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Sample records for few-nucleon transfer reactions

  1. Few-Nucleon Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kievsky, A.

    2005-04-01

    Recent advances in the theoretical description of few-nucleon systems are reported. This research activity has been performed under the Italian project FISICA TEORICA DEL NUCLEO E DEI SISTEMI A MOLTI CORPI. Bound and scattering states as well as specific reactions are analyzed in connection with the current experimental activity.

  2. Few Nucleon Scattering and Three Nucleon Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Kimiko

    2009-10-01

    One recent topic of the few-nucleon system studies to explore the properties of three nucleon forces (3NFs) that appear in the system more than two nucleons. The 3NFs arise naturally in the standard meson exchange picture as well as in the more recent concept of chiral effective field theory. These forces are considered to be one key element to understand the nuclear phenomena in a consistent way. However there had been little knowledge with which to constrain the 3NFs. That is due to the fact that 3NFs are relatively weak compared to the nucleon--nucleon (NN) forces and then their effects are easily masked. Few nucleon scattering is one of the most promising tool for the 3NF study, because this system provides a rich set of energy dependent spin observables and differential cross sections. In the end of 1990's two theory groups reported the rigorous numerical Faddeev calculations incorporating 2π-exchange 3NFs in elastic Nd scattering at intermediate energies (E/A ˜100 MeV), and they suggested that the difference found in the cross section minima is the signature of 3NF effects. Since then experimental studies of intermediate-energy pd/nd elastic scattering and pd breakup reactions have been performed by groups at RIKEN, RCNP, KVI, IUCF and Uppsala. Theoretically addition of 3NFs other than 2π exchange types, and/or relativistic treatment, and completely new approach based on chiral effective field theory are now in progress. The importance of 3NFs has also been noted in other instances; e.g. descriptions of the binding energies of light mass nuclei and the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. It is clear that the testing of 3NF models has just begun. In the presentation, recent progress in the 3NF study with few nucleon scattering at intermediate energies will be given.

  3. Recent Experiments Involving Few-Nucleon Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornow, W.

    2014-08-01

    Recent experimental results are presented for reactions involving A = 3 to A = 6 nuclear systems. The emphasis is on unique data obtained at new experimental facilities. It is shown that the inertial confinement fusion facilities OMEGA and NIF provide a largely unexpected opportunity for experimental few-body physics to both obtain data of unprecedented quality and extend previous measurements to energies not accessible in the past. Whenever possible, data are compared to state-of-the-art theoretical calculations.

  4. Few-nucleon experiments with fast polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Klages, H.O.; Aures, R.; Brady, F.P.; Doll, P.; Finckh, E.; Hansmeyer, J.; Heeringa, W.; Hiebert, J.C.; Hofmann, K.; Krupp, H.

    1985-01-20

    At the Karlsruhe cyclotron few-nucleon systems are studied in scattering experiments of polarized fast neutrons on very light nuclei. The continuous energy distribution of the neutron beam from POLKA enables one to measure spin-dependent observables in the energy range from 15 to 50 Me simultaneously.

  5. Few-Nucleon Research at TUNL: Probing Two- and Three-Nucleon Interactions with Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, C. R.; Tornow, W.; Witała, H.

    2016-03-01

    The central goal of few-nucleon research at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) is to perform measurements that contribute to advancing ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure and reactions. The program aims include evaluating theoretical treatments of few-nucleon reaction dynamics through strategically comparing theory predictions to data, determining properties of the neutron-neutron interaction that are not accessible in two-nucleon reactions, and searching for evidence of longrange features of three-nucleon interactions, e.g., spin and isospin dependence. This paper will review studies of three- and four-nucleon systems at TUNL conducted using unpolarized and polarized neutron beams. Measurements of neutron-induced reactions performed by groups at TUNL over the last six years are described in comparison with theory predictions. The results are discussed in the context of the program goals stated above. Measurements of vector analyzing powers for elastic scattering in A=3 and A=4 systems, differential cross sections for neutron-deuteron elastic scattering and neutrondeuteron breakup in several final-state configurations are described. The findings from these studies and plans for the coming three years are presented in the context of worldwide activities in this front, in particular, research presented in this session.

  6. A relativistic theory of few-nucleon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred Stadler

    2010-12-01

    This talk provides an overview of recent results for two- and three-nucleon systems obtained within the framework of the covariant spectator theory (CST). The main features of two recently published models for the neutron–proton interaction, that fit the 2007 world data base containing several thousands of neutron-proton scattering data below 350 MeV with χ 2/N data ≈ 1, are presented. These one-boson-exchange models, called WJC-1 and WJC-2, have a considerably smaller number of adjustable parameters than are present in realistic nonrelativistic potentials. When applied to the three-nucleon bound state, the correct binding energy is obtained without additional three-body forces. First calculations of the electromagnetic form factors of helium-3 and the triton in complete impulse approximation also give very reasonable results. One can conclude that the CST yields a very efficient description of few-nucleon systems, in which the relativistic formulation of the dynamics is an essential element.

  7. Large Scattering Lengths, Universality, Correlations and Few-Nucleon Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesshammer, Harald W.

    2010-02-01

    In a plethora of processes pivotal e.g. for Big-Bang Nucleo-synthesis BBN, the typical energy scale lies below 10;MeV. Since the scattering lengths between two nucleons are much larger than the typical range of the nucleon-nucleon interaction, Nuclear Physics at these energies is described by the Effective Field Theory of Point-Like Interactions, EFT(PLI), a model-independent theory with systematically improvable, reliable theoretical uncertainties. It helps to provide the bridge from the deceptive simplicity of high-energy QCD, the microscopic theory of strong interactions, to the richness and complexity of few-nucleon physics, and to explain in turn how universal aspects emerge from that complexity. In contradistinction to atomic systems, effective-range contributions have often to be accounted for, as they provide sizable corrections of up to 30%. EFT(PLI) is an excellent tool to check data consistencies, to extract nucleon properties by uniquely subtracting nuclear binding effects, and to model-independently predict processes which are experimentally hard to access, e.g. for BBN and interactions between neutrinos and the lightest nuclei. Furthermore, its model-independent assessment of few-body interactions explains correlations between e.g. binding energies and scattering lengths, and thus allows to differentiate between observables which are dominated by large scattering lengths from those which are sensitive to the details of the nuclear force. The same concepts apply to halo-nuclei, i.e. systems which are much larger than its constituents, namely a small core orbited by nucleons. Some of these systems exhibit e.g. Borromean binding or an Efimov-spectrum. While the nucleon-nucleon scattering lengths cannot be tuned experimentally, there are indications that they are infinite when the pion has about 1.4 times its physical mass. EFT(PLI) explores whcih impact varying fundamental parameters of QCD has on the nuclear spectrum, and in particular on BBN. This

  8. Chiral effective field theory analysis of hadronic parity violation in few-nucleon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viviani, M.; Baroni, A.; Girlanda, L.; Kievsky, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Schiavilla, R.

    2014-06-01

    Background: Weak interactions between quarks induce a parity-violating (PV) component in the nucleon-nucleon potential, whose effects are currently being studied in a number of experiments involving few-nucleon systems. In the present work, we reconsider the derivation of this PV component within a chiral effective field theory (χEFT) framework. Purpose: The objectives of the present work are twofold. The first is to perform a detailed analysis of the PV nucleon-nucleon potential up to next-to-next-to-leading (N2LO) order in the chiral expansion, in particular, by determining the number of independent low-energy constants (LECs) at N2LO. The second objective is to investigate PV effects in a number of few-nucleon observables, including the p⃗-p longitudinal asymmetry, the neutron spin rotation in n⃗-p and n⃗-d scattering, and the longitudinal asymmetry in the 3He(n⃗,p)3H charge-exchange reaction. Methods: The χEFT PV potential includes one-pion-exchange, two-pion-exchange, and contact terms as well as 1/M (M being the nucleon mass) nonstatic corrections. Dimensional regularization is used to renormalize pion loops. The wave functions for the A =2-4 nuclei are obtained by using strong two- and three-body potentials also derived, for consistency, from χEFT. In the case of the A =3-4 systems, the wave functions are computed by expanding on a hyperspherical harmonics functions basis. Results: We find that the PV potential at N2LO depends on six LECs: the pion-nucleon PV coupling constant hπ1 and five parameters multiplying contact interactions. An estimate for the range of values of the various LECs is provided by using available experimental data, and these values are used to obtain predictions for the other PV observables. Conclusions: The χEFT approach provides a very satisfactory framework to analyze PV effects in few-nucleon systems.

  9. Chiral effective field theory analysis of hadronic parity violation in few-nucleon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Viviani, M.; Baroni, A.; Girlanda, L.; Kievsky, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Schiavilla, R.

    2014-06-18

    Weak interactions between quarks induce a parity-violating (PV) component in the nucleon-nucleon potential, whose effects are currently being studied in a number of experiments involving few-nucleon systems. In the present work, we reconsider the derivation of this PV component within a chiral effective field theory (${\\chi }$EFT) framework. Purpose: The objectives of the present work are twofold. The first is to perform a detailed analysis of the PV nucleon-nucleon potential up to next-to-next-to-leading (N2LO) order in the chiral expansion, in particular, by determining the number of independent low-energy constants (LECs) at N2LO. The second objective is to investigate PV effects in a number of few-nucleon observables, including the $\\vec{p}$-p longitudinal asymmetry, the neutron spin rotation in n-p and n-d scattering, and the longitudinal asymmetry in the 3He( $\\vec{n}$,p)3H charge-exchange reaction. Methods: The ${\\chi }$EFT PV potential includes one-pion-exchange, two-pion-exchange, and contact terms as well as 1/M (M being the nucleon mass) nonstatic corrections. Dimensional regularization is used to renormalize pion loops. The wave functions for the A=2-4 nuclei are obtained by using strong two- and three-body potentials also derived, for consistency, from ${\\chi }$EFT. In the case of the A=3-4 systems, systems, the wave functions are computed by expanding on a hyperspherical harmonics functions basis. Results: We find that the PV potential at N2LO depends on six LECs: the pion-nucleon PV coupling constant h$1\\atop{π}$ and five parameters multiplying contact interactions. An estimate for the range of values of the various LECs is provided by using available experimental data, and these values are used to obtain predictions for the other PV observables. Conclusions: The ${\\chi }$EFT approach provides a very satisfactory framework to analyze PV effects in few-nucleon systems.

  10. Electromagnetic Structure of Few-Nucleon Systems: a Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schiavilla

    2000-10-01

    Our current understanding of the structure of nuclei with up to A=8, including energy spectra, electromagnetic form factors, and capture reactions, is critically reviewed within the context of a realistic approach to nuclear dynamics based on two- and three-nucleon interactions and associated electromagnetic currents.

  11. Los Alamos experiments on the few nucleon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Spinka, H.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of recently studied proton-, pion-, and neutron-induced reactions on nuclei up to /sup 4/He at LAMPF is given. Upgrades to the LAMPF experimental facilities for these studies are described. Some new proton-proton total cross sections in pure helicity states (..delta..sigma/sub L/(pp)) from the ZGS near 3 GeV/c are also presented. 46 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Electromagnetic structure of few-nucleon ground states

    DOE PAGES

    Marcucci, Laura E.; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; Gross, Franz L.; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility; Peña, M. T.; Piarulli, M.; Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA; Schiavilla, Rocco; Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA; Sick, Ingo; et al

    2016-01-08

    Experimental form factors of the hydrogen and helium isotopes, extracted from an up-to-date global analysis of cross sections and polarization observables measured in elastic electron scattering from these systems, are compared to predictions obtained in three different theoretical approaches: the first is based on realistic interactions and currents, including relativistic corrections (labeled as the conventional approach); the second relies on a chiral effective field theory description of the strong and electromagnetic interactions in nuclei (labeled ChiEFT); the third utilizes a fully relativistic treatment of nuclear dynamics as implemented in the covariant spectator theory (labeled CST). Furthermore, for momentum transfers belowmore » Q < 5 fm-1 there is satisfactory agreement between experimental data and theoretical results in all three approaches. Conversely, at Q > 5 fm-1, particularly in the case of the deuteron, a relativistic treatment of the dynamics, as is done in the CST, is necessary. The experimental data on the deuteron A structure function extend to Q ~ 12 fm-1, and the close agreement between these data and the CST results suggests that, even in this extreme kinematical regime, there is no evidence for new effects coming from quark and gluon degrees of freedom at short distances.« less

  13. Electromagnetic structure of few-nucleon ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcucci, L. E.; Gross, F.; Peña, M. T.; Piarulli, M.; Schiavilla, R.; Sick, I.; Stadler, A.; Van Orden, J. W.; Viviani, M.

    2016-02-01

    Experimental form factors of the hydrogen and helium isotopes, extracted from an up-to-date global analysis of cross sections and polarization observables measured in elastic electron scattering from these systems, are compared to predictions obtained in three different theoretical approaches: the first is based on realistic interactions and currents, including relativistic corrections (labeled as the conventional approach); the second relies on a chiral effective field theory description of the strong and electromagnetic interactions in nuclei (labeled χEFT) the third utilizes a fully relativistic treatment of nuclear dynamics as implemented in the covariant spectator theory (labeled CST). For momentum transfers below Q≲ 5 fm-1 there is satisfactory agreement between experimental data and theoretical results in all three approaches. However, at Q≳ 5 fm-1, particularly in the case of the deuteron, a relativistic treatment of the dynamics, as is done in the CST, is necessary. The experimental data on the deuteron A structure function extend to Q≃ 12 fm-1, and the close agreement between these data and the CST results suggests that, even in this extreme kinematical regime, the study of few-body form factors provides no evidence for new effects coming from quark and gluon degrees of freedom at short distances.

  14. Polarized lepton deep-inelastic scattering from few-nucleon targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woloshyn, R. M.

    1989-06-01

    The structure functions for deep-inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from polarized few-nucleon targets (nucleon, 2H, 3He) are calculated in a parton model. Spin-dependent quark distributions constructed along the lines of Carlitz-Kaur model are used. The asymmetry for scattering from polarized 3He is small in magnitude and dominated by the neutron contribution. For 2H, cancellation between proton and neutron contributions leads to a very small asymmetry below x≈0.1. Otherwise the asymmetry is large but dominated by the proton.

  15. Effective Field Theory and Isospin Violation in Few-Nucleon Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Evgeny Epelbaum

    2004-08-01

    I discuss the leading and subleading isospin--breaking three--nucleon forces in the chiral effective field theory framework. I have discussed the leading and subleading isospin-violating 3NFs. The leading contributions are generated by one- and two-pion exchange diagrams with their strength given by the strong neutron-proton mass difference. The subleading corrections are again given by one- and two-pion exchange diagrams, driven largely by the charged-to-neutral pion mass difference and also by the electromagnetic neutron-proton mass difference and the dimension two electromagnetic LEC f{sub 1}. In the future, these isospin-breaking forces should be used to analyze few-nucleon systems based on chiral EFT.

  16. Few-Nucleon Charge Radii and a Precision Isotope Shift Measurement in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan Rezaeian, Nima; Shiner, David

    2015-10-01

    Recent improvements in atomic theory and experiment provide a valuable method to precisely determine few nucleon charge radii, complementing the more direct scattering approaches, and providing sensitive tests of few-body nuclear theory. Some puzzles with respect to this method exist, particularly in the muonic and electronic measurements of the proton radius, known as the proton puzzle. Perhaps this puzzle will also exist in nuclear size measurements in helium. Muonic helium measurements are ongoing while our new electronic results will be discussed here. We measured precisely the isotope shift of the 23S - 23P transitions in 3He and 4He. The result is almost an order of magnitude more accurate than previous measured values. To achieve this accuracy, we implemented various experimental techniques. We used a tunable laser frequency discriminator and electro-optic modulation technique to precisely control the frequency and intensity. We select and stabilize the intensity of the required sideband and eliminate unused sidebands. The technique uses a MEMS fiber switch (ts = 10 ms) and several temperature stabilized narrow band (3 GHz) fiber gratings. A beam with both species of helium is achieved using a custom fiber laser for simultaneous optical pumping. A servo-controlled retro-reflected laser beam eliminates Doppler effects. Careful detection design and software are essential for unbiased data collection. Our new results will be compared to previous measurements.

  17. Few-Nucleon Charge Radii and a Precision Isotope Shift Measurement in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan Rezaeian, Nima; Shiner, David

    2015-05-01

    Precision atomic theory and experiment provide a valuable method to determine few nucleon charge radii, complementing the more direct scattering approaches, and providing sensitive tests of few-body nuclear theory. Some puzzles with respect to this method exist, particularly in the muonic and electronic measurements of the proton radius, and as well with respect to measurements of nuclear size in helium. We perform precision measurements of the isotope shift of the 23S -23P transitions in 3He and 4He. A tunable laser frequency discriminator and electro-optic modulation technique give precise frequency and intensity control. We select (ts <50 ms) and stabilize the intensity of the required sideband and eliminate the unused sidebands (<= 10¬5) . The technique uses a MEMS fiber switch (ts = 10 ms) and several temperature stabilized narrow band (3 GHz) fiber gratings. A fiber based optical circulator and amplifier provide the desired isolation and net gain for the selected frequency. A beam with both species of helium is achieved using a custom fiber laser for simultaneous optical pumping. A servo-controlled retro-reflected laser beam eliminates Doppler effects. Careful detection design and software control allows for unbiased data collection. Current results will be discussed. This work is supported by NSF PHY-1068868 and PHY-1404498.

  18. Nucleon polarisabilities from Compton scattering off the one- and few-nucleon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, Harald W.

    2005-07-01

    These proceedings sketch how combining recent theoretical advances with data from the new generation of high-precision Compton scattering experiments on both the proton and few-nucleon systems offers fresh, detailed insight into the Physics of the nucleon polarisabilities. A multipole-analysis is presented to simplify their interpretation. Predictions from Chiral Effective Field Theory with special emphasis on the spin-polarisabilities can serve as a guideline for doubly-polarised experiments below 300 MeV. The strong energy-dependence of the scalar magnetic dipole-polarisability β turns out to be crucial to understanding the proton and deuteron data. Finally, a high-accuracy determination of the proton and neutron polarisabilities shows that they are identical within error-bars. For details and a better list of references, consult Refs. [H.W. Grießhammer, T.R. Hemmert, Phys. Rev. C 65 (2002) 045207, nucl-th/0110006; R.P. Hildebrandt, H.W. Grießhammer, T.R. Hemmert, B. Pasquini, Eur. Phys. J. A 20 (2004) 293, nucl-th/0307070; R.P. Hildebrandt, H.W. Grießhammer, T.R. Hemmert, Eur. Phys. J. A 20 (2004) 329, nucl-th/0308054; R.P. Hildebrandt, H.W. Grießhammer, T.R. Hemmert, D.R. Phillips, Eur. Phys. J. A, nucl-th/0405077 (in press)].

  19. Charge Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennerl, Konrad

    2010-12-01

    Charge transfer, or charge exchange, describes a process in which an ion takes one or more electrons from another atom. Investigations of this fundamental process have accompanied atomic physics from its very beginning, and have been extended to astrophysical scenarios already many decades ago. Yet one important aspect of this process, i.e. its high efficiency in generating X-rays, was only revealed in 1996, when comets were discovered as a new class of X-ray sources. This finding has opened up an entirely new field of X-ray studies, with great impact due to the richness of the underlying atomic physics, as the X-rays are not generated by hot electrons, but by ions picking up electrons from cold gas. While comets still represent the best astrophysical laboratory for investigating the physics of charge transfer, various studies have already spotted a variety of other astrophysical locations, within and beyond our solar system, where X-rays may be generated by this process. They range from planetary atmospheres, the heliosphere, the interstellar medium and stars to galaxies and clusters of galaxies, where charge transfer may even be observationally linked to dark matter. This review attempts to put the various aspects of the study of charge transfer reactions into a broader historical context, with special emphasis on X-ray astrophysics, where the discovery of cometary X-ray emission may have stimulated a novel look at our universe.

  20. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  1. Transfer reactions in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    To a high degree many aspects of the large-scale behavior of objects in the Universe are governed by the underlying nuclear physics. In fact the shell structure of nuclear physics is directly imprinted into the chemical abundances of the elements. The tranquility of the night sky is a direct result of the relatively slow rate of nuclear reactions that control and determines a star’s fate. Understanding the nuclear structure and reaction rates between nuclei is vital to understanding our Universe. Nuclear-transfer reactions make accessible a wealth of knowledge from which we can extract much of the required nuclear physics information. A review of transfer reactions for nuclear astrophysics is presented with an emphasis on the experimental challenges and opportunities for future development.

  2. Transfer reactions with heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    Transfer reactions for several transuranium elements are studied. (/sup 248/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, /sup 249/CF, /sup 254/Es), /sup 16,18/O, /sup 20,22/Ne, and /sup 40,48/Ca projectiles are used. The production of neutron-rich heavy actinides is enhanced by the use of neutron-rich projectiles /sup 18/O and /sup 22/Ne. The maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at only 2 to 3 mass numbers larger for /sup 48/Ca than for /sup 40/Ca reactions with /sup 248/Cm. The cross sections decrease rapidly with the number of nucleons transferred. The use of neutron-rich targets favors the production of neutron-rich isotopes. ''Cold'' heavy targets are produced. Comparisons with simple calculations of the product excitation energies assuming binary transfers indicate that the maxima of the isotopic distributions occur at the lightest product isotope for which the energy exceeds the reaction barrier. The cross sections for transfer of the same nucleon clusters appear to be comparable for a wide variety of systems. 23 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion.

  4. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion. PMID:26193994

  5. Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Xiao, Jian

    2016-04-01

    The cascade [1,n]-hydrogen transfer/cyclization, recognized as the tert-amino effect one century ago, has received considerable interest in recent decades, and great achievements have been made. With the aid of this strategy, the inert C(sp(3))-H bonds can be directly functionalized into C-C, C-N, C-O bonds under catalysis of Lewis acids, Brønsted acids, as well as organocatalysts, and even merely under thermal conditions. Hydrogen can be transferred intramolecularly from hydrogen donor to acceptor in the form of hydride, or proton, followed by cyclization to furnish the cyclic products in processes featuring high atom economy. Methylene/methine adjacent to heteroatoms, e.g., nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, can be exploited as hydride donor as well as methylene/methine without heteroatom assistance. Miscellaneous electrophilic subunits or intermediates, e.g., alkylidene malonate, carbophilic metal activated alkyne or allene, α,β-unsaturated aldehydes/ketone, saturated aldehydes/iminium, ketenimine/carbodiimide, metal carbenoid, electron-withdrawing groups activated allene/alkyne, in situ generated carbocation, can serve as hydride acceptors. This methodology has shown preeminent power to construct 5-, 6-, or 7-membered heterocyclic as well as carbon rings. In this chapter, various hydrogen donors and acceptors are adequately discussed. PMID:27573142

  6. Photoinduced Electron Transfer Reactions for Macromolecular Syntheses.

    PubMed

    Dadashi-Silab, Sajjad; Doran, Sean; Yagci, Yusuf

    2016-09-14

    Photochemical reactions, particularly those involving photoinduced electron transfer processes, establish a substantial contribution to the modern synthetic chemistry, and the polymer community has been increasingly interested in exploiting and developing novel photochemical strategies. These reactions are efficiently utilized in almost every aspect of macromolecular architecture synthesis, involving initiation, control of the reaction kinetics and molecular structures, functionalization, and decoration, etc. Merging with polymerization techniques, photochemistry has opened up new intriguing and powerful avenues for macromolecular synthesis. Construction of various polymers with incredibly complex structures and specific control over the chain topology, as well as providing the opportunity to manipulate the reaction course through spatiotemporal control, are one of the unique abilities of such photochemical reactions. This review paper provides a comprehensive account of the fundamentals and applications of photoinduced electron transfer reactions in polymer synthesis. Besides traditional photopolymerization methods, namely free radical and cationic polymerizations, step-growth polymerizations involving electron transfer processes are included. In addition, controlled radical polymerization and "Click Chemistry" methods have significantly evolved over the last few decades allowing access to narrow molecular weight distributions, efficient regulation of the molecular weight and the monomer sequence and incredibly complex architectures, and polymer modifications and surface patterning are covered. Potential applications including synthesis of block and graft copolymers, polymer-metal nanocomposites, various hybrid materials and bioconjugates, and sequence defined polymers through photoinduced electron transfer reactions are also investigated in detail.

  7. Exclusive Reactions at High Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyushkin, Anatoly; Stoler, Paul

    2008-03-01

    . P. Szczepaniak and J. T. Londergan -- High energy break-up of few-nucleon systems / M. Sargsian -- Photodisintegration of the deuteron, and [symbol]He / R. Gilman -- A review of the few-body form factors / G. G. Petratos -- Nucleon form factor measurements and interpretation / C. F. Perdrisat -- Implications of G[symbol](Q[symbol])/G[symbol](Q[symbol]) / S. Dubnicka and A. Z. Dubnickova -- High Q[symbol] large acceptance G[symbol]/G[symbol] measurements using polarization transfer / L. Pentchev, C. F. Perdrisat and B. Wojtsekhowski -- A precise measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor G[symbol] in the few-GeV[symbol] region / G. P. Gilfoyle et al. (the CLAS collaboration) -- Magnetic form factor of the neutron up to 8 (GeV/c)[symbol] / B. Quinn -- Timelike form factors / K. K. Seth -- Polarization phenomena in e[symbol]e[symbol] [symbol] pp¯ revisited / A. Z. Dubnickova and S. Dubnicka -- Light-cone sum rules for form factors of the N[symbol] transition at Q[symbol] = 0 / J. Rohrwild -- Exclusive electroproduction of [symbol] mesons / A. N. Villano (for the JLab E01-002 collaboration) -- Exclusive electroproduction of [symbol] mesons in the S[symbol](1535) resonance region at high momentum transfer / M. M. Dalton (for the JLab E01-002 collaboration) -- Two-photon exchange in electron-proton elastic scattering: theory update / A. V. Afanasev -- Two-photon exchange contributions to elastic ep scattering in the non-local field formalism / P. Jain, S. D. Joglekar and S. Mitra -- Beyond the born approximation: a precise comparison of positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering in CLAS / J. Lachniet et al. -- Meson form factors in the space-like region / D. Gaskell -- Pion-nucleon distribution amplitudes / A. Peters -- [symbol] scattering in the 1/N[symbol] expansion / H. J. Kwee -- [symbol] annihilations into quasi-two-body final states at 10.58 GeV / Kai Yi -- Transition distribution amplitudes / J. P. Lansberg, B. Pire and L. Szymanowski -- Novel QCD

  8. Exclusive Reactions at High Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyushkin, Anatoly; Stoler, Paul

    2008-03-01

    . P. Szczepaniak and J. T. Londergan -- High energy break-up of few-nucleon systems / M. Sargsian -- Photodisintegration of the deuteron, and [symbol]He / R. Gilman -- A review of the few-body form factors / G. G. Petratos -- Nucleon form factor measurements and interpretation / C. F. Perdrisat -- Implications of G[symbol](Q[symbol])/G[symbol](Q[symbol]) / S. Dubnicka and A. Z. Dubnickova -- High Q[symbol] large acceptance G[symbol]/G[symbol] measurements using polarization transfer / L. Pentchev, C. F. Perdrisat and B. Wojtsekhowski -- A precise measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor G[symbol] in the few-GeV[symbol] region / G. P. Gilfoyle et al. (the CLAS collaboration) -- Magnetic form factor of the neutron up to 8 (GeV/c)[symbol] / B. Quinn -- Timelike form factors / K. K. Seth -- Polarization phenomena in e[symbol]e[symbol] [symbol] pp¯ revisited / A. Z. Dubnickova and S. Dubnicka -- Light-cone sum rules for form factors of the N[symbol] transition at Q[symbol] = 0 / J. Rohrwild -- Exclusive electroproduction of [symbol] mesons / A. N. Villano (for the JLab E01-002 collaboration) -- Exclusive electroproduction of [symbol] mesons in the S[symbol](1535) resonance region at high momentum transfer / M. M. Dalton (for the JLab E01-002 collaboration) -- Two-photon exchange in electron-proton elastic scattering: theory update / A. V. Afanasev -- Two-photon exchange contributions to elastic ep scattering in the non-local field formalism / P. Jain, S. D. Joglekar and S. Mitra -- Beyond the born approximation: a precise comparison of positron-proton and electron-proton elastic scattering in CLAS / J. Lachniet et al. -- Meson form factors in the space-like region / D. Gaskell -- Pion-nucleon distribution amplitudes / A. Peters -- [symbol] scattering in the 1/N[symbol] expansion / H. J. Kwee -- [symbol] annihilations into quasi-two-body final states at 10.58 GeV / Kai Yi -- Transition distribution amplitudes / J. P. Lansberg, B. Pire and L. Szymanowski -- Novel QCD

  9. Effects of nonlocality on transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, Luke

    Nuclear reactions play a key role in the study of nuclei away from stability. Single-nucleon transfer reactions involving deuterons provide an exceptional tool to study the single-particle structure of nuclei. Theoretically, these reactions are attractive as they can be cast into a three-body problem composed of a neutron, proton, and the target nucleus. Optical potentials are a common ingredient in reactions studies. Traditionally, nucleon-nucleus optical potentials are made local for convenience. The effects of nonlocal potentials have historically been included approximately by applying a correction factor to the solution of the corresponding equation for the local equivalent interaction. This is usually referred to as the Perey correction factor. In this thesis, we have systematically investigated the effects of nonlocality on (p,d) and (d,p) transfer reactions, and the validity of the Perey correction factor. We implemented a method to solve the single channel nonlocal equation for both bound and scattering states. We also developed an improved formalism for nonlocal interactions that includes deuteron breakup in transfer reactions. This new formalism, the nonlocal adiabatic distorted wave approximation, was used to study the effects of including nonlocality consistently in ( d,p) transfer reactions. For the (p,d) transfer reactions, we solved the nonlocal scattering and bound state equations using the Perey-Buck type interaction, and compared to local equivalent calculations. Using the distorted wave Born approximation we construct the T-matrix for (p,d) transfer on 17O, 41Ca, 49Ca, 127 Sn, 133Sn, and 209Pb at 20 and 50 MeV. Additionally we studied (p,d) reactions on 40Ca using the the nonlocal dispersive optical model. We have also included nonlocality consistently into the adiabatic distorted wave approximation and have investigated the effects of nonlocality on on (d,p) transfer reactions for deuterons impinged on 16O, 40Ca, 48Ca, 126Sn, 132Sn, 208Pb at 10

  10. Transfer reaction code with nonlocal interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, L. J.; Ross, A.; Nunes, F. M.

    2016-10-01

    We present a suite of codes (NLAT for nonlocal adiabatic transfer) to calculate the transfer cross section for single-nucleon transfer reactions, (d , N) or (N , d) , including nonlocal nucleon-target interactions, within the adiabatic distorted wave approximation. For this purpose, we implement an iterative method for solving the second order nonlocal differential equation, for both scattering and bound states. The final observables that can be obtained with NLAT are differential angular distributions for the cross sections of A(d , N) B or B(N , d) A. Details on the implementation of the T-matrix to obtain the final cross sections within the adiabatic distorted wave approximation method are also provided. This code is suitable to be applied for deuteron induced reactions in the range of Ed =10-70 MeV, and provides cross sections with 4% accuracy.

  11. The influence of transfer reactions on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement in the systems {sup 58.64}Ni +, {sup 92,100}Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H.

    1995-08-01

    High resolution experiments performed during the past few years demonstrated that the various reaction modes occurring in heavy ion collisions can strongly influence each other. This interrelation of the different reaction modes brings a nuclear structure dependence to the fusion and deep-inelastic channels that were previously described in the framework of pure statistical models. In order to fully understand the interrelation between these reaction channels, a complete set of measurements including elastic and inelastic scattering, few-nucleon transfer and fusion is required. In continuation of our earlier measurements of the fusion cross sections in the system {sup 58,64}Ni + {sup 92,100}Mo we finished the studies of the quasielastic process in these systems. The experiments were done in inverse reaction kinematics using the split-pole spectrograph with its hybrid focal-plane detector for particle identification. The experiments with {sup 100}Mo beams were performed previously. First test runs with {sup 92}Mo showed the possible interference with {sup 98}Mo ions which could be eliminated by using the 13{sup +} charge state from the ECR source. The data from these experiments were completely analyzed. The smallest transfer cross sections are observed for the systems {sup 64}Ni + {sup 100}Mo and {sup 58}Ni + {sup 92}Mo, i.e., the most neutron-rich and neutron-deficient systems, respectively. For the other systems, {sup 64}Ni + {sup 92}Mo and {sup 58}Ni + {sup 100}Mo, the transfer cross sections at energies close to the barrier are about of equal magnitude. This observation does not correlate with the deviation of the experimental fusion cross sections from the coupled-channels predictions. While for {sup 58}Ni + {sup 100}Mo discrepancies between the experimental and theoretical fusion cross sections are observed, the system {sup 64}Ni + {sup 92}Mo which shows about the same transfer yields, is quite well described by the coupled-channels calculations.

  12. Electron Transfer and Reaction Mechanism of Laccases

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen M.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2015-01-01

    Laccases are part of the family of multicopper oxidases (MCOs), which couple the oxidation of substrates to the four electron reduction of O2 to H2O. MCOs contain a minimum of four Cu's divided into Type 1 (T1), Type 2 (T2), and binuclear Type 3 (T3) Cu sites that are distinguished based on unique spectroscopic features. Substrate oxidation occurs near the T1, and electrons are transferred approximately 13 Å through the protein via the Cys-His pathway to the T2/T3 trinuclear copper cluster (TNC) where dioxygen reduction occurs. This review outlines the electron transfer (ET) process in laccases, and the mechanism of O2 reduction as elucidated through spectroscopic, kinetic, and computational data. Marcus theory is used to describe the relevant factors which impact ET rates including the driving force (ΔG°), reorganization energy (λ), and electronic coupling matrix element (HDA). Then the mechanism of O2 reaction is detailed with particular focus on the intermediates formed during the two 2e− reduction steps. The first 2e− step forms the peroxide intermediate (PI), followed by the second 2e− step to form the native intermediate (NI), which has been shown to be the catalytically relevant fully oxidized form of the enzyme. PMID:25572295

  13. Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction Snapshots in Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gerlits, Oksana; Tian, Jianhui; Das, Amit; Langan, Paul; Heller, William T.; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. The present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date. PMID:25925954

  14. A classical but new kinetic equation for hydride transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Deng, Fei-Huang; Yang, Jin-Dong; Li, Xiu-Tao; Chen, Qiang; Lei, Nan-Ping; Meng, Fan-Kun; Zhao, Xiao-Peng; Han, Su-Hui; Hao, Er-Jun; Mu, Yuan-Yuan

    2013-09-28

    A classical but new kinetic equation to estimate activation energies of various hydride transfer reactions was developed according to transition state theory using the Morse-type free energy curves of hydride donors to release a hydride anion and hydride acceptors to capture a hydride anion and by which the activation energies of 187 typical hydride self-exchange reactions and more than thirty thousand hydride cross transfer reactions in acetonitrile were safely estimated in this work. Since the development of the kinetic equation is only on the basis of the related chemical bond changes of the hydride transfer reactants, the kinetic equation should be also suitable for proton transfer reactions, hydrogen atom transfer reactions and all the other chemical reactions involved with breaking and formation of chemical bonds. One of the most important contributions of this work is to have achieved the perfect unity of the kinetic equation and thermodynamic equation for hydride transfer reactions.

  15. [Mechanistic examination of organometallic electron transfer reactions: Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    Our mechanistic examination of electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes has required data from our stopped-flow infrared spectrophotometer that was constructed in the first year. Our research on organometallic electron transfer reaction mechanisms was recognized by an invitation to the Symposium on Organometallic Reaction Mechanisms at the National ACS meeting in Miami. We have obtained a reasonable understanding of the electron transfer reactions between metal cations and anions and between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl dimers. In addition we have begun to obtain data on the outer sphere electron transfer between metal carbonyl anions and coordination complexes and on reactions involving cluster anions.

  16. Transfer-type products accompanying cold fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V.

    2005-12-15

    Production of nuclei heavier than the target is treated for projectile-target combinations used in cold fusion reactions leading to superheavy nuclei. These products are related to transfer-type or to asymmetry-exit-channel quasifission reactions. The production of isotopes in the transfer-type reactions emitting of {alpha} particles with large energies is discussed.

  17. Dispersed Polaron Simulations of Electron Transfer in Photosynthetic Reaction Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warshel, A.; Chu, Z. T.; Parson, W. W.

    1989-10-01

    A microscopic method for simulating quantum mechanical, nuclear tunneling effects in biological electron transfer reactions is presented and applied to several electron transfer steps in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers. In this ``dispersed polaron'' method the fluctuations of the protein and the electron carriers are projected as effective normal modes onto an appropriate reaction coordinate and used to evaluate the quantum mechanical rate constant. The simulations, based on the crystallographic structure of the reaction center from Rhodopseudomonas viridis, focus on electron transfer from a bacteriopheophytin to a quinone and the subsequent back-reaction. The rates of both of these reactions are almost independent of temperature or even increase with decreasing temperature. The simulations reproduce this unusual temperature dependence in a qualitative way, without the use of adjustable parameters for the protein's Franck-Condon factors. The observed dependence of the back-reaction on the free energy of the reaction also is reproduced, including the special behavior in the ``inverted region.''

  18. Biological phosphoryl-transfer reactions: understanding mechanism and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Jonathan K; Zalatan, Jesse G; Herschlag, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Phosphoryl-transfer reactions are central to biology. These reactions also have some of the slowest nonenzymatic rates and thus require enormous rate accelerations from biological catalysts. Despite the central importance of phosphoryl transfer and the fascinating catalytic challenges it presents, substantial confusion persists about the properties of these reactions. This confusion exists despite decades of research on the chemical mechanisms underlying these reactions. Here we review phosphoryl-transfer reactions with the goal of providing the reader with the conceptual and experimental background to understand this body of work, to evaluate new results and proposals, and to apply this understanding to enzymes. We describe likely resolutions to some controversies, while emphasizing the limits of our current approaches and understanding. We apply this understanding to enzyme-catalyzed phosphoryl transfer and provide illustrative examples of how this mechanistic background can guide and deepen our understanding of enzymes and their mechanisms of action. Finally, we present important future challenges for this field. PMID:21513457

  19. Intramolecular hydrogen transfer reaction: menthon from isopulegol.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Thomas; Rüdenauer, Stefan; Weis, Martine

    2014-05-16

    The flavor menthon (isomeric mixture of (-)-menthon and (+)-isomenthon) was obtained in good yields and selectivities by a solventless ruthenium catalyzed isomerization of the homoallylic alcohol (-)-isopulegol. In contrast to most previous assumptions on such "isomerization" reactions, this reaction follows an intermolecular pathway, with menthol and pulegon being the central intermediates in this transformation. PMID:24779450

  20. KOtBu: A Privileged Reagent for Electron Transfer Reactions?

    PubMed

    Barham, Joshua P; Coulthard, Graeme; Emery, Katie J; Doni, Eswararao; Cumine, Florimond; Nocera, Giuseppe; John, Matthew P; Berlouis, Leonard E A; McGuire, Thomas; Tuttle, Tell; Murphy, John A

    2016-06-15

    Many recent studies have used KOtBu in organic reactions that involve single electron transfer; in the literature, the electron transfer is proposed to occur either directly from the metal alkoxide or indirectly, following reaction of the alkoxide with a solvent or additive. These reaction classes include coupling reactions of halobenzenes and arenes, reductive cleavages of dithianes, and SRN1 reactions. Direct electron transfer would imply that alkali metal alkoxides are willing partners in these electron transfer reactions, but the literature reports provide little or no experimental evidence for this. This paper examines each of these classes of reaction in turn, and contests the roles proposed for KOtBu; instead, it provides new mechanistic information that in each case supports the in situ formation of organic electron donors. We go on to show that direct electron transfer from KOtBu can however occur in appropriate cases, where the electron acceptor has a reduction potential near the oxidation potential of KOtBu, and the example that we use is CBr4. In this case, computational results support electrochemical data in backing a direct electron transfer reaction. PMID:27183183

  1. Probing cluster structures through sub-barrier transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafferty, D. C.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Williams, E.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Luong, D. H.; McNeil, S. D.; Ramachandran, K.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Wakhle, A.

    2016-09-01

    Multinucleon transfer probabilities and excitation energy distributions have been measured in 16,18O, 19F + 208Pb at energies between 90% - 100% of the Coulomb barrier. A strong 2p2n enhancement is observed for all reactions, though most spectacularly in the 18O induced reaction. Results are interpreted in terms of the Semiclassical model, which seems to suggest α-cluster transfer in all studied systems. The relation to cluster-states in the projectile is discussed, with the experimental results consistent with previous structure studies. Dissipation of energy in the collisions of 18O is compared between different reaction modes, with cluster transfer associated with dissipation over a large number of internal states. Cluster transfer is shown to be a long range dissipation mechanism, which will inform the development of future models to treat these dynamic processes in reactions.

  2. Electron transfer, proton transfer and photoaddition reactions in isolated clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Elliot R.

    1993-02-01

    This report contains the abstracts of the published and to be published papers from this work. They include studies of the structure of nonrigid molecules, the formation of clusters and dimers, liquid cluster structure, chemical reaction studies, and studies of cluster dynamics.

  3. Study of transfer and breakup reactions with the plastic box

    SciTech Connect

    Stokstad, R.G.; Albiston, C.R.; Bantel, M.; Chan, Y.; Countryman, P.J.; Gazes, S.; Harvey, B.G.; Homeyer, H.; Murphy, M.J.; Tserruya, I.

    1984-12-01

    The study of transfer reactions with heavy-ion projectiles is complicated by the frequent presence of three or more nuclei in the final state. One prolific source of three-body reactions is the production of a primary ejectile in an excited state above a particle threshold. A subset of transfer reactions, viz., those producing ejectiles in bound states, can be identified experimentally. This has been accomplished with a 4..pi.. detector constructed of one-millimeter-thick scintillator paddles of dimension 20 cm x 20 cm. The paddles are arranged in the form of a cube centered around the target with small entrance and exit apertures for the beam and the projectile-like fragments, (PLF). The detection of a light particle (e.g., a proton or an alpha particle) in coincidence with a PLF indicates a breakup reaction. The absence of any such coincidence indicates a reaction in which all the charge lost by the projectile was transferred to the target. With this technique we have studied the transfer and breakup reactions induced by 220 and 341 MeV /sup 20/Ne ions on a gold target. Ejectiles from Li to Ne have been measured at several scattering angles. The absolute cross sections, angular distributions and energy spectra for the transfer and breakup reactions are presented. Relatively large cross sections are observed for the complete transfer of up to seven units of charge (i.e., a nitrogen nucleus). The relatively large probabilities for ejectiles to be produced in particle-bound states suggest that on the average, most of the excitation energy in a collision resides in the heavy fragment when mass is transferred from the lighter to the heavier fragment. The gross features and trends in the energy spectra for transfer and breakup reactions are similar. 20 references.

  4. Amine, Alcohol and Phosphine Catalysts for Acyl Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivey, Alan C.; Arseniyadis, Stellios

    An overview of the area of organocatalytic asymmetric acyl transfer processes is presented including O- and N-acylation. The material has been ordered according to the structural class of catalyst employed rather than reaction type with the intention to draw mechanistic parallels between the manner in which the various reactions are accelerated by the catalysts and the concepts employed to control transfer of chiral information from the catalyst to the substrates.

  5. Coherent and semi-coherent neutron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Neutron transfer reactions are proposed to account for anomalies reported in Pons-Fleischmann experiments. The prototypical reaction involves the transfer of a neutron (mediated by low frequency electric or magnetic fields) from a donor nucleus to virtual continuum states, followed by the capture of the virtual neutron by an acceptor nucleus. In this work we summarize basic principles, recent results and the ultimate goals of the theoretical effort.

  6. Coherent and semi-coherent neutron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1992-12-31

    Neutron transfer reactions are proposed to account for anomalies reported in Pons-Fleischmann experiments. The prototypical reaction involves the transfer of a neutron (mediated by low frequency electric or magnetic fields) from a donor nucleus to virtual continuum states, followed by the capture of the virtual neutron by an acceptor nucleus. In this work we summarize basic principles, recent results and the ultimate goals of the theoretical effort.

  7. Dynamic salt effect on intramolecular charge-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jianjun; Ma Rong; Lu Yan; Stell, George

    2005-12-08

    The dynamic salt effect in charge-transfer reactions is investigated theoretically in this paper. Free-energy surfaces are derived based on a nonequilibrium free-energy functional. Reaction coordinates are clearly defined. The solution of the reaction-diffusion equation leads to a rate constant depending on the time correlation function of the reaction coordinates. The time correlation function of the ion-atmosphere coordinate is derived from the solution of the Debye-Falkenhagen equation. It is shown that the dynamic salt effect plays an important role in controlling the rate of charge-transfer reactions in the narrow-window limit but is balanced by the energetics and the dynamics of the polar-solvent coordinate. The simplest version of the theory is compared with an experiment, and the agreement is fairly good. The theory can also be extended to charge-transfer in the class of electrolytes that has come to be called 'ionic fluids'.

  8. Visualized kinematics code for two-body nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. J.; Chae, K. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The one or few nucleon transfer reaction has been a great tool for investigating the single-particle properties of a nucleus. Both stable and exotic beams are utilized to study transfer reactions in normal and inverse kinematics, respectively. Because many energy levels of the heavy recoil from the two-body nuclear reaction can be populated by using a single beam energy, identifying each populated state, which is not often trivial owing to high level-density of the nucleus, is essential. For identification of the energy levels, a visualized kinematics code called VISKIN has been developed by utilizing the Java programming language. The development procedure, usage, and application of the VISKIN is reported.

  9. Quasi-Elastic Transfer Reactions in SULFUR-32 + MOLYBDENUM-92,98,100 and NIOBIUM-93 Systems at Energies Near the Coulomb Barrier.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Junjien Felix

    Angular distributions of the few-nucleon transfer reactions in ^{32}S + ^{92,98,100}Mo and ^{93}Nb were measured at laboratory energies of 109, 116, and 125 MeV. Beams of ^ {32}S were accelerated by the Stony Brook tandem-linac accelerator. The charge of the projectile -like transfer products was identified by E - Delta E gas telescopes. The mass identification was achieved by measuring the energy and time-of-flight, using Si surface barrier detectors, where the linac RF signals provided master time references. The timing width of the beam was between 150 and 200 ps. Up to three nucleons pickup and four nucleons stripping were observed. The pickup channels are primarily neutron pickup and the stripping channels are dominated by proton stripping which agrees with the Q-matching condition predictions. The elastic scattering data were fitted by the optical model to obtain optical model potential parameters. The transfer angular distributions are bell-shaped. The peak of the angular distribution shifts toward 180 ^circ, in the center-of-mass frame, as energies approach the Coulomb barrier. Distorted-wave Born approximation calculations were performed to compare with the one- and two-nucleon transfer data. Good agreement was seen, particularly at energies below the barrier. The one-nucleon transfer cross sections are among 60 to 70% of the total transfer cross sections. The sum of the total transfer and fusion cross sections made up the total reaction cross sections. Large transfer cross sections were measured in ^{98,100 }Mo and ^{93}Nb targets while small transfer cross sections were measured in ^{92}Mo target, particularly at energies near the barrier. This is consistent with the large sub-barrier fusion enhancement observed in ^{32}S + ^{98,100 }Mo, ^{93}Nb but no enhancement in ^{32}S + ^{92}Mo. The transfer probability for one- and two-nucleon transfer was compared with the DWBA predictions at large reaction distances, d_0 >= 1.6 fm. The transfer probability for

  10. Production of 199Ir via Exotic Nucleon Transfer Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kui; J, S. Lilley; P, V. Drumm; D, D. Warner; R, A. Cunningham; J, N. Mo

    1993-05-01

    A new nucleus 199Ir has been produced using the exotic transfer reaction 198Pt(18O, 17F)199Ir at 140 MeV. The mass of 199Ir has been measured by the determination of the reaction Q value. Its mass excess is -24.424 ± 0.034 MeV.

  11. Vibrational control of electron-transfer reactions: a feasibility study for the fast coherent transfer regime.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, P; Ma, Z; Zhang, P; Beratan, D N; Skourtis, S S

    2015-12-14

    Molecular vibrations and electron-vibrational interactions are central to the control of biomolecular electron and energy-transfer rates. The vibrational control of molecular electron-transfer reactions by infrared pulses may enable the precise probing of electronic-vibrational interactions and of their roles in determining electron-transfer mechanisms. This type of electron-transfer rate control is advantageous because it does not alter the electronic state of the molecular electron-transfer system or irreversibly change its molecular structure. For bridge-mediated electron-transfer reactions, infrared (vibrational) excitation of the bridge linking the electron donor to the electron acceptor was suggested as being capable of influencing the electron-transfer rate by modulating the bridge-mediated donor-to-acceptor electronic coupling. This kind of electron-transfer experiment has been realized, demonstrating that bridge-mediated electron-transfer rates can be changed by exciting vibrational modes of the bridge. Here, we use simple models and ab initio computations to explore the physical constraints on one's ability to vibrationally perturb electron-transfer rates using infrared excitation. These constraints stem from the nature of molecular vibrational spectra, the strengths of the electron-vibrational coupling, and the interaction between molecular vibrations and infrared radiation. With these constraints in mind, we suggest parameter regimes and molecular architectures that may enhance the vibrational control of electron transfer for fast coherent electron-transfer reactions.

  12. Two-neutron transfer reactions with heavy-deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.; Landowne, S.; Esbensen, H.

    1988-01-01

    In a recent communication we pointed out that one can combine the macroscopic model for two-particle transfer reactions on deformed nuclei with the sudden limit approximation for rotational excitation, and thereby obtain a practical method for calculating transfer reactions leading to high-spin states. As an example, we presented results for the reaction WSDy(VYNi,WNi) WDy populating the ground-state rotational band up to the spin I = 14 state. We have also tested the validity of the sudden limit for the inelastic excitation of high spin states and we have noted how the macroscopic model may be modified to allow for more microscopic nuclear structure effects in an application to diabolic pair-transfer processes. This paper describes our subsequent work in which we investigated the systematic features of pair-transfer reactions within the macroscopic model by using heavier projectiles to generate higher spins and by decomposing the cross sections according to the multipolarity of the transfer interaction. Particular attention is paid to characteristic structures in the angular distributions for the lower spin states and how they depend on the angular momentum carried by the transferred particles. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Path Sampling Methods for Enzymatic Quantum Particle Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Dzierlenga, M W; Varga, M J; Schwartz, S D

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are studied via a host of computational techniques. While previous methods have been used successfully, many fail to incorporate the full dynamical properties of enzymatic systems. This can lead to misleading results in cases where enzyme motion plays a significant role in the reaction coordinate, which is especially relevant in particle transfer reactions where nuclear tunneling may occur. In this chapter, we outline previous methods, as well as discuss newly developed dynamical methods to interrogate mechanisms of enzymatic particle transfer reactions. These new methods allow for the calculation of free energy barriers and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with the incorporation of quantum effects through centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and the full complement of enzyme dynamics through transition path sampling (TPS). Recent work, summarized in this chapter, applied the method for calculation of free energy barriers to reaction in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). We found that tunneling plays an insignificant role in YADH but plays a more significant role in LDH, though not dominant over classical transfer. Additionally, we summarize the application of a TPS algorithm for the calculation of reaction rates in tandem with CMD to calculate the primary H/D KIE of YADH from first principles. We found that the computationally obtained KIE is within the margin of error of experimentally determined KIEs and corresponds to the KIE of particle transfer in the enzyme. These methods provide new ways to investigate enzyme mechanism with the inclusion of protein and quantum dynamics.

  14. Path Sampling Methods for Enzymatic Quantum Particle Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Dzierlenga, M W; Varga, M J; Schwartz, S D

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are studied via a host of computational techniques. While previous methods have been used successfully, many fail to incorporate the full dynamical properties of enzymatic systems. This can lead to misleading results in cases where enzyme motion plays a significant role in the reaction coordinate, which is especially relevant in particle transfer reactions where nuclear tunneling may occur. In this chapter, we outline previous methods, as well as discuss newly developed dynamical methods to interrogate mechanisms of enzymatic particle transfer reactions. These new methods allow for the calculation of free energy barriers and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with the incorporation of quantum effects through centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and the full complement of enzyme dynamics through transition path sampling (TPS). Recent work, summarized in this chapter, applied the method for calculation of free energy barriers to reaction in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). We found that tunneling plays an insignificant role in YADH but plays a more significant role in LDH, though not dominant over classical transfer. Additionally, we summarize the application of a TPS algorithm for the calculation of reaction rates in tandem with CMD to calculate the primary H/D KIE of YADH from first principles. We found that the computationally obtained KIE is within the margin of error of experimentally determined KIEs and corresponds to the KIE of particle transfer in the enzyme. These methods provide new ways to investigate enzyme mechanism with the inclusion of protein and quantum dynamics. PMID:27497161

  15. Heat transfer to a supercritical hydrocarbon fuel with endothermic reaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Wambsganss, M. W.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2000-01-01

    Supercritical fuel reforming is being studied as a technology for reducing emissions of industrial gas turbine engines. In this study, experiments were performed in a 2.67-mm-inside-diameter stainless steel tube with a heated length of 0.610 m for the purpose of investigating the characteristics of supercritical heat transfer with endothermic fuel reforming. Thermocouples were positioned along the tube both in the fluid stream and on the heated wall for local heat transfer measurements. Both heat transfer coefficients and endotherms were calculated from the measured results. State-of-the-art correlations for heat transfer were evaluated, and a correlation for supercritical heat transfer to hydrocarbon fuel has been developed. The results provide a basis for supercritical fuel heat-exchanger/reactor design and its practical applications, in an area that has received relatively little attention in the engineering literature, viz., supercritical forced convection heat transfer with endothermic chemical reaction.

  16. Femtochemistry of Intramolecular Charge and Proton Transfer Reactions in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Douhal, Abderrazzak; Sanz, Mikel; Carranza, Maria Angeles; Organero, Juan Angel; Tormo, Laura

    2005-03-17

    We report on the first observation of ultrafast intramolecular charge- and proton-transfer reactions in 4'-dimethylaminoflavonol (DAMF) in solution. Upon femtosecond excitation of a non-planar structure of DMAF in apolar medium, the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) does not occur, and a slow (2 ps) proton motion takes place. However, in polar solvents, the ICT is very fast (100-200 fs) and the produced structure is stabilized that proton motion takes place in few or tens of ps.

  17. The effective molarity (EM) puzzle in proton transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Rafik

    2009-08-01

    The DFT and HF calculation results for the proton transfer reactions of three different systems reveal that the reaction mechanism (transfer of a proton to a nucleophile) is largely determined by the distance between the two reactive centers (r). Systems with relatively large r values tend to abstract a proton from a molecule of water, whereas, these with a relatively small r values prefer to be engaged intramolecularly and their interaction with water is only via hydrogen bonding. Further, the results indicate that the effective molarity (logEM) for an intramolecular process is strongly correlated with the distance between the two reacting centers (r) in accordance with Menger's "spatiotemporal hypothesis".

  18. Intrinsic barriers for H-atom transfer reactions involving hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, D.M.; Autrey, S.T.; Franz, J.A.

    1994-08-01

    Intrinsic barriers (formally the barrier in the absence of driving force) for H-atom transfer reactions are key parameters in Evans-Polyanyi and Marcus equations for estimating exothermic reaction barriers and are fundamentally significant for the insight they provide about bond reorganization energies for formation of transition state structures. Although knowable from experiment, relatively few of these barriers have been measured due to experimental difficulties in measuring rates for identity reactions. Thus, the authors have used semiempirical Molecular Orbital theoretical methods (MNDO/PM3) to calculate barriers for a series of H-atom transfer identity reactions involving alkyl, alkenyl, arylalkyl and hydroaryl radicals and donors. Briefly stated, they find that barriers decrease with the degree of alkyl substitution at the radical site whereas barriers increase with the degree of conjugation with the radical site. Details of the methodology and analyses of how these barrier heights correlate with reactant and transition state properties will be presented and discussed.

  19. Disulfide bond cleavage: a redox reaction without electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Florian; Frank, Irmgard

    2010-05-01

    By using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations we have simulated a mechanically induced redox reaction. Previous single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrated that the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins with the weak reducing agent dithiothreitol depends on a mechanical destabilization of the breaking bond. With reactive molecular dynamics simulations the single steps of the reaction mechanism can be elucidated and the motion of the electrons can be monitored. The simulations show that the redox reaction consists of the heterolytic cleavage of the S--S bond followed by a sequence of proton transfers. PMID:20349464

  20. Saponification reaction system: a detailed mass transfer coefficient determination.

    PubMed

    Pečar, Darja; Goršek, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The saponification of an aromatic ester with an aqueous sodium hydroxide was studied within a heterogeneous reaction medium in order to determine the overall kinetics of the selected system. The extended thermo-kinetic model was developed compared to the previously used simple one. The reaction rate within a heterogeneous liquid-liquid system incorporates a chemical kinetics term as well as mass transfer between both phases. Chemical rate constant was obtained from experiments within a homogeneous medium, whilst the mass-transfer coefficient was determined separately. The measured thermal profiles were then the bases for determining the overall reaction-rate. This study presents the development of an extended kinetic model for considering mass transfer regarding the saponification of ethyl benzoate with sodium hydroxide within a heterogeneous reaction medium. The time-dependences are presented for the mass transfer coefficient and the interfacial areas at different heterogeneous stages and temperatures. The results indicated an important role of reliable kinetic model, as significant difference in k(L)a product was obtained with extended and simple approach.

  1. Magnetic resonance studies of photo-induced electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    van Willigen, H.

    1990-12-01

    During the period covered by this report research has been concerned with the application of Fourier Transform Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (FT EPR) in the study of photo-induced electron transfer reactions. Donor molecules used in this investigation have been various porphyrins, whereas quinones were used as acceptor molecules.

  2. Mechanisms for control of biological electron transfer reactions

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Heather R.; Dow, Brian A.; Davidson, Victor L.

    2014-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) through and between proteins is a fundamental biological process. The rates and mechanisms of these ET reactions are controlled by the proteins in which the redox centers that donate and accept electrons reside. The protein influences the magnitudes of the ET parameters, the electronic coupling and reorganization energy that are associated with the ET reaction. The protein can regulate the rates of the ET reaction by requiring reaction steps to optimize the system for ET, leading to kinetic mechanisms of gated or coupled ET. Amino acid residues in the segment of the protein through which long range ET occurs can also modulate the ET rate by serving as staging points for hopping mechanisms of ET. Specific examples are presented to illustrate these mechanisms by which proteins control rates of ET reactions. PMID:25085775

  3. Primary reactions in photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides - Time constants of the initial electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Pablo Nahuel; Himmelstoss, Matthias; Michelmann, Jeff; Lehner, Florian Thomas; Gardiner, Alastair T.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    The primary dynamics of reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides at room temperature are studied at low excitation intensities and low excitation rates. Analysis based on singular value decomposition yields three time constants in the picosecond range (ca. 1.2 ps, 3.5 ps and 220 ps). The spectral and temporal signatures are fully consistent with the step-wise electron transfer model published previously, with a first electron transfer to the bacteriochlorophyll with a time constant of 3.5 ps and a second 1.2 ps transfer to the bacteriopheophytin. No indications for adiabatic electron transfer are found in the time range >0.5 ps.

  4. Role of Double Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions in Atmospheric Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Sinha, Amitabha; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-05-17

    Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions are ubiquitous and play a crucial role in chemistries occurring in the atmosphere, biology, and industry. In the atmosphere, the most common and traditional HAT reaction is that associated with the OH radical abstracting a hydrogen atom from the plethora of organic molecules in the troposphere via R-H + OH → R + H2O. This reaction motif involves a single hydrogen transfer. More recently, in the literature, there is an emerging framework for a new class of HAT reactions that involves double hydrogen transfers. These reactions are broadly classified into four categories: (i) addition, (ii) elimination, (iii) substitution, and (iv) rearrangement. Hydration and dehydration are classic examples of addition and elimination reactions, respectively whereas tautomerization or isomerization belongs to a class of rearrangement reactions. Atmospheric acids and water typically mediate these reactions. Organic and inorganic acids are present in appreciable levels in the atmosphere and are capable of facilitating two-point hydrogen bonding interactions with oxygenates possessing an hydroxyl and/or carbonyl-type functionality. As a result, acids influence the reactivity of oxygenates and, thus, the energetics and kinetics of their HAT-based chemistries. The steric and electronic effects of acids play an important role in determining the efficacy of acid catalysis. Acids that reduce the steric strain of 1:1 substrate···acid complex are generally better catalysts. Among a family of monocarboxylic acids, the electronic effects become important; barrier to the catalyzed reaction correlates strongly with the pKa of the acid. Under acid catalysis, the hydration of carbonyl compounds leads to the barrierless formation of diols, which can serve as seed particles for atmospheric aerosol growth. The hydration of sulfur trioxide, which is the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfuric acid formation, also becomes barrierless under acid catalysis

  5. Role of Double Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions in Atmospheric Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Sinha, Amitabha; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-05-17

    Hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions are ubiquitous and play a crucial role in chemistries occurring in the atmosphere, biology, and industry. In the atmosphere, the most common and traditional HAT reaction is that associated with the OH radical abstracting a hydrogen atom from the plethora of organic molecules in the troposphere via R-H + OH → R + H2O. This reaction motif involves a single hydrogen transfer. More recently, in the literature, there is an emerging framework for a new class of HAT reactions that involves double hydrogen transfers. These reactions are broadly classified into four categories: (i) addition, (ii) elimination, (iii) substitution, and (iv) rearrangement. Hydration and dehydration are classic examples of addition and elimination reactions, respectively whereas tautomerization or isomerization belongs to a class of rearrangement reactions. Atmospheric acids and water typically mediate these reactions. Organic and inorganic acids are present in appreciable levels in the atmosphere and are capable of facilitating two-point hydrogen bonding interactions with oxygenates possessing an hydroxyl and/or carbonyl-type functionality. As a result, acids influence the reactivity of oxygenates and, thus, the energetics and kinetics of their HAT-based chemistries. The steric and electronic effects of acids play an important role in determining the efficacy of acid catalysis. Acids that reduce the steric strain of 1:1 substrate···acid complex are generally better catalysts. Among a family of monocarboxylic acids, the electronic effects become important; barrier to the catalyzed reaction correlates strongly with the pKa of the acid. Under acid catalysis, the hydration of carbonyl compounds leads to the barrierless formation of diols, which can serve as seed particles for atmospheric aerosol growth. The hydration of sulfur trioxide, which is the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfuric acid formation, also becomes barrierless under acid catalysis

  6. Enzymatic Catalysis of Proton Transfer and Decarboxylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Richard, John P

    2011-07-01

    Deprotonation of carbon and decarboxylation at enzyme active sites proceed through the same carbanion intermediates as for the uncatalyzed reactions in water. The mechanism for the enzymatic reactions can be studied at the same level of detail as for nonenzymatic reactions, using the mechanistic tools developed by physical organic chemists. Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) catalyzed interconversion of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate is being studied as a prototype for enzyme catalyzed proton transfer, and orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) catalyzed decarboxylation of orotidine 5'-monophosphate is being studied as a prototype for enzyme-catalyzed decarboxylation. (1)H NMR spectroscopy is an excellent analytical method to monitor proton transfer to and from carbon catalyzed by these enzymes in D2O. Studies of these partial enzyme-catalyzed exchange reactions provide novel insight into the stability of carbanion reaction intermediates, that is not accessible in studies of the full enzymatic reaction. The importance of flexible enzyme loops and the contribution of interactions between these loops and the substrate phosphodianion to the enzymatic rate acceleration are discussed. The similarity in the interactions of OMPDC and TIM with the phosphodianion of bound substrate is emphasized.

  7. Multi-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies.

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K. E.

    1998-01-20

    The optimum conditions for multi-neutron transfer have been studied in the system {sup 58}Ni + {sup 124}Sn at bombarding energies at and below the Coulomb barrier. The experiments were performed in inverse kinematics with a {sup 124}Sn beam bombarding a {sup 58}Ni target. The particles were identified with respect to mass and Z in the split-pole spectrograph with a hybrid focal plane detector with mass and Z-resolutions of A/{Delta}A = 150 and Z/{Delta}Z = 70. At all energies the transfer of up to 6 neutrons was observed. The yields for these transfer reactions are found to decrease by about a factor of four for each transferred neutron.

  8. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions with Photometric Bases Reveal Free Energy Relationships for Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Thomas T; Howland, William C; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2016-08-18

    The proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) oxidation of p-aminophenol in acetonitrile was initiated via stopped-flow rapid-mixing and spectroscopically monitored. For oxidation by ferrocenium in the presence of 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline proton acceptors, both the electron transfer and proton transfer components could be optically monitored in the visible region; the decay of the ferrocenium absorbance is readily monitored (λmax = 620 nm), and the absorbance of the 2,4-substituted 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives (λmax = 370-392 nm) red-shifts substantially (ca. 70 nm) upon protonation. Spectral analysis revealed the reaction proceeds via a stepwise electron transfer-proton transfer process, and modeling of the kinetics traces monitoring the ferrocenium and quinolinium signals provided rate constants for elementary proton and electron transfer steps. As the pKa values of the conjugate acids of the 2,4-R-7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives employed were readily tuned by varying the substituents at the 2- and 4-positions of the quinoline backbone, the driving force for proton transfer was systematically varied. Proton transfer rate constants (kPT,2 = (1.5-7.5) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), kPT,4 = (0.55-3.0) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) were found to correlate with the pKa of the conjugate acid of the proton acceptor, in agreement with anticipated free energy relationships for proton transfer processes in PCET reactions. PMID:27500804

  9. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions with Photometric Bases Reveal Free Energy Relationships for Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Thomas T; Howland, William C; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2016-08-18

    The proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) oxidation of p-aminophenol in acetonitrile was initiated via stopped-flow rapid-mixing and spectroscopically monitored. For oxidation by ferrocenium in the presence of 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline proton acceptors, both the electron transfer and proton transfer components could be optically monitored in the visible region; the decay of the ferrocenium absorbance is readily monitored (λmax = 620 nm), and the absorbance of the 2,4-substituted 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives (λmax = 370-392 nm) red-shifts substantially (ca. 70 nm) upon protonation. Spectral analysis revealed the reaction proceeds via a stepwise electron transfer-proton transfer process, and modeling of the kinetics traces monitoring the ferrocenium and quinolinium signals provided rate constants for elementary proton and electron transfer steps. As the pKa values of the conjugate acids of the 2,4-R-7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives employed were readily tuned by varying the substituents at the 2- and 4-positions of the quinoline backbone, the driving force for proton transfer was systematically varied. Proton transfer rate constants (kPT,2 = (1.5-7.5) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), kPT,4 = (0.55-3.0) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) were found to correlate with the pKa of the conjugate acid of the proton acceptor, in agreement with anticipated free energy relationships for proton transfer processes in PCET reactions.

  10. Study of multi-nucleon transfer reactions with light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Benzoni, G.; Montanari, D.; Bracco, A.; Blasi, N.; Camera, F.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Corsi, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Nicolini, R.; Wieland, O.; Zalite, A.; Zocca, F.; Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Stefan, I.; Ibrahim, F.; Verney, D.; Battacharyya, S.; De France, G.

    2008-05-12

    Multi-nucleon transfer reactions are useful tools to populate exotic nuclei, particularly the neutron-rich ones. In this view, two different experiments have been performed employing a stable ({sup 22}Ne) and a radioactive ({sup 24}Ne) beam, both impinging on a {sup 208}Pb target. The first reaction has been studied using the CLARA-PRISMA-DANTE set-up at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Legnaro-Italy), while the second reaction was performed at Ganil (Caen-France) employing a SPIRAL radioactive beam of {sup 24}Ne. In this case recoils and coincident {gamma} rays were detected with the VAMOS-EXOGAM set-up.The data show that MNT reactions can selectively populate states of different nature and, therefore, are a good tool to study nuclear structure further away from stability.

  11. Mass transfer model for two-layer TBP oxidation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1994-09-28

    To prove that two-layer, TBP-nitric acid mixtures can be safely stored in the canyon evaporators, it must be demonstrated that a runaway reaction between TBP and nitric acid will not occur. Previous bench-scale experiments showed that, at typical evaporator temperatures, this reaction is endothermic and therefore cannot run away, due to the loss of heat from evaporation of water in the organic layer. However, the reaction would be exothermic and could run away if the small amount of water in the organic layer evaporates before the nitric acid in this layer is consumed by the reaction. Provided that there is enough water in the aqueous layer, this would occur if the organic layer is sufficiently thick so that the rate of loss of water by evaporation exceeds the rate of replenishment due to mixing with the aqueous layer. This report presents measurements of mass transfer rates for the mixing of water and butanol in two-layer, TBP-aqueous mixtures, where the top layer is primarily TBP and the bottom layer is comprised of water or aqueous salt solution. Mass transfer coefficients are derived for use in the modeling of two-layer TBP-nitric acid oxidation experiments. Three cases were investigated: (1) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of both the aqueous and TBP layers, (2) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of just the TBP layer, and (3) transfer of butanol into the aqueous layer with sparging of both layers. The TBP layer was comprised of 99% pure TBP (spiked with butanol for the butanol transfer experiments), and the aqueous layer was comprised of either water or an aluminum nitrate solution. The liquid layers were air sparged to simulate the mixing due to the evolution of gases generated by oxidation reactions. A plastic tube and a glass frit sparger were used to provide different size bubbles. Rates of mass transfer were measured using infrared spectrophotometers provided by SRTC/Analytical Development.

  12. Molecular modeling of the reaction pathway and hydride transfer reactions of HMG-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Haines, Brandon E; Steussy, C Nicklaus; Stauffacher, Cynthia V; Wiest, Olaf

    2012-10-01

    HMG-CoA reductase catalyzes the four-electron reduction of HMG-CoA to mevalonate and is an enzyme of considerable biomedical relevance because of the impact of its statin inhibitors on public health. Although the reaction has been studied extensively using X-ray crystallography, there are surprisingly no computational studies that test the mechanistic hypotheses suggested for this complex reaction. Theozyme and quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) calculations up to the B3LYP/6-31g(d,p)//B3LYP/6-311++g(2d,2p) level of theory were employed to generate an atomistic description of the enzymatic reaction process and its energy profile. The models generated here predict that the catalytically important Glu83 is protonated prior to hydride transfer and that it acts as the general acid or base in the reaction. With Glu83 protonated, the activation energies calculated for the sequential hydride transfer reactions, 21.8 and 19.3 kcal/mol, are in qualitative agreement with the experimentally determined rate constant for the entire reaction (1 s(-1) to 1 min(-1)). When Glu83 is not protonated, the first hydride transfer reaction is predicted to be disfavored by >20 kcal/mol, and the activation energy is predicted to be higher by >10 kcal/mol. While not involved in the reaction as an acid or base, Lys267 is critical for stabilization of the transition state in forming an oxyanion hole with the protonated Glu83. Molecular dynamics simulations and MM/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area free energy calculations predict that the enzyme active site stabilizes the hemithioacetal intermediate better than the aldehyde intermediate. This suggests a mechanism in which cofactor exchange occurs before the breakdown of the hemithioacetal. Slowing the conversion to aldehyde would provide the enzyme with a mechanism to protect it from solvent and explain why the free aldehyde is not observed experimentally. Our results support the hypothesis that the pK(a) of an active site acidic

  13. Test of Sum Rules in Nucleon Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffer, J. P.; Hoffman, C. R.; Kay, B. P.; Clark, J. A.; Deibel, C. M.; Freeman, S. J.; Howard, A. M.; Mitchell, A. J.; Parker, P. D.; Sharp, D. K.; Thomas, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    The quantitative consistency of nucleon transfer reactions as a probe of the occupancy of valence orbits in nuclei is tested. Neutron-adding, neutron-removal, and proton-adding transfer reactions were measured on the four stable even Ni isotopes, with particular attention to the cross section determinations. The data were analyzed consistently in terms of the distorted wave Born approximation to yield spectroscopic factors. Valence-orbit occupancies were extracted, utilizing the Macfarlane-French sum rules. The deduced occupancies are consistent with the changing number of valence neutrons, as are the vacancies for protons, both at the level of <5%. While there has been some debate regarding the true “observability” of spectroscopic factors, the present results indicate that empirically they yield self-consistent results.

  14. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Wang, Jianji; Stell, George

    2006-10-01

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying the solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact.

  15. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-12-21

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two {pi}-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5{sup '}-GG-3{sup '} and 5{sup '}-GT-3{sup '}. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  16. Calculation of deuterium isotope effects in proton transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiner, Steve

    1994-05-01

    Various levels of theory are tested for the purpose of computing the rate constant for proton transfer reactions. Standard transition state theory is applied to a series of molecules with a progressively more bent intramolecular hydrogen bond. The systems all display similar deuterium isotope effects (DIEs); the larger DIE at low temperature is attributed to zero-point vibrational effects. However, when tunneling is incorporated via a microcanonical approach, a dramatically enhanced effect is observed for the most distorted H-bond. The energy barrier for proton transfer between carbon atoms involved in triple bonds is smaller than for carbons with lesser multiplicity. The DIE displays a sensitivity to temperature that is least for the carbon atoms with the greatest multiplicity of bonding. The tunneling obtained by following the minimum energy reaction path along the potential energy surface is similar to that when the potential is approximated by an Eckart barrier. However, significant discrepancies are observed at temperatures below about 250 K.

  17. Fission of actinide nuclei using multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léguillon, Romain; Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Orlandi, Riccardo; Makii, Hiroyuki; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Ishii, Tetsuro; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Chiba, Satoshi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Araki, Shohei; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Tatsuzawa, Ryotaro; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2014-09-01

    We are promoting a campaign to measure fission-fragment mass distributions for neutron-rich actinide nuclei populated by transfer reactions from their ground state up to an excitation energy of several tens MeV. We thus obtain the excitation energy dependence of the mass distribution. The experiment was carried out at the 20 MV JAEA tandem facility at Tokai. We report on the data obtained in the direct reaction 18 O + 232 Th . Transfer-channels and excitation energies of the fissioning nuclei were identified using silicon dE-E detectors located at forward angle. Two fission fragments were detected in coincidence using multi-wire proportional counters. Fission fragment masses were determined by kinematic consideration. We obtained the fission fragment mass distributions for 13 nuclei from actinium to uranium and some fission barrier heights. We are promoting a campaign to measure fission-fragment mass distributions for neutron-rich actinide nuclei populated by transfer reactions from their ground state up to an excitation energy of several tens MeV. We thus obtain the excitation energy dependence of the mass distribution. The experiment was carried out at the 20 MV JAEA tandem facility at Tokai. We report on the data obtained in the direct reaction 18 O + 232 Th . Transfer-channels and excitation energies of the fissioning nuclei were identified using silicon dE-E detectors located at forward angle. Two fission fragments were detected in coincidence using multi-wire proportional counters. Fission fragment masses were determined by kinematic consideration. We obtained the fission fragment mass distributions for 13 nuclei from actinium to uranium and some fission barrier heights. Present study is supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  18. Momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    Relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions yield fragments (Delta-Z = + 1) whose longitudinal momentum distributions are downshifted by larger values than those associated with the remaining fragments (Delta-Z = 1, -2,...). Kinematics alone cannot account for the observed downshifts; therefore, an additional contribution from collision dynamics must be included. In this work, an optical model description of collision momentum transfer is used to estimate the additional dynamical momentum downshift. Good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental data is obtained.

  19. Shell effects in fission, quasifission and multinucleon transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozulin, E. M.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Itkis, I. M.; Kozulina, N. I.; Loktev, T. A.; Novikov, K. V.; Harca, I.

    2014-05-01

    Results of the study of mass-energy distributions of binary fragments for a wide range of nuclei with Z= 82-122 produced in reactions of ions located between 22Ne and 136Xe at energies close and below the Coulomb barrier are reported. The role of the shell effects, the influence of the entrance channel asymmetry and the deformations of colliding nuclei on the mechanism of the fusion-fission, quasifission and multinucleon transfer reactions are discussed. The observed peculiarities of the mass and energy distributions of reaction fragments are determined by the shell structure of the formed fragments. Special attention is paid on the symmetric fragment features in order to clarify the origin of these fragments (fission or quasifission). The influence of shell effects on the fragment yield in quasifission and multinucleon transfer reactions is considered. It is noted that the major part of the asymmetric quasifission fragments peaks around the region of the Z=82 and N=126 (double magic lead) and Z=28 and N=50 shells; moreover the maximum of the yield of the quasifission component is a mixing between all these shells. Hence, shell effects are everywhere present and determine the basic characteristics of fragment mass distributions.

  20. Light and heavy transfer products in 136Xe+238U multinucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, A.; Birkenbach, B.; Reiter, P.; Corradi, L.; Mijatović, T.; Montanari, D.; Szilner, S.; Bazzacco, D.; Bowry, M.; Bracco, A.; Bruyneel, B.; Crespi, F. C. L.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Geibel, K.; Gengelbach, A.; Giaz, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Hess, H.; John, P. R.; Jolie, J.; Judson, D. S.; Jungclaus, A.; Korten, W.; Leoni, S.; Lunardi, S.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Montagnoli, G.; Napoli, D.; Pellegri, L.; Pollarolo, G.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Radeck, F.; Recchia, F.; Rosso, D.; Şahin, E.; Salsac, M. D.; Scarlassara, F.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Steinbach, T.; Stezowski, O.; Szpak, B.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Vandone, V.; Wiens, A.

    2015-08-01

    Background: Multinucleon transfer reactions (MNT) are a competitive tool to populate exotic neutron-rich nuclei in a wide region of nuclei, where other production methods have severe limitations or cannot be used at all. Purpose: Experimental information on the yields of MNT reactions in comparison with theoretical calculations are necessary to make predictions for the production of neutron-rich heavy nuclei. It is crucial to determine the fraction of MNT reaction products which are surviving neutron emission or fission at the high excitation energy after the nucleon exchange. Method: Multinucleon transfer reactions in +238U 136Xe have been measured in a high-resolution γ -ray/particle coincidence experiment. The large solid-angle magnetic spectrometer PRISMA coupled to the high-resolution Advanced Gamma Tracking Array (AGATA) has been employed. Beamlike reaction products after multinucleon transfer in the Xe region were identified and selected with the PRISMA spectrometer. Coincident particles were tagged by multichannel plate detectors placed at the grazing angle of the targetlike recoils inside the scattering chamber. Results: Mass yields have been extracted and compared with calculations based on the grazing model for MNT reactions. Kinematic coincidences between the binary reaction products, i.e., beamlike and targetlike nuclei, were exploited to obtain population yields for nuclei in the actinide region and compared to x-ray yields measured by AGATA. Conclusions: No sizable yield of actinide nuclei beyond Z =93 is found to perform nuclear structure investigations. In-beam γ -ray spectroscopy is feasible for few-neutron transfer channels in U and the -2 p channel populating Th isotopes.

  1. Transfer function between tibial acceleration and ground reaction force.

    PubMed

    Lafortune, M A; Lake, M J; Hennig, E

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to capture the relationship between ground reaction force (GRF) and tibial axial acceleration. Tibia acceleration and GRF were simultaneously recorded from five subjects during running. The acceleration of the bone was measured with a transducer mounted onto an intracortical pin. The signals were analyzed in the frequency domain to characterize the relationship between GRF and tibial acceleration. The results confirmed that for each subject this relationship could be represented by a frequency transfer function. The existence of a more general relationship for all five subjects was also confirmed by the results. The transfer functions provided information about transient shock transmissibility for the entire impact phase of running.

  2. A new setup for transfer reactions at REX-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bildstein, V.; Gernhäuser, R.; Kröll, Th.; Krücken, R.; Raabe, R.; van Duppen, P.; Rex-Isolde; Miniball Collaborations

    2007-07-01

    A new setup is proposed aimed at the study of single particle structures of nuclei far from stability by nucleon transfer reactions in inverse kinematics using radioactive ion beams obtained from REX-ISOLDE. The setup combines particle and γ-ray detection using the MINIBALL array and was designed to achieve a high particle efficiency by covering a large angular range while retaining the high γ-ray efficiency of the MINIBALL setup. All particle detectors are segmented and/or position-sensitive silicon detectors, for forward angles built as ΔE-E telescopes for light particle identification. As a first experiment with this new setup, the d( 30Mg, 31Mg)p reaction at 3 MeV/u will be performed in 2007.

  3. Chemical reaction fouling model for single-phase heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Watkinson, A.P.

    1993-08-01

    A fouling model was developed on the premise that the chemical reaction for generation of precursor can take place in the bulk fluid, in the thermalboundary layer, or at the fluid/wall interface, depending upon the interactive effects of flu id dynamics, heat and mass transfer, and the controlling chemical reaction. The analysis was used to examine the experimental data for fouling deposition of polyperoxides produced by autoxidation of indene in kerosene. The effects of fluid and wall temperatures for two flow geometries were analyzed. The results showed that the relative effects of physical parameters on the fouling rate would differ for the three fouling mechanisms; therefore, it is important to identify the controlling mechanism in applying the closed-flow-loop data to industrial conditions.

  4. Modeling charge transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudlak, Michal; Pinčak, Richard

    2003-12-01

    In this work, we present a model to elucidate the unidirectionality of the primary charge-separation process in the bacterial reaction centers. We have used a model of three sites/molecules with electron transfer beginning at site 1 with an option to proceed to site 2 or site 3. We used a stochastic model with arbitrary correlation functions. We get the quantum yields of electron escape via the sites 2,3 in two limiting cases that correspond to a spectral density of underdamped and overdamped Brownian oscillator. In the fast modulation limit of an overdamped regime we get the effect, which was named “fear of death,” in which for strong enough sink parameters the electron has a tendency to avoid the place with greater sink. The presented model was used to provide a plausible explanation of the temperature dependence of the quantum yields of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic reaction center in the high-temperature regime.

  5. Single-collision studies of energy transfer and chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, J.J.

    1993-12-01

    The research focus in this group is state-to-state dynamics of reaction and energy transfer in collisions of free radicals such as H, OH, and CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2}, alkanes, alcohols and other hydrogen-containing molecules. The motivation for the work is the desire to provide a detailed understanding of the chemical dynamics of prototype reactions that are important in the production and utilization of energy sources, most importantly in combustion. The work is primarily experimental, but with an important and growing theoretical/computational component. The focus of this research program is now on reactions in which at least one of the reactants and one of the products is polyatomic. The objective is to determine how the high dimensionality of the reactants and products differentiates such reactions from atom + diatom reactions of the same kinematics and energetics. The experiments use highly time-resolved laser spectroscopic methods to prepare reactant states and analyze the states of the products on a single-collision time scale. The primary spectroscopic tool for product state analysis is coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. CARS is used because of its generality and because the extraction of quantum state populations from CARS spectra is straightforward. The combination of the generality and easy analysis of CARS makes possible absolute cross section measurements (both state-to-state and total), a particularly valuable capability for characterizing reactive and inelastic collisions. Reactant free radicals are produced by laser photolysis of appropriate precursors. For reactant vibrational excitation stimulated Raman techniques are being developed and implemented.

  6. Double group transfer reactions: role of activation strain and aromaticity in reaction barriers.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Israel; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Cossío, Fernando P

    2009-12-01

    Double group transfer (DGT) reactions, such as the bimolecular automerization of ethane plus ethene, are known to have high reaction barriers despite the fact that their cyclic transition states have a pronounced in-plane aromatic character, as indicated by NMR spectroscopic parameters. To arrive at a way of understanding this somewhat paradoxical and incompletely understood phenomenon of high-energy aromatic transition states, we have explored six archetypal DGT reactions using density functional theory (DFT) at the OLYP/TZ2P level. The main trends in reactivity are rationalized using the activation strain model of chemical reactivity. In this model, the shape of the reaction profile DeltaE(zeta) and the height of the overall reaction barrier DeltaE( not equal)=DeltaE(zeta=zeta(TS)) is interpreted in terms of the strain energy DeltaE(strain)(zeta) associated with deforming the reactants along the reaction coordinate zeta plus the interaction energy DeltaE(int)(zeta) between these deformed reactants: DeltaE(zeta)=DeltaE(strain)(zeta)+DeltaE(int)(zeta). We also use an alternative fragmentation and a valence bond model for analyzing the character of the transition states. PMID:19852009

  7. Electrocatalysis of anodic and cathodic oxygen-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wels, B.R.

    1990-09-21

    The electrocatalysis of oxygen-transfer reactions is discussed in two parts. In Part I, the reduction of iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) is examined as an example of cathodic oxygen transfer. On oxide-covered Pt electrodes (PtO), a large cathodic current is observed in the presence of IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to coincide with the reduction of PtO. The total cathodic charge exceeds the amount required for reduction of PtO and IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to produce an adsorbed product. An electrocatalytic link between reduction of IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and reduction of PtO is indicated. In addition, on oxide-free Pt electrodes, the reduction of IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} is determined to be sensitive to surface treatment. The electrocatalytic oxidation of CN{sup {minus}} is presented as an example of anodic oxygen transfer in Part II. The voltametric response of CN{sup {minus}} is virtually nonexistent at PbO{sub 2} electrodes. The response is significantly improved by doping PbO{sub 2} with Cu. Cyanide is also oxidized effectively at CuO-film electrodes. Copper is concluded to serve as an adsorption site for CN{sup {minus}}. It is proposed that an oxygen tunneling mechanism comparable to electron tunneling does not occur at the electrode-solution interface. The adsorption of CN{sup {minus}} is therefore considered to be a necessary prerequisite for oxygen transfer. 201 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Population of high spin states in very heavy ion transfer reactions. The experimental evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer reactions have been studied for some time with light heavy ions such as oxygen. Although states of spin I approx.10 h are sometimes populated in such reactions, it is assumed that collective excitation is small, and the transferred particles are responsible for the angular momentum transfer. In this paper we will discuss a qualitatively different kind of transfer reaction using very heavy ions (A greater than or equal to 40). In these reactions the collective excitation in both the entrance and exit channels is strong, and there may be appreciable angular momentum transfer associated with inelastic excitation. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  9. The mechanism of electron transfer in laccase-catalysed reactions.

    PubMed

    Andréasson, L E; Reinhammar, B

    1979-05-10

    1. The reaction of the electron acceptors in Rhus vernicifera laccase (monophenol, dihydroxyphenylalanine:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.18.1) have been studied with stopped-flow and rapid-freeze EPR techniques. The studies have been directed mainly towards elucidation of the role of the type 2Cu2+ as a possible pH-sensitve regulator of electron transfer. 2. Anaerobic reduction experiments with Rhus laccase indicate that the type 1 and 2 sites contribute one electron each to the reduction of the two-electron-accepting type 3 site. There is also evidence that the reduction of the type 1 Cu2+ triggers the reduction of the type 2 Cu2+. 3. Only at pH values at which the reduction of the two-electron acceptor is limited by a slow intramolecular reaction can an OH- be displaced from the type 2 Cu2+ by the inhibitor F-. 4. A model describing the role of the electron-accepting sites in catalysis is formulated. PMID:221027

  10. Multinucleon transfer in the 136Xe+208Pb reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Zhang, Fan; Li, Jingjing; Zhu, Long; Tian, Junlong; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic mechanics in the multinucleon transfer reaction 136Xe+208Pb at an incident energy of Ec .m .=450 MeV is investigated by using the improved quantum molecular dynamics model (ImQMD). The lifetime of the neck directly influences the nucleon exchange and energy dissipation between the projectile and the target. The total-kinetic-energy-mass distributions and excitation energy division of primary binary fragments and the mass distributions of primary fragments at different impact parameters are calculated. The thermal equilibrium between two reaction partners has been observed at the lifetime of a neck larger than 480 fm /c . By using the statistical decay code gemini to describe the de-excitation process of the primary fragments, the isotope production cross sections from Pt to At are compared with the prediction by the dinuclear system and GRAZING model. The calculations indicate that the GRAZING model is suitable for estimating the isotope production cross sections only for Δ Z =-1 to +2; the DNS + gemini calculations underestimate the cross sections in the neutron-rich and neutron-deficient regions; and the ImQMD + gemini calculations give reasonable predictions of the isotope production cross sections for Δ Z =-3 to 0.

  11. Intermolecula transfer and elimination of molecular hydrogen in thermal reactions of unsaturated organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Suria, S.

    1995-02-10

    Two reactions which are important to coal liquefaction include intermolecular transfer and the elimination of two hydrogen atoms. We have designed several model reactions to probe the viability of several hydrogen transfer and elimination pathways. This report described studies on these reactions using organic model compounds.

  12. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: the microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices.

    PubMed

    Basilevsky, M V; Odinokov, A V; Titov, S V; Mitina, E A

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/k(B)T where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 < 1 - 3) and for low (ξ0 ≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T → 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually

  13. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: the microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices.

    PubMed

    Basilevsky, M V; Odinokov, A V; Titov, S V; Mitina, E A

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/k(B)T where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 < 1 - 3) and for low (ξ0 ≫ 1) temperature ranges. For the first (quasi-classical) kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T → 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually

  14. Neutrino Reactions on Two-Nucleon System and Core-Collapse Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasu, Shota

    2011-10-01

    The neutrino reactions on nucleon and nucleus play important role in core-collapse supernova. Recently it is pointed that light nuclei(A = 2,3) can be abundant at the various stage of supernova environment. As an important mechanism of neutrino reaction on a few nucleon system, we study the neutrino emissivity on neutron fusion reaction nn-->de-νe.

  15. Ions interacting with planar aromatic molecules: Modeling electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, B. O.; Alexander, J. D.; Chen, T.; Pettersson, A. T.; Gatchell, M.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H.

    2013-02-07

    We present theoretical absolute charge exchange cross sections for multiply charged cations interacting with the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules pyrene C{sub 14}H{sub 10}, coronene C{sub 24}H{sub 12}, or circumcoronene C{sub 54}H{sub 18}. These planar, nearly circular, PAHs are modelled as conducting, infinitely thin, and perfectly circular discs, which are randomly oriented with respect to straight line ion trajectories. We present the analytical solution for the potential energy surface experienced by an electron in the field of such a charged disc and a point-charge at an arbitrary position. The location and height of the corresponding potential energy barrier from this simple model are in close agreement with those from much more computationally demanding Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations in a number of test cases. The model results compare favourably with available experimental data on single- and multiple electron transfer reactions and we demonstrate that it is important to include the orientation dependent polarizabilities of the molecules (model discs) in particular for the larger PAHs. PAH ionization energy sequences from DFT are tabulated and used as model inputs. Absolute cross sections for the ionization of PAH molecules, and PAH ionization energies such as the ones presented here may be useful when considering the roles of PAHs and their ions in, e.g., interstellar chemistry, stellar atmospheres, and in related photoabsorption and photoemission spectroscopies.

  16. Next-generation transfer reaction studies with JENSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipps, K. A.

    2015-04-01

    Next generation radioactive ion beam facilities are being planned and built across the globe, and with them an incredible new array of exotic isotopes will be available for study. To keep pace with the state of nuclear physics research, both new detector systems and new target systems are needed. The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target is one of these new target systems, designed to provide a target of light gas that is localized, dense, and pure. The JENSA gas jet target was originally constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for testing and characterization, and has now moved to the ReA3 reaccelerated beam hall at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University for use with radioactive beams. The availability of a pure, localized target of light gases will enable exceptional scattering and transfer reaction studies with these exotic beams. Some examples will be given, and future plans will be discussed. This work is supported by the US DOE Office of Science (Office of Nuclear Physics) and the NSF.

  17. Rates of primary electron transfer reactions in the photosystem I reaction center reconstituted with different quinones as the secondary acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazaki, Shigeichi; Kandori, Hideki; Yoshihara, Keitaro ); Iwaki, Masayo; Itoh, Shigeru ); Ikegamu, Isamu )

    1994-10-27

    Rates of sequential electron transfer reactions from the primary electron donor chlorophyll dimer (P700) to the electron acceptor chlorophyll a-686 (A[sub 0]) and to the secondary acceptor quinone (Q[sub [phi

  18. A molecular mechanism of the energetic coupling of a sequence of electron transfer reactions to endergonic reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Cartling, B; Ehrenberg, A

    1978-01-01

    A molecular mechanism of the energetic coupling of a sequence of electron transfer reactions to endergonic reactions is proposed and discussed from a physical point of view. The scheme represents a synthesis of concepts of electron transfer by tunneling and the conformational and chemiosmotic aspects of energy coupling processes. Its relation to existing experimental information and theoretical models is discussed, and further experimental tests are suggested. PMID:698347

  19. Bioorthogonal tetrazine-mediated transfer reactions facilitate reaction turnover in nucleic acid-templated detection of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haoxing; Cisneros, Brandon T; Cole, Christian M; Devaraj, Neal K

    2014-12-31

    Tetrazine ligations have proven to be a powerful bioorthogonal technique for the detection of many labeled biomolecules, but the ligating nature of these reactions can limit reaction turnover in templated chemistry. We have developed a transfer reaction between 7-azabenzonorbornadiene derivatives and fluorogenic tetrazines that facilitates turnover amplification of the fluorogenic response in nucleic acid-templated reactions. Fluorogenic tetrazine-mediated transfer (TMT) reaction probes can be used to detect DNA and microRNA (miRNA) templates to 0.5 and 5 pM concentrations, respectively. The endogenous oncogenic miRNA target mir-21 could be detected in crude cell lysates and detected by imaging in live cells. Remarkably, the technique is also able to differentiate between miRNA templates bearing a single mismatch with high signal to background. We imagine that TMT reactions could find wide application for amplified fluorescent detection of clinically relevant nucleic acid templates.

  20. Reaction electronic flux and its role in DNA intramolecular proton transfers.

    PubMed

    Durán, Rocío; Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Herrera, Bárbara

    2016-06-01

    Proton transfer reactions present a key step in many biological and chemical processes. Here, we focused on the electronic changes in the proton transfer reactions of the four DNA bases. In combination with the previous structural analysis the reaction electronic flux together with local descriptors as the Hirshfeld-I charges allow us to identify chemical events and rationalize the underlying reaction mechanism. Our results show that imine-enamine in adenine and citosyne, and keto-enol tautomerizations in thymine and guanine have different reaction mechanisms. The former involve net structural rearrangements driven by favoured electrostatic interactions between the proton and the acceptor atom whereas the keto-enol tautomerizations require electronic changes reflected in the reaction electronic flux and changes in the NBO bond orders which favour the proton transfer reaction.

  1. Observation of the one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C.L.; Rehm, K.E.; Gehring, J.

    1995-08-01

    It was suggested many years ago that when two heavy nuclei are in contact during a grazing collision, the transfer of several correlated neutron-pairs could occur. Despite considerable experimental effort, however, so far only cross sections for up to four-neutron transfers have been uniquely identified. The main difficulties in the study of multi-neutron transfer reactions are the small cross sections encountered at incident energies close to the barrier, and various experimental uncertainties which can complicate the analysis of these reactions. We have for the first time found evidence for multi-neutron transfer reactions covering the full sequence from one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies in the system {sup 58}Ni + {sup 100}Mo.

  2. Cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams: A spectroscopic tool for neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoni, S.; Leoni, S.; Fornal, B.; Raabe, R.; Rusek, K.; Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Morales, A. I.; Bednarczyk, P.; Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Królas, W.; Maj, A.; Szpak, B.; Callens, M.; Bouma, J.; Elseviers, J.; De Witte, H.; Flavigny, F.; Orlandi, R.; Reiter, P.; Seidlitz, M.; Warr, N.; Siebeck, B.; Hellgartner, S.; Mücher, D.; Pakarinen, J.; Vermeulen, M.; Bauer, C.; Georgiev, G.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Balabanski, D.; Sferrazza, M.; Kowalska, M.; Rapisarda, E.; Voulot, D.; Lozano Benito, M.; Wenander, F.

    2015-08-01

    An exploratory experiment performed at REX-ISOLDE to investigate cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics is presented. The aim of the experiment was to test the potential of cluster-transfer reactions at the Coulomb barrier as a mechanism to explore the structure of exotic neutron-rich nuclei. The reactions 7Li(98Rb,α xn ) and 7Li(98Rb,t xn ) were studied through particle-γ coincidence measurements, and the results are presented in terms of the observed excitation energies and spins. Moreover, the reaction mechanism is qualitatively discussed as a transfer of a clusterlike particle within a distorted-wave Born approximation framework. The results indicate that cluster-transfer reactions can be described well as a direct process and that they can be an efficient method to investigate the structure of neutron-rich nuclei at medium-high excitation energies and spins.

  3. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1992-07-31

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

  4. Examining the effect of nonlocality in (d ,n ) transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A.; Titus, L. J.; Nunes, F. M.

    2016-07-01

    Background: In the past year we have been exploring the effect of the explicit inclusion of nonlocality in (d ,p ) reactions. Purpose: The goal of this paper is to extend previous studies to (d ,n ) reactions, which, although similar to (d ,p ) reactions, have specific properties that merit inspection. Method: We apply our methods (both the distorted-wave Born approximation and the adiabatic wave approximation) to (d ,n ) reactions on 16O,40Ca,48Ca,126Sn,132Sn , and 208Pb at 20 and 50 MeV. Results: We look separately at the modifications introduced by nonlocality in the final bound and scattering states as well as the consequences reflected on the differential angular distributions. The cross sections obtained when using nonlocality explicitly are significantly different than those using the local approximation, just as in (d ,p ) reactions. Due to the particular role of the Coulomb force in the bound state, often we found the effects of nonlocality to be larger in (d ,n ) than in (d ,p ) reactions. Conclusions: Our results confirm the importance of including nonlocality explicitly in deuteron-induced reactions.

  5. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solutions based upon mixed quantum-classical approximation. I. Proton transfer reaction in water

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Atsushi; Kojima, Hidekazu; Okazaki, Susumu

    2014-08-28

    In order to investigate proton transfer reaction in solution, mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations have been carried out based on our previously proposed quantum equation of motion for the reacting system [A. Yamada and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 044507 (2008)]. Surface hopping method was applied to describe forces acting on the solvent classical degrees of freedom. In a series of our studies, quantum and solvent effects on the reaction dynamics in solutions have been analysed in detail. Here, we report our mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations for intramolecular proton transfer of malonaldehyde in water. Thermally activated proton transfer process, i.e., vibrational excitation in the reactant state followed by transition to the product state and vibrational relaxation in the product state, as well as tunneling reaction can be described by solving the equation of motion. Zero point energy is, of course, included, too. The quantum simulation in water has been compared with the fully classical one and the wave packet calculation in vacuum. The calculated quantum reaction rate in water was 0.70 ps{sup −1}, which is about 2.5 times faster than that in vacuum, 0.27 ps{sup −1}. This indicates that the solvent water accelerates the reaction. Further, the quantum calculation resulted in the reaction rate about 2 times faster than the fully classical calculation, which indicates that quantum effect enhances the reaction rate, too. Contribution from three reaction mechanisms, i.e., tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing reactions, is 33:46:21 in the mixed quantum-classical calculations. This clearly shows that the tunneling effect is important in the reaction.

  6. Ion-ion reactions in the gas phase: Proton transfer reactions of protonated pyridine with multiply charged oligonucleotide anions.

    PubMed

    Herron, W J; Goeringer, D E; McLuckey, S A

    1995-06-01

    Isolated triply and doubly charged anions of the single-stranded deoxynucleotide 5'-d(AAAA)-3' were allowed to undergo ion-ion proton transfer reactions with protonated pyridine cations within a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Sufficiently high ion number densities and spatial overlap of the oppositely charged ion clouds could be achieved to yield readily measurable rates. Three general observations were made: (1) the ion-ion reaction rate constants were estimated to be 10(- (7 - 8)) cm(3) ion(-1) s(-1); (2) the ion-ion reaction rates were found to be dependent on the reactant ion number density, which could be controlled by both the reactant ion number and the pseudopotential well depth, and (3) very little fragmentation, if any, was observed, as might normally be expected with highly exothermic proton transfer reactions.

  7. An abnormally slow proton transfer reaction in a simple HBO derivative due to ultrafast intramolecular-charge transfer events.

    PubMed

    Alarcos, Noemí; Gutierrez, Mario; Liras, Marta; Sánchez, Félix; Douhal, Abderrazzak

    2015-07-01

    We report on the steady-state, picosecond and femtosecond time-resolved studies of a charge and proton transfer dye 6-amino-2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (6A-HBO) and its methylated derivative 6-amino-2-(2'-methoxyphenyl)benzoxazole (6A-MBO), in different solvents. With femtosecond resolution and comparison with the photobehaviour of 6A-MBO, we demonstrate for 6A-HBO in solution, the photoproduction of an intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) process at S1 taking place in ∼140 fs or shorter, followed by solvent relaxation in the charge transferred species. The generated structure (syn-enol charge transfer conformer) experiences an excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer (ESIPT) reaction to produce a keto-type tautomer. This subsequent proton motion occurs in 1.2 ps (n-heptane), 14 ps (DCM) and 35 ps (MeOH). In MeOH, it is assisted by the solvent molecules and occurs through tunneling for which we got a large kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of about 13. For the 6A-DBO (deuterated sample in CD3OD) the global proton-transfer reaction takes place in 200 ps, showing a remarkable slow KIE regime. The slow ESIPT reaction in DCM (14 ps), not through tunnelling as it is not sensitive to OH/OD exchange, has however to overcome an energy barrier using intramolecular as well as solvent coordinates. The rich ESIPT dynamics of 6A-HBO in the used solutions is governed by an ICT reaction, triggered by the amino group, and it is solvent dependent. Thus, the charge injection to a 6A-HBO molecular frame makes the ICT species more stable, and the phenol group less acidic, slowing down the subsequent ESIPT reaction. Our findings bring new insights into the coupling between ICT and ESIPT reactions on the potential-energy surfaces of several barriers.

  8. Charge transfer reactions in multiply charged ion-atom collisions. [in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions in collisions between highly charged ions and neutral atoms of hydrogen and/or helium may be rapid at thermal energies. If these reactions are rapid, they will suppress highly charged ions in H I regions and guarantee that the observed absorption features from such ions cannot originate in the interstellar gas. A discussion of such charge-transfer reactions is presented and compared with the available experimental data. The possible implications of these reactions for observations of the interstellar medium, H II regions, and planetary nebulae are outlined.

  9. Recyclable polystyrene-supported siloxane-transfer agent for palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh H; Smith, Amos B

    2014-04-01

    The rational design, synthesis, and validation of a significantly improved insoluble polymer-supported siloxane-transfer agent has been achieved that permits efficient palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. The cross-linked polystyrene support facilitates product purification with excellent siloxane recycling. Drawbacks of a previous polymer-supported siloxane-transfer agent, relating to reaction efficiency and polymer stability after repeated cycles, have been addressed.

  10. Recyclable Polystyrene-Supported Siloxane-Transfer Agent for Palladium-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The rational design, synthesis, and validation of a significantly improved insoluble polymer-supported siloxane-transfer agent has been achieved that permits efficient palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. The cross-linked polystyrene support facilitates product purification with excellent siloxane recycling. Drawbacks of a previous polymer-supported siloxane-transfer agent, relating to reaction efficiency and polymer stability after repeated cycles, have been addressed. PMID:24661113

  11. Structure of Light Neutron-rich Nuclei Studied with Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wuosmaa, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Transfer reactions have been used for many years to understand the shell structure of nuclei. Recent studies with rare-isotope beams extend this work and make it possible to probe the evolution of shell structure far beyond the valley of stability, requiring measurements in inverse kinematics. We present a novel technical approach to measurements in inverse kinematics, and apply this method to different transfer reactions, each of which probes different properties of light, neutron-rich nuclei.

  12. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry applications in medical research.

    PubMed

    Herbig, Jens; Amann, Anton

    2009-06-01

    Gathering information about a subject's physiological and pathophysiological condition from the `smell' of breath is an idea that dates back to antiquity. This intriguing concept of non-invasive diagnosis has been revitalized by `exhaled breath analysis' in recent decades. A main driving force was the development of sensitive and versatile gas-chromatographic and mass-spectrometric instruments for trace gas analysis. Ironically, only non-smelling constituents of breath, such as O(2), CO(2), H(2), and NO have so far been included in routine clinical breath analysis. The `smell' of human breath, on the other hand, arises through a combination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of which several hundred have been identified to date. Most of these volatiles are systemic and are released in the gas-exchange between blood and air in the alveoli. The concentration of these compounds in the alveolar breath is related to the respective concentrations in blood. Measuring VOCs in exhaled breath allows for screening of disease markers, studying the uptake and effect of medication (pharmacokinetics), or monitoring physiological processes. There is a range of requirements for instruments for the analysis of a complex matrix, such as human breath. Mass-spectrometric techniques are particularly well suited for this task since they offer the possibility of detecting a large variety of interesting compounds. A further requirement is the ability to measure accurately in the concentration range of breath VOCs, i.e. between parts-per-trillion (pptv) and parts-per-million (ppmv) range. In the mid 1990's proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was developed as a powerful and promising tool for the analysis of VOCs in gaseous media. Soon thereafter these instruments became commercially available to a still growing user community and have now become standard equipment in many fields including environmental research, food and flavour science, as well as life sciences. Their

  13. Definition and determination of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Felipe; Marazzi, Marco; Castaño, Obis; Acuña, A Ulises; Frutos, Luis Manuel

    2014-01-21

    A definition of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate within the very weak electronic coupling limit is proposed, and a novel theoretical formalism is developed for its quantitative determination in terms of internal coordinates The present formalism permits (i) the separation of donor and acceptor contributions to the reaction coordinate, (ii) the identification of the intrinsic role of donor and acceptor in the triplet energy transfer process, and (iii) the quantification of the effect of every internal coordinate on the transfer process. This formalism is general and can be applied to classical as well as to nonvertical triplet energy transfer processes. The utility of the novel formalism is demonstrated here by its application to the paradigm of nonvertical triplet-triplet energy transfer involving cis-stilbene as acceptor molecule. In this way the effect of each internal molecular coordinate in promoting the transfer rate, from triplet donors in the low and high-energy limit, could be analyzed in detail.

  14. Population of mixed-symmetry states via {alpha} transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C. E.; Arias, J. M.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.; Pietralla, N.

    2008-07-15

    Within the neutron-proton interacting boson model we study the population of mixed-symmetry states via {alpha} transfer processes. Closed expressions are deduced in the case of the limiting U{sub {pi}}{sub +{nu}}(5) and SU{sub {pi}}{sub +{nu}}(3). We find that the population of the lowest mixed-symmetry 2{sup +} state, vanishing along the N{sub {pi}}=N{sub {nu}} line, depends on the number of active bosons and is normally smaller than that of the lowest full symmetric 2{sup +} state. In particular, for deformed nuclei where the number of bosons is normally large, the relative population of the mixed-symmetry 2{sup +} state is of the order of a few percent. More favorable cases can be found near shell closures, as in the case of {alpha} transfer leading to {sup 140}Ba.

  15. Kinetic energy release in thermal ion--molecule reactions: The Nb sup 2+ --(benzene) single charge--transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gord, J.R.; Freiser, B.S. ); Buckner, S.W. )

    1991-03-15

    We have adapted the techniques originally developed to measure ion kinetic energies in ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectrometry to study the single charge--transfer reaction of Nb{sup 2+} with benzene under thermal conditions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICRMS). The partitioning of reaction exothermicity among the internal and translational modes available is consistent with a long-distance electron-transfer mechanism, in which the reactants approach on an ion-induced dipole attractive potential and cross to a repulsive potential at a critical separation of {similar to}7.5 A when electron transfer occurs. The reaction exothermicity, 5.08 eV, is partitioned to translation of Nb{sup +} , 0.81{plus minus}0.25 eV, translation of C{sub 6} H{sub 6}{sup +}, 1.22{plus minus}0.25 eV, and internal excitation of C{sub 6} H{sub 6}{sup +} to produce the la{sub 2{ital u}} electronic state, which is {similar to}3 eV above the ground state of the ion. We have also studied the kinetics of the reaction of Nb{sup 2+} with benzene and determined the rate constant, {ital k} = 1.4{times}10{sup {minus}9} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, and the efficiency, 0.60, of the process. These also support the proposed charge--transfer mechanism. In addition to the charge--transfer pathway, which accounts for 95% of the reaction products, Nb{sup 2+} is observed to dehydrogenate benzene to form Nb{sup 2+} (benzyne). This process implies {ital D}(Nb{sup 2+} --benzyne){ge}79 kcal/mol.

  16. Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer reactions in supramolecular arrays: From charge separation and storage to molecular switches

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Photoinduced charge separation reactions form the basis for energy storage processes in both natural and artificial photosynthesis. Moreover, rapid reversible photoinduced electron transfer reactions are a class of photophysical phenomena that can be exploited to develop schemes for optical switching. Examples from each of these fields are discussed.

  17. Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer reactions in supramolecular arrays: From charge separation and storage to molecular switches

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    Photoinduced charge separation reactions form the basis for energy storage processes in both natural and artificial photosynthesis. Moreover, rapid reversible photoinduced electron transfer reactions are a class of photophysical phenomena that can be exploited to develop schemes for optical switching. Examples from each of these fields are discussed.

  18. Neutron Transfer Reactions: Surrogates for Neutron Capture for Basic and Applied Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizewski, J. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Adekola, A.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Becker, J. A.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K. A.; Erikson, L.; Gaddis, A.; Harlin, C.; Hatarik, R.; Howard, J.; Jandel, M.; Johnson, M. S.; Kapler, R.; Krolas, W.; Liang, F.; Livesay, R. J.; Ma, Z.; Matei, C.; Matthews, C.; Moazen, B.; Nesaraja, C. D.; O'Malley, P.; Patterson, N.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Pelham, T.; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, D.; Rogers, J.; Schmitt, K.; Shapira, D.; Shriner, J. F.; Sissom, D. J.; Smith, M. S.; Swan, T.; Thomas, J. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, G. L.

    2009-03-01

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on 130,132Sn, 134Te and 75As are discussed.

  19. Neutron transfer reactions: Surrogates for neutron capture for basic and applied nuclear science

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, Steven D; Peters, W. A.; Adekola, Aderemi S; Allen, J.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Becker, J.; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Erikson, Luke; Gaddis, A. L.; Harlin, Christopher W; Hatarik, Robert; Howard, Joshua A; Jandel, M.; Johnson, Micah; Kapler, R.; Krolas, W.; Liang, J Felix; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Matei, Catalin; Matthews, C.; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Patterson, N. P.; Paulauskas, Stanley; Pelham, T.; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Rogers, J.; Schmitt, Kyle; Shapira, Dan; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Sissom, D. J.; Smith, Michael Scott; Swan, T. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, Gemma L

    2009-04-01

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

  20. Au25 Clusters as Electron-Transfer Catalysts Induced the Intramolecular Cascade Reaction of 2-nitrobenzonitrile

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hanbao; Li, Peng; Wang, Shuxin; Fu, Fangyu; Xiang, Ji; Zhu, Manzhou; Li, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Design of atomically precise metal nanocluster catalysts is of great importance in understanding the essence of the catalytic reactions at the atomic level. Here, for the first time, Au25z nanoslusters were employed as electron transfer catalysts to induce an intramolecular cascade reaction at ambient conditions and gave rise to high conversion (87%) and selectivity (96%). Electron spin-resonance spectra indeed confirmed the consecutive electron transfer process and the formation of N radical. UV-vis absorption spectra also verified Au25z was intact after the catalytic circle. Our research may open up wide opportunities for extensive organic reactions catalyzed by Au25z. PMID:24225495

  1. Fission Study of Actinide Nuclei Using Multi-nucleon Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Léguillon, R.; Makii, Hiroyuki; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Orlandi, Riccardo; Smallcombe, James; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Chiba, Satoshi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Tatsuzawa, Ryotaro; Takaki, Naoyuki

    We have developed a set up to measure fission properties of excited compound nuclei populated by multi-nucleon transfer reactions. This approach has an advantage that we can study fission of neutron-rich nuclei which cannot be accessed by particle or charged-particle capture reactions. Unique feature in our setup is that we can produce fission data for many nuclei depending on different transfer channels. Also wide excitation energy range can be covered in this set up, allowing us to measure the excitation energy dependence of the fission properties. Preliminary data obtained in the 18O + 238U reaction will be presented.

  2. Recent advances in transition metal-catalyzed N -atom transfer reactions of azides

    PubMed Central

    Driver, Tom G.

    2011-01-01

    Transition metal-catalyzed N-atom transfer reactions of azides provide efficient ways to construct new carbon–nitrogen and sulfur–nitrogen bonds. These reactions are inherently green: no additive besides catalyst is needed to form the nitrenoid reactive intermediate, and the by-product of the reaction is environmentally benign N2 gas. As such, azides can be useful precursors for transition metal-catalyzed N-atom transfer to sulfides, olefins and C–H bonds. These methods offer competitive selectivities and comparable substrate scope as alternative processes to generate metal nitrenoids. PMID:20617243

  3. Proton transfer reactions and hydrogen-bond networks in protein environments.

    PubMed

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Saito, Keisuke

    2014-02-01

    In protein environments, proton transfer reactions occur along polar or charged residues and isolated water molecules. These species consist of H-bond networks that serve as proton transfer pathways; therefore, thorough understanding of H-bond energetics is essential when investigating proton transfer reactions in protein environments. When the pKa values (or proton affinity) of the H-bond donor and acceptor moieties are equal, significantly short, symmetric H-bonds can be formed between the two, and proton transfer reactions can occur in an efficient manner. However, such short, symmetric H-bonds are not necessarily stable when they are situated near the protein bulk surface, because the condition of matching pKa values is opposite to that required for the formation of strong salt bridges, which play a key role in protein-protein interactions. To satisfy the pKa matching condition and allow for proton transfer reactions, proteins often adjust the pKa via electron transfer reactions or H-bond pattern changes. In particular, when a symmetric H-bond is formed near the protein bulk surface as a result of one of these phenomena, its instability often results in breakage, leading to large changes in protein conformation.

  4. Proton transfer reactions and hydrogen-bond networks in protein environments

    PubMed Central

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Saito, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    In protein environments, proton transfer reactions occur along polar or charged residues and isolated water molecules. These species consist of H-bond networks that serve as proton transfer pathways; therefore, thorough understanding of H-bond energetics is essential when investigating proton transfer reactions in protein environments. When the pKa values (or proton affinity) of the H-bond donor and acceptor moieties are equal, significantly short, symmetric H-bonds can be formed between the two, and proton transfer reactions can occur in an efficient manner. However, such short, symmetric H-bonds are not necessarily stable when they are situated near the protein bulk surface, because the condition of matching pKa values is opposite to that required for the formation of strong salt bridges, which play a key role in protein–protein interactions. To satisfy the pKa matching condition and allow for proton transfer reactions, proteins often adjust the pKa via electron transfer reactions or H-bond pattern changes. In particular, when a symmetric H-bond is formed near the protein bulk surface as a result of one of these phenomena, its instability often results in breakage, leading to large changes in protein conformation. PMID:24284891

  5. Recent aspects of the proton transfer reaction in H-bonded complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafran, Mirosław

    1996-07-01

    Proton transfer processes cover a very wide range of situations and time scales and they are of great interest from the viewpoint of chemical reactions in solution. These processes can occur via thermally activated crossing or tunneling. This review considers various aspects of this many-faceted field. Spectroscopic, dielectric, colligative and energetic properties and structures of various species with H-bonds are examined. Proton transfer reactions in water and organic solvents, and the contribution of various H-bonded species and ions to these processes are discussed. Among other topics, this survey includes the effects of solvent, acid-base stoichiometry, concentration, temperature and impurity on proton transfer reactions in complexes of phenols and carboxylic acids with amines, pyridines and pyridine N-oxides. The contribution of the nonstoichiometric acid-base complexes and ionic species to the reversible proton transfer mechanism is discussed.

  6. Synthesis of new transuranium isotopes in multinucleon transfer reactions using a velocity filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, S.; Devaraja, H. M.; Beliuskina, O.; Comas, V.; Hofmann, S.; Hornung, C.; Münzenberg, G.; Ackermann, D.; Gupta, M.; Henderson, R. A.; Heßberger, F. P.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Maurer, J.; Moody, K. J.; Nishio, K.; Popeko, A. G.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Yeremin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    Recently, we reported the observation of several new isotopes with proton numbers Z ≥ 92 in low-energy collisions of 48Ca + 248Cm . The peculiarity is that the nuclei were produced in multinucleon transfer reactions, a method which is presently discussed as a possible new way to enter so far unknown regions in the upper part of the Chart of Nuclides. For separation of the transfer products we used a velocity filter, the Separator for Heavy Ion Reaction Products SHIP at GSI. The resulting strong background suppression allowed us to detect nuclei with cross-sections down to the sub-nanobarn scale. Beside the new isotopes we identified about 100 further target-like transfer products and determined their cross-sections. The results together with previous measurements strongly indicate that multinucleon transfer reactions are a viable pathway to the production of new transuranium isotopes.

  7. 9,10-Diphenylanthracene as a matrix for MALDI-MS electron transfer secondary reactions.

    PubMed

    Boutaghou, M Nazim; Cole, Richard B

    2012-08-01

    The most common secondary-ionization mechanism in positive ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) involves a proton transfer reaction to ionize the analyte. Peptides and proteins are molecules that have basic (and acidic) sites that make them susceptible to proton transfer. However, non-polar, aprotic compounds that lack basic sites are more difficult to protonate, and creating charged forms of this type of analyte can pose a problem when conventional MALDI matrices are employed. In this case, forming a radical molecular ion through electron transfer is a viable alternative, and certain matrices may facilitate the process. In this work, we investigate the performance of a newly developed electron-transfer secondary reaction matrix: 9,10-diphenylanthracene (9,10-DPA). The use of 9,10-DPA as matrix for MALDI analysis has been tested using several model compounds. It appears to promote ionization through electron transfer in a highly efficient manner as compared to other potential matrices. Thermodynamic aspects of the observed electron transfers in secondary-ionization reactions were also considered, as was the possibility for kinetically controlled/endothermic, electron-transfer reactions in the MALDI plume.

  8. Carboxyl group participation in sulfate and sulfamate group transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, A.; Williams, A.

    1982-04-23

    The pH dependence for the hydrolysis of N-(2-carboxyphenyl)sulfamic acid exhibits a plateau region corresponding to participation of the carboxyl function. A normal deuterium oxide solvent isotope effect indicates that proton transfer from the carboxylic acid is concerted with sulfamate group transfer to water. Hydrolysis of salicylic sulfate and N-(2-carboxyphenyl)sulfamate in /sup 18/O-enriched water yields salicylic acid and anthranilic acids with no enrichment, excluding catalysis by neighboring nucleophilic attack on sulfur by the carboxylate group. Intermolecular catalysis by carboxylic acids is demonstrated in the hydrolysis of N-(1-naphthyl)sulfamic acid; the mechanism is shown to involve preequilibrium protonation of the nitrogen followed by nucleophilic attack on sulfur by the carboxylate anion. Fast decomposition of the acyl sulfate completes the hydrolysis; this mechanism is considered to be the most efficient but is excluded in the intramolecular case which is constrained by the electronic requirements of displacement at the sulfur atom (6-ENDO-tet).

  9. Development of Novel Electrode Materials for the Electrocatalysis of Oxygen-Transfer and Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Brett Kimball Simpson

    2002-08-27

    Throughout this thesis, the fundamental aspects involved in the electrocatalysis of anodic O-transfer reactions and cathodic H-transfer reactions have been studied. The investigation into anodic O-transfer reactions at undoped and Fe(III)[doped MnO{sub 2} films] revealed that MnO{sub 2} film electrodes prepared by a cycling voltammetry deposition show improved response for DMSO oxidation at the film electrodes vs. the Au substrate. Doping of the MnO{sub 2} films with Fe(III) further enhanced electrode activity. Reasons for this increase are believed to involve the adsorption of DMSO by the Fe(III) sites. The investigation into anodic O-transfer reactions at undoped and Fe(III)-doped RuO{sub 2} films showed that the Fe(III)-doped RuO{sub 2}-film electrodes are applicable for anodic detection of sulfur compounds. The Fe(III) sites in the Fe-RuO{sub 2} films are speculated to act as adsorption sites for the sulfur species while the Ru(IV) sites function for anodic discharge of H{sub 2}O to generate the adsorbed OH species. The investigation into cathodic H-transfer reactions, specifically nitrate reduction, at various pure metals and their alloys demonstrated that the incorporation of metals into alloy materials can create a material that exhibits bifunctional properties for the various steps involved in the overall nitrate reduction reaction. The Sb{sub 10}Sn{sub 20}Ti{sub 70}, Cu{sub 63}Ni{sub 37} and Cu{sub 25}Ni{sub 75} alloy electrodes exhibited improved activity for nitrate reduction as compared to their pure component metals. The Cu{sub 63}Ni{sub 37} alloy displayed the highest activity for nitrate reduction. The final investigation was a detailed study of the electrocatalytic activity of cathodic H-transfer reactions (nitrate reduction) at various compositions of Cu-Ni alloy electrodes. Voltammetric response for NO{sub 3}{sup -} at the Cu-Ni alloy electrode is superior to the response at the pure Cu and Ni electrodes. This is explained on the basis of the

  10. Matching effective few-nucleon theories to QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirscher, J.

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of complex macroscopic phenomena from a small set of parameters and microscopic concepts demonstrates the power and beauty of physical theories. A theory which relates the wealth of data and peculiarities found in nuclei to the small number of parameters and symmetries of quantum chromodynamics is by that standard of exceptional beauty. Decade-long research on computational physics and on effective field theories facilitate the assessment of the presumption that quark masses and strong and electromagnetic coupling constants suffice to parametrize the nuclear chart. By presenting the current status of that enterprise, this article touches the methodology of predicting nuclei by simulating the constituting quarks and gluons and the development of effective field theories as appropriate representations of the fundamental theory. While the nuclear spectra and electromagnetic responses analyzed computationally so far with lattice QCD are in close resemblance to those which intrigued experimentalists a century ago, they also test the theoretical understanding which was unavailable to guide the nuclear pioneers but developed since then. This understanding is shown to be deficient in terms of correlations amongst nuclear observables and their sensitivity to fundamental parameters. By reviewing the transition from one effective field theory to another, from QCD to pionful chiral theories to pionless and eventually to cluster theories, we identify some of those deficiencies and conceptual problems awaiting a solution before QCD can be identified as the high-energy theory from which the nuclear landscape emerges.

  11. The effect of the environment on the methyl transfer reaction mechanism between trimethylsulfonium and phenolate.

    PubMed

    Saez, David Adrian; Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Inostroza-Rivera, Ricardo; Kubař, Tomáš; Elstner, Marcus; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro; Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban

    2016-09-14

    Methyl transfer reactions play an important role in biology and are catalyzed by various enzymes. Here, the influence of the molecular environment on the reaction mechanism was studied using advanced ab initio methods, implicit solvation models and QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations. Various conceptual DFT and electronic structure descriptors identified different processes along the reaction coordinate e.g. electron transfer. The results show that the polarity of the solvent increases the energy required for the electron transfer and that this spontaneous process is located in the transition state region identified by the (mean) reaction force analysis and takes place through the bonds which are broken and formed. The inclusion of entropic contributions and hydrogen bond interactions in QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations with a validated DFTB3 Hamiltonian yields activation barriers in good agreement with the experimental values in contrast to the values obtained using two implicit solvation models. PMID:27524496

  12. Polyelectrolytes as interfaces for retarding back-reaction in photoinduced electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Otvos, J.W.; Casti, T.E.; Calvin, M.

    1984-08-01

    Flash photolysis experiments on the effect of the polyelectrolytes poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) and Poly(N,N-dimethyl-3, 5-dimethylene piperidinium chloride) (PolyP) on the photoinduced electron transfer reaction between zinc(II) tetrakis (4-N-methylpyridinium)porphyin (ZnP) and propyl viologen sulfonate (PVS/sup 0/) show that PSS decreases both the forward and back- electron transfer reaction rates significantly, by a factor of approx. 60. The effect of PSS is due to hydrophobic envelopment of ZnP by the polyelectrolyte, hindering approach of reactants to it and thus reducing all bimolecular reaction rates between ZnP and species in solution. The cationic polyelectrolyte, PolyP, decreases the back-electron transfer rate by a factor of approx. 2 without affecting other bimolecular reaction rates. This effect is probably due to binding of the PVS/sup -/ to the polyelectrolyte, which then repels the oxidized porphyrin electrostatically.

  13. [Spectrophotometric determination of cinnarizine based on charge-transfer reaction].

    PubMed

    Xu, B; Zhao, F; Tong, S

    1999-12-01

    The charge-transfer (CT) complex formed between cinnarizine as the donor and 7, 7, 8, 8-Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) as the acceptor in acetone-methanol has been studied by spectrophotometric method. Beer's law is obeyed in the range of 0-18 microg x mL(-1) of cinnarizine. The apparent molar absorptivity of CT complex at 743 nm is 1.58 x 10(4) L x mol(-1) x cm(-1). The composition of CT complex is found to be 1 : 1 by Bent-French and Job's methods. The relative standard deviation is less than 3% (n = 10). The method has been applied to the determination of cinnarizine in tablets with satisfactory results. PMID:15822327

  14. On superexchange electron-transfer reactions involving three paraboloidal potential surfaces in a two-dimensional reaction coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jau; Norris, James R.

    1994-10-01

    A stochastic Liouville theory is presented for the superexchange electron-transfer reactions involving three paraboloidal potential surfaces in a two-dimensional reaction coordinate. Its close relationship with the spin-boson model for photosynthesis is discussed. A triangle representation is used to explain the relationship between the reorganization energy and the degree of correlation for the solvent fluctuations experienced by the donor, the intermediate, and the acceptor. Explanations for a small reorganization energy for an efficient superexchange mechanism in natural photosynthesis are offered.

  15. The kinetics of electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride in different solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Rehana; Nadeem, Syed Muhammad Saqib

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride was investigated in different solvents by spectrophotometry at different temperatures. The the reaction rate was determined by monitoring the absorbance as a function of time at λmax 655 nm. The reaction is pseudo-first order, dependent only on the concentration of titanium trichloride at a fixed concentration of methylene green. The effect of an aqueous alcoholic solvent was studied in the acidic range of pH from 4 to 7. It was observed that the reaction rate increased with an increase in polarity of the reaction medium. The the reaction rate was high in acidic conditions and decreased with a further increase in acidity. The increase in temperature increased the rate of the electron transfer reaction of methylene green and titanium trichloride. The activation energy ( E a) was calculated by the Arrhenius relation. The absence of any reaction intermediate was confirmed by spectroscopic and kinetic investigations. A plausible mechanism for the reaction in line with outer-sphere reaction pathway has been proposed. Thermodynamic parameters such as the activation energy ( E a), enthalpy change (Δ H), free energy change (Δ G), and entropy change (Δ S) were also evaluated

  16. Electrocatalysis of anodic, oxygen-transfer reactions at noble metal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Vitt, J.E.

    1992-06-09

    Voltammetry at rotated disk and rotated ring-disk electrodes was applied to the study of several aspects of anodic, oxygen-transfer reactions at noble electrodes. Anodic reactions which involve the transfer of oxygen from H{sub 2}O to the oxidation products generally exhibit a voltammetric response characterized by severe kinetic limitations. Mechanistic studies were performed at noble electrodes in order to contrive strategies for improving the kinetics of these reactions. Competitive adsorption studies were used to devise an adsorption hierarchy for Au rotated disk electrodes. It was concluded that adsorption was a prerequisite for oxidations involving the transfer of oxygen present on the electrodes surface as adsorbed hydroxyl radicals. The electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of luminol was studied at Au, Pt, Pd, glassy carbon, PbO{sub 2}, and Bi-doped PbO{sub 2} electrodes. The ECL intensity was determined to be inversely related to electrochemical activity for the oxidation of luminol. It was concluded that the oxygen-transfer oxidation of luminol to 3-aminophthalate ( n = 4 eq mol{sup {minus}1}) corresponded to the dark reaction, whereas the electron-transfer oxidation of luminol with n = 1 eq mol{sup {minus}1} initiated the chemiluminescent reaction in solution.

  17. Ultrafast Electron Transfer Kinetics in the LM Dimer of Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chang; Carey, Anne-Marie; Gao, Bing-Rong; Wraight, Colin A; Woodbury, Neal W; Lin, Su

    2016-06-23

    It has become increasingly clear that dynamics plays a major role in the function of many protein systems. One system that has proven particularly facile for studying the effects of dynamics on protein-mediated chemistry is the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Previous experimental and computational analysis have suggested that the dynamics of the protein matrix surrounding the primary quinone acceptor, QA, may be particularly important in electron transfer involving this cofactor. One can substantially increase the flexibility of this region by removing one of the reaction center subunits, the H-subunit. Even with this large change in structure, photoinduced electron transfer to the quinone still takes place. To evaluate the effect of H-subunit removal on electron transfer to QA, we have compared the kinetics of electron transfer and associated spectral evolution for the LM dimer with that of the intact reaction center complex on picosecond to millisecond time scales. The transient absorption spectra associated with all measured electron transfer reactions are similar, with the exception of a broadening in the QX transition and a blue-shift in the QY transition bands of the special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P) in the LM dimer. The kinetics of the electron transfer reactions not involving quinones are unaffected. There is, however, a 4-fold decrease in the electron transfer rate from the reduced bacteriopheophytin to QA in the LM dimer compared to the intact reaction center and a similar decrease in the recombination rate of the resulting charge-separated state (P(+)QA(-)). These results are consistent with the concept that the removal of the H-subunit results in increased flexibility in the region around the quinone and an associated shift in the reorganization energy associated with charge separation and recombination. PMID:27243380

  18. Electrocatalysis of anodic oxygen-transfer reactions: Evolution of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.; Johnson, D.C. ); Lowery, S.N.; Carey, J.J. . Kodak Research Labs.)

    1994-10-01

    Current efficiencies are compared for the generation of O[sub 3] simultaneously with O[sub 2] during anodic discharge of H[sub 2]O at pure and iron(III)-doped [beta]-lead dioxide film electrodes in phosphate buffer (pH 7.5, 10 C) containing 2.5 mM KF. Also examined is the effect of applied current density. A current efficiency of 14.6% was obtained for the Fe(III)-doped PbO[sub 2] film electrode deposited on a internally cooled (10 C) tubular titanium substrate at a current density of 200 mA cm[sup [minus]2] as compared to only 6.1% at the undoped PbO[sub 2] electrode under the same conditions. This result is tentatively explained on the basis of a mechanism involving the transfer of oxygen from hydroxyl radicals adsorbed on Pb(IV) sites adjacent to Fe(III) sites to O[sub 2] adsorbed at the Fe(III) sites in the surface of the Fe(III)-doped PbO[sub 2] electrodes.

  19. Camptothecins guanine interactions: mechanism of charge transfer reaction upon photoactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenkeste, K.; Guiot, E.; Tfibel, F.; Pernot, P.; Mérola, F.; Georges, P.; Fontaine-Aupart, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    The potent activity exhibited by the antitumoral camptothecin (CPT) and its analog irinotecan (CPT-11) is known to be related to a close contact between the drug and the nucleic acid base guanine. This specificity of interaction between these two chromophores was examined by following changes in the photophysical properties of the drug using steady-state as well as time-resolved absorption and fluorescence methods. The observed effects on absorption, fluorescence emission and singlet excited state lifetimes give evidence for the occurrence of a stacking complex formation restricted to the quinoline part of CPT or CPT-11 and the guanine base but also with the adenine base. The triplet excited state properties of the drugs have been also characterized in absence and in presence of guanosine monophosphate and reveal the occurrence of an electron transfer from the guanine base to the drug. Support for this conclusion was obtained from the studies of a set of biological targets of various oxido-reduction potentials, adenosine monophosphate, cytidine, cytosine, tryptophan, tyrosine and phenylalanine. This finding gives an interpretation of the CPT-induced guanine photolesions previously reported in the literature. These data taken together are discussed in connection with the drug activity. The stacking complex CPT/guanine is necessary but not sufficient to explain the role of the chirality and of the lactone structure in the function of the drug. A stereospecific interaction with the enzyme topoisomerase I seems necessary to stabilize the stacking complex. The first experiments using time-resolved fluorescence by two-photon excitation confirms that CPT does not bind to the isolated enzyme.

  20. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1991-12-31

    During this period, conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used for the characterization of the intermediates that are involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. The intermediates of interest were the excited states of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and the species formed in the reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern has been the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

  1. Single and Multi-Nucleon Transfer Reactions for Nuclear Moment Studies Toward Radioactive-Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lozeva, R. L.; Georgiev, G. P.; Audi, G.; Cabaret, S.; Fiori, E.; Gaulard, C.; Hauschilda, K.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Risegari, L.; Blazhev, A.; Jolie, J.; Moschner, K.; Zell, K.-O.; Daugas, J.-M.; Faul, T.; Morel, P.; Roig, O.; Ferraton, M.; Ibrahim, F.

    2010-04-30

    This study is a part of an experimental program to measure nuclear moments in transfer reactions. It aims to probe for a first time the nuclear -spin orientation in multi-nucleon transfer. Fist experiments were performed to measure the quadrupole moment of an isomeric state in {sup 66}Cu (I{sup p}i 6{sup -}, E{sub x} = 1154 keV, T{sub 1/2} = 595(20) ns) in single nucleon transfer and the population of mus isomers in {sup 66}Cu and {sup 63}Ni in multi-nucleon transfer. The experimentally tested methodology allows broad applications toward more exotic species and feasibility of these reactions to produce species away from stability.

  2. Observation of the one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub- barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C.L.; Rehm, K.E.; Gehring, J.; Glagola, B.; Kutschera, W.; Rhein, M.; Wuosmaa, A.H.

    1994-04-01

    An unambiguous determination of the cross sections for the one- to six neutron transfer reactions has been made in the system {sup 58}Ni + {sup 100}Mo. The cross sections for multi-neutron transfer processes show an exponential falloff in agreement with recent theoretical calculations. Upper limits for the absolute yields to the ground states have been extracted which are smaller by a factor of ten as compared to theoretical predictions.

  3. Two-dimensional free energy surfaces for primary electron transfer in a photosynthetic reaction center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warshel, A.; Chu, Z. T.; Parson, W. W.

    1997-01-01

    Fushiki and Tachiya [Chem. Phys. Lett. 255 (1996) 83] recently analyzed the free energy surfaces of the initial electron-transfer processes in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers. The authors state that when the results from simulations described by Warshel, Chu and Parson [Photochem. Photobiol. A: Chem. 82 (1994) 123] are analyzed using their formulation, the calculated energy of a key ion-pair state is inconsistent with experiment. They also state that previous analyses of the photosynthetic electron-transfer reactions had been limited to one-dimensional free energy surfaces. We show here that both these assertions are incorrect.

  4. Ion-atom charge-transfer reactions and a hot intercloud medium. [in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the ionization equilibrium of carbon in a hot intercloud medium (ICM), taking into account various charge-transfer reactions. Attention is given to problems related to observations of carbon along the lines of sight to several unreddened stars. It is pointed out that the observed underabundance of C III and overabundance of C I can be consistent with the presence of a hot, partially ionized ICM, provided that two of the charge-transfer reactions considered are rapid at thermal energies.

  5. Analysis of trace gases at ppb levels by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindinger, W.; Hansel, A.

    1997-05-01

    A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) system has been developed which allows for on-line measurements of trace gas components with concentrations as low as 1 ppb. The method is based on reactions of 0963-0252/6/2/004/img1 ions, which perform non-dissociative proton transfer to most of the common organic trace constituents but do not react with any of the components present in clean air. Examples of medical applications by means of breath analysis, examples of environmental trace gas analysis and examples in the field of food chemistry demonstrate the wide applicability of the method.

  6. One and two-neutron transfer reactions at REX-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, Kathrin; T-REX Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    In this contribution we will report on one and two neutron transfer reaction experiments in inverse kinematics at the REX-ISOLDE facility (CERN). Light charged target-like reaction products were detected and identified by the T-REX particle detector while coincident γ-rays were detected by the MINIBALL Germanium detector array. Recent results on (d,p) as well as (t,p) reactions with radioactive beams ranging from 11Be to 78Zn isotopes will be presented. The two-neutron transfer reactions involved for the first time the use of a radioactive tritium target in combination with a radioactive heavy ion beam. Supported by BMBF 06MT238, 06DA9036I, EURONS (No. 506065), and the DFG cluster of excellence Universe.

  7. Transfer reactions using a low-energy {sup 11}Be beam

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, Jacob

    2011-10-28

    A series of experiments have been performed to investigate neutron rich beryllium isotopes. Scattering as well as one neutron transfer reactions have been studied using a {sup 11}Be beam on deuteron targets. Bound states of {sup 10,11,12}Be have been studied and reaction cross sections have been calculated. The elastic scattering cross section has shown remarkable structure due to the halo structure of {sup 11}Be.

  8. Very efficient, reusable copper catalyst for carbene transfer reactions under biphasic conditions using ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Pilar; Caballero, Ana; Díaz-Requejo, M Mar; Nicasio, M Carmen; Pérez, Pedro J

    2006-02-16

    [reaction: see text] The complex {[HC(3,5-Me(2)pz)(3)]Cu(NCMe)}BF(4) catalyzes the transfer of the :CHCO(2)Et unit from ethyl diazoacetate to several saturated and unsaturated substrates with very high yields and under biphasic conditions using the ionic liquid [bmim][PF(6)] and hexane as the reaction medium. The catalyst has been tested for several cycles of recovery and reuse without any loss of activity.

  9. Transfer cross sections from reactions with /sup 254/Es as a target

    SciTech Connect

    Schadel, M.; Bruechle, W.; Bruegger, M.; Gaggeler, H.; Moody, K.J.; Schardt, D.; Suemmerer, K.; Hulet, E.K.; Dougan, A.D.; Dougan, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    We report radiochemically determined cross sections for the heaviest known actinides produced in transfer reactions of /sup 16,18/O and /sup 22/Ne with /sup 254/Es as a target. A comparison with data for similar transfers from /sup 248/Cm targets is made. Transfer cross sections are extrapolated for the production of the unknown, neutron-rich isotopes of elements 101 through 105, and the unique potential of /sup 254/Es as a target to make these exotic nuclei accessible is demonstrated.

  10. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one and two proton transfer reactions for 28Si+90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Verma, S.; Sandal, Rohit; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one and two proton stripping reactions for 28Si+90,94Zr systems were performed at lab energy 120 MeV with 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. Theoretical calculations performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code FRESCO (including various intermediate states involving target and projectile excitations before and/or after transfer along with sequential transfer) were able to reproduce one and two proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It was found that the DWBA calculations could describe the one proton transfer data well for both the systems but failed to reproduce the angular distributions for two proton transfer channels. The present measurements underline the importance of sequential transfer at energies much above the Coulomb barrier. We had also performed transfer reaction measurements for these systems in the sub- and near barrier region using recoil mass separator.

  11. Inter-layer proton transfer with a heterogeneous reaction on ice surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Yeohoon; Shin, Seokmin

    2008-02-01

    We report the results of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations on the reaction dynamics of a heterogeneous reaction between HCl and ClONO 2 on an ice surface. The constrained CPMD simulations showed that completely dissociated products are formed, and the most likely Cl-Cl distance is near 2.30 Å. The proton released from the reactant HCl is observed to be in the inter-layer region of the ice surface. It is also observed that an inter-layer proton transfer is possible on the protonated ice surface. These results illustrate the relationship between the heterogeneous reactions and the proton mobility between layers.

  12. Transfer to the continuum calculations of quasifree (p,pn) and (p,2p) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Ramos, M.; Moro, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    Nucleon removal (p, pn) and (p, 2p) reactions at intermediate energies have gained renewed attention in recent years as a tool to extract information from exotic nuclei. The information obtained from these experiments is expected to be sensitive to deeper portions of the wave function of the removed nucleon than knockout reactions with heavier targets. In this contribution, we present calculations for (p, 2p) and (p, pn) reactions performed within the so-called transfer to the continuum method (TR*). Results for stable and unstable nuclei are presented, and compared with experimental data, when available.

  13. Atomic decomposition of conceptual DFT descriptors: application to proton transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Inostroza-Rivera, Ricardo; Yahia-Ouahmed, Meziane; Tognetti, Vincent; Joubert, Laurent; Herrera, Bárbara; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2015-07-21

    In this study, we present an atomic decomposition, in principle exact, at any point on a given reaction path, of the molecular energy, reaction force and reaction flux, which is based on Bader's atoms-in-molecules theory and on Pendás' interacting quantum atoms scheme. This decomposition enables the assessment of the importance and the contribution of each atom or molecular group to these global properties, and may cast the light on the physical factors governing bond formation or bond breaking. The potential use of this partition is finally illustrated by proton transfers in model biological systems.

  14. Dual Catalysis: Proton/Metal-Catalyzed Tandem Benzofuran Annulation/Carbene Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Chen, Kai; Fu, Hongguang; Zhang, Li; Wu, Wanqing; Jiang, Huanfeng; Zhu, Shifa

    2016-03-18

    An efficient proton/metal-catalyzed tandem benzofuran annulation/carbene transfer reaction for the synthesis of various benzofuryl-substituted cyclopropanes and cycloheptatrienes has been developed. The reaction was proposed to proceed through two key intermediates, o-quinone methide (o-QM) and benzofuryl carbene. The DFT-based computational studies indicated that the reaction was initiated through the dehydration of o-HBA via a Brønsted acid mediated proton shuttle transition state, forming the key intermediate o-QM. PMID:26950391

  15. Single-drop reactive extraction/extractive reaction with forced convective diffusion and interphase mass transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinman, Leonid S.; Red, X. B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for time-dependent forced convective diffusion-reaction having convection by a recirculating flow field within the drop that is hydrodynamically coupled at the interface with a convective external flow field that at infinity becomes a uniform free-streaming flow. The concentration field inside the droplet is likewise coupled with that outside by boundary conditions at the interface. A chemical reaction can take place either inside or outside the droplet, or reactions can take place in both phases. The algorithm has been implemented, and for comparison results are shown here for the case of no reaction in either phase and for the case of an external first order reaction, both for unsteady behavior. For pure interphase mass transfer, concentration isocontours, local and average Sherwood numbers, and average droplet concentrations have been obtained as a function of the physical properties and external flow field. For mass transfer enhanced by an external reaction, in addition to the above forms of results, we present the enhancement factor, with the results now also depending upon the (dimensionless) rate of reaction.

  16. Single-drop reactive extraction/extractive reaction with forced convective diffusion and interphase mass transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinman, Leonid S.; Reed, X. B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed for the forced convective diffusion-reaction problem for convection inside and outside a droplet by a recirculating flow field hydrodynamically coupled at the droplet interface with an external flow field that at infinity becomes a uniform streaming flow. The concentration field inside the droplet is likewise coupled with that outside by boundary conditions at the interface. A chemical reaction can take place either inside or outside the droplet or reactions can take place in both phases. The algorithm has been implemented and results are shown here for the case of no reaction and for the case of an external first order reaction, both for unsteady behavior. For pure interphase mass transfer, concentration isocontours, local and average Sherwood numbers, and average droplet concentrations have been obtained as a function of the physical properties and external flow field. For mass transfer enhanced by an external reaction, in addition to the above forms of results, we present the enhancement factor, with the results now also depending upon the (dimensionless) rate of reaction.

  17. Polymer-supported siloxane transfer agents for Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh H; Smith, Amos B

    2013-08-16

    The design, synthesis, and validation of a ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) polymer supporting siloxane transfer agents have been achieved that permit efficient palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. The solubility properties of the polymer facilitate not only product purification but also polymer recycling without significant loss of cross-coupling activity.

  18. Beyond frontier molecular orbital theory: a systematic electron transfer model (ETM) for polar bimolecular organic reactions.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Katharine J; Johnson, Richard P

    2013-03-01

    Polar bimolecular reactions often begin as charge-transfer complexes and may proceed with a high degree of electron transfer character. Frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory is predicated in part on this concept. We have developed an electron transfer model (ETM) in which we systematically transfer one electron between reactants and then use density functional methods to model the resultant radical or radical ion intermediates. Sites of higher reactivity are revealed by a composite spin density map (SDM) of odd electron character on the electron density surface, assuming that a new two-electron bond would occur preferentially at these sites. ETM correctly predicts regio- and stereoselectivity for a broad array of reactions, including Diels-Alder, dipolar and ketene cycloadditions, Birch reduction, many types of nucleophilic additions, and electrophilic addition to aromatic rings and polyenes. Conformational analysis of radical ions is often necessary to predict reaction stereochemistry. The electronic and geometric changes due to one-electron oxidation or reduction parallel the reaction coordinate for electrophilic or nucleophilic addition, respectively. The effect is more dramatic for one-electron reduction.

  19. Synthesis, characterisation, and oxygen atom transfer reactions involving the first gold(I)-alkylperoxo complexes.

    PubMed

    Collado, Alba; Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Oonishi, Yoshihiro; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Nolan, Steven P

    2013-11-25

    The synthesis of a new class of organogold species containing a peroxo moiety is reported. Complexes [Au(IPr)(OO(t)Bu)] and [Au(SIPr)(OO(t)Bu)] have been synthesised via a straightforward methodology using the parent gold(I) hydroxide complexes as synthons. These complexes have been successfully used in oxygen-transfer reactions to triphenylphosphine.

  20. Phthalimides as exceptionally efficient single electron transfer acceptors in reductive coupling reactions promoted by samarium diiodide.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Tatiana; Alvarez, Eleuterio; Chiara, Jose Luis

    2007-12-20

    Experimental and theoretical evidence shows that phthalimides are highly efficient single electron transfer acceptors in reactions promoted by samarium diiodide, affording ketyl radical anion intermediates, which participate in high-yielding inter- and intramolecular reductive coupling processes with different radicophiles including imides, oxime ethers, nitrones, and Michael acceptors.

  1. Marcus Theory: Thermodynamics CAN Control the Kinetics of Electron Transfer Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Todd P.

    2012-01-01

    Although it is generally true that thermodynamics do not influence kinetics, this is NOT the case for electron transfer reactions in solution. Marcus Theory explains why this is so, using straightforward physical chemical principles such as transition state theory, Arrhenius' Law, and the Franck-Condon Principle. Here the background and…

  2. Impact of Mutation on Proton Transfer Reactions in Ketosteroid Isomerase: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The two proton transfer reactions catalyzed by ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) involve a dienolate intermediate stabilized by hydrogen bonds with Tyr14 and Asp99. Molecular dynamics simulations based on an empirical valence bond model are used to examine the impact of mutating these residues on the hydrogen-bonding patterns, conformational changes, and van der Waals and electrostatic interactions during the proton transfer reactions. While the rate constants for the two proton transfer steps are similar for wild-type (WT) KSI, the simulations suggest that the rate constant for the first proton transfer step is smaller in the mutants due to the significantly higher free energy of the dienolate intermediate relative to the reactant. The calculated rate constants for the mutants D99L, Y14F, and Y14F/D99L relative to WT KSI are qualitatively consistent with the kinetic experiments indicating a significant reduction in the catalytic rates along the series of mutants. In the simulations, WT KSI retained two hydrogen-bonding interactions between the substrate and the active site, while the mutants typically retained only one hydrogen-bonding interaction. A new hydrogen-bonding interaction between the substrate and Tyr55 was observed in the double mutant, leading to the prediction that mutation of Tyr55 will have a greater impact on the proton transfer rates for the double mutant than for WT KSI. The electrostatic stabilization of the dienolate intermediate relative to the reactant was greater for WT KSI than for the mutants, providing a qualitative explanation for the significantly reduced rates of the mutants. The active site exhibited highly restricted motion during the proton transfer reactions, but small conformational changes occurred to facilitate the proton transfer reactions by strengthening the hydrogen-bonding interactions and by bringing the proton donor and acceptor closer to each other with the proper orientation for proton transfer. Thus, these calculations

  3. {gamma} spectroscopy around doubly magic {sup 48}Ca by heavy-ion transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Leoni, Silvia

    2012-10-20

    {gamma} spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei around {sup 48}Ca is performed by the heavy-ion transfer reaction {sup 48}Ca on {sup 64}Ni at 282 MeV, with the PRISMA-CLARA setup at Legnaro Laboratory. Angular distributions, polarizations and lifetimes analysis probe spin and parities of several excited states, shading lights on their configuration. In the one neutron transfer channels, {sup 49}Ca and {sup 47}Ca, states arising by coupling a single particle to the 3{sup -} phonon of {sup 48}Ca are observed, showing the robustness of nuclear collectivity in rather light systems. The work demonstrates the feasibility of complete in-beam {gamma}-spectroscopy with heavy-ion transfer reactions and provides a method that can be further exploited in the future with heavy targets and radioactive beams.

  4. Promotion of multi-electron transfer for enhanced photocatalysis: A review focused on oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changhua; Zhang, Xintong; Liu, Yichun

    2015-12-01

    Semiconductor photocatalysis has attracted significant interest for solar light induced environmental remediation and solar fuel generation. As is well known, photocatalytic performance is determined by three steps: photoexcitation, separation and transport of photogenerated charge carriers, and surface reactions. To achieve higher efficiency, significant efforts have been made on improvement of efficiency of above first two steps, which have been well documented in recent review articles. In contrast, this review intends to focus on strategies moving onto the third step of improvement for enhanced photocatalysis wherein active oxygen species including superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical are in situ detected. Particularly, surface electron-transfer reduction of oxygen over single component photocatalysts is reviewed and systems enabling multi-electron transfer induced oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are highlighted. It is expected this review could provide a guideline for readers to better understand the critical role of ORR over photocatalyst in charge carrier separation and transfer and obtain reliable results for enhanced aerobic photocatalysis.

  5. Two-neutron transfer analysis of the 16O(18O,16O)18O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermamatov, M. J.; Cappuzzello, F.; Lubian, J.; Cubero, M.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Ferreira, J. L.; Foti, A.; Garcia, V. N.; Gargano, A.; Lay, J. A.; Lenzi, S. M.; Linares, R.; Santagati, G.; Vitturi, A.

    2016-08-01

    Recently a quantitative description of the two-neutron transfer reaction 12C(18O,16O)14C was performed and the measured cross sections were successfully reproduced [M. Cavallaro et al., Phys. Rev. C 88, 054601 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevC.88.054601]. This task was accomplished by combining nuclear structure calculations of spectroscopic amplitudes and a full quantum description of the reaction mechanism. Verification of such a theoretical approach to other heavy nuclear systems is mandatory in order to use (18O,16O ) reactions to assess pair configurations in nuclear states. In this work we apply this methodology to the 16O(18O,16O)18O reaction at 84 MeV. Experimental angular distributions for the two-neutron transfer to the ground state and 21+ state of 18O were obtained using the MAGNEX spectrometer at INFN-LNS. The roles of one- and two-step processes are analyzed under the exact finite range coupled reaction channel and the second order distorted wave Born approximation. We conclude that the one-step transfer mechanism is dominant in this system.

  6. Neutrino Reactions on Two-Nucleon System and Core-Collapse Supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Nasu, Shota

    2011-10-21

    The neutrino reactions on nucleon and nucleus play important role in core-collapse supernova. Recently it is pointed that light nuclei(A = 2,3) can be abundant at the various stage of supernova environment. As an important mechanism of neutrino reaction on a few nucleon system, we study the neutrino emissivity on neutron fusion reaction nn{yields}de{sup -}{nu}-bar{sub e}.

  7. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D; Zimmermann, Sabine; Reinstein, Jochen; Hansen, D Flemming

    2016-09-12

    States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side-chains were quantified by NMR spin-relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand-bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side-chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  8. Two-quasiparticle states in {sup 250}Bk studied by decay scheme and transfer reaction spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Kondev, F. G.; Koenig, Z. M.; McHarris, Wm. C.; Yates, S. W.

    2008-05-15

    Two-quasiparticle states in {sup 250}Bk were investigated with decay scheme studies and the single-neutron transfer reaction {sup 249}Bk(d,p){sup 250}Bk. Mass-separated sources of {sup 254}Es were used for {alpha} singles and {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence measurements. These studies, plus previous studies of {sup 254}Es{sup m} {alpha} decay and the {sup 249}Bk(n,{gamma}) reaction, provide spins and parities of the observed levels. The transfer reaction {sup 249}Bk(d,p){sup 250}Bk was used to deduce neutron single-particle components of the observed bands. Six pairs of singlet and triplet states, formed by the coupling of proton and neutron one-quasiparticle states, were identified. The splitting energies between the triplet and singlet states were found to be in agreement with previous calculations.

  9. Gas-phase reactions and energy transfer at very low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sims, I R; Smith, I W

    1995-01-01

    Experimental studies of gas-phase chemical reactions and molecular energy transfer at very low temperatures and between electrically neutral species are reviewed. Although work of collisionally induced vibrational and rotational transfer is described, emphasis is placed on very recent results on the rates of free radical reactions obtained by applying the pulsed laser photolysis (PLP)-laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique in a CRESU (Cinétique de Réactions en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme) apparatus at temperatures as low as 13 K. These measurements demonstrate that quite a wide variety of reactions-including those between two radicals, those between radicals and unsaturated molecules, and even some of those between radicals and saturated molecules-remain rapid at very low temperatures. Theoretical efforts to explain some of these results are described, as is their impact on attempts to model the synthesis of molecules in interstellar clouds.

  10. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Zimmermann, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side‐chains were quantified by NMR spin‐relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand‐bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side‐chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  11. Solvation dynamics and energetics of intramolecular hydride transfer reactions in biomass conversion.

    PubMed

    Mushrif, Samir H; Varghese, Jithin J; Krishnamurthy, Chethana B

    2015-02-21

    Hydride transfer changes the charge structure of the reactant and thus, may induce reorientation/reorganization of solvent molecules. This solvent reorganization may in turn alter the energetics of the reaction. In the present work, we investigate the intramolecular hydride transfer by taking Lewis acid catalyzed glucose to fructose isomerization as an example. The C2-C1 hydride transfer is the rate limiting step in this reaction. Water and methanol are used as solvents and hydride transfer is simulated in the presence of explicit solvent molecules, treated quantum mechanically and at a finite temperature, using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) and metadynamics. Activation free energy barrier for hydride transfer in methanol is found to be 50 kJ mol(-1) higher than that in water. In contrast, in density functional theory calculations, using an implicit solvent environment, the barriers are almost identical. Analysis of solvent dynamics and electronic polarization along the molecular dynamics trajectory and the results of CPMD-metadynamics simulation of the hydride transfer process in the absence of any solvent suggest that higher barrier in methanol is a result of non-equilibrium solvation. Methanol undergoes electronic polarization during the hydride transfer step. However, its molecular orientational relaxation is a much slower process that takes place after the hydride transfer, over an extended timescale. This results in non-equilibrium solvation. Water, on the other hand, does not undergo significant electronic polarization and thus, has to undergo minimal molecular reorientation to provide near equilibrium solvation to the transition state and an improved equilibrium solvation to the post hydride shift product state. Hence, the hydride transfer step is also observed to be exergonic in water and endergonic in methanol. The aforementioned explanation is juxtaposed to enzyme catalyzed charge transfer reactions, where the enhanced solvation of the

  12. Definition and determination of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Felipe; Marazzi, Marco; Castaño, Obis; Acuña, A Ulises; Frutos, Luis Manuel

    2014-01-21

    A definition of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate within the very weak electronic coupling limit is proposed, and a novel theoretical formalism is developed for its quantitative determination in terms of internal coordinates The present formalism permits (i) the separation of donor and acceptor contributions to the reaction coordinate, (ii) the identification of the intrinsic role of donor and acceptor in the triplet energy transfer process, and (iii) the quantification of the effect of every internal coordinate on the transfer process. This formalism is general and can be applied to classical as well as to nonvertical triplet energy transfer processes. The utility of the novel formalism is demonstrated here by its application to the paradigm of nonvertical triplet-triplet energy transfer involving cis-stilbene as acceptor molecule. In this way the effect of each internal molecular coordinate in promoting the transfer rate, from triplet donors in the low and high-energy limit, could be analyzed in detail. PMID:25669358

  13. Direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer reaction dynamics and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Miller, Thomas F., III

    2014-03-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, in which both an electron and an associated proton undergo reactive transfer, play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. Due to the complexity of this class of reactions, a variety of different mechanisms fall under the umbrella of PCET. However, the physical driving forces that determine the preferred mechanism in a given system still remain poorly understood. Towards this end, we extend ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD), a path-integral quantum dynamics method, to enable the direct simulation and characterization of PCET reaction dynamics in both fully atomistic and system-bath models of organometallic catalysts. In addition to providing validation for the simulation method via extensive comparison with existing PCET rate theories, we analyze the RPMD trajectories to investigate the competition between the concerted and sequential reaction mechanisms for PCET, elucidating the large role of the solvent in controlling the preferred mechanism. We further employ RPMD to determine the kinetics and mechanistic features of concerted PCET reactions across different regimes of electronic and vibrational coupling, providing evidence for a new and distinct PCET reaction mechanism.

  14. Phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by membrane diacylglycerol kinase: a theoretical mechanism study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yafei; Tan, Hongwei; Zheng, Jimin; Li, Xichen; Chen, Guangju; Jia, Zongchao

    2015-10-14

    Diacylglycerol kinase is an integral membrane protein which catalyzes phosphoryl transfer from ATP to diacylglycerol. As the smallest kinase known, it shares no sequence homology with conventional kinases and possesses a distinct trimer structure. Thus far, its catalytic mechanism remains elusive. Using molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations, we investigated the co-factor and the substrate binding and phosphoryl transfer mechanism. Based on the analysis of density functional theory calculations, we reveal that the phosphorylation reaction of diacylglycerol kinase features the same phosphoryl transfer mechanism as other kinases, despite its unique structural properties. Our results further show that the active site is relatively open and able to accommodate ligands in multiple orientations, suggesting that the optimization of binding orientations and conformational changes would occur prior to actual phosphoryl transfer.

  15. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one- and two-proton transfer reactions for the 28Si + 90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Sandal, Rohit; Chakraborty, Santosh; Verma, Shashi; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one- and two-proton stripping reactions for 28Si + 90,94Zr systems were performed at 120 MeV. The experiment was carried out with the 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. The theoretical calculations were performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code fresco. The distorted wave Born approximation calculations reproduced the experimental angular distributions for the one-proton transfer channel for both the systems reasonably well but failed for the two-proton transfer channel. Coupled channels calculations including various intermediate states (involving target and projectile inelastic excitations before and/or after transfer) along with the sequential transfer were able to reproduce the two-proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It seems that at an energy above the Coulomb barrier, there is significant contribution of the indirect multistep and sequential transfer to the two-proton stripping reaction.

  16. Correcting reaction rates measured by saturation-transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabr, Refaat E.; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2008-04-01

    Off-resonance or spillover irradiation and incomplete saturation can introduce significant errors in the estimates of chemical rate constants measured by saturation-transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Existing methods of correction are effective only over a limited parameter range. Here, a general approach of numerically solving the Bloch-McConnell equations to calculate exchange rates, relaxation times and concentrations for the saturation-transfer experiment is investigated, but found to require more measurements and higher signal-to-noise ratios than in vivo studies can practically afford. As an alternative, correction formulae for the reaction rate are provided which account for the expected parameter ranges and limited measurements available in vivo. The correction term is a quadratic function of experimental measurements. In computer simulations, the new formulae showed negligible bias and reduced the maximum error in the rate constants by about 3-fold compared to traditional formulae, and the error scatter by about 4-fold, over a wide range of parameters for conventional saturation transfer employing progressive saturation, and for the four-angle saturation-transfer method applied to the creatine kinase (CK) reaction in the human heart at 1.5 T. In normal in vivo spectra affected by spillover, the correction increases the mean calculated forward CK reaction rate by 6-16% over traditional and prior correction formulae.

  17. In Situ Catalyst Modification in Atom Transfer Radical Reactions with Ruthenium Benzylidene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juneyoung; Grandner, Jessica M; Engle, Keary M; Houk, K N; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Ruthenium benzylidene complexes are well-known as olefin metathesis catalysts. Several reports have demonstrated the ability of these catalysts to also facilitate atom transfer radical (ATR) reactions, such as atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). However, while the mechanism of olefin metathesis with ruthenium benzylidenes has been well-studied, the mechanism by which ruthenium benzylidenes promote ATR reactions remains unknown. To probe this question, we have analyzed seven different ruthenium benzylidene complexes for ATR reactivity. Kinetic studies by (1)H NMR revealed that ruthenium benzylidene complexes are rapidly converted into new ATRA-active, metathesis-inactive species under typical ATRA conditions. When ruthenium benzylidene complexes were activated prior to substrate addition, the resulting activated species exhibited enhanced kinetic reactivity in ATRA with no significant difference in overall product yield compared to the original complexes. Even at low temperature, where the original intact complexes did not catalyze the reaction, preactivated catalysts successfully reacted. Only the ruthenium benzylidene complexes that could be rapidly transformed into ATRA-active species could successfully catalyze ATRP, whereas other complexes preferred redox-initiated free radical polymerization. Kinetic measurements along with additional mechanistic and computational studies show that a metathesis-inactive ruthenium species, generated in situ from the ruthenium benzylidene complexes, is the active catalyst in ATR reactions. Based on data from (1) H, (13)C, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, we suspect that this ATRA-active species is a RuxCly(PCy3)z complex.

  18. Diagnostic Criteria for the Characterization of Electrode Reactions with Chemically Coupled Reactions Preceding the Electron Transfer by Cyclic Square Wave Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Helfrick, John C; Mann, Megan A; Bottomley, Lawrence A

    2016-08-18

    Theory for cyclic square wave voltammetry of electrode reactions with chemical reactions preceding the electron transfer is presented. Theoretical voltammograms were calculated following systematic variation of empirical parameters to assess their impact on the shape of the voltammogram. From the trends obtained, diagnostic criteria for this mechanism were deduced. When properly applied, these criteria will enable non-experts in voltammetry to assign the electrode reaction mechanism and accurately measure reaction kinetics. PMID:27443581

  19. Development of ORRUBA: A Silicon Array for the Measurement of Transfer Reactions in Inverse Kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, S. D.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, Robert; Johnson, Micah; Jones, K. L.; Kapler, R.; Kozub, R. L.; Livesay, Jake; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Smith, Michael Scott; Swan, T. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Wilson, Gemma L

    2009-01-01

    The development of high quality radioactive beams has made possible the measurement of transfer reactions in inverse kinematics on unstable nuclei. Measurement of (d,p) reactions on neutron-rich nuclei yield data on the evolution of nuclear structure away from stability, and are of astrophysical interest. Experimentally, (d,p) reactions on heavy (Z=50) fission fragments are complicated by the strongly inverse kinematics, and relatively low beam intensities. Consequently, ejectile detection with high resolution in position and energy, a high dynamic range and a high solid angular coverage is required. The Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) is a new silicon detector array optimized for the measurement of (d,p) reactions in inverse kinematics.

  20. Photochemistry and proton transfer reaction chemistry of selected cinnamic acid derivatives in hydrogen bonded environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Russell, David H.

    1998-05-01

    Proton transfer reactions between cinnamic acid derivatives (MH) and ammonia are studied using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with a supersonic nozzle to entrain neutral species formed by 337 nm laser desorption. The supersonic nozzle is used to form clusters of the type MH(NH3)n where n ranges to numbers greater than 20. Multimeric clusters of MH, e.g. MH2(NH3)n are not detected in this experiment or are of low abundance. Photoexcitation of MH(NH3)n clusters by using 355 nm photons yields ionic species that correspond to direct multiphoton ionization, e.g. MH+[middle dot](NH3)n, and proton transfer reactions, e.g. H+(NH3)n. Analogous product ions are formed by photoexcitation of the methylamine, MH(CH3NH2)n, and ammonia/methanol, MH(NH3)(CH3OH)n, clusters. Detailed analysis of energetics data suggests that proton transfer occurs through neutral excited stare species, and a mechanism analogous to one proposed previously is used to rationalize the data. The energetics of proton transfer via a radical cation form of the cinnarnic acid dimer is also consistent with the data. The relevance of this work to fundamental studies of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) is discussed. In particular, the role of excited state proton transfer (ESPT) in MALDI is discussed.

  1. Key Role of Active-Site Water Molecules in Bacteriorhodopsin Proton-Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, A.N.; Baudry, Jerome Y; Suhai, Sandor; Fischer, S.; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-10-01

    The functional mechanism of the light-driven proton pump protein bacteriorhodopsin depends on the location of water molecules in the active site at various stages of the photocycle and on their roles in the proton-transfer steps. Here, free energy computations indicate that electrostatic interactions favor the presence of a cytoplasmic-side water molecule hydrogen bonding to the retinal Schiff base in the state preceding proton transfer from the retinal Schiff base to Asp85. However, the nonequilibrium nature of the pumping process means that the probability of occupancy of a water molecule in a given site depends both on the free energies of insertion of the water molecule in this and other sites during the preceding photocycle steps and on the kinetic accessibility of these sites on the time scale of the reaction steps. The presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule has a dramatic effect on the mechanism of proton transfer: the proton is channeled on the Thr89 side of the retinal, whereas the transfer on the Asp212 side is hindered. Reaction-path simulations and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule permits a low-energy bacteriorhodopsin conformer in which the water molecule bridges the twisted retinal Schiff base and the proton acceptor Asp85. From this low-energy conformer, proton transfer occurs via a concerted mechanism in which the water molecule participates as an intermediate proton carrier.

  2. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'Yov, Ilia A.

    2015-12-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor.

  3. Discovery of the Shape Coexisting 0+ State in Mg32 by a Two Neutron Transfer Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, K.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Bildstein, V.; Gernhäuser, R.; Bastin, B.; Bree, N.; Diriken, J.; van Duppen, P.; Huyse, M.; Patronis, N.; Vermaelen, P.; Voulot, D.; van de Walle, J.; Wenander, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Chapman, R.; Hadinia, B.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, J. F.; Lutter, R.; Thirolf, P. G.; Labiche, M.; Blazhev, A.; Kalkühler, M.; Reiter, P.; Seidlitz, M.; Warr, N.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Jeppesen, H. B.; Fiori, E.; Georgiev, G.; Schrieder, G.; Das Gupta, S.; Lo Bianco, G.; Nardelli, S.; Butterworth, J.; Johansen, J.; Riisager, K.

    2010-12-01

    The “island of inversion” nucleus Mg32 has been studied by a (t, p) two neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE. The shape coexistent excited 0+ state in Mg32 has been identified by the characteristic angular distribution of the protons of the ΔL=0 transfer. The excitation energy of 1058 keV is much lower than predicted by any theoretical model. The low γ-ray intensity observed for the decay of this 0+ state indicates a lifetime of more than 10 ns. Deduced spectroscopic amplitudes are compared with occupation numbers from shell-model calculations.

  4. Discovery of the shape coexisting 0+ state in 32 Mg by a two neutron transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, K; Kröll, T; Krücken, R; Bildstein, V; Gernhäuser, R; Bastin, B; Bree, N; Diriken, J; Van Duppen, P; Huyse, M; Patronis, N; Vermaelen, P; Voulot, D; Van de Walle, J; Wenander, F; Fraile, L M; Chapman, R; Hadinia, B; Orlandi, R; Smith, J F; Lutter, R; Thirolf, P G; Labiche, M; Blazhev, A; Kalkühler, M; Reiter, P; Seidlitz, M; Warr, N; Macchiavelli, A O; Jeppesen, H B; Fiori, E; Georgiev, G; Schrieder, G; Das Gupta, S; Lo Bianco, G; Nardelli, S; Butterworth, J; Johansen, J; Riisager, K

    2010-12-17

    The "island of inversion" nucleus 32 Mg has been studied by a (t, p) two neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE. The shape coexistent excited 0+ state in 32 Mg has been identified by the characteristic angular distribution of the protons of the Δ L=0 transfer. The excitation energy of 1058 keV is much lower than predicted by any theoretical model. The low γ-ray intensity observed for the decay of this 0+ state indicates a lifetime of more than 10 ns. Deduced spectroscopic amplitudes are compared with occupation numbers from shell-model calculations.

  5. Protein Dynamics Control of Electron Transfer in Photosynthetic Reaction Centers from Rps. Sulfoviridis

    PubMed Central

    Medvedev, E. S.; Kotelnikov, A. I.; Barinov, A. V.; Psikha, B. L.; Ortega, J. M.; Popović, D. M.; Stuchebrukhov, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    In the cycle of photosynthetic reaction centers, the initially oxidized special pair of bacteriochlorophyll molecules is subsequently reduced by an electron transferred over a chain of four hemes of the complex. Here, we examine the kinetics of electron transfer between the proximal heme c-559 of the chain and the oxidized special pair in the reaction center from Rps. sulfoviridis in the range of temperatures from 294 to 40 K. The experimental data were obtained for three redox states of the reaction center, in which one, two, or three nearest hemes of the chain are reduced prior to special pair oxidation. The experimental kinetic data are analyzed in terms of a Sumi–Marcus-type model developed in our previous paper,1 in which similar measurements were reported on the reaction centers from Rps. viridis. The model allows us to establish a connection between the observed nonexponential electron-transfer kinetics and the local structural relaxation dynamics of the reaction center protein on the microsecond time scale. The activation energy for relaxation dynamics of the protein medium has been found to be around 0.1 eV for all three redox states, which is in contrast to a value around 0.4–0.6 eV in Rps. viridis.1 The possible nature of the difference between the reaction centers from Rps. viridis and Rps. sulfoviridis, which are believed to be very similar, is discussed. The role of the protein glass transition at low temperatures and that of internal water molecules in the process are analyzed. PMID:18284231

  6. Differential Quantum Tunneling Contributions in Nitroalkane Oxidase Catalyzed and the Uncatalyzed Proton Transfer Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Major , D.; Heroux , A; Orville , A; Valley , M; Fitzpatrick , P; Gao , J

    2009-01-01

    The proton transfer reaction between the substrate nitroethane and Asp-402 catalyzed by nitroalkane oxidase and the uncatalyzed process in water have been investigated using a path-integral free-energy perturbation method. Although the dominating effect in rate acceleration by the enzyme is the lowering of the quasiclassical free energy barrier, nuclear quantum effects also contribute to catalysis in nitroalkane oxidase. In particular, the overall nuclear quantum effects have greater contributions to lowering the classical barrier in the enzyme, and there is a larger difference in quantum effects between proton and deuteron transfer for the enzymatic reaction than that in water. Both experiment and computation show that primary KIEs are enhanced in the enzyme, and the computed Swain-Schaad exponent for the enzymatic reaction is exacerbated relative to that in the absence of the enzyme. In addition, the computed tunneling transmission coefficient is approximately three times greater for the enzyme reaction than the uncatalyzed reaction, and the origin of the difference may be attributed to a narrowing effect in the effective potentials for tunneling in the enzyme than that in aqueous solution.

  7. One Nucleon Transfer Reactions Around 68Ni at REX-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patronis, N.; Raabe, R.; Bildstein, V.; Bree, N.; Gernhäuser, R.; Huyse, M.; Kröll, Th.; Krücken, R.; Mahgoub, M.; Maierbeck, P.; Stefanescu, I.; van de Walle, J.; van Duppen, P.

    2008-05-01

    The newly built position sensitive Si detectors array of nearly 4π angular coverage which is going to be installed at the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN is briefly presented. This setup will be combined with the Miniball detectors array, constituting a unique tool for the study of one-nucleon transfer reactions. The experimental study of d(66Ni,p)67Ni reaction will be proposed, as a starting point for a series of experiments aiming to the study of the single particle character of the levels of the odd mass neutron reach unstable Ni isotopes. In this contribution, the feasibility and sensitivity of the experiment is presented.

  8. Transfer Reactions on Neutron-rich Nuclei at REX-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröll, Th.; Bildstein, V.; Wimmer, K.; Krücken, R.; Gernhäuser, R.; Lutter, R.; Schwerdtfeger, W.; Thirolf, P.; Bastin, B.; Bree, N.; Diriken, J.; Huyse, M.; Patronis, N.; Raabe, R.; Van Duppen, P.; Vermaelen, P.; Cederkäll, J.; Clément, E.; Van de Walle, J.; Voulot, D.; Wenander, F.; Blazhev, A.; Kalkühler, M.; Reiter, P.; Seidlitz, M.; Warr, N.; Deacon, A.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Freeman, S.; Das Gupta, S.; Lo Bianco, G.; Nardelli, S.; Fiori, E.; Georgiev, G.; Scheck, M.; Fraile, L. M.; Balabanski, D.; Nilsson, T.; Tengborn, E.; Butterworth, J.; Singh, B. S. Nara; Angus, L.; Chapman, R.; Hadinia, B.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, J. F.; Wady, P.; Schrieder, G.; Labiche, M.; Johansen, J.; Riisager, K.; Jeppesen, H. B.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Davinson, T.

    2009-08-01

    We report on one- and two-neutron transfer reactions to study the single-particle properties of nuclei at the border of the "island of inversion." The (d, p)- and (t, p)-reactions in inverse kinematics on the neutron-rich isotope 30Mg, delivered as radioactive beam by the REX-ISOLDE facility, have been investigated. The outgoing protons have been detected and identified by a newly built array of Si detectors. The γ-decay of excited states has been detected in coincidence by the MINIBALL array. First results for 31Mg and from the search for the second, spherical, 0+ state in 32Mg are presented.

  9. Analysis of the role of neutron transfer in asymmetric fusion reactions at subbarrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogloblin, A. A.; Zhang, H. Q.; Lin, C. J.; Jia, H. M.; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Kuzmin, E. A.; Danilov, A. N.; Demyanova, A. S.; Trzaska, W. H.; Xu, X. X.; Yang, F.; Sargsyan, V. V. Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Scheid, W.

    2015-12-15

    The excitation functions were measured for the {sup 28}Si + {sup 208}Pb complete-fusion (capture) reaction at deep subbarrier energies. The results were compared with the cross sections predicted within the quantum diffusion approach. The role of neutron transfer in the case of positive Q values in the {sup 28}Si + {sup 124}Sn, {sup 208}Pb; {sup 30}Si + {sup 124}Sn, {sup 208}Pb; {sup 20}Ne + {sup 208}Pb; {sup 40}Ca + {sup 96}Zr; and {sup 134}Te + {sup 40}Ca complete-fusion (capture) reactions is discussed.

  10. GALS - setup for production and study of multinucleon transfer reaction products: present status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemlyanoy, S.; Zagrebaev, V.; Kozulin, E.; Kudryavtsev, Yu; Fedosseev, V.; Bark, R.; Janas, Z.

    2016-06-01

    This is a brief report on the current status of the new GAs cell based Laser ionization Setup (GALS) at Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) - JINR, Dubna. GALS is planned to exploit available beams from the U-400M cyclotron in low energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions to study exotic neutron-rich nuclei located in the "north-east" region of nuclear map. Products from 4.5 to 9 MeV/nucleon heavy-ion collisions, such as 136Xe on 208Pb, are to be captured in a gas cell and selectively laser-ionized in a sextupole (quadrupole) ion guide extraction system.

  11. Production of new heavy isotopes in low-energy multinucleon transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Zagrebaev, Valery; Greiner, Walter

    2008-09-19

    It is shown that the multinucleon transfer reactions in low-energy collisions of heavy ions may be used for production of new neutron-rich nuclei at the "northeast" part of the nuclear map along the neutron closed shell N=126 which plays an important role in the r process of nucleosynthesis. More than 50 unknown nuclei might be produced in such reactions (in particular, in collision of 136Xe with 208Pb) with cross sections of not less than 1 microb. PMID:18851367

  12. X-ray Crystal Structures Elucidate the Nucleotidyl Transfer Reaction of Transcript Initiation Using Two Nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    M Gleghorn; E Davydova; R Basu; L Rothman-Denes; K Murakami

    2011-12-31

    We have determined the X-ray crystal structures of the pre- and postcatalytic forms of the initiation complex of bacteriophage N4 RNA polymerase that provide the complete set of atomic images depicting the process of transcript initiation by a single-subunit RNA polymerase. As observed during T7 RNA polymerase transcript elongation, substrate loading for the initiation process also drives a conformational change of the O helix, but only the correct base pairing between the +2 substrate and DNA base is able to complete the O-helix conformational transition. Substrate binding also facilitates catalytic metal binding that leads to alignment of the reactive groups of substrates for the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. Although all nucleic acid polymerases use two divalent metals for catalysis, they differ in the requirements and the timing of binding of each metal. In the case of bacteriophage RNA polymerase, we propose that catalytic metal binding is the last step before the nucleotidyl transfer reaction.

  13. Acidic C-H Bond as a Proton Donor in Excited State Intramolecular Proton Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Stasyuk, Anton J; Cyrański, Michał K; Gryko, Daniel T; Solà, Miquel

    2015-03-10

    An unprecedented type of excited state intramolecular proton transfer in a series of benzo[h]quinoline (BHQ) derivatives substituted at position 10 with strong CH acid character is described using density functional theory/time-dependent density functional theory computational approaches with a hybrid functional and the 6-311++G(d,p) triple-ξ quality basis set. Our results show that for 10-malononitrile-substituted BHQ (2CNBHQ) the excited state intramolecular proton transfer C-H···N reaction is a barrierless process. Calculations also reveal that the reaction profiles of the 4-amino-substituted 2CNBHQ show a large dependence on the polarity of the environment. PMID:26579756

  14. Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry: on-line trace gas analysis at the ppb level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, A.; Jordan, A.; Holzinger, R.; Prazeller, P.; Vogel, W.; Lindinger, W.

    1995-11-01

    A system for trace gas analysis using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been developed which allows for on-line measurements of components with concentrations as low as 1 ppb. The method is based on reactions of H3O+ ions, which perform non-dissociative proton transfer to most of the common organic trace constituents but do not react with any of the components present in clean air. Examples of analysis of breath taken from smokers and non-smokers as well as from patients suffering from cirrhosis of the liver, and of air in buildings as well as of ambient air taken at a road crossing demonstrate the wide range of applicability of this method. An enhanced level of acetonitrile in the breath is a most suitable indicator that a person is a smoker. Enhanced levels of propanol strongly indicate that a person has a severe liver deficiency.

  15. Room temperature, hybrid sodium-based flow batteries with multi-electron transfer redox reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shamie, Jack S.; Liu, Caihong; Shaw, Leon L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2015-06-11

    We introduce a new concept of hybrid Na-based flow batteries (HNFBs) with a molten Na alloy anode in conjunction with a flowing catholyte separated by a solid Na-ion exchange membrane for grid-scale energy storage. Such HNFBs can operate at ambient temperature, allow catholytes to have multiple electron transfer redox reactions per active ion, offer wide selection of catholyte chemistries with multiple active ions to couple with the highly negative Na alloy anode, and enable the use of both aqueous and non-aqueous catholytes. Further, the molten Na alloy anode permits the decoupled design of power and energy since a large volume of the molten Na alloy can be used with a limited ion-exchange membrane size. In this proof-of-concept study, the feasibility of multielectron transfer redox reactions per active ion and multiple active ions for catholytes has been demonstrated. Furthermore, the critical barriers to mature this new HNFBs have also been explored.

  16. Temperature-dependent kinetics of charge transfer, hydrogen-atom transfer, and hydrogen-atom expulsion in the reaction of CO+ with CH4 and CD4.

    PubMed

    Melko, Joshua J; Ard, Shaun G; Johnson, Ryan S; Shuman, Nicholas S; Guo, Hua; Viggiano, Albert A

    2014-09-18

    We have determined the rate constants and branching ratios for the reactions of CO(+) with CH4 and CD4 in a variable-temperature selected ion flow tube. We find that the rate constants are collisional for all temperatures measured (193-700 K for CH4 and 193-500 K for CD4). For the CH4 reaction, three product channels are identified, which include charge transfer (CH4(+) + CO), H-atom transfer (HCO(+) + CH3), and H-atom expulsion (CH3CO(+) + H). H-atom transfer is slightly preferred to charge transfer at low temperature, with the charge-transfer product increasing in contribution as the temperature is increased (H-atom expulsion is a minor product for all temperatures). Analogous products are identified for the CD4 reaction. Density functional calculations on the CO(+) + CH4 reaction were also conducted, revealing that the relative temperature dependences of the charge-transfer and H-atom transfer pathways are consistent with an initial charge transfer followed by proton transfer.

  17. Protein modifications affecting triplet energy transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed Central

    Laible, P D; Chynwat, V; Thurnauer, M C; Schiffer, M; Hanson, D K; Frank, H A

    1998-01-01

    The efficiency of triplet energy transfer from the special pair (P) to the carotenoid (C) in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from a large family of mutant strains has been investigated. The mutants carry substitutions at positions L181 and/or M208 near chlorophyll-based cofactors on the inactive and active sides of the complex, respectively. Light-modulated electron paramagnetic resonance at 10 K, where triplet energy transfer is thermally prohibited, reveals that the mutations do not perturb the electronic distribution of P. At temperatures > or = 70 K, we observe reduced signals from the carotenoid in most of the RCs with L181 substitutions. In particular, triplet transfer efficiency is reduced in all RCs in which a lysine at L181 donates a sixth ligand to the monomeric bacteriochlorophyll B(B). Replacement of the native Tyr at M208 on the active side of the complex with several polar residues increased transfer efficiency. The difference in the efficiencies of transfer in the RCs demonstrates the ability of the protein environment to influence the electronic overlap of the chromophores and thus the thermal barrier for triplet energy transfer. PMID:9591686

  18. Electron transfer in reactions of ketones with organolithium reagents. A carbon-14 kinetic isotope effect probe

    SciTech Connect

    Yamataka, H.; Fujimura, N.; Kawafuji, Y.; Hanafusa, T.

    1987-07-08

    Kinetic isotope effects have been determined for reactions of ketones labeled with carbon-14 at the carbonyl carbon with MeLi and Me/sub 2/CuLi in diethyl ether at 0/sup 0/C. Observed isotope effects were as follows: (C/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/C double bonds O + MeLi, /sup 12/k//sup 14/k = 1.000 +/- 0.002; (C/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/C double bonds O + Me/sub 2/CuLi, 1.029 +/- 0.005; 2,4,6-Me/sub 3/C/sub 6/H/sub 2/COC/sub 6/H/sub 5/ + MeLi, 1.023 +/- 0.004. The relative reactivities of ortho-, meta-, and para-substituted benzophenones with these reagents were also determined by the competition experiments. These results are consistent with an electron-transfer step which is followed by a carbon-carbon bond-forming step that is or is not rate determining depending on the structure of ketones and reagents. The reaction of benzophenone with MeLi proceeds via rate-determining electron transfer; the change in nucleophile from MeLi to Me/sub 2/CuLi shifts the rate-determining step from electron transfer to recombination; the change in ketone from benzophenone to 2,4,6-trimethylbenzophenone also shifts the rate-determining step from electron transfer to recombination because the latter step becomes slower for the more hindered ketone. The extent of the geometrical change of the substrate at the electron-transfer transition state of the reaction of benzophenone with MeLi was estimated to be small on the basis of the magnitude of the KIE and the rho value of the Hammett correlation.

  19. Spectroscopy of 46Ar by the (t ,p ) two-neutron transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, K.; Wimmer, K.; Hellgartner, S.; Mücher, D.; Bildstein, V.; Diriken, J.; Elseviers, J.; Gaffney, L. P.; Gernhäuser, R.; Iwanicki, J.; Johansen, J. G.; Huyse, M.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Lutter, R.; Orlandi, R.; Pakarinen, J.; Raabe, R.; Reiter, P.; Roger, T.; Schrieder, G.; Seidlitz, M.; Sorlin, O.; Van Duppen, P.; Warr, N.; De Witte, H.; Zielińska, M.

    2016-04-01

    States in the N =28 nucleus 46Ar have been studied by a two-neutron transfer reaction at REX-ISOLDE (CERN). A beam of radioactive 44Ar at an energy of 2.16 AMeV and a tritium-loaded titanium target were used to populate 46Ar by the 3H(44Ar,p ) two-neutron transfer reaction. Protons emitted from the target were identified in the T-REX silicon detector array. The excitation energies of states in 46Ar have been reconstructed from the measured angles and energies of recoil protons. Angular distributions for three final states were measured and based on the shape of the differential cross section an excited state at 3695 keV was identified as Jπ=0+ . The angular differential cross section for the population of different states are compared to calculations using a reaction model employing both sequential and direct transfer of two neutrons. Results are compared to shell-model calculations using state-of-the-art effective interactions.

  20. Electrocatalysis of anodic oxygen-transfer reactions at modified lead dioxide electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Yun-Lin.

    1990-09-21

    The electrocatalytic activities were compared for pure and chloride-doped beta-PbO{sub 2} (Cl-PbO{sub 2}) films on gold and platinum substrates. Rate constants were increased significantly for oxidations of Mn{sup 2+}, toluene, benzyl alcohol, dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) and benzaldehyde in acidic media by the incorporation of Cl{sup {minus}} into the oxide films. These reactions are concluded to occur by the electrocatalytic transfer of oxygen from H{sub 2}O to the reaction products. Results of x-ray diffraction studies indicate the Cl-PbO{sub 2} film continues to have the slightly distorted rutile structure of pure beta-PbO{sub 2}. The observed electrocatalytic phenomena are concluded to be the beneficial consequence of surface defects generated when Cl{sup {minus}} serves for charge compensation within the surface matrix and, thereby, increases the number of surface sites capable of adsorbing hydroxyl radicals which are transferred in the electrocatalytic O-transfer reactions. 91 refs., 44 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Donor-site giant cell reaction following backfill with synthetic bone material during osteochondral plug transfer.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Donald E; Hart, Joseph M; Hart, Jennifer A; Miller, Mark D

    2009-10-01

    Osteochondral defects are common in younger, active patients. Multiple strategies have been used to treat these lesions, including microfracture and osteochondral plug transfer. We describe a patient experiencing chronic knee pain and a full-thickness cartilage defect on the lateral femoral condyle. After failing conservative management and microfracture surgery, the patient underwent osteochondral autograft plug transfer, with backfilling of the donor sites using synthetic bone graft substitute. Initial recovery was uncomplicated until the patient experienced pain following a twist of the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging for the subsequent knee injury revealed poor healing at the donor sites. The donor sites were debrided, and specimens revealed a foreign body giant cell reaction. Donor-site morbidity is of primary concern during osteochondral plug transfer; however, insufficient data exist to support the use of synthetic bone graft material. Our results indicate that off-label use of synthetic bone graft substitute during a primary procedure requires further investigation.

  2. Thermal proton transfer reactions in ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kuan Yu; Lee, Sheng; Tsai, Ming-Tsang; Lu, I-Chung; Dyakov, Yuri A; Lai, Yin Hung; Lee, Yuan-Tseh; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2014-03-01

    One of the reasons that thermally induced reactions are not considered a crucial mechanism in ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (UV-MALDI) is the low ion-to-neutral ratios. Large ion-to-neutral ratios (10(-4)) have been used to justify the unimportance of thermally induced reactions in UV-MALDI. Recent experimental measurements have shown that the upper limit of the total ion-to-neutral ratio is approximately 10(-7) at a high laser fluence and less than 10(-7) at a low laser fluence. Therefore, reexamining the possible contributions of thermally induced reactions in MALDI may be worthwhile. In this study, the concept of polar fluid was employed to explain the generation of primary ions in MALDI. A simple model, namely thermal proton transfer, was used to estimate the ion-to-neutral ratios in MALDI. We demonstrated that the theoretical calculations of ion-to-neutral ratios exhibit the same trend and similar orders of magnitude compared with those of experimental measurements. Although thermal proton transfer may not generate all of the ions observed in MALDI, the calculations demonstrated that thermally induced reactions play a crucial role in UV-MALDI.

  3. Dynamics of the F(-) + CH3I → HF + CH2I(-) Proton Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaxu; Xie, Jing; Hase, William L

    2015-12-17

    Direct chemical dynamics simulations, at collision energies Erel of 0.32 and 1.53 eV, were performed to obtain an atomistic understanding of the F(-) + CH3I reaction dynamics. There is only the F(-) + CH3I → CH3F + I(-) bimolecular nucleophilic substitution SN2 product channel at 0.32 eV. Increasing Erel to 1.53 eV opens the endothermic F(-) + CH3I → HF + CH2I(-) proton transfer reaction, which is less competitive than the SN2 reaction. The simulations reveal proton transfer occurs by two direct atomic-level mechanisms, rebound and stripping, and indirect mechanisms, involving formation of the F(-)···HCH2I complex and the roundabout. For the indirect trajectories all of the CH2I(-) is formed with zero-point energy (ZPE), while for the direct trajectories 50% form CH2I(-) without ZPE. Without a ZPE constraint for CH2I(-), the reaction cross sections for the rebound, stripping, and indirect mechanisms are 0.2 ± 0.1, 1.2 ± 0.4, and 0.7 ± 0.2 Å(2), respectively. Discarding trajectories that do not form CH2I(-) with ZPE reduces the rebound and stripping cross sections to 0.1 ± 0.1 and 0.7 ± 0.5 Å(2). The HF product is formed rotationally and vibrationally unexcited. The average value of J is 2.6 and with histogram binning n = 0. CH2I(-) is formed rotationally excited. The partitioning between CH2I(-) vibration and HF + CH2I(-) relative translation energy depends on the treatment of CH2I(-) ZPE. Without a CH2I(-) ZPE constraint the energy partitioning is primarily to relative translation with little CH2I(-) vibration. With a ZPE constraint, energy partitioning to CH2I(-) rotation, CH2I(-) vibration, and relative translation are statistically the same. The overall F(-) + CH3I rate constant at Erel of both 0.32 and 1.53 eV is in good agreement with experiment and negligibly affected by the treatment of CH2I(-) ZPE, since the SN2 reaction is the major contributor to the total reaction rate constant. The potential energy surface and reaction dynamics for F

  4. Dynamics of the F(-) + CH3I → HF + CH2I(-) Proton Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaxu; Xie, Jing; Hase, William L

    2015-12-17

    Direct chemical dynamics simulations, at collision energies Erel of 0.32 and 1.53 eV, were performed to obtain an atomistic understanding of the F(-) + CH3I reaction dynamics. There is only the F(-) + CH3I → CH3F + I(-) bimolecular nucleophilic substitution SN2 product channel at 0.32 eV. Increasing Erel to 1.53 eV opens the endothermic F(-) + CH3I → HF + CH2I(-) proton transfer reaction, which is less competitive than the SN2 reaction. The simulations reveal proton transfer occurs by two direct atomic-level mechanisms, rebound and stripping, and indirect mechanisms, involving formation of the F(-)···HCH2I complex and the roundabout. For the indirect trajectories all of the CH2I(-) is formed with zero-point energy (ZPE), while for the direct trajectories 50% form CH2I(-) without ZPE. Without a ZPE constraint for CH2I(-), the reaction cross sections for the rebound, stripping, and indirect mechanisms are 0.2 ± 0.1, 1.2 ± 0.4, and 0.7 ± 0.2 Å(2), respectively. Discarding trajectories that do not form CH2I(-) with ZPE reduces the rebound and stripping cross sections to 0.1 ± 0.1 and 0.7 ± 0.5 Å(2). The HF product is formed rotationally and vibrationally unexcited. The average value of J is 2.6 and with histogram binning n = 0. CH2I(-) is formed rotationally excited. The partitioning between CH2I(-) vibration and HF + CH2I(-) relative translation energy depends on the treatment of CH2I(-) ZPE. Without a CH2I(-) ZPE constraint the energy partitioning is primarily to relative translation with little CH2I(-) vibration. With a ZPE constraint, energy partitioning to CH2I(-) rotation, CH2I(-) vibration, and relative translation are statistically the same. The overall F(-) + CH3I rate constant at Erel of both 0.32 and 1.53 eV is in good agreement with experiment and negligibly affected by the treatment of CH2I(-) ZPE, since the SN2 reaction is the major contributor to the total reaction rate constant. The potential energy surface and reaction dynamics for F

  5. Effect of Electronic Excitation on Hydrogen Atom Transfer (Tautomerization) Reactions for the DNA Base Adenine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Salter, Latasha M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Geometrical structures and energetic properties for four different tautomers of adenine are calculated in this study, using multi-configurational wave functions. Both the ground and the lowest single excited state potential energy surface are studied. The energetic order of the tautomers on the ground state potential surface is 9H less than 7H less than 3H less than 1H, while on the excited state surface this order is found to be different: 3H less than 1H less than 9H less than 7H. Minimum energy reaction paths are obtained for hydrogen atom transfer (9 yields 3 tautomerization) reactions in the ground and the lowest excited electronic state. It is found that the barrier heights and the shapes of the reaction paths are different for the ground and the excited electronic state, suggesting that the probability of such tautomerization reaction is higher on the excited state potential energy surface. The barrier for this reaction in the excited state may become very low in the presence of water or other polar solvent molecules, and therefore such tautomerization reaction may play an important role in the solution phase photochemistry of adenine.

  6. A computational study of the phosphoryl transfer reaction between ATP and Dha in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Bordes, I; Ruiz-Pernía, J J; Castillo, R; Moliner, V

    2015-10-28

    Phosphoryl transfer reactions are ubiquitous in biology, being involved in processes ranging from energy and signal transduction to the replication genetic material. Dihydroxyacetone phosphate (Dha-P), an intermediate of the synthesis of pyruvate and a very important building block in nature, can be generated by converting free dihydroxyacetone (Dha) through the action of the dihydroxyacetone kinase enzyme. In this paper the reference uncatalyzed reaction in solution has been studied in order to define the foundations of the chemical reaction and to determine the most adequate computational method to describe this electronically complex reaction. In particular, the phosphorylation reaction mechanism between adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Dha in aqueous solution has been studied by means of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations with the QM subset of atoms described with semi-empirical and DFT methods. The results appear to be strongly dependent on the level of calculation, which will have to be taken into account for future studies of the reaction catalyzed by enzymes. In particular, PM3/MM renders lower free energy barriers and a less endergonic process than AM1d/MM and PM6/MM methods. Nevertheless, the concerted pathway was not located with the former combination of potentials. PMID:26303076

  7. The 9Be(8Li,9Be)8Li elastic-transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, O.; Guimarães, V.; Lichtenthäler, R.; Scarduelli, V.; Kolata, J. J.; Bertulani, C. A.; Amro, H.; Becchetti, F. D.; Jiang, Hao; Aguilera, E. F.; Lizcano, D.; Martinez-Quiroz, E.; Garcia, H.

    2008-09-01

    Angular distributions for the 9Be(8Li,9Be)8Li elastic-transfer reaction have been measured with a 27-MeV Li8 radioactive nuclear beam. Spectroscopic factors for the <9Be|8Li+p> bound system were obtained from the comparison between the experimental differential cross sections and finite-range distorted-wave Born approximation calculations made with the code FRESCO. The spectroscopic factors so obtained are compared with shell-model calculations and other experimental values. Using the present value for the spectroscopic factors, cross sections and reaction rates for the 8Li(p,γ)9Be direct proton-capture reaction of astrophysical interest were calculated in the framework of the potential model.

  8. Proton transfer reactions between nitric acid and acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde in the solid phase.

    PubMed

    Lasne, Jérôme; Laffon, Carine; Parent, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    The heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions of acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde with solid nitric acid (HNO(3)) films have been studied with Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (RAIRS) under Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) conditions in the 90-170 K temperature range. In the bulk or at the surface of the films, nitric acid transfers its proton to the carbonyl function of the organic molecules, producing protonated acetone-H(+), hydroxyacetone-H(+), acetaldehyde-H(+) and benzaldehyde-H(+), and nitrate anions NO(3)(-), a reaction not observed when nitric acid is previously hydrated [J. Lasne, C. Laffon and Ph. Parent, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 697]. This provides a molecular-scale description of the carbonyl protonation reaction in an acid medium, the first step of the acid-catalyzed condensation of carbonyl compounds, fuelling the growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere.

  9. Calculated protein and proton motions coupled to electron transfer: electron transfer from QA- to QB in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Alexov, E G; Gunner, M R

    1999-06-29

    Reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides were subjected to Monte Carlo sampling to determine the Boltzmann distribution of side-chain ionization states and positions and buried water orientation and site occupancy. Changing the oxidation states of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer electron donor (P) and primary (QA) and secondary (QB) quinone electron acceptors allows preparation of the ground (all neutral), P+QA-, P+QB-, P0QA-, and P0QB- states. The calculated proton binding going from ground to other oxidation states and the free energy of electron transfer from QA-QB to form QAQB- (DeltaGAB) compare well with experiment from pH 5 to pH 11. At pH 7 DeltaGAB is measured as -65 meV and calculated to be -80 meV. With fixed protein positions as in standard electrostatic calculations, DeltaGAB is +170 meV. At pH 7 approximately 0.2 H+/protein is bound on QA reduction. On electron transfer to QB there is little additional proton uptake, but shifts in side chain protonation and position occur throughout the protein. Waters in channels leading from QB to the surface change site occupancy and orientation. A cluster of acids (GluL212, AspL210, and L213) and SerL223 near QB play important roles. A simplified view shows this cluster with a single negative charge (on AspL213 with a hydrogen bond to SerL233) in the ground state. In the QB- state the cluster still has one negative charge, now on the more distant AspL210. AspL213 and SerL223 move so SerL223 can hydrogen bond to QB-. These rearrangements plus other changes throughout the protein make the reaction energetically favorable.

  10. pH-dependent electron transfer reaction and direct bioelectrocatalysis of the quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouta; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya; Yoshida, Makoto; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Nobuhumi

    2016-08-26

    A pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea (CcPDH) is an extracellular quinohemoeprotein, which consists a b-type cytochrome domain, a pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ) domain, and a family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module. The electron transfer reaction of CcPDH was studied using some electron acceptors and a carbon electrode at various pH levels. Phenazine methosulfate (PMS) reacted directly at the PQQ domain, whereas cytochrome c (cyt c) reacted via the cytochrome domain of intact CcPDH. Thus, electrons are transferred from reduced PQQ in the catalytic domain of CcPDH to heme b in the N-terminal cytochrome domain, which acts as a built-in mediator and transfers electron to a heterogenous electron transfer protein. The optimal pH values of the PMS reduction (pH 6.5) and the cyt c reduction (pH 8.5) differ. The catalytic currents for the oxidation of l-fucose were observed within a range of pH 4.5 to 11. Bioelectrocatalysis of CcPDH based on direct electron transfer demonstrated that the pH profile of the biocatalytic current was similar to the reduction activity of cyt c characters.

  11. Femtosecond real-time probing of reactions. IX. Hydrogen-atom transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herek, J. L.; Pedersen, S.; Bañares, L.; Zewail, A. H.

    1992-12-01

    The real-time dynamics of hydrogen-atom-transfer processes under collisionless conditions are studied using femtosecond depletion techniques. The experiments focus on the methyl salicylate system, which exhibits ultrafast hydrogen motion between two oxygen atoms due to molecular tautomerization, loosely referred to as intramolecular ``proton'' transfer. To test for tunneling and mass effects on the excited potential surface, we also studied deuterium and methyl-group substitutions. We observe that the motion of the hydrogen, under collisionless conditions, takes place within 60 fs. At longer times, on the picosecond time scale, the hydrogen-transferred form decays with a threshold of 15.5 kJ/mol; this decay behavior was observed up to a total vibrational energy of ˜7200 cm-1. The observed dynamics provide the global nature of the motion, which takes into account bonding before and after the motion, and the evolution of the wave packet from the initial nonequilibrium state to the transferred form along the O-H—O reaction coordinate. The vibrational periods (2π/ω) of the relevant modes range from 13 fs (the OH stretch) to 190 fs (the low-frequency distortion) and the motion involves (in part) these coordinates. The intramolecular vibrational-energy redistribution dynamics at longer times are important to the hydrogen-bond dissociation and to the nonradiative decay of the hydrogen-transferred form.

  12. pH-dependent electron transfer reaction and direct bioelectrocatalysis of the quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouta; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya; Yoshida, Makoto; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Nobuhumi

    2016-08-26

    A pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea (CcPDH) is an extracellular quinohemoeprotein, which consists a b-type cytochrome domain, a pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ) domain, and a family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module. The electron transfer reaction of CcPDH was studied using some electron acceptors and a carbon electrode at various pH levels. Phenazine methosulfate (PMS) reacted directly at the PQQ domain, whereas cytochrome c (cyt c) reacted via the cytochrome domain of intact CcPDH. Thus, electrons are transferred from reduced PQQ in the catalytic domain of CcPDH to heme b in the N-terminal cytochrome domain, which acts as a built-in mediator and transfers electron to a heterogenous electron transfer protein. The optimal pH values of the PMS reduction (pH 6.5) and the cyt c reduction (pH 8.5) differ. The catalytic currents for the oxidation of l-fucose were observed within a range of pH 4.5 to 11. Bioelectrocatalysis of CcPDH based on direct electron transfer demonstrated that the pH profile of the biocatalytic current was similar to the reduction activity of cyt c characters. PMID:27338639

  13. In Situ Catalyst Modification in Atom Transfer Radical Reactions with Ruthenium Benzylidene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juneyoung; Grandner, Jessica M; Engle, Keary M; Houk, K N; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Ruthenium benzylidene complexes are well-known as olefin metathesis catalysts. Several reports have demonstrated the ability of these catalysts to also facilitate atom transfer radical (ATR) reactions, such as atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). However, while the mechanism of olefin metathesis with ruthenium benzylidenes has been well-studied, the mechanism by which ruthenium benzylidenes promote ATR reactions remains unknown. To probe this question, we have analyzed seven different ruthenium benzylidene complexes for ATR reactivity. Kinetic studies by (1)H NMR revealed that ruthenium benzylidene complexes are rapidly converted into new ATRA-active, metathesis-inactive species under typical ATRA conditions. When ruthenium benzylidene complexes were activated prior to substrate addition, the resulting activated species exhibited enhanced kinetic reactivity in ATRA with no significant difference in overall product yield compared to the original complexes. Even at low temperature, where the original intact complexes did not catalyze the reaction, preactivated catalysts successfully reacted. Only the ruthenium benzylidene complexes that could be rapidly transformed into ATRA-active species could successfully catalyze ATRP, whereas other complexes preferred redox-initiated free radical polymerization. Kinetic measurements along with additional mechanistic and computational studies show that a metathesis-inactive ruthenium species, generated in situ from the ruthenium benzylidene complexes, is the active catalyst in ATR reactions. Based on data from (1) H, (13)C, and (31)P NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, we suspect that this ATRA-active species is a RuxCly(PCy3)z complex. PMID:27186790

  14. Excited state structural evolution during charge-transfer reactions in betaine-30.

    PubMed

    Ruchira Silva, W; Frontiera, Renee R

    2016-07-27

    Ultrafast photo-induced charge-transfer reactions are fundamental to a number of photovoltaic and photocatalytic devices, yet the multidimensional nature of the reaction coordinate makes these processes difficult to model theoretically. Here we use femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy to probe experimentally the structural changes occurring following photoexcitation in betaine-30, a canonical intramolecular charge-transfer complex. We observe changes in vibrational mode frequencies and amplitudes on the femtosecond timescale, which for some modes results in frequency shifts of over 20 cm(-1) during the first 200 fs following photoexcitation. These rapid mode-specific frequency changes track the planarization of the molecule on the 400 ± 100 fs timescale. Oscillatory amplitude modulations of the observed high frequency Raman modes indicate coupling between specific high frequency and low frequency vibrational motions, which we quantify for 6 low frequency modes and 4 high frequency modes. Analysis of the mode-specific kinetics is suggestive of the existence of a newly discovered electronic state involved in a relaxation pathway, which may be a low-lying triplet state. These results directly track the multiple nuclear coordinates involved in betaine-30's reactive pathway, and should be of use in rationally designing molecular systems with rapid electron transfer processes. PMID:26725657

  15. Femtosecond dynamics of fundamental reaction processes in liquids: Proton transfer, geminate recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, B.J.

    1992-11-01

    The fast excited state intramolecular proton transfer of 3-hydroxyflavone is measured and effects of external hydrogen-bonding interactions on the proton transfer are studied. The proton transfer takes place in {approximately}240 fsec in nonpolar environments, but becomes faster than instrumental resolution of 110 fsec in methanol solution. The dynamics following photodissociation of CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} and other small molecules provide the first direct observations of geminate recombination. The recombination of many different photodissociating species occurs on a {approximately}350 fsec time scale. Results show that recombination yields but not rates depend on the solvent environment and suggest that recombination kinetics are dominated by a single collision with surrounding solvent cage. Studies of sterically locked phenyl-substituted butadienes offer new insights into the electronic structure and isomerization behavior of conjugated polyenes. Data show no simple correlation between hinderance of specific large amplitude motions and signatures of isomerizative behavior such as viscosity dependent excited state lifetimes, implying that the isomerization does not provide a suitable for simple condensed phase reaction rate theories. The spectral dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran indicate that recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation all play important roles in photoreactivity of complex molecules. The interplay of these microscopic phenomena and their effect on macroscopic properties such as photochromism are discussed. All the results indicate that the initial steps of the photochromic reaction process occur extremely rapidly. Laser system and computer codes for data analysis are discussed.

  16. Probable new type of reaction mechanism: Double. cap alpha. direct transfer process

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Shu-wei; Wu Guo-hua; Miao Rong-zhi; Han Fei

    1983-10-01

    It is assumed that /sup 8/Be consists of two ..cap alpha.. particles which are close to each other in configuration space. A spectroscopic density of /sup 8/Be cluster in the residue nuclei is then obtained, which is proportional to the square of the preformation probability of ..cap alpha.. particle at nuclear surface. Using the improved method of parametrization of EFR-DWBA overlap integral,/sup 1//sup en-dash//sup 2/ we calculate the double differential energy spectra and angular distributions of ..cap alpha.. particles for the reactions /sup 209/Bi (/sup 12/C, ..cap alpha..) /sup 217/Fr and extract the preformation probability of ..cap alpha.. particle at the surface of /sup 217/Fr nuclei from fitting the experimental data. The agreement within the range of calculation error between the preformation probabilities extracted from transfer reactions and ..cap alpha.. decay suggests that the reaction /sup 209/Bi(/sup 12/C, ..cap alpha..) /sup 217/Fr may be explained as a double ..cap alpha.. direct transfer process.

  17. In situ Regeneration of NADH via Lipoamide Dehydrogenase-catalyzed Electron Transfer Reaction Evidenced by Spectroelectrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Tsz Kin; Chen, Baowei; Lei, Chenghong; Liu, Jun

    2012-08-01

    NAD/NADH is a coenzyme found in all living cells, carrying electrons from one reaction to another. We report on characterizations of in situ regeneration of NADH via lipoamide dehydrogenase (LD)-catalyzed electron transfer reaction to regenerate NADH using UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and maximum velocity (Vmax) of NADH regeneration were measured as 0.80 {+-} 0.15 mM and 1.91 {+-} 0.09 {micro}M s-1 in a 1-mm thin-layer spectroelectrochemical cell using gold gauze as the working electrode at the applied potential -0.75 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The electrocatalytic reduction of the NAD system was further coupled with the enzymatic conversion of pyruvate to lactate by lactate dehydrogenase to examine the coenzymatic activity of the regenerated NADH. Although the reproducible electrocatalytic reduction of NAD into NADH is known to be difficult compared to the electrocatalytic oxidation of NADH, our spectroelectrochemical results indicate that the in situ regeneration of NADH via LD-catalyzed electron transfer reaction is fast and sustainable and can be potentially applied to many NAD/NADH-dependent enzyme systems.

  18. A spectroscopist's view of energy states, energy transfers, and chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Moore, C Bradley

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes a research career beginning at Berkeley in 1960, shortly after Sputnik and the invention of the laser. Following thesis work on vibrational spectroscopy and the chemical reactivity of small molecules, we studied vibrational energy transfers in my own lab. Collision-induced transfers among vibrations of a single molecule, from one molecule to another, and from vibration to rotation and translation were elucidated. My research group also studied the competition between vibrational relaxation and chemical reaction for potentially reactive collisions with one molecule vibrationally excited. Lasers were used to enrich isotopes by the excitation of a predissociative transition of a selected isotopomer. We also tested the hypotheses of transition-state theory for unimolecular reactions of ketene, formaldehyde, and formyl fluoride by (a) resolving individual molecular eigenstates above a dissociation threshold, (b) locating vibrational levels at the transition state, (c) observing quantum resonances in the barrier region for motion along a reaction coordinate, and (d) studying energy release to fragments. PMID:17034339

  19. Bimolecular electron transfer reactions in coumarin amine systems: Donor acceptor orientational effect on diffusion-controlled reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpati, A. K.; Nath, S.; Kumbhakar, M.; Maity, D. K.; Senthilkumar, S.; Pal, H.

    2008-04-01

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions between excited coumarin dyes and different aliphatic amine (AlA) and aromatic amine (ArA) donors have been investigated in acetonitrile solution using steady-state (SS) and time-resolved (TR) fluorescence quenching measurements. No ground state complex or emissive exciplex formation has been indicated in these systems. SS and TR measurements give similar quenching constants ( kq) for each of the coumarin-amine pairs, suggesting dynamic nature of interaction in these systems. On correlating kq values with the free energy changes (Δ G0) of the ET reactions show the typical Rehm-Weller type of behavior as expected for bimolecular ET reactions under diffusive condition, where kq increases with -Δ G0 at the lower exergonicity (-Δ G0) region but ultimately saturate to a diffusion-limited value (kqDC) at the higher exergonicity region. It is, however, interestingly observed that the kqDC values vary largely depending on the type of the amines used. Thus, kqDC is much higher with ArAs than AlAs. Similarly, the kqDC for cyclic monoamine 1-azabicyclo-[2,2,2]-octane (ABCO) is distinctly lower and that for cyclic diamine 1,4-diazabicyclo-[2,2,2]-octane (DABCO) is distinctly higher than the kqDC value obtained for other noncyclic AlAs. These differences in the kqDC values have been rationalized on the basis of the differences in the orientational restrictions involved in the ET reactions with different types of amines. As understood, n-type donors (AlAs) introduce large orientational restriction and thus significantly reduces the ET efficiency in comparison to the π-type donors (ArAs). Structural constrains are inferred to be the reason for the differences in the kqDC values involving ABCO, DABCO donors in comparison to other noncyclic AlAs. Supportive evidence for the orientational restrictions involving different types of amines donors has also been obtained from DFT based quantum chemical calculations on the molecular orbitals of

  20. Imaging Proton Transfer and Dihalide Formation Pathways in Reactions of F(-) + CH3I.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, Eduardo; Michaelsen, Tim; Stei, Martin; Bastian, Björn; Meyer, Jennifer; Mikosch, Jochen; Wester, Roland

    2016-07-14

    Ion-molecule reactions of the type X(-) + CH3Y are commonly assumed to produce Y(-) through bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2). Beyond this reaction, additional reaction products have been observed throughout the last decades and have been ascribed to different entrance channel geometries differing from the commonly assumed collinear approach. We have performed a crossed beam velocity map imaging experiment on the F(-) + CH3I reaction at different relative collision energies between 0.4 and 2.9 eV. We find three additional channels competing with nucleophilic substitution at high energies. Experimental branching ratios and angle- and energy differential cross sections are presented for each product channel. The proton transfer product CH2I(-) is the main reaction channel, which competes with nucleophilic substitution up to 2.9 eV relative collision energy. At this level, the second additional channel, the formation of IF(-) via halogen abstraction, becomes more efficient. In addition, we present the first evidence for an [FHI](-) product ion. This [FHI](-) product ion is present only for a narrow range of collision energies, indicating possible dissociation at high energies. All three products show a similar trend with respect to their velocity- and scattering angle distributions, with isotropic scattering and forward scattering of the product ions occurring at low and high energies, respectively. Reactions leading to all three reaction channels present a considerable amount of energy partitioning in product internal excitation. The internally excited fraction shows a collision energy dependence only for CH2I(-). A similar trend is observed for the isoelectronic OH(-) + CH3I system. The comparison of our experimental data at 1.55 eV collision energy with a recent theoretical calculation for the same system shows a slightly higher fraction of internal excitation than predicted, which is, however, compatible within the experimental accuracy. PMID:26799548

  1. Imaging Proton Transfer and Dihalide Formation Pathways in Reactions of F– + CH3I

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ion–molecule reactions of the type X– + CH3Y are commonly assumed to produce Y– through bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2). Beyond this reaction, additional reaction products have been observed throughout the last decades and have been ascribed to different entrance channel geometries differing from the commonly assumed collinear approach. We have performed a crossed beam velocity map imaging experiment on the F– + CH3I reaction at different relative collision energies between 0.4 and 2.9 eV. We find three additional channels competing with nucleophilic substitution at high energies. Experimental branching ratios and angle- and energy differential cross sections are presented for each product channel. The proton transfer product CH2I– is the main reaction channel, which competes with nucleophilic substitution up to 2.9 eV relative collision energy. At this level, the second additional channel, the formation of IF– via halogen abstraction, becomes more efficient. In addition, we present the first evidence for an [FHI]− product ion. This [FHI]− product ion is present only for a narrow range of collision energies, indicating possible dissociation at high energies. All three products show a similar trend with respect to their velocity- and scattering angle distributions, with isotropic scattering and forward scattering of the product ions occurring at low and high energies, respectively. Reactions leading to all three reaction channels present a considerable amount of energy partitioning in product internal excitation. The internally excited fraction shows a collision energy dependence only for CH2I–. A similar trend is observed for the isoelectronic OH– + CH3I system. The comparison of our experimental data at 1.55 eV collision energy with a recent theoretical calculation for the same system shows a slightly higher fraction of internal excitation than predicted, which is, however, compatible within the experimental accuracy. PMID:26799548

  2. Electronic shift register memory based on molecular electron-transfer reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopfield, J. J.; Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Beratan, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a shift register memory at the molecular level is described in detail. The memory elements are based on a chain of electron-transfer molecules incorporated on a very large scale integrated (VLSI) substrate, and the information is shifted by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions. The design requirements for such a system are discussed, and several realistic strategies for synthesizing these systems are presented. The immediate advantage of such a hybrid molecular/VLSI device would arise from the possible information storage density. The prospect of considerable savings of energy per bit processed also exists. This molecular shift register memory element design solves the conceptual problems associated with integrating molecular size components with larger (micron) size features on a chip.

  3. Electron transfer reactions of osmium(II) complexes with phenols and phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Velayudham, Murugesan; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-07-01

    Three [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes (NN = polypyridine) with ligands of varying hydrophobicity were synthesized and characterized by NMR spectral techniques. The geometry of the molecules are optimized by DFT calculations. The interaction between [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes and phenolate ion in ground state is confirmed by absorption spectral study and the binding constant values are in the range of 3-740 M-1. The photoinduced electron transfer reaction of these [Os(NN)3]2+ complexes with phenols and phenolic acids at pH 12.5 leads to the formation of phenoxyl radical confirmed through transient absorption spectral study. Binding constants and electron transfer rate constants within the [Os(NN)3]2+-phenolate ion adduct account for the change for the overall quenching constant with the change of structure of reactants.

  4. On the theory of electron transfer reactions at semiconductor electrode/liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi Qin; Georgievskii, Yuri; Marcus, R. A.

    2000-02-01

    Electron transfer reaction rate constants at semiconductor/liquid interfaces are calculated using the Fermi Golden Rule and a tight-binding model for the semiconductors. The slab method and a z-transform method are employed in obtaining the electronic structures of semiconductors with surfaces and are compared. The maximum electron transfer rate constants at Si/viologen2+/+ and InP/Me2Fc+/0 interfaces are computed using the tight-binding type calculations for the solid and the extended-Hückel for the coupling to the redox agent at the interface. These results for the bulk states are compared with the experimentally measured values of Lewis and co-workers, and are in reasonable agreement, without adjusting parameters. In the case of InP/liquid interface, the unusual current vs applied potential behavior is additionally interpreted, in part, by the presence of surface states.

  5. Dissociative charge-transfer reactions of Ar + with simple aliphatic hydrocarbons at thermal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Masaharu; Kouno, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Ken-ichi; Funatsu, Tsuyoshi; Nishimura, Yukio; Obase, Hiroshi; Kugishima, Hirofumi; Yoshida, Kouichi

    1993-02-01

    A flowing-afterglow apparatus coupled with a low pressure chamber has been used to measure product ion distributions and rate constants in the charge-transfer reactions of Ar+ with CH4, C2Hn(n=2,4,6), and C3Hn(n=6,8) at thermal energy. Only parent cation is formed for C2H2 due to energy restriction. Major product channels are dissociative charge transfer followed by cleavage of C-H bond(s) for CH4, C2H4, C2H6, and C3H6, while by cleavage of a C-C bond for C3H8. A comparison of the product ion distributions with the photoelectron-photoion coincidence data for CH4, C2H4, and C2H6 leads us to conclude that the mean energies of precursor (pre)dissociative states are 15.3-15.5 eV, which are 0.3-0.5 eV below the resonance states. Thus the fractions of available energy deposited into internal modes of precursor parent ions at the instant of charge transfer are estimated to be 85%-95%, indicating that most of the CT reactions occurs without significant momentum transfer. The total rate constants for CH4, C2Hn(n=4,6), and C3Hn(n=6,8) are (0.78-1.1)×10-9 cm3 s-1, corresponding to 60%-92% of the calculated values from the Langevin theory. The rate constant for C2H2, 4.2×10-10 cm3 s-1, amounts to 38% of the kcalcd value. The small kobsd/kcalcd ratio is attributed to the lack of ionic states with favorable Franck-Condon factors for ionization.

  6. Theoretical study on the effect of solvent and intermolecular fluctuations in proton transfer reactions: General theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Nobuhiko; Ida, Tomonori; Endo, Kazunaka

    2004-04-30

    We present a theory of proton transfer reactions which incorporate the modulation of the proton's potential surface by intermolecular vibrations and the effect of coupling to solvent degree of freedom. The proton tunnels between states corresponding to it being localized in the wells of a double minimum potential. The resulting tunnel splitting depends on the intermolecular separation. The solvent response to the proton's charge is modeled as that of a continuous distribution of harmonic oscillators and the intermolecular stretching mode is also damped because of the interaction with solvent degree of freedom. The transition rate is given by the Fermi Gorlden Rule expression.

  7. Heat and mass transfer in unsteady rotating fluid flow with binary chemical reaction and activation energy.

    PubMed

    Awad, Faiz G; Motsa, Sandile; Khumalo, Melusi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM) is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM) are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations. PMID:25250830

  8. Heat and Mass Transfer in Unsteady Rotating Fluid Flow with Binary Chemical Reaction and Activation Energy

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Faiz G.; Motsa, Sandile; Khumalo, Melusi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM) is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM) are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations. PMID:25250830

  9. Interplay between aromaticity and strain in double group transfer reactions to 1,2-benzyne.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Israel; Cossío, Fernando P

    2016-05-30

    Density Functional Theory calculations are used to explore the double hydrogen atom transfer from different alkanes to 1,2-benzyne. State-of-the-art calculations including the Activation Strain Model of reactivity, Energy Decomposition Analysis, and Valence Bond methods, reveal the origins of the relatively low activation barriers computed for these processes compared to the analogous reaction involving acetylene. In addition, the interplay between the in-plane aromaticity of the corresponding transition states and the variation of the π-aromaticity associated with the benzyne moiety as well as their influence on the barrier heights of the transformations are analyzed in detail.

  10. Studies of Nuclei Close to 132Sn Using Single-Neutron Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. L.; Pain, S. D.; Kozub, R. L.; Adekola, Aderemi S; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Catford, Wilton N; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Cizewski, J. A.; Erikson, Luke; Gaddis, A. L.; Greife, U.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Harlin, Christopher W; Hatarik, Robert; Howard, Joshua A; James, J.; Kapler, R.; Krolas, W.; Liang, J Felix; Ma, Zhanwen; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Patterson, N. P.; Paulauskas, Stanley; Shapira, Dan; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Sikora, M.; Sissom, D. J.; Smith, Michael Scott; Swan, T. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Wilson, Gemma L

    2009-01-01

    Neutron transfer reactions were performed in inverse kinematics using radioactive ion beams of 132Sn, 130Sn, and 134Te and deuterated polyethylene targets. Preliminary results are presented. The Q-value spectra for 133Sn, 131Sn and 135Te reveal a number of previously unobserved peaks. The angular distributions are compatible with the expected lf7/2 nature of the ground state of 133Sn, and 2p3/2 for the 3.4 MeV state in 131Sn.

  11. Silicon Nano-well Arrays for Reliable Pattern Transfer and Locally Confined High Temperature Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Wi, Jung-Sub; Wilson, Robert J.; Lee, Donkoun; White, Robert M.; Wang, Shan X.

    2011-01-01

    Si nano-well arrays, with precisely controlled undercut Si sidewall profiles and flat bottomed pockets, enable uniform nanoscale pattern transfer from resists to metal deposits without degradation of the initial lithographic resolution, as verified by formation of arrays of Au nano-dots with 10 nm diameter. An additional functionality of the Si nano-wells as local nano-reactors, where the patterned material is enclosed in a Si pocket during high temperature reaction, is demonstrated by thermally inducing a phase transformation of the as-deposited A1 phase of FePt nano-dots to the high coercivity, chemically ordered L10 phase. PMID:21709347

  12. Studies of nuclei close to {sup 132}Sn using single-neutron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K. J.; Pain, S. D.; Kozub, R. L.; Howard, J. A.; O'Malley, P. D.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Shriner, J. F.; Sissom, D. J.; Adekola, A. S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Liang, J. F.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Shapira, D.; Smith, M. S.; Catford, W. N.; Harlin, C.; Patterson, N. P.; Swan, T. P.; Wilson, G. L.

    2009-03-04

    Neutron transfer reactions were performed in inverse kinematics using radioactive ion beams of {sup 132}Sn, {sup 130}Sn, and {sup 134}Te and deuterated polyethylene targets. Preliminary results are presented. The Q-value spectra for {sup 133}Sn, {sup 131}Sn and {sup 135}Te reveal a number of previously unobserved peaks. The angular distributions are compatible with the expected lf{sub 7/2} nature of the ground state of {sup 133}Sn, and 2p{sub 3/2} for the 3.4 MeV state in {sup 131}Sn.

  13. One Nucleon Transfer Reactions Around {sup 68}Ni at REX-ISOLDE

    SciTech Connect

    Patronis, N.; Raabe, R.; Bree, N.; Huyse, M.; Stefanescu, I.; Walle, J. van de; Duppen, P. van; Bildstein, V.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Kroell, Th.; Kruecken, R.; Mahgoub, M.; Maierbeck, P.

    2008-05-12

    The newly built position sensitive Si detectors array of nearly 4{pi} angular coverage which is going to be installed at the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN is briefly presented. This setup will be combined with the Miniball detectors array, constituting a unique tool for the study of one-nucleon transfer reactions. The experimental study of d({sup 66}Ni,p){sup 67}Ni reaction will be proposed, as a starting point for a series of experiments aiming to the study of the single particle character of the levels of the odd mass neutron reach unstable Ni isotopes. In this contribution, the feasibility and sensitivity of the experiment is presented.

  14. Transfer Reactions on Neutron-rich Nuclei at REX-ISOLDE

    SciTech Connect

    Kroell, Th.; Bildstein, V.; Wimmer, K.; Kruecken, R.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Lutter, R.; Schwerdtfeger, W.; Thirolf, P.; Bastin, B.; Bree, N.; Diriken, J.; Huyse, M.; Patronis, N.; Raabe, R.; Van Duppen, P.; Vermaelen, P.; Cederkaell, J.; Clement, E.; Van de Walle, J.; Voulot, D.

    2009-08-26

    We report on one- and two-neutron transfer reactions to study the single-particle properties of nuclei at the border of the ''island of inversion.'' The (d, p)- and (t, p)-reactions in inverse kinematics on the neutron-rich isotope {sup 30}Mg, delivered as radioactive beam by the REX-ISOLDE facility, have been investigated. The outgoing protons have been detected and identified by a newly built array of Si detectors. The {gamma}-decay of excited states has been detected in coincidence by the MINIBALL array. First results for {sup 31}Mg and from the search for the second, spherical, 0{sup +} state in {sup 32}Mg are presented.

  15. Interhemispheric transfer of extinction of the active avoidance reaction in rats.

    PubMed

    Islam, S; Bures, J; Buresová, O

    1975-07-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) was employed in rats to study the lateralization of extinction of a jumping avoidance reaction. Under unilateral CSD, 181 nonreinforced trials were needed to extinguish the avoidance reaction acquired in three 100-trial sessions of intact-brain training. During a second extinction session, either with the same or with the contralateral hemisphere depressed, the mean number of trials to the extinction criterion (9/10) was 39 (n = 12) or 186 (n = 15), respectively. Five extinction trials performed with the brain intact 1 hr before extinction with contralateral CSD decreased the number of trials to extinction of 98 (n = 11). Thus, extinction of active avoidance can be lateralized and interhemispherically transferred in the same way as acquisition of this habit.

  16. Lifetime and g-factor measurements of excited states using Coulomb excitation and alpha transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Z. E.; Torres, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution the challenges in the use of a setup to simultaneously measure lifetimes and g-factor values will be presented. The simultaneous use of the transient field technique and the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method, to measure magnetic moments and lifetimes respectively, allows to obtain a complete characterization of the currents of nucleons and the deformation in excited states close to the ground state. The technique is at the moment limited to Coulomb excitation and alpha-transfer reactions, what opens an interesting perspective to consider this type of experiments with radioactive beams. The use of deep-inelastic and fusion-evaporation reactions will be discussed. An example of a setup that makes use of a beam of 106Cd to study excited states of 110Sn and the beam nuclei itself will be presented.

  17. Ab initio calculations of free energy barriers for chemical reactions in solution: proton transfer in [FHF]-.

    PubMed

    Muller, R P; Warshel, A

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method for calculating activation free energies of chemical reactions in solution, using molecular mechanics force fields for the solvent and an ab initio technique that incorporates the potential from the solvent in its Hamiltonian for the solute. The empirical valence bond (EVB) method is used as a reference potential for the ab initio free energy calculation, and drives the reaction along the proper coordinate, thus overcoming problems encountered by direct attempts to use molecular orbital methods in calculations of activation free energies. The utility of our method is illustrated by calculating the activation free energy for proton transfer between fluoride ions in the [FHF]-system, in both polar and nonpolar solution.

  18. BALANCE : a computer program for calculating mass transfer for geochemical reactions in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parkhurst, David L.; Plummer, L. Niel; Thorstenson, Donald C.

    1982-01-01

    BALANCE is a Fortran computer designed to define and quantify chemical reactions between ground water and minerals. Using (1) the chemical compositions of two waters along a flow path and (2) a set of mineral phases hypothesized to be the reactive constituents in the system, the program calculates the mass transfer (amounts of the phases entering or leaving the aqueous phase) necessary to account for the observed changes in composition between the two waters. Additional constraints can be included in the problem formulation to account for mixing of two end-member waters, redox reactions, and, in a simplified form, isotopic composition. The computer code and a description of the input necessary to run the program are presented. Three examples typical of ground-water systems are described. (USGS)

  19. Localization of dolichyl phosphate- and pyrophosphate-dependent glycosyl transfer reactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, M; Tanner, W

    1979-01-01

    Membranes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae protoplasts were fractionated on a continuous sucrose gradient. Six bands were obtained, which contained altogether about 15% of the total cell protein. From their densitites, their behavior in the presence and absence of Mg2+ ions, and the distribution of marker enzymes, it was possible to identify fractions enriched in rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum and in mitochondria. All glycosyl transfer reactions investigated where dolichyl phosphates served as glycosyl acceptors or where dolichyl phosphate- and pyrophosphate-activated sugars served as glycosyl donors showed the highest specific activity and up to 75% of the total activity in the endoplasmic reticulum. This was the case for the reactions involved in the formation of O-glycosidic as well as N-glycosidic linkages in yeast glycoprotein biosynthesis. Membrane fractions enriched in plasmalemma contained less than 3% of the corresponding activities. PMID:222737

  20. Operando NMR spectroscopic analysis of proton transfer in heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue Lu; Liu, Wenqing; Yu, Yan-Yan; Song, Yanhong; Fang, Wen Qi; Wei, Daxiu; Gong, Xue-Qing; Yao, Ye-Feng; Yang, Hua Gui

    2016-01-01

    Proton transfer (PT) processes in solid–liquid phases play central roles throughout chemistry, biology and materials science. Identification of PT routes deep into the realistic catalytic process is experimentally challenging, thus leaving a gap in our understanding. Here we demonstrate an approach using operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that allows to quantitatively describe the complex species dynamics of generated H2/HD gases and liquid intermediates in pmol resolution during photocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this system, the effective protons for HER are mainly from H2O, and CH3OH evidently serves as an outstanding sacrificial agent reacting with holes, further supported by our density functional theory calculations. This results rule out controversy about the complicated proton sources for HER. The operando NMR method provides a direct molecular-level insight with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the quantitative studies of mechanisms of proton-involved catalytic reactions in solid–liquid phases. PMID:27311326

  1. Conformity between IBM and TQM (SU(6) quadrupole phonon model) in treating two-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrchev, G.; Paar, V.

    1983-03-01

    It is shown that TQM is capable of treating two-nucleon transfer (TNT) reactions in an analogous manner to IBM. A proof that the IBM two-nucleon transfer amplitudes can be identically converted into standard matrix elements for TQM, is presented, using the relation between the Schwinger and Holstein-Primakoff representations of the SU(6) generators.

  2. Development of a measurement system for the determination of (n , γ) cross-sections using multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makii, H.; Ota, S.; Ishii, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Furutaka, K.; Nishio, K.; Nishinaka, I.; Chiba, S.; Igashira, M.; Czeszumska, A.

    2015-10-01

    We have installed a new experimental apparatus to measure γ-rays from highly excited states populated by the multi-nucleon transfer reactions with heavy-ion projectiles to determine the (n, γ) cross-sections by means of the surrogate reaction method. An apparatus consists of two anti-Compton LaBr3(Ce) spectrometers to measure the γ-rays and a Si ΔE-E detector system to detect outgoing projectile-like particles. Reactions of 153-MeV 18O beams with 155Gd and 157Gd targets were used to study the performance of apparatus. By using the LaBr3(Ce) scintillators with relatively large volume (101.6 mm in diameter and 127 mm in length), we have successfully measured γ-rays from the compound nuclei, which have excitation energy above neutron separation energy, populated by 155Gd(18O, 16O)157Gd and 157Gd(18O, 16O)159Gd two-neutron transfer reactions. To measure in-beam γ-rays through heavy-ion-induced transfer reaction, it is important to assign the reaction channel clearly, since the cross-sections of the transfer reactions are much smaller than those of competing reactions such as Coulomb excitation and fusion reactions. The Si ΔE-E detector system was used to separate outgoing particles. The present study has demonstrated high capability of apparatus to measure the de-excitation γ-rays in the compound nuclei produced by the multi-nucleon transfer reactions for determination of the (n, γ) cross-sections by using the surrogate reaction method.

  3. Charge constrained density functional molecular dynamics for simulation of condensed phase electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2009-08-14

    We present a plane-wave basis set implementation of charge constrained density functional molecular dynamics (CDFT-MD) for simulation of electron transfer reactions in condensed phase systems. Following the earlier work of Wu and Van Voorhis [Phys. Rev. A 72, 024502 (2005)], the density functional is minimized under the constraint that the charge difference between donor and acceptor is equal to a given value. The classical ion dynamics is propagated on the Born-Oppenheimer surface of the charge constrained state. We investigate the dependence of the constrained energy and of the energy gap on the definition of the charge and present expressions for the constraint forces. The method is applied to the Ru{sup 2+}-Ru{sup 3+} electron self-exchange reaction in aqueous solution. Sampling the vertical energy gap along CDFT-MD trajectories and correcting for finite size effects, a reorganization free energy of 1.6 eV is obtained. This is 0.1-0.2 eV lower than a previous estimate based on a continuum model for solvation. The smaller value for the reorganization free energy can be explained by the fact that the Ru-O distances of the divalent and trivalent Ru hexahydrates are predicted to be more similar in the electron transfer complex than for the separated aqua ions.

  4. Charge constrained density functional molecular dynamics for simulation of condensed phase electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2009-08-01

    We present a plane-wave basis set implementation of charge constrained density functional molecular dynamics (CDFT-MD) for simulation of electron transfer reactions in condensed phase systems. Following the earlier work of Wu and Van Voorhis [Phys. Rev. A 72, 024502 (2005)], the density functional is minimized under the constraint that the charge difference between donor and acceptor is equal to a given value. The classical ion dynamics is propagated on the Born-Oppenheimer surface of the charge constrained state. We investigate the dependence of the constrained energy and of the energy gap on the definition of the charge and present expressions for the constraint forces. The method is applied to the Ru2+-Ru3+ electron self-exchange reaction in aqueous solution. Sampling the vertical energy gap along CDFT-MD trajectories and correcting for finite size effects, a reorganization free energy of 1.6 eV is obtained. This is 0.1-0.2 eV lower than a previous estimate based on a continuum model for solvation. The smaller value for the reorganization free energy can be explained by the fact that the Ru-O distances of the divalent and trivalent Ru hexahydrates are predicted to be more similar in the electron transfer complex than for the separated aqua ions.

  5. Room Temperature, Hybrid Sodium-Based Flow Batteries with Multi-Electron Transfer Redox Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Shamie, Jack S.; Liu, Caihong; Shaw, Leon L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new concept of hybrid Na-based flow batteries (HNFBs) with a molten Na alloy anode in conjunction with a flowing catholyte separated by a solid Na-ion exchange membrane for grid-scale energy storage. Such HNFBs can operate at ambient temperature, allow catholytes to have multiple electron transfer redox reactions per active ion, offer wide selection of catholyte chemistries with multiple active ions to couple with the highly negative Na alloy anode, and enable the use of both aqueous and non-aqueous catholytes. Further, the molten Na alloy anode permits the decoupled design of power and energy since a large volume of the molten Na alloy can be used with a limited ion-exchange membrane size. In this proof-of-concept study, the feasibility of multi-electron transfer redox reactions per active ion and multiple active ions for catholytes has been demonstrated. The critical barriers to mature this new HNFBs have also been explored. PMID:26063629

  6. Tryptophan as a probe of photosystem I electron transfer reactions: a UV resonance Raman study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Bender, Shana L; Keough, James M; Barry, Bridgette A

    2009-08-20

    Photosystem I (PSI) is one of the two membrane-associated reaction centers involved in oxygenic photosynthesis. In photosynthesis, solar energy is converted to chemical energy in the form of a transmembrane charge separation. PSI oxidizes cytochrome c(6) or plastocyanin and reduces ferredoxin. In cyanobacterial PSI, there are 10 tryptophan residues with indole side chains located less than 10 A from the electron transfer cofactors. In this study, we apply pump-probe difference UV resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to acquire the spectrum of aromatic amino acids in cyanobacterial PSI. This UVRR technique allows the use of the tryptophan vibrational spectrum as a reporter for structural changes, which are linked to PSI electron transfer reactions. Our results show that photo-oxidation of the chlorophyll a/a' heterodimer, P(700), causes shifts in the vibrational frequencies of two or more tryptophan residues. Similar perturbations of tryptophan are observed when P(700) is chemically oxidized. The observed spectral frequencies suggest that the perturbed tryptophan side chains are only weakly or not hydrogen bonded and are located in an environment in which there is steric repulsion. The direction of the spectral shifts is consistent with an oxidation-induced increase in dielectric constant or a change in hydrogen bonding. To explain our results, the perturbation of tryptophan residues must be linked to a PSI conformational change, which is, in turn, driven by P(700) oxidation.

  7. Influence of mass transfer and chemical reaction on ozonation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Choi, I S; Wiesmann, U

    2004-01-01

    Azo dyes can be only mineralised by chemical oxidation. In this paper the oxidation of Reactive Black 5 (RB 5) and Reactive Orange 96 (RO 96) with concentrations between 35 and 5,700 mgL(-1) (RB 5) and between 20 and 2,050 mgL(-1) (RO 96) was investigated in a lab-scale bubble column. The reactor was modelled for two cases, a completely mixed and a plug flow gas phase. The oxidation rate was influenced by mass transfer for all dye concentrations used. For low dye concentrations mass transfer alone was decisive for the reaction rate showing no enhancement due to chemical reaction, E approximately equal to 1. However, in the region of high dye concentrations, the slope of the ozone concentration profile inside the liquid boundary layer increases more and more with increasing dye concentration as a result of a chemical oxidation. Therefore, the enhancement factor depends on the type and concentration of the azo dyes. For RB 5, a diazo dye, an enhancement factor of E = 5.5 was observed for cd = 2,000 mgL(-1), RO 96, a mono azo dye, with a remarkably higher chemical oxidation rate shows an E = 16 for cd = 2,050 mgL(-1).

  8. Rigorous calculation of electric field effects on the free energy change of the electron transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Traytak, S. D.; Tachiya, M.

    2003-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the effect of an external electric field on the free energy change of electron transfer reaction in polar solvents. The external electric field produces polarization both on the solutes and in the solvent. Since the polarization produced on the solute differs from that in the solvent, apparent surface charge is created on the surface of the solutes. The polarization charge on the surface of the solutes interacts with the charge associated with the electron transfer. The free energy change of the reaction including such effect is calculated rigorously. A simple formula is derived and compared to the exact result in the case of spherical solutes in the dielectric continuum media. Only slight deviations are observed for any values of the solvent polarity and of the ratio between the radii of the donor and the acceptor molecules. In addition, we also applied the same method to evaluate the reorganization energy rigorously: The Marcus expression for the reorganization energy is an approximate one. The accuracy of the Marcus expression is assessed by comparing it with the exact result.

  9. Room temperature, hybrid sodium-based flow batteries with multi-electron transfer redox reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Shamie, Jack S.; Liu, Caihong; Shaw, Leon L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2015-06-11

    We introduce a new concept of hybrid Na-based flow batteries (HNFBs) with a molten Na alloy anode in conjunction with a flowing catholyte separated by a solid Na-ion exchange membrane for grid-scale energy storage. Such HNFBs can operate at ambient temperature, allow catholytes to have multiple electron transfer redox reactions per active ion, offer wide selection of catholyte chemistries with multiple active ions to couple with the highly negative Na alloy anode, and enable the use of both aqueous and non-aqueous catholytes. Further, the molten Na alloy anode permits the decoupled design of power and energy since a large volumemore » of the molten Na alloy can be used with a limited ion-exchange membrane size. In this proof-of-concept study, the feasibility of multielectron transfer redox reactions per active ion and multiple active ions for catholytes has been demonstrated. Furthermore, the critical barriers to mature this new HNFBs have also been explored.« less

  10. Room Temperature, Hybrid Sodium-Based Flow Batteries with Multi-Electron Transfer Redox Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamie, Jack S.; Liu, Caihong; Shaw, Leon L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a new concept of hybrid Na-based flow batteries (HNFBs) with a molten Na alloy anode in conjunction with a flowing catholyte separated by a solid Na-ion exchange membrane for grid-scale energy storage. Such HNFBs can operate at ambient temperature, allow catholytes to have multiple electron transfer redox reactions per active ion, offer wide selection of catholyte chemistries with multiple active ions to couple with the highly negative Na alloy anode, and enable the use of both aqueous and non-aqueous catholytes. Further, the molten Na alloy anode permits the decoupled design of power and energy since a large volume of the molten Na alloy can be used with a limited ion-exchange membrane size. In this proof-of-concept study, the feasibility of multi-electron transfer redox reactions per active ion and multiple active ions for catholytes has been demonstrated. The critical barriers to mature this new HNFBs have also been explored.

  11. Peroxyl Radical Reactions in Water Solution: A Gym for Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Theories.

    PubMed

    Amorati, Riccardo; Baschieri, Andrea; Morroni, Gloria; Gambino, Rossana; Valgimigli, Luca

    2016-06-01

    The reactions of alkylperoxyl radicals with phenols have remained difficult to investigate in water. We describe herein a simple and reliable method based on the inhibited autoxidation of water/THF mixtures, which we calibrated against pulse radiolysis. With this method we measured the rate constants kinh for the reactions of 2-tetrahydrofuranylperoxyl radicals with reference compounds: urate, ascorbate, ferrocenes, 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethyl-6-chromanol, Trolox, 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-acetic acid, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methoxyphenol, 4-methoxyphenol, catechol and 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. The role of pH was investigated: the value of kinh for Trolox and 4-methoxyphenol increased 11- and 50-fold from pH 2.1 to 12, respectively, which indicate the occurrence of a SPLET-like mechanism. H(D) kinetic isotope effects combined with pH and solvent effects suggest that different types of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanisms are involved in water: less electron-rich phenols react at low pH by concerted electron-proton transfer (EPT) to the peroxyl radical, whereas more electron-rich phenols and phenoxide anions react by multi-site EPT in which water acts as proton relay.

  12. Possibility of production of neutron-rich Zn and Ge isotopes in multinucleon transfer reactions at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Scheid, W.

    2010-02-01

    The production cross sections of new neutron-rich Zn84,86 and Ge90,92 isotopes beyond N=50 are estimated for the first time in the multinucleon transfer reactions Ca48 + U238 and Ca48 + Pu244. The production of new isotopes in reactions with a Ca48 beam is discussed for future experiments.

  13. Validated spectrophotometric methods for determination of sodium valproate based on charge transfer complexation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belal, Tarek S.; El-Kafrawy, Dina S.; Mahrous, Mohamed S.; Abdel-Khalek, Magdi M.; Abo-Gharam, Amira H.

    2016-02-01

    This work presents the development, validation and application of four simple and direct spectrophotometric methods for determination of sodium valproate (VP) through charge transfer complexation reactions. The first method is based on the reaction of the drug with p-chloranilic acid (p-CA) in acetone to give a purple colored product with maximum absorbance at 524 nm. The second method depends on the reaction of VP with dichlone (DC) in dimethylformamide forming a reddish orange product measured at 490 nm. The third method is based upon the interaction of VP and picric acid (PA) in chloroform resulting in the formation of a yellow complex measured at 415 nm. The fourth method involves the formation of a yellow complex peaking at 361 nm upon the reaction of the drug with iodine in chloroform. Experimental conditions affecting the color development were studied and optimized. Stoichiometry of the reactions was determined. The proposed spectrophotometric procedures were effectively validated with respect to linearity, ranges, precision, accuracy, specificity, robustness, detection and quantification limits. Calibration curves of the formed color products with p-CA, DC, PA and iodine showed good linear relationships over the concentration ranges 24-144, 40-200, 2-20 and 1-8 μg/mL respectively. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the assay of sodium valproate in tablets and oral solution dosage forms with good accuracy and precision. Assay results were statistically compared to a reference pharmacopoeial HPLC method where no significant differences were observed between the proposed methods and reference method.

  14. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in nonaqueous electrolyte solutions: Temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Tuhin; Gazi, Harun Al Rasid; Biswas, Ranjit

    2009-08-01

    Temperature dependence of the excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile (P4C) in ethyl acetate (EA), acetonitrile (ACN), and ethanol at several concentrations of lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) has been investigated by using the steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The temperature range considered is 267-343 K. The temperature dependent spectral peak shifts and reaction driving force (-ΔGr) in electrolyte solutions of these solvents can be explained qualitatively in terms of interaction between the reactant molecule and ion-atmosphere. Time resolved studies indicate that the decay kinetics of P4C is biexponential, regardless of solvents, LiClO4 concentrations, and temperatures considered. Except at higher electrolyte concentrations in EA, reaction rates in solutions follow the Arrhenius-type temperature dependence where the estimated activation energy exhibits substantial electrolyte concentration dependence. The average of the experimentally measured activation energies in these three neat solvents is found to be in very good agreement with the predicted value based on data in room temperature solvents. While the rate constant in EA shows a electrolyte concentration induced parabolic dependence on reaction driving force (-ΔGr), the former in ethanol and ACN increases only linearly with the increase in driving force (-ΔGr). The data presented here also indicate that the step-wise increase in solvent reorganization energy via sequential addition of electrolyte induces the ICT reaction in weakly polar solvents to crossover from the Marcus inverted region to the normal region.

  15. Hydrogen atom transfer reactions in thiophenol: photogeneration of two new thione isomers.

    PubMed

    Reva, Igor; Nowak, Maciej J; Lapinski, Leszek; Fausto, Rui

    2015-02-21

    Photoisomerization reactions of monomeric thiophenol have been investigated for the compound isolated in low-temperature argon matrices. The initial thiophenol population consists exclusively of the thermodynamically most stable thiol form. Phototransformations were induced by irradiation of the matrices with narrowband tunable UV light. Irradiation at λ > 290 nm did not induce any changes in isolated thiophenol molecules. Upon irradiation at 290-285 nm, the initial thiol form of thiophenol converted into its thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione. This conversion occurs by transfer of an H atom from the SH group to a carbon atom at the ortho position of the ring. Subsequent irradiation at longer wavelengths (300-427 nm) demonstrated that this UV-induced hydrogen-atom transfer is photoreversible. Moreover, upon irradiation at 400-425 nm, the cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione product converts, by transfer of a hydrogen atom from the ortho to para position, into another thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,5-diene-1-thione. The latter thione isomer is also photoreactive and is consumed if irradiated at λ < 332 nm. The obtained results clearly show that H-atom-transfer isomerization reactions dominate the unimolecular photochemistry of thiophenol confined in a solid argon matrix. A set of low-intensity infrared bands, observed in the spectra of UV irradiated thiophenol, indicates the presence of a phenylthiyl radical with an H- atom detached from the SH group. Alongside the H-atom-transfer and H-atom-detachment processes, the ring-opening photoreaction occurred in cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione by the cleavage of the C-C bond at the alpha position with respect to the thiocarbonyl C[double bond, length as m-dash]S group. The resulting open-ring conjugated thioketene adopts several isomeric forms, differing by orientations around single and double bonds. The species photogenerated upon UV irradiation of thiophenol were identified by comparison of their experimental infrared

  16. A general theoretical model for electron transfer reactions in complex systems.

    PubMed

    Amadei, Andrea; Daidone, Isabella; Aschi, Massimiliano

    2012-01-28

    In this paper we present a general theoretical-computational model for treating electron transfer reactions in complex atomic-molecular systems. The underlying idea of the approach, based on unbiased first-principles calculations at the atomistic level, utilizes the definition and the construction of the Diabatic Perturbed states of the involved reactive partners (i.e. the quantum centres in our perturbation approach) as provided by the interaction with their environment, including their mutual interaction. In this way we reconstruct the true Adiabatic states of the reactive partners characterizing the electron transfer process as the fluctuation of the electronic density due to the fluctuating perturbation. Results obtained by using a combination of Molecular Dynamics simulation and the Perturbed Matrix Method on a prototypical intramolecular electron transfer (from 2-(9,9'-dimethyl)fluorene to the 2-naphthalene group separated by a steroidal 5-α-androstane skeleton) well illustrate the accuracy of the method in reproducing both the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the process. PMID:22158942

  17. Lithium ion phase-transfer reaction at the interface between the lithium manganese oxide electrode and the nonaqueous electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shota; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2005-07-14

    The lithium ion phase-transfer reaction between the spinel lithium manganese oxide electrode and a nonaqueous electrolyte was investigated by the ac impedance spectroscopic method. The dependence of the impedance spectra on the electrochemical potential of the lithium ion in the electrode, the lithium salt concentration in the electrolyte, the kind of solvent, and the measured temperature were examined. Nyquist plots, obtained from the impedance measurements, consist of two semicircles for high and medium frequency and warburg impedance for low frequency, indicating that the reaction process of two main steps for high and medium frequency obey the Butler-Volmer type equation and could be related to the charge-transfer reaction process accompanied with lithium ion phase-transfer at the interface. The dependency on the solvent suggests that both steps in the lithium ion phase-transfer at the electrode/electrolyte interface include the desolvation process and have high activation barriers. PMID:16852662

  18. Trends in Ground-State Entropies for Transition Metal Based Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, Elizabeth A.; Manner, Virginia W.; Markle, Todd F.; Wu, Adam; Franz, James A.; Mayer, James M.

    2009-03-10

    Reported herein are thermochemical studies of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions involving transition metal H-atom donors MIILH and oxyl radicals. [FeII(H2bip)3]2+, [FeII(H2bim)3]2+, [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ and RuII(acac)2(py-imH) [H2bip = 2,2’-bi-1,4,5,6-tetrahydro¬pyrimidine, H2bim = 2,2’-bi-imidazoline, acac = 2,4-pentandionato, py-imH = 2-(2’-pyridyl)¬imidazole)] each react with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl) or tBu3PhO• (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) to give the deprotonated, oxidized metal complex MIIIL, and TEMPOH or tBu3PhOH. Solution equilibrium measurements for the reactions of Co and Fe complexes with TEMPO show a large, negative ground-state entropy for hydrogen atom transfer: ΔSºHAT = -30 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for the two iron complexes and -41 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for [CoII(H2bim)3]2+. The ΔSºHAT for TEMPO + RuII(acac)2(py-imH) is much closer to zero, 4.9 ± 1.1 cal mol-1 K-1. Calorimetric measurements quantitatively confirm the enthalpy of reaction for [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ + TEMPO, thus also confirming ΔSºHAT. Calorimetry on TEMPOH + tBu3PhO• gives ΔHºHAT = 11.2 ± 0.5 kcal mol-1 which matches the enthalpy predicted from the difference in literature solution BDEs. An evaluation of the literature BDEs of both TEMPOH and tBu3PhOH is briefly presented and new estimates are included on the relative enthalpy of solvation for tBu3PhO• vs. tBu3PhOH. The primary contributor to the large magnitude of the ground-state entropy |ΔSºHAT| for the metal complexes is vibrational entropy, ΔSºvib. The common assumption that ΔSºHAT ≈ 0 for HAT reactions, developed for organic and small gas phase molecules, does not hold for transition metal based HAT reactions. The trend in magnitude of |ΔSºHAT| for reactions with TEMPO, RuII(acac)2(py-imH) << [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ = [FeII(H2bim)3]2+ < [CoII(H2bim)3]2+, is surprisingly well predicted by the trends for electron transfer half-reaction entropies, ΔSºET, in aprotic solvents. ΔSºET and

  19. Neutron transfer reactions induced by {sup 8}Li on {sup 9}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes, V.; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Camargo, O.; Barioni, A.; Assuncao, M.; Kolata, J. J.; Amro, H.; Becchetti, F. D.; Jiang, Hao; Aguilera, E. F.; Lizcano, D.; Martines-Quiroz, E.; Garcia, H.

    2007-05-15

    Angular distributions for the elastic scattering of {sup 8}Li on {sup 9}Be and the neutron transfer reactions {sup 9}Be({sup 8}Li,{sup 7}Li){sup 10}Be and {sup 9}Be({sup 8}Li,{sup 9}Li){sup 8}Be were measured with a 27 MeV {sup 8}Li radioactive nuclear beam. Spectr- oscopic factors for {sup 8}Li (multiply-in-circle sign)n{sup 9}Li and {sup 7}Li (multiply-in-circle sign)n{sup 8}Li bound systems were obtained from the comparison between the experimental differential cross section and finite-range distorted-wave Born approximation calculations with the code FRESCO. The spectroscopic factors obtained were compared to shell model calculations and to other experimental values from (d,p) reactions. Using the present values for the spectroscopic factor, cross sections for the direct neutron-capture reactions {sup 7}Li(n,{gamma}){sup 8}Li and {sup 8}Li(n,{gamma}){sup 9}Li were calculated in the framework of a potential model.

  20. Catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of hydrazones by oxidative deprotonation electron transfer and TEMPO mediation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Qiang; Qi, Xiaotian; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Quan-Qing; Wei, Qiang; Lan, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the popularity of various C-centred radicals, the N-centred radicals remain largely unexplored in catalytic radical cascade reactions because of a lack of convenient methods for their generation. Known methods for their generation typically require the use of N-functionalized precursors or various toxic, potentially explosive or unstable radical initiators. Recently, visible-light photocatalysis has emerged as an attractive tool for the catalytic formation of N-centred radicals, but the pre-incorporation of a photolabile groups at the nitrogen atom largely limited the reaction scope. Here, we present a visible-light photocatalytic oxidative deprotonation electron transfer/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediation strategy for catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of unsaturated hydrazones. This mild protocol provides a broadly applicable synthesis of 1,6-dihydropyradazines with complete regioselectivity and good yields. The 1,6-dihydropyradazines can be easily transformed into diazinium salts that showed promising in vitro antifungal activities against fungal pathogens. DFT calculations are conducted to explain the mechanism. PMID:27048886

  1. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming

    2015-03-31

    In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m(-3), ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages.

  2. Multinucleon transfer in O,1816,19F+208Pb reactions at energies near the fusion barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafferty, D. C.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Williams, E.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Luong, D. H.; McNeil, S. D.; Ramachandran, K.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Wakhle, A.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Nuclear reactions are complex, involving collisions between composite systems where many-body dynamics determines outcomes. Successful models have been developed to explain particular reaction outcomes in distinct energy and mass regimes, but a unifying picture remains elusive. The irreversible transfer of kinetic energy from the relative motion of the collision partners to their internal states, as is known to occur in deep inelastic collisions, has yet to be successfully incorporated explicitly into fully quantal reaction models. The influence of these processes on fusion is not yet quantitatively understood. Purpose: To investigate the population of high excitation energies in transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies, which are precursors to deep inelastic processes, and their dependence on the internuclear separation. Methods: Transfer probabilities and excitation energy spectra have been measured in collisions of O,1816,19F+208Pb , at various energies below and around the fusion barrier, by detecting the backscattered projectile-like fragments in a Δ E -E telescope. Results: The relative yields of different transfer outcomes are strongly driven by Q values, but change with the internuclear separation. In 16O+208Pb , single nucleon transfer dominates, with a strong contribution from -2 p transfer close to the Coulomb barrier, though this channel becomes less significant in relation to the -2 p 2 n transfer channel at larger separations. For 18O+208Pb , the -2 p 2 n channel is the dominant charge transfer mode at all separations. In the reactions with 19F,-3 p 2 n transfer is significant close to the barrier, but falls off rapidly with energy. Multinucleon transfer processes are shown to lead to high excitation energies (up to ˜15 MeV), which is distinct from single nucleon transfer modes which predominantly populate states at low excitation energy. Conclusions: Kinetic energy is transferred into internal excitations following transfer, with this

  3. Effect of mass transfer on the oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by platinum dendrimer encapsulated nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, Ioana; Crooks, Richard M

    2012-07-17

    Here we report on the effect of the mass transfer rate (k(t)) on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyzed by Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) comprised of 147 and 55 atoms (Pt(147) and Pt(55)). The experiments were carried out using a dual-electrode microelectrochemical device, which enables the study of the ORR under high k(t) conditions with simultaneous detection of H(2)O(2). At low k(t) (0.02 to 0.12 cm s(-1)) the effective number of electrons involved in ORR, n(eff), is 3.7 for Pt(147) and 3.4 for Pt(55). As k(t) is increased, the mass-transfer-limited current for the ORR becomes significantly lower than the value predicted by the Levich equation for a 4-electron process regardless of catalyst size. However, the percentage of H(2)O(2) detected remains constant, such that n(eff) barely changes over the entire k(t) range explored (0.02 cm s(-1)). This suggests that mass transfer does not affect n(eff), which has implications for the mechanism of the ORR on Pt nanoparticles. Interestingly, there is a significant difference in n(eff) for the two sizes of Pt DENs (n(eff) = 3.7 and 3.5 for Pt(147) and Pt(55), respectively) that cannot be assigned to mass transfer effects and that we therefore attribute to a particle size effect.

  4. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water–acetonitrile mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-28

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water–acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water–acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is −10.6 kcal mol{sup −1}. On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol{sup −1}. The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form.

  5. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-01

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water-acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is -10.6 kcal mol-1. On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol-1. The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form.

  6. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-28

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water-acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is -10.6 kcal mol(-1). On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol(-1). The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form. PMID:26026430

  7. Theoretical analysis of co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Yukako; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2015-05-28

    The co-solvent effect on the proton transfer reaction of glycine in a water-acetonitrile mixture was examined using the reference interaction-site model self-consistent field theory. The free energy profiles of the proton transfer reaction of glycine between the carboxyl oxygen and amino nitrogen were computed in a water-acetonitrile mixture solvent at various molar fractions. Two types of reactions, the intramolecular proton transfer and water-mediated proton transfer, were considered. In both types of the reactions, a similar tendency was observed. In the pure water solvent, the zwitterionic form, where the carboxyl oxygen is deprotonated while the amino nitrogen is protonated, is more stable than the neutral form. The reaction free energy is -10.6 kcal mol(-1). On the other hand, in the pure acetonitrile solvent, glycine takes only the neutral form. The reaction free energy from the neutral to zwitterionic form gradually increases with increasing acetonitrile concentration, and in an equally mixed solvent, the zwitterionic and neutral forms are almost isoenergetic, with a difference of only 0.3 kcal mol(-1). The free energy component analysis based on the thermodynamic cycle of the reaction also revealed that the free energy change of the neutral form is insensitive to the change of solvent environment but the zwitterionic form shows drastic changes. In particular, the excess chemical potential, one of the components of the solvation free energy, is dominant and contributes to the stabilization of the zwitterionic form.

  8. Electron transfer reactions of cytochrome f from Brassica komatsuna with hexacyanoferrate.

    PubMed

    Takabe, T; Niwa, S; Ishikawa, H; Takenaka, K

    1980-10-01

    The electron transfer reactions of membrane-bound monomeric cytochrome f from Brassica komatosuna (Brassica rapa L. var. perviridis Bailey) with hexacyanoferrate (II)-(III) have been studied as a function of pH, ionic strength and temperature. The second-order rate constant for the oxidation of cytochrome f by Fe(CN)6(3-) at pH 7.0, mu 0.1 M, and 20 degrees C is 1.7 X 10(5) M-1 X S-1, which is similar to the value of oligomeric cytochrome f from parsley. The activation parameters obtained were delta H not equal to = -0.87 kcal/mol and delta S not equal to - -38 cal/mol x deg. Respective rat constant and activation parameters obtained for the reduction of cytochrome f by Fe(CN)6(4-) were k = 1.7 X 10(4) M-1 x S-1, delta H not equal to = +6.7 kcal/mol, and delta S not equal to -16 cal/mol x deg. Both the rate constants for the oxidation and the reduction of cytochrome f markedly decreased with increasing ionic strength. The results indicate that the oxidation and the reduction take place at a positively charged site on the cytochrome f surface, and electrostatic interactions are important for these reactions. The participation of protons and specific amino acid residues in electron transfer reactions of cytochrome f is implied from the pH results. Alkaline isomerization of ferricytochrome f was not observed. The midpoint potential of cytochrome f has a constant value of 360 mV between pH 5.0-8.9, and decreases by about 55 mV per pH unit above 8.9. The results are compared with the data for horse heart cytochrome c and Euglena gracilis cytochrome c-552. These data are discussed in relation to the theories of electrostatic corrected outer-sphere electron transfer of Marcus and multiphonon nonadiabatic electron tunneling of Jortner and Hopfield.

  9. Population of isomeric states in fusion and transfer reactions in beams of loosely bound nuclei near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Skobelev, N. K.

    2015-07-15

    The influence of the mechanisms of nuclear reactions on the population of {sup 195m}Hg and {sup 197m}Hg(7/2{sup −}), {sup 198m}Tl and {sup 196m}Tl(7{sup +}), and {sup 196m}Au and {sub 198m}Au(12{sup −}) isomeric nuclear states obtained in reactions induced by beams of {sup 3}He, {sup 6}Li, and {sup 6}He weakly bound nuclei is studied. The behavior of excitation functions and high values of isomeric ratios (δ{sub m}/δ{sub g}) for products of nuclear reactions proceeding through a compound nucleus and involving neutron evaporation are explained within statistical models. Reactions in which the emission of charged particles occurs have various isomeric ratios depending on the reaction type. The isomeric ratio is lower in direct transfer reactions involving charged-particle emission than in reactions where the evaporation of charged particles occurs. Reactions accompanied by neutron transfer usually have a lower isomeric ratio, which behaves differently for different direct-reaction types (stripping versus pickup reactions)

  10. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solution based upon a mixed quantum-classical approximation. II. Proton transfer reaction in non-polar solvent.

    PubMed

    Kojima, H; Yamada, A; Okazaki, S

    2015-05-01

    The intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in neon solvent has been investigated by mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics (QCMD) calculations and fully classical molecular dynamics (FCMD) calculations. Comparing these calculated results with those for malonaldehyde in water reported in Part I [A. Yamada, H. Kojima, and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 084509 (2014)], the solvent dependence of the reaction rate, the reaction mechanism involved, and the quantum effect therein have been investigated. With FCMD, the reaction rate in weakly interacting neon is lower than that in strongly interacting water. However, with QCMD, the order of the reaction rates is reversed. To investigate the mechanisms in detail, the reactions were categorized into three mechanisms: tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing. Then, the quantum and solvent effects were analyzed from the viewpoint of the reaction mechanism focusing on the shape of potential energy curve and its fluctuations. The higher reaction rate that was found for neon in QCMD compared with that found for water solvent arises from the tunneling reactions because of the nearly symmetric double-well shape of the potential curve in neon. The thermal activation and barrier vanishing reactions were also accelerated by the zero-point energy. The number of reactions based on these two mechanisms in water was greater than that in neon in both QCMD and FCMD because these reactions are dominated by the strength of solute-solvent interactions.

  11. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solution based upon a mixed quantum–classical approximation. II. Proton transfer reaction in non-polar solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, H.; Yamada, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2015-05-07

    The intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in neon solvent has been investigated by mixed quantum–classical molecular dynamics (QCMD) calculations and fully classical molecular dynamics (FCMD) calculations. Comparing these calculated results with those for malonaldehyde in water reported in Part I [A. Yamada, H. Kojima, and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 084509 (2014)], the solvent dependence of the reaction rate, the reaction mechanism involved, and the quantum effect therein have been investigated. With FCMD, the reaction rate in weakly interacting neon is lower than that in strongly interacting water. However, with QCMD, the order of the reaction rates is reversed. To investigate the mechanisms in detail, the reactions were categorized into three mechanisms: tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing. Then, the quantum and solvent effects were analyzed from the viewpoint of the reaction mechanism focusing on the shape of potential energy curve and its fluctuations. The higher reaction rate that was found for neon in QCMD compared with that found for water solvent arises from the tunneling reactions because of the nearly symmetric double-well shape of the potential curve in neon. The thermal activation and barrier vanishing reactions were also accelerated by the zero-point energy. The number of reactions based on these two mechanisms in water was greater than that in neon in both QCMD and FCMD because these reactions are dominated by the strength of solute–solvent interactions.

  12. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solution based upon a mixed quantum-classical approximation. II. Proton transfer reaction in non-polar solvent.

    PubMed

    Kojima, H; Yamada, A; Okazaki, S

    2015-05-01

    The intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in neon solvent has been investigated by mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics (QCMD) calculations and fully classical molecular dynamics (FCMD) calculations. Comparing these calculated results with those for malonaldehyde in water reported in Part I [A. Yamada, H. Kojima, and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 084509 (2014)], the solvent dependence of the reaction rate, the reaction mechanism involved, and the quantum effect therein have been investigated. With FCMD, the reaction rate in weakly interacting neon is lower than that in strongly interacting water. However, with QCMD, the order of the reaction rates is reversed. To investigate the mechanisms in detail, the reactions were categorized into three mechanisms: tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing. Then, the quantum and solvent effects were analyzed from the viewpoint of the reaction mechanism focusing on the shape of potential energy curve and its fluctuations. The higher reaction rate that was found for neon in QCMD compared with that found for water solvent arises from the tunneling reactions because of the nearly symmetric double-well shape of the potential curve in neon. The thermal activation and barrier vanishing reactions were also accelerated by the zero-point energy. The number of reactions based on these two mechanisms in water was greater than that in neon in both QCMD and FCMD because these reactions are dominated by the strength of solute-solvent interactions. PMID:25956108

  13. Numerical simulation of ultrasonic enhancement on mass transfer in liquid-solid reaction by a new computational model.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qingbin; Bayanheshig; Tan, Xin; Zhu, Jiwei

    2014-03-01

    Mass transfer coefficient is an important parameter in the process of mass transfer. It can reflect the degree of enhancement of mass transfer process in liquid-solid reaction and in non-reactive systems like dissolution and leaching, and further verify the issues by experiments in the reaction process. In the present paper, a new computational model quantitatively solving ultrasonic enhancement on mass transfer coefficient in liquid-solid reaction is established, and the mass transfer coefficient on silicon surface with a transducer at frequencies of 40 kHz, 60 kHz, 80 kHz and 100 kHz has been numerically simulated. The simulation results indicate that mass transfer coefficient increases with the increasing of ultrasound power, and the maximum value of mass transfer coefficient is 1.467 × 10(-4) m/s at 60 kHz and the minimum is 1.310 × 10(-4) m/s at 80 kHz in the condition when ultrasound power is 50 W (the mass transfer coefficient is 2.384 × 10(-5) m/s without ultrasound). The extrinsic factors such as temperature and transducer diameter and distance between reactor and ultrasound source also influence the mass transfer coefficient on silicon surface. Mass transfer coefficient increases with the increasing temperature, with the decreasing distance between silicon and central position, with the decreasing of transducer diameter, and with the decreasing of distance between reactor and ultrasound source at the same ultrasonic power and frequency. The simulation results indicate that the computational model can quantitatively solve the ultrasonic enhancement on mass transfer coefficient.

  14. New recoil transfer chamber for thermalization of heavy ions produced in fusion-evaporation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, M. C.; Tereshatov, E. E.; DeVanzo, M. J.; Sefcik, J. A.; Bennett, M. E.; Mayorov, D. A.; Werke, T. A.; Folden, C. M.

    2015-10-01

    A new Recoil Transfer Chamber (RTC) has been designed, fabricated, and characterized at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. The design is based on a gas stopper that was previously in routine use at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. This new RTC uses He gas to stop ions, and a combination of a static electric field and gas flow to maximize the extraction efficiency. In offline experiments, a 228Th source was used to produce 216Po which was successfully extracted even though it has a short half-life. In online experiments using the products of the 118Sn(40Ar, 6n)152Er reaction, an efficiency of several tens of percent was measured.

  15. Mass driver reaction engine characteristics and performance in earth orbital transfer missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. R.; Dunbar, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Configurations of a typical mass driver reaction engine (MDRE) are presented and its use for delivery of payloads to geosynchronous orbit (GEO) from low earth orbit (LEO) is discussed. Basic rocket equations are developed for LEO to GEO round-trip missions using a single exhaust velocity. It is shown that exhaust velocities in the 5-10 km/sec range (specific impulse of 500-1000 sec) are well suited for mass drivers, minimizing the overall cost of missions. Payload delivery rate fractions show that there is little to be gained by stretching out LEO to GEO transfer times from 90 to 180 days. It therefore pays to use the shorter trip time, approximately doubling the amount of delivered payload during any fixed time of use of the MDRE.

  16. A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry based system for determining plant uptake of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Akira; Kato, Shungo; Kajii, Yoshizumi; Wilkinson, Michael; Owen, Sue; Hewitt, Nick

    In order to evaluate the contribution that higher plants make to the removal of volatile organic compounds from the atmosphere, a measurement system consisting of a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), CO 2 analyzer, diffusion devise and leaf enclosure was established. The uptake of VOCs by Golden Pothos ( Epipremnum aureum) was investigated. The overall relative error associated with measurements made using this system was <2.2% when a Golden Pothos leaf was exposed to 75-750 ppbv of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Even at the lowest MIBK concentration, more than 2.2% of the inflowing VOC was lost to the leaf, representing a detectable and positive MIBK uptake rate by the plant. The results of the investigation were compared with a measurement system based on gas chromatography analysis and it was shown that the use of a PTR-MS based system can significantly increase the certainties in determining the rate of VOC uptake by plants.

  17. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids. Progress report, September 1990--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Basic thrust the research program involves use of microporous solids (zeolites, clays, layered and tunnel structure oxide semiconductors) as organizing media for artificial photosynthetic systems. Purpose of the microporous solid is twofold. First, it induces spatial organization of photoactive and electroactive components (sensitizers, semiconductor particles, electron relays, and catalysts) at the solid-solution interface, enhancing the quantum efficiency of charge separation and separating physically the ultimate electron donor and acceptor in the electron transport chain. Second, since the microcrystalline solid admits only molecules of a certain charge and size, it is possible to achieve permanent charge separation by sieving chemical photoproducts (e.g., H{sub 2} and I{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, or H{sub 2} and O{sub 2)} from each other. Spectroscopic and electrochemical methods are used to study the kinetics of electron transfer reactions in these hybrid molecular/solid state assemblies.

  18. Quantum-chemical ab initio investigation of the two-step charge transfer process of hydrogen reaction: approach of reaction pathways via hydrogen intermediate on Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, An. M.; Lorenz, W.

    1994-08-01

    Local reaction events in the course of the electrochemical two-step hydrogen evolution reaction have been investigated by means of quantum-chemical all-electron ab initio calculations on interfacial supermolecular cluster models including a hydrated hydrogen intermediate on Cu(100). Expanding on preceding study to larger hydration clusters, an approach to relevant reaction path characteristics has been pursued for two processes: (i) the transfer of hydrated hydronium ion into a chemisorbed hydrogen intermediate: (ii) the reaction of hydronium ion with the intermediate to molecular hydrogen. Computations were carried out on RHF level, using contracted (12,8,4)/[8,6,2,] and/or 6-31G * or G ** pol-O bases for the metal and adsorbate part, respectively. Destruction of the hydronium configuration in process (i) has been confirmed. Electronic partial charge transfer dut to chemical bond conversions in both steps (i) and (ii) has been displayed along relevant cuts of adiabatic potential surfaces, proving significantly different amounts of charge transfer in both steps, λ 1 > 1, λ 2≡(2-λ 1) < 1. In advance of consideration of macroscopic double layer effects, first insight has been gained into coupled nuclear motions and into the origin of reaction barriers

  19. Proton-transfer reaction dynamics and energetics in calcification and decalcification.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Ryota; Hatta, Masayuki; Ichikawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-10-13

    CaCO3 -saturated saline waters at pH values below 8.5 are characterized by two stationary equilibrium states: reversible chemical calcification/decalcification associated with acid dissociation, Ca(2+) +HCO3 (-) ⇌CaCO3 +H(+) ; and reversible static physical precipitation/dissolution, Ca(2+) +CO3 (2-) ⇌CaCO3 . The former reversible reaction was determined using a strong base and acid titration. The saturation state described by the pH/PCO2 -independent solubility product, [Ca(2+) ][CO3 (2-) ], may not be observed at pH below 8.5 because [Ca(2+) ][CO3 (2-) ]/([Ca(2+) ][HCO3 (-) ]) ≪1. Since proton transfer dynamics controls all reversible acid dissociation reactions in saline waters, the concentrations of calcium ion and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were expressed as a function of dual variables, pH and PCO2 . The negative impact of ocean acidification on marine calcifying organisms was confirmed by applying the experimental culture data of each PCO2 /pH-dependent coral polyp skeleton weight (Wskel) to the proton transfer idea. The skeleton formation of each coral polyp was performed in microspaces beneath its aboral ectoderm. This resulted in a decalcification of 14 weight %, a normalized CaCO3 saturation state Λ of 1.3 at PCO2 ≈400 ppm and pH ≈8.0, and serious decalcification of 45 % and Λ 2.5 at PCO2 ≈1000 ppm and pH ≈7.8.

  20. Coulomb renormalization of the pole singularity of the neutron-transfer-reaction amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Borbely, I.; Kayumov, S.S.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.; Yarmukhamedov, R. )

    1989-05-01

    The behavior of the neutron-transfer-reaction amplitude has been determined in the DWBA near the cos{theta} singularity ({theta} being the scattering angle in the c. m. s.) corresponding to the pole mechanism of neutron transfer. The Coulomb renormalization factor (CRF) of the pole residue of the differential cross section has been obtained. The exact CRF {vert bar}{ital N}{vert bar}{sup 2} (in the three-body model), the CRF {vert bar}{ital N}{sup {ital DW}}{vert bar}{sup 2} determined by the total DWBA amplitude, and the CRF {vert bar}{ital N}{sup {ital DW}}{sub post}{vert bar}{sup 2} given by the DWBA amplitude in the post approximation are compared. It is shown that the factors {vert bar}{ital N}{sup {ital DW}}{vert bar}{sup 2} and {vert bar}{ital N}{vert bar}{sup 2} are practically the same, and always {vert bar}{ital N}{vert bar}{sup 2}{gt}{vert bar}{ital N}{sup {ital DW}}{sub post}{vert bar}{sup 2}. As the energy increases, the difference between {vert bar}{ital N}{sup {ital DW}}{sub post}{vert bar}{sup 2} and {vert bar}{ital N}{vert bar}{sup 2} decreases.

  1. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.

  2. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, themore » thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.« less

  3. The role of mercury redox reactions in snow on snow-to-air mercury transfer.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Janick D; Poulain, Alexandre J; Amyot, Marc

    2002-01-15

    Wet deposition of Hg in snow represents a major air-to-land flux of Hg in temperate and polar environments. However, the chemical speciation of Hg in snow and its chemical and physical behavior after deposition are poorly understood. To investigate Hg dynamics in snow, we followed Hg0 and total Hg concentrations in a snowpack above a frozen lake over 1 month. Our results indicate that newly deposited Hg is highly labile in snowpacks. On average, Hg levels in particular snow episodes decrease by 54% within 24 h after deposition. We hypothesize that Hg depletion in snow could be caused by a rapid snow-to-air Hg transfer resulting from Hg(II) photoinduced reduction to volatile Hg0. Both snowmelt incubated under a UV lamp at 17 degrees C and solid snow incubated under the sun at -10 degrees C in clear reaction vessels yielded a statistically significant increase in Hg0(aq) with time of exposure, while the Hg0(aq) levels remained constant in the dark controls. The snow-to-air Hg transfer we observed in this study suggests that the massive Hg deposition events observed in springtime in northern environments may have less impact than previously anticipated, since once deposited, Hg could be rapidly reduced and re-emitted.

  4. Structural tuning intra- versus inter-molecular proton transfer reaction in the excited state.

    PubMed

    Chung, Min-Wen; Liao, Jia-Ling; Tang, Kuo-Chun; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Tsung-Yi; Liu, Chun; Lee, Gene-Hsiang; Chi, Yun; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2012-07-01

    A series of 2-pyridyl-pyrazole derivatives 1-4 possessing five-membered ring hydrogen bonding configuration are synthesized, the structural flexibility of which is strategically tuned to be in the order of 1 > 2 > 3 > 4. This system then serves as an ideal chemical model to investigate the correlation between excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction and molecular skeleton motion associated with hydrogen bonds. The resulting luminescence data reveal that the rate of ESIPT decreases upon increasing the structural constraint. At sufficiently low concentration where negligible dimerization is observed, ESIPT takes place in 1 and 2 but is prohibited in 3 and 4, for which high geometry constraint is imposed. The results imply that certain structural bending motions associated with hydrogen bonding angle/distance play a key role in ESIPT. This trend is also well supported by the DFT computational approach, in which the barrier associated with ESIPT is in the order of 1 < 2 < 3 < 4. Upon increasing the concentration in cyclohexane, except for 2, the rest of the title compounds undergo ground-state dimerization, from which the double proton transfer takes place in the excited state, resulting in a relatively blue shifted dimeric tautomer emission (cf. the monomer tautomer emission). The lack of dimerization in 2 is rationalized by substantial energy required to adjust the angle of hydrogen bond via twisting the propylene bridge prior to dimerization. PMID:22618273

  5. The protein's role in triplet energy transfer in bacterial reaction centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Laible, P. D.

    1998-08-14

    When photosynthetic organisms are subjected to high-light conditions in nature, electron transfer becomes blocked as the rate of conversion of light into charge-separated states in the reaction center (RC) exceeds the capacity of the soluble carriers involved in cyclic electron transfer. In that event, a well-characterized T{sub 0}-polarized triplet state {sup T}P, is formed on the primary donor, P, from the P{sup +}H{sub A}{sup {minus}} state (reviewed in [1]). In an aerobic or semi-aerobic environment, the major role of the carotenoid (C), also bound by the RC, is to quench {sup T}P prior to its sensitization of the {sup 1}{Delta}{sub g} singlet state of oxygen--a potentially damaging biological oxidant. The carotenoid performs this function efficiently in most bacterial RCs by rapidly accepting the triplet state from P and dissipating this excited-state energy into heat through internal conversion. The lowest-lying triplet states of P and the carotenoid are sufficiently different that {sup T}P can promote oxygen to its excited singlet state whereas {sup T}C can quench the {sup T}P state (reviewed in [2]).

  6. The 2H(e, e' p)n reaction at large energy transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willering, Hendrik Willem

    2003-04-01

    At the ELSA accelerator facillity in Bonn, Germany, we have measured the deutron breakup reaction 2H(e, e' p)n at four-momentum transfers around Q2 = -0 .20(GeV/c)2 with an electron beam energy of E0 = 1.6 GeV. The cross section has been determined for energy transfers extending from the quasielastic region to just below the Delta(1232)-resonance, and for proton polar angles up to Thetanp = 145 o in the center-of-momentum system. This angular range represents missing momenta up to pm = 1000 MeV/c. By detecting the scattered protons in two segmented 3 3 m2 scintillator time-of-flight detectors, we have covered a considerable part of the out-of-plane region. The clearly visible variation of the cross section with the proton azimuthal angle fnp has enabled us to extract values for the longitudinal-transverse interference form factor fLT and for a combination of the non-interference form factors fL and fT for proton angles up to Thetanp = 40o in the center-of-momentum system. The experimental results have been compared to the full model calculations by Arenhövel et al. For the major part of our kinematical range the shape of the cross section and of the form factors is reproduced by the model, but some differences remain in the normalization, especially at higher energy transfers. Our results corroborate the conclusions from other recent experiments concerning the importance of subnuclear degrees-of-freedom beyond the quasielastic region, but the discrepancy indicates that the model can still be improved

  7. Multiparameter Estimation in Voltammetry When an Electron Transfer Process Is Coupled to a Chemical Reaction.

    PubMed

    Simonov, Alexandr N; Morris, Graham P; Mashkina, Elena; Bethwaite, Blair; Gillow, Kathryn; Baker, Ruth E; Gavaghan, David J; Bond, Alan M

    2016-05-01

    Estimation of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters in electrochemical studies is usually undertaken via comparison of the experimental results with theory based on a model that mimics the experiment. The present study examines the credibility of transient d.c. and a.c. voltammetric theory-experiment comparisons for recovery of the parameters needed to model the ubiquitous mechanism when an electron transfer (E) reaction is followed by a chemical (C) step in the EC process ([Formula: see text]). The data analysis has been undertaken using optimization methods facilitated in some cases by grid computing. These techniques have been applied to the simulated (5% noise added) and experimental (reduction of trans-stilbene) voltammograms to assess the capabilities of parameter recovery of E(0) (reversible potential for the E step), k(0) (heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant at E(0)), α (charge transfer coefficient for the E step), and k(f) and k(b) (forward and backward rate constants for the C step) under different kinetic regimes. The advantages provided by the use of a.c. instead of d.c. voltammetry and data optimization methods over heuristic approaches to "experiment"-theory comparisons are discussed, as are the limitations in the efficient recovery of a unique set of parameters for the EC mechanism. In the particular experimental case examined herein, results for the protonation of the electrochemically generated stilbene dianion demonstrate that, notwithstanding significant advances in experiment and theory of voltammetric analysis, reliable recovery of the parameters for the EC mechanism with a fast chemical process remains a stiff problem. PMID:27041344

  8. Multiparameter Estimation in Voltammetry When an Electron Transfer Process Is Coupled to a Chemical Reaction.

    PubMed

    Simonov, Alexandr N; Morris, Graham P; Mashkina, Elena; Bethwaite, Blair; Gillow, Kathryn; Baker, Ruth E; Gavaghan, David J; Bond, Alan M

    2016-05-01

    Estimation of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters in electrochemical studies is usually undertaken via comparison of the experimental results with theory based on a model that mimics the experiment. The present study examines the credibility of transient d.c. and a.c. voltammetric theory-experiment comparisons for recovery of the parameters needed to model the ubiquitous mechanism when an electron transfer (E) reaction is followed by a chemical (C) step in the EC process ([Formula: see text]). The data analysis has been undertaken using optimization methods facilitated in some cases by grid computing. These techniques have been applied to the simulated (5% noise added) and experimental (reduction of trans-stilbene) voltammograms to assess the capabilities of parameter recovery of E(0) (reversible potential for the E step), k(0) (heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant at E(0)), α (charge transfer coefficient for the E step), and k(f) and k(b) (forward and backward rate constants for the C step) under different kinetic regimes. The advantages provided by the use of a.c. instead of d.c. voltammetry and data optimization methods over heuristic approaches to "experiment"-theory comparisons are discussed, as are the limitations in the efficient recovery of a unique set of parameters for the EC mechanism. In the particular experimental case examined herein, results for the protonation of the electrochemically generated stilbene dianion demonstrate that, notwithstanding significant advances in experiment and theory of voltammetric analysis, reliable recovery of the parameters for the EC mechanism with a fast chemical process remains a stiff problem.

  9. Probing Nonadiabaticity in the Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reaction Catalyzed by Soybean Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a vital role in many biological and chemical processes. PCET rate constant expressions are available for various well-defined regimes, and determining which expression is appropriate for a given system is essential for reliable modeling. Quantitative diagnostics have been devised to characterize the vibronic nonadiabaticity between the electron–proton quantum subsystem and the classical nuclei, as well as the electron–proton nonadiabaticity between the electrons and proton(s) within the quantum subsystem. Herein these diagnostics are applied to a model of the active site of the enzyme soybean lipoxygenase, which catalyzes a PCET reaction that exhibits unusually high deuterium kinetic isotope effects at room temperature. Both semiclassical and electronic charge density diagnostics illustrate vibronic and electron–proton nonadiabaticity for this PCET reaction, supporting the use of the Golden rule nonadiabatic rate constant expression with a specific form of the vibronic coupling. This type of characterization will be useful for theoretical modeling of a broad range of PCET processes. PMID:25258676

  10. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D.; Tulk, Christopher A.; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J.; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; et al

    2016-08-25

    Acetonitrile (CH3CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. In this study, it is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH···N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp2 and sp3more » bonded carbon. Lastly, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst.« less

  11. Radiolytic and electron-transfer reactions in supercritical CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, D. M.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Jonah, C. D.; Takahashi, K.

    2000-01-19

    Using supercritical fluids as solvents is useful for both practical and theoretical reasons. It has been proposed to use supercritical CO{sub 2} as a solvent for synthesis because it eliminates the air pollution arising from other solvents. The properties of supercritical fluids can be easily varied with only modest changes in temperature and density, so they provide a way of testing theories of chemical reactions. It has also been proposed to use supercritical fluids for the treatment of hazardous mixed waste. For these reasons the authors have studied the production of radiolytic species in supercritical CO{sub 2} and have measured their reactivity as a function of density. They have shown that the C{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup +} is formed. They also have shown that the electron transfer reactions of dimethylaniline to C{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup +} and CO{sub 2}(e{sup {minus}}) to benzoquinone are diffusion controlled over a considerable density range.

  12. Study of fluorescence characteristics of the charge-transfer reaction of quinolone agents with bromanil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Fang; Xuan, Chun-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    A spectrofluorimetric method was discussed for the determination of three antibacterial quinolone derivatives, ofloxacin (OFL), norfloxacin (NOR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) through charge-transfer complexation (CTC) with 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-1,4-benzoquinone (bromanil, TBBQ). The method was based on the reaction of these drugs as n-electron donors with the π-acceptor TBBQ. TBBQ was found to react with these drugs to produce a kind of yellow complexes and the fluorescence intensities of the complexes were enhanced by 29-36 times more than those of the corresponding monomers. UV-vis, 1H NMR and XPS techniques were used to study the complexes formed. The various experimental parameters affecting the fluorescence intensity were studied and optimized. Under optimal reaction conditions, the rectilinear calibration graphs were obtained in the concentration range of 0.021-2.42 μg mL -1, 0.017-2.63 μg mL -1 and 0.019-2.14 μg mL -1 for OFL, NOR and CIP, respectively. The methods developed were applied successfully to the determination of the subject drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage forms with good precision and accuracy compared to official and reported methods as revealed by t- and F-tests.

  13. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D; Tulk, Christopher A; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; Ivanov, Ilia N; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Guthrie, Malcolm; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2016-09-19

    Acetonitrile (CH3 CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. It is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp(2) and sp(3) bonded carbon. Finally, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst. PMID:27561179

  14. Nitrogen-doped graphene prepared by a transfer doping approach for the oxygen reduction reaction application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Zaiyong; Zheng, Ruiping; Peng, Hongliang; Liang, Huagen; Liao, Shijun

    2014-01-01

    Well defined nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) is prepared by a transfer doping approach, in which the graphene oxide (GO) is deoxidized and nitrogen doped by the vaporized polyaniline, and the GO is prepared by a thermal expansion method from graphite oxide. The content of doped nitrogen in the doped graphene is high up to 6.25 at% by the results of elements analysis, and oxygen content is lowered to 5.17 at%. As a non-precious metal cathode electrocatalyst, the NG catalyst exhibits excellent activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction, as well as excellent tolerance toward methanol. In 0.1 M KOH solution, its onset potential, half-wave potential and limiting current density for the oxygen reduction reaction reach 0.98 V (vs. RHE), 0.87 V (vs. RHE) and 5.38 mA cm-2, respectively, which are comparable to those of commercial 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst. The well defined graphene structure of the catalyst is revealed clearly by HRTEM and Raman spectra. It is suggested that the nitrogen-doping and large surface area of the NG sheets give the main contribution to the high ORR catalytic activity.

  15. Integration of Ultraviolet Photodissociation with Proton Transfer Reactions and Ion Parking for Analysis of Intact Proteins.

    PubMed

    Holden, Dustin D; McGee, William M; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    We report the implementation of proton transfer reactions (PTR) and ion parking on an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. PTR/ion parking allows charge states of proteins to be focused into a single lower charge state via sequential deprotonation reactions with a proton scavenging reagent, in this case, a nitrogen-containing adduct of fluoranthene. Using PTR and ion parking, we evaluate the charge state dependence of fragmentation of ubiquitin (8.6 kDa), myoglobin (17 kDa), and carbonic anhydrase (29 kDa) upon higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD) or ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD). UVPD exhibited less charge state dependence, thus yielding more uniform distributions of cleavages along the protein backbone and consequently higher sequence coverage than HCD. HCD resulted in especially prominent cleavages C-terminal to amino acids containing acidic side-chains and N-terminal to proline residues; UVPD did not exhibit preferential cleavage adjacent to acidic residues but did show enhancement next to proline and phenylalanine. PMID:26633754

  16. Synthesis of new asymmetric substituted boron amidines - reactions with CO and transfer hydrogenations of phenylacetylene.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Alan R; Rojas, Rene S; Valderrama, Mauricio; Plüss, Pascal; Berke, Heinz; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Kehr, Gerald; Erker, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    The syntheses of the new asymmetric substituted boron amidines [N'-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-N-(pentafluorophenyl)acetimidamide]bis(pentafluorophenyl)borate () and [N'-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-N-(4-cyanophenyl)acetimidamide]bis(pentafluorophenyl)borate () were achieved by reaction of one equivalent of HB(C6F5)2 and the respective amidines and . These adducts, bearing electron withdrawing groups, showed thermally induced H2 elimination forming the four-membered cyclic diazaborate derivatives and . These new species were characterized by spectroscopic methods. X-ray diffraction studies have been carried out on , and . To prevent undesired reactions at the nitrile group, one equivalent of B(C6F5)3 was added to yielding the -B(C6F5)3 nitrile adduct . Compound underwent thermally induced dehydrogenation to give the four-membered cyclic diazaborate derivative . CO was inserted into the ring systems of and forming the five-membered diazaborolone derivatives and . Phenylacetylene reacted stoichiometrically with the asymmetric substituted boron amidines , and to give styrene by double H transfer.

  17. Solvent free energy curves for electron transfer reactions: A nonlinear solvent response model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiye, Toshiko

    1996-05-01

    Marcus theory for electron transfer assumes a linear response of the solvent so that both the reactant and product free energy curves are parabolic functions of the solvent polarization, each with the same solvent force constant k characterizing the curvature. Simulation data by other workers indicate that the assumption of parabolic free energy curves is good for the Fe2+-Fe3+ self-exchange reaction but that the k of the reactant and product free energy curves are different for the reaction D0+A0→D1-+A1+. However, the fluctuations sampled in these simulations were not large enough to reach the activation barrier region, which was thus treated either by umbrella sampling or by parabolic extrapolation. Here, we present free energy curves calculated from a simple model of ionic solvation developed in an earlier paper by Hyun, Babu, and Ichiye, which we refer to here as the HBI model. The HBI model describes the nonlinearity of the solvent response due to the orientation of polar solvent molecules. Since it is a continuum model, it may be considered the first-order nonlinear correction to the linear response Born model. Moreover, in the limit of zero charge or infinite radius, the Born model and the Marcus relations are recovered. Here, the full free energy curves are calculated using analytic expressions from the HBI model. The HBI reactant and product curves have different k for D0+A0→D1-+A1+ as in the simulations, but examining the full curves shows they are nonparabolic due to the nonlinear response of the solvent. On the other hand, the HBI curves are close to parabolic for the Fe2+-Fe3+ reaction, also in agreement with simulations, while those for another self-exchange reaction D0-A1+ show greater deviations from parabolic behavior than the Fe2+-Fe3+ reaction. This indicates that transitions from neutral to charged species will have the largest deviations. Thus, the second moment of the polarization is shown to be a measure of the deviation from Marcus

  18. Measurement of atmospheric sesquiterpenes by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Karl, T.; Helmig, D.; Daly, R.; Rasmussen, R.; Guenther, A.

    2008-12-01

    The ability to measure sesquiterpenes (SQT; C15H24) by a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) was investigated with SQT standards, prepared by a capillary diffusion method, and the estimated mixing ratios, derived from the counts of product ions and proton transfer reaction constants were intercompared with measured mixing ratios, measured by a complementary Gas Chromatograph (GC) coupled to a Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID). Product ion distributions due to soft-ionization occurring in a selected ion drift tube via proton transfer were measured as a function of collision energies. Results after the consideration of the mass discrimination of the PTR-MS system suggest that quantitative SQT measurements within 20% accuracy can be achieved with PTR-MS if two major product ions (m/z 149+ and 205+) out of seven major product ions (m/z 81+, 95+, 109+, 123+, 135+, 149+ and 205+) are accounted for. Bicyclic sesquiterpenes, i.e. β-caryophyllene and α-humulene, showed considerable fragmentation causing the accuracy of their analysis to be reduced to 50% if only the parent ion (m/z 205) is considered. These findings were applied to a field dataset collected above a deciduous forest at the PROPHET (Program for Research on Oxidants: Photochemistry, Emissions, and Transport) research station in 2005. Inferred Average daytime ecosystem scale mixing ratios (fluxes) of isoprene, sum of monoterpenes (MT), and sum of SQT exhibited values of 15 μg m-3 (4.5 mg m-2 h-1), 1.2 μg m-3 (0.21 mg m-2 h-1) and 0.0016 μg m-3 (0.10 mgm-2 h-1) respectively. A range of MT and SQT reactivities with respect to the OH radical was calculated and compared to an earlier study inferring significantly underestimated OH reactivities due to unknown terpenes above this deciduous forest. The results indicate that MT and SQT can resolve ~30% of missing OH reactivity, reported from this site.

  19. Synthesis and Hydride Transfer Reactions of Cobalt and Nickel Hydride Complexes to BX3 Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Michael T.; Potter, Robert G.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2011-12-05

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H{sub 2} gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe){sub 2}, dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane) was capable of reducing a variety of BX{sub 3} compounds having hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to HA of BEt{sub 3}. This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, (HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +}), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities ({Delta}G{sub H{sup -}}{sup o}) of HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX{sub 3} compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX{sub 3} compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe){sub 2} was observed to transfer H{sup -} to BX{sub 3} compounds with X = H, OC{sub 6}F{sub 5} and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh){sub 3} is accompanied by formation of (BH{sub 3}){sub 2}-dmpe and (BH{sub 2}SPh){sub 2}-dmpe products that follow from reduction of multiple BSPh bonds and loss of a dmpe ligand from Co. Reactions between HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and B(SPh){sub 3} in the presence of triethylamine result in formation of Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh and Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 3} with no loss of dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} with B(SPh){sub 3} under analogous conditions give Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe){sub 2}(SPh)]{sup +}. The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe){sub 2} (dedpe = diethyldiphenyl(phosphino)ethane) from H{sub 2} and a base is also discussed; including the formation of an uncommon trans

  20. Nucleon-nucleon correlations in heavy ion transfer reactions: Recent investigations at energies far below the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Corradi, Lorenzo

    2015-10-15

    Excitation functions of one- and two-neutron transfer channels have been measured for the {sup 96}Zr+{sup 40}Ca and {sup 116}Sn+{sup 60}Ni systems at bombarding energies ranging from the Coulomb barrier to ∼25% below. Target-like recoils have been identified in A, Z and velocity with the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer PRISMA. The experimental transfer probabilities have been compared, in absolute values and in slope, with semiclassical microscopic calculations which incorporate nucleon-nucleon pairing correlations. For the first time in a heavy ion collision, one was able to provide a consistent description of one and two neutron transfer reactions by incorporating, in the reaction mechanism, all known structure information of entrance and exit channels nuclei. In particular, there is no need to introduce any enhancement factor for the description of two neutron transfer, of course very important are the correlations induced by the pairing interaction.

  1. Effect of divers anions on the electron-transfer reaction between iron and rusticyanin from Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R.C. II; White, K.J.; Shute, E.A. )

    1991-10-01

    Rusticyanin is a soluble blue copper protein found in abundance in the periplasmic space of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, an acidophilic bacterium capable of growing chemolithotrophically on soluble ferrous sulfate. The one-electron-transfer reactions between soluble iron and purified rusticyanin were studied by stopped-flow spectrophotometry in acidic solutions containing each of 14 different anions. The second-order rate constants for both the Fe(II)-dependent reduction and the Fe(III)-dependent oxidation of the rusticyanin varied as a function of the identity of the principal anion in solution. Analogous electron-transfer reactions between soluble iron and bis(dipicolinato)cobaltate(III) or bis(dipicolinato)ferrate(II) were studied by stopped-flow spectrophotometry under solution conditions identical with those of the rusticyanin experiments. Similar anion-dependent reactivity patterns were obtained with soluble iron whether the other reaction partner was rusticyanin or with of the two organometallic complexes. The Marcus theory of outer-sphere electron transfer reactions was applied to this set of kinetic data to demonstrate that the rusticyanin may possess at least two electron-transfer pathways for liganded iron, one where the pattern of electron-transfer reactivity is controlled largely by protein-independent activation parameters and one where the protein exhibits and anion-dependent kinetic specificity. The exact role of rusticyanin in the iron-dependent respiratory electron transport chain of T. ferrooxidans remains unclear.

  2. Response function of the magnetic spectrometer PRISMA for the multinucleon transfer reaction {sup 40}Ar+{sup 208}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Mijatovic, T.; Szilner, S.; Corradi, L.; Courtin, S.; Farnea, E.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Goasduff, A.; Haas, F.; Jelavic-Malenica, D.; Lunardi, S.; Mengoni, D.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Pollarolo, G.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Soic, N.; Stefanini, A. M.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Multinucleon transfer reaction {sup 40}Ar+{sup 208}Pb has been investigated with the PRISMA-CLARA experimental setup in LNL, INFN, Italy. The experimental differential cross sections have been obtained for different transfer channels by measuring more than {Delta}{theta}{sub lab} = 20 Degree-Sign covered by three angular settings of PRISMA. Results have been compared with the semiclassical calculation GRAZING. Since the understanding of the reaction mechanism depends strongly on the determination of absolute cross section, effect of transport of ions through PRISMA has been studied via a Monte Carlo simulation code.

  3. Insight into the kinetics and thermodynamics of the hydride transfer reactions between quinones and lumiflavin: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Clorice R; Jaglinski, Tanner C; Kastenschmidt, Ashly M; Song, Eun H; Gross, Adam K; Krause, Alyssa J; Gollmar, Jonathan M; Meise, Kristin J; Stenerson, Zachary S; Weibel, Tyler J; Dison, Andrew; Finnegan, Mackenzie R; Griesi, Daniel S; Heltne, Michael D; Hughes, Tom G; Hunt, Connor D; Jansen, Kayla A; Xiong, Adam H; Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-09-01

    The kinetics and equilibrium of the hydride transfer reaction between lumiflavin and a number of substituted quinones was studied using density functional theory. The impact of electron withdrawing/donating substituents on the redox potentials of quinones was studied. In addition, the role of these substituents on the kinetics of the hydride transfer reaction with lumiflavin was investigated in detail under the transition state (TS) theory assumption. The hydride transfer reactions were found to be more favorable for an electron-withdrawing substituent. The activation barrier exhibited a quadratic relationship with the driving force of these reactions as derived under the formalism of modified Marcus theory. The present study found a significant extent of electron delocalization in the TS that is stabilized by enhanced electrostatic, polarization, and exchange interactions. Analysis of geometry, bond-orders, and energetics revealed a predominant parallel (Leffler-Hammond) effect on the TS. Closer scrutiny reveals that electron-withdrawing substituents, although located on the acceptor ring, reduce the N-H bond order of the donor fragment in the precursor complex. Carried out in the gas-phase, this is the first ever report of a theoretical study of flavin's hydride transfer reactions with quinones, providing an unfiltered view of the electronic effect on the nuclear reorganization of donor-acceptor complexes.

  4. Insight into the kinetics and thermodynamics of the hydride transfer reactions between quinones and lumiflavin: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Clorice R; Jaglinski, Tanner C; Kastenschmidt, Ashly M; Song, Eun H; Gross, Adam K; Krause, Alyssa J; Gollmar, Jonathan M; Meise, Kristin J; Stenerson, Zachary S; Weibel, Tyler J; Dison, Andrew; Finnegan, Mackenzie R; Griesi, Daniel S; Heltne, Michael D; Hughes, Tom G; Hunt, Connor D; Jansen, Kayla A; Xiong, Adam H; Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-09-01

    The kinetics and equilibrium of the hydride transfer reaction between lumiflavin and a number of substituted quinones was studied using density functional theory. The impact of electron withdrawing/donating substituents on the redox potentials of quinones was studied. In addition, the role of these substituents on the kinetics of the hydride transfer reaction with lumiflavin was investigated in detail under the transition state (TS) theory assumption. The hydride transfer reactions were found to be more favorable for an electron-withdrawing substituent. The activation barrier exhibited a quadratic relationship with the driving force of these reactions as derived under the formalism of modified Marcus theory. The present study found a significant extent of electron delocalization in the TS that is stabilized by enhanced electrostatic, polarization, and exchange interactions. Analysis of geometry, bond-orders, and energetics revealed a predominant parallel (Leffler-Hammond) effect on the TS. Closer scrutiny reveals that electron-withdrawing substituents, although located on the acceptor ring, reduce the N-H bond order of the donor fragment in the precursor complex. Carried out in the gas-phase, this is the first ever report of a theoretical study of flavin's hydride transfer reactions with quinones, providing an unfiltered view of the electronic effect on the nuclear reorganization of donor-acceptor complexes. PMID:27491848

  5. Possibility of production of neutron-rich Zn and Ge isotopes in multinucleon transfer reactions at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Scheid, W.

    2010-02-15

    The production cross sections of new neutron-rich {sup 84,86}Zn and {sup 90,92}Ge isotopes beyond N=50 are estimated for the first time in the multinucleon transfer reactions {sup 48}Ca + {sup 238}U and {sup 48}Ca + {sup 244}Pu. The production of new isotopes in reactions with a {sup 48}Ca beam is discussed for future experiments.

  6. Electron transfer reactions between cytochrome f and plastocyanin from Brassica komatsuna.

    PubMed

    Niwa, S; Ishikawa, H; Nikai, S; Takabe, T

    1980-10-01

    The protein-protein electron transfer reactions between cytochrome f and plastocyanin, both purified from Brassica komatsuna (Brassica rapa L. var. pervirdis Bailey), have been studied as a function of pH, ionic strength, and temperature. The second-order rate constant for the oxidation of ferrocytochrome f by plastocyanin was found to be k = 4.5 X 10(7) M-1 x S-1 at pH 7.0 mu 0.2 M, and 20 degrees C, with activation parameters delta H not equal to = 8.4 kcal/mol and delta S not equal to = 4.9 cal/mol x deg. Respective rate constant and activation parameters obtained for the reduction of ferricytochrome f by plastocyanin were k = 1.9 X 10(7) M-1 x S-1, delta H not equal to = 8.6 kcal/mol, and delta S not equal to = 3.9 cal/mol x deg. The high rate constants for these reactions and delta S not equal to = 4.9 cal/mol x deg. Respective rate constant and activation parameters obtained for the reduction of ferricytochrome f by plastocyanin were k = 1.9 X 10(7) M-1 x S-1, delta H not equal to = 8.6 kcal/mol, and delta S not equal to = 3.9 cal/mol x deg. The high rate constants for these reactions are attributable not to a low activation enthalpy but to a positive activation entropy term. The rate constants both for the oxidation and the reduction of cytochrome f by plastocyanin drastically decreased with increasing ionic strength, indicating the importance of electrostatic interactions. Divalent cations are more effective than monovalent cations in reducing the rates of these reactions. The rate constants for the oxidation of cytochrome f by plastocyanin are constant between pH 6.0 and 9.0 but decrease markedly above pH 9.0 and below pH 6.0. In the case of the reduction of cytochrome f by plastocyanin, an optimum pH around 7.0 was obtained and a biphasic feature was observed at alkaline pH. The results are discussed in relation to photosynthetic electron transport systems.

  7. A molecular Debye-Hückel approach to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions in an electric cell

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Tiejun; Song, Xueyu

    2014-10-07

    Electron transfer near an electrode immersed in ionic fluids is studied using the linear response approximation, namely, mean value of the vertical energy gap can be used to evaluate the reorganization energy, and hence any linear response model that can treat Coulomb interactions successfully can be used for the reorganization energy calculation. Specifically, a molecular Debye-Hückel theory is used to calculate the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions in an electric cell. Applications to electron transfer near an electrode in molten salts show that the reorganization energies from our molecular Debye-Hückel theory agree well with the results from MD simulations.

  8. The ^2H(e,e'p)n Reaction at High Four-Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan Ibrahim

    2006-12-31

    This dissertation presents the highest four-momentum transfer, Q^2,quasielastic (x_Bj = 1) results from Experiment E01-020 which systematically explored the 2He(e,e'p)n reaction ("Electro-disintegration" of the deuteron) at three different four-momentum transfers, Q^2 = 0.8, 2.1, and 3.5 GeV^2 and missing momenta, P_miss = 0, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 GeV including separations of the longitudinal-transverse interference response function, R_LT, and extractoin of the longitudinal-transverse asymmetry, A_LT. This systematic approach will help to understand the reaction mechanism and the deuteron structure down to the short range part of the nucleon-nucleon interaction which is one of the fundamental missions of nuclear physics. By studying the very short distance structure of the deuteron, one may also determine whether or to what extent the description of nuclei in terms of nucleon/meson degrees of freedom must be supplemented by inclusion of explicit quark effects. The unique combination of energy, current, duty factor, and control of systematics for Hall A at Jefferson Lab made Jefferson Lab the only facility in the world where these systematic studies of the deuteron can be undertaken. This is especially true when we want to understand the short range structure of the deuteron where high energies and high luminosity/duty factor are needed. All these features of Jefferson Lab allow us to examine large missing momenta (short range scales) at kinematics where the effects of final state interactions (FSI), meson exchange currents (MEC), and isobar currents (IC) are minimal, making the extraction of the deuteron structure less model-dependent. Jefferson Lab also provides the kinematical flexibility to perform the separation of R_LT over a broad range of missing momenta and momentum transfers. Experiment E01-020 use the standard Hall A equipment in coincidence configuration in addition to the cryogenic target system. The low and middle Q^2 kinematics were completed

  9. Effect of different hand positions on trunk and shoulder kinematics and reaction forces in sitting pivot transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Shin; Her, Jin Gan; Ko, Tae Sung

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the changes in trunk and shoulder angles, and reaction forces under the two hands elicited by different hand base of support positions during sitting pivot transfer. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen unimpaired subjects performed independent sitting pivot transfer. Subjects performed sitting pivot transfer between an initial seat to a target seat by only using their hands positioned at the same height as and lower than the seat position. Trunk and shoulder kinematics, and reaction forces on the trailing and leading hands were calculated. Mean peak joint angles and forces were compared between the hand positions using the pared t-test for the lift phase of the transfer. [Results] There were significant increases in the trunk angles of forward and lateral flexion, even though rotation decreased while transferring in the lower hand position. Increased shoulder flexion, anterior/posterior forces and reduced lateral forces were also shown. [Conclusion] Placing the hands of the supporting arms lower than the seat position during sitting pivot transfer was identified as having biomechanical advantages. Therefore, the lower hand position can be recommended as an effective and safe method for sitting pivot transfer by patients with spinal cord injury and can be utilized as a reference data for considering the appropriate height of aids for a wheelchair. PMID:26310994

  10. Effect of different hand positions on trunk and shoulder kinematics and reaction forces in sitting pivot transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Shin; Her, Jin Gan; Ko, Tae Sung

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the changes in trunk and shoulder angles, and reaction forces under the two hands elicited by different hand base of support positions during sitting pivot transfer. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen unimpaired subjects performed independent sitting pivot transfer. Subjects performed sitting pivot transfer between an initial seat to a target seat by only using their hands positioned at the same height as and lower than the seat position. Trunk and shoulder kinematics, and reaction forces on the trailing and leading hands were calculated. Mean peak joint angles and forces were compared between the hand positions using the pared t-test for the lift phase of the transfer. [Results] There were significant increases in the trunk angles of forward and lateral flexion, even though rotation decreased while transferring in the lower hand position. Increased shoulder flexion, anterior/posterior forces and reduced lateral forces were also shown. [Conclusion] Placing the hands of the supporting arms lower than the seat position during sitting pivot transfer was identified as having biomechanical advantages. Therefore, the lower hand position can be recommended as an effective and safe method for sitting pivot transfer by patients with spinal cord injury and can be utilized as a reference data for considering the appropriate height of aids for a wheelchair.

  11. Effect of different hand positions on trunk and shoulder kinematics and reaction forces in sitting pivot transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Shin; Her, Jin Gan; Ko, Tae Sung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the changes in trunk and shoulder angles, and reaction forces under the two hands elicited by different hand base of support positions during sitting pivot transfer. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen unimpaired subjects performed independent sitting pivot transfer. Subjects performed sitting pivot transfer between an initial seat to a target seat by only using their hands positioned at the same height as and lower than the seat position. Trunk and shoulder kinematics, and reaction forces on the trailing and leading hands were calculated. Mean peak joint angles and forces were compared between the hand positions using the pared t-test for the lift phase of the transfer. [Results] There were significant increases in the trunk angles of forward and lateral flexion, even though rotation decreased while transferring in the lower hand position. Increased shoulder flexion, anterior/posterior forces and reduced lateral forces were also shown. [Conclusion] Placing the hands of the supporting arms lower than the seat position during sitting pivot transfer was identified as having biomechanical advantages. Therefore, the lower hand position can be recommended as an effective and safe method for sitting pivot transfer by patients with spinal cord injury and can be utilized as a reference data for considering the appropriate height of aids for a wheelchair. PMID:26310994

  12. Kinetics of acyl transfer reactions in organic media catalysed by Candida antarctica lipase B.

    PubMed

    Martinelle, M; Hult, K

    1995-09-01

    The acyl transfer reactions catalysed by Candida antartica lipase B in organic media followed a bi-bi ping-pong mechanism, with competitive substrate inhibition by the alcohols used as acyl acceptors. The effect of organic solvents on Vm and Km was investigated. The Vm values in acetonitrile was 40-50% of those in heptane. High Km values in acetonitrile compared to those in heptane could partly be explained by an increased solvation of the substrates in acetonitrile. Substrate solvation caused a 10-fold change in substrate specificity, defined as (Vm/Km)ethyl octanoate/(Vm/Km)octanoic acid, going from heptane to acetonitrile. Deacylation was the rate determining step for the acyl transfer in heptane with vinyl- and ethyl octanoate as acyl donors and (R)-2-octanol as acyl acceptor. With 1-octanol, a rate determining deacylation step in heptane was indicated using the same acyl donors. Using 1-octanol as acceptor in heptane, S-ethyl thiooctanoate had a 25- to 30-fold lower Vm/Km value and vinyl octanoate a 4-fold higher Vm/Km value than that for ethyl octanoate. The difference showed to be a Km effect for vinyl octanoate and mainly a Km effect for S-ethyl thiooctanoate. The Vm values of the esterification of octanoic acid with different alcohols was 10-30-times lower than those for the corresponding transesterification of ethyl octanoate. The low activity could be explained by a low pH around the enzyme caused by the acid or a withdrawing of active enzyme by nonproductive binding by the acid. PMID:7669809

  13. Calculated coupling of electron and proton transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis.

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, C R; Michel, H; Honig, B; Gunner, M R

    1996-01-01

    Based on new Rhodopseudomonas (Rp.) viridis reaction center (RC) coordinates with a reliable structure of the secondary acceptor quinone (QB) site, a continuum dielectric model and finite difference technique have been used to identify clusters of electrostatically interacting ionizable residues. Twenty-three residues within a distance of 25 A from QB (QB cluster) have been shown to be strongly electrostatically coupled to QB, either directly or indirectly. An analogous cluster of 24 residues is found to interact with QA (QA cluster). Both clusters extend to the cytoplasmic surface in at least two directions. However, the QB cluster differs from the QA cluster in that it has a surplus of acidic residues, more strong electrostatic interactions, is less solvated, and experiences a strong positive electrostatic field arising from the polypeptide backbone. Consequently, upon reduction of QA or QB, it is the QB cluster, and not the QA cluster, which is responsible for substoichiometric proton uptake at neutral pH. The bulk of the changes in the QB cluster are calculated to be due to the protonation of a tightly coupled cluster of the three Glu residues (L212, H177, and M234) within the QB cluster. If the lifetime of the doubly reduced state QB2- is long enough, Asp M43 and Ser L223 are predicted to also become protonated. The calculated complex titration behavior of the strongly interacting residues of the QB cluster and the resulting electrostatic response to electron transfer may be a common feature in proton-transferring membrane protein complexes. Images FIGURE 2 p2482-a FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 PMID:8744288

  14. Chemical evolution of a travertine-depositing stream: geochemical processes and mass transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lorah, M.M.; Herman, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    This field study focuses on quantitatively defining the chemical changes occurring in Falling Spring Creek, a travertine-depositing stream located in Alleghany County, Virginia. The processes of CO/sub 2/ outgassing and calcite precipitation or dissolution control the chemical evolution of the stream. The observed chemical composition of the water was used with the computerized geochemical model WATEQF to calculate aqueous speciation, saturation indices, and CO/sub 2/ partial pressure values. Mass balance calculations were performed to obtain mass transfers of CO/sub 2/ and calcite. Reaction times, estimated from stream discharge, were used with the mass transfer results to calculate rates of CO/sub 2/ outgassing and calcite precipitation between consecutive sampling points. The stream, which is fed by a carbonate spring, is supersaturated with respect to CO/sub 2/ along the entire 5.2-km flow path. Outgassing of CO/sub 2/ drives the solution to high degrees of supersaturation with respect to calcite. Metabolic uptake of CO/sub 2/ by photosynthetic plants is insignificant, because the high supply rate of dissolved carbon dioxide and the extreme agitation of the stream at waterfalls and rapids causes a much greater amount of inorganic CO/sub 2/ outgassing to occur. Calcite precipitation is kinetically inhibited until near the crest of a 20-m vertical waterfall. Calcite precipitation rates then reach a maximum at the waterfall where greater water turbulence allows the most rapid escape of CO/sub 2/. Physical evidence for calcite precipitation exists in the travertine deposits which are first observed immediately above the waterfall and extend for at least 1.0 km below the falls. Net calcite precipitation occurs at all times of the year but is greatest during low-flow conditions in the summer and early fall.

  15. Kinetics of acyl transfer reactions in organic media catalysed by Candida antarctica lipase B.

    PubMed

    Martinelle, M; Hult, K

    1995-09-01

    The acyl transfer reactions catalysed by Candida antartica lipase B in organic media followed a bi-bi ping-pong mechanism, with competitive substrate inhibition by the alcohols used as acyl acceptors. The effect of organic solvents on Vm and Km was investigated. The Vm values in acetonitrile was 40-50% of those in heptane. High Km values in acetonitrile compared to those in heptane could partly be explained by an increased solvation of the substrates in acetonitrile. Substrate solvation caused a 10-fold change in substrate specificity, defined as (Vm/Km)ethyl octanoate/(Vm/Km)octanoic acid, going from heptane to acetonitrile. Deacylation was the rate determining step for the acyl transfer in heptane with vinyl- and ethyl octanoate as acyl donors and (R)-2-octanol as acyl acceptor. With 1-octanol, a rate determining deacylation step in heptane was indicated using the same acyl donors. Using 1-octanol as acceptor in heptane, S-ethyl thiooctanoate had a 25- to 30-fold lower Vm/Km value and vinyl octanoate a 4-fold higher Vm/Km value than that for ethyl octanoate. The difference showed to be a Km effect for vinyl octanoate and mainly a Km effect for S-ethyl thiooctanoate. The Vm values of the esterification of octanoic acid with different alcohols was 10-30-times lower than those for the corresponding transesterification of ethyl octanoate. The low activity could be explained by a low pH around the enzyme caused by the acid or a withdrawing of active enzyme by nonproductive binding by the acid.

  16. Control and Automation of Fluid Flow, Mass Transfer and Chemical Reactions in Microscale Segmented Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolhasani, Milad

    Flowing trains of uniformly sized bubbles/droplets (i.e., segmented flows) and the associated mass transfer enhancement over their single-phase counterparts have been studied extensively during the past fifty years. Although the scaling behaviour of segmented flow formation is increasingly well understood, the predictive adjustment of the desired flow characteristics that influence the mixing and residence times, remains a challenge. Currently, a time consuming, slow and often inconsistent manual manipulation of experimental conditions is required to address this task. In my thesis, I have overcome the above-mentioned challenges and developed an experimental strategy that for the first time provided predictive control over segmented flows in a hands-off manner. A computer-controlled platform that consisted of a real-time image processing module within an integral controller, a silicon-based microreactor and automated fluid delivery technique was designed, implemented and validated. In a first part of my thesis I utilized this approach for the automated screening of physical mass transfer and solubility characteristics of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a physical solvent at a well-defined temperature and pressure and a throughput of 12 conditions per hour. Second, by applying the segmented flow approach to a recently discovered CO2 chemical absorbent, frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs), I determined the thermodynamic characteristics of the CO2-FLP reaction. Finally, the segmented flow approach was employed for characterization and investigation of CO2-governed liquid-liquid phase separation process. The second part of my thesis utilized the segmented flow platform for the preparation and shape control of high quality colloidal nanomaterials (e.g., CdSe/CdS) via the automated control of residence times up to approximately 5 minutes. By introducing a novel oscillatory segmented flow concept, I was able to further extend the residence time limitation to 24 hours. A case study of a

  17. Kinetic and vibrational isotope effects of proton transfer reactions in channelrhodopsin-2.

    PubMed

    Resler, Tom; Schultz, Bernd-Joachim; Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A; Schlesinger, Ramona; Heberle, Joachim

    2015-07-21

    Channelrhodopsins (ChRs) are light-gated cation channels. After blue-light excitation, the protein undergoes a photocycle with different intermediates. Here, we have recorded transient absorbance changes of ChR2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in the visible and infrared regions with nanosecond time resolution, the latter being accomplished using tunable quantum cascade lasers. Because proton transfer reactions play a key role in channel gating, we determined vibrational as well as kinetic isotope effects (VIEs and KIEs) of carboxylic groups of various key aspartic and glutamic acid residues by monitoring their C=O stretching vibrations in H2O and in D2O. D156 exhibits a substantial KIE (>2) in its deprotonation and reprotonation, which substantiates its role as the internal proton donor to the retinal Schiff base. The unusual VIE of D156, upshifted from 1736 cm(-1) to 1738 cm(-1) in D2O, was scrutinized by studying the D156E variant. The C=O stretch of E156 shifted down by 8 cm(-1) in D2O, providing evidence for the accessibility of the carboxylic group. The C=O stretching band of E90 exhibits a VIE of 9 cm(-1) and a KIE of ∼2 for the de- and the reprotonation reactions during the lifetime of the late desensitized state. The KIE of 1 determined in the time range from 20 ns to 5 ms is incompatible with early deprotonation of E90. PMID:26200864

  18. Switchover of the Mechanism between Electron Transfer and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer for a Protonated Manganese(IV)-Oxo Complex by Changing Only the Reaction Temperature.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jieun; Kim, Surin; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-06-20

    Hydroxylation of mesitylene by a nonheme manganese(IV)-oxo complex, [(N4Py)Mn(IV) (O)](2+) (1), proceeds via one-step hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) with a large deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 3.2(3) at 293 K. In contrast, the same reaction with a triflic acid-bound manganese(IV)-oxo complex, [(N4Py)Mn(IV) (O)](2+) -(HOTf)2 (2), proceeds via electron transfer (ET) with no KIE at 293 K. Interestingly, when the reaction temperature is lowered to less than 263 K in the reaction of 2, however, the mechanism changes again from ET to HAT with a large KIE of 2.9(3). Such a switchover of the reaction mechanism from ET to HAT is shown to occur by changing only temperature in the boundary region between ET and HAT pathways when the driving force of ET from toluene derivatives to 2 is around -0.5 eV. The present results provide a valuable and general guide to predict a switchover of the reaction mechanism from ET to the others, including HAT. PMID:27191357

  19. Fusion and neutron transfer reactions with weakly bound nuclei within time-dependent and coupled channel approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarin, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation and the coupled channel approach based on the method of perturbed stationary two-center states are used to describe nucleon transfers and fusion in low-energy nuclear reactions. Results of the cross sections calculation for the formation of the 198Au and fusion in the 6He+197Au reaction and for the formation of the 65Zn in 6He+64Zn reaction agree satisfactorily with the experimental data near the barrier. The Feynman's continual integrals calculations for a few-body systems were used for the proposal of the new form of the shell model mean field for helium isotopes.

  20. A Short Account of RRKM Theory of Unimolecular Reactions and of Marcus Theory of Electron Transfer in a Historical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Giacomo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The RRKM Theory of Unimolecular Reactions and Marcus Theory of Electron Transfer are here briefly discussed in a historical perspective. In the final section, after a general discussion on the educational usefulness of teaching chemistry in a historical framework, hints are given on how some characteristics of Marcus' work could be introduced in…

  1. Diphenylbutadienes Syntheses by Means of the Wittig Reaction: Experimental Introduction to the Use of Phase Transfer Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillois, J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis of 1,4-diphenylbutadiene by means of the Wittig reaction is presented as suitable for organic chemistry students at the end of a basic laboratory program to apply laboratory skills and display understanding of the use of phase transfer catalysis and its application in syntheses. (CS)

  2. Multi-capillary-column proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry☆

    PubMed Central

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Fischer, Lukas; Herbig, Jens; Ager, Clemes; Amann, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (PTR-TOFMS) exhibits high selectivity with a resolution of around 5000 m/Δm. While isobars can be separated with this resolution, discrimination of isomeric compounds is usually not possible. The coupling of a multi-capillary column (MCC) with a PTR-TOFMS overcomes these problems as demonstrated in this paper for the ketone isomers 3-heptanone and 2-methyl-3-hexanone and for different aldehydes. Moreover, fragmentation of compounds can be studied in detail which might even improve the identification. LODs for compounds tested are in the range of low ppbv and peak positions of the respective separated substances show good repeatability (RSD of the peak positions <3.2%). Due to its special characteristics, such as isothermal operation, compact size, the MCC setup is suitable to be installed inside the instrument and the overall retention time for a complete spectrum is only a few minutes: this allows near real-time measurements in the optional MCC mode. In contrast to other methods that yield additional separation, such as the use of pre-cursor ions other than H3O+, this method yields additional information without increasing complexity. PMID:24119758

  3. First Measurement of Transferred Polarization in the Exclusive e p --> e' K+ Lambda Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel S. Carman; Et. Al.

    2003-04-04

    The first measurements of the transferred polarization for the exclusive {rvec e}p {yields} e{prime}K{sup +}{rvec {Lambda}} reaction have been performed in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility using the CLAS spectrometer. A 2.567 GeV electron beam was used to measure the hyperon polarization over a range of Q{sup 2} from 0.3 to 1.5 (GeV/c){sup 2}, W from 1.6 to 2.15 GeV, and over the full center-of-mass angular range of the K{sup +} meson. Comparison with predictions of hadrodynamic models indicates strong sensitivity to the underlying resonance contributions. A non-relativistic quark model interpretation of our data suggests that the s{bar s} quark pair is produced with spins predominantly anti-aligned. Implications for the validity of the widely used {sup 3}P{sub o} quark-pair creation operator are discussed.

  4. Reaction-diffusion systems in natural sciences and new technology transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, André A.

    2012-12-01

    Diffusion mechanisms in natural sciences and innovation management involve partial differential equations (PDEs). This is due to their spatio-temporal dimensions. Functional semi-discretized PDEs (with lattice spatial structures or time delays) may be even more adapted to real world problems. In the modeling process, PDEs can also formalize behaviors, such as the logistic growth of populations with migration, and the adopters’ dynamics of new products in innovation models. In biology, these events are related to variations in the environment, population densities and overcrowding, migration and spreading of humans, animals, plants and other cells and organisms. In chemical reactions, molecules of different species interact locally and diffuse. In the management of new technologies, the diffusion processes of innovations in the marketplace (e.g., the mobile phone) are a major subject. These innovation diffusion models refer mainly to epidemic models. This contribution introduces that modeling process by using PDEs and reviews the essential features of the dynamics and control in biological, chemical and new technology transfer. This paper is essentially user-oriented with basic nonlinear evolution equations, delay PDEs, several analytical and numerical methods for solving, different solutions, and with the use of mathematical packages, notebooks and codes. The computations are carried out by using the software Wolfram Mathematica®7, and C++ codes.

  5. Photoinduced homogeneous proton-coupled electron transfer: model study of isotope effects on reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Charulatha; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2009-10-21

    A model Hamiltonian for photoinduced homogeneous proton-coupled electron transfer reactions is presented, and the equations of motion for the reduced density matrix elements in an electron-proton vibronic basis are derived. This formalism enables a detailed analysis of the proton vibrational dynamics, as well as the dynamics of the electronic state populations, following photoexcitation. The application of this theory to model systems provides insight into the fundamental physical principles underlying these types of processes. The initial nonequilibrium state is prepared by vertical photoexcitation from the ground electronic state to a coherent vibrational mixture in the donor electronic state. This nonstationary state relaxes to the equilibrium distributions in the donor and acceptor electronic states via dynamical processes arising from nonadiabatic transitions between the donor and acceptor vibronic states concurrent with energy dissipation to the bath. During the initial stage, when the proton vibrational population in the donor state is distributed among higher vibrational states and the donor proton wavepacket is oscillating with large amplitude, the electronic state population dynamics exhibits virtually no hydrogen/deuterium isotope effect. After vibrational relaxation, when the proton vibrational population in the donor state becomes concentrated in the lower vibrational states and the donor proton wavepacket becomes more localized near the minimum of the donor potential, a significant hydrogen/deuterium isotope effect on the electronic state population dynamics is exhibited. These model system calculations lead to experimentally testable predictions about the qualitative behavior of these isotope effects. PMID:20568867

  6. [Ultraviolet spectral characteristics of charge-transfer reaction complex in micellar system and its application].

    PubMed

    Du, Li-ming; Chen, Cai-ping; Li, Jian-hua

    2005-02-01

    Charge-transfer (CT) reaction of chloranil (TCBQ) as a pi-electron acceptor with fleroxacin (FLX) as an electron donor has been studied by ultraviolet spectrophotometry method. Experiment showed that FLX reacted with TCBQ in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micellar systems, and a stable complex was formed and the absorbency was remarkably enhanced. Therefore, a simple, rapid, accurate and sensitive method for the determination of FLX has been developed. Beer's law is obeyed in the range of 0.6-24 mg x L(-1) of FLX and r = 0.9993. The apparent molar absorptivity of CT complexes at 326 nm is 3.3 x 10(4) L x mol(-1) x cm(-1). The composition of CT complex was found to be 1:1 by Bent-French and curved intersection methods. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of ESL in tablets. The recoveries are 99.2%-99.7%. The relative standard deviation is 0.7%-2.1%. The proposed methods are suitable for the routine quality control of drug alone and in tablets or capsules without fear of interference caused by the excipients expected to be present in tablets or capsules.

  7. Triacetone triperoxide detection using low reduced-field proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chengyin; Li, Jianquan; Han, Haiyan; Wang, Hongmei; Jiang, Haihe; Chu, Yannan

    2009-08-01

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was applied to on-line detection of the explosive triacetone triperoxide (TATP) using a discharge gas of water vapor or alternative ammonia in the ion source. The dependence of ionic intensity on reduced-field in the drift tube was investigated, and the results indicate that an irregular operation using low reduced-field can enhance TATP detection due to reduced collision-induced dissociation in the drift tube. When water vapor is used as the discharge gas, the characteristic ions for TATP identification are [TATP + H]+ which are detectable at a reduced-field about 50 Td. If ammonia is the discharge gas, PTR-MS exhibits a better sensitivity, the explosive TATP can be discriminated according to the adduct ions [TATP + NH4]+, and a limit of detection at ppb level can be achieved at a reduced-field around 100 Td in this PTR-MS apparatus. PTR-MS is suggested as a potential tool for on-site detection of the explosive TATP with the advantages of rapid response and high sensitivity without sample pretreatment.

  8. Rapid tomato volatile profiling by using proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS).

    PubMed

    Farneti, Brian; Cristescu, Simona M; Costa, Guglielmo; Harren, Frans J M; Woltering, Ernst J

    2012-05-01

    The availability of rapid and accurate methods to assess fruit flavor is of utmost importance to support quality control especially in the breeding phase. Breeders need more information and analytical tools to facilitate selection for complex multigenic traits such as flavor quality. In this study, it is shown that proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a suitable method to monitor at high sensitivity the emission of volatiles determining the tomato aromatic profile such as hexanal, hexenals, methanol, ethanol, and acetaldehyde. The volatiles emitted by 14 tomato varieties (at red stage) were analyzed by 2 solvent-free headspace methods: solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography MS and PTR-MS. Multivariate statistics (principal component analysis and cluster analysis) of the PTR-MS results allow an unambiguous separation between varieties, especially with a clear fingerprinting separation between the different tomato types: round truss, cocktail, and cherry tomatoes. PTR-MS was also successfully used to monitor the changes in volatile profiles during postharvest ripening and storage. PMID:22509736

  9. Monitoring benzene formation from benzoate in model systems by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Carlin, Silvia; Märk, Tilmann D.; Gasperi, Flavia

    2008-08-01

    The presence of benzene in food and in particular in soft drinks has been reported in several studies and should be considered in fundamental investigations about formation of this carcinogen compound as well as in quality control. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been used here for rapid, direct quantification of benzene and to monitor its formation in model systems related to the use of benzoate, a common preservative, in presence of ascorbic acid: a widespread situation that yields benzene in, e.g., soft drinks and fruit juices. Firstly, we demonstrate here that PTR-MS allows a rapid determination of benzene that is in quantitative agreement with independent solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography (SPME/GC) analysis. Secondly, as a case study, the effect of different sugars (sucrose, fructose and glucose) on benzene formation is investigated indicating that they inhibit its formation and that this effect is enhanced for reducing sugars. The sugar-induced inhibition of benzene formation depends on several parameters (type and concentration of sugar, temperature, time) but can be more than 80% in situations that can be expected in the storage of commercial soft drinks. This is consistent with the reported observations of higher benzene concentrations in sugar-free soft drinks.

  10. Production of heavy isotopes in transfer reactions by collisions of {sup 238}U+{sup 238}U

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Zhaoqing; Jin Genming; Li Junqing

    2009-12-15

    The dynamics of transfer reactions in collisions of two very heavy nuclei {sup 238}U+{sup 238}U is studied within the dinuclear system (DNS) model. Collisions of two actinide nuclei form a superheavy composite system during a very short time, in which a large number of charge and mass transfers may take place. Such reactions have been investigated experimentally as an alternative way for the production of heavy and superheavy nuclei. The role of collision orientation in the production cross sections of heavy nuclides is analyzed systematically. Calculations show that the cross sections decrease drastically as the charged numbers of the heavy fragments increase. The transfer mechanism is favorable to synthesizing heavy neutron-rich isotopes, such as nuclei around the subclosure at N=162 from No (Z=102) to Db (Z=105)

  11. Electron transfer and bond-forming reactions following collisions of I2+ with CO and CS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, James D.; Parkes, Michael A.; Price, Stephen D.

    2015-08-01

    Collisions between I2+ and CO have been investigated using time-of-flight mass spectrometry at a range of centre-of-mass collision energies between 0.5 and 3.0 eV. Following I2++CO collisions, we detect I++CO+ from a single-electron transfer reaction and IO++C+ from bond-forming reactivity. Reaction-window calculations, based on Landau-Zener theory, have been used to rationalise the electron transfer reactivity and computational chemistry has been used to explore the [I-CO]2+ potential energy surface to account for the observation of IO+. In addition, collisions between I2+ and CS2 have been investigated over a range of centre-of-mass collision energies between 0.8 and 6.0 eV. Both single- and double-electron transfer reactions are observed in the I2+/CS2 collision system, an observation again rationalised by reaction-window theory. The monocations IS+ and IC+ are also detected following collisions of I2+ with CS2, and these ions are clearly products from a bond-forming reaction. We present a simple model based on the structure of the [I-CS2]2+ collision complex to rationalise the significantly larger yield of IS+ than IC+ in this bond-forming process.

  12. Role of 3,5-dimethyl anisole (DMA) as an electron donor in photoinduced electron transfer (ET) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, S.; De, R.; Ganguly, T.

    1997-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to reveal the nature of photoinduced bimolecular quenching reactions, e.g. electron transfer (ET) and energy transfer processes within the donor DMA and acceptor 2-nitrofluorene (2NF) molecules in polar acetonitrile (ACN) fluid solution at the ambient temperature. From the observed large negative values of ΔG (the energy gap between the locally excited, LE and radical ion pair or RIP states) when one of the chromorphores was excited along with large R0 ( ˜27 Å), Förster critical transfer distance between the donor and acceptor measured from the considerable overlapping region of donor DMA emission with acceptor absorption and nearly 100% theoretical transfer efficiency ( T) value of the Förster type energy transfer the concurrent occurrences of the two processes, photoinduced ET and excitational energy transfer, were inferred. Moreover it was suggested that ET reaction within the present donor and acceptor systems is of outersphere type as evidenced from the large negative value of ΔG (˜ -2.3 eV).

  13. Carbon-, sulfur-, and phosphorus-based charge transfer reactions in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Guillermo; Gras, Luis; Mora, Juan; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T. C.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the influence of carbon-, sulfur-, and phosphorus-based charge transfer reactions on the emission signal of 34 elements (Ag, Al, As, Au, B, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Hg, I, In, Ir, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Pt, S, Sb, Se, Sr, Te, and Zn) in axially viewed inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry has been investigated. To this end, atomic and ionic emission signals for diluted glycerol, sulfuric acid, and phosphoric acid solutions were registered and results were compared to those obtained for a 1% w w- 1 nitric acid solution. Experimental results show that the emission intensities of As, Se, and Te atomic lines are enhanced by charge transfer from carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus ions. Iodine and P atomic emission is enhanced by carbon- and sulfur-based charge transfer whereas the Hg atomic emission signal is enhanced only by carbon. Though signal enhancement due to charge transfer reactions is also expected for ionic emission lines of the above-mentioned elements, no experimental evidence has been found with the exception of Hg ionic lines operating carbon solutions. The effect of carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus charge transfer reactions on atomic emission depends on (i) wavelength characteristics. In general, signal enhancement is more pronounced for electronic transitions involving the highest upper energy levels; (ii) plasma experimental conditions. The use of robust conditions (i.e. high r.f. power and lower nebulizer gas flow rates) improves carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus ionization in the plasma and, hence, signal enhancement; and (iii) the presence of other concomitants (e.g. K or Ca). Easily ionizable elements reduce ionization in the plasma and consequently reduce signal enhancement due to charge transfer reactions.

  14. Solvent effects on the oxidation (electron transfer) reaction of [Fe(CN) 6] 4- by [Co(NH 3) 5pz] 3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muriel, F.; Jiménez, R.; López, M.; Prado-Gotor, R.; Sánchez, F.

    2004-03-01

    Solvent effects on the title reaction were studied in different reaction media constituted by water and organic cosolvents (methanol, tert-butyl alcohol, ethyleneglycol and glucose) at 298.2 K. The results are considered in light of the Marcus-Hush approach for electron transfer reactions. Variations of the electron transfer rate constant are shown to be mainly due to changes in the reaction free energy. On the other hand the energies of the MMCT band, corresponding to the optical electron transfer within the ion pair [Fe(CN) 6] 4-/[Co(NH 3) 5pz] 3+, in the different reaction media, have been obtained. The activation free energies of the thermal electron transfer process have been calculated from the band ( Eop) data, and compared with those obtained from the kinetic study. Quantitative agreement is found between the two series of data. This shows the possibility of estimating activation free energies for electron transfer reactions from static (optical) measurements.

  15. Residual Water Modulates QA−-to-QB Electron Transfer in Bacterial Reaction Centers Embedded in Trehalose Amorphous Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Francia, Francesco; Palazzo, Gerardo; Mallardi, Antonia; Cordone, Lorenzo; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    The role of protein dynamics in the electron transfer from the reduced primary quinone, QA−, to the secondary quinone, QB, was studied at room temperature in isolated reaction centers (RC) from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides by incorporating the protein in trehalose water systems of different trehalose/water ratios. The effects of dehydration on the reaction kinetics were examined by analyzing charge recombination after different regimes of RC photoexcitation (single laser pulse, double flash, and continuous light) as well as by monitoring flash-induced electrochromic effects in the near infrared spectral region. Independent approaches show that dehydration of RC-containing matrices causes reversible, inhomogeneous inhibition of QA−-to-QB electron transfer, involving two subpopulations of RCs. In one of these populations (i.e., active), the electron transfer to QB is slowed but still successfully competing with P+QA− recombination, even in the driest samples; in the other (i.e., inactive), electron transfer to QB after a laser pulse is hindered, inasmuch as only recombination of the P+QA− state is observed. Small residual water variations (∼7 wt %) modulate fully the relative fraction of the two populations, with the active one decreasing to zero in the driest samples. Analysis of charge recombination after continuous illumination indicates that, in the inactive subpopulation, the conformational changes that rate-limit electron transfer can be slowed by >4 orders of magnitude. The reported effects are consistent with conformational gating of the reaction and demonstrate that the conformational dynamics controlling electron transfer to QB is strongly enslaved to the structure and dynamics of the surrounding medium. Comparing the effects of dehydration on P+QA−→PQA recombination and QA−QB→QAQB− electron transfer suggests that conformational changes gating the latter process are distinct from those stabilizing the primary

  16. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) ytterbium: Electron-transfer reactions with organotransition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, P.T.

    1991-11-01

    The divalent lanthanide complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb, reacts with methylcopper to produce the base-free, ytterbium-methyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe. This product forms a asymmetric, methyl-bridged dimer in the solid state. The bulky alkyl complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, displays similar chemistry to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbMe, but at a reduced reaction rate due to the limited accessibility of the metal in (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}YbCH(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. Copper and silver halide salts react with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V to produce the trivalent halide derivatives, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VX (X + F, Cl, Br, I). The chloride complex, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}VCl, reacts with lithium reagents to form the phenyl and borohydride species. Nitrous oxide transfers an oxygen atom to (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}V producing the vanadium-oxo complex, (Me{sub 5}Ce{sub 5}){sub 2}VO. The trivalent titanium species, (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}TiX (X = Cl, Br, Me, BH{sub 4}), form bimetallic coordination complexes with (Me{sub 5}C{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb. The magnetic behavior of the products indicates that electron transfer has not occurred. The solid state structures of the chloride and bromide complexes show unusual bend angles for the halide bridges between ytterbium and titanium. A model based on frontier orbital theory has been proposed to account for the bending behavior in these species. The bimetallic methyl complex contains a linear methyl bridge between ytterbium and titanium.

  17. Deuteron-induced nucleon transfer reactions within an ab initio framework: First application to p -shell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, Francesco; Hupin, Guillaume; Navrátil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia

    2016-05-01

    Background: Low-energy transfer reactions in which a proton is stripped from a deuteron projectile and dropped into a target play a crucial role in the formation of nuclei in both primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis, as well as in the study of exotic nuclei using radioactive beam facilities and inverse kinematics. Ab initio approaches have been successfully applied to describe the 3H (d ,n )4He and 3He(d ,p )4He fusion processes. Purpose: An ab initio treatment of transfer reactions would also be desirable for heavier targets. In this work, we extend the ab initio description of (d ,p ) reactions to processes with light p -shell nuclei. As a first application, we study the elastic scattering of deuterium on 7Li and the 7Li(d ,p )8Li transfer reaction based on a two-body Hamiltonian. Methods: We use the no-core shell model to compute the wave functions of the nuclei involved in the reaction, and describe the dynamics between targets and projectiles with the help of microscopic-cluster states in the spirit of the resonating group method. Results: The shapes of the excitation functions for deuterons impinging on 7Li are qualitatively reproduced up to the deuteron breakup energy. The interplay between d -7Li and p -8Li particle-decay channels determines some features of the 9Be spectrum above the d +7Li threshold. Our prediction for the parity of the 17.298 MeV resonance is at odds with the experimental assignment. Conclusions: Deuteron stripping reactions with p -shell targets can now be computed ab initio, but calculations are very demanding. A quantitative description of the 7Li(d ,p )8Li reaction will require further work to include the effect of three-nucleon forces and additional decay channels and to improve the convergence rate of our calculations.

  18. Effect of micellar environment on Marcus correlation curves for photoinduced bimolecular electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kumbhakar, Manoj; Nath, Sukhendu; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Pal, Haridas

    2005-07-15

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) between coumarin dyes and aromatic amine has been investigated in two cationic micelles, namely, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB), and the results have been compared with those observed earlier in sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and triton-X-100 (TX-100) micelles for similar donor-acceptor pairs. Due to a reasonably high effective concentration of the amines in the micellar Stern layer, the steady-state fluorescence results show significant static quenching. In the time-resolved (TR) measurements with subnanosecond time resolution, contribution from static quenching is avoided. Correlations of the dynamic quenching constants (k{sub q}{sup TR}), as estimated from the TR measurements, show the typical bell-shaped curves with the free-energy changes ({delta}G{sup 0}) of the ET reactions, as predicted by the Marcus outersphere ET theory. Comparing present results with those obtained earlier for similar coumarin-amine systems in SDS and TX-100 micelles, it is seen that the inversion in the present micelles occurs at an exergonicity (-{delta}G{sup 0}>{approx}1.2-1.3 eV) much higher than that observed in SDS and TX-100 micelles (-{delta}G{sup 0}>{approx}0.7 eV), which has been rationalized based on the relative propensities of the ET and solvation rates in different micelles. In CTAB and DTAB micelles, the k{sub q}{sup TR} values are lower than the solvation rates, which result in the full contribution of the solvent reorganization energy ({lambda}{sub s}) towards the activation barrier for the ET reaction. Contrary to this, in SDS and TX-100 micelles, k{sub q}{sup TR} values are either higher or comparable with the solvation rates, causing only a partial contribution of {lambda}{sub s} in these cases. Thus, Marcus inversion in present cationic micelles is inferred to be the true inversion, whereas that in the anionic SDS and neutral TX-100 micelles are understood to be the apparent

  19. Effect of micellar environment on Marcus correlation curves for photoinduced bimolecular electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhakar, Manoj; Nath, Sukhendu; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Pal, Haridas

    2005-07-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) between coumarin dyes and aromatic amine has been investigated in two cationic micelles, namely, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB), and the results have been compared with those observed earlier in sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and triton-X-100 (TX-100) micelles for similar donor-acceptor pairs. Due to a reasonably high effective concentration of the amines in the micellar Stern layer, the steady-state fluorescence results show significant static quenching. In the time-resolved (TR) measurements with subnanosecond time resolution, contribution from static quenching is avoided. Correlations of the dynamic quenching constants (kqTR), as estimated from the TR measurements, show the typical bell-shaped curves with the free-energy changes (ΔG0) of the ET reactions, as predicted by the Marcus outersphere ET theory. Comparing present results with those obtained earlier for similar coumarin-amine systems in SDS and TX-100 micelles, it is seen that the inversion in the present micelles occurs at an exergonicity (-ΔG0>˜1.2-1.3eV) much higher than that observed in SDS and TX-100 micelles (-ΔG0>˜0.7eV), which has been rationalized based on the relative propensities of the ET and solvation rates in different micelles. In CTAB and DTAB micelles, the kqTR values are lower than the solvation rates, which result in the full contribution of the solvent reorganization energy (λs) towards the activation barrier for the ET reaction. Contrary to this, in SDS and TX-100 micelles, kqTR values are either higher or comparable with the solvation rates, causing only a partial contribution of λs in these cases. Thus, Marcus inversion in present cationic micelles is inferred to be the true inversion, whereas that in the anionic SDS and neutral TX-100 micelles are understood to be the apparent inversion, as envisaged from two-dimensional ET theory.

  20. New study of the astrophysical reaction 13C(a,n)16O via the 13C(7Li,t)17O transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegriti, Maria Grazia; Hammache, F.; Roussel, P.; Audouin, L.; Beaumel, D.; Fortier, S.; Gaudefroy, L.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schujl, A.; Stanoiu, M.; Tatischeff, V.; Vilmay, M.

    PoS(NIC-IX)161 , , [1] , L. Gaudefroy[2] , J. Kiener[3] , A. Lefebvre-Schuhl[3] , M. Stanoiu[4] , V. The cross section of the 13 C(α,n)16 O reaction is a key ingredient for the comprehension of the s-process (slow neutron captures) in stars. This reaction is considered as the main neutron source for the s-process in low-mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars (1-3 solar mass) [1, 2, 3]. At the α-13 C energies of astrophysical interest (Ecm around 190 keV, corresponding to a tem- perature of 108 K) the contribution of the 17 O α-decay subthreshold resonance at 6.356 MeV to the 13 C(α,n)16 O cross section should be taken into account. The effect of this resonance is controversial after the different analyses of the Kubono et al. measurement [4] of the 6.356 MeV α-spectroscopic factor (Sα ) via the transfer reaction 13 C(6 Li,d)17 O . In order to further investigate the contribution of the 6.356 MeV resonance to the 13 C(α,n)16 O cross section, we performed a new measurement of its Sα factor via a different α-transfer reac- tion, namely the 13 C(7 Li,t)17 O reaction. The experiment was performed at the Orsay Tandem by using a 7 Li beam of 28 and 34 MeV on a 13C target. The angular distribution for the transfer dif- ferential cross section was measured by detecting the tritons at the focal plane of the SPLITPOLE spectrometer. The analysis procedure used in order to extract the yield of the 6.356 MeV level will be described. Preliminary results of the angular distribution will be shown.

  1. Calibration and intercomparison of acetic acid measurements using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haase, K.B.; Keene, W.C.; Pszenny, A.A.P.; Mayne, H.R.; Talbot, R.W.; Sive, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Acetic acid is one of the most abundant organic acids in the ambient atmosphere, with maximum mixing ratios reaching into the tens of parts per billion by volume (ppbv) range. The identities and associated magnitudes of the major sources and sinks for acetic acid are poorly characterized, due in part to the limitation in available measurement techniques. This paper demonstrates that Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) can reliably quantify acetic acid vapor in ambient air. Three different PTR-MS configurations were calibrated at low ppbv mixing ratios using permeation tubes, which yielded calibration factors between 7.0 and 10.9 normalized counts per second per ppbv (ncps ppbv−1) at a drift tube field strength of 132 townsend (Td). Detection limits ranged from 0.06 to 0.32 ppbv with dwell times of 5 s. These calibration factors showed negligible humidity dependence. Using the experimentally determined calibration factors, PTR-MS measurements of acetic acid during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) campaign were validated against results obtained using Mist Chambers coupled with Ion Chromatography (MC/IC). An orthogonal least squares linear regression of paired data yielded a slope of 1.14 ± 0.06 (2σ), an intercept of 0.049 ± 20 (2σ) ppbv, and an R2 of 0.78. The median mixing ratio of acetic acid on Appledore Island, ME during the ICARTT campaign was 0.530 ± 0.025 ppbv with a minimum of 0.075 ± 0.004 ppbv, and a maximum of 3.555 ± 0.171 ppbv.

  2. Experimental study of the 66Ni(d ,p ) 67Ni one-neutron transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diriken, J.; Patronis, N.; Andreyev, A.; Antalic, S.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Darby, I. G.; De Witte, H.; Eberth, J.; Elseviers, J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flavigny, F.; Fransen, Ch.; Georgiev, G.; Gernhauser, R.; Hess, H.; Huyse, M.; Jolie, J.; Kröll, Th.; Krücken, R.; Lutter, R.; Marsh, B. A.; Mertzimekis, T.; Muecher, D.; Orlandi, R.; Pakou, A.; Raabe, R.; Randisi, G.; Reiter, P.; Roger, T.; Seidlitz, M.; Seliverstov, M.; Sotty, C.; Tornqvist, H.; Van De Walle, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wimmer, K.

    2015-05-01

    The quasi-SU(3) sequence of the positive parity ν g9 /2,d5 /2,s1 /2 orbitals above the N =40 shell gap are assumed to induce strong quadrupole collectivity in the neutron-rich Fe (Z =26 ) and Cr (Z =24 ) isotopes below the nickel region. In this paper the position and strength of these single-particle orbitals are characterized in the neighborhood of 68Ni (Z =28 ,N =40 ) through the 66Ni(d ,p )67Ni one-neutron transfer reaction at 2.95 MeV/nucleon in inverse kinematics, performed at the REX-ISOLDE facility in CERN. A combination of the Miniball γ -array and T-REX particle-detection setup was used and a delayed coincidence technique was employed to investigate the 13.3-μ s isomer at 1007 keV in 67Ni. Excited states up to an excitation energy of 5.8 MeV have been populated. Feeding of the ν g9 /2 (1007 keV) and ν d5 /2 (2207 keV and 3277 keV) positive-parity neutron states and negative parity (ν p f ) states have been observed at low excitation energy. The extracted relative spectroscopic factors, based on a distorted-wave Born approximation analysis, show that the ν d5 /2 single-particle strength is mostly split over these two excited states. The results are also compared to the distribution of the proton single-particle strength in the 90Zr region (Z =40 ,N =50 ) .

  3. Fluorescent probes for tracking the transfer of iron-sulfur cluster and other metal cofactors in biosynthetic reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Vranish, James N; Russell, William K; Yu, Lusa E; Cox, Rachael M; Russell, David H; Barondeau, David P

    2015-01-14

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are protein cofactors that are constructed and delivered to target proteins by elaborate biosynthetic machinery. Mechanistic insights into these processes have been limited by the lack of sensitive probes for tracking Fe-S cluster synthesis and transfer reactions. Here we present fusion protein- and intein-based fluorescent labeling strategies that can probe Fe-S cluster binding. The fluorescence is sensitive to different cluster types ([2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters), ligand environments ([2Fe-2S] clusters on Rieske, ferredoxin (Fdx), and glutaredoxin), and cluster oxidation states. The power of this approach is highlighted with an extreme example in which the kinetics of Fe-S cluster transfer reactions are monitored between two Fdx molecules that have identical Fe-S spectroscopic properties. This exchange reaction between labeled and unlabeled Fdx is catalyzed by dithiothreitol (DTT), a result that was confirmed by mass spectrometry. DTT likely functions in a ligand substitution reaction that generates a [2Fe-2S]-DTT species, which can transfer the cluster to either labeled or unlabeled Fdx. The ability to monitor this challenging cluster exchange reaction indicates that real-time Fe-S cluster incorporation can be tracked for a specific labeled protein in multicomponent assays that include several unlabeled Fe-S binding proteins or other chromophores. Such advanced kinetic experiments are required to untangle the intricate networks of transfer pathways and the factors affecting flux through branch points. High sensitivity and suitability with high-throughput methodology are additional benefits of this approach. We anticipate that this cluster detection methodology will transform the study of Fe-S cluster pathways and potentially other metal cofactor biosynthetic pathways.

  4. Near-barrier neutron transfer in reactions 3,6He + 45Sc and 3,6He + 197Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarin, V. V.; Naumenko, M. A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu E.; Skobelev, N. K.; Kroha, V.; Mrazek, J.

    2016-06-01

    Experimental cross sections for formation of 196,198Au isotopes in reactions 3,6He + 197Au and cross sections for formation of 44,46Sc isotopes in reactions 3,6He + 45Sc have been analyzed. To calculate neutron transfer probabilities and cross sections the time- dependent Schrödinger equation for external neutrons of 3He, 6He, 45Sc and 197Au nuclei has been solved numerically. It is shown that the contribution of fusion and subsequent evaporation is significant in the case of reactions 3,6He + 45Sc, whereas in the case of reactions 3,6He + 197Au, it is negligible. Fusion-evaporation was taken into account using NRV evaporation code. Results of calculations demonstrate overall satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  5. Photochemical reactions of electron-deficient olefins with N,N,N‧,N‧-tetramethylbenzidine via photoinduced electron-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yang; Zhao, Junshu; Ji, Yuanyuan; Yan, Lei; Yu, Shuqin

    2006-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer reactions of several electron-deficient olefins with N, N, N', N'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in acetonitrile solution have been studied by using laser flash photolysis technique and steady-state fluorescence quenching method. Laser pulse excitation of TMB yields 3TMB* after rapid intersystem crossing from 1TMB*. The triplet which located at 480 nm is found to undergo fast quenching with the electron acceptors fumaronitrile (FN), dimethyl fumarate (DMF), diethyl fumarate (DEF), cinnamonitrile (CN), α-acetoxyacrylonitrile (AAN), crotononitrile (CrN) and 3-methoxyacrylonitrile (MAN). Substituents binding to olefin molecule own different electron-donating/withdrawing powers, which determine the electron-deficient property (π-cloud density) of olefin molecule as well as control the electron transfer rate constant directly. The detection of ion radical intermediates in the photolysis reactions confirms the proposed electron transfer mechanism, as expected from thermodynamics. The quenching rate constants of triplet TMB by these olefins have been determined at 510 nm to avoid the disturbance of formed TMB cation radical around 475 nm. All the kqT values approach or reach to the diffusion-controlled limit. In addition, fluorescence quenching rate constants kqS have been also obtained by calculating with Stern-Volmer equation. A correlation between experimental electron transfer rate constants and free energy changes has been explained by Marcus theory of adiabatic outer-sphere electron transfer. Disharmonic kq values for CN and CrN in endergonic region may be the disturbance of exciplexs formation.

  6. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion.

    PubMed

    Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  7. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-17

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency regimes for the proton donor-acceptor vibrational mode. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term does not significantly impact the rate constants derived using the cumulant expansion approach in any of the regimes studied. The effects of the quadratic term may become significant when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant, however, particularly at high temperatures and for proton transfer interfaces with extremely soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with extraordinarily weak hydrogen bonds. Even with the thermal averaging procedure, the effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances, and the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer in chemical and biological processes. We are grateful for support from National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (applications to enzymes) and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy

  8. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  9. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion.

    PubMed

    Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  10. Observation of the Marcus inverted region for bimolecular photoinduced electron-transfer reactions in viscous media.

    PubMed

    Kumbhakar, Manoj; Manna, Arpan; Sayed, Mhejabeen; Kumar, Anil; Pal, Haridas

    2014-09-11

    The general observation of Marcus inverted region (MIR) for bimolecular electron-transfer (ET) reactions in different viscous media, e.g., micelles, reverse micelles, vesicles, ionic liquids, DNA scaffold, etc. has been doubted in some recent publications arguing limitations in Stern-Volmer (SV) analysis to account for the static and transient stages of quenching in these slow diffusing media. Thus, following a theoretical treatment based on a spherically symmetric diffusion equation coupled with conventional Marcus ET description, it has been suggested that the MIR observed in viscous media arises due to the inadequate consideration of different quenching regimes and also due to the differential excited-state lifetimes of the fluorophores used than a genuine one (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 11396). However, the overall treatment in this study is severely compromised by setting the minimum solvent reorganization energy (λs) to ∼0.96 eV while fitting the experimental data, which unambiguously suggests that the inversion in ET rate will never appear in the exergonicity (-ΔG(0)) range of 0.16 to 0.71 eV, as is the case for the studied ET systems. Besides, the applicability of the conventional Marcus ET model (instead of Sumi-Marcus two-dimensional ET model) in such extremely viscous media with exceptionally slow solvent response is highly debatable and perhaps is the main cause of the failure in fitting the experimental data quite satisfactorily. In the present study involving ultrafast ET quenching for coumarin derivatives by dimethylaniline donor in viscous ionic liquid media, we demonstrate clear MIR for the intrinsic ET rates, directly obtained from the ultrafast decay components of 1-10 ps, a time scale in which diffusion of reactants is negligible and the ET rates are either faster than or, at the most, competitive with the solvent reorganization. The appearance of MIR at ΔG(0) ∼ -0.5 eV, significantly lower than expected from the λs value, further

  11. Discovery of the Shape Coexisting 0{sup +} State in {sup 32}Mg by a Two Neutron Transfer Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmer, K.; Kroell, T.; Kruecken, R.; Bildstein, V.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Bastin, B.; Bree, N.; Diriken, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Huyse, M.; Patronis, N.; Vermaelen, P.; Voulot, D.; Van de Walle, J.; Wenander, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Chapman, R.; Hadinia, B.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, J. F.

    2010-12-17

    The ''island of inversion'' nucleus {sup 32}Mg has been studied by a (t, p) two neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE. The shape coexistent excited 0{sup +} state in {sup 32}Mg has been identified by the characteristic angular distribution of the protons of the {Delta}L=0 transfer. The excitation energy of 1058 keV is much lower than predicted by any theoretical model. The low {gamma}-ray intensity observed for the decay of this 0{sup +} state indicates a lifetime of more than 10 ns. Deduced spectroscopic amplitudes are compared with occupation numbers from shell-model calculations.

  12. Extraordinary Mechanism of the Diels-Alder Reaction: Investigation of Stereochemistry, Charge Transfer, Charge Polarization, and Biradicaloid Formation.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Thomas; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2016-02-25

    The Diels-Alder reaction between 1,3-butadiene and ethene is investigated from far-out in the entrance channel to the very last step in the exit channel thus passing two bifurcation points and extending the range of the reaction valley studied with URVA (Unified Reaction Valley Approach) by 300% compared to previous studies. For the first time, the pre- and postchemical steps of the reaction are analyzed at the same level of theory as the actual chemical processes utilizing the path curvature and its decomposition into internal coordinate or curvilinear coordinate components. A first smaller charge transfer to the dienophile facilitates the rotation of gauche butadiene into its cis form. The actual chemical processes are initiated by a second larger charge transfer to the dienophile that facilitates pyramidalization of the reacting carbon centers, bond equalization, and biradicaloid formation of the reactants. The transition state is aromatically stabilized and moved by five path units into the entrance channel in line with the Hammond-Leffler postulate. The pseudorotation of the boat form into the halfchair of cyclohexene is analyzed. Predictions are made for the Diels-Alder reaction based on a 11-phase mechanism obtained by the URVA analysis. PMID:26785172

  13. Evidencing an inner-sphere mechanism for NHC-Au(I)-catalyzed carbene-transfer reactions from ethyl diazoacetate

    PubMed Central

    Fructos, Manuel R; Urbano, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Kinetic experiments based on the measurement of nitrogen evolution in the reaction of ethyl diazoacetate (N2CHCO2Et, EDA) and styrene or methanol catalyzed by the [IPrAu]+ core (IPr = 1,3-bis(diisopropylphenyl)imidazole-2-ylidene) have provided evidence that the transfer of the carbene group CHCO2Et to the substrate (styrene or methanol) takes place in the coordination sphere of Au(I) by means of an inner-sphere mechanism, in contrast to the generally accepted proposal of outer-sphere mechanisms for Au(I)-catalyzed reactions. PMID:26664649

  14. Evidencing an inner-sphere mechanism for NHC-Au(I)-catalyzed carbene-transfer reactions from ethyl diazoacetate.

    PubMed

    Fructos, Manuel R; Urbano, Juan; Díaz-Requejo, M Mar; Pérez, Pedro J

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic experiments based on the measurement of nitrogen evolution in the reaction of ethyl diazoacetate (N2CHCO2Et, EDA) and styrene or methanol catalyzed by the [IPrAu](+) core (IPr = 1,3-bis(diisopropylphenyl)imidazole-2-ylidene) have provided evidence that the transfer of the carbene group CHCO2Et to the substrate (styrene or methanol) takes place in the coordination sphere of Au(I) by means of an inner-sphere mechanism, in contrast to the generally accepted proposal of outer-sphere mechanisms for Au(I)-catalyzed reactions.

  15. Nuclear spectroscopy study of the isotopes populated via multinucleon transfer in the 90Zr + 208Pb reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ur, C. A.; Corradi, L.; Stefanini, A. M.; Behera, B. R.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Szilner, S.; Beghini, S.; Farnea, E.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Haas, F.; Pollarolo, G.

    2006-08-14

    The present work takes advantage of the multinucleon transfer mechanism between heavy reaction partners to study the population pattern of excited nuclear states in near spherical Zirconium isotopes following the 90Zr + 208Pb reaction at an energy closed to the Coulomb barrier. Both the projectile and the target are well known closed shell nuclei offering an optimum situation for clean experimental and theoretical conditions. Total kinetic energy loss (TKEL) distributions were compared with calculations performed with the GRAZING code. The ability to use the TKEL as a selection tool for the states at different excitation energies was shown.

  16. Neutron Transfer Reactions on Neutron-Rich N=50 and N=82 Nuclei Near the r-Process Path

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, S. D.; Thomas, J. S.; Arbanas, Goran; Adekola, Aderemi S; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Dean, David Jarvis; Erikson, Luke; Gaddis, A. L.; Harlin, Christopher W; Hatarik, Robert; Howard, Joshua A; Johnson, Micah; Kapler, R.; Krolas, W.; Liang, J Felix; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Paulauskas, Stanley V; Shapira, Dan; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Sissom, D. J.; Smith, Michael Scott; Swan, T. P.; Wilson, Gemma L

    2009-01-01

    Neutron transfer (d,p) reaction studies on the N = 50 isotones, 82Ge and 84Se, and A{approx}130 nuclei, 130,132Sn and 134Te, have been measured. Direct neutron capture cross sections for 82Ge and 84Se (n,?) have been calculated and are combined with Hauser-Feshbach expectations to estimate total (n,?) cross sections. The A{approx}130 studies used an early implementation of the ORRUBA array of position-sensitive silicon strip detectors for reaction proton measurements. Preliminary excitation energy and angular distribution results from the A{approx}130 measurements are reported.

  17. Long-term mass transfer and mixing-controlled reactions of a DNAPL plume from persistent residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2014-02-01

    Understanding and being able to predict the long-term behavior of DNAPL (i.e., PCE and TCE) residuals after active remediation has ceased have become increasingly important as attention at many sites turns from aggressive remediation to monitored natural attenuation and long-term stewardship. However, plume behavior due to mass loading and reactions during these later phases is less studied as they involve large spatial and temporal scales. We apply both theoretical analysis and pore-scale simulations to investigate mass transfer from DNAPL residuals and subsequent reactions within the generated plume, and, in particular, to show the differences between early- and late-time behaviors of the plume. In the zone of entry of the DNAPL entrapment zone where the concentration boundary layer in the flowing groundwater has not fully developed, the pore-scale simulations confirm the past findings based on laboratory studies that the mass transfer increases as a power-law function of the Peclét number, and is enhanced due to reactions in the plume. Away from the entry zone and further down gradient, the long-term reactions are limited by the available additive and mixing in the porous medium, thereby behave considerably differently from the entry zone. For the reaction between the contaminant and an additive with intrinsic second-order bimolecular kinetics, the late-time reaction demonstrates a first-order decay macroscopically with respect to the mass of the limiting additive, not with respect to that of the contaminant. The late-time decay rate only depends on the intrinsic reaction rate and the solubility of the entrapped DNAPL. At the intermediate time, the additive decays exponentially with the square of time (t2), instead of time (t). Moreover, the intermediate decay rate also depends on the initial conditions, the spatial distribution of DNAPL residuals, and the effective dispersion coefficient.

  18. Long-term mass transfer and mixing-controlled reactions of a DNAPL plume from persistent residuals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Illangasekare, Tissa H; Kitanidis, Peter K

    2014-02-01

    Understanding and being able to predict the long-term behavior of DNAPL (i.e., PCE and TCE) residuals after active remediation has ceased have become increasingly important as attention at many sites turns from aggressive remediation to monitored natural attenuation and long-term stewardship. However, plume behavior due to mass loading and reactions during these later phases is less studied as they involve large spatial and temporal scales. We apply both theoretical analysis and pore-scale simulations to investigate mass transfer from DNAPL residuals and subsequent reactions within the generated plume, and, in particular, to show the differences between early- and late-time behaviors of the plume. In the zone of entry of the DNAPL entrapment zone where the concentration boundary layer in the flowing groundwater has not fully developed, the pore-scale simulations confirm the past findings based on laboratory studies that the mass transfer increases as a power-law function of the Peclét number, and is enhanced due to reactions in the plume. Away from the entry zone and further down gradient, the long-term reactions are limited by the available additive and mixing in the porous medium, thereby behave considerably differently from the entry zone. For the reaction between the contaminant and an additive with intrinsic second-order bimolecular kinetics, the late-time reaction demonstrates a first-order decay macroscopically with respect to the mass of the limiting additive, not with respect to that of the contaminant. The late-time decay rate only depends on the intrinsic reaction rate and the solubility of the entrapped DNAPL. At the intermediate time, the additive decays exponentially with the square of time (t(2)), instead of time (t). Moreover, the intermediate decay rate also depends on the initial conditions, the spatial distribution of DNAPL residuals, and the effective dispersion coefficient.

  19. Dual-face nucleoside scaffold featuring a stereogenic all-carbon quaternary center. Intramolecular silicon tethered group-transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Tambutet, Guillaume; Becerril-Jiménez, Fabiola; Dostie, Starr; Simard, Ryan; Prévost, Michel; Mochirian, Philippe; Guindon, Yvan

    2014-11-01

    The design of a novel nucleoside scaffold that exhibits an all-carbon quaternary center is reported. This allows for both α- and β-anomers of a given 2'-deoxy-2',2'-difluoro nucleoside analog (NA) to have potential biological activity. Using an intramolecular atom-transfer reaction, an all-carbon quaternary center was obtained without the use of heavy metals and/or harsh conditions. The chemistry developed is efficient, easily scalable and leads to novel libraries of molecules.

  20. Polymer stabilized silver nanoparticle: An efficient catalyst for proton-coupled electron transfer reaction and the electrochemical recognition of biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Meenakshi; Siwal, Samarjeet; Ul Islam, Rafique; Witcomb, Michael J.; Mallick, Kaushik

    2014-07-01

    A facile in situ synthesis route [1] has been described for the preparation of polymer stabilized silver nanoparticles. Such in situ synthesized silver nanoparticles are shown to have excellent catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenolate (4NP), an example of a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction mechanism. Also, the silver-polymer nanocomposite material is shown to perform as an efficient electro-catalyst for the oxidation of ascorbic acid.

  1. Lung cancer detection by proton transfer reaction mass-spectrometric analysis of human breath gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehinger, Andreas; Schmid, Alex; Mechtcheriakov, Sergei; Ledochowski, Maximilian; Grabmer, Christoph; Gastl, Guenther A.; Amann, Anton

    2007-08-01

    Background Determination of the diagnostic usefulness of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for detecting primary lung cancer through analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled human breath was demonstrated in this investigation. Unlike, for example, gas-chromatographic analyses, PTR-MS can be used without time-consuming preconcentration of the gas samples.Methods By means of PTR-MS, exhaled breath samples from primary lung cancer patients (n = 17) were analyzed and compared with both an overall control collective (controls total, n = 170) and three sub-collectives: hospital personnel (controls hospital, n = 35), age-matched persons (controls age, n = 25), and smokers (controls s, n = 60), respectively.Results Among the VOCs present at reasonably high concentrations, the ones leading to the product ion at m/z = 31 (VOC-31, tentatively protonated formaldehyde) and m/z = 43 (VOC-43, tentatively a fragment of protonated iso-propanol), were found at significantly higher concentrations in the breath gas of the primary lung cancer patients as compared to the healthy controls at the following median concentrations (with interquartile distance, iqr): For VOC-31 the median concentrations were 7.0 ppb (iqr, 15.5 ppb) versus 3.0 ppb (iqr, 1.9 ppb) with P < 10-4. For VOC-43 the median concentrations were 244.1 ppb (iqr, 236.2 ppb) versus 94.1 ppb (iqr, 55.2 ppb) with P < 10-6. The discriminative power between the two collectives was further assessed by ROC-curves obtained upon variation of the chosen threshold concentration and by Fisher's Quadratic Discriminant Method.Conclusions Within the limits of pilot study, VOC-31 and -43 were found to best discriminate between exhaled breath of primary lung cancer cases and healthy controls. Simple and time-saving breath gas analysis by PTR-MS makes this method attractive for a larger clinical evaluation. It may become a new valuable tool for diagnosing primary lung cancer.

  2. Electron transfer within a reaction path model calibrated by constrained DFT calculations: application to mixed-valence organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Mangaud, E; de la Lande, A; Meier, C; Desouter-Lecomte, M

    2015-12-14

    The quantum dynamics of electron transfer in mixed-valence organic compounds is investigated using a reaction path model calibrated by constrained density functional theory (cDFT). Constrained DFT is used to define diabatic states relevant for describing the electron transfer, to obtain equilibrium structures for each of these states and to estimate the electronic coupling between them. The harmonic analysis at the diabatic minima yields normal modes forming the dissipative bath coupled to the electronic states. In order to decrease the system-bath coupling, an effective one dimensional vibronic Hamiltonian is constructed by partitioning the modes into a linear reaction path which connects both equilibrium positions and a set of secondary vibrational modes, coupled to this reaction coordinate. Using this vibronic model Hamiltonian, dissipative quantum dynamics is carried out using Redfield theory, based on a spectral density which is determined from the cDFT results. In a first benchmark case, the model is applied to a series of mixed-valence organic compounds formed by two 1,4-dimethoxy-3-methylphenylene fragments linked by an increasing number of phenylene bridges. This allows us to examine the coherent electron transfer in extreme situations leading to a ground adiabatic state with or without a barrier and therefore to the trapping of the charge or to an easy delocalization.

  3. Fission fragments mass distributions of nuclei populated by the multinucleon transfer channels of the 18O + 232Th reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léguillon, R.; Nishio, K.; Hirose, K.; Makii, H.; Nishinaka, I.; Orlandi, R.; Tsukada, K.; Smallcombe, J.; Chiba, S.; Aritomo, Y.; Ohtsuki, T.; Tatsuzawa, R.; Takaki, N.; Tamura, N.; Goto, S.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Petrache, C. M.; Andreyev, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    It is shown that the multinucleon transfer reactions is a powerful tool to study fission of exotic neutron-rich actinide nuclei, which cannot be accessed by particle-capture or heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, multinucleon transfer channels of the 18O + 232Th reaction are used to study fission of fourteen nuclei 231,232,233,234Th, 232,233,234,235,236Pa, and 234,235,236,237,238U. Identification of fissioning nuclei and of their excitation energy is performed on an event-by-event basis, through the measurement of outgoing ejectile particle in coincidence with fission fragments. Fission fragment mass distributions are measured for each transfer channel, in selected bins of excitation energy. In particular, the mass distributions of 231,234Th and 234,235,236Pa are measured for the first time. Predominantly asymmetric fission is observed at low excitation energies for all studied cases, with a gradual increase of the symmetric mode towards higher excitation energy. The experimental distributions are found to be in general agreement with predictions of the fluctuation-dissipation model.

  4. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, Yijing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-06-01

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis.

  5. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, YiJing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-01-01

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis. PMID:24954746

  6. Dielectric image effects in environmental reorganization free energies and inter-reactant work terms of metalloprotein electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkats, Yurij I.; Ulstrup, Jens

    1990-02-01

    Kinetics of electron transfer between redox metalloproteins and small inorganic reaction partners has become a powerful tool for investigations of protein electron transport. We introduce here a model for metalloprotein electron transfer which incorporates essential features omitted in previous approaches to metalloprotein electron transfer data analysis. The protein is represented by a spherical region of low dielectric constant, with a conducting sphere excentrically located inside the protein simulating the metal centre. A conducting sphere outside the protein represents the small reaction partners, and the whole system is embedded in a dielectric solvent. The inter-reactant work terms and overall protein and solvent reorganization free energy for this model have been calculated. It appears that dielectric image interactions for multiply charged small reactants are important and comparable to interactions with both the protein surface charges and the solvent. The character of work terms and reorganization free energies for proteins is thus different from those of small ionic reactants. Cross relations and other frames where these features are disregarded should therefore be used with care for protein electron transfer.

  7. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions at a Heme-Propionate in an Iron-Protoporphyrin-IX Model Compound

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A heme model system has been developed in which the heme-propionate is the only proton donating/accepting site, using protoporphyrin IX-monomethyl esters (PPIXMME) and N-methylimidazole (MeIm). Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions of these model compounds have been examined in acetonitrile solvent. (PPIXMME)FeIII(MeIm)2-propionate (FeIII~CO2) is readily reduced by the ascorbate derivative 5,6-isopropylidine ascorbate to give (PPIXMME)FeII(MeIm)2-propionic acid (FeII~CO2H). Excess of the hydroxylamine TEMPOH or of hydroquinone similarly reduce FeIII~CO2, and TEMPO and benzoquinone oxidize FeII~CO2H to return to FeIII~CO2. The measured equilibrium constants, and the determined pKa and E1/2 values, indicate that FeII~CO2H has an effective bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of 67.8 ± 0.6 kcal mol–1. In these PPIX models, electron transfer occurs at the iron center and proton transfer occurs at the remote heme propionate. According to thermochemical and other arguments, the TEMPOH reaction occurs by concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET), and a similar pathway is indicated for the ascorbate derivative. Based on these results, heme propionates should be considered as potential key components of PCET/CPET active sites in heme proteins. PMID:21524059

  8. Experimental exploration of the Mulliken-Hush relationship for intramolecular electron transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Tamal; Ito, Naoki; Gould, Ian R

    2011-03-17

    The Mulliken-Hush (M-H) relationship provides the critical link between optical and thermal electron transfer processes, and yet very little direct experimental support for its applicability has been provided. Dicyanovinylazaadamantane (DCVA) represents a simple two-state (neutral/charge-transfer) intramolecular electron transfer system that exhibits charge-transfer absorption and emission spectra that are readily measurable in solvents with a wide range of polarities. In this regard it represents an ideal model system for studying the factors that control both optical charge separation (absorption) and recombination (emission) processes in solution. Here we explore the applicability of the M-H relation to quantitative descriptions of the optical charge-transfer processes in DCVA. For DCVA, the measured radiative rate constants exhibit a linear dependence on transition energy, and transition dipole moments exhibit an inverse dependence on transition energy, consistent with the M-H relationship.

  9. Mixed quantum classical calculation of proton transfer reaction rates: From deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Weiwei; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Lili; Shi, Qiang

    2014-05-07

    We present mixed quantum classical calculations of the proton transfer (PT) reaction rates represented by a double well system coupled to a dissipative bath. The rate constants are calculated within the so called nontraditional view of the PT reaction, where the proton motion is quantized and the solvent polarization is used as the reaction coordinate. Quantization of the proton degree of freedom results in a problem of non-adiabatic dynamics. By employing the reactive flux formulation of the rate constant, the initial sampling starts from the transition state defined using the collective reaction coordinate. Dynamics of the collective reaction coordinate is treated classically as over damped diffusive motion, for which the equation of motion can be derived using the path integral, or the mixed quantum classical Liouville equation methods. The calculated mixed quantum classical rate constants agree well with the results from the numerically exact hierarchical equation of motion approach for a broad range of model parameters. Moreover, we are able to obtain contributions from each vibrational state to the total reaction rate, which helps to understand the reaction mechanism from the deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes. The numerical results are also compared with those from existing approximate theories based on calculations of the non-adiabatic transmission coefficients. It is found that the two-surface Landau-Zener formula works well in calculating the transmission coefficients in the deep tunneling regime, where the crossing point between the two lowest vibrational states dominates the total reaction rate. When multiple vibrational levels are involved, including additional crossing points on the free energy surfaces is important to obtain the correct reaction rate using the Landau-Zener formula.

  10. N-Heterocyclic olefins as ancillary ligands in catalysis: a study of their behaviour in transfer hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Iturmendi, Amaia; García, Nestor; Jaseer, E A; Munárriz, Julen; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J; Polo, Victor; Iglesias, Manuel; Oro, Luis A

    2016-08-01

    The Ir(i) complexes [Ir(cod)(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))]PF6 and [IrCl(cod)(κC-NHO(OMe))] (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene, NHO(PPh2) = 1,3-bis(2-(diphenylphosphanyl)ethyl)-2-methyleneimidazoline) and NHO(OMe) = 1,3-bis(2-(methoxyethyl)-2-methyleneimidazoline), both featuring an N-heterocyclic olefin ligand (NHO), have been tested in the transfer hydrogenation reaction; this representing the first example of the use of NHOs as ancillary ligands in catalysis. The pre-catalyst [Ir(cod)(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))]PF6 has shown excellent activities in the transfer hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines using (i)PrOH as a hydrogen source, while [IrCl(cod)(κC-NHO(OMe))] decomposes throughout the reaction to give low yields of the hydrogenated product. Addition of one or two equivalents of a phosphine ligand to the latter avoids catalyst decomposition and significantly improves the reaction yields. The reaction mechanism has been investigated by means of stoichiometric studies and theoretical calculations. The formation of the active species ([Ir(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))((i)PrO)]) has been proposed to occur via isopropoxide coordination and concomitant COD dissociation. Moreover, throughout the catalytic cycle the NHO moiety behaves as a hemilabile ligand, thus allowing the catalyst to adopt stable square planar geometries in the transition states, which reduces the energetic barrier of the process. PMID:27472896

  11. Separation of electron-transfer and coupled chemical reaction components of biocatalytic processes using Fourier transform ac voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Barry D; Zhang, Jie; Bond, Alan M; Bell, Stephen G; Wong, Luet-Lok

    2005-06-01

    The underlying electron-transfer and coupled chemical processes associated with biologically important catalytic reactions can be resolved using a combination of Fourier transform ac voltammetry with an analysis of the separated dc and ac components. This outcome can be achieved because the response associated with generation of the catalytic current is essentially confined to the steady-state dc component, whereas the electron-transfer step is dominant in the fundamental and higher harmonics. For the mediated oxidation of glucose with glucose oxidase, it was found that the underlying reversible redox chemistry of the mediator, ferrocenemonocarboxylic acid, as detected in the third and higher harmonics, was totally unaffected by introduction of the catalytic process. In contrast, for the catalytic reduction of molecular oxygen by cytochrome P450, slight changes in the P450 redox process were detected when the catalytic reaction was present. Simulations of a simple catalytic reaction scheme support the fidelity of this novel FT ac voltammetric approach for examining mechanistic nuances of catalytic forms of electrochemical reaction schemes.

  12. N-Heterocyclic olefins as ancillary ligands in catalysis: a study of their behaviour in transfer hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Iturmendi, Amaia; García, Nestor; Jaseer, E A; Munárriz, Julen; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J; Polo, Victor; Iglesias, Manuel; Oro, Luis A

    2016-08-01

    The Ir(i) complexes [Ir(cod)(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))]PF6 and [IrCl(cod)(κC-NHO(OMe))] (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene, NHO(PPh2) = 1,3-bis(2-(diphenylphosphanyl)ethyl)-2-methyleneimidazoline) and NHO(OMe) = 1,3-bis(2-(methoxyethyl)-2-methyleneimidazoline), both featuring an N-heterocyclic olefin ligand (NHO), have been tested in the transfer hydrogenation reaction; this representing the first example of the use of NHOs as ancillary ligands in catalysis. The pre-catalyst [Ir(cod)(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))]PF6 has shown excellent activities in the transfer hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines using (i)PrOH as a hydrogen source, while [IrCl(cod)(κC-NHO(OMe))] decomposes throughout the reaction to give low yields of the hydrogenated product. Addition of one or two equivalents of a phosphine ligand to the latter avoids catalyst decomposition and significantly improves the reaction yields. The reaction mechanism has been investigated by means of stoichiometric studies and theoretical calculations. The formation of the active species ([Ir(κP,C,P'-NHO(PPh2))((i)PrO)]) has been proposed to occur via isopropoxide coordination and concomitant COD dissociation. Moreover, throughout the catalytic cycle the NHO moiety behaves as a hemilabile ligand, thus allowing the catalyst to adopt stable square planar geometries in the transition states, which reduces the energetic barrier of the process.

  13. Final Report: The Impact of Carbonate on Surface Protonation, Electron Transfer and Crystallization Reactions in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David Adams

    2013-07-02

    This project addresses key issues of importance in the geochemical behavior of iron oxides and in the geochemical cycling of carbon and iron. For Fe, we are specifically studying the influence of carbonate on electron transfer reactions, solid phase transformations, and the binding of carbonate to reactive sites on the edges of particles. The emphasis on carbonate arises because it is widely present in the natural environment, is known to bind strongly to oxide surfaces, is reactive on the time scales of interest, and has a speciation driven by acid-base reactions. The geochemical behavior of carbonate strongly influences global climate change and CO{sub 2} sequestration technologies. Our goal is to answer key questions with regards to specific site binding, electron transfer reactions, and crystallization reactions of iron oxides that impact both the geochemical cycling of iron and CO{sub 2} species. Our work is focused on the molecular level description of carbonate chemistry in solution including the prediction of isotope fractionation factors. We have also done work on critical atmospheric species.

  14. The {sup 9}Be({sup 8}Li,{sup 9}Be){sup 8}Li elastic-transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Camargo, O.; Guimaraes, V.; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Scarduelli, V.; Kolata, J. J.; Bertulani, C. A.; Amro, H.; Becchetti, F. D.; Jiang Hao; Aguilera, E. F.; Lizcano, D.; Martinez-Quiroz, E.; Garcia, H.

    2008-09-15

    Angular distributions for the {sup 9}Be({sup 8}Li,{sup 9}Be){sup 8}Li elastic-transfer reaction have been measured with a 27-MeV {sup 8}Li radioactive nuclear beam. Spectroscopic factors for the <{sup 9}Be|{sup 8}Li+p> bound system were obtained from the comparison between the experimental differential cross sections and finite-range distorted-wave Born approximation calculations made with the code FRESCO. The spectroscopic factors so obtained are compared with shell-model calculations and other experimental values. Using the present value for the spectroscopic factors, cross sections and reaction rates for the {sup 8}Li(p,{gamma}){sup 9}Be direct proton-capture reaction of astrophysical interest were calculated in the framework of the potential model.

  15. Skin reactions triggered by the use of cosmetic products in nonspecific lipid transfer protein-sensitive patients.

    PubMed

    Giani, M; Pirotta, L; Locanto, M; Cadoni, S; Puddu, P; De Pità, O

    2010-01-01

    Nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are members of the prolamine superfamily and they are found in pollen and food, as well as in latex. Due to the strong stability both against pepsin digestion and thermal denaturation, sensitisation towards these proteins is often associated with severe systemic reactions (angioedema, urticaria, asthma, anaphylaxis, etc.) following the ingestion of both raw or fresh food and cooked or preserved food. Many studies have shown reactivity towards nsLTPs both via inhalation and orally and in this study we present two cases of nsLTPs-sensitive patients who manifested the immediate onset of skin reactions following the use of cosmetic products containing these proteins. Thus, in order to prevent immediate reactions linked to their use, it is necessary to recommend nsLTPssensitive patients to avoid the topical use of products containing these proteins (and obviously the ingestion of foods containing these proteins).

  16. Electron transfer and multi-atom abstraction reactions between atomic metal anions and NO, NO2 and SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, J. M.; Curtis, S.; Mayer, P. M.

    2016-05-01

    The atomic metal anions Fe-, Cs-, Cu- and Ag- were reacted with NO, NO2 and SO2 to form intact NO-, NO2- and SO2- with no fragmentation. Yields for the molecular anions ranged from 4 to 97% and were found to correlate to the exothermicity of the electron transfer process. Sequential oxygen atom extraction was found to take place between the metal anions and NO and NO2. Reactions between NO2 and Fe- resulted in FeO-, FeO2- and FeO3- while reactions of Cu- with NO2 resulted in CuO- and CuO2-. Reactions of Cu- and Ag- with NO resulted in CuO- and AgO- respectively.

  17. Electron Transfer in Bacterial Reaction Centers with the Photoactive Bacteriopheophytin Replaced by a Bacteriochlorophyll through Coordinating Ligand Substitution.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Saer, Rafael; Lin, Su; Beatty, J Thomas; Woodbury, Neal W

    2016-09-01

    The influence of amino acid substitutions at position M214 (M-subunit, residue 214) on the rate and pathway of electron transfer involving the bacteriopheophytin cofactor, HA, in a bacterial photosynthetic reaction center has been explored in a series of Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants. The M214 leucine (L) residue of the wild type was replaced with histidine (H), glutamine (Q), and asparagine (N), creating the mutants M214LH, M214LQ, and M214LN, respectively. As has been reported previously for M214LH, each of these mutations resulted in a bacteriochlorophyll molecule in place of a bacteriopheophytin in the HA pocket, forming so-called β-type mutants (in which the HA cofactor is called βA). In addition, these mutations changed the properties of the surrounding protein environment in terms of charge distribution and the amino acid side chain volume. Electron transfer reactions from the excited primary donor P to the acceptor QA were characterized using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopic techniques. Similar to that of the previously characterized M214LH (β mutant), the strong energetic mixing of the P(+)BA(-) and P(+)βA(-) states (the mixed anion is denoted I(-)) increased the rate of charge recombination between P(+) and I(-) in competition with the I(-) → QA forward reaction. This reduced the overall yield of charge separation forming the P(+)QA(-) state. While the kinetics of the primary electron transfer forming P(+)I(-) were essentially identical in all three β mutants, the rates of the βA(-) (I(-)) → QA electron transfer in M214LQ and M214LH were very similar but quite different from that of the M214LN mutant. The observed yield changes and the differences in kinetics are correlated more closely with the volume of the mutated amino acid than with their charge characteristics. These results are consistent with those of previous studies of a series of M214 mutants with different sizes of amino acid side chains that did not alter the HA

  18. Kinetic analysis of the effect of HIV nucleocapsid protein (NCp) on internal strand transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Raja, A; DeStefano, J J

    1999-04-20

    The mechanism of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) catalyzed strand transfer synthesis (i.e., switching of the primer to a new template) from internal regions on RNA templates in the presence and absence of HIV nucleocapsid protein (NCp) was investigated. Two different systems each consisting of DNA-primed RNA donor (on which primer extension initiated) and acceptor (to which DNAs initiated on the donor could transfer) templates were used to determine kinetic parameters of strand transfer. The donor and acceptor shared an internal region of homology where homologous strand transfer could occur. The rate of strand transfer at various acceptor concentrations was determined by monitoring the production of transfer products over time. These rates were used to construct Lineweaver-Burk plots. In each system, NCp increased the Vmax about 3-fold while the Km for acceptor template was decreased severalfold. NCp's effects on RT extension ranged from no effect to inhibition depending on the primer-template used. The lowered Km shows that NCp increases the affinity of the acceptor template for the transferring DNA. Vmax increases despite the inhibition of RT extension. The increased Vmax implies a stimulatory mechanism that cannot be mimicked by high acceptor concentrations. Therefore, NCp does not act by merely increasing the effective concentration of nucleic acids.

  19. Gamma-glutamyltransferase of rat kidney. Simultaneous assay of the hydrolysis and transfer reactions with (glutamate-14C)glutathione.

    PubMed Central

    Elce, J S; Broxmeyer, B

    1976-01-01

    1. The hydrolytic and transfer reactions catalysed by rat kidney-gamma-glutamyltransferase (EC 2.3.2.2) were studied in vitro with substrates [U-14C]glutamic acid-labelled glutathione and methionine. Initial-velocity patterns, isotope-exchange and binding studies were consistent with a branched non-sequential mechanism in which a gamma-glutamyl-enzyme intermediate may react either with water (hydrolysis) or with methionine (gamma-glutamyl transfer). 2. The Michaelis constant for glutathione in hydrolysis was 13.9 +/- 1.4 mum, for glutathione in transfer it was 113 +/- 15 muM and for methionine as substrate it was 4.7 +/- 0.7 mM. At substrate concentrations in the ranges of their respective Michaelis constants, the rate of transfer was about ten times higher than that of hydrolysis, but at concentrations of methionine approximating to the physiological (64 muM in rat plasma) the transfer is negligible. 3. The enzyme is reported to lie on the luminal surface of the proximal straight kidney tubule. In this situation, if the kinetic results obtained with the detergent-solubilized enzyme are relevant to the behavior of the enzyme in vivo, it appears likely that the main function of renal gamma-glutamyltransferase is not in amino acid transport, but rather to hydrolyse glutathione in the renal filtrate. PMID:6004

  20. Steric effect for proton, hydrogen-atom, and hydride transfer reactions with geometric isomers of NADH-model ruthenium complexes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Brian W; Polyansky, Dmitry E; Achord, Patrick; Cabelli, Diane; Muckerman, James T; Tanaka, Koji; Thummel, Randolph P; Zong, Ruifa; Fujita, Etsuko

    2012-01-01

    Two isomers, [Ru(1)]2+ (Ru = Ru(bpy)2, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, 1 = 2-(pyrid-2'-yl)-1-azaacridine) and [Ru(2)]2+ (2 = 3-(pyrid-2'-yl)-4-azaacridine), are bioinspired model compounds containing the nicotinamide functionality and can serve as precursors for the photogeneration of C-H hydrides for studying reactions pertinent to the photochemical reduction of metal-C1 complexes and/or carbon dioxide. While it has been shown that the structural differences between the azaacridine ligands of [Ru(1)]2+ and [Ru(2)]2+ have a significant effect on the mechanism of formation of the hydride donors, [Ru(1HH)]2+ and [Ru(2HH)]2+, in aqueous solution, we describe the steric implications for proton, net-hydrogen-atom and net-hydride transfer reactions in this work. Protonation of [Ru(2*-)] in aprotic and even protic media is slow compared to that of [Ru(1*-)]+. The net hydrogen-atom transfer between *[Ru(1)]2+ and hydroquinone (H2Q) proceeds by one-step EPT, rather than stepwise electron-proton transfer. Such a reaction was not observed for *[Ru(2)]2+ because the non-coordinated N atom is not easily available for an interaction with H2Q. Finally, the rate of the net hydride ion transfer from [Ru(1HH)]2+ to [Ph3C]+ is significantly slower than that of [Ru (2HH)]2+ owing to steric congestion at the donor site. PMID:22470971

  1. Kinetic mechanism of molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air-fuel plasmas.

    PubMed

    Adamovich, Igor V; Li, Ting; Lempert, Walter R

    2015-08-13

    This work describes the kinetic mechanism of coupled molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air, H2-air and hydrocarbon-air plasmas sustained by nanosecond pulse discharges (single-pulse or repetitive pulse burst). The model incorporates electron impact processes, state-specific N(2) vibrational energy transfer, reactions of excited electronic species of N(2), O(2), N and O, and 'conventional' chemical reactions (Konnov mechanism). Effects of diffusion and conduction heat transfer, energy coupled to the cathode layer and gasdynamic compression/expansion are incorporated as quasi-zero-dimensional corrections. The model is exercised using a combination of freeware (Bolsig+) and commercial software (ChemKin-Pro). The model predictions are validated using time-resolved measurements of temperature and N(2) vibrational level populations in nanosecond pulse discharges in air in plane-to-plane and sphere-to-sphere geometry; temperature and OH number density after nanosecond pulse burst discharges in lean H(2)-air, CH(4)-air and C(2)H(4)-air mixtures; and temperature after the nanosecond pulse discharge burst during plasma-assisted ignition of lean H2-mixtures, showing good agreement with the data. The model predictions for OH number density in lean C(3)H(8)-air mixtures differ from the experimental results, over-predicting its absolute value and failing to predict transient OH rise and decay after the discharge burst. The agreement with the data for C(3)H(8)-air is improved considerably if a different conventional hydrocarbon chemistry reaction set (LLNL methane-n-butane flame mechanism) is used. The results of mechanism validation demonstrate its applicability for analysis of plasma chemical oxidation and ignition of low-temperature H(2)-air, CH(4)-air and C(2)H(4)-air mixtures using nanosecond pulse discharges. Kinetic modelling of low-temperature plasma excited propane-air mixtures demonstrates the need for development of a more accurate

  2. Kinetic mechanism of molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air-fuel plasmas.

    PubMed

    Adamovich, Igor V; Li, Ting; Lempert, Walter R

    2015-08-13

    This work describes the kinetic mechanism of coupled molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air, H2-air and hydrocarbon-air plasmas sustained by nanosecond pulse discharges (single-pulse or repetitive pulse burst). The model incorporates electron impact processes, state-specific N(2) vibrational energy transfer, reactions of excited electronic species of N(2), O(2), N and O, and 'conventional' chemical reactions (Konnov mechanism). Effects of diffusion and conduction heat transfer, energy coupled to the cathode layer and gasdynamic compression/expansion are incorporated as quasi-zero-dimensional corrections. The model is exercised using a combination of freeware (Bolsig+) and commercial software (ChemKin-Pro). The model predictions are validated using time-resolved measurements of temperature and N(2) vibrational level populations in nanosecond pulse discharges in air in plane-to-plane and sphere-to-sphere geometry; temperature and OH number density after nanosecond pulse burst discharges in lean H(2)-air, CH(4)-air and C(2)H(4)-air mixtures; and temperature after the nanosecond pulse discharge burst during plasma-assisted ignition of lean H2-mixtures, showing good agreement with the data. The model predictions for OH number density in lean C(3)H(8)-air mixtures differ from the experimental results, over-predicting its absolute value and failing to predict transient OH rise and decay after the discharge burst. The agreement with the data for C(3)H(8)-air is improved considerably if a different conventional hydrocarbon chemistry reaction set (LLNL methane-n-butane flame mechanism) is used. The results of mechanism validation demonstrate its applicability for analysis of plasma chemical oxidation and ignition of low-temperature H(2)-air, CH(4)-air and C(2)H(4)-air mixtures using nanosecond pulse discharges. Kinetic modelling of low-temperature plasma excited propane-air mixtures demonstrates the need for development of a more accurate

  3. Reaction Mechanism for Direct Proton Transfer from Carbonic Acid to a Strong Base in Aqueous Solution II: Solvent Coordinate-Dependent Reaction Path.

    PubMed

    Daschakraborty, Snehasis; Kiefer, Philip M; Miller, Yifat; Motro, Yair; Pines, Dina; Pines, Ehud; Hynes, James T

    2016-03-10

    The protonation of methylamine base CH3NH2 by carbonic acid H2CO3 within a hydrogen (H)-bonded complex in aqueous solution was studied via Car-Parrinello dynamics in the preceding paper (Daschakraborty, S.; Kiefer, P. M.; Miller, Y.; Motro, Y.; Pines, D.; Pines, E.; Hynes, J. T. J. Phys. Chem. B 2016, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpcb.5b12742). Here some important further details of the reaction path are presented, with specific emphasis on the water solvent's role. The overall reaction is barrierless and very rapid, on an ∼100 fs time scale, with the proton transfer (PT) event itself being very sudden (<10 fs). This transfer is preceded by the acid-base H-bond's compression, while the water solvent changes little until the actual PT occurrence; this results from the very strong driving force for the reaction, as indicated by the very favorable acid-protonated base ΔpKa difference. Further solvent rearrangement follows immediately the sudden PT's production of an incipient contact ion pair, stabilizing it by establishment of equilibrium solvation. The solvent water's short time scale ∼120 fs response to the incipient ion pair formation is primarily associated with librational modes and H-bond compression of water molecules around the carboxylate anion and the protonated base. This is consistent with this stabilization involving significant increase in H-bonding of hydration shell waters to the negatively charged carboxylate group oxygens' (especially the former H2CO3 donor oxygen) and the nitrogen of the positively charged protonated base's NH3(+). PMID:26876428

  4. Reaction Mechanism for Direct Proton Transfer from Carbonic Acid to a Strong Base in Aqueous Solution II: Solvent Coordinate-Dependent Reaction Path.

    PubMed

    Daschakraborty, Snehasis; Kiefer, Philip M; Miller, Yifat; Motro, Yair; Pines, Dina; Pines, Ehud; Hynes, James T

    2016-03-10

    The protonation of methylamine base CH3NH2 by carbonic acid H2CO3 within a hydrogen (H)-bonded complex in aqueous solution was studied via Car-Parrinello dynamics in the preceding paper (Daschakraborty, S.; Kiefer, P. M.; Miller, Y.; Motro, Y.; Pines, D.; Pines, E.; Hynes, J. T. J. Phys. Chem. B 2016, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpcb.5b12742). Here some important further details of the reaction path are presented, with specific emphasis on the water solvent's role. The overall reaction is barrierless and very rapid, on an ∼100 fs time scale, with the proton transfer (PT) event itself being very sudden (<10 fs). This transfer is preceded by the acid-base H-bond's compression, while the water solvent changes little until the actual PT occurrence; this results from the very strong driving force for the reaction, as indicated by the very favorable acid-protonated base ΔpKa difference. Further solvent rearrangement follows immediately the sudden PT's production of an incipient contact ion pair, stabilizing it by establishment of equilibrium solvation. The solvent water's short time scale ∼120 fs response to the incipient ion pair formation is primarily associated with librational modes and H-bond compression of water molecules around the carboxylate anion and the protonated base. This is consistent with this stabilization involving significant increase in H-bonding of hydration shell waters to the negatively charged carboxylate group oxygens' (especially the former H2CO3 donor oxygen) and the nitrogen of the positively charged protonated base's NH3(+).

  5. Measurements of Sub-Barrier Transfer Yields in SULFUR-32 + NIOBIUM-93, MOLYBDENUM(98,100) Reactions at 180 Degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Roland Blaine

    1994-01-01

    The Rochester RMS was used to measure excitation functions for 180^circ sub -barrier one- and two-neutron pickup reactions for E _{rm lab} <= 106 MeV in ^{32}S + ^{93}Nb, ^ {98,100}Mo systems by detecting target -like recoils at 0^circ. The measured yields are for quasi-elastic transfer; final states were not identified. The RMS technique was chosen for its self-normalizing property which makes obtaining absolute cross sections straightforward. The distorted-wave Born-approximation (DWBA) computer code scPTOLEMY was used to obtain quantal predictions of the one-neutron pickup yields. The calculations were performed for several final states and summed (using the appropriate spectroscopic factors) to estimate the total quasi-elastic transfer yield. P scTOLEMY over-predicted the yield in each system by a factor of 2-3. Since DWBA calculations for heavy-ion reactions are known to have difficulty reproducing experimentally measured yields within a factor of two, this discrepancy is not surprising. Although the absolute yields were not reproduced by the calculations, the shape of the excitation function is well reproduced. No calculations were performed for two-neutron transfer due to the lack of reliable spectroscopic factors. The transfer probabilities are obtained directly from these measurements. Distances of closest approach were calculated using a proximity potential. The slopes of transfer probability vs distance of closest approach are in good agreement with the predictions obtained from semi-classical theory using binding energies, indicating the absence of a "slope anomaly." This is consistent with the prediction that diffractive effects, which may distort the measured slope, are minimized at backward angles and sub-barrier energies--the precise conditions under which these measurements were performed. Angle-integrated transfer cross sections were derived from the measured transfer probabilities by assuming the ions follow Rutherford trajectories. These derived

  6. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. [Annual] progress report, August 1, 1989--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1992-07-31

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

  7. B-side charge separation in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers: nanosecond time scale electron transfer from HB- to QB.

    PubMed

    Kirmaier, Christine; Laible, Philip D; Hanson, Deborah K; Holten, Dewey

    2003-02-25

    We report time-resolved optical measurements of the primary electron transfer reactions in Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction centers (RCs) having four mutations: Phe(L181) --> Tyr, Tyr(M208) --> Phe, Leu(M212) --> His, and Trp(M250) --> Val (denoted YFHV). Following direct excitation of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P) to its lowest excited singlet state P, electron transfer to the B-side bacteriopheophytin (H(B)) gives P(+)H(B)(-) in approximately 30% yield. When the secondary quinone (Q(B)) site is fully occupied, P(+)H(B)(-) decays with a time constant estimated to be in the range of 1.5-3 ns. In the presence of excess terbutryn, a competitive inhibitor of Q(B) binding, the observed lifetime of P(+)H(B)(-) is noticeably longer and is estimated to be in the range of 4-8 ns. On the basis of these values, the rate constant for P(+)H(B)(-) --> P(+)Q(B)(-) electron transfer is calculated to be between approximately (2 ns)(-)(1) and approximately (12 ns)(-)(1), making it at least an order of magnitude smaller than the rate constant of approximately (200 ps)(-)(1) for electron transfer between the corresponding A-side cofactors (P(+)H(A)(-) --> P(+)Q(A)(-)). Structural and energetic factors associated with electron transfer to Q(B) compared to Q(A) are discussed. Comparison of the P(+)H(B)(-) lifetimes in the presence and absence of terbutryn indicates that the ultimate (i.e., quantum) yield of P(+)Q(B)(-) formation relative to P is 10-25% in the YFHV RC.

  8. Chemical Evolution of Groundwater Near a Sinkhole Lake, Northern Florida: 2. Chemical Patterns, Mass Transfer Modeling, and Rates of Mass Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Brian G.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Revesz, Kinga M.; Jones, Blair F.; Lee, Terrie M.

    1995-06-01

    Chemical patterns along evolutionary groundwater flow paths in silicate and carbonate aquifers were interpreted using solute tracers, carbon and sulfur isotopes, and mass balance reaction modeling for a complex hydrologic system involving groundwater inflow to and outflow from a sinkhole lake in northern Florida. Rates of dominant reactions along defined flow paths were estimated from modeled mass transfer and ages obtained from CFC-modeled recharge dates. Groundwater upgradient from Lake Barco remains oxic as it moves downward, reacting with silicate minerals in a system open to carbon dioxide (CO2), producing only small increases in dissolved species. Beneath and downgradient of Lake Barco the oxic groundwater mixes with lake water leakage in a highly reducing, silicate-carbonate mineral environment. A mixing model, developed for anoxic groundwater downgradient from the lake, accounted for the observed chemical and isotopic composition by combining different proportions of lake water leakage and infiltrating meteoric water. The evolution of major ion chemistry and the 13C isotopic composition of dissolved carbon species in groundwater downgradient from the lake can be explained by the aerobic oxidation of organic matter in the lake, anaerobic microbial oxidation of organic carbon, and incongruent dissolution of smectite minerals to kaolinite. The dominant process for the generation of methane was by the CO2 reduction pathway based on the isotopic composition of hydrogen (δ2H(CH4) = -186 to -234‰) and carbon (δ13C(CH4) = -65.7 to -72.3‰). Rates of microbial metabolism of organic matter, estimated from the mass transfer reaction models, ranged from 0.0047 to 0.039 mmol L-1 yr-1 for groundwater downgradient from the lake.

  9. Time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations for multinucleon transfer and quasifission processes in the 238U+64Ni reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekizawa, Kazuyuki; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Background: Multinucleon transfer (MNT) and quasifission (QF) processes are dominant processes in low-energy collisions of two heavy nuclei. They are expected to be useful to produce neutron-rich unstable nuclei. Nuclear dynamics leading to these processes depends sensitively on nuclear properties such as deformation and shell structure. Purpose: We elucidate reaction mechanisms of MNT and QF processes involving heavy deformed nuclei, making detailed comparisons between microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations and measurements for the 238U+64Ni reaction. Methods: Three-dimensional Skyrme-TDHF calculations are performed. Particle-number projection method is used to evaluate MNT cross sections from the TDHF wave function after collision. Results: Fragment masses, total kinetic energy (TKE), scattering angle, contact time, and MNT cross sections are investigated for the 238U+64Ni reaction. They show reasonable agreements with measurements. At small impact parameters, collision dynamics depends sensitively on the orientation of deformed 238U. In tip (side) collisions, we find a larger (smaller) TKE and a shorter (longer) contact time. In tip collisions, we find a strong influence of quantum shells around 208Pb. Conclusions: It is confirmed that the TDHF calculations reasonably describe both MNT and QF processes in the 238U64Ni reaction. Analyses of this system indicate the significance of the nuclear structure effects such as deformation and quantum shells in nuclear reaction dynamics at low energies.

  10. Dynamics of intramolecular electron transfer reaction of FAD studied by magnetic field effects on transient absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masaaki; Maeda, Kiminori; Arai, Tatsuo

    2005-07-01

    The kinetics of intermediates generated from intramolecular electron-transfer reaction by photo irradiation of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) molecule was studied by a magnetic field effect (MFE) on transient absorption (TA) spectra. Existence time of MFE and MFE action spectra have a strong dependence on the pH of solutions. The MFE action spectra have indicated the existence of interconversion between the radical pair and the cation form of the triplet excited state of flavin part. All rate constants of the triplet and the radical pair were determined by analysis of the MFE action spectra and decay kinetics of TA. The obtained values for the interconversion indicate that the formation of cation radical promotes the back electron-transfer reaction to the triplet excited state. Further, rate constants of spin relaxation and recombination have been studied by the time profiles of MFE at various pH. The drastic change of those two factors has been obtained and can be explained by SOC (spin-orbit coupling) induced back electron-transfer promoted by the formation of a stacking conformation at pH > 2.5.

  11. Femtosecond dynamics of fundamental reaction processes in liquids: Proton transfer, geminate recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation. [Spiropyrans

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, B.J.

    1992-11-01

    The fast excited state intramolecular proton transfer of 3-hydroxyflavone is measured and effects of external hydrogen-bonding interactions on the proton transfer are studied. The proton transfer takes place in [approximately]240 fsec in nonpolar environments, but becomes faster than instrumental resolution of 110 fsec in methanol solution. The dynamics following photodissociation of CH[sub 2]I[sub 2] and other small molecules provide the first direct observations of geminate recombination. The recombination of many different photodissociating species occurs on a [approximately]350 fsec time scale. Results show that recombination yields but not rates depend on the solvent environment and suggest that recombination kinetics are dominated by a single collision with surrounding solvent cage. Studies of sterically locked phenyl-substituted butadienes offer new insights into the electronic structure and isomerization behavior of conjugated polyenes. Data show no simple correlation between hinderance of specific large amplitude motions and signatures of isomerizative behavior such as viscosity dependent excited state lifetimes, implying that the isomerization does not provide a suitable for simple condensed phase reaction rate theories. The spectral dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran indicate that recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation all play important roles in photoreactivity of complex molecules. The interplay of these microscopic phenomena and their effect on macroscopic properties such as photochromism are discussed. All the results indicate that the initial steps of the photochromic reaction process occur extremely rapidly. Laser system and computer codes for data analysis are discussed.

  12. Ab initio studies of the reaction of hydrogen transfer from DNA to the calicheamicinone diradical.

    PubMed Central

    Sapse, A. M.; Rothchild, R.; Kumar, R.; Lown, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The biological activity of enediyne chemotherapeutic (anti-cancer) agents is attributed to their ability to cleave duplex DNA. Part of the reaction of cleavage is the abstraction of hydrogens from the deoxyribose moiety of DNA by the biradical formed via a Bergman rearrangement. METHODS: The mechanism of the reaction of abstraction of two hydrogen atoms from two deoxyribophosphate molecules by the calicheamicinone biradical is studied with ab initio calculations at Hartree-Fock and post-Hartree-Fock level. The Titan program is used to perform the calculations. RESULTS: It is found that the reactions are exothermic and thus thermodynamically reasonable. CONCLUSIONS: The mechanism of DNA cleavage by the enediyne-containing drugs is likely to proceed by the abstraction of the hydrogens from deoxyribose by the biradical formed by the drug. Further studies should determine in which way the modification of the drug's structure would make this reaction even more exothermic and, thus, more likely to occur. PMID:11844867

  13. Protein structure, electron transfer and evolution of prokaryotic photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers from a variety of organisms have been isolated and characterized. The groups of prokaryotic photosynthetic organisms include the purple bacteria, the filamentous green bacteria, the green sulfur bacteria and the heliobacteria as anoxygenic representatives as well as the cyanobacteria and prochlorophytes as oxygenic representatives. This review focuses on structural and functional comparisons of the various groups of photosynthetic reaction centers and considers possible evolutionary scenarios to explain the diversity of existing photosynthetic organisms.

  14. Studying 10Be and 11Be Halo States through the (p,d) Single-Neutron Transfer Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Keri; Sarazin, Fred; (Pcb)2 Collaboration; Tigress Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    One-neutron transfer reactions are being used to study single-particle neutron states in nuclei. For one-neutron halo nuclei, such as 11Be, the (p,d) reaction enables the removal of the halo neutron or of one of the core neutrons. This way, it is possible to simultaneously study the halo wavefunction of the 11Be ground-state but also a possible excited halo state in 10Be. The 11Be(p, d)10Be transfer reaction at 10 MeV/nucleon is being investigated at the TRIUMF-ISAC II facility with the Printed Circuit Board Based Charged Particle ((PCB)2) array inside the TRIUMF ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS). The ground state and first excited state of 10Be can be directly identified using deuteron identification and kinematics from the charged particle array, while the four excited states in10Be around 6 MeV, including the suspected halo state (2- state), are identified using coincident gamma rays from TIGRESS with the identified deuterons. Angular distributions for the 10Be populated states will be shown along with their FRESCO fits. This work is partially supported by the US Department of Energy through Grant/Contract No. DE-FG03-93ER40789 (Colorado School of Mines).

  15. Phosphorus-31 NMR magnetization transfer measurements of metabolic reaction rates in the rat heart and kidney in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Koretsky, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    /sup 31/P NMR is a unique tool to study bioenergetics in living cells. The application of magnetization transfer techniques to the measurement of steady-state enzyme reaction rates provides a new approach to understanding the regulation of high energy phosphate metabolism. This dissertation is concerned with the measurement of the rates of ATP synthesis in the rat kidney and of the creatine kinase catalyzed reaction in the rat heart in situ. The theoretical considerations of applying magnetization transfer techniques to intact organs are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with multiple exchange reactions and compartmentation of reactants. Experimental measurements of the ATP synthesis rate were compared to whole kidney oxygen consumption and Na/sup +/ reabsorption rates to derive ATP/O values. The problems associated with ATP synthesis rate measurements in kidney, e.g. the heterogeneity of the inorganic phosphate resonance, are discussed and experiments to overcome these problems proposed. In heart, the forward rate through creatine kinase was measured to be larger than the reverse rate. To account for the difference in forward and reverse rates a model is proposed based on the compartmentation of a small pool of ATP.

  16. On the reaction mechanism of the complete intermolecular O2 transfer between mononuclear nickel and manganese complexes with macrocyclic ligands.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Rivera, Jhon; Caballol, Rosa; Calzado, Carmen J; Liakos, Dimitrios G; Neese, Frank

    2014-10-01

    The recently described intermolecular O2 transfer between the side-on Ni-O2 complex [(12-TMC)Ni-O2](+) and the manganese complex [(14-TMC)Mn](2+), where 12-TMC and 14-TMC are 12- and 14-membered macrocyclic ligands, 12-TMC=1,4,7,10-tetramethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane and 14-TMC=1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane, is studied by means of DFT methods. B3LYP calculations including long-range corrections and solvent effects are performed to elucidate the mechanism. The potential energy surfaces (PESs) compatible with different electronic states of the reactants have been analyzed. The calculations confirm a two-step reaction, with a first rate-determining bimolecular step and predict the exothermic character of the global process. The relative stability of the products and the reverse barrier are in line with the fact that no reverse reaction is experimentally observed. An intermediate with a μ-η(1):η(1)-O2 coordination and two transition states are identified on the triplet PES, slightly below the corresponding stationary points of the quintet PES, suggesting an intersystem crossing before the first transition state. The calculated activation parameters and the relative energies of the two transition sates and the products are in very good agreement with the experimental data. The calculations suggest that a superoxide anion is transferred during the reaction.

  17. Protease-catalyzed peptide synthesis using inverse substrates: the influence of reaction conditions on the trypsin acyl transfer efficiency.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, V; Jakubke, H D; Zapevalova, N P; Mitin, Y V

    1991-06-01

    Benzyloxycarbonyl-L-alanine p-guanidinophenyl ester behaves as a trypsin "inverse substrate," i.e., a cationic center is included in the leaving group instead of being in the acyl moiety. Using this substrate as an acyl donor, trypsin catalyzes the synthesis of peptide bonds that cannot be split by this enzyme. An optimal acyl transfer efficiency was achieved between pH 8 and 9 at 30 degrees C.The addition of as much as 50% cosolvent was shown to be of minor influence on the acyl transfer efficiency, whereas the reaction velocity decreases by more than one order of magnitude. The efficiency of H-Leu-NH(2) and H-Val-NH(2) in deacylation is almost the same for "inverse" and normal type substrates. PMID:18600704

  18. The discovery of allyltyrosine based tripeptides as selective inhibitors of the HIV-1 integrase strand-transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Neal; Gordon, Christopher P; Boyle, Timothy P; Vandegraaf, Nicholas; Deadman, John; Rhodes, David I; Coates, Jonathan A; Pyne, Stephen G; Keller, Paul A; Bremner, John B

    2016-07-01

    From library screening of synthetic antimicrobial peptides, an O-allyltyrosine-based tripeptide was identified to possess inhibitory activity against HIV-1 integrase (IN) exhibiting an IC50 value of 17.5 μM in a combination 3'-processing and strand transfer microtitre plate assay. The tripeptide was subjected to structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies with 28 peptides, incorporating an array of natural and non-natural amino acids. Resulting SAR analysis revealed the allyltyrosine residue was a key feature for IN inhibitory activity whilst incorporation of a lysine residue and extended hydrophilic chains bearing a terminal methyl ester was advantageous. Addition of hydrophobic aromatic moieties to the N-terminal of the scaffold afforded compounds with improved inhibitory activity. Consolidation of these functionalities lead to the development of the tripeptide 96 which specifically inhibited the IN strand-transfer reaction with an IC50 value of 2.5 μM.

  19. Oxidative catalysis using the stoichiometric oxidant as a reagent: an efficient strategy for single-electron-transfer-induced tandem anion-radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Kafka, František; Holan, Martin; Hidasová, Denisa; Pohl, Radek; Císařová, Ivana; Klepetářová, Blanka; Jahn, Ullrich

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative single-electron transfer-catalyzed tandem reactions consisting of a conjugate addition and a radical cyclization are reported, which incorporate the mandatory terminal oxidant as a functionality into the product.

  20. The Study of the D(e,e'p)n Reaction at High Four-Momentum Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Hari

    2014-09-01

    A study of the D (e ,e' p) reaction has been carried out at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) for a set of fixed values of four-momentum transfers Q2 = 2.1 and 0.8 (GeV/c)2 and for missing momenta pm ranging from pm = 0.03 to pm = 0.65 GeV/c. The analysis resulted in the determination of absolute D (e ,e' p) n cross sections as a function of the recoiling neutron momentum and it's scattering angle with respect to the momentum transfer q-> . The experimental momentum distribution of the bound proton inside the deuteron has been determined for the first time at a set of fixed neutron recoil angle. A study of the D (e ,e' p) reaction has been carried out at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) for a set of fixed values of four-momentum transfers Q2 = 2.1 and 0.8 (GeV/c)2 and for missing momenta pm ranging from pm = 0.03 to pm = 0.65 GeV/c. The analysis resulted in the determination of absolute D (e ,e' p) n cross sections as a function of the recoiling neutron momentum and it's scattering angle with respect to the momentum transfer q-> . The experimental momentum distribution of the bound proton inside the deuteron has been determined for the first time at a set of fixed neutron recoil angle. Department of Energy (DOE).

  1. The generalized spin-boson model for electron-transfer reactions involving two harmonic potentials with a different force constant

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.

    1994-01-01

    The generalized spin-model is employed to analyze the electron-transfer reactions involving two harmonic potentials with a different force constant. An analytical expression for the nonadiabatic rate constant is derived with fill consideration of the effects of quantum modes. For a single dominant solvent mode at low frequency, the result of the high temperature regime is reduced to the formula derived earlier based on the stochastic Liouville theory. For multiple soft solvent modes, the rate constant is a convoluted integral of a rate function for each individual single mode.

  2. A simple approach to the solvent reorganization Gibbs free energy in electron transfer reactions of redox metalloproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkats, Yurij I.; Ulstrup, Jens

    1999-04-01

    We discuss a simple model for the environmental reorganisation Gibbs free energy, Er, in electron transfer between a metalloprotein and a small reaction partner. The protein is represented as a dielectric globule with low dielectric constant, the metal centres as conducting spheres, all embedded in a continuous solvent with high dielectric constant. This model has previously reproduced thermodynamic metalloprotein properties. Er takes an analytic form expressed by a continuous image charge distribution, and depends weakly on the globular radius, indicating that repolarisation at the globule/solvent interface contributes less to these effects than to the work terms and driving force.

  3. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry: online and rapid determination of volatile organic compounds of microbial origin.

    PubMed

    Romano, Andrea; Capozzi, Vittorio; Spano, Giuseppe; Biasioli, Franco

    2015-05-01

    Analytical tools for the identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by microbial cultures have countless applications in an industrial and research context which are still not fully exploited. The various techniques for VOC analysis generally arise from the application of different scientific and technological philosophies, favoring either sample throughput or chemical information. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) represents a valid compromise between the two aforementioned approaches, providing rapid and direct measurements along with highly informative analytical output. The present paper reviews the main applications of PTR-MS in the microbiological field, comprising food, environmental, and medical applications.

  4. Description of nucleon-transfer and fusion reactions within time-dependent approaches and coupled-channel method

    SciTech Connect

    Samarin, V. V.

    2015-01-15

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation and the method of perturbed stationary states that is based on the expansion of the total wave function for the system of two nuclear cores and a nucleon in a set of nucleon two-center functions are used to describe nucleon transfers and fusion in low-energy nuclear reactions. A set of multichannel equations that couple the relative motion of nuclei to the motion of the nucleon is obtained. The kinetic-energy coupling matrix is similar to the coupling matrix for collective excitations of nuclei.

  5. Monitoring single coffee bean roasting by direct volatile compound analysis with proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yener, Sine; Navarini, Luciano; Lonzarich, Valentina; Cappellin, Luca; Märk, Tilmann D; Bonn, Günther K; Biasioli, Franco

    2016-09-01

    This study applies proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the rapid analysis of volatile compounds released from single coffee beans. The headspace volatile profiles of single coffee beans (Coffeea arabica) from different geographical origins (Brazil, Guatemala and Ethiopia) were analyzed via offline profiling at different stages of roasting. The effect of coffee geographical origin was reflected on volatile compound formation that was supported by one-way ANOVA. Clear origin signatures were observed in the formation of different coffee odorants. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27476633

  6. Effect of viscosity on photoinduced electron transfer reaction: An observation of the Marcus inverted region in homogeneous solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Rajesh Kumar; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2016-09-01

    The viscosity effect of homogeneous solvents on the dynamics of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) reaction among the coumarins and N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA) is investigated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. A bell shape Marcus inversion in the ET rates has been detected in the plot of ET rate constant (kq) with free energy change (ΔG0) in viscous solvents decanol and EG, but it is not observed in DMSO like low viscous solvent. We have also reported that there is no complex formation between the coumarin dye and DMA molecule by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

  7. Production of neutron-rich Ca, Sn, and Xe isotopes in transfer-type reactions with radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Lacroix, D.

    2010-12-15

    The production cross sections of neutron-rich isotopes {sup 52,54,56,58,60}Ca, {sup 136,138,140,142}Sn, and {sup 146,148,150,152}Xe are predicted for future experiments in the diffusive multinucleon transfer reactions {sup 86,90,92,94}Kr, {sup 124,130,132,134}Sn, {sup 136,140,142,146}Xe, and {sup 138,144,146}Ba+{sup 48}Ca with stable and radioactive beams at incident energies close to the Coulomb barrier. Because of the small cross sections, the production of neutron-rich isotopes requires the optimal choice of projectile-target combinations and bombarding energies.

  8. Neutron Transfer Reactions on Neutron-Rich N = 50 and N = 82 Nuclei Near the r-Process Path

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Shriner, J. F.; Sissom, D. J.; Pain, S. D.; Thomas, J. S.; Swan, T.; Wilson, G. L.; Arbanas, G.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Dean, D.; Liang, F.; Shapira, D.; Smith, M. S.; Adekola, A.; Chae, K. Y.

    2009-01-28

    Neutron transfer (d,p) reaction studies on the N = 50 isotones, {sup 82}Ge and {sup 84}Se, and A{approx_equal}130 nuclei, {sup 130,132}Sn and {sup 134}Te, have been measured. Direct neutron capture cross sections for {sup 82}Ge and {sup 84}Se (n,{gamma}) have been calculated and are combined with Hauser-Feshbach expectations to estimate total (n,{gamma}) cross sections. The A{approx_equal}130 studies used an early implementation of the ORRUBA array of position-sensitive silicon strip detectors for reaction proton measurements. Preliminary excitation energy and angular distribution results from the A{approx_equal}130 measurements are reported.

  9. Relevance of single-particle and collective excitations in zirconium isotopes populated by neutron transfer reactions in the {sup 90}Zr+{sup 208}Pb system

    SciTech Connect

    Pajtler, M. Varga; Szilner, S.; Malenica, D. Jelavić; Mijatović, T.; Soić, N.; Corradi, L.; Angelis, G. de; Fioretto, E.; Montanari, D.; Stefanini, A. M.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Gadea, A.; Haas, F.; Lunardi, S.; Mengoni, D.; Montagnoli, G.; Recchia, F.; Scarlassara, F.; Märginean, N.; Pollarolo, G.; and others

    2015-10-15

    Multineutron transfer reaction {sup 90}Zr+{sup 208}Pb has been studied at the energy close to the Coulomb barrier energy by using the PRISMA + CLARA set-up. In this fragment-γ coincidence measurement, the selective properties of the reaction mechanism in the population of the specific states have been discussed. Based on the observed γ transitions of neutron transfer channels, namely {sup 89–94}Zr isotopes, their level schemes have been constructed and updated.

  10. Production Cross Sections for Synthesis of Nuclides with Z = 118 IN Large Mass Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Jin, Xin; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, En-Guang

    The production cross sections for the synthesis of superheavy nuclei with charge number 118 are studied with the di-nuclear system model with dynamical potential surface (DNS-DyPES model). The dynamical potential energy surface (PES) and the fusion probabilities for 48Ca bombarding Cf nuclei reactions are studied. By multiplying the capture cross section, fusion probability and survival probability, the evaporation residue(ER) cross sections for superheavy nuclei with Z = 118 are obtained. And the excitation functions for the reactions with a mixture target of Cf isotopes are also shown.

  11. The role of quantum effects in proton transfer reactions in enzymes: quantum tunneling in a noisy environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothma, Jacques P.; Gilmore, Joel B.; McKenzie, Ross H.

    2010-05-01

    We consider the role of quantum effects in the transfer of hydrogen-like species in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. This review is stimulated by claims that the observed magnitude and temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) implies that quantum tunneling below the energy barrier associated with the transition state significantly enhances the reaction rate in many enzymes. We review the path integral approach and the Caldeira-Leggett model, which provides a general framework to describe and understand tunneling in a quantum system that interacts with a noisy environment at nonzero temperature. Here the quantum system is the active site of the enzyme, and the environment is the surrounding protein and water. Tunneling well below the barrier only occurs for temperatures less than a temperature T0, which is determined by the curvature of the potential energy surface near the top of the barrier. We argue that for most enzymes this temperature is less than room temperature. We review typical values for the parameters in the Caldeira-Leggett Hamiltonian, including the frequency-dependent friction and noise due to the environment. For physically reasonable parameters, we show that quantum transition state theory gives a quantitative description of the temperature dependence and magnitude of KIEs for two classes of enzymes that have been claimed to exhibit signatures of quantum tunneling. The only quantum effects are those associated with the transition state, both reflection at the barrier top and tunneling just below the barrier. We establish that the friction and noise due to the environment are weak and only slightly modify the reaction rate. Furthermore, at room temperature and for typical energy barriers environmental fluctuations with frequencies much less than 1000 cm-1 do not have a significant effect on quantum corrections to the reaction rate. This is essentially because the time scales associated with the dynamics of proton transfer are faster than

  12. The Use of Conjugate Charts in Transfer Reactions: A Unified Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allnutt, Michael I.

    2007-01-01

    Redox reactions can be conveniently discussed in terms of the relative strengths of the oxidant, the reductant, and their conjugates; a conjugate chart is a most convenient and useful way of doing this. A similar chart for acids and bases is proposed, which can be applied in the same manner. (Contains 7 figures and 2 tables.)

  13. Calculation of High Pressure Effects in Reactions of Hydrogen Transfer from Substituted Toluenes to Bromine Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Brandon; Spooner, Jacob; Weinberg, Noham

    2013-06-01

    A given reaction may proceed through several different mechanisms, each with its own transition state (TS). These TSs may have similar energies but different geometries and, as a result, different volumes. According to transition state theory, the activation volume (ΔV≠) is the difference between the volume of the TS and the reactants. Experimentally, activation volumes can be obtained from the pressure dependences of the rate constants: -RT(∂ln k/ ∂P)T = Δ V≠ = V≠ - VR By comparing the calculated and experimental activation volumes, one can pick a TS of the right ``size'' and thus elucidate the reaction mechanism by identifying the most likely reaction pathway. It has recently been shown by our research group that molecular dynamics simulations provide a suitable tool for theoretical calculations of activation volumes. In this project we focus on the calculation of the activation volumes for a series of reactions in which an alpha-hydrogen is abstracted from a substituted aromatic hydrocarbon by bromine radical.

  14. Measurement of proton transfer reaction rates in a microwave cavity discharge flowing afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, George M., IV

    The reaction rate coefficients between the hydronium ion and the molecules ethene (C2H4), propene (C 3H6), 1-butene (C4H8) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) were measured at 296 K. The measured reaction rates were compared to collision rates calculated using average dipole orientation (ADO) theory. Reaction efficiency depends primarily upon the proton affinity of the molecules. All the measurements were obtained using the newly developed microwave cavity discharge flowing afterglow (MCD-FA) apparatus. This device uses an Asmussen-type microwave cavity discharge ion source that is spatially separated from the flow tube, eliminating many of the problems inherent with the original FA devices. In addition to measuring reaction rate coefficients, the MCD-FA was shown to be an effective tool for measuring trace compounds in atmospheric air. This method has many advantages over current detection techniques since compounds can be detected in almost real time, large mass ranges can be scanned quickly, and repeated calibration is not required. Preliminary measurements were made of car exhaust and exhaled alveolar air. Car exhaust showed the presence of numerous hydrocarbons, such as butene, benzene and toluene while the exhaled alveolar air showed the presence of various volatile organic compounds such as methanol and acetone.

  15. The design, synthesis and validation of recoverable and readily reusable siloxane transfer agents for Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Solorio, Dionicio; Hoye, Adam T; Nguyen, Minh H; Smith, Amos B

    2013-05-17

    The development of competent, recoverable and reusable 1-oxa-2-silacyclopentene (siloxane) transfer agents for Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions (CCRs) of organolithium reagents with aryl and alkenyl iodides has been achieved. Drawbacks of the first-generation siloxane-transfer agent (1), relating to facile recovery for potential recycling, have been addressed.

  16. Ultrafast electron transfer reactions initiated by excited CT states of push pull perylenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Scott E.; Zhao, Yongyu; Schaller, Richard; Mulloni, Viviana; Just, Eric M.; Johnson, Robert C.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Two new chromophores that absorb in the visible spectrum, the 9-( N-pyrrolidinyl)- and 9-( N-piperidinyl)perylene-3,4-dicarboximides, 5PMI and 6PMI, respectively, were synthesized and shown to possess lowest excited singlet states with about 70% charge transfer (CT) character. Changing the ring size of the cyclic amine from 5 to 6 significantly changes the energies of the CT states, as well as the redox potentials of the chromophores. These chromophores were linked to pyromellitimide (PI) and 1,8:4,5-naphthalenediimide (NI) electron acceptors using a single N-N bond between their respective imides to yield the corresponding donor-acceptor dyads 5PMI-PI, 5PMI-NI, 6PMI-PI, and 6PMI-NI. The donors and acceptors in these molecules are positioned relative to one another in a rod-like arrangement at fixed distances and restricted orientations. The rates of charge separation and recombination were measured using transient absorption spectroscopy. These chromophores were also used to prepare rigid donor-acceptor triads 5PMI-PI-NI and 6PMI-PI-NI, which display one- or two-step electron transfer mechanisms that depend on solvent polarity. These compounds exhibit a broad range of structure and media driven changes in electron transfer mechanism.

  17. Does excited-state proton-transfer reaction contribute to the emission behaviour of 4-aminophthalimide in aqueous media?

    PubMed

    Khara, Dinesh Chandra; Banerjee, Sanghamitra; Samanta, Anunay

    2014-06-23

    4-Aminophthalimide (AP) is an extensively used molecule both for fundamental studies and applications primarily due to its highly solvent-sensitive fluorescence properties. The fluorescence spectrum of AP in aqueous media was recently shown to be dependent on the excitation wavelength. A time-dependent blue shift of its emission spectrum is also reported. On the basis of these findings, the excited-state solvent-mediated proton-transfer reaction of the molecule, which was proposed once but discarded at a later stage, is reintroduced. We report on the fluorescence behaviour of AP and its imide-H protected derivative, N-BuAP, to prove that a solvent-assisted excited-state keto-enol transformation does not contribute to the steady-state and time-resolved emission behaviour of AP in aqueous media. Our results also reveal that the fluorescence of AP in aqueous media arises from two distinct hydrogen-bonded species. The deuterium isotope effect on the fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime of AP, which was thought to be a reflection of the excited-state proton-transfer reaction in the system, is explained by considering the difference in the influence of H(2)O and D(2)O on the nonradiative rates and ground-state exchange of the proton with the solvent.

  18. Fusion of liposomones and chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas capsulata: effect on photosynthetic energy transfer between B875 and reaction center complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Takemoto, J.Y.; Schonhardt, T.; Golecki, J.R.; Drews, G.

    1985-06-01

    The photosynthetic chromatophore membranes of Rhodopseudomonas capsulata were fused with liposomes to investigate the effects of lipid dilution on energy transfer between the bacteriochlorophyll-protein complexes of this membrane. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed that the fractions contained closed vesicles formed by the fusion of liposomes to chromatophores. Particles with 9-nm diameters on the P fracture faces did not appear to change in size with increasing lipid content, but the number of particles per membrane area decreased proportionally with increases in the lipid-to-protein ratio. The bacteriochlorophyll-to-protein ratios, electrophoretic polypeptide profiles on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, and light-induced absorbance changes at 595 nm caused by photosynthetic reaction centers were not altered by fusion. The relative fluorescence emission intensities due to the B875 light-harvesting complex increased significantly with increasing lipid content, but no increases in fluorescence due to the B800-B850 light-harvesting complex were observed. Electron transport rates, measured as succinate-cytochrome c reductase activities, decreased with increased lipid content. The results indicate an uncoupling of energy transfer between the B875 light-harvesting and reaction center complexes with lipid dilution of the chromatophore membrane.

  19. A Semi-Empirical Method to Estimate the Response Factors for VOCs in Proton-Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Leithead, A.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Graus, M.; Veres, P. R.; Murphy, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds are essential in sustaining atmospheric chemical processes which lie at the heart of most atmospheric environmental issues. Recent advances in VOC measurement technologies have allowed rapid detection of the primary VOCs and their oxidation products. Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTRMS) has been widely used to determine air concentrations of many hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons rapidly. The recent advance in PTRMS with time-of-flight mass (TOF) detection, allows hundreds of VOC compounds to be detected simultaneously and rapidly. Converting these detected signals into air concentrations is a challenge. This is usually accomplished with calibrations using a limited number of target compounds at known concentrations. However, for the hundreds of masses in the PTR mass spectrum particularly from TOF detectors, conversion to air concentration is not always practical nor possible if their compound identities are not known. Here, we have developed a new method to estimate the response factors for VOCs to convert the measured ion signals into air concentrations. This method is based on semi-empirical calculations of the rate constants for the proton transfer reactions between the hydronium ion and target hydrocarbons using polarizabilities and permanent dipole moments, and extrapolation to unknown hydrocarbons. The method is further validated with calibration results for selected hydrocarbons. Using these response factors, conversion to air concentrations for many signals in a PTR MS of unknown chemical structures can be accomplished.

  20. A relevant coupled particle-tracking solution for network reaction and multirate mass transfer under heterogeneous conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Considering complex physical and reactive processes is necessary to a trustable plume behavior prediction. However, complexity is often synonym of inefficiency and numerical problem for existing model. We present an efficient particle method to simulate plumes evolution moved by advection-dispersion and affected by network reactions and multirate-mass transfer processes under heterogeneous spatial conditions. The stochastic approach is based on the derivation of the probability that a particle being at a certain position, specie and mobility zone will move into another specie and/or zone. Transport processes are fully coupled with reactions. The particle method is free of numerical dispersion and overcomes the inherent numerical problems stemming from the incorporation of heterogeneities into reactive transport codes based on Eulerian approaches. Even if the method aims to be universal, we show that analytical solutions can be provided for the simpler cases, which may improve consequently the model efficiency. Illustratively, we apply our method to model the sequential degradation of chlorinated solvents (PCE ⇒ TCE ⇒ DCE ⇒ VC ⇒ 0) into a finely discretized field and show how spatially variable coefficients of hydraulic permeability, bio-decay and mass transfer affect the spatial and temporal behavior of the four reactive plumes.

  1. Effect on the parameters of the high-heel shoe and transfer time of ground reaction force during level walking

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Young-Pyo; Ryew, Che-Cheong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze an effect on the parameters of high-heel shoe and transfer time of ground reaction force during level walking and subjects participated were composed of adult female subjects (n=13) of 20s with height of high heel (0 cm, 9 cm, respectively). Instrument used for the study was 1 set force plate (AMTI-OR9-7) and sampling rate for data collection of analysis parameters was set-up at 1,000 Hz. The revelation of required coefficient of friction (RCOF) maximum showed significant difference with more rapid than that of 1st peak vertical force (1 PVF). Transfer time of body weight showed significant difference with more delay at 9 cm than that of 0 cm. RCOF required more frictional force required because PVF showed significant difference with larger value on 9 cm than that of 3 cm at 1 PVF. Both center of pressure (COP) x and COPy showed rather less displacement on 9 cm than that of 0 cm. In addition, level walking by high heel shoe did not control efficiently the ground reaction force due to restricted control capacity of coefficient of frictional force and therefore could suggest an inducement of muscle fatigue, heightening a possibility of sliding and falling due to decrease of frictional force. PMID:27807524

  2. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-01

    Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH2) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such zwitterion modified PP surface.

  3. The citric acid-Mn III,IVO 2(birnessite) reaction. Electron transfer, complex formation, and autocatalytic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Stone, Alan T.

    2006-09-01

    Citrate released by plants, bacteria, and fungi into soils is subject to abiotic oxidation by MnO 2(birnessite), yielding 3-ketoglutarate, acetoacetate, and Mn II. Citrate loss and generation of products as a function of time all yield S-shaped curves, indicating autocatalysis. Increasing the citrate concentration decreases the induction period. The maximum rate ( rmax) along the reaction coordinate follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood dependence on citrate concentration. Increases in pH decrease rmax and increase the induction time. Adding Mn II, Zn II, orthophosphate, or pyrophosphate at the onset of reaction decreases rmax. Mn II addition eliminates the induction period, while orthophosphate and pyrophosphate addition increase the induction period. These findings indicate that two parallel processes are responsible. The first, relatively slow process involves the oxidation of free citrate by surface-bound Mn III,IV, yielding Mn II and citrate oxidation products. The second process, which is subject to strong positive feedback, involves electron transfer from Mn II-citrate complexes to surface-bound Mn III,IV, generating Mn III-citrate and Mn II. Subsequent intramolecular electron transfer converts Mn III-citrate into Mn II and citrate oxidation products.

  4. Analysis of Native-Like Proteins and Protein Complexes Using Cation to Anion Proton Transfer Reactions (CAPTR).

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Kenneth J; Bush, Matthew F

    2015-12-01

    Mass spectra of native-like protein complexes often exhibit narrow charge-state distributions, broad peaks, and contributions from multiple, coexisting species. These factors can make it challenging to interpret those spectra, particularly for mixtures with significant heterogeneity. Here we demonstrate the use of ion/ion proton transfer reactions to reduce the charge states of m/z-selected, native-like ions of proteins and protein complexes, a technique that we refer to as cation to anion proton transfer reactions (CAPTR). We then demonstrate that CAPTR can increase the accuracy of charge state assignments and the resolution of interfering species in native mass spectrometry. The CAPTR product ion spectra for pyruvate kinase exhibit ~30 peaks and enable unambiguous determination of the charge state of each peak, whereas the corresponding precursor spectra exhibit ~6 peaks and the assigned charge states have an uncertainty of ±3%. 15+ bovine serum albumin and 21+ yeast enolase dimer both appear near m/z 4450 and are completely unresolved in a mixture. After a single CAPTR event, the resulting product ions are baseline resolved. The separation of the product ions increases dramatically after each subsequent CAPTR event; 12 events resulted in a 3000-fold improvement in separation relative to the precursor ions. Finally, we introduce a framework for interpreting and predicting the figures of merit for CAPTR experiments. More generally, these results suggest that CAPTR strongly complements other mass spectrometry tools for analyzing proteins and protein complexes, particularly those in mixtures. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  5. Use of proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry for quantitative monitoring of toxic nitramines in the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisthaler, A.; Zhu, L.; Stenstrøm, Y.; Nielsen, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Naturally occurring aliphatic amines and industrially emitted aromatic amines and alkanolamines produce toxic nitramines, (R1R2)-N-NO2, when photo-oxidized in the atmosphere in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx). Particular concerns arise from amine-based CO2 capture where the amine solution may get nitrated by NOx in the flue gas. An on-line analytical technique for measuring nitramines in industrial emissions and in ambient air is thus in high demand. Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a state-of-the-art technique for on-line measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. Herein, we report on the use of high mass resolution proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) for on-line analysis of nitramines. We generated a mass spectral library from a series of nitramines and investigated the analytical performance of PTR-ToF-MS in terms of sensitivity, precision, accuracy and detection limit. We will discuss limitations of the innovative technique and propose measurement strategies for future emission and ambient measurements.

  6. Analysis of Native-Like Proteins and Protein Complexes Using Cation to Anion Proton Transfer Reactions (CAPTR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Bush, Matthew F.

    2015-12-01

    Mass spectra of native-like protein complexes often exhibit narrow charge-state distributions, broad peaks, and contributions from multiple, coexisting species. These factors can make it challenging to interpret those spectra, particularly for mixtures with significant heterogeneity. Here we demonstrate the use of ion/ion proton transfer reactions to reduce the charge states of m/ z-selected, native-like ions of proteins and protein complexes, a technique that we refer to as cation to anion proton transfer reactions (CAPTR). We then demonstrate that CAPTR can increase the accuracy of charge state assignments and the resolution of interfering species in native mass spectrometry. The CAPTR product ion spectra for pyruvate kinase exhibit ~30 peaks and enable unambiguous determination of the charge state of each peak, whereas the corresponding precursor spectra exhibit ~6 peaks and the assigned charge states have an uncertainty of ±3%. 15+ bovine serum albumin and 21+ yeast enolase dimer both appear near m/ z 4450 and are completely unresolved in a mixture. After a single CAPTR event, the resulting product ions are baseline resolved. The separation of the product ions increases dramatically after each subsequent CAPTR event; 12 events resulted in a 3000-fold improvement in separation relative to the precursor ions. Finally, we introduce a framework for interpreting and predicting the figures of merit for CAPTR experiments. More generally, these results suggest that CAPTR strongly complements other mass spectrometry tools for analyzing proteins and protein complexes, particularly those in mixtures.

  7. Intramolecular 1,5-H transfer reaction of aryl iodides through visible-light photoredox catalysis: a concise method for the synthesis of natural product scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Qiang; Wei, Yun-Long; Xu, Guo-Qiang; Liang, Yong-Min; Xu, Peng-Fei

    2016-05-11

    The intramolecular 1,5-H transfer reaction of the aryl radicals generated from unactivated aryl iodides by photocatalysis is described. The features of this transformation are operational simplicity, excellent yields, mild reaction conditions, and good functional group tolerance. With this approach, a more concise formal synthesis of (±)-coerulescine and (±)-physovenine is accomplished.

  8. Shining Light on Copper: Unique Opportunities for Visible-Light-Catalyzed Atom Transfer Radical Addition Reactions and Related Processes.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Oliver

    2016-09-20

    Visible-light photoredox catalysis offers exciting opportunities to achieve challenging carbon-carbon bond formations under mild and ecologically benign conditions. Desired features of photoredox catalysts are photostability, long excited-state lifetimes, strong absorption in the visible region, and high reduction or oxidation potentials to achieve electron transfer to substrates, thus generating radicals that can undergo synthetic organic transformations. These requirements are met in a convincing way by Ru(II)(phenanthroline)3- and Ir(III)(phenylpyridine)3-type complexes and, as a low-cost alternative, by organic dyes that offer a metal-free catalyst but suffer in general from lower photostability. Cu(I)(phenanthroline)2 complexes have been recognized for more than 30 years as photoresponsive compounds with highly negative Cu(I)* → Cu(II) oxidation potentials, but nevertheless, they have not been widely considered as suitable photoredox catalysts, mainly because their excited lifetimes are shorter by a factor of 5 to 10 compared with Ru(II) and Ir(III) complexes, their absorption in the visible region is weak, and their low Cu(II) → Cu(I) reduction potentials might impede the closure of a catalytic cycle for a given process. Contrasting again with Ru(II)L3 and Ir(III)L3 complexes, Cu(I)L2 assemblies undergo more rapid ligand exchange in solution, thus potentially reducing the concentration of the photoactive species. Focusing on atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) reactions and related processes, we highlight recent developments that show the utility of Cu(I)(phenanthroline)2 complexes as photoredox catalysts, demonstrating that despite their short excited-state lifetimes and weak absorption such complexes are efficient at low catalyst loadings. Moreover, some of the inherent disadvantages stated above can even be turned to advantages: (1) the low Cu(II) → Cu(I) reduction potential might efficiently promote reactions via a radical chain pathway, and (2

  9. Level structure of sup 101 Tc investigated by means of massive transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dejbakhsh, H.; Mouchaty, G.; Schmitt, R.P. )

    1991-07-01

    The structure of {sup 101}Tc has been studied using the {sup 100}Mo({sup 7}Li,{alpha}2{ital n}) reaction at 49 MeV. Both particle-{gamma} and particle--{gamma}-{gamma} coincidence experiments were performed. The intensities of {gamma} rays both in and out of the reaction plane were measured to obtain information on the {Delta}{ital I} of the transitions. A new band based on the {pi}{ital g}{sub 9/2} configuration was identified for the first time. To investigate the shape coexistence or configuration dependent deformation in this nucleus, interacting-boson-fermion-model and cranked shell-model calculations have been performed. Cranked shell-model calculations were used to interpret the states at higher excitation energies.

  10. Nitrene transfer reactions catalysed by copper(I) complexes in ionic liquid using chloramine-T.

    PubMed

    Cano, Israel; Nicasio, M Carmen; Pérez, Pedro J

    2009-01-28

    The complex [Tpm(*,Br)Cu(NCMe)]BF4 (Tpm(*,Br) = HC(3,5-Me2-4-Br-pyrazolyl)3) catalyses the aziridination of alkenes and the amidation of cyclic ethers with chloramine-T as the nitrene source and the ionic liquid [bmim]PF6 as the reaction medium (bmim = 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium). High conversions have been obtained over several cycles of catalyst recovery and reuse.

  11. Spectroscopic Factors from the Single Neutron Transfer Reaction 111Cd(d,p)112Cd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, D. S.; Garrett, P. E.; Demand, G. A.; Finlay, P.; Green, K. L.; Leach, K. G.; Phillips, A. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Triambak, S.; Wong, J.; Ball, G.; Faestermann, T.; Krücken, R.; Hertenberger, R.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2013-03-01

    The cadmium isotopes have been cited as excellent examples of vibrational nuclei for decades, with multi-phonon quadrupole, quadrupole-octupole, and mixed-symmetry states proposed. From a variety of experimental studies, a large amount of spectroscopic data has been obtained, recently focused on γ-ray studies. In the present work, the single-particle structure of 112Cd has been investigated using the 111Cd(ěcd, p)112Cd reaction. The investigation was carried out using a 22 MeV beam of polarized deuterons obtained from the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory at Garching, Germany. The reaction ejectiles were momentum analyzed using a Q3D spectrograph, and 115 levels have been identified up to 4.2 MeV of excitation energy. Spin-parity has been assigned to each analyzed level, and angular distributions for the reaction cross sections and analyzing powers were obtained. Many additional levels have been observed compared with the previous (d,p) study performed with 8 MeV deuterons,1 including strongly populated 5- and 6- states. The former was previously assigned as a member of the quadrupole-octupole quintuplet, based on a strongly enhanced B(E2) value to the 3- state, but is now re-assigned as being predominately s1/2 ⊗ h11/2 configuration.

  12. Hydrogen tunnelling in enzyme-catalysed H-transfer reactions: flavoprotein and quinoprotein systems

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, Michael J; Masgrau, Laura; Roujeinikova, Anna; Johannissen, Linus O; Hothi, Parvinder; Basran, Jaswir; Ranaghan, Kara E; Mulholland, Adrian J; Leys, David; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2006-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that enzyme-catalysed C–H bond breakage occurs by quantum mechanical tunnelling. This paradigm shift in the conceptual framework for these reactions away from semi-classical transition state theory (TST, i.e. including zero-point energy, but with no tunnelling correction) has been driven over the recent years by experimental studies of the temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for these reactions in a range of enzymes, including the tryptophan tryptophylquinone-dependent enzymes such as methylamine dehydrogenase and aromatic amine dehydrogenase, and the flavoenzymes such as morphinone reductase and pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase, which produced observations that are also inconsistent with the simple Bell-correction model of tunnelling. However, these data—especially, the strong temperature dependence of reaction rates and the variable temperature dependence of KIEs—are consistent with other tunnelling models (termed full tunnelling models), in which protein and/or substrate fluctuations generate a configuration compatible with tunnelling. These models accommodate substrate/protein (environment) fluctuations required to attain a configuration with degenerate nuclear quantum states and, when necessary, motion required to increase the probability of tunnelling in these states. Furthermore, tunnelling mechanisms in enzymes are supported by atomistic computational studies performed within the framework of modern TST, which incorporates quantum nuclear effects. PMID:16873125

  13. Electron-transfer reaction of cinnamic acids and their methyl esters with the DPPH(*) radical in alcoholic solutions.

    PubMed

    Foti, Mario C; Daquino, Carmelo; Geraci, Corrada

    2004-04-01

    The kinetic behavior of cinnamic acids, their methyl esters, and two catechols 1-10 (ArOH) in the reaction with DPPH(*) in methanol and ethanol is not compatible with a reaction mechanism that involves hydrogen atom abstraction from the hydroxyl group of 1-10 by DPPH(*). The rate of this reaction at 25 degrees C is, in fact, comparatively fast despite that the phenolic OH group of ArOH is hydrogen bonded to solvent molecules. The observed rate constants (k(1)) relative to DPPH(*) + ArOH are 3-5 times larger for the methyl esters than for the corresponding free acids and, for the latter, decrease as their concentration is increased according to the relation k(1) = B/[ArOH](0)(m), where k(1) is given in units of M(-1) s(-1), m is ca. 0.5, and B ranges from 0.02 (p-coumaric acid) to ca. 3.48 (caffeic acid) in methanol and from 0.04 (p-coumaric acid) to ca. 13 (sinapic acid) in ethanol. Apparently, the reaction mechanism of DPPH(*) + ArOH involves a fast electron-transfer process from the phenoxide anion of 1-10 to DPPH(*). Kinetic analysis of the reaction sequence for the free acids leads to an expression for the observed rate constant, k(1), proportional to [ArOH](0)(-1/2) in excellent agreement with the experimental behavior of these phenols. The experimental results are also interpreted in terms of the influence that adventitious acids or bases present in the solvent may have. These impurities dramatically influence the ionization equilibrium of phenols and cause a reduction or an enhancement, respectively, of the measured rate constants. PMID:15049623

  14. EPR and ENDOR Investigation of Rhodosemiquinone in Bacterial Reaction Centers Formed by B-Branch Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Paddock, M. L.; Flores, M.; Isaacson, R.; Shepherd, J. N.

    2010-01-01

    In photosynthetic bacteria, light-induced electron transfer takes place in a protein called the reaction center (RC) leading to the reduction of a bound ubiquinone molecule, QB, coupled with proton binding from solution. We used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) to study the magnetic properties of the protonated semiquinone, an intermediate proposed to play a role in proton coupled electron transfer to QB. To stabilize the protonated semiquinone state, we used a ubiquinone derivative, rhodoquinone, which as a semiquinone is more easily protonated than ubisemiquinone. To reduce this low-potential quinone we used mutant RCs modified to directly reduce the quinone in the QB site via B-branch electron transfer (Paddock et al. in Biochemistry 44:6920–6928, 2005). EPR and ENDOR signals were observed upon illumination of mutant RCs in the presence of rhodoquinone. The EPR signals had g values characteristic of rhodosemiquinone (gx = 2.0057, gy = 2.0048, gz ∼ 2.0018) at pH 9.5 and were changed at pH 4.5. The ENDOR spectrum showed couplings due to solvent exchangeable protons typical of hydrogen bonds similar to, but different from, those found for ubisemiquinone. This approach should be useful in future magnetic resonance studies of the protonated semiquinone. PMID:20157643

  15. Unmediated heterogeneous electron transfer reaction of ascorbate oxidase and laccase at a gold electrode.

    PubMed Central

    Santucci, R; Ferri, T; Morpurgo, L; Savini, I; Avigliano, L

    1998-01-01

    The unmediated electrochemistry of two large Cu-containing proteins, ascorbate oxidase and laccase, was investigated by direct-current cyclic voltammetry. Rapid heterogeneous electron transfer was achieved in the absence of promoters or mediators by trapping a small amount of protein within a solid, electrochemically inert, tributylmethyl phosphonium chloride membrane coating a gold electrode. The problems typical of proteins in solution, such as adsorption on the electrode surface, were avoided by this procedure. In anaerobic conditions, the cyclic voltammograms, run at a scan rate of up to 200 mV/s, showed the electron transfer process to be quasi-reversible and diffusion-controlled. The pH-dependent redox potentials (+360 mV and +400 mV against a normal hydrogen electrode at pH7.0 for ascorbate oxidase and laccase respectively and +390 mV and +410 mV at pH5.5) were similar to those of the free proteins. The same electrochemical behaviour was recorded for the type 2 Cu-depleted derivatives, which contain reduced type 3 Cu, whereas the apoproteins were electrochemically inactive. Under aerobic conditions the catalytic current intensity of holoprotein voltammograms increased up to approx. 2-fold at a low scanning rate, with unchanged redox potentials. The voltammograms of type 2 Cu-depleted proteins and of apoproteins were unaffected by the presence of oxygen. This suggests that electron uptake at the electrode surface involves type 1 Cu and that only in the presence of oxygen is the intramolecular electron transfer to other protein sites rapid enough to be observed. The analogy with available kinetic results is discussed. PMID:9620861

  16. Ultrafast and ultraslow oxygen atom transfer reactions between late metal centers.

    PubMed

    Fortner, Kevin C; Laitar, David S; Muldoon, John; Pu, Lihung; Braun-Sand, Sonja B; Wiest, Olaf; Brown, Seth N

    2007-01-24

    Oxotrimesityliridium(V), (mes)3Ir=O (mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl), and trimesityliridium(III), (mes)3Ir, undergo extremely rapid degenerate intermetal oxygen atom transfer at room temperature. At low temperatures, the two complexes conproportionate to form (mes)3Ir-O-Ir(mes)3, the 2,6-dimethylphenyl analogue of which has been characterized crystallographically. Variable-temperature NMR measurements of the rate of dissociation of the mu-oxo dimer combined with measurements of the conproportionation equilibrium by low-temperature optical spectroscopy indicate that oxygen atom exchange between iridium(V) and iridium(III) occurs with a rate constant, extrapolated to 20 degrees C, of 5 x 107 M-1 s-1. The oxotris(imido)osmium(VIII) complex (ArN)3Os=O (Ar = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl) also undergoes degenerate intermetal atom transfer to its deoxy partner, (ArN)3Os. However, despite the fact that its metal-oxygen bond strength and reactivity toward triphenylphosphine are nearly identical to those of (mes)3Ir=O, the osmium complex (ArN)3Os=O transfers its oxygen atom 12 orders of magnitude more slowly to (ArN)3Os than (mes)3Ir=O does to (mes)3Ir (kOsOs = 1.8 x 10-5 M-1 s-1 at 20 degrees C). Iridium-osmium cross-exchange takes place at an intermediate rate, in quantitative agreement with a Marcus-type cross relation. The enormous difference between the iridium-iridium and osmium-osmium exchange rates can be rationalized by an analogue of the inner-sphere reorganization energy. Both Ir(III) and Ir(V) are pyramidal and can form pyramidal iridium(IV) with little energetic cost in an orbitally allowed linear approach. Conversely, pyramidalization of the planar tris(imido)osmium(VI) fragment requires placing a pair of electrons in an antibonding orbital. The unique propensity of (mes)3Ir=O to undergo intermetal oxygen atom transfer allows it to serve as an activator of dioxygen in cocatalyzed oxidations, for example, acting with osmium tetroxide to catalyze the aerobic

  17. Quantifying free energy profiles of proton transfer reactions in solution and proteins by using a diabatic FDFT mapping.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yun; Warshel, Arieh

    2008-01-24

    Reliable studies of proton transfer (PT) reactions in solution and in enzymes by combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approaches with an ab initio description of the quantum region present a major challenge to computational chemists. The main problem is the need for extensive computer time to evaluate the QM energy, which in turn makes it extremely challenging to perform proper configurational sampling. The present work presents a new effective way for performing such calculations by using the frozen density functional (FDFT) approach to generate diabatic surfaces that are used to generate a mapping potential that takes the system from the reactant to the product state. The resulting umbrella sampling/free energy perturbation (US/FEP) mapping is done in full analogy with the approach used in the empirical valence bond (EVB) treatment, moving from the diabatic mapping potential to the adiabatic ground state surface, while an ab initio Hamiltonian is used for the QM part. The present approach provides a particularly effective way for evaluating the free energy associated with both the substrate and the solvent motions. This allows us to obtain a free energy barrier that properly reflects the solute entropy. This advance allows one to obtain ab initio QM/MM (QM(ai)/MM) free energy surfaces for very challenging cases such as the autodissociation of water in water, proton transfer between methanol and water in water, and the effect of Mg2+ ion on such a reaction. We also consider as a benchmark the initial PT reaction in the catalytic cycle of triose phosphate isomerase and obtain excellent results without any adjustable parameters. Our results point out that the present implementation of the FDFT approach provides a very promising approach for evaluating QM(ai)/MM free energy surfaces.

  18. Donor-acceptor graphene-based hybrid materials facilitating photo-induced electron-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, Anastasios; Pagona, Georgia; Tagmatarchis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Graphene research and in particular the topic of chemical functionalization of graphene has exploded in the last decade. The main aim is to increase the solubility and thereby enhance the processability of the material, which is otherwise insoluble and inapplicable for technological applications when stacked in the form of graphite. To this end, initially, graphite was oxidized under harsh conditions to yield exfoliated graphene oxide sheets that are soluble in aqueous media and amenable to chemical modifications due to the presence of carboxylic acid groups at the edges of the lattice. However, it was obvious that the high-defect framework of graphene oxide cannot be readily utilized in applications that are governed by charge-transfer processes, for example, in solar cells. Alternatively, exfoliated graphene has been applied toward the realization of some donor-acceptor hybrid materials with photo- and/or electro-active components. The main body of research regarding obtaining donor-acceptor hybrid materials based on graphene to facilitate charge-transfer phenomena, which is reviewed here, concerns the incorporation of porphyrins and phthalocyanines onto graphene sheets. Through illustrative schemes, the preparation and most importantly the photophysical properties of such graphene-based ensembles will be described. Important parameters, such as the generation of the charge-separated state upon photoexcitation of the organic electron donor, the lifetimes of the charge-separation and charge-recombination as well as the incident-photon-to-current efficiency value for some donor-acceptor graphene-based hybrids, will be discussed.

  19. Effect of NaCl Salts on the Activation Energy of Excited-State Proton Transfer Reaction of Coumarin 183.

    PubMed

    Joung, Joonyoung F; Kim, Sangin; Park, Sungnam

    2015-12-17

    Coumarin 183 (C183) was used as a photoacid to study excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) reactions. Here, we studied the effect of ions on the ESPT of C183 in aqueous NaCl solutions using a steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy and time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) method. The acid dissociation equilibrium of excited-state C183 and the activation energy for the ESPT of C183 were determined as a function of NaCl concentration. The change in the equilibrium constant was found to be correlated with the solvation energy of deprotonated C183. Frequency-resolved TCSPC signals measured at several temperatures were analyzed by using a global fitting analysis method which enabled us to extract all the rate constants involving the ESPT reaction and the spectra of individual species. The activation energy for the ESPT reaction of C183 was highly dependent on NaCl concentration. Quantum chemical calculations were used to calculate the local hydrogen-bond (H-bond) configurations around C183 in aqueous NaCl solutions. It was found that the activation energy for the ESPT was determined by the local H-bond configurations around C183 which were significantly influenced by the dissolved ions.

  20. The 20Ne(d,p)21Ne transfer reaction in relation to the s-process abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nsangu, C. T.; Laird, A. M.; Parikh, A.; Adsley, P.; Birch, M. D.; Chen, A. A.; Faestermann, T.; Fox, S. P.; Fulton, B. R.; Hertenberger, R.; Irvine, D.; Kay, B. P.; Longland, R.; Manwell, S.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Schmitt, K.; de Séréville, N.; Tomlinson, J. R.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2016-01-01

    A study of the 20Ne(d,p)21Ne transfer reaction was performed using the Quadrupole Dipole Dipole Dipole (Q3D) magnetic spectrograph in Garching, Germany. The experiment probed excitation energies in 21Ne ranging from 6.9 MeV to 8.5 MeV. The aim was to investigate the spectroscopic information of 21Ne within the Gamow window of core helium burning in massive stars. Further information in this region will help reduce the uncertainties on the extrapolation down to Gamow window cross sections of the 17O(α,γ)21Ne reaction. In low metallicity stars, this reaction has a direct impact on s-process abundances by determining the fate of 16O as either a neutron poison or a neutron absorber. The experiment used a 22-MeV deuteron beam, with intensities varying from 0.5-1 μA, and an implanted target of 20Ne of 7 μg/cm2 in 40 μg/cm2 carbon foils. Sixteen 21Ne peaks have been identified in the Ex = 6.9-8.5 MeV range, of which only thirteen peaks correspond to known states. Only the previously-known Ex = 7.960 MeV state was observed within the Gamow window.

  1. Application of a BOSS-Gaussian interface for QM/MM simulations of Henry and methyl transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Vilseck, Jonah Z; Kostal, Jakub; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2015-10-15

    Hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) computer simulations have become an indispensable tool for studying chemical and biological phenomena for systems too large to treat with QM alone. For several decades, semiempirical QM methods have been used in QM/MM simulations. However, with increased computational resources, the introduction of ab initio and density function methods into on-the-fly QM/MM simulations is being increasingly preferred. This adaptation can be accomplished with a program interface that tethers independent QM and MM software packages. This report introduces such an interface for the BOSS and Gaussian programs, featuring modification of BOSS to request QM energies and partial atomic charges from Gaussian. A customizable C-shell linker script facilitates the interprogram communication. The BOSS-Gaussian interface also provides convenient access to Charge Model 5 (CM5) partial atomic charges for multiple purposes including QM/MM studies of reactions. In this report, the BOSS-Gaussian interface is applied to a nitroaldol (Henry) reaction and two methyl transfer reactions in aqueous solution. Improved agreement with experiment is found by determining free-energy surfaces with MP2/CM5 QM/MM simulations than previously reported investigations using semiempirical methods.

  2. Application of a BOSS – Gaussian Interface for QM/MM Simulations of Henry and Methyl Transfer Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Vilseck, Jonah Z.; Kostal, Jakub; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) computer simulations have become an indispensable tool for studying chemical and biological phenomena for systems too large to treat with quantum mechanics alone. For several decades, semi-empirical QM methods have been used in QM/MM simulations. However, with increased computational resources, the introduction of ab initio and density function methods into on-the-fly QM/MM simulations is being increasingly preferred. This adaptation can be accomplished with a program interface that tethers independent QM and MM software packages. This report introduces such an interface for the BOSS and Gaussian programs, featuring modification of BOSS to request QM energies and partial atomic charges from Gaussian. A customizable C-shell linker script facilitates the inter-program communication. The BOSS–Gaussian interface also provides convenient access to Charge Model 5 (CM5) partial atomic charges for multiple purposes including QM/MM studies of reactions. In this report, the BOSS–Gaussian interface is applied to a nitroaldol (Henry) reaction and two methyl transfer reactions in aqueous solution. Improved agreement with experiment is found by determining free-energy surfaces with MP2/CM5 QM/MM simulations than previously reported investigations employing semiempirical methods. PMID:26311531

  3. Study of the Ne((3)P2) + CH3F electron-transfer reaction below 1 K.

    PubMed

    Jankunas, Justin; Bertsche, Benjamin; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Relatively little is known about the dynamics of electron-transfer reactions at low collision energy. We present a study of Penning ionization of ground-state methyl fluoride molecules by electronically excited neon atoms in the 13 μeV–4.8 meV (150 mK–56 K) collision energy range, using a neutral–neutral merged beam setup. Relative cross sections have been measured for three Ne((3)P2) + CH3F reaction channels by counting the number of CH3F(+), CH2F(+), and CH3(+) product ions as a function of relative velocity between the neon and methyl fluoride molecular beams. Experimental cross sections markedly deviate from the Langevin capture model at collision energies above 20 K. The branching ratios are constant. In other words, the chemical shape of the CH3F molecule, as seen by the Ne((3)P2) atom, appears not to change as the collision energy is varied, in contrast to related Ne((3)PJ) + CH3X (X = Cl and Br) reactions at higher collision energies.

  4. Multinucleon transfer reactions for the {sup 28}Si+{sup 90,94}Zr systems in the region below and near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Garg, Ritika; Saxena, Mansi; Goyal, Savi; Verma, S.; Kumar, Suresh; Singh, R.; Madhavan, N.; Jhingan, A.; Nath, S.; Gehlot, J.; Mohanto, Gayatri; Prasad, E.; Sandal, Rohit; Behera, B. R.; Pramanik, U. D.; Sinha, A. K.

    2011-05-15

    Measurements on multinucleon transfer reactions for {sup 28}Si+{sup 90,94}Zr systems were performed at sub- and near-barrier energies. The fact that {sup 90}Zr has a closed neutron shell (N = 50) and {sup 94}Zr has four neutrons outside the closed shell, allows us to investigate the effects of shell closure and pairing correlation on multinucleon transfer mechanism. The experiment was performed with pulsed {sup 28}Si beam using the Heavy Ion Reaction Analyzer (HIRA) at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. Based on the Q-value considerations, it turned out that pickup channels were neutron transfer whereas stripping channels were proton transfer. For the {sup 28}Si+{sup 90}Zr system, the values of the slope parameter for two-neutron pickup turned out to be less than that for one-neutron pickup. The values of the slope parameter were almost the same for two-, three-, and four-neutron pickup channels in the case of the {sup 28}Si+{sup 94}Zr system. The transfer probabilities in the case of the {sup 28}Si+{sup 94}Zr system were much larger than those for the {sup 28}Si+{sup 90}Zr system, further supporting the fact that there is a correlation between the transfer channels and sub-barrier fusion cross-section enhancement. An odd-even staggering was observed in the extracted transfer probabilities at the barrier radius implying the role of pairing correlation in transfer reactions.

  5. Non-adiabatic processes in the charge transfer reaction of O{sub 2} molecules with potassium surfaces without dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Krix, David; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2014-08-21

    Thin potassium films grown on Si(001) substrates are used to measure internal chemicurrents and the external emission of exoelectrons simultaneously during adsorption of molecular oxygen on K surfaces at 120 K. The experiments clarify the dynamics of electronic excitations at a simple metal with a narrow valence band. X-ray photoemission reveals that for exposures below 5 L almost exclusively peroxide K{sub 2}O{sub 2} is formed, i.e., no dissociation of the molecule occurs during interaction. Still a significant chemicurrent and a delayed exoelectron emission are detected due to a rapid injection of unoccupied molecular levels below the Fermi level. Since the valence band width of potassium is approximately equal to the potassium work function (2.4 eV) the underlying mechanism of exoemission is an Auger relaxation whereas chemicurrents are detected after resonant charge transfer from the metal valence band into the injected level. The change of the chemicurrent and exoemission efficiencies with oxygen coverage can be deduced from the kinetics of the reaction and the recorded internal and external emission currents traces. It is shown that the non-adiabaticity of the reaction increases with coverage due to a reduction of the electronic density of states at the surface while the work function does not vary significantly. Therefore, the peroxide formation is one of the first reaction systems which exhibits varying non-adiabaticity and efficiencies during the reaction. Non-adiabatic calculations based on model Hamiltonians and density functional theory support the picture of chemicurrent generation and explain the rapid injection of hot hole states by an intramolecular motion, i.e., the expansion of the oxygen molecule on the timescale of a quarter of a vibrational period.

  6. Microscopic calculations to predict the temperature dependence of the electron transfer rate in the outer sphere reaction Fe/sup 3+/ yields Fe/sup 2+/ at a gold electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Halley, J.W.; Hautman, J.; Rahman, A.; Curtiss, L.

    1987-01-01

    The study of electron transfer processes has always been known to be central to the understanding of electrochemical processes. This work develops a model to calculate the temperature dependence of a well known electron transfer reaction from first principles. The reaction is the ferrous-ferric electron transfer reaction in HClO/sub 4/ at a gold electrode. In this reaction, the iron is aquo-coordinated, which simplifies the modeling problem.

  7. Isotope Effects as Probes for Enzyme Catalyzed Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Roston, Daniel; Islam, Zahidul; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic Isotope effects (KIEs) have long served as a probe for the mechanisms of both enzymatic and solution reactions. Here, we discuss various models for the physical sources of KIEs, how experimentalists can use those models to interpret their data, and how the focus of traditional models has grown to a model that includes motion of the enzyme and quantum mechanical nuclear tunneling. We then present two case studies of enzymes, thymidylate synthase and alcohol dehydrogenase, and discuss how KIEs have shed light on the C-H bond cleavages those enzymes catalyze. We will show how the combination of both experimental and computational studieshas changed our notion of how these enzymes exert their catalytic powers. PMID:23673528

  8. Charge-transfer processes and redox reactions in planar lipid monolayers and bilayers.

    PubMed

    Krysiñki, P; Tien, H T; Ottova, A

    1999-01-01

    Supported bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) and lipid monolayers have been known for quite sometime and are attracting sustained interest since they open new research vista and offer practical approaches in biosensor development and molecular device applications. Central to these areas of interest are electric processes and redox reactions where the movement of ions and electrons plays a pivotal role. In this paper an overview of the major findings in this field is presented. Further, we summarize the work on planar lipid bilayers and monolayers that have been done in the past few years in a number of laboratories. Supported planar BLMs and their closely related systems provide the foundation for a variety of lipid bilayer-based molecular sensors that are sensitive, versatile, as well as potentially inexpensive (i.e., disposable), and open to all sorts of experimentation.

  9. A precise few-nucleon size difference by isotope shift measurements of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeian, Nima Hassan

    We perform high precision measurements of an isotope shift between the two stable isotopes of helium. We use laser excitation of the 23 S1 -- 23P0 transition at 1083 .... in a metastable beam of 3He and 4He atoms. A newly developed tunable laser frequency selector along with our previous electro-optic frequency modulation technique provides extremely reliable, adaptable, and precise frequency and intensity control. The intensity control contributes negligibly to overall experimental uncertainty by selecting (t selection < 50 ) and stabilizing the intensity of the required sideband and eliminating (˜10-5) the unwanted frequencies generated during the modulation of 1083 nm laser carrier frequency. The selection technique uses a MEMS based fiber switch (tswitch ≈ 10 ms) and several temperature stabilized narrow band (˜3 GHz) fiber gratings. A fiber based optical circulator and an inline fiber amplifier provide the desired isolation and the net gain for the selected frequency. Also rapid (˜2 sec.) alternating measurements of the 23 S1 -- 23P0 interval for both species of helium is achieved with a custom fiber laser for simultaneous optical pumping. A servo-controlled retro-reflected laser beam eliminates residual Doppler effects during the isotope shift measurement. An improved detection design and software control makes negligible subtle potential biases in the data collection. With these advances, combined with new internal and external consistency checks, we are able to obtain results consistent with the best previous measurements, but with substantially improved precision. Our measurement of the 23S 1 -- 23P0 isotope shift between 3He and 4He is 31 097 535.2 (5)kHz. The most recent theoretic calculation combined with this measuremen. yields a new determination for nuclear size differences between 3He and 4He: Deltarc = 0.292 6 (1)exp (8)th(52)expfm, with a precision of less than a part in 104 coming from the experimental uncertainty (first parenthesis), and a part in 10 3 coming from theory. This value is consistent with electron scattering measurement, but a factor of 10 more precise. It is inconsistent (4 sigma) with a recent isotope shift measurement on another helium transition (2 1S0 -- 23 S1). Comparisons with ongoing muonic helium measurements may provide clues to the origin of what is currently called the proton puzzle: electronic and muonic measurements of the proton size do not agree. In the future, the experimental improvements described here can be used for higher precision tests of atomic theory and quantum electrodynamics, as well as an important atomic physics source of the fine structure constant.

  10. Few-nucleon systems with state-of-the-art chiral nucleon-nucleon forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, S.; Calci, A.; Epelbaum, E.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Golak, J.; Hebeler, K.; Kamada, H.; Krebs, H.; Langhammer, J.; Liebig, S.; Maris, P.; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Minossi, D.; Nogga, A.; Potter, H.; Roth, R.; Skibiński, R.; Topolnicki, K.; Vary, J. P.; Witała, H.; Lenpic Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We apply improved nucleon-nucleon potentials up to fifth order in chiral effective field theory, along with a new analysis of the theoretical truncation errors to study nucleon-deuteron (N d ) scattering and selected low-energy observables in 3H,4He , and 6Li. Calculations beyond second order differ from experiment well outside the range of quantified uncertainties, providing truly unambiguous evidence for missing three-nucleon forces within the employed framework. The sizes of the required three-nucleon-force contributions agree well with expectations based on Weinberg's power counting. We identify the energy range in elastic N d scattering best suited to study three-nucleon-force effects and estimate the achievable accuracy of theoretical predictions for various observables.

  11. Total cross sections for neutron scattering from few nucleon systems. II. Theoretical considerations.^.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elster, Ch.; Abfalterer, W. P.; Bateman, F. B.; Dietrich, F. S.; Finlay, R. W.; Glöckle, W.; Golak, J.; Haight, R. C.; Hüber, D.; Morgan, G. L.; Witala, H.

    1998-04-01

    New high precision measurements of the difference in neutron total cross sections of deuterium and hydrogen (d-h) were performed for neutron energies between 10 and 600 MeV. The results are compared to state-of-the-art Faddeev calculations of the n+d total cross section between 10 and 300 MeV, which systematically underpredict the experiment above 100 MeV. This result is not very sensitive to the type of modern NN interaction employed. Further, the convergence of the Faddeev multiple scattering series is demonstrated. We therefore conclude that the Faddeev description is inadequate above 100 MeV projectile energy. We also consider the first and second order terms in the multiple scattering series in the high energy limit to study shadowing effects. [1mm] ^ This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contracts W-7405-ENG-48 (LLNL), W-7405-ENG-36 (LANL), and DE-FG02-93ER40756 (Ohio U.), the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), the Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) and the HLRZ Jülich.

  12. Total cross sections for neutron scattering from few nucleon systems. I. Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abfalterer, W. P.; Bateman, F. B.; Dietrich, F. S.; Elster, Ch.; Finlay, R. W.; Glöckle, W.; Golak, J.; Haight, R. C.; Hüber, D.; Morgan, G. L.; Witala, H.

    1998-04-01

    We have recently measured neutron total cross sections for hydrogen and the total cross section difference for deuterium-hydrogen (d-h) over a wide energy range (approximately 10-600 MeV projectile energy). These measurements were made by an attenuation technique at the LANSCE/WNR facility using samples of D_2O, H_2O, C_8H_18, and CH2 with a technique similar to that applied in Ref. [1]. The results for d-h are in significant disagreement with previous measurements of this quantity (up to 9% near 80 MeV). The results have been used to test the Faddeev description of the n+d total cross section between 10 and 300 MeV as reported in the following abstract. [1mm] [1] R.W. Finlay et al., Phys. Rev. C47, 237 (1993) [2mm] ^ This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contracts W-7405-ENG-48 (LLNL), W-7405-ENG-36 (LANL), and DE-FG02-93ER40756 (Ohio U.), the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG), the Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) and the HLRZ Jülich.

  13. Universal solid-phase approach for the immobilization, derivatization, and resin-to-resin transfer reactions of boronic acids.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Michel; Thompson, Kim A; Zak, Mark; Bérubé, Christian; Hall, Dennis G

    2002-01-11

    Boronic acid-containing molecules are employed in a broad range of biological, medicinal, and synthetic applications. These compounds, however, tend to be difficult to handle by solution-phase methods. Herein, this problem is addressed with the development of the first general solid-phase approach for the derivatization of functionalized boronic acids. This approach is based on the use of a diethanolamine resin anchor that facilitates boronic acid immobilization by avoiding the need for exhaustive removal of water in the esterification process. The immobilization of a wide variety of boronic acids onto N,N-diethanolaminomethyl polystyrene (DEAM-PS, 1) can be performed within minutes by simple stirring in anhydrous solvents at room temperature. Evidence for the formation of a bicyclic diethanolamine boronate with putative N-B coordination was shown by (1)H NMR analysis of DEAM-PS-supported p-tolylboronic acid. The hydrolytic cleavage of the same model boronic acid from the DEAM-PS resin was studied by UV spectroscopy. Hydrolysis and attachment were shown to occur under a rapidly attained equilibrium, and a large excess of water (>32 equiv) is required to effect a practically quantitative release of boronic acids from DEAM-PS. Despite their relative sensitivity to water and alcohols, DEAM-PS-bound arylboronic acids functionalized with a formyl, a bromomethyl, a carboxyl, or an amino group can be transformed in good to excellent yields into a wide variety of amines, amides, anilides, and ureas, respectively. Ugi multicomponent reactions on DEAM-PS-supported aminobenzeneboronic acids, derivatization of multifunctional arylboronic acids, and sequential reactions can also be carried out efficiently. These new DEAM-PS-supported arylboronic acids can be employed directly into resin-to-resin transfer reactions (RRTR). This type of multiresin process helps eliminate time-consuming cleavage and transfer operations, thereby considerably simplifying the outlook of combinatorial

  14. Ion/Ion Reactions with "Onium" Reagents: An Approach for the Gas-phase Transfer of Organic Cations to Multiply-Charged Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Joshua D.; Prentice, Boone M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-05-01

    The use of ion/ion reactions to effect gas-phase alkylation is demonstrated. Commonly used fixed-charge "onium" cations are well-suited for ion/ion reactions with multiply deprotonated analytes because of their tendency to form long-lived electrostatic complexes. Activation of these complexes results in an SN2 reaction that yields an alkylated anion with the loss of a neutral remnant of the reagent. This alkylation process forms the basis of a general method for alkylation of deprotonated analytes generated via electrospray, and is demonstrated on a variety of anionic sites. SN2 reactions of this nature are demonstrated empirically and characterized using density functional theory (DFT). This method for modification in the gas phase is extended to the transfer of larger and more complex R groups that can be used in later gas-phase synthesis steps. For example, N-cyclohexyl- N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) is used to transfer a carbodiimide functionality to a peptide anion containing a carboxylic acid. Subsequent activation yields a selective reaction between the transferred carbodiimide group and a carboxylic acid, suggesting the carbodiimide functionality is retained through the transfer process. Many different R groups are transferable using this method, allowing for new possibilities for charge manipulation and derivatization in the gas phase.

  15. Ion/Ion Reactions with “Onium” Reagents: An Approach for the Gas-phase Transfer of Organic Cations to Multiply-Charged Anions

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Joshua D.; Prentice, Boone M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of ion/ion reactions to effect gas-phase alkylation is demonstrated. Commonly used fixed-charge “onium” cations are well-suited for ion/ion reactions with multiply deprotonated analytes because of their tendency to form long-lived electrostatic complexes. Activation of these complexes results in an SN2 reaction that yields an alkylated anion with the loss of a neutral remnant of the reagent. This alkylation process forms the basis of a general method for alkylation of deprotonated analytes generated via electrospray, and is demonstrated on a variety of anionic sites. SN2 reactions of this nature are demonstrated empirically and characterized using density functional theory (DFT). This method for modification in the gas phase is extended to the transfer of larger and more complex R groups that can be used in later gas-phase synthesis steps. For example, N-cyclohexyl-N′-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) is used to transfer a carbodiimide functionality to a peptide anion containing a carboxylic acid. Subsequent activation yields a selective reaction between the transferred carbodiimide group and a carboxylic acid, suggesting the carbodiimide functionality is retained through the transfer process. Many different R groups are transferable using this method, allowing for new possibilities for charge manipulation and derivatization in the gas phase. PMID:25652935

  16. Ion/ion reactions with "onium" reagents: an approach for the gas-phase transfer of organic cations to multiply-charged anions.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Joshua D; Prentice, Boone M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2015-05-01

    The use of ion/ion reactions to effect gas-phase alkylation is demonstrated. Commonly used fixed-charge "onium" cations are well-suited for ion/ion reactions with multiply deprotonated analytes because of their tendency to form long-lived electrostatic complexes. Activation of these complexes results in an SN2 reaction that yields an alkylated anion with the loss of a neutral remnant of the reagent. This alkylation process forms the basis of a general method for alkylation of deprotonated analytes generated via electrospray, and is demonstrated on a variety of anionic sites. SN2 reactions of this nature are demonstrated empirically and characterized using density functional theory (DFT). This method for modification in the gas phase is extended to the transfer of larger and more complex R groups that can be used in later gas-phase synthesis steps. For example, N-cyclohexyl-N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) is used to transfer a carbodiimide functionality to a peptide anion containing a carboxylic acid. Subsequent activation yields a selective reaction between the transferred carbodiimide group and a carboxylic acid, suggesting the carbodiimide functionality is retained through the transfer process. Many different R groups are transferable using this method, allowing for new possibilities for charge manipulation and derivatization in the gas phase. PMID:25652935

  17. Experimental study of bound states in 12Be through low-energy 11Be(d,p)-transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, J. G.; Bildstein, V.; Borge, M. J. G.; Cubero, M.; Diriken, J.; Elseviers, J.; Fraile, L. M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Gaffney, L. P.; Gernhäuser, R.; Jonson, B.; Koldste, G. T.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Mücher, D.; Nilsson, T.; Nowak, K.; Pakarinen, J.; Pesudo, V.; Raabe, R.; Riisager, K.; Seidlitz, M.; Tengblad, O.; Törnqvist, H.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wimmer, K.; De Witte, H.

    2013-10-01

    The bound states of 12Be have been studied through a 11Be(d,p)12Be transfer reaction experiment in inverse kinematics. A 2.8 MeV/u beam of 11Be was produced using the REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN. The outgoing protons were detected with the T-REX silicon detector array. The MINIBALL germanium array was used to detect gamma rays from the excited states in 12Be. The gamma-ray detection enabled a clear identification of the four known bound states in 12Be, and each of the states has been studied individually. Differential cross sections over a large angular range have been extracted. Spectroscopic factors for each of the states have been determined from distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) calculations and have been compared to previous experimental and theoretical results.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of transfer reactions using extended R-matrix theory picturing surrogate-type WFCF features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouland, Olivier H.

    2016-03-01

    This article supplies an overview of issues related to the interpretation of surrogate measurement results for neutron-incident cross section predictions; difficulties that are somehow masked by the historical conversion route based on Weisskopf-Ewing approximation. Our proposal is to handle the various difficulties by using a more rigorous approach relying on Monte Carlo simulation of transfer reactions with extended R-matrix theory. The multiple deficiencies of the historical surrogate treatment are recalled but only one is examined in some details here; meaning the calculation of in-out-going channel Width Fluctuation Correction Factors (WFCF) which behavior witness partly the failure of Niels Bohr's compound nucleus theoretical landmark. Relevant WFCF calculations according to neutron-induced surrogate- and cross section-types as a function of neutron-induced fluctuating energy range [0 - 2.1 MeV] are presented and commented in the case of the 240Pu* and 241Pu* compound nucleus isotopes.

  19. On-road measurements of volatile organic compounds in the Mexico City metropolitan area using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, T. M.; Grimsrud, E. P.; Herndon, S. C.; Jayne, J. T.; Kolb, C. Ee; Allwine, E.; Westberg, H.; Lamb, B. K.; Zavala, M.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.; Knighton, W. B.

    2006-05-01

    A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was redesigned and deployed to monitor selected hydrocarbon emissions from in-use vehicles as part of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) 2003 field campaign. This modified PTR-MS instrument provides the necessary time response (<2 s total cycle time) and sensitivity to monitor the rapidly changing hydrocarbon concentrations, within intercepted dilute exhaust emission plumes. Selected hydrocarbons including methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), benzene and toluene were among the vehicle exhaust emission components monitored. A comparison with samples collected in canisters and analyzed by gas chromatography provides validation to the interpretation of the ion assignments and the concentrations derived using the PTR-MS. The simultaneous detection of multiple hydrocarbons in dilute vehicle exhaust plumes provides a valuable tool to study the impact of driving behavior on the exhaust gas emissions.

  20. DNAzyme-based biosensor for Cu(2+) ion by combining hybridization chain reaction with fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Ling; Ou, Yidian; Wang, Zhenhua; Fu, Fengfu; Guo, Liangqia

    2016-08-01

    A novel signal amplification strategy based on Cu(2+)-dependent DNAzyme was developed for sensing Cu(2+) ion by combining hybridization chain reaction (HCR) with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. In the presence of Cu(2+) ion, the substrate strands of Cu(2+)-dependent DNAzyme immobilized on magnetic beads were specifically cleaved and released. The released strands initiated the HCR process of hairpin H1 and H2 labeled with FAM as the donor and TAMRA as the acceptor, respectively. Long nicked dsDNA structures were self-assembled to bring the donor and the acceptor in close proximity, resulting in a FRET process. The relative ratio of fluorescent intensities of the acceptor and donor was used to quantitatively detect Cu(2+) ion with a limit of detection of 0.5nmolL(-1). This proposed biosensor was applied to detect Cu(2+) ion in tap water with satisfactory results.

  1. Side chain effects in reactions of the potassium-tyrosine charge transfer complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, F. Ferreira; Meneses, G.; Ingólfsson, O.; Limão-Vieira, P.

    2016-10-01

    Fragmentation of transient negative ions of tyrosine formed through electron transfer in collisions with neutral potassium atoms is presented in the collision energy range from 30 to 75 eV. At low collision energies the dominating side chain channel observed corresponds to the cleavage of the bond from the para-position of the phenyl ring to the β-C of the remaining moiety, but cleavage of the Cαsbnd Cβ bond is also observed. Further fragments are formed through cleavage of the Cα bond to the carbonyl group, through decomposition of the carboxyl group or through significant decomposition of the backbone. The dehydrogenated molecular anion is also observed with appreciable intensity. These results are discussed in the context of earlier studies on dissociative electron attachment to tyrosine and other amino acids, as well as within the role of the side chain in electron induced decomposition of this aromatic amino acid. Stabilization of the temporary molecular anion in the transient collision complex is discussed and we argue that this may have significant influence on the branching ratios observed.

  2. Spectral properties of chlorines and electron transfer with their participation in the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchupak, E. E.; Ivashin, N. V.

    2014-02-01

    Structural factors that provide localization of excited states and determine the properties of primary donor and acceptor of electron in the reaction center of photosystem II (PSII RC) are studied. The results of calculations using stationary and time-dependent density functional theory indicate an important role of protein environments of chlorophylls PA, PB, BA, and BB and pheophytins HA and HB in the area with a radius of no greater than ≤10 Å in the formation of excitonic states of PSII RC. When the neighboring elements are taken into account, the wavelength of long-wavelength Q y transition of chlorophyll molecules is varied by about 10 nm. The effect is less developed for pheophytin molecules (Δλ ≅ 2 nm). The following elements strongly affect energy of the transition: HisA198 and HisD197 amino-acid residues that serve as ligands of magnesium atoms affect PA and PB, respectively; MetA183 affects PA; MetA172 and MetD198 affect BA; water molecules that are located above the planes of the BA and BB macrocycles form H bonds with carbonyl groups; and phytol chains of PA and PB affect BA, BB, HA, and HB. The analysis of excitonic states, mutual positions of molecular orbitals of electron donors and acceptors, and matrix elements of electron transfer reaction shows that (i) charge separation between BA and HA and PB and BA is possible in the active A branch of cofactors of PSII RC and (ii) electron transfer is blocked at the BB - HB fragment in inactive B branch of PSII RC.

  3. "Abnormal" salt and solvent effects on anion/cation electron-transfer reactions: an interpretation based on Marcus-Hush treatment.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Fernandez, E; Prado-Gotor, R; Sanchez, F

    2005-08-11

    Salt and solvent effects on the kinetics of the reactions [Fe(CN)6]3- + [Ru(NH3)5pz](2+) right arrow over left arrow [Fe(CN)6]4- + [Ru(NH3)5pz]3+ (pz = pyrazine) have been studied through T-jump measurements. The forward and reverse reactions show different behaviors: "abnormal" salt and solvent effects in the first case and normal effects in the second one. These facts imply an asymmetric behavior of anion/cation reactions depending on the charge of the oxidant. The results can be rationalized by using the Marcus-Hush treatment for electron-transfer reactions.

  4. Novel double bond-transferring hydroxylation reaction involved in microbial metabolism of eugenol.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, H; Nagasawa, T

    1998-12-13

    We isolated a eugenol-degrading bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens E118. This strain produced a novel enzyme, eugenol dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the conversion of eugenol into coniferyl alcohol. The enzyme was purified from the eugenol-induced cells of P. fluorescens E118. The purified enzyme appeared to be homogeneous, judging from the analysis of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme was a 68-kDa protein composed of two different subunits (alpha subunit, 10 kDa; and beta subunit, 58 kDa). The enzyme exhibited a cytochrome c-like absorption spectrum. The alpha subunit corresponded to cytochrome c. The enzyme catalyzed the dehydrogenation of 4-alkylphenol into the corresponding alkyl 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-alcohol derivatives. The reaction products were isolated and identified physicochemically. The enzyme catalyzed the enantioselective hydroxylation of p-alkylphenols. p-Ethylphenol and p-propylphenol were converted to S-(-)-p-(1-hydroxyphenyl)ethanol and S-(-)-p(1-hydroxyphenyl)propanol, respectively. PMID:10075640

  5. Photosynthetic electron transfer from reaction center pigment-protein complex in silica nanopores.

    PubMed

    Oda, Ippei; Iwaki, Masayo; Fujita, Daiju; Tsutsui, Yasutaka; Ishizaka, Souji; Dewa, Makiko; Nango, Mamoru; Kajino, Tsutomu; Fukushima, Yoshiaki; Itoh, Shigeru

    2010-08-17

    A photosynthetic reaction center (RC) pigment-protein complex purified from a thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium, Thermochromatium tepidum, was adsorbed to a folded-sheet silica mesoporous material (FSM). The RC has a molecular structure with a 7.0 x 5.0 x 13 nm diameter. The amount of RC adsorbed to the FSM compound with an average internal pore diameter of 7.9 nm (FSM(7.9)) was high at 0.29 gRC/gFSM, while that to the FSM(2.7) (2.7 nm diameter) was low at 0.02 gRC/gFSM, suggesting the specific binding of the RC into the 7.9 nm pores of FSM(7.9). An N(2)-adsorption isotherm study indicated the incorporation of the RC into the 7.9 nm pores. The RC inside FSM(7.9) showed absorption spectra in the visible and infrared regions similar to those of the RC in solution, indicating almost no structural changes induced by the adsorption. The RC-FSM(7.9) conjugate showed the high photochemical activity with the increased thermal stability up to 50 degrees C in the measurements by laser spectroscopy. The conjugates rapidly provided electrons to a dye in the outer medium or showed electric current on the ITO electrode upon the illumination. The RC-FSM conjugate will be useful for the construction of artificial photosynthetic systems and new photodevices. PMID:20695584

  6. Electrocatalysis of anodic oxygen-transfer reactions: The electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J.; Houk, L.L.; Johnson, D.C. |; Lowery, S.N.; Carey, J.J.

    1995-11-01

    The electrochemical performance of several anode materials is compared for the electrochemical incineration of p-benzoquinone in acetate buffer media (pH 5). The chemical oxygen demand (COD) estimated for benzoquinone by titration with standard permanganate solution can be decreased to virtually zero by electrolysis at electrodes comprised of Fe(III)-doped {beta}-PbO{sub 2} films on Ti substrates. Carbon dioxide is a product of the electrochemical process; however, the possibility of other volatile products cannot be dismissed. Addition of solid benzoquinone to acetate media is followed by slow formation of a brownish black color that is concluded to result from one or more humic compounds produced by condensation of benzoquinone; however, it cannot be concluded whether the condensation reaction is a necessary prerequisite to successful electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone. Optimal operating conditions suggested for electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone in acetate buffer include heating of the anode (e.g., 60 C) to increase the rate of anodic discharge of H{sub 2}O and, thereby, decrease the anodic overpotential. Evidence also is presented that the rate of electrochemical incineration is enhanced slightly by the addition of a traces of Fe(III) with reduction of dioxygen (O{sub 2}) to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at a cooled stainless steel cathode (e.g., 15 C) in an undivided cell.

  7. Spectroscopy of 7He using the 9Be(6He,8Be) transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renzi, F.; Raabe, R.; Randisi, G.; Smirnov, D.; Angulo, C.; Cabrera, J.; Casarejos, E.; Keutgen, Th.; Ninane, A.; Charvet, J. L.; Gillibert, A.; Lapoux, V.; Nalpas, L.; Obertelli, A.; Skaza, F.; Sida, J. L.; Orr, N. A.; Sidorchuk, S. I.; Wolski, R.; Borge, M. J. G.; Escrig, D.

    2016-08-01

    The unbound nucleus 7He has been investigated via the reaction of a 16.8 MeV 6He radioactive ion beam on a 9Be target. The measurement of the outgoing 8Be through its well characterized two-α decay permitted the energy of the 6He+n system to be reconstructed. Through comparison with a complete Monte Carlo simulation incorporating R -matrix lineshapes, the 7He ground state was determined to lie 0.380(28) MeV above the neutron decay with a width of Γ =0.179 (21 ) MeV. A neutron spectroscopic factor SF=0.608 (18 ) was extracted in agreement with the most recent calculations. Significant evidence was found for a broad resonance lying at 2.6(2) MeV above threshold with a ΓFWHM=2.3 (3 ) MeV. These parameters are fully consistent with the properties of 1 /2- state reported by Wuosmaa et al. [Phys. Rev. C 72, 061301(R) (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevC.72.061301]. Limits were also put on the presence of narrow resonances seen in earlier experiments.

  8. Role of Intramolecular Vibrations in Long-Range Electron Transfer between Pheophytin and Ubiquinone in Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Raffaele; Di Donato, Mariangela; Peluso, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of the elementary electron transfer step between pheophytin and primary ubiquinone in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers is investigated by using a discrete state approach, including only the intramolecular normal modes of vibration of the two redox partners. The whole set of normal coordinates of the acceptor and donor groups have been employed in the computations of the Hamiltonian matrix, to reliably account both for shifts and mixing of the normal coordinates, and for changes in vibrational frequencies upon ET. It is shown that intramolecular modes provide not only a discrete set of states more strongly coupled to the initial state but also a quasicontinuum of weakly coupled states, which account for the spreading of the wave packet after ET. The computed transition probabilities are sufficiently high for asserting that electron transfer from bacteriopheophytin to the primary quinone can occur via tunneling solely promoted by intramolecular modes; the transition times, computed for different values of the electronic energy difference and coupling term, are of the same order of magnitude (102 ps) of the observed one. PMID:15894646

  9. Transfer of Neutrons from Deep Below the Fermi Surface via the (p,t) Reaction in the N = 90 Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humby, P.; Wilson, E.; Beausang, C. W.; Simon, A.; Gell, K.; Tarlow, T.; Vyas, G.; Ross, T. J.; Hughes, R. O.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; Koglin, J.; Ota, S.; Allmond, J. M.; McCleskey, M.; McCleskey, E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Chyzh, R.; Dag, M.

    2015-10-01

    The 152,154Sm(p,t) reactions were used to investigate excited states populated by the transfer of neutrons from deep below the Fermi surface. States corresponding to the transfer of at least one neutron from below the N = 82 shell closure are of particular interest since they provide a sensitive probe of the evolution of the shell closure with increasing deformation. In the present work, large quasi-discrete structures were observed in the triton energy spectra at excitation energies of 2-3 MeV and are interpreted in terms of the underlying Nilsson orbitals. The experiment utilized a 25 MeV proton beam from the K-150 cyclotron at the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University and the outgoing charged particles and γ rays were detected using the STARLiTeR array. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy No. DE-FG02-05ER41379, DE-FG52-09NA29467 and DE-NA0001801, the National Science Foundation under PHY-130581, and by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Detection of nerve agents using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry with ammonia as reagent gas.

    PubMed

    Ringer, Joachim M

    2013-01-01

    The chemical warfare agents (CWA) Sarin, Soman, Cyclosarin and Tabun were characterised by proton transfer mass spectrometry (PTRMS). It was found that PTRMS is a suitable technique to detect nerve agents highly sensitively, highly selectively and in near real-time. Methods were found to suppress molecule fragmentation which is significant under PTRMS hollow cathode ionisation conditions. In this context, the drift voltage (as one of the most important system parameters) was varied and ammonia was introduced as an additional chemical reagent gas. Auxiliary chemicals such as ammonia affect ionisation processes and are quite common in context with detectors for CWAs based on ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). With both, variation of drift voltage and ammonia as the reagent gas, fragmentation can be suppressed effectively. Suppression of fragmentation is crucial particularly concerning the implementation of an algorithm for automated agent identification in field applications. On the other hand, appearance of particular fragments might deliver additional information. Degradation and rearrangement products of nerve agents are not distinctive for the particular agent but for the chemical class they belong to. It was found that switching between ammonia doped and ordinary water ionisation chemistry can easily be performed within a few seconds. Making use of this effect it is possible to switch between fragment and molecular ion peak spectra. Thus, targeted fragmentation can be used to confirm identification based only on single peak detection. PTRMS turned out to be a promising technique for future CWA detectors. In terms of sensitivity, response time and selectivity (or confidence of identification, respectively) PTRMS performs as a bridging technique between IMS and GC-MS.

  11. Detection of nerve agents using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry with ammonia as reagent gas.

    PubMed

    Ringer, Joachim M

    2013-01-01

    The chemical warfare agents (CWA) Sarin, Soman, Cyclosarin and Tabun were characterised by proton transfer mass spectrometry (PTRMS). It was found that PTRMS is a suitable technique to detect nerve agents highly sensitively, highly selectively and in near real-time. Methods were found to suppress molecule fragmentation which is significant under PTRMS hollow cathode ionisation conditions. In this context, the drift voltage (as one of the most important system parameters) was varied and ammonia was introduced as an additional chemical reagent gas. Auxiliary chemicals such as ammonia affect ionisation processes and are quite common in context with detectors for CWAs based on ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). With both, variation of drift voltage and ammonia as the reagent gas, fragmentation can be suppressed effectively. Suppression of fragmentation is crucial particularly concerning the implementation of an algorithm for automated agent identification in field applications. On the other hand, appearance of particular fragments might deliver additional information. Degradation and rearrangement products of nerve agents are not distinctive for the particular agent but for the chemical class they belong to. It was found that switching between ammonia doped and ordinary water ionisation chemistry can easily be performed within a few seconds. Making use of this effect it is possible to switch between fragment and molecular ion peak spectra. Thus, targeted fragmentation can be used to confirm identification based only on single peak detection. PTRMS turned out to be a promising technique for future CWA detectors. In terms of sensitivity, response time and selectivity (or confidence of identification, respectively) PTRMS performs as a bridging technique between IMS and GC-MS. PMID:24308198

  12. Hybrid quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations of the proton transfer reactions catalyzed by ketosteroid isomerase: analysis of hydrogen bonding, conformational motions, and electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2009-11-10

    Hybrid quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations of the two proton transfer reactions catalyzed by ketosteroid isomerase are presented. The potential energy surfaces for the proton transfer reactions are described with the empirical valence bond method. Nuclear quantum effects of the transferring hydrogen increase the rates by a factor of approximately 8, and dynamical barrier recrossings decrease the rates by a factor of 3-4. For both proton transfer reactions, the donor-acceptor distance decreases substantially at the transition state. The carboxylate group of the Asp38 side chain, which serves as the proton acceptor and donor in the first and second steps, respectively, rotates significantly between the two proton transfer reactions. The hydrogen-bonding interactions within the active site are consistent with the hydrogen bonding of both Asp99 and Tyr14 to the substrate. The simulations suggest that a hydrogen bond between Asp99 and the substrate is present from the beginning of the first proton transfer step, whereas the hydrogen bond between Tyr14 and the substrate is virtually absent in the first part of this step but forms nearly concurrently with the formation of the transition state. Both hydrogen bonds are present throughout the second proton transfer step until partial dissociation of the product. The hydrogen bond between Tyr14 and Tyr55 is present throughout both proton transfer steps. The active site residues are more mobile during the first step than during the second step. The van der Waals interaction energy between the substrate and the enzyme remains virtually constant along the reaction pathway, but the electrostatic interaction energy is significantly stronger for the dienolate intermediate than for the reactant and product. Mobile loop regions distal to the active site exhibit significant structural rearrangements and, in some cases, qualitative changes in the electrostatic potential during the catalytic reaction. These results suggest

  13. Hybrid Quantum/Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Proton Transfer Reactions Catalyzed by Ketosteroid Isomerase: Analysis of Hydrogen Bonding, Conformational Motions, and Electrostatics

    PubMed Central

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations of the two proton transfer reactions catalyzed by ketosteroid isomerase are presented. The potential energy surfaces for the proton transfer reactions are described with the empirical valence bond method. Nuclear quantum effects of the transferring hydrogen increase the rates by a factor of ~8, and dynamical barrier recrossings decrease the rates by a factor of 3–4. For both proton transfer reactions, the donor-acceptor distance decreases substantially at the transition state. The carboxylate group of the Asp38 side chain, which serves as the proton acceptor and donor in the first and second steps, respectively, rotates significantly between the two proton transfer reactions. The hydrogen bonding interactions within the active site are consistent with the hydrogen bonding of both Asp99 and Tyr14 to the substrate. The simulations suggest that a hydrogen bond between Asp99 and the substrate is present from the beginning of the first proton transfer step, whereas the hydrogen bond between Tyr14 and the substrate is virtually absent in the first part of this step but forms nearly concurrently with the formation of the transition state. Both hydrogen bonds are present throughout the second proton transfer step until partial dissociation of the product. The hydrogen bond between Tyr14 and Tyr55 is present throughout both proton transfer steps. The active site residues are more mobile during the first step than during the second step. The van der Waals interaction energy between the substrate and the enzyme remains virtually constant along the reaction pathway, but the electrostatic interaction energy is significantly stronger for the dienolate intermediate than for the reactant and product. Mobile loop regions distal to the active site exhibit significant structural rearrangements and, in some cases, qualitative changes in the electrostatic potential during the catalytic reaction. These results suggest that

  14. In situ measurements of atmospheric nitrous acid by chemical ionization mass spectrometry using chloride ion transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Jun; Kato, Takehiro; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2009-10-15

    Recently, chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) has been widely applied to the in situ measurements of atmospheric trace species. In this article, we propose a new chemical ionization scheme using a chloride ion transfer reaction from SO(2)Cl(-) as the reagent ion and discuss the applicability of this technique to the detection of nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere. From laboratory investigations, the detection sensitivity was found to depend on the flow rate of SO(2) introduced into the ion source region and the pressure inside the chemical ionization region, which suggests that the chemical ionization reaction is reversible. The detection sensitivity was well described in terms of the forward and backward rates. The present limit of detection is estimated to be 60 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) for an integration time of 1 min. Improvement of the CIMS instrument would enable the measurements of the daytime level of HONO, which might be less than 50 pptv. In addition, the possibility of the interference is discussed from thermodynamic considerations based on ab initio calculations, and the effects of the sampling artifacts are experimentally quantified.

  15. Phosphorus-31 NMR magnetization transfer measurements of metabolic reaction rates in the rat heart and kidney in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Koretsky, A.P.

    1984-08-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the measurement of the rates of ATP synthesis in the rat kidney and of the creatine kinase catalyzed reaction in the rat heart in situ. Chronically implanted detection coils, employing a balanced matching configuration of capacitors in the tuned circuit, were used to obtain /sup 31/P NMR spectra from heart, kidney, and liver in situ. Gated spectra of heart obtained at systole and diastole and the effects of fructose on kidney and liver were studied. The ability to observe other nuclei using implanted coils is illustrated with /sup 39/K NMR spectra from kidney and muscle. The theoretical considerations of applying magnetization transfer techniques to intact organs are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with multiple exchange reactions and compartmentation of reactants. Experimental measurements of the ATP synthesis rate (13 ..mu..mol/min/gm tissue) were compared to whole kidney oxygen consumption and Na/sup +/ reabsorption rates to derive ATP/O (0.8 to 1.7) and Na/sup +//ATP (4 to 10) values. The problems associated with ATP synthesis rate measurements in kidney, e.g., the heterogeneity of the inorganic phosphate resonance, are discussed and experiments to overcome these problems proposed.

  16. Conducting Polymers: Insights Into Reduced Polyparaphenylene Vinylene Materials via Nucleophilic Addition, Proton Abstraction, and Electron Transfer Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilker, Brian Lee

    Grignard routes were investigated as methods to produce poly paraphenylene vinylene polymers. Because of coupling problems with these reactions, high molecular weight unsubstituted and dimethyl and dimethoxy substituted poly paraphenylene vinylene polymers were prepared via a literature-proven synthetic route: the sodium hydride dehydrochlorination addition polymerization route. Both the Grignard reactions and the sodium hydride method required dichloromethyl compounds monomers. The syntheses of these dichloromethyl monomers were studied extensively. The three high molecular weight poly paraphenylene vinylene polymer systems prepared in this work were charged with the traditional electron transfer reducing agent potassium/naphthalide. They were also charged via the novel nucleophilic addition of n-butyllithium across the alkenes and subjected to proton abstraction charging in the presence of a strong, complexed base mixture of n-butyllithium and potassium-t-butoxide. Conductivities were obtained via standard four point probe techniques. Characterization of these polymers and their quenched anion derivatives was via FTIR and acid titration. Results of these topics are presented and discussed.

  17. In situ measurements of atmospheric nitrous acid by chemical ionization mass spectrometry using chloride ion transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Jun; Kato, Takehiro; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2009-10-15

    Recently, chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) has been widely applied to the in situ measurements of atmospheric trace species. In this article, we propose a new chemical ionization scheme using a chloride ion transfer reaction from SO(2)Cl(-) as the reagent ion and discuss the applicability of this technique to the detection of nitrous acid (HONO) in the atmosphere. From laboratory investigations, the detection sensitivity was found to depend on the flow rate of SO(2) introduced into the ion source region and the pressure inside the chemical ionization region, which suggests that the chemical ionization reaction is reversible. The detection sensitivity was well described in terms of the forward and backward rates. The present limit of detection is estimated to be 60 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) for an integration time of 1 min. Improvement of the CIMS instrument would enable the measurements of the daytime level of HONO, which might be less than 50 pptv. In addition, the possibility of the interference is discussed from thermodynamic considerations based on ab initio calculations, and the effects of the sampling artifacts are experimentally quantified. PMID:19746928

  18. Electron transfer kinetics in purified reaction centers from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum studied by multiple-flash excitation.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, N; Sétif, P; Brettel, K; Seo, D; Sakurai, H

    1999-09-14

    Reaction center preparations from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum, which contain monoheme cytochrome c, were studied by flash-absorption spectroscopy in the near-UV, visible, and near-infrared regions. The decay kinetics of the photooxidized primary donor P840(+), together with the amount of photooxidized cytochrome c, were analyzed along a series of four flashes spaced by 1 ms: 95% of the P840(+) was reduced by cytochrome c with a t(1/2) of approximately 65 micros after the first flash, 80% with a t(1/2) of approximately 100 micros after the second flash, and 23% with a t(1/2) of approximately 100 micros after the third flash; after the fourth flash, almost no cytochrome c oxidation occurred. The observed rates, the establishment of redox equilibrium after each flash, and the total amount of photooxidizable cytochrome c are consistent with the presence of two equivalent cytochrome c molecules per photooxidizable P840. The data are well fitted assuming a standard free energy change DeltaG degrees of -53 meV for electron transfer from one cytochrome c to P840(+), DeltaG degrees being independent of the oxidation state of the other cytochrome c. These observations support a model with two monoheme cytochromes c which are symmetrically arranged around the reaction center core. From the ratio of menaquinone-7 to the bacteriochlorophyll pigment absorbing at 663 nm, it was estimated that our preparations contain 0.6-1.2 menaquinone-7 molecules per reaction center. However, no transient signal due to menaquinone could be observed between 360 and 450 nm in the time window from 10 ns to 4 micros. No recombination reaction between the primary partners P840(+) and A(0)(-) could be detected under normal conditions. Such a recombination was observed (t(1/2) approximately 19 ns) under highly reducing conditions or after accumulation of three electrons on the acceptor side during a series of flashes, showing that the secondary acceptors can stabilize three electrons

  19. Validity of quasi-steady-state and transfer-function representations for input-output relation in a Michaelis-Menten reaction.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, N

    1986-08-01

    In relation to the input-output characteristics of enzymatic reactions in the cellular metabolism and biochemical reactors, the validity of the quasi-steady-state and transfer-function representations of reaction velocity has been examined for a basic Michaelis-Menten reaction employing computer simulation, that is, numerical integration of the rate equation. The well-known S-v relationship (relationship between substrate concentration and reaction velocity)derived on the quasi-steady-state assumption is found to be in general a good approximation to the actual velocity throughout the temporal progress of the reaction. The validity of the approximation depends on a ratio of the Michaelis constant to the total enzyme concentration in the reaction system rather than on the individual rate constants. A transfer-function representation is derived on assuming an exponential change in the reaction velocity for the indicial response to the substrate influx rate. The representation has a wider valid region with a decrease in influx rate than with an increase in the influx rate. The validity is most dependent on a ratio of total enzyme concentration to the steady-state concentration of the substrate. The analysis of the linear sensitivity of the reaction velocity to rate constants reveals that the characteristics of these valid representations in systems analysis change according to the phase of the reaction.

  20. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. Progress report, August 1, 1989--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1991-12-31

    During this period, conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used for the characterization of the intermediates that are involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. The intermediates of interest were the excited states of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and the species formed in the reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern has been the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

  1. Reproducibility of creatine kinase reaction kinetics in human heart: a (31) P time-dependent saturation transfer spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Adil; Gropler, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Creatine kinase (CK) is essential for the buffering and rapid regeneration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in heart tissue. Herein, we demonstrate a (31) P MRS protocol to quantify CK reaction kinetics in human myocardium at 3 T. Furthermore, we sought to quantify the test-retest reliability of the measured metabolic parameters. The method localizes the (31) P signal from the heart using modified one-dimensional image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS), and a time-dependent saturation transfer (TDST) approach was used to measure CK reaction parameters. Fifteen healthy volunteers (22 measurements in total) were tested. The CK reaction rate constant (kf ) was 0.32 ± 0.05 s(-1) and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 15.62%. The intrinsic T1 for phosphocreatine (PCr) was 7.36 ± 1.79 s with CV = 24.32%. These values are consistent with those reported previously. The PCr/ATP ratio was equal to 1.94 ± 0.15 with CV = 7.73%, which is within the range of healthy subjects. The reproducibility of the technique was tested in seven subjects and inferred parameters, such as kf and T1 , exhibited good reliability [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.90 and 0.79 for kf and T1 , respectively). The reproducibility data provided in this study will enable the calculation of the power and sample sizes required for clinical and research studies. The technique will allow for the examination of cardiac energy metabolism in clinical and research studies, providing insight into the relationship between energy deficit and functional deficiency in the heart.

  2. B-Methylated Amine-Boranes: Substituent Redistribution, Catalytic Dehydrogenation, and Facile Metal-Free Hydrogen Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Naomi E; Schäfer, André; Robertson, Alasdair P M; Leitao, Erin M; Jurca, Titel; Sparkes, Hazel A; Woodall, Christopher H; Haddow, Mairi F; Manners, Ian

    2015-11-16

    Although the dehydrogenation chemistry of amine-boranes substituted at nitrogen has attracted considerable attention, much less is known about the reactivity of their B-substituted analogues. When the B-methylated amine-borane adducts, RR'NH·BH2Me (1a: R = R' = H; 1b: R = Me, R' = H; 1c: R = R' = Me; 1d: R = R' = iPr), were heated to 70 °C in solution (THF or toluene), redistribution reactions were observed involving the apparent scrambling of the methyl and hydrogen substituents on boron to afford a mixture of the species RR'NH·BH3-xMex (x = 0-3). These reactions were postulated to arise via amine-borane dissociation followed by the reversible formation of diborane intermediates and adduct reformation. Dehydrocoupling of 1a-1d with Rh(I), Ir(III), and Ni(0) precatalysts in THF at 20 °C resulted in an array of products, including aminoborane RR'N═BHMe, cyclic diborazane [RR'N-BHMe]2, and borazine [RN-BMe]3 based on analysis by in situ (11)B NMR spectroscopy, with peak assignments further supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Significantly, very rapid, metal-free hydrogen transfer between 1a and the monomeric aminoborane, iPr2N═BH2, to yield iPr2NH·BH3 (together with dehydrogenation products derived from 1a) was complete within only 10 min at 20 °C in THF, substantially faster than for the N-substituted analogue MeNH2·BH3. DFT calculations revealed that the hydrogen transfer proceeded via a concerted mechanism through a cyclic six-membered transition state analogous to that previously reported for the reaction of the N-dimethyl species Me2NH·BH3 and iPr2N═BH2. However, as a result of the presence of an electron donating methyl substituent on boron rather than on nitrogen, the process was more thermodynamically favorable and the activation energy barrier was reduced. PMID:26535961

  3. Shining Light on Copper: Unique Opportunities for Visible-Light-Catalyzed Atom Transfer Radical Addition Reactions and Related Processes.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Oliver

    2016-09-20

    Visible-light photoredox catalysis offers exciting opportunities to achieve challenging carbon-carbon bond formations under mild and ecologically benign conditions. Desired features of photoredox catalysts are photostability, long excited-state lifetimes, strong absorption in the visible region, and high reduction or oxidation potentials to achieve electron transfer to substrates, thus generating radicals that can undergo synthetic organic transformations. These requirements are met in a convincing way by Ru(II)(phenanthroline)3- and Ir(III)(phenylpyridine)3-type complexes and, as a low-cost alternative, by organic dyes that offer a metal-free catalyst but suffer in general from lower photostability. Cu(I)(phenanthroline)2 complexes have been recognized for more than 30 years as photoresponsive compounds with highly negative Cu(I)* → Cu(II) oxidation potentials, but nevertheless, they have not been widely considered as suitable photoredox catalysts, mainly because their excited lifetimes are shorter by a factor of 5 to 10 compared with Ru(II) and Ir(III) complexes, their absorption in the visible region is weak, and their low Cu(II) → Cu(I) reduction potentials might impede the closure of a catalytic cycle for a given process. Contrasting again with Ru(II)L3 and Ir(III)L3 complexes, Cu(I)L2 assemblies undergo more rapid ligand exchange in solution, thus potentially reducing the concentration of the photoactive species. Focusing on atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) reactions and related processes, we highlight recent developments that show the utility of Cu(I)(phenanthroline)2 complexes as photoredox catalysts, demonstrating that despite their short excited-state lifetimes and weak absorption such complexes are efficient at low catalyst loadings. Moreover, some of the inherent disadvantages stated above can even be turned to advantages: (1) the low Cu(II) → Cu(I) reduction potential might efficiently promote reactions via a radical chain pathway, and (2

  4. Single step synthesis of gold-amino acid composite, with the evidence of the catalytic hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reaction, for the electrochemical recognition of Serotonin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Meenakshi; Siwal, Samarjeet; Nandi, Debkumar; Mallick, Kaushik

    2016-03-01

    A composite architecture of amino acid and gold nanoparticles has been synthesized using a generic route of 'in-situ polymerization and composite formation (IPCF)' [1,2]. The formation mechanism of the composite has been supported by a model hydrogen atom (H•≡H++e-) transfer (HAT) type of reaction which belongs to the proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism. The 'gold-amino acid composite' was used as a catalyst for the electrochemical recognition of Serotonin.

  5. Toward a Unified Mechanism for Oxoammonium Salt-Mediated Oxidation Reactions: A Theoretical and Experimental Study Using a Hydride Transfer Model.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Trevor A; Kelly, Christopher B; Ovian, John M; Wiles, Rebecca J; Tilley, Leon J; Leadbeater, Nicholas E

    2015-08-21

    A range of oxoammonium salt-based oxidation reactions have been explored computationally using density functional theory (DFT), and the results have been correlated with experimentally derived trends in reactivity. Mechanistically, most reactions involve a formal hydride transfer from an activated C-H bond to the oxygen atom of the oxoammonium cation. Several new potential modes of reactivity have been uncovered and validated experimentally.

  6. The Mu transposase tetramer is inactive in unassisted strand transfer: an auto-allosteric effect of Mu A promotes the reaction in the absence of Mu B.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z; Chaconas, G

    1997-03-21

    A tetramer of the Mu transposase is the structural and functional core in all three stable higher-order nucleoprotein complexes (Type 0, Type 1 and Type 2 transpososomes) generated in a defined in vitro strand transfer reaction. Although functional in donor cleavage, we report here that contrary to previous belief, the Mu A tetramer is incapable of unassisted strand transfer. The Mu B protein is required to stimulate the tetramer for intermolecular strand transfer. In the absence of Mu B protein we show that additional Mu A molecules must be added to the core tetramer to stimulate intramolecular strand transfer. Mapping experiments indicate that domain II of the assisting Mu A mediates functional interactions with the core tetramer. The recipient site for Mu A stimulated strand transfer on the A tetramer is likely in domain II and is clearly different from the domain IIIb site used by the Mu B protein. The Mu accessory end binding sites and the Mu enhancer are not required in the Mu A assisted strand transfer, suggesting that helper A molecules in solution can interact with the core tetramer to stimulate the reaction. Finally, we argue that the strand transfer activity and protein sites for target interaction reside within the core tetramer; hence the role of the stimulatory A molecules appears to be limited to that of an auto-allosteric effector.

  7. A random walk solution for modeling solute transport with network reactions and multi-rate mass transfer in heterogeneous systems: Impact of biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher V.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between the spatial variability of the aquifer hydraulic properties, mass transfer due to sub-grid heterogeneity and chemical reactions often complicates reactive transport simulations. It is well documented that hydro-biochemical properties are ubiquitously heterogeneous and that diffusion and slow advection at the sub-grid scale typically leads to the conceptualization of an aquifer as a multi-porosity system. Within this context, chemical reactions taking place in mobile/immobile water regions can be substantially different between each other. This paper presents a particle-based method that can efficiently simulate heterogeneity, network reactions and multi-rate mass transfer. The approach is based on the development of transition probabilities that describe the likelihood that particles belonging to a given species and mobile/immobile domain at a given time will be transformed into another species and mobile/immobile domain afterwards. The joint effect of mass transfer and sequential degradation is shown to be non-trivial. A characteristic rebound of degradation products can be observed. This late rebound of concentrations is not driven by any change in the flow regime (e.g., pumping ceases in the pump-and-treat remediation strategy) but due to the natural interplay between mass transfer and chemical reactions. To illustrate that the method can simultaneously represent mass transfer, spatially varying properties and network reactions without numerical problems, we have simulated the degradation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in a three-dimensional fully heterogeneous aquifer subjected to rate-limited mass transfer. Two types of degradation modes were considered to compare the effect of an active biofilm with that of clay pods present in the aquifer. Results of the two scenarios display significantly differences. Biofilms that promote the degradation of compounds in an immobile region are shown to significantly enhance degradation, rapidly producing

  8. Teaching the fundamentals of electron transfer reactions in mitochondria and the production and detection of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria fulfill a number of biological functions which inherently depend on ATP and O2−•/H2O2 production. Both ATP and O2−•/H2O2 are generated by electron transfer reactions. ATP is the product of oxidative phosphorylation whereas O2−• is generated by singlet electron reduction of di-oxygen (O2). O2−• is then rapidly dismutated by superoxide dismutase (SOD) producing H2O2. O2−•/H2O2 were once viewed as unfortunately by-products of aerobic respiration. This characterization is fitting considering over production of O2−•/H2O2 by mitochondria is associated with range of pathological conditions and aging. However, O2−•/H2O2 are only dangerous in large quantities. If produced in a controlled fashion and maintained at a low concentration, cells can benefit greatly from the redox properties of O2−•/H2O2. Indeed, low rates of O2−•/H2O2 production are required for intrinsic mitochondrial signaling (e.g. modulation of mitochondrial processes) and communication with the rest of the cell. O2−•/H2O2 levels are kept in check by anti-oxidant defense systems that sequester O2−•/H2O2 with extreme efficiency. Given the importance of O2−•/H2O2 in cellular function, it is imperative to consider how mitochondria produce O2−•/H2O2 and how O2−•/H2O2 genesis is regulated in conjunction with fluctuations in nutritional and redox states. Here, I discuss the fundamentals of electron transfer reactions in mitochondria and emerging knowledge on the 11 potential sources of mitochondrial O2−•/H2O2 in tandem with their significance in contributing to overall O2−•/H2O2 emission in health and disease. The potential for classifying these different sites in isopotential groups, which is essentially defined by the redox properties of electron donator involved in O2−•/H2O2 production, as originally suggested by Brand and colleagues is also surveyed in detail. In addition, redox signaling mechanisms that control O2−•/H2O2

  9. A homogeneous quenching resonance energy transfer assay for the kinetic analysis of the GTPase nucleotide exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Kopra, Kari; Ligabue, Alessio; Wang, Qi; Syrjänpää, Markku; Blaževitš, Olga; Veltel, Stefan; van Adrichem, Arjan J; Hänninen, Pekka; Abankwa, Daniel; Härmä, Harri

    2014-07-01

    A quenching resonance energy transfer (QRET) assay for small GTPase nucleotide exchange kinetic monitoring is demonstrated using nanomolar protein concentrations. Small GTPases are central signaling proteins in all eukaryotic cells acting as a "molecular switches" that are active in the GTP-state and inactive in the GDP-state. GTP-loading is highly regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). In several diseases, most prominently cancer, this process in misregulated. The kinetics of the nucleotide exchange reaction reports on the enzymatic activity of the GEF reaction system and is, therefore, of special interest. We determined the nucleotide exchange kinetics using europium-labeled GTP (Eu-GTP) in the QRET assay for small GTPases. After GEF catalyzed GTP-loading of a GTPase, a high time-resolved luminescence signal was found to be associated with GTPase bound Eu-GTP, whereas the non-bound Eu-GTP fraction was quenched by soluble quencher. The association kinetics of the Eu-GTP was measured after GEF addition, whereas the dissociation kinetics could be determined after addition of unlabeled GTP. The resulting association and dissociation rates were in agreement with previously published values for H-Ras(Wt), H-Ras(Q61G), and K-Ras(Wt), respectively. The broader applicability of the QRET assay for small GTPases was demonstrated by determining the kinetics of the Ect2 catalyzed RhoA(Wt) GTP-loading. The QRET assay allows the use of nanomolar protein concentrations, as more than 3-fold signal-to-background ratio was achieved with 50 nM GTPase and GEF proteins. Thus, small GTPase exchange kinetics can be efficiently determined in a HTS compatible 384-well plate format.

  10. Rapid analysis of Forster resonance energy transfer by two-color global fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: trypsin proteinase reaction.

    PubMed

    Eggeling, Christian; Kask, Peet; Winkler, Dirk; Jäger, Stefan

    2005-07-01

    In this study we introduce the combination of two-color global fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (2CG-FCS) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) as a very powerful combination for monitoring biochemical reactions on the basis of single molecule events. 2CG-FCS, which is a new variation emerging from the family of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, globally analyzes the simultaneously recorded auto- and cross-correlation data from two photon detectors monitoring the fluorescence emission of different colors. Overcoming the limitations inherent in mere auto- and cross-correlation analysis, 2CG-FCS is sensitive in resolving and quantifying fluorescent species that differ in their diffusion characteristics and/or their molecular brightness either in one or both detection channels. It is able to account for effects that have often been considered as sources of severe artifacts in two-color and FRET measurements, the most prominent artifacts comprising photobleaching, cross talk, or concentration variations in sample preparation. Because of its very high statistical accuracy, the combination of FRET and 2CG-FCS is suited for high-throughput applications such as drug screening. Employing beam scanning during data acquisition even further enhances this capability and allows measurement times of <2 s. The improved performance in monitoring a FRET sample was verified by following the protease cleavage reaction of a FRET-active peptide. The FRET-inactive subpopulation of uncleaved substrate could be correctly assigned, revealing a substantial portion of inactive or missing acceptor label. The results were compared to those obtained by two-dimensional fluorescence intensity distribution analysis.

  11. Predicted yields of new neutron-rich isotopes of nuclei with Z=64-80 in the multinucleon transfer reaction {sup 48}Ca+{sup 238}U

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Scheid, W.

    2010-05-15

    The production cross sections of new neutron-rich isotopes of nuclei with charge numbers Z=64-80 are estimated for future experiments in the multinucleon transfer reaction {sup 48}Ca+{sup 238}U at bombarding energy E{sub c.m.}=189 MeV close to the Coulomb barrier.

  12. SOLID-LIQUID PHASE TRANSFER CATALYZED SYNTHESIS OF CINNAMYL ACETATE-KINETICS AND ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING THE REACTION IN A BATCH REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of solid-liquid phase transfer catalysis has an advantage of carrying out reaction between two immiscible substrates, one in solid phase and the other in liquid phase, with high selectivity and at relatively low temperatures. In this study we investigated the synthesis ci...

  13. The thiostrepton A tryptophan methyltransferase TsrM catalyses a cob(II)alamin-dependent methyl transfer reaction

    PubMed Central

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Pierre, Stéphane; Gherasim, Carmen; Guillot, Alain; Carmona, Manon; Amara, Patricia; Banerjee, Ruma; Berteau, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a novel class of natural products including several antibiotics and bacterial toxins. In countless RiPP biosynthetic pathways, cobalamin-dependent radical SAM (B12/rSAM) enzymes play a pivotal role. In the biosynthetic pathway of the antibiotic and anti-cancer agent thiostrepton A, TsrM, a B12/rSAM enzyme, catalyses the transfer of a methyl group to an electrophilic carbon atom of tryptophan. Here we show that methylcob(III)alamin is the probable physiological enzyme cofactor, and cob(II)alamin rather than cob(I)alamin is a key reaction intermediate. Furthermore, we establish that TsrM and a triple-alanine mutant alkylate cob(II)alamin efficiently leading to the synthesis of MeCbl. Exploiting TsrM substrate ambiguity, we demonstrate that TsrM does not catalyse substrate H-atom abstraction like most radical SAM enzymes. Based on these data, we propose an unprecedented radical-based C-methylation mechanism, which further expands the chemical versatility of rSAM enzymes. PMID:26456915

  14. Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry for the study of the production of volatile compounds by bakery yeast starters.

    PubMed

    Makhoul, Salim; Romano, Andrea; Cappellin, Luca; Spano, Giuseppe; Capozzi, Vittorio; Benozzi, Elisabetta; Märk, Tilmann D; Aprea, Eugenio; Gasperi, Flavia; El-Nakat, Hanna; Guzzo, Jean; Biasioli, Franco

    2014-09-01

    The aromatic impact of bakery yeast starters is currently receiving considerable attention. The flavor characteristics of the dough and the finished products are usually evaluated by gas chromatography and sensory analysis. The limit of both techniques resides in their low-throughput character. In the present work, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), coupled to a time-of-flight mass analyzer, was employed, for the first time, to measure the volatile fractions of dough and bread, and to monitor Saccharomyces cerevisiae volatile production in a fermented food matrix. Leavening was performed on small-scale (1 g) dough samples inoculated with different commercial yeast strains. The leavened doughs were then baked, and volatile profiles were determined during leavening and after baking. The experimental setup included a multifunctional autosampler, which permitted the follow-up of the leavening process on a small scale with a typical throughput of 500 distinct data points in 16 h. The system allowed to pinpoint differences between starter yeast strains in terms of volatile emission kinetics, with repercussions on the final product (i.e. the corresponding micro-loaves). This work demonstrates the applicability of PTR-MS for the study of volatile organic compound production during bread-making, for the automated and online real-time monitoring of the leavening process, and for the characterization and selection of bakery yeast starters in view of their production of volatile compounds.

  15. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  16. Role of bonding mechanisms during transfer hydrogenation reaction on heterogeneous catalysts of platinum nanoparticles supported on zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Alawi, Reem A.; Laxman, Karthik; Dastgir, Sarim; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-07-01

    For supported heterogeneous catalysis, the interface between a metal nanoparticle and the support plays an important role. In this work the dependency of the catalytic efficiency on the bonding chemistry of platinum nanoparticles supported on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods is studied. Platinum nanoparticles were deposited on ZnO nanorods (ZnO NR) using thermal and photochemical processes and the effects on the size, distribution, density and chemical state of the metal nanoparticles upon the catalytic activities are presented. The obtained results indicate that the bonding at Pt-ZnO interface depends on the deposition scheme which can be utilized to modulate the surface chemistry and thus the activity of the supported catalysts. Additionally, uniform distribution of metal on the catalyst support was observed to be more important than the loading density. It is also found that oxidized platinum Pt(IV) (platinum hydroxide) provided a more suitable surface for enhancing the transfer hydrogenation reaction of cyclohexanone with isopropanol compared to zero valent platinum. Photochemically synthesized ZnO supported nanocatalysts were efficient and potentially viable for upscaling to industrial applications.

  17. Influence of mastication rate on dynamic flavour release analysed by combined model mouth/proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ruth, Saskia M.; Buhr, Katja

    2004-12-01

    The influence of mastication rate on the dynamic release of seven volatile flavour compounds from sunflower oil was evaluated by combined model mouth/proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Air/oil partition coefficients were measured by static headspace gas chromatography. The dynamic release of the seven volatile flavour compounds from sunflower oil was significantly affected by the compounds' hydrophobicity and the mastication rate employed in the model mouth. The more hydrophobic compounds were released at a higher rate than their hydrophilic counterparts. Increase in mastication rate increased the maximum concentration measured by 36% on average, and the time to reach this maximum by 35% on average. Mastication affected particularly the release of the hydrophilic compounds. The maximum concentration of the compounds correlated significantly with the compounds' air/oil partition coefficients. The initial release rates over the first 15 s were affected by the type of compound, but not by the mastication rate. During the course of release, the proportions of the hydrophilic compounds to the overall flavour mixture in air decreased. The contribution of the hydrophobic compounds increased. Higher mastication rates, however, increased the proportions of the hydrophilic compounds and decreased those of the hydrophobic compounds.

  18. The roles of polycarboxylates in Cr(VI)/sulfite reaction system: Involvement of reactive oxygen species and intramolecular electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Wang, Xianli; Liu, Yukun; Wang, Zhaohui; Zheng, Jingtang; Wu, Mingbo

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the effects of polycarboxylates on both Cr(VI) reduction and S(IV) consumption in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system was investigated in acidic solution. Under aerobic condition, the productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), i.e., SO4(-) and OH, have been confirmed in S(IV) reducing Cr(VI) process by using electron spin resonance and fluorescence spectrum techniques, leading to the excess consumption of S(IV). However, when polycarboxylates (oxalic, citric, malic and tartaric acid) were present in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system, the affinity of polycarboxylates to CrSO6(2-) can greatly promote the reduction of Cr(VI) via expanding the coordination of Cr(VI) species from tetrahedron to hexahedron. Besides, as alternatives to S(IV), these polycarboxylates can also act as electron donors for Cr(VI) reduction via intramolecular electron transfer reaction, which is dependent on the energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital of these polycarboxylates. Notably, the variant electron donating capacity of these polycarboxylates resulted in different yield of ROS and therefore the oxidation efficiencies of other pollutants, e.g., rhodamine B and As(III). Generally, this study does not only shed light on the mechanism of S(IV) reducing Cr(VI) process mediated by polycarboxylates, but also provides an escalated, cost-effective and green strategy for the remediation of Cr(VI) using sulfite as a reductant. PMID:26610099

  19. Characterization of Gas-Phase Organics Using Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: Cooking Emissions.

    PubMed

    Klein, Felix; Platt, Stephen M; Farren, Naomi J; Detournay, Anais; Bruns, Emily A; Bozzetti, Carlo; Daellenbach, Kaspar R; Kilic, Dogushan; Kumar, Nivedita K; Pieber, Simone M; Slowik, Jay G; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Hamilton, Jacqueline F; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S H; El Haddad, Imad

    2016-02-01

    Cooking processes produce gaseous and particle emissions that are potentially deleterious to human health. Using a highly controlled experimental setup involving a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), we investigate the emission factors and the detailed chemical composition of gas phase emissions from a broad variety of cooking styles and techniques. A total of 95 experiments were conducted to characterize nonmethane organic gas (NMOG) emissions from boiling, charbroiling, shallow frying, and deep frying of various vegetables and meats, as well as emissions from vegetable oils heated to different temperatures. Emissions from boiling vegetables are dominated by methanol. Significant amounts of dimethyl sulfide are emitted from cruciferous vegetables. Emissions from shallow frying, deep frying and charbroiling are dominated by aldehydes of differing relative composition depending on the oil used. We show that the emission factors of some aldehydes are particularly large which may result in considerable negative impacts on human health in indoor environments. The suitability of some of the aldehydes as tracers for the identification of cooking emissions in ambient air is discussed. PMID:26766423

  20. Investigation of Fundamental Physical Properties of a Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) Membrane using a Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PRTMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Boscaini, Elena; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Prazeller, Peter; Mark, T. D.

    2004-12-15

    A membrane introduction proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (MI-PTRMS) has been employed for the characterisation of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane. For this purpose the diffusion and partition coefficients (which serves as a measure for solubility) have been determined experimentally for different classes of chemical compounds both non-polar and polar species, i.e. aromatics, alcohols, ketones. It turned out that not only polar compounds exhibit strong interaction with a hydrophobic membrane such as the PDMS, but also non polar compounds as trimethylbenzene or propylbenzene which bear a relevant number of methyl groups or an alkyl chain show strong interaction with a PDMS membrane. Stronger interaction analyte-membrane leads to a slower diffusion coefficient and larger partition coefficient. The effect of the temperature on the diffusion coefficient and partition coefficient is also investigated. At higher temperature diffusion becomes faster and solubility lower. Permeability is calculated from diffusion and partition coefficients and activation energy are derived from corresponding Arrhenius plots. The MI-PTRMS system shows detection limits in the order of tens of pptv and it’s linear over five orders of magnitude.