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Sample records for fh-cn fh-nc h2o-cn

  1. A high level Ab initio study of the anionic hydrogen-bonded complexes FH-CN-, FH-NC-, H2O-CN- and H2O-NC-

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    HF, H2O, CN- and their hydrogen-bonded complexes were studied using state-of-the-art ab initio quantum mechanical methods. A large Gaussian one particle basis set consisting of triple zeta plus double polarization plus diffuse s and p functions (TZ2P + diffuse) was used. The theoretical methods employed include self consistent field, second order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, singles and doubles configuration interaction theory and the singles and doubles coupled cluster approach. The FH-CN- and FH-NC- and H2O-CN-, H2O-NC- pairs of complexes are found to be essentially isoenergetic. The first pair of complexes are predicted to be bound by approx. 24 kcal/mole and the latter pair bound by approximately 15 kcal/mole. The ab initio binding energies are in good agreement with the experimental values. The two being shorter than the analogous C-N hydrogen bond. The infrared (IR) spectra of the two pairs of complexes are also very similar, though a severe perturbation of the potential energy surface by proton exchange means that the accurate prediction of the band center of the most intense IR mode requires a high level of electronic structure theory as well as a complete treatment of anharmonic effects. The bonding of anionic hydrogen-bonded complexes is discussed and contrasted with that of neutral hydrogen-bonded complexes.

  2. A high-level ab initio study of the anionic hydrogen-bonded complexes FH-CN(-), FH-NC(-), H2O-CN(-), and H2O-NC(-)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    HF, H2O, CN- and their hydrogen-bonded complexes were studied using state-of-the-art ab initio quantum mechanical methods. A large Gaussian one particle basis set consisting of triple zeta plus double polarization plus diffuse s and p functions (TZ2P + diffuse) was used. The theoretical methods employed include self consistent field, second order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, singles and doubles configuration interaction theory and the singles and doubles coupled cluster approach. The FH-CN- and FH-NC- and H2O-CN-, H2O-NC- pairs of complexes are found to be essentially isoenergetic. The first pair of complexes are predicted to be bound by approx. 24 kcal/mole and the latter pair bound by approximately 15 kcal/mole. The ab initio binding energies are in good agreement with the experimental values. The two being shorter than the analogous C-N hydrogen bond. The infrared (IR) spectra of the two pairs of complexes are also very similar, though a severe perturbation of the potential energy surface by proton exchange means that the accurate prediction of the band center of the most intense IR mode requires a high level of electronic structure theory as well as a complete treatment of anharmonic effects. The bonding of anionic hydrogen-bonded complexes is discussed and contrasted with that of neutral hydrogen-bonded complexes.

  3. High resolution spectral imagery of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    C-13/C-12 data at a spectral resolution of 75,000, resolving the background interferences was obtained. Some data was obtained for N-15/N-14. In April, observations were obtained for the D/H ratio. The model analysis of these observations is beginning with the goal of presentation at the Heidelberg Halley meeting. A very large quantity of observations were obtained of both features with variations on the time scale of an hour being measured. At times, the 5577 feature dominates, and at times it is nearly absent. To date, a large body of data have been obtained for C2, NH2, (O I), and probably H2O+, CN, and from the MKO data, OH. These features can all be correlated with respect to their relative velocities and distribution at the time of observation. The Greenstein effect will be used to measure similar results for CN, OH, and few other selected molecular features.

  4. The cometary contribution to prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    OrĂ³, J; Mills, T; Lazcano, A

    1992-01-01

    Different estimates based on dynamical considerations, lunar cratering rates, Solar System chemical abundances, and the single-impact theory on the origin of the Earth-Moon system suggest that comets and other related small, volatile-rich primitive minor bodies captured by the Earth during the early Archean must have been a major source of volatiles on our planet. It is likely that a substantial fraction of the organic molecules present in the colliding cometary nuclei, which may have included nitrogen bases and the precursors of amino acids, were destroyed due to the high temperatures and shock wave energy associated with the collision. However, the presence of H2O, CN, CH, CO, CO2 and other carbon-bearing molecules and radicals in the atmosphere of the Sun and in circumstellar shells around carbon-rich stars suggests that at least simple carbon species could have survived the cometary collisions. Under the anoxic conditions thought to prevail in the prebiotic terrestrial paleoatmosphere, the post-collisional formation of a large number of excited molecules and radicals, and the rapid quenching of the expanding gaseous ball may have led, upon rapid cooling, to the formation of molecules of biogenic elements and to their eventual deposition in localized environments where complex organic compounds of biochemical significance may have been produced and accumulated.