-Soria, Sergio; Escribano, José M.; Reche, Pedro A.; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The lack of available vaccines against African swine fever virus (ASFV) means that the evaluation of new immunization strategies is required. Here we show that fusion of the extracellular domain of the ASFV Hemagglutinin (sHA) to p54 and p30, two immunodominant structural viral antigens, exponentially improved both the humoral and the cellular responses induced in pigs after DNA immunization. However, immunization with the resulting plasmid (pCMV-sHAPQ) did not confer protection against lethal challenge with the virulent E75 ASFV-strain. Due to the fact that CD8+ T-cell responses are emerging as key components for ASFV protection, we designed a new plasmid construct, pCMV-UbsHAPQ, encoding the three viral determinants above mentioned (sHA, p54 and p30) fused to ubiquitin, aiming to improve Class I antigen presentation and to enhance the CTL responses induced. As expected, immunization with pCMV-UbsHAPQ induced specific T-cell responses in the absence of antibodies and, more important, protected a proportion of immunized-pigs from lethal challenge with ASFV. In contrast with control pigs, survivor animals showed a peak of CD8+ T-cells at day 3 post-infection, coinciding with the absence of viremia at this time point. Finally, an in silico prediction of CTL peptides has allowed the identification of two SLA I-restricted 9-mer peptides within the hemagglutinin of the virus, capable of in vitro stimulating the specific secretion of IFNγ when using PBMCs from survivor pigs. Our results confirm the relevance of T-cell responses in protection against ASF and open new expectations for the future development of more efficient recombinant vaccines against this disease. PMID:23049728

  4. Genetic and antigenic analyses of a Puumala virus isolate as a potential vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Abu Daude, Nur Hardy; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Tkachenko, Evgeniy; Dzagurnova, Tamara; Medvedkina, Olga; Tkachenko, Petr; Ishizuka, Mariko; Seto, Takahiro; Miyashita, Daisuke; Sanada, Takahiro; Nakauchi, Mina; Yoshii, Kentaro; Maeda, Akihiko; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takashima, Ikuo

    2008-11-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV), a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), is prevalent in Europe and European Russia. No vaccine has been developed for PUUV-associated HFRS, primarily because of the low viral yield in cultured cells. A PUUV strain known as DTK/Ufa-97 was isolated in Russia and adapted for growth in Vero E6 cells maintained in serum-free medium. The DTK/Ufa-97 strain produced a higher viral titer in serum-free medium, suggesting that it may prove useful in the development of an HFRS vaccine. When PUUV-infected Vero E6 cells were grown in serum-free medium, the DTK/Ufa-97 strain yielded more copies of intracellular viral RNA and a higher viral titer in the culture fluid than did the Sotkamo strain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PUUVs can be classified into multiple lineages according to geographical origin, and that the DTK/Ufa-97 strain is a member of the Bashkiria-Saratov lineage. The deduced amino acid sequences of the small, medium, and large segments of the DTK/Ufa-97 strain were 99.2% to 100%, 99.3% to 99.8%, and 99.8% identical, respectively, to those of the Bashkirian PUUV strains and 96.9%, 92.6%, and 97.4% identical, respectively, to those of the Sotkamo strain, indicating that the PUUVs are genetically diverse. However, DTK/Ufa-97 and other strains of PUUV exhibited similar patterns of binding to a panel of monoclonal antibodies against Hantaan virus. In addition, diluted antisera (i.e., ranging from 1:160 to 1:640) specific to three strains of PUUV neutralized both homologous and heterologous viruses. These results suggest that the DTK/Ufa-97 strain is capable of extensive growth and is antigenically similar to genetically distant strains of PUUV.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Oncolytic Sendai virus Strain Moscow

    PubMed Central

    Zainutdinov, Sergei S.; Tikunov, Artem Y.; Matveeva, Olga V.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Sendai virus Moscow strain. Anecdotal evidence for the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy exists for this strain. The RNA genome of the Moscow strain is 15,384 nucleotides in length and differs from the nearest strain, BB1, by 18 nucleotides and 11 amino acids. PMID:27516510

  6. The Rift Valley Fever virus protein NSm and putative cellular protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Engdahl, Cecilia; Näslund, Jonas; Lindgren, Lena; Ahlm, Clas; Bucht, Göran

    2012-07-28

    Rift Valley Fever is an infectious viral disease and an emerging problem in many countries of Africa and on the Arabian Peninsula. The causative virus is predominantly transmitted by mosquitoes and high mortality and abortion rates characterize outbreaks in animals while symptoms ranging from mild to life-threatening encephalitis and hemorrhagic fever are noticed among infected humans. For a better prevention and treatment of the infection, an increased knowledge of the infectious process of the virus is required. The focus of this work was to identify protein-protein interactions between the non-structural protein (NSm), encoded by the M-segment of the virus, and host cell proteins. This study was initiated by screening approximately 26 million cDNA clones of a mouse embryonic cDNA library for interactions with the NSm protein using a yeast two-hybrid system. We have identified nine murine proteins that interact with NSm protein of Rift Valley Fever virus, and the putative protein-protein interactions were confirmed by growth selection procedures and β-gal activity measurements. Our results suggest that the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 2 (Cpsf2), the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (cyclophilin)-like 2 protein (Ppil2), and the synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) are the most promising targets for the NSm protein of the virus during an infection.

  7. Investigations of Pro- and Anti-Apoptotic Factors Affecting African Swine Fever Virus Replication and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Linda K.; Sánchez-Cordón, Pedro J.; Galindo, Inmaculada

    2017-01-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a large DNA virus that replicates predominantly in the cell cytoplasm and is the only member of the Asfarviridae family. The virus causes an acute haemorrhagic fever, African swine fever (ASF), in domestic pigs and wild boar resulting in the death of most infected animals. Apoptosis is induced at an early stage during virus entry or uncoating. However, ASFV encodes anti-apoptotic proteins which facilitate production of progeny virions. These anti-apoptotic proteins include A179L, a Bcl-2 family member; A224L, an inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP) family member; EP153R a C-type lectin; and DP71L. The latter acts by inhibiting activation of the stress activated pro-apoptotic pathways pro-apoptotic pathways. The mechanisms by which these proteins act is summarised. ASF disease is characterised by massive apoptosis of uninfected lymphocytes which reduces the effectiveness of the immune response, contributing to virus pathogenesis. Mechanisms by which this apoptosis is induced are discussed. PMID:28841179

  8. Investigations of Pro- and Anti-Apoptotic Factors Affecting African Swine Fever Virus Replication and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Linda K; Sánchez-Cordón, Pedro J; Galindo, Inmaculada; Alonso, Covadonga

    2017-08-25

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a large DNA virus that replicates predominantly in the cell cytoplasm and is the only member of the Asfarviridae family. The virus causes an acute haemorrhagic fever, African swine fever (ASF), in domestic pigs and wild boar resulting in the death of most infected animals. Apoptosis is induced at an early stage during virus entry or uncoating. However, ASFV encodes anti-apoptotic proteins which facilitate production of progeny virions. These anti-apoptotic proteins include A179L, a Bcl-2 family member; A224L, an inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAP) family member; EP153R a C-type lectin; and DP71L. The latter acts by inhibiting activation of the stress activated pro-apoptotic pathways pro-apoptotic pathways. The mechanisms by which these proteins act is summarised. ASF disease is characterised by massive apoptosis of uninfected lymphocytes which reduces the effectiveness of the immune response, contributing to virus pathogenesis. Mechanisms by which this apoptosis is induced are discussed.

  9. The Rift Valley Fever virus protein NSm and putative cellular protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever is an infectious viral disease and an emerging problem in many countries of Africa and on the Arabian Peninsula. The causative virus is predominantly transmitted by mosquitoes and high mortality and abortion rates characterize outbreaks in animals while symptoms ranging from mild to life-threatening encephalitis and hemorrhagic fever are noticed among infected humans. For a better prevention and treatment of the infection, an increased knowledge of the infectious process of the virus is required. The focus of this work was to identify protein-protein interactions between the non-structural protein (NSm), encoded by the M-segment of the virus, and host cell proteins. This study was initiated by screening approximately 26 million cDNA clones of a mouse embryonic cDNA library for interactions with the NSm protein using a yeast two-hybrid system. We have identified nine murine proteins that interact with NSm protein of Rift Valley Fever virus, and the putative protein-protein interactions were confirmed by growth selection procedures and β-gal activity measurements. Our results suggest that the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 2 (Cpsf2), the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (cyclophilin)-like 2 protein (Ppil2), and the synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) are the most promising targets for the NSm protein of the virus during an infection. PMID:22838834

  10. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vector mediates postexposure protection against Sudan Ebola hemorrhagic fever in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Geisbert, Thomas W; Daddario-DiCaprio, Kathleen M; Williams, Kinola J N; Geisbert, Joan B; Leung, Anders; Feldmann, Friederike; Hensley, Lisa E; Feldmann, Heinz; Jones, Steven M

    2008-06-01

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors expressing homologous filoviral glycoproteins can completely protect rhesus monkeys against Marburg virus when administered after exposure and can partially protect macaques after challenge with Zaire ebolavirus. Here, we administered a VSV vector expressing the Sudan ebolavirus (SEBOV) glycoprotein to four rhesus macaques shortly after exposure to SEBOV. All four animals survived SEBOV challenge, while a control animal that received a nonspecific vector developed fulminant SEBOV hemorrhagic fever and succumbed. This is the first demonstration of complete postexposure protection against an Ebola virus in nonhuman primates and provides further evidence that postexposure vaccination may have utility in treating exposures to filoviruses.

  11. Oral receptivity of Aedes aegypti from Cape Verde for yellow fever, dengue, and chikungunya viruses.

    PubMed

    Vazeille, Marie; Yébakima, André; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Andriamahefazafy, Barrysson; Correira, Artur; Rodrigues, Julio Monteiro; Veiga, Antonio; Moreira, Antonio; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Grandadam, Marc; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2009, 21,313 cases of dengue-3 virus (DENV-3) were reported in the islands of Cape Verde, an archipelago located in the Atlantic Ocean 570 km from the coast of western Africa. It was the first dengue outbreak ever reported in Cape Verde. Mosquitoes collected in July 2010 in the city of Praia, on the island of Santiago, were identified morphologically as Aedes aegypti formosus. Using experimental oral infections, we found that this vector showed a moderate ability to transmit the epidemic dengue-3 virus, but was highly susceptible to chikungunya and yellow fever viruses.

  12. Efficacy of a recombinant Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 with NSm deletion as a vaccine candidate in sheep.

    PubMed

    Weingartl, Hana M; Nfon, Charles K; Zhang, Shunzhen; Marszal, Peter; Wilson, William C; Morrill, John C; Bettinger, George E; Peters, Clarence J

    2014-04-25

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a mosquito-borne virus in the Bunyaviridae family and Phlebovirus genus, causes RVF, a disease of ruminants and man, endemic in Sub-Saharan African countries. However, outbreaks in Yemen and Saudi Arabia demonstrate the ability for RVFV to spread into virgin territory and thus the need exists to develop safe and efficacious vaccines that can be used outside the endemic zones. Commercial RVFV vaccines are available but have limitations that prevent their use in disease-free countries. Consequently, there are ongoing efforts to develop and/or improve RVFV vaccines with global acceptability. In this study a previously developed MP-12-derived vaccine candidate with a large deletion of the NSm gene in the pre Gn region of the M segment (arMP-12-ΔNSm21/384) developed by T. Ikegami, that was already shown to be safe in pregnant sheep causing neither abortion nor fetal malformation was further evaluated. This vaccine was tested for protection of sheep from viremia and fever following challenge with virulent RVFV ZH501 strain. A single vaccination with arMP-12-ΔNSm21/384 fully protected sheep when challenged four weeks post vaccination, thereby demonstrating that this vaccine is efficacious in protecting these animals from RVFV infection.

  13. Rift Valley fever virus NS{sub S} gene expression correlates with a defect in nuclear mRNA export

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Anna Maria; Van Deusen, Nicole M.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2015-12-15

    We investigated the localization of host mRNA during Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that infection with RVFV altered the localization of host mRNA. mRNA accumulated in the nuclei of RVFV-infected but not mock-infected cells. Further, overexpression of the NS{sub S} gene, but not the N, G{sub N} or NS{sub M} genes correlated with mRNA nuclear accumulation. Nuclear accumulation of host mRNA was not observed in cells infected with a strain of RVFV lacking the gene encoding NS{sub S}, confirming that expression of NS{sub S} is likely responsible for this phenomenon. - Highlights: • Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection alters the localization of host mRNA. • mRNA accumulates in the nuclei of RVFV-infected but not mock-infected cells. • NS{sub S} is likely responsible for mRNA relocalization to the nucleus.

  14. Identification of two amino acids within E2 important for the pathogenicity of chimeric classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui; Li, Ling; Zhao, Yu; Tu, Jun; Pan, Zishu

    2016-01-04

    Our previous study demonstrated that a chimeric classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vSM/CE2 containing the E2 gene of the vaccine C-strain on the genetic background of the virulent CSFV strain Shimen (vSM) was attenuated in swine but reversed to virulence after serial passages in PK15 cells. To investigate the molecular basis of the pathogenicity, the genome of the 11th passage vSM/CE2 variant (vSM/CE2-p11) was sequenced, and two amino acid mutations, T745I and M979K, within E2 of vSM/CE2-p11 were observed. Based on reverse genetic manipulation of the chimeric cDNA clone pSM/CE2, the mutated viruses vSM/CE2/T745I, vSMCE2/M979K and vSM/CE2/T745I;M979K were rescued. The data from infection of pigs demonstrated that the M979K amino acid substitution was responsible for pathogenicity. Studies in vitro indicated that T745I and M979K increased infectious virus production and replication. Our results indicated that two residues located at sites 745 and 979 within E2 play a key role in determining the replication in vitro and pathogenicity in vivo of chimeric CSFV vSM/CE2.

  15. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in ticks collected from livestock in Albania.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Velo, Enkeleda; Kadiaj, Perparim; Tsioka, Katerina; Kontana, Anastasia; Kota, Majlinda; Bino, Silvia

    2017-08-19

    Albania is a Balkan country endemic for Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF). It was shown previously that CCHF virus (CCHFV) sequences from Albanian patients cluster into Europe 1 clade. Aim of the present study was to test for CCHFV ticks collected in several regions of Albania, and to determine the genetic lineage(s) of the CCHFV strains in relation with their geographic distribution. A total of 726 ticks (366 Hyalomma marginatum, 349 Rhipicephalus bursa and 11 Rhipicephalus sanguineus) collected from livestock during 2007-2014 were included in the study. Thirty of 215 (13.9%) tick pools were positive for CCHFV. Lineage Europe 1 was detected in H. marginatum ticks collected in the endemic region of Albania, while lineage Europe 2 was detected mainly in R. bursa ticks in various regions of the country. Both genetic lineages were detected in the CCHF endemic area (northeastern Albania), while only Europe 2 lineage was detected in the south of the country. A higher genetic diversity was seen among Europe 2 than Europe 1 Albanian sequences (mean distance 3.7% versus 1%), suggesting a longer evolution of AP92-like strains (Europe 2) in their tick hosts. The present study shows that besides CCHFV lineage Europe 1, lineage Europe 2 is also present in Albania. Combined with results from recent studies, it is concluded that lineage Europe 2 is widely spread in the Balkans and Turkey, and is associated mainly with R. bursa ticks (at least in this region). Its pathogenicity and impact to the public health remain to be elucidated. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Chapare Virus, a Newly Discovered Arenavirus Isolated from a Fatal Hemorrhagic Fever Case in Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Simon; Erickson, Bobbie R.; Agudo, Roberto; Blair, Patrick J.; Vallejo, Efrain; Albariño, César G.; Vargas, Jorge; Comer, James A.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.; Olson, James G.; Nichol, Stuart T.

    2008-01-01

    A small focus of hemorrhagic fever (HF) cases occurred near Cochabamba, Bolivia, in December 2003 and January 2004. Specimens were available from only one fatal case, which had a clinical course that included fever, headache, arthralgia, myalgia, and vomiting with subsequent deterioration and multiple hemorrhagic signs. A non-cytopathic virus was isolated from two of the patient serum samples, and identified as an arenavirus by IFA staining with a rabbit polyvalent antiserum raised against South American arenaviruses known to be associated with HF (Guanarito, Machupo, and Sabiá). RT-PCR analysis and subsequent analysis of the complete virus S and L RNA segment sequences identified the virus as a member of the New World Clade B arenaviruses, which includes all the pathogenic South American arenaviruses. The virus was shown to be most closely related to Sabiá virus, but with 26% and 30% nucleotide difference in the S and L segments, and 26%, 28%, 15% and 22% amino acid differences for the L, Z, N, and GP proteins, respectively, indicating the virus represents a newly discovered arenavirus, for which we propose the name Chapare virus. In conclusion, two different arenaviruses, Machupo and Chapare, can be associated with severe HF cases in Bolivia. PMID:18421377

  17. [The vaccines based on the replicon of the venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus against viral hemorrhagic fevers].

    PubMed

    Petrov, A A; Plekhanova, T M; Sidorova, O N; Borisevich, S V; Makhlay, A A

    2015-01-01

    The status of the various recombinant DNA and RNA-derived candidate vaccines, as well as the Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus (VEEV) replicon vaccine system against extremely hazardous viral hemorrhagic fevers, were reviewed. The VEEV-based replication-incompetent vectors offer attractive features in terms of safety, high expression levels of the heterologous viral antigen, tropism to dendritic cells, robust immune responses, protection efficacy, low potential for pre-existing anti-vector immunity and possibility of engineering multivalent vaccines were tested. These features of the VEEV replicon system hold much promise for the development of new generation vaccine candidates against viral hemorrhagic fevers.

  18. Mayaro virus fever in French Guiana: isolation, identification, and seroprevalence.

    PubMed

    Talarmin, A; Chandler, L J; Kazanji, M; de Thoisy, B; Debon, P; Lelarge, J; Labeau, B; Bourreau, E; Vié, J C; Shope, R E; Sarthou, J L

    1998-09-01

    This paper reports the first isolation of Mayaro (MAY) virus from a patient infected in French Guiana. The identification was initially performed using immunofluorescent antibody testing with specific mouse antibody, and confirmed by plaque-reduction neutralization testing and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. To determine if MAY virus infection is widespread in French Guiana, a serosurvey was performed to determine the prevalence of antibody to this virus in various ethnic groups and areas of French Guiana. Human sera (n = 1,962) were screened using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. To determine whether MAY virus circulates in the rain forest, a serosurvey in monkey populations was performed. Monkey sera (n = 150) were also screened for antibody to MAY virus using HI testing. Of the human sera tested, 6.3% were positive for anti-MAY virus antibodies. Significant differences in MAY virus seroprevalence between different age groups were observed. Seroprevalence rates increased with age, with a large increase in people 10-19 years of age in comparison with those less than 10 years of age. After adjustment for age, significant differences were also found between places of residence. The prevalence of anti-MAY virus antibody was higher in people living in contact with the forest, especially in the Haut Oyapock area (odds ratio [OR] = 97.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 48.2-197.9) and along the Maroni River (OR = 39.7, 95% CI = 20.6-76.6). The ethnic differences observed in this study were probably due to differences in residence. Among monkeys, higher seroprevalence rates were found in Alouatta seniculus (66.0%) than in Saguinus midas (18.2%). Among Alouatta, the seroprevalence increased significantly with weight (and therefore with age). This study indicates that MAY virus is present in French Guiana, and human infections occur in areas where people live near the tropical rain forest.

  19. The naming of Potato virus Y strains infecting potato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potato virus Y (PVY) strain groups are based on host-response and resistance-gene interactions. The strain groups PVYO, PVYC and PVYN are well-established for the isolates infecting potato in the field. A switch in the emphasis from host response to nucleotide sequence differences in the virus genom...